WorldWideScience

Sample records for aligned biological networks

  1. GraphAlignment: Bayesian pairwise alignment of biological networks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Meier, J.; Mustonen, V.; Lässig, M.; Berg, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 6, November 21 (2012) ISSN 1752-0509 Grant - others:Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB 680; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) SFB-TR12; Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft(DE) BE 2478/2-1 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Graph alignment * Biological networks * Parameter estimation * Bioconductor Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.982, year: 2012

  2. GraphAlignment: Bayesian pairwise alignment of biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolář Michal

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With increased experimental availability and accuracy of bio-molecular networks, tools for their comparative and evolutionary analysis are needed. A key component for such studies is the alignment of networks. Results We introduce the Bioconductor package GraphAlignment for pairwise alignment of bio-molecular networks. The alignment incorporates information both from network vertices and network edges and is based on an explicit evolutionary model, allowing inference of all scoring parameters directly from empirical data. We compare the performance of our algorithm to an alternative algorithm, Græmlin 2.0. On simulated data, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 in several benchmarks except for computational complexity. When there is little or no noise in the data, GraphAlignment is slower than Græmlin 2.0. It is faster than Græmlin 2.0 when processing noisy data containing spurious vertex associations. Its typical case complexity grows approximately as O(N2.6. On empirical bacterial protein-protein interaction networks (PIN and gene co-expression networks, GraphAlignment outperforms Græmlin 2.0 with respect to coverage and specificity, albeit by a small margin. On large eukaryotic PIN, Græmlin 2.0 outperforms GraphAlignment. Conclusions The GraphAlignment algorithm is robust to spurious vertex associations, correctly resolves paralogs, and shows very good performance in identification of homologous vertices defined by high vertex and/or interaction similarity. The simplicity and generality of GraphAlignment edge scoring makes the algorithm an appropriate choice for global alignment of networks.

  3. BinAligner: a heuristic method to align biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jialiang; Li, Jun; Grünewald, Stefan; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2013-01-01

    The advances in high throughput omics technologies have made it possible to characterize molecular interactions within and across various species. Alignments and comparison of molecular networks across species will help detect orthologs and conserved functional modules and provide insights on the evolutionary relationships of the compared species. However, such analyses are not trivial due to the complexity of network and high computational cost. Here we develop a mixture of global and local algorithm, BinAligner, for network alignments. Based on the hypotheses that the similarity between two vertices across networks would be context dependent and that the information from the edges and the structures of subnetworks can be more informative than vertices alone, two scoring schema, 1-neighborhood subnetwork and graphlet, were introduced to derive the scoring matrices between networks, besides the commonly used scoring scheme from vertices. Then the alignment problem is formulated as an assignment problem, which is solved by the combinatorial optimization algorithm, such as the Hungarian method. The proposed algorithm was applied and validated in aligning the protein-protein interaction network of Kaposi's sarcoma associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and that of varicella zoster virus (VZV). Interestingly, we identified several putative functional orthologous proteins with similar functions but very low sequence similarity between the two viruses. For example, KSHV open reading frame 56 (ORF56) and VZV ORF55 are helicase-primase subunits with sequence identity 14.6%, and KSHV ORF75 and VZV ORF44 are tegument proteins with sequence identity 15.3%. These functional pairs can not be identified if one restricts the alignment into orthologous protein pairs. In addition, BinAligner identified a conserved pathway between two viruses, which consists of 7 orthologous protein pairs and these proteins are connected by conserved links. This pathway might be crucial for virus packing and

  4. VANLO - Interactive visual exploration of aligned biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linsen Lars

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein interaction (PPI is fundamental to many biological processes. In the course of evolution, biological networks such as protein-protein interaction networks have developed. Biological networks of different species can be aligned by finding instances (e.g. proteins with the same common ancestor in the evolutionary process, so-called orthologs. For a better understanding of the evolution of biological networks, such aligned networks have to be explored. Visualization can play a key role in making the various relationships transparent. Results We present a novel visualization system for aligned biological networks in 3D space that naturally embeds existing 2D layouts. In addition to displaying the intra-network connectivities, we also provide insight into how the individual networks relate to each other by placing aligned entities on top of each other in separate layers. We optimize the layout of the entire alignment graph in a global fashion that takes into account inter- as well as intra-network relationships. The layout algorithm includes a step of merging aligned networks into one graph, laying out the graph with respect to application-specific requirements, splitting the merged graph again into individual networks, and displaying the network alignment in layers. In addition to representing the data in a static way, we also provide different interaction techniques to explore the data with respect to application-specific tasks. Conclusion Our system provides an intuitive global understanding of aligned PPI networks and it allows the investigation of key biological questions. We evaluate our system by applying it to real-world examples documenting how our system can be used to investigate the data with respect to these key questions. Our tool VANLO (Visualization of Aligned Networks with Layout Optimization can be accessed at http://www.math-inf.uni-greifswald.de/VANLO.

  5. Triangular Alignment (TAME). A Tensor-based Approach for Higher-order Network Alignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadi, Shahin [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Gleich, David F. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Kolda, Tamara G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Grama, Ananth [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Network alignment is an important tool with extensive applications in comparative interactomics. Traditional approaches aim to simultaneously maximize the number of conserved edges and the underlying similarity of aligned entities. We propose a novel formulation of the network alignment problem that extends topological similarity to higher-order structures and provide a new objective function that maximizes the number of aligned substructures. This objective function corresponds to an integer programming problem, which is NP-hard. Consequently, we approximate this objective function as a surrogate function whose maximization results in a tensor eigenvalue problem. Based on this formulation, we present an algorithm called Triangular AlignMEnt (TAME), which attempts to maximize the number of aligned triangles across networks. We focus on alignment of triangles because of their enrichment in complex networks; however, our formulation and resulting algorithms can be applied to general motifs. Using a case study on the NAPABench dataset, we show that TAME is capable of producing alignments with up to 99% accuracy in terms of aligned nodes. We further evaluate our method by aligning yeast and human interactomes. Our results indicate that TAME outperforms the state-of-art alignment methods both in terms of biological and topological quality of the alignments.

  6. AlignNemo: a local network alignment method to integrate homology and topology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Ciriello

    Full Text Available Local network alignment is an important component of the analysis of protein-protein interaction networks that may lead to the identification of evolutionary related complexes. We present AlignNemo, a new algorithm that, given the networks of two organisms, uncovers subnetworks of proteins that relate in biological function and topology of interactions. The discovered conserved subnetworks have a general topology and need not to correspond to specific interaction patterns, so that they more closely fit the models of functional complexes proposed in the literature. The algorithm is able to handle sparse interaction data with an expansion process that at each step explores the local topology of the networks beyond the proteins directly interacting with the current solution. To assess the performance of AlignNemo, we ran a series of benchmarks using statistical measures as well as biological knowledge. Based on reference datasets of protein complexes, AlignNemo shows better performance than other methods in terms of both precision and recall. We show our solutions to be biologically sound using the concept of semantic similarity applied to Gene Ontology vocabularies. The binaries of AlignNemo and supplementary details about the algorithms and the experiments are available at: sourceforge.net/p/alignnemo.

  7. An Adaptive Hybrid Algorithm for Global Network Alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jiang; Xiang, Chaojuan; Ma, Jin; Tan, Jun; Wen, Tieqiao; Lei, Jinzhi; Nie, Qing

    2016-01-01

    It is challenging to obtain reliable and optimal mapping between networks for alignment algorithms when both nodal and topological structures are taken into consideration due to the underlying NP-hard problem. Here, we introduce an adaptive hybrid algorithm that combines the classical Hungarian algorithm and the Greedy algorithm (HGA) for the global alignment of biomolecular networks. With this hybrid algorithm, every pair of nodes with one in each network is first aligned based on node information (e.g., their sequence attributes) and then followed by an adaptive and convergent iteration procedure for aligning the topological connections in the networks. For four well-studied protein interaction networks, i.e., C.elegans, yeast, D.melanogaster, and human, applications of HGA lead to improved alignments in acceptable running time. The mapping between yeast and human PINs obtained by the new algorithm has the largest value of common gene ontology (GO) terms compared to those obtained by other existing algorithms, while it still has lower Mean normalized entropy (MNE) and good performances on several other measures. Overall, the adaptive HGA is effective and capable of providing good mappings between aligned networks in which the biological properties of both the nodes and the connections are important.

  8. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  9. Functional alignment of regulatory networks: a study of temperate phages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ala Trusina

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the design and functionality of molecular networks is now a key issue in biology. Comparison of regulatory networks performing similar tasks can provide insights into how network architecture is constrained by the functions it directs. Here, we discuss methods of network comparison based on network architecture and signaling logic. Introducing local and global signaling scores for the difference between two networks, we quantify similarities between evolutionarily closely and distantly related bacteriophages. Despite the large evolutionary separation between phage lambda and 186, their networks are found to be similar when difference is measured in terms of global signaling. We finally discuss how network alignment can be used to pinpoint protein similarities viewed from the network perspective.

  10. NETAL: a new graph-based method for global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neyshabur, Behnam; Khadem, Ahmadreza; Hashemifar, Somaye; Arab, Seyed Shahriar

    2013-07-01

    The interactions among proteins and the resulting networks of such interactions have a central role in cell biology. Aligning these networks gives us important information, such as conserved complexes and evolutionary relationships. Although there have been several publications on the global alignment of protein networks; however, none of proposed methods are able to produce a highly conserved and meaningful alignment. Moreover, time complexity of current algorithms makes them impossible to use for multiple alignment of several large networks together. We present a novel algorithm for the global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks. It uses a greedy method, based on the alignment scoring matrix, which is derived from both biological and topological information of input networks to find the best global network alignment. NETAL outperforms other global alignment methods in terms of several measurements, such as Edge Correctness, Largest Common Connected Subgraphs and the number of common Gene Ontology terms between aligned proteins. As the running time of NETAL is much less than other available methods, NETAL can be easily expanded to multiple alignment algorithm. Furthermore, NETAL overpowers all other existing algorithms in term of performance so that the short running time of NETAL allowed us to implement it as the first server for global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks. Binaries supported on linux are freely available for download at http://www.bioinf.cs.ipm.ir/software/netal. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Synthetic biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, Eric; Süel, Gürol M

    2013-01-01

    Despite their obvious relationship and overlap, the field of physics is blessed with many insightful laws, while such laws are sadly absent in biology. Here we aim to discuss how the rise of a more recent field known as synthetic biology may allow us to more directly test hypotheses regarding the possible design principles of natural biological networks and systems. In particular, this review focuses on synthetic gene regulatory networks engineered to perform specific functions or exhibit particular dynamic behaviors. Advances in synthetic biology may set the stage to uncover the relationship of potential biological principles to those developed in physics. (review article)

  12. Networks in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; 1. Network views of the cell Paolo De Los Rios and Michele Vendruscolo; 2. Transcriptional regulatory networks Sarath Chandra Janga and M. Madan Babu; 3. Transcription factors and gene regulatory networks Matteo Brilli, Elissa Calistri and Pietro Lió; 4. Experimental methods for protein interaction identification Peter Uetz, Björn Titz, Seesandra V. Rajagopala and Gerard Cagney; 5. Modeling protein interaction networks Francesco Rao; 6. Dynamics and evolution of metabolic networks Daniel Segré; 7. Hierarchical modularity in biological networks: the case of metabolic networks Erzsébet Ravasz Regan; 8. Signalling networks Gian Paolo Rossini; Appendix 1. Complex networks: from local to global properties D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 2. Modelling the local structure of networks D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 3. Higher-order topological properties S. Ahnert, T. Fink and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 4. Elementary mathematical concepts A. Gabrielli and G. Caldarelli; References.

  13. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  14. Sentence alignment using feed forward neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, Mohamed Abdel; Ren, Fuji; Kuroiwa, Shingo

    2006-12-01

    Parallel corpora have become an essential resource for work in multi lingual natural language processing. However, sentence aligned parallel corpora are more efficient than non-aligned parallel corpora for cross language information retrieval and machine translation applications. In this paper, we present a new approach to align sentences in bilingual parallel corpora based on feed forward neural network classifier. A feature parameter vector is extracted from the text pair under consideration. This vector contains text features such as length, punctuate score, and cognate score values. A set of manually prepared training data has been assigned to train the feed forward neural network. Another set of data was used for testing. Using this new approach, we could achieve an error reduction of 60% over length based approach when applied on English-Arabic parallel documents. Moreover this new approach is valid for any language pair and it is quite flexible approach since the feature parameter vector may contain more/less or different features than that we used in our system such as lexical match feature.

  15. Biological process linkage networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikla Dotan-Cohen

    Full Text Available The traditional approach to studying complex biological networks is based on the identification of interactions between internal components of signaling or metabolic pathways. By comparison, little is known about interactions between higher order biological systems, such as biological pathways and processes. We propose a methodology for gleaning patterns of interactions between biological processes by analyzing protein-protein interactions, transcriptional co-expression and genetic interactions. At the heart of the methodology are the concept of Linked Processes and the resultant network of biological processes, the Process Linkage Network (PLN.We construct, catalogue, and analyze different types of PLNs derived from different data sources and different species. When applied to the Gene Ontology, many of the resulting links connect processes that are distant from each other in the hierarchy, even though the connection makes eminent sense biologically. Some others, however, carry an element of surprise and may reflect mechanisms that are unique to the organism under investigation. In this aspect our method complements the link structure between processes inherent in the Gene Ontology, which by its very nature is species-independent. As a practical application of the linkage of processes we demonstrate that it can be effectively used in protein function prediction, having the power to increase both the coverage and the accuracy of predictions, when carefully integrated into prediction methods.Our approach constitutes a promising new direction towards understanding the higher levels of organization of the cell as a system which should help current efforts to re-engineer ontologies and improve our ability to predict which proteins are involved in specific biological processes.

  16. Approaching the Capacity of Wireless Networks through Distributed Interference Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Gomadam, Krishna; Cadambe, Viveck R.; Jafar, Syed A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent results establish the optimality of interference alignment to approach the Shannon capacity of interference networks at high SNR. However, the extent to which interference can be aligned over a finite number of signalling dimensions remains unknown. Another important concern for interference alignment schemes is the requirement of global channel knowledge. In this work we provide examples of iterative algorithms that utilize the reciprocity of wireless networks to achieve interference ...

  17. Services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Kim; Uoti, Mikko; Karvonen, Iris

    2015-08-01

    Large-scale facilities such as power plants, process factories, ships and communication infrastructures are often engineered and delivered through geographically distributed operations. The competencies required are usually distributed across several contributing organisations. In these complicated projects, it is of key importance that all partners work coherently towards a common goal. VTT and a number of industrial organisations in the marine sector have participated in a national collaborative research programme addressing these needs. The main output of this programme was development of the Innovation and Engineering Maturity Model for Marine-Industry Networks. The recently completed European Union Framework Programme 7 project COIN developed innovative solutions and software services for enterprise collaboration and enterprise interoperability. One area of focus in that work was services for collaborative project management. This article first addresses a number of central underlying research themes and previous research results that have influenced the development work mentioned above. This article presents two approaches for the development of services that support distributed engineering work. Experience from use of the services is analysed, and potential for development is identified. This article concludes with a proposal for consolidation of the two above-mentioned methodologies. This article outlines the characteristics and requirements of future services supporting collaborative alignment of engineering networks.

  18. GraphCrunch 2: Software tool for network modeling, alignment and clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayes Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advancements in experimental biotechnology have produced large amounts of protein-protein interaction (PPI data. The topology of PPI networks is believed to have a strong link to their function. Hence, the abundance of PPI data for many organisms stimulates the development of computational techniques for the modeling, comparison, alignment, and clustering of networks. In addition, finding representative models for PPI networks will improve our understanding of the cell just as a model of gravity has helped us understand planetary motion. To decide if a model is representative, we need quantitative comparisons of model networks to real ones. However, exact network comparison is computationally intractable and therefore several heuristics have been used instead. Some of these heuristics are easily computable "network properties," such as the degree distribution, or the clustering coefficient. An important special case of network comparison is the network alignment problem. Analogous to sequence alignment, this problem asks to find the "best" mapping between regions in two networks. It is expected that network alignment might have as strong an impact on our understanding of biology as sequence alignment has had. Topology-based clustering of nodes in PPI networks is another example of an important network analysis problem that can uncover relationships between interaction patterns and phenotype. Results We introduce the GraphCrunch 2 software tool, which addresses these problems. It is a significant extension of GraphCrunch which implements the most popular random network models and compares them with the data networks with respect to many network properties. Also, GraphCrunch 2 implements the GRAph ALigner algorithm ("GRAAL" for purely topological network alignment. GRAAL can align any pair of networks and exposes large, dense, contiguous regions of topological and functional similarities far larger than any other

  19. Metannogen: annotation of biological reaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gille, Christoph; Hübner, Katrin; Hoppe, Andreas; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2011-10-01

    Semantic annotations of the biochemical entities constituting a biological reaction network are indispensable to create biologically meaningful networks. They further heighten efficient exchange, reuse and merging of existing models which concern present-day systems biology research more often. Two types of tools for the reconstruction of biological networks currently exist: (i) several sophisticated programs support graphical network editing and visualization. (ii) Data management systems permit reconstruction and curation of huge networks in a team of scientists including data integration, annotation and cross-referencing. We seeked ways to combine the advantages of both approaches. Metannogen, which was previously developed for network reconstruction, has been considerably improved. From now on, Metannogen provides sbml import and annotation of networks created elsewhere. This permits users of other network reconstruction platforms or modeling software to annotate their networks using Metannogen's advanced information management. We implemented word-autocompletion, multipattern highlighting, spell check, brace-expansion and publication management, and improved annotation, cross-referencing and team work requirements. Unspecific enzymes and transporters acting on a spectrum of different substrates are efficiently handled. The network can be exported in sbml format where the annotations are embedded in line with the miriam standard. For more comfort, Metannogen may be tightly coupled with the network editor such that Metannogen becomes an additional view for the focused reaction in the network editor. Finally, Metannogen provides local single user, shared password protected multiuser or public access to the annotation data. Metannogen is available free of charge at: http://www.bioinformatics.org/strap/metannogen/ or http://3d-alignment.eu/metannogen/. christoph.gille@charite.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  20. Value Systems Alignment Analysis in Collaborative Networked Organizations Management

    OpenAIRE

    Patricia Macedo; Luis Camarinha-Matos

    2017-01-01

    The assessment of value systems alignment can play an important role in the formation and evolution of collaborative networks, contributing to reduce potential risks of collaboration. For this purpose, an assessment tool is proposed as part of a collaborative networks information system, supporting both the formation and evolution of long-term strategic alliances and goal-oriented networks. An implementation approach for value system alignment analysis is described, which is intended to assis...

  1. Finding optimal interaction interface alignments between biological complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Xuefeng

    2015-06-13

    Motivation: Biological molecules perform their functions through interactions with other molecules. Structure alignment of interaction interfaces between biological complexes is an indispensable step in detecting their structural similarities, which are keys to understanding their evolutionary histories and functions. Although various structure alignment methods have been developed to successfully access the similarities of protein structures or certain types of interaction interfaces, existing alignment tools cannot directly align arbitrary types of interfaces formed by protein, DNA or RNA molecules. Specifically, they require a \\'blackbox preprocessing\\' to standardize interface types and chain identifiers. Yet their performance is limited and sometimes unsatisfactory. Results: Here we introduce a novel method, PROSTA-inter, that automatically determines and aligns interaction interfaces between two arbitrary types of complex structures. Our method uses sequentially remote fragments to search for the optimal superimposition. The optimal residue matching problem is then formulated as a maximum weighted bipartite matching problem to detect the optimal sequence order-independent alignment. Benchmark evaluation on all non-redundant protein-DNA complexes in PDB shows significant performance improvement of our method over TM-align and iAlign (with the \\'blackbox preprocessing\\'). Two case studies where our method discovers, for the first time, structural similarities between two pairs of functionally related protein-DNA complexes are presented. We further demonstrate the power of our method on detecting structural similarities between a protein-protein complex and a protein-RNA complex, which is biologically known as a protein-RNA mimicry case. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Querying Large Biological Network Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulsoy, Gunhan

    2013-01-01

    New experimental methods has resulted in increasing amount of genetic interaction data to be generated every day. Biological networks are used to store genetic interaction data gathered. Increasing amount of data available requires fast large scale analysis methods. Therefore, we address the problem of querying large biological network datasets.…

  3. Natalie 2.0: Sparse Global Network Alignment as a Special Case of Quadratic Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed El-Kebir

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Data on molecular interactions is increasing at a tremendous pace, while the development of solid methods for analyzing this network data is still lagging behind. This holds in particular for the field of comparative network analysis, where one wants to identify commonalities between biological networks. Since biological functionality primarily operates at the network level, there is a clear need for topology-aware comparison methods. We present a method for global network alignment that is fast and robust and can flexibly deal with various scoring schemes taking both node-to-node correspondences as well as network topologies into account. We exploit that network alignment is a special case of the well-studied quadratic assignment problem (QAP. We focus on sparse network alignment, where each node can be mapped only to a typically small subset of nodes in the other network. This corresponds to a QAP instance with a symmetric and sparse weight matrix. We obtain strong upper and lower bounds for the problem by improving a Lagrangian relaxation approach and introduce the open source software tool Natalie 2.0, a publicly available implementation of our method. In an extensive computational study on protein interaction networks for six different species, we find that our new method outperforms alternative established and recent state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Waferscale assembly of Field-Aligned nanotube Networks (FANs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimaki, Maria; Bøggild, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the integration of nanotube networks on 512 individual devices on a full 4-inch wafer in less than 60 seconds with a roughly 80% yield using dielectrophoresis. We present here investigations of the morphology and electrical resistance of such field aligned networks for different fr...

  5. An Alignment Model for Collaborative Value Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremer, Carlos; Azevedo, Rodrigo Cambiaghi; Klen, Alexandra Pereira

    This paper presents parts of the work carried out in several global organizations through the development of strategic projects with high tactical and operational complexity. By investing in long-term relationships, strongly operating in the transformation of the competitive model and focusing on the value chain management, the main aim of these projects was the alignment of multiple value chains. The projects were led by the Axia Transformation Methodology as well as by its Management Model and following the principles of Project Management. As a concrete result of the efforts made in the last years in the Brazilian market this work also introduces the Alignment Model which supports the transformation process that the companies undergo.

  6. Distributed interference alignment iterative algorithms in symmetric wireless network

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    YANG Jingwen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Interference alignment is a novel interference alignment way,which is widely noted all of the world.Interference alignment overlaps interference in the same signal space at receiving terminal by precoding so as to thoroughly eliminate the influence of interference impacted on expected signals,thus making the desire user achieve the maximum degree of freedom.In this paper we research three typical algorithms for realizing interference alignment,including minimizing the leakage interference,maximizing Signal to Interference plus Noise Ratio (SINR and minimizing mean square error(MSE.All of these algorithms utilize the reciprocity of wireless network,and iterate the precoders between original network and the reverse network so as to achieve interference alignment.We use the uplink transmit rate to analyze the performance of these three algorithms.Numerical simulation results show the advantages of these algorithms.which is the foundation for the further study in the future.The feasibility and future of interference alignment are also discussed at last.

  7. Value Systems Alignment Analysis in Collaborative Networked Organizations Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Macedo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The assessment of value systems alignment can play an important role in the formation and evolution of collaborative networks, contributing to reduce potential risks of collaboration. For this purpose, an assessment tool is proposed as part of a collaborative networks information system, supporting both the formation and evolution of long-term strategic alliances and goal-oriented networks. An implementation approach for value system alignment analysis is described, which is intended to assist managers in virtual and networked organizations management. The implementation of the assessment and analysis methods is supported by a set of software services integrated in the information system that supports the management of the networked organizations. A case study in the solar energy sector was conducted, and the data collected through this study allow us to confirm the practical applicability of the proposed methods and the software services.

  8. Design principles in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Sidhartha

    Much of biology emerges from networks of interactions. Even in a single bacterium such as Escherichia coli, there are hundreds of coexisting gene and protein networks. Although biological networks are the outcome of evolution, various physical and biological constraints limit their functional capacity. The focus of this thesis is to understand how functional constraints such as optimal growth in mircoorganisms and information flow in signaling pathways shape the metabolic network of bacterium E. coli and the quorum sensing network of marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, respectively. Metabolic networks convert basic elemental sources into complex building-blocks eventually leading to cell's growth. Therefore, typically, metabolic pathways are often coupled both by the use of a common substrate and by stoichiometric utilization of their products for cell growth. We showed that such a coupled network with product-feedback inhibition may exhibit limit-cycle oscillations which arise via a Hopf bifurcation. Furthermore, we analyzed several representative metabolic modules and find that, in all cases, simple product-feedback inhibition allows nearly optimal growth, in agreement with the predicted growth-rate by the flux-balance analysis (FBA). Bacteria have fascinating and diverse social lives. They display coordinated group behaviors regulated by quorum sensing (QS) systems. The QS circuit of V. harveyi integrates and funnels different ecological information through a common phosphorelay cascade to a set of small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) that enables collective behavior. We analyzed the signaling properties and information flow in the QS circuit, which provides a model for information flow in signaling networks more generally. A comparative study of post-transcriptional and conventional transcriptional regulation suggest a niche for sRNAs in allowing cells to transition quickly yet reliably between distinct states. Furthermore, we develop a new framework for analyzing signal

  9. Inferring Directed Road Networks from GPS Traces by Track Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingzhe Xie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method to infer road networks from GPS traces. These networks include intersections between roads, the connectivity between the intersections and the possible traffic directions between directly-connected intersections. These intersections are localized by detecting and clustering turning points, which are locations where the moving direction changes on GPS traces. We infer the structure of road networks by segmenting all of the GPS traces to identify these intersections. We can then form both a connectivity matrix of the intersections and a small representative GPS track for each road segment. The road segment between each pair of directly-connected intersections is represented using a series of geographical locations, which are averaged from all of the tracks on this road segment by aligning them using the dynamic time warping (DTW algorithm. Our contribution is two-fold. First, we detect potential intersections by clustering the turning points on the GPS traces. Second, we infer the geometry of the road segments between intersections by aligning GPS tracks point by point using a “stretch and then compress” strategy based on the DTW algorithm. This approach not only allows road estimation by averaging the aligned tracks, but also a deeper statistical analysis based on the individual track’s time alignment, for example the variance of speed along a road segment.

  10. Diffusion tensor of water in partially aligned fibre networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourell, Monique C.; Powell, Sean K.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2013-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were used to investigate the relationship between the morphological characteristics and the diffusion tensor (DT) of partially aligned networks of cylindrical fibres. The orientation distributions of the fibres in each network were approximately uniform within a cone of a given semi-angle (θ0). This semi-angle was used to control the degree of alignment of the fibres. The networks studied ranged from perfectly aligned (θ0 = 0) to completely disordered (θ0 = 90°). Our results are qualitatively consistent with previous numerical models in the overall behaviour of the DT. However, we report a non-linear relationship between the fractional anisotropy (FA) of the DT and collagen volume fraction, which is different to the findings from previous work. We discuss our results in the context of diffusion tensor imaging of articular cartilage. We also demonstrate how appropriate diffusion models have the potential to enable quantitative interpretation of the experimentally measured diffusion-tensor FA in terms of collagen fibre alignment distributions.

  11. A Survey on Interference Networks: Interference Alignment and Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Woon Jeon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been rapid progress on understanding Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections, and new coding techniques have emerged. The essence of multi-source networks is how to efficiently manage interference that arises from the transmission of other sessions. Classically, interference is removed by orthogonalization (in time or frequency. This means that the rate per session drops inversely proportional to the number of sessions, suggesting that interference is a strong limiting factor in such networks. However, recently discovered interference management techniques have led to a paradigm shift that interference might not be quite as detrimental after all. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of these new coding techniques as they apply to the case of time-varying Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections. Specifically, we review interference alignment and ergodic interference alignment for multi-source single-hop networks and interference neutralization and ergodic interference neutralization for multi-source multi-hop networks. We mainly focus on the “degrees of freedom” perspective and also discuss an approximate capacity characterization.

  12. A direct method for computing extreme value (Gumbel) parameters for gapped biological sequence alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terrance; Sinkala, Zachariah

    2014-01-01

    We develop a general method for computing extreme value distribution (Gumbel, 1958) parameters for gapped alignments. Our approach uses mixture distribution theory to obtain associated BLOSUM matrices for gapped alignments, which in turn are used for determining significance of gapped alignment scores for pairs of biological sequences. We compare our results with parameters already obtained in the literature.

  13. Introduction to Network Analysis in Systems Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Ma’ayan, Avi

    2011-01-01

    This Teaching Resource provides lecture notes, slides, and a problem set for a set of three lectures from a course entitled “Systems Biology: Biomedical Modeling.” The materials are from three separate lectures introducing applications of graph theory and network analysis in systems biology. The first lecture describes different types of intracellular networks, methods for constructing biological networks, and different types of graphs used to represent regulatory intracellular networks. The ...

  14. Mapping biological systems to network systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rathore, Heena

    2016-01-01

    The book presents the challenges inherent in the paradigm shift of network systems from static to highly dynamic distributed systems – it proposes solutions that the symbiotic nature of biological systems can provide into altering networking systems to adapt to these changes. The author discuss how biological systems – which have the inherent capabilities of evolving, self-organizing, self-repairing and flourishing with time – are inspiring researchers to take opportunities from the biology domain and map them with the problems faced in network domain. The book revolves around the central idea of bio-inspired systems -- it begins by exploring why biology and computer network research are such a natural match. This is followed by presenting a broad overview of biologically inspired research in network systems -- it is classified by the biological field that inspired each topic and by the area of networking in which that topic lies. Each case elucidates how biological concepts have been most successfully ...

  15. Invasion exponents in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetrius, Lloyd; Gundlach, Volker Matthias; Ochs, Gunter

    2009-03-01

    This article is concerned with the characterization of invasion exponents in biological networks defined by a population of replicating elements: molecules, cells, higher organisms. We show that the outcome of competition between an invader and a resident population is a stochastic process, determined by the rate at which a population returns to its steady state after a random perturbation in the parameters that characterize the replicating elements. This return rate is defined by the macroscopic parameter evolutionary entropy, a measure of the diversity of the interaction between the individuals in the population. We also show that the evolutionary stability of a population, that is the invulnerability of a resident to the introduction of an invader competing for the available resources, are given by extremal states of entropy. These results which pertain to networks of interacting molecules, cells and higher organisms, are generalizations of results established for demographic networks, that is populations of replicating organisms parametrized by the ages at which they reproduce and die.

  16. Biological transportation networks: Modeling and simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2015-09-15

    We present a model for biological network formation originally introduced by Cai and Hu [Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 138701]. The modeling of fluid transportation (e.g., leaf venation and angiogenesis) and ion transportation networks (e.g., neural networks) is explained in detail and basic analytical features like the gradient flow structure of the fluid transportation network model and the impact of the model parameters on the geometry and topology of network formation are analyzed. We also present a numerical finite-element based discretization scheme and discuss sample cases of network formation simulations.

  17. Measuring the evolutionary rewiring of biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Shou

    Full Text Available We have accumulated a large amount of biological network data and expect even more to come. Soon, we anticipate being able to compare many different biological networks as we commonly do for molecular sequences. It has long been believed that many of these networks change, or "rewire", at different rates. It is therefore important to develop a framework to quantify the differences between networks in a unified fashion. We developed such a formalism based on analogy to simple models of sequence evolution, and used it to conduct a systematic study of network rewiring on all the currently available biological networks. We found that, similar to sequences, biological networks show a decreased rate of change at large time divergences, because of saturation in potential substitutions. However, different types of biological networks consistently rewire at different rates. Using comparative genomics and proteomics data, we found a consistent ordering of the rewiring rates: transcription regulatory, phosphorylation regulatory, genetic interaction, miRNA regulatory, protein interaction, and metabolic pathway network, from fast to slow. This ordering was found in all comparisons we did of matched networks between organisms. To gain further intuition on network rewiring, we compared our observed rewirings with those obtained from simulation. We also investigated how readily our formalism could be mapped to other network contexts; in particular, we showed how it could be applied to analyze changes in a range of "commonplace" networks such as family trees, co-authorships and linux-kernel function dependencies.

  18. Gapped sequence alignment using artificial neural networks: application to the MHC class I system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreatta, Massimo; Nielsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    . On this relatively simple system, we developed a sequence alignment method based on artificial neural networks that allows insertions and deletions in the alignment. Results: We show that prediction methods based on alignments that include insertions and deletions have significantly higher performance than methods...

  19. Interference Alignment for the Uplink Heterogeneous Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous cellular networks, due to its multi-tier topological structure, provide significant improvements in terms of increased data rates and cell coverage. However, there are important intra-tier and inter-tier interference management problem to be solved. In this paper, we model a two-tier uplink heterogeneous network, which include a macrocell and K overlaid femtocells. Meanwhile we constitute a heterogeneous configuration that each femto BS is equipped with two antennas and the macro BS is equipped with A(2 ≤ A ≤ 2K antennas. We proved that the sum-DoF outer bound of the network is 4K2/4K ‒ A, and the DoF outer bound for the femtocell and macrocell is (2K‒A/(4K‒A and A/(4K‒A respectively. Moreover, we present the achievable scheme, which is based on interference alignment. The simulation results show that the sum rate of the whole HetNet increases as the number of macro BS’s antennas increases.

  20. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An epidemic can also spread faster in neuronal networks than in the other biological networks studied here. Thus, the underlying undirected architecture of a neuronal network possesses certain conformation which is favourable for spreading different entities or information. Now, to explore the topological characteristics that ...

  1. Network Reconstruction of Dynamic Biological Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Asadi, Behrang

    2013-01-01

    Inference of network topology from experimental data is a central endeavor in biology, since knowledge of the underlying signaling mechanisms a requirement for understanding biological phenomena. As one of the most important tools in bioinformatics area, development of methods to reconstruct biological networks has attracted remarkable attention in the current decade. Integration of different data types can lead to remarkable improvements in our ability to identify the connectivity of differe...

  2. Generating confidence intervals on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stumpf Michael PH

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the analysis of networks we frequently require the statistical significance of some network statistic, such as measures of similarity for the properties of interacting nodes. The structure of the network may introduce dependencies among the nodes and it will in general be necessary to account for these dependencies in the statistical analysis. To this end we require some form of Null model of the network: generally rewired replicates of the network are generated which preserve only the degree (number of interactions of each node. We show that this can fail to capture important features of network structure, and may result in unrealistic significance levels, when potentially confounding additional information is available. Methods We present a new network resampling Null model which takes into account the degree sequence as well as available biological annotations. Using gene ontology information as an illustration we show how this information can be accounted for in the resampling approach, and the impact such information has on the assessment of statistical significance of correlations and motif-abundances in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein interaction network. An algorithm, GOcardShuffle, is introduced to allow for the efficient construction of an improved Null model for network data. Results We use the protein interaction network of S. cerevisiae; correlations between the evolutionary rates and expression levels of interacting proteins and their statistical significance were assessed for Null models which condition on different aspects of the available data. The novel GOcardShuffle approach results in a Null model for annotated network data which appears better to describe the properties of real biological networks. Conclusion An improved statistical approach for the statistical analysis of biological network data, which conditions on the available biological information, leads to qualitatively different results

  3. SEBINI: Software Environment for BIological Network Inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ronald C; Shah, Anuj; Treatman, Charles; Blevins, Meridith

    2006-11-01

    The Software Environment for BIological Network Inference (SEBINI) has been created to provide an interactive environment for the deployment and evaluation of algorithms used to reconstruct the structure of biological regulatory and interaction networks. SEBINI can be used to compare and train network inference methods on artificial networks and simulated gene expression perturbation data. It also allows the analysis within the same framework of experimental high-throughput expression data using the suite of (trained) inference methods; hence SEBINI should be useful to software developers wishing to evaluate, compare, refine or combine inference techniques, and to bioinformaticians analyzing experimental data. SEBINI provides a platform that aids in more accurate reconstruction of biological networks, with less effort, in less time. A demonstration website is located at https://www.emsl.pnl.gov/NIT/NIT.html. The Java source code and PostgreSQL database schema are available freely for non-commercial use.

  4. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    As there is an interplay between network architecture and dynamics, structure plays an important role in communication and spreading of information in a network. ... Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Kolkata, Mohanpur 741 246, India; Department of Biological ...

  5. How Scale-Free Are Biological Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanin, Raya; Wit, Ernst

    2006-01-01

    The concept of scale-free network has emerged as a powerful unifying paradigm in the study of complex systems in biology and in physical and social studies. Metabolic, protein, and gene interaction networks have been reported to exhibit scale-free behavior based on the analysis of the distribution

  6. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from five different classes (neuronal, food web, protein–protein interaction, metabolism and gene regulation) and ..... food webs show good expansion property (see table 1) unlike other biological networks. The distribution of distances ..... tion is very fast on a network having high degree nodes. Later on, it was shown that.

  7. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  8. Proposal for an alignment method of the CLIC linear accelerator - From geodesic networks to the active pre-alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Touze, T.

    2011-01-01

    The compact linear collider (CLIC) is the particle accelerator project proposed by the european organization for nuclear research (CERN) for high energy physics after the large hadron collider (LHC). Because of the nano-metric scale of the CLIC leptons beams, the emittance growth budget is very tight. It induces alignment tolerances on the positions of the CLIC components that have never been achieved before. The last step of the CLIC alignment will be done according to the beam itself. It falls within the competence of the physicists. However, in order to implement the beam-based feedback, a challenging pre-alignment is required: 10 μm at 3σ along a 200 m sliding window. For such a precision, the proposed solution must be compatible with a feedback between the measurement and repositioning systems. The CLIC pre-alignment will have to be active. This thesis does not demonstrate the feasibility of the CLIC active pre-alignment but shows the way to the last developments that have to be done for that purpose. A method is proposed. Based on the management of the Helmert transformations between Euclidean coordinate systems, from the geodetic networks to the metrological measurements, this method is likely to solve the CLIC pre-alignment problem. Large scale facilities have been built and Monte-Carlo simulations have been made in order to validate the mathematical modeling of the measurement systems and of the alignment references. When this is done, it will be possible to extrapolate the modeling to the entire CLIC length. It will be the last step towards the demonstration of the CLIC pre-alignment feasibility. (author)

  9. Predicting biological networks from genomic data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrington, Eoghan D; Jensen, Lars J; Bork, Peer

    2008-01-01

    Continuing improvements in DNA sequencing technologies are providing us with vast amounts of genomic data from an ever-widening range of organisms. The resulting challenge for bioinformatics is to interpret this deluge of data and place it back into its biological context. Biological networks...... provide a conceptual framework with which we can describe part of this context, namely the different interactions that occur between the molecular components of a cell. Here, we review the computational methods available to predict biological networks from genomic sequence data and discuss how they relate...

  10. C. elegans network biology: a beginning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piano, Fabio; Gunsalus, Kristin C; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc

    2006-08-21

    The architecture and dynamics of molecular networks can provide an understanding of complex biological processes complementary to that obtained from the in-depth study of single genes and proteins. With a completely sequenced and well-annotated genome, a fully characterized cell lineage, and powerful tools available to dissect development, Caenorhabditis elegans, among metazoans, provides an optimal system to bridge cellular and organismal biology with the global properties of macromolecular networks. This chapter considers omic technologies available for C. elegans to describe molecular networks--encompassing transcriptional and phenotypic profiling as well as physical interaction mapping--and discusses how their individual and integrated applications are paving the way for a network-level understanding of C. elegans biology.

  11. Fast grid layout algorithm for biological networks with sweep calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Kaname; Nagasaki, Masao; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-06-15

    Properly drawn biological networks are of great help in the comprehension of their characteristics. The quality of the layouts for retrieved biological networks is critical for pathway databases. However, since it is unrealistic to manually draw biological networks for every retrieval, automatic drawing algorithms are essential. Grid layout algorithms handle various biological properties such as aligning vertices having the same attributes and complicated positional constraints according to their subcellular localizations; thus, they succeed in providing biologically comprehensible layouts. However, existing grid layout algorithms are not suitable for real-time drawing, which is one of requisites for applications to pathway databases, due to their high-computational cost. In addition, they do not consider edge directions and their resulting layouts lack traceability for biochemical reactions and gene regulations, which are the most important features in biological networks. We devise a new calculation method termed sweep calculation and reduce the time complexity of the current grid layout algorithms through its encoding and decoding processes. We conduct practical experiments by using 95 pathway models of various sizes from TRANSPATH and show that our new grid layout algorithm is much faster than existing grid layout algorithms. For the cost function, we introduce a new component that penalizes undesirable edge directions to avoid the lack of traceability in pathways due to the differences in direction between in-edges and out-edges of each vertex. Java implementations of our layout algorithms are available in Cell Illustrator. masao@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Quantifying evolvability in small biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemenman, Ilya [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mugler, Andrew [COLUMBIA UNIV; Ziv, Etay [COLUMBIA UNIV; Wiggins, Chris H [COLUMBIA UNIV

    2008-01-01

    The authors introduce a quantitative measure of the capacity of a small biological network to evolve. The measure is applied to a stochastic description of the experimental setup of Guet et al. (Science 2002, 296, pp. 1466), treating chemical inducers as functional inputs to biochemical networks and the expression of a reporter gene as the functional output. The authors take an information-theoretic approach, allowing the system to set parameters that optimise signal processing ability, thus enumerating each network's highest-fidelity functions. All networks studied are highly evolvable by the measure, meaning that change in function has little dependence on change in parameters. Moreover, each network's functions are connected by paths in the parameter space along which information is not significantly lowered, meaning a network may continuously change its functionality without completely losing it along the way. This property further underscores the evolvability of the networks.

  13. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    2009-01-01

    this binding event. RESULTS: Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data...... due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC...... class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. CONCLUSION: The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/Net...

  14. Exploring biological network structure with clustered random networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bansal Shweta

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex biological systems are often modeled as networks of interacting units. Networks of biochemical interactions among proteins, epidemiological contacts among hosts, and trophic interactions in ecosystems, to name a few, have provided useful insights into the dynamical processes that shape and traverse these systems. The degrees of nodes (numbers of interactions and the extent of clustering (the tendency for a set of three nodes to be interconnected are two of many well-studied network properties that can fundamentally shape a system. Disentangling the interdependent effects of the various network properties, however, can be difficult. Simple network models can help us quantify the structure of empirical networked systems and understand the impact of various topological properties on dynamics. Results Here we develop and implement a new Markov chain simulation algorithm to generate simple, connected random graphs that have a specified degree sequence and level of clustering, but are random in all other respects. The implementation of the algorithm (ClustRNet: Clustered Random Networks provides the generation of random graphs optimized according to a local or global, and relative or absolute measure of clustering. We compare our algorithm to other similar methods and show that ours more successfully produces desired network characteristics. Finding appropriate null models is crucial in bioinformatics research, and is often difficult, particularly for biological networks. As we demonstrate, the networks generated by ClustRNet can serve as random controls when investigating the impacts of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and clustering in empirical networks. Conclusion ClustRNet generates ensembles of graphs of specified edge structure and clustering. These graphs allow for systematic study of the impacts of connectivity and redundancies on network function and dynamics. This process is a key step in

  15. Discriminative topological features reveal biological network mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levovitz Chaya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent genomic and bioinformatic advances have motivated the development of numerous network models intending to describe graphs of biological, technological, and sociological origin. In most cases the success of a model has been evaluated by how well it reproduces a few key features of the real-world data, such as degree distributions, mean geodesic lengths, and clustering coefficients. Often pairs of models can reproduce these features with indistinguishable fidelity despite being generated by vastly different mechanisms. In such cases, these few target features are insufficient to distinguish which of the different models best describes real world networks of interest; moreover, it is not clear a priori that any of the presently-existing algorithms for network generation offers a predictive description of the networks inspiring them. Results We present a method to assess systematically which of a set of proposed network generation algorithms gives the most accurate description of a given biological network. To derive discriminative classifiers, we construct a mapping from the set of all graphs to a high-dimensional (in principle infinite-dimensional "word space". This map defines an input space for classification schemes which allow us to state unambiguously which models are most descriptive of a given network of interest. Our training sets include networks generated from 17 models either drawn from the literature or introduced in this work. We show that different duplication-mutation schemes best describe the E. coli genetic network, the S. cerevisiae protein interaction network, and the C. elegans neuronal network, out of a set of network models including a linear preferential attachment model and a small-world model. Conclusions Our method is a first step towards systematizing network models and assessing their predictability, and we anticipate its usefulness for a number of communities.

  16. Value-Based Business-IT Alignment in Networked Constellations of Enterprises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordijn, Jaap; van Eck, Pascal; Cox, K.; Dubois, E.; Pigneur, Y.; Bleistein, S.J.; Verner, J.; Davis, A.M.; Wieringa, Roelf J.

    Business-ICT alignment is the problem of matching ICTservices with the requirements of the business. In businesses of any significant size, business-ICT alignment is a hard problem, which is currently not solved completely. With the advent of networked constellations of enterprises, the problem gets

  17. Reconstructing Causal Biological Networks through Active Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunghoon Cho

    Full Text Available Reverse-engineering of biological networks is a central problem in systems biology. The use of intervention data, such as gene knockouts or knockdowns, is typically used for teasing apart causal relationships among genes. Under time or resource constraints, one needs to carefully choose which intervention experiments to carry out. Previous approaches for selecting most informative interventions have largely been focused on discrete Bayesian networks. However, continuous Bayesian networks are of great practical interest, especially in the study of complex biological systems and their quantitative properties. In this work, we present an efficient, information-theoretic active learning algorithm for Gaussian Bayesian networks (GBNs, which serve as important models for gene regulatory networks. In addition to providing linear-algebraic insights unique to GBNs, leading to significant runtime improvements, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our method on data simulated with GBNs and the DREAM4 network inference challenge data sets. Our method generally leads to faster recovery of underlying network structure and faster convergence to final distribution of confidence scores over candidate graph structures using the full data, in comparison to random selection of intervention experiments.

  18. Network biology methods integrating biological data for translational science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebek, Gurkan; Koyutürk, Mehmet; Price, Nathan D; Chance, Mark R

    2012-07-01

    The explosion of biomedical data, both on the genomic and proteomic side as well as clinical data, will require complex integration and analysis to provide new molecular variables to better understand the molecular basis of phenotype. Currently, much data exist in silos and is not analyzed in frameworks where all data are brought to bear in the development of biomarkers and novel functional targets. This is beginning to change. Network biology approaches, which emphasize the interactions between genes, proteins and metabolites provide a framework for data integration such that genome, proteome, metabolome and other -omics data can be jointly analyzed to understand and predict disease phenotypes. In this review, recent advances in network biology approaches and results are identified. A common theme is the potential for network analysis to provide multiplexed and functionally connected biomarkers for analyzing the molecular basis of disease, thus changing our approaches to analyzing and modeling genome- and proteome-wide data.

  19. Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaji, V. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Earth Science Grid Federation (ESGF); Boden, Tom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cowley, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dart, Eli [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Dattoria, Vince [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Desai, Narayan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Egan, Rob [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Foster, Ian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Goldstone, Robin [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gregurick, Susan [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological Systems Science Division; Houghton, John [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; Izaurralde, Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnston, Bill [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Joseph, Renu [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Climate and Environmental Sciences Division; Kleese-van Dam, Kerstin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lipton, Mary [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Monga, Inder [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Pritchard, Matt [British Atmospheric Data Centre (BADC), Oxon (United Kingdom); Rotman, Lauren [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Strand, Gary [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Stuart, Cory [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tatusova, Tatiana [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States); Tierney, Brian [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). ESNet; Thomas, Brian [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zurawski, Jason [Internet2, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 25 years. In November 2012, ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the DOE SC organized a review to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by the BER program office. Several key findings resulted from the review. Among them: 1) The scale of data sets available to science collaborations continues to increase exponentially. This has broad impact, both on the network and on the computational and storage systems connected to the network. 2) Many science collaborations require assistance to cope with the systems and network engineering challenges inherent in managing the rapid growth in data scale. 3) Several science domains operate distributed facilities that rely on high-performance networking for success. Key examples illustrated in this report include the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF) and the Systems Biology Knowledgebase (KBase). This report expands on these points, and addresses others as well. The report contains a findings section as well as the text of the case studies discussed at the review.

  20. Network biology: Describing biological systems by complex networks. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by M. Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Mahdi

    2018-03-01

    I enjoyed reading Gosak et al. review on analysing biological systems from network science perspective [1]. Network science, first started within Physics community, is now a mature multidisciplinary field of science with many applications ranging from Ecology to biology, medicine, social sciences, engineering and computer science. Gosak et al. discussed how biological systems can be modelled and described by complex network theory which is an important application of network science. Although there has been considerable progress in network biology over the past two decades, this is just the beginning and network science has a great deal to offer to biology and medical sciences.

  1. Dense module enumeration in biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Koji; Georgii, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of large networks is a central topic in various research fields including biology, sociology, and web mining. Detection of dense modules (a.k.a. clusters) is an important step to analyze the networks. Though numerous methods have been proposed to this aim, they often lack mathematical rigorousness. Namely, there is no guarantee that all dense modules are detected. Here, we present a novel reverse-search-based method for enumerating all dense modules. Furthermore, constraints from additional data sources such as gene expression profiles or customer profiles can be integrated, so that we can systematically detect dense modules with interesting profiles. We report successful applications in human protein interaction network analyses.

  2. Alignment of global supply networks based on strategic groups of supply chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos G. Moraitakis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: From a supply chain perspective, often big differences exist between global raw material suppliers’ approaches to supply their respective local markets. The progressing complexity of large centrally managed global supply networks and their often-unknown upstream ramifications increase the likelihood of undetected bottlenecks and inefficiencies. It is therefore necessary to develop an approach to strategically master the upstream complexity of such networks from a holistic supply chain perspective in order to align regional competitive priorities and supply chain structures. The objective of this research is hence to develop an approach for the supply-chain-based alignment of complex global supply networks. Method: We review existing literature from the fields of supply chain and network management, strategic sourcing, and strategic management. Based on the literature review and theoretical and practical considerations we deduce a conceptual approach to consider upstream supply chain structures in supply network alignment initiatives. Results: On the basis of these considerations and current empirical literature we transfer strategic group theory to the supply network management context. The proposed approach introduces strategic groups of supply chains as a segmentation criterion for complex global supply networks which enables the network-wide alignment of competitive priorities. Conclusion: Supply-chain-based segmentation of global supply network structures can effectively reduce the complexity, firms face when aiming to strategically align their supply chains on a holistic level. The results of this research are applicable for certain types of global supply networks and can be used for network alignment and strategy development. The approach can furthermore generate insights useable for negotiation support with suppliers.

  3. Biodiesel and Integrated STEM: Vertical Alignment of High School Biology/Biochemistry and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, Andrea C.; Breiner, Jonathan M.; Keiner, Jennifer; Behm, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the vertical alignment of two high school classes, biology and chemistry, around the core concept of biodiesel fuel production. High school teachers and university faculty members investigated biodiesel as it relates to societal impact through a National Science Foundation Research Experience for Teachers. Using an action…

  4. Network biology concepts in complex disease comorbidities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jessica Xin; Thomas, Cecilia Engel; Brunak, Søren

    2016-01-01

    The co-occurrence of diseases can inform the underlying network biology of shared and multifunctional genes and pathways. In addition, comorbidities help to elucidate the effects of external exposures, such as diet, lifestyle and patient care. With worldwide health transaction data now often being...

  5. Global Alignment of Pairwise Protein Interaction Networks for Maximal Common Conserved Patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhong Tian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of tools for the alignment of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks have laid the foundation for PPI network analysis. Most of alignment tools focus on finding conserved interaction regions across the PPI networks through either local or global mapping of similar sequences. Researchers are still trying to improve the speed, scalability, and accuracy of network alignment. In view of this, we introduce a connected-components based fast algorithm, HopeMap, for network alignment. Observing that the size of true orthologs across species is small comparing to the total number of proteins in all species, we take a different approach based on a precompiled list of homologs identified by KO terms. Applying this approach to S. cerevisiae (yeast and D. melanogaster (fly, E. coli K12 and S. typhimurium, E. coli K12 and C. crescenttus, we analyze all clusters identified in the alignment. The results are evaluated through up-to-date known gene annotations, gene ontology (GO, and KEGG ortholog groups (KO. Comparing to existing tools, our approach is fast with linear computational cost, highly accurate in terms of KO and GO terms specificity and sensitivity, and can be extended to multiple alignments easily.

  6. Network Analyses in Systems Biology: New Strategies for Dealing with Biological Complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Sara; Serban, Maria; Scholl, Raphael

    2018-01-01

    The increasing application of network models to interpret biological systems raises a number of important methodological and epistemological questions. What novel insights can network analysis provide in biology? Are network approaches an extension of or in conflict with mechanistic research...

  7. Discovery of Chemical Toxicity via Biological Networks and Systems Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, Edward; Habib, Tanwir; Guan, Xin; Escalon, Barbara; Falciani, Francesco; Chipman, J.K.; Antczak, Philipp; Edwards, Stephen; Taylor, Ronald C.; Vulpe, Chris; Loguinov, Alexandre; Van Aggelen, Graham; Villeneuve, Daniel L.; Garcia-Reyero, Natalia

    2010-09-30

    Both soldiers and animals are exposed to many chemicals as the result of military activities. Tools are needed to understand the hazards and risks that chemicals and new materials pose to soldiers and the environment. We have investigated the potential of global gene regulatory networks in understanding the impact of chemicals on reproduction. We characterized effects of chemicals on ovaries of the model animal system, the Fathead minnow (Pimopheles promelas) connecting chemical impacts on gene expression to circulating blood levels of the hormones testosterone and estradiol in addition to the egg yolk protein vitellogenin. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional gene expression data to characterize chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis that governs reproduction in fathead minnows. The construction of global gene regulatory networks provides deep insights into how drugs and chemicals effect key organs and biological pathways.

  8. Assessing business-IT alignment in networked organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santana Tapia, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    Concerns such as identifying ways to control costs, improve quality, increase effectiveness, and manage risk have become increasingly important for organizations as they face more and more pressure to gain and maintain their competitive edge. Business-IT alignment (B-ITa) is recognized as a solution

  9. Business-IT alignment domains and principles for networked organizations: A qualitative multiple case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santana Tapia, R.G.; Daneva, Maia; van Eck, Pascal; Castro Cárdenas, N.; van Oene, L.

    2008-01-01

    Applying principles for business-IT alignment in networked organizations seems to be key for their survival in competitive environments. In this paper, we present a qualitative multiple case study conducted in three collaborative networked organizations: (i) an outsourcing relation between an

  10. Review of Biological Network Data and Its Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyeon Yu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Studying biological networks, such as protein-protein interactions, is key to understanding complex biological activities. Various types of large-scale biological datasets have been collected and analyzed with high-throughput technologies, including DNA microarray, next-generation sequencing, and the two-hybrid screening system, for this purpose. In this review, we focus on network-based approaches that help in understanding biological systems and identifying biological functions. Accordingly, this paper covers two major topics in network biology: reconstruction of gene regulatory networks and network-based applications, including protein function prediction, disease gene prioritization, and network-based genome-wide association study.

  11. Rod-Shaped Neural Units for Aligned 3D Neural Network Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Negishi, Midori; Onoe, Hiroaki; Ito, Akane; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-08-01

    This paper proposes neural tissue units with aligned nerve fibers (called rod-shaped neural units) that connect neural networks with aligned neurons. To make the proposed units, 3D fiber-shaped neural tissues covered with a calcium alginate hydrogel layer are prepared with a microfluidic system and are cut in an accurate and reproducible manner. These units have aligned nerve fibers inside the hydrogel layer and connectable points on both ends. By connecting the units with a poly(dimethylsiloxane) guide, 3D neural tissues can be constructed and maintained for more than two weeks of culture. In addition, neural networks can be formed between the different neural units via synaptic connections. Experimental results indicate that the proposed rod-shaped neural units are effective tools for the construction of spatially complex connections with aligned nerve fibers in vitro. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Opportunistic Downlink Interference Alignment for Multi-Cell MIMO Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyun Jong; Shin, Won-Yong; Jung, Bang Chul; Suh, Changho; Paulraj, Arogyaswami

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an opportunistic downlink interference alignment (ODIA) for interference-limited cellular downlink, which intelligently combines user scheduling and downlink IA techniques. The proposed ODIA not only efficiently reduces the effect of inter-cell interference from other-cell base stations (BSs) but also eliminates intra-cell interference among spatial streams in the same cell. We show that the minimum number of users required to achieve a target degrees-of-freedom (DoF...

  13. Social traits, social networks and evolutionary biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D N; McAdam, A G

    2017-12-01

    effects) provides the potential to understand how entire networks of social interactions in populations influence phenotypes and predict how these traits may evolve. By theoretical integration of social network analysis and quantitative genetics, we hope to identify areas of compatibility and incompatibility and to direct research efforts towards the most promising areas. Continuing this synthesis could provide important insights into the evolution of traits expressed in a social context and the evolutionary consequences of complex and nuanced social phenotypes. © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2017 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Interference Cancellation trough Interference Alignment for Downlink of Cognitive Cellular Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Moussa, May; Foukalas, Fotis; Khattab, Tamer

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, we propose the interference cancellation through interference alignment at the downlink of cognitive cellular networks. Interference alignment helps the spatial resources to be shared among primary and secondary cells and thus, it can provide higher degrees of freedom through interference cancellation. We derive and depict the achievable degrees of freedom. We also analyse and calculate the achievable sum rates applying water-filling optimal power allocation.

  15. NN-align. An artificial neural network-based alignment algorithm for MHC class II peptide binding prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Ole

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecule plays a central role in controlling the adaptive immune response to infections. MHC class I molecules present peptides derived from intracellular proteins to cytotoxic T cells, whereas MHC class II molecules stimulate cellular and humoral immunity through presentation of extracellularly derived peptides to helper T cells. Identification of which peptides will bind a given MHC molecule is thus of great importance for the understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and large efforts have been placed in developing algorithms capable of predicting this binding event. Results Here, we present a novel artificial neural network-based method, NN-align that allows for simultaneous identification of the MHC class II binding core and binding affinity. NN-align is trained using a novel training algorithm that allows for correction of bias in the training data due to redundant binding core representation. Incorporation of information about the residues flanking the peptide-binding core is shown to significantly improve the prediction accuracy. The method is evaluated on a large-scale benchmark consisting of six independent data sets covering 14 human MHC class II alleles, and is demonstrated to outperform other state-of-the-art MHC class II prediction methods. Conclusion The NN-align method is competitive with the state-of-the-art MHC class II peptide binding prediction algorithms. The method is publicly available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetMHCII-2.0.

  16. Novel topological descriptors for analyzing biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varmuza Kurt K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topological descriptors, other graph measures, and in a broader sense, graph-theoretical methods, have been proven as powerful tools to perform biological network analysis. However, the majority of the developed descriptors and graph-theoretical methods does not have the ability to take vertex- and edge-labels into account, e.g., atom- and bond-types when considering molecular graphs. Indeed, this feature is important to characterize biological networks more meaningfully instead of only considering pure topological information. Results In this paper, we put the emphasis on analyzing a special type of biological networks, namely bio-chemical structures. First, we derive entropic measures to calculate the information content of vertex- and edge-labeled graphs and investigate some useful properties thereof. Second, we apply the mentioned measures combined with other well-known descriptors to supervised machine learning methods for predicting Ames mutagenicity. Moreover, we investigate the influence of our topological descriptors - measures for only unlabeled vs. measures for labeled graphs - on the prediction performance of the underlying graph classification problem. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the application of entropic measures to molecules representing graphs is useful to characterize such structures meaningfully. For instance, we have found that if one extends the measures for determining the structural information content of unlabeled graphs to labeled graphs, the uniqueness of the resulting indices is higher. Because measures to structurally characterize labeled graphs are clearly underrepresented so far, the further development of such methods might be valuable and fruitful for solving problems within biological network analysis.

  17. Bayesian Network Webserver: a comprehensive tool for biological network modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziebarth, Jesse D; Bhattacharya, Anindya; Cui, Yan

    2013-11-01

    The Bayesian Network Webserver (BNW) is a platform for comprehensive network modeling of systems genetics and other biological datasets. It allows users to quickly and seamlessly upload a dataset, learn the structure of the network model that best explains the data and use the model to understand relationships between network variables. Many datasets, including those used to create genetic network models, contain both discrete (e.g. genotype) and continuous (e.g. gene expression traits) variables, and BNW allows for modeling hybrid datasets. Users of BNW can incorporate prior knowledge during structure learning through an easy-to-use structural constraint interface. After structure learning, users are immediately presented with an interactive network model, which can be used to make testable hypotheses about network relationships. BNW, including a downloadable structure learning package, is available at http://compbio.uthsc.edu/BNW. (The BNW interface for adding structural constraints uses HTML5 features that are not supported by current version of Internet Explorer. We suggest using other browsers (e.g. Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox) when accessing BNW). ycui2@uthsc.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Continuum Modeling of Biological Network Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Albi, Giacomo

    2017-04-10

    We present an overview of recent analytical and numerical results for the elliptic–parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai, which models the formation of biological transportation networks. The model describes the pressure field using a Darcy type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects. Randomness in the material structure is represented by a linear diffusion term and conductance relaxation by an algebraic decay term. We first introduce micro- and mesoscopic models and show how they are connected to the macroscopic PDE system. Then, we provide an overview of analytical results for the PDE model, focusing mainly on the existence of weak and mild solutions and analysis of the steady states. The analytical part is complemented by extensive numerical simulations. We propose a discretization based on finite elements and study the qualitative properties of network structures for various parameter values.

  19. Mango: combining and analyzing heterogeneous biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Cho, Hyejin; Chou, Hui-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneous biological data such as sequence matches, gene expression correlations, protein-protein interactions, and biochemical pathways can be merged and analyzed via graphs, or networks. Existing software for network analysis has limited scalability to large data sets or is only accessible to software developers as libraries. In addition, the polymorphic nature of the data sets requires a more standardized method for integration and exploration. Mango facilitates large network analyses with its Graph Exploration Language, automatic graph attribute handling, and real-time 3-dimensional visualization. On a personal computer Mango can load, merge, and analyze networks with millions of links and can connect to online databases to fetch and merge biological pathways. Mango is written in C++ and runs on Mac OS, Windows, and Linux. The stand-alone distributions, including the Graph Exploration Language integrated development environment, are freely available for download from http://www.complex.iastate.edu/download/Mango. The Mango User Guide listing all features can be found at http://www.gitbook.com/book/j23414/mango-user-guide.

  20. Multiple-users interference alignment base on two-tired heterogeneous networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Jingwen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Interference alignment is a novel interference alignment way,which is popular in interference management of two-tiered heterogeneous networks.Based Interference alignment technique,a two level precoding scheme has been presented to solve the interference in the case of muti-femtocell network coexist with macrocell network.First we define co-layer interference as the interference between femtocell and femtocell,correspondingly,we define cross-layer interference as the interference between macrocell and femtocell,and use precoders at macrocell users and femtocell users respectively.The precoders of macrocell users minimize the cross-layer interference,and output of iteration between precoders of femtocell users and post code of base station bases on mean square error minimization algorithm,which would be used to handle co-layer interference,thus it will reduce interference of femtocell at last and ensure the QoS of femtocell users.

  1. Parallel algorithms for large-scale biological sequence alignment on Xeon-Phi based clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Haidong; Chan, Yuandong; Xu, Kai; Schmidt, Bertil; Peng, Shaoliang; Liu, Weiguo

    2016-07-19

    Computing alignments between two or more sequences are common operations frequently performed in computational molecular biology. The continuing growth of biological sequence databases establishes the need for their efficient parallel implementation on modern accelerators. This paper presents new approaches to high performance biological sequence database scanning with the Smith-Waterman algorithm and the first stage of progressive multiple sequence alignment based on the ClustalW heuristic on a Xeon Phi-based compute cluster. Our approach uses a three-level parallelization scheme to take full advantage of the compute power available on this type of architecture; i.e. cluster-level data parallelism, thread-level coarse-grained parallelism, and vector-level fine-grained parallelism. Furthermore, we re-organize the sequence datasets and use Xeon Phi shuffle operations to improve I/O efficiency. Evaluations show that our method achieves a peak overall performance up to 220 GCUPS for scanning real protein sequence databanks on a single node consisting of two Intel E5-2620 CPUs and two Intel Xeon Phi 7110P cards. It also exhibits good scalability in terms of sequence length and size, and number of compute nodes for both database scanning and multiple sequence alignment. Furthermore, the achieved performance is highly competitive in comparison to optimized Xeon Phi and GPU implementations. Our implementation is available at https://github.com/turbo0628/LSDBS-mpi .

  2. A Survey on Interference Networks: Interference Alignment and Neutralization

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Sang-Woon; Gastpar, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, there has been rapid progress on understanding Gaussian networks with multiple unicast connections, and new coding techniques have emerged. The essence of multi-source networks is how to efficiently manage interference that arises from the transmission of other sessions. Classically, interference is removed by orthogonalization (in time or frequency). This means that the rate per session drops inversely proportional to the number of sessions, suggesting that interference is a...

  3. An extensive assessment of network alignment algorithms for comparison of brain connectomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, Marianna; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Tymofieva, Olga; Xu, Duan; Hess, Christofer; Veltri, Pierangelo; Cannataro, Mario

    2017-06-06

    Recently the study of the complex system of connections in neural systems, i.e. the connectome, has gained a central role in neurosciences. The modeling and analysis of connectomes are therefore a growing area. Here we focus on the representation of connectomes by using graph theory formalisms. Macroscopic human brain connectomes are usually derived from neuroimages; the analyzed brains are co-registered in the image domain and brought to a common anatomical space. An atlas is then applied in order to define anatomically meaningful regions that will serve as the nodes of the network - this process is referred to as parcellation. The atlas-based parcellations present some known limitations in cases of early brain development and abnormal anatomy. Consequently, it has been recently proposed to perform atlas-free random brain parcellation into nodes and align brains in the network space instead of the anatomical image space, as a way to deal with the unknown correspondences of the parcels. Such process requires modeling of the brain using graph theory and the subsequent comparison of the structure of graphs. The latter step may be modeled as a network alignment (NA) problem. In this work, we first define the problem formally, then we test six existing state of the art of network aligners on diffusion MRI-derived brain networks. We compare the performances of algorithms by assessing six topological measures. We also evaluated the robustness of algorithms to alterations of the dataset. The results confirm that NA algorithms may be applied in cases of atlas-free parcellation for a fully network-driven comparison of connectomes. The analysis shows MAGNA++ is the best global alignment algorithm. The paper presented a new analysis methodology that uses network alignment for validating atlas-free parcellation brain connectomes. The methodology has been experimented on several brain datasets.

  4. Biological Networks Entropies: Examples in Neural Memory Networks, Genetic Regulation Networks and Social Epidemic Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Demongeot

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Networks used in biological applications at different scales (molecule, cell and population are of different types: neuronal, genetic, and social, but they share the same dynamical concepts, in their continuous differential versions (e.g., non-linear Wilson-Cowan system as well as in their discrete Boolean versions (e.g., non-linear Hopfield system; in both cases, the notion of interaction graph G(J associated to its Jacobian matrix J, and also the concepts of frustrated nodes, positive or negative circuits of G(J, kinetic energy, entropy, attractors, structural stability, etc., are relevant and useful for studying the dynamics and the robustness of these systems. We will give some general results available for both continuous and discrete biological networks, and then study some specific applications of three new notions of entropy: (i attractor entropy, (ii isochronal entropy and (iii entropy centrality; in three domains: a neural network involved in the memory evocation, a genetic network responsible of the iron control and a social network accounting for the obesity spread in high school environment.

  5. PREMER: a Tool to Infer Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, Alejandro F; Becker, Kolja; Banga, Julio R

    2017-10-04

    Inferring the structure of unknown cellular networks is a main challenge in computational biology. Data-driven approaches based on information theory can determine the existence of interactions among network nodes automatically. However, the elucidation of certain features - such as distinguishing between direct and indirect interactions or determining the direction of a causal link - requires estimating information-theoretic quantities in a multidimensional space. This can be a computationally demanding task, which acts as a bottleneck for the application of elaborate algorithms to large-scale network inference problems. The computational cost of such calculations can be alleviated by the use of compiled programs and parallelization. To this end we have developed PREMER (Parallel Reverse Engineering with Mutual information & Entropy Reduction), a software toolbox that can run in parallel and sequential environments. It uses information theoretic criteria to recover network topology and determine the strength and causality of interactions, and allows incorporating prior knowledge, imputing missing data, and correcting outliers. PREMER is a free, open source software tool that does not require any commercial software. Its core algorithms are programmed in FORTRAN 90 and implement OpenMP directives. It has user interfaces in Python and MATLAB/Octave, and runs on Windows, Linux and OSX (https://sites.google.com/site/premertoolbox/).

  6. Derivative-free neural network for optimizing the scoring functions associated with dynamic programming of pairwise-profile alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazunori D

    2018-01-01

    A profile-comparison method with position-specific scoring matrix (PSSM) is among the most accurate alignment methods. Currently, cosine similarity and correlation coefficients are used as scoring functions of dynamic programming to calculate similarity between PSSMs. However, it is unclear whether these functions are optimal for profile alignment methods. By definition, these functions cannot capture nonlinear relationships between profiles. Therefore, we attempted to discover a novel scoring function, which was more suitable for the profile-comparison method than existing functions, using neural networks. Although neural networks required derivative-of-cost functions, the problem being addressed in this study lacked them. Therefore, we implemented a novel derivative-free neural network by combining a conventional neural network with an evolutionary strategy optimization method used as a solver. Using this novel neural network system, we optimized the scoring function to align remote sequence pairs. Our results showed that the pairwise-profile aligner using the novel scoring function significantly improved both alignment sensitivity and precision relative to aligners using existing functions. We developed and implemented a novel derivative-free neural network and aligner (Nepal) for optimizing sequence alignments. Nepal improved alignment quality by adapting to remote sequence alignments and increasing the expressiveness of similarity scores. Additionally, this novel scoring function can be realized using a simple matrix operation and easily incorporated into other aligners. Moreover our scoring function could potentially improve the performance of homology detection and/or multiple-sequence alignment of remote homologous sequences. The goal of the study was to provide a novel scoring function for profile alignment method and develop a novel learning system capable of addressing derivative-free problems. Our system is capable of optimizing the performance of other

  7. Reconstruction of biological networks based on life science data integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kormeier Benjamin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available For the implementation of the virtual cell, the fundamental question is how to model and simulate complex biological networks. Therefore, based on relevant molecular database and information systems, biological data integration is an essential step in constructing biological networks. In this paper, we will motivate the applications BioDWH - an integration toolkit for building life science data warehouses, CardioVINEdb - a information system for biological data in cardiovascular-disease and VANESA- a network editor for modeling and simulation of biological networks. Based on this integration process, the system supports the generation of biological network models. A case study of a cardiovascular-disease related gene-regulated biological network is also presented.

  8. Noncommutative Biology: Sequential Regulation of Complex Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Letsou

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Single-cell variability in gene expression is important for generating distinct cell types, but it is unclear how cells use the same set of regulatory molecules to specifically control similarly regulated genes. While combinatorial binding of transcription factors at promoters has been proposed as a solution for cell-type specific gene expression, we found that such models resulted in substantial information bottlenecks. We sought to understand the consequences of adopting sequential logic wherein the time-ordering of factors informs the final outcome. We showed that with noncommutative control, it is possible to independently control targets that would otherwise be activated simultaneously using combinatorial logic. Consequently, sequential logic overcomes the information bottleneck inherent in complex networks. We derived scaling laws for two noncommutative models of regulation, motivated by phosphorylation/neural networks and chromosome folding, respectively, and showed that they scale super-exponentially in the number of regulators. We also showed that specificity in control is robust to the loss of a regulator. Lastly, we connected these theoretical results to real biological networks that demonstrate specificity in the context of promiscuity. These results show that achieving a desired outcome often necessitates roundabout steps.

  9. Neural-network-directed alignment of optical systems using the laser-beam spatial filter as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Krasowski, Michael J.; Weiland, Kenneth E.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes an effort at NASA Lewis Research Center to use artificial neural networks to automate the alignment and control of optical measurement systems. Specifically, it addresses the use of commercially available neural network software and hardware to direct alignments of the common laser-beam-smoothing spatial filter. The report presents a general approach for designing alignment records and combining these into training sets to teach optical alignment functions to neural networks and discusses the use of these training sets to train several types of neural networks. Neural network configurations used include the adaptive resonance network, the back-propagation-trained network, and the counter-propagation network. This work shows that neural networks can be used to produce robust sequencers. These sequencers can learn by example to execute the step-by-step procedures of optical alignment and also can learn adaptively to correct for environmentally induced misalignment. The long-range objective is to use neural networks to automate the alignment and operation of optical measurement systems in remote, harsh, or dangerous aerospace environments. This work also shows that when neural networks are trained by a human operator, training sets should be recorded, training should be executed, and testing should be done in a manner that does not depend on intellectual judgments of the human operator.

  10. Modeling and analysis of modular structure in diverse biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Anzi, Bader; Gerges, Sherif; Olsman, Noah; Ormerod, Christopher; Piliouras, Georgios; Ormerod, John; Zinn, Kai

    2017-06-07

    Biological networks, like most engineered networks, are not the product of a singular design but rather are the result of a long process of refinement and optimization. Many large real-world networks are comprised of well-defined and meaningful smaller modules. While engineered networks are designed and refined by humans with particular goals in mind, biological networks are created by the selective pressures of evolution. In this paper, we seek to define aspects of network architecture that are shared among different types of evolved biological networks. First, we developed a new mathematical model, the Stochastic Block Model with Path Selection (SBM-PS) that simulates biological network formation based on the selection of edges that increase clustering. SBM-PS can produce modular networks whose properties resemble those of real networks. Second, we analyzed three real networks of very different types, and showed that all three can be fit well by the SBM-PS model. Third, we showed that modular elements within the three networks correspond to meaningful biological structures. The networks chosen for analysis were a proteomic network composed of all proteins required for mitochondrial function in budding yeast, a mesoscale anatomical network composed of axonal connections among regions of the mouse brain, and the connectome of individual neurons in the nematode C. elegans. We find that the three networks have common architectural features, and each can be divided into subnetworks with characteristic topologies that control specific phenotypic outputs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. On the interference alignment with limited feedback for device-to-device networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Zhao, Chenglin; Yu, Jusheng; Hong, Li; Zhang, Hongxia

    In this paper, we analyze the performance of interference alignment of device-to-device (D2D) uplink underlay cellular networks. By fully considering the impact of imperfect precoding vectors caused by limited feedback, the exact closed-form expressions of average throughput for cellular network and D2D network are derived in terms of transmit power and the number of feedback bits. The accuracy of the average throughput is verified by simulation results. Our analytic results provide great promises to practical system designs.

  12. A simulation model for aligning smart home networks and deploying smart objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    Smart homes use sensor based networks to capture activities and offer learned services to the user. These smart home networks are challenging because they mainly use wireless communication at frequencies that are shared with other services and equipments. One of the major challenges...... is the interferences produced by WiFi access points in smart home networks which are expensive to overcome in terms of battery energy. Currently, different method exists to handle this. However, they use complex mechanisms such as sharing frequencies, sharing time slots, and spatial reuse of frequencies. This paper...... introduces a unique concept which saves battery energy and lowers the interference level by simulating the network alignment and assign the necessary amount of transmit power to each individual network node and finally, deploy the smart objects. The needed transmit powers are calculated by the presented...

  13. SANA NetGO: A combinatorial approach to using Gene Ontology (GO) terms to score network alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Wayne B; Mamano, Nil

    2017-12-07

    Gene Ontology (GO) terms are frequently used to score alignments between protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. Methods exist to measure GO similarity between proteins in isolation, but proteins in a network alignment are not isolated: each pairing is dependent on every other via the alignment itself. Existing measures fail to take into account the frequency of GO terms across networks, instead imposing arbitrary rules on when to allow GO terms. Here we develop NetGO, a new measure that naturally weighs infrequent, informative GO terms more heavily than frequent, less informative GO terms, without arbitrary cutoffs, instead downweighting GO terms according to their frequency in the networks being aligned. This is a global measure applicable only to alignments, independent of pairwise GO measures, in the same sense that the edge-based EC or S3 scores are global measures of topological similarity independent of pairwise topological similarities. We demonstrate the superiority of NetGO in alignments of predetermined quality and show that NetGO correlates with alignment quality better than any existing GO-based alignment measures. We also demonstrate that NetGO provides a measure of taxonomic similarity between species, consistent with existing taxonomic measuresa feature not shared with existing GObased network alignment measures. Finally, we re-score alignments produced by almost a dozen aligners from a previous study and show that NetGO does a better job at separating good alignments from bad ones. available as part of SANA. whayes@uci.edu. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. An Active Pre-Alignment System and Metrology Network for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Becker, F; Pittin, R; Wilson, Ian H

    2003-01-01

    The pre-alignment tolerance on the transverse positions of the components of the CLIC linacs is typically ten microns over distances of 200 m. Such tight tolerances cannot be obtained by a static one-time alignment because normal seismic ground movement and cultural noise associated with human and industrial activity quickly creates significant errors. It is therefore foreseen to maintain the components in place using an active-alignment system which will be linked to a permanent metrology and geodetic network. This report describes the overall philosophy and implementation of such a system and proposes one possible solution for active-alignment which uses stepping-motors to move components and stretched-wires as reference lines. Special sensors have been developed to measure the position of the components with respect to the reference lines, and to measure local tilt and relative vertical position. An in-depth analysis has been made of the repercussions on the alignment system of perturbing effects due to th...

  15. The dichotomy in degree correlation of biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dapeng Hao

    Full Text Available Most complex networks from different areas such as biology, sociology or technology, show a correlation on node degree where the possibility of a link between two nodes depends on their connectivity. It is widely believed that complex networks are either disassortative (links between hubs are systematically suppressed or assortative (links between hubs are enhanced. In this paper, we analyze a variety of biological networks and find that they generally show a dichotomous degree correlation. We find that many properties of biological networks can be explained by this dichotomy in degree correlation, including the neighborhood connectivity, the sickle-shaped clustering coefficient distribution and the modularity structure. This dichotomy distinguishes biological networks from real disassortative networks or assortative networks such as the Internet and social networks. We suggest that the modular structure of networks accounts for the dichotomy in degree correlation and vice versa, shedding light on the source of modularity in biological networks. We further show that a robust and well connected network necessitates the dichotomy of degree correlation, suggestive of an evolutionary motivation for its existence. Finally, we suggest that a dichotomous degree correlation favors a centrally connected modular network, by which the integrity of network and specificity of modules might be reconciled.

  16. Asymmetric Branching in Biological Resource Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummer, Alexander Byers

    There is a remarkable relationship between an organism's metabolic rate (resting power consumption) and the organism's mass. It may be a universal law of nature that an organism's resting metabolic rate is proportional to its mass to the power of 3/4. This relationship, known as Kleiber's Law, appears to be valid for both plants and animals. This law is important because it implies that larger organisms are more efficient than smaller organisms, and knowledge regarding metabolic rates are essential to a multitude of other fields in ecology and biology. This includes modeling the interactions of many species across multiple trophic levels, distributions of species abundances across large spatial landscapes, and even medical diagnostics for respiratory and cardiovascular pathologies. Previous models of vascular networks that seek to identify the origin of metabolic scaling have all been based on the unrealistic assumption of perfectly symmetric branching. In this dissertation I will present a theory of asymmetric branching in self-similar vascular networks (published by Brummer et al. in [9]). The theory shows that there can exist a suite of vascular forms that result in the often observed 3/4 metabolic scaling exponent of Kleiber's Law. Furthermore, the theory makes predictions regarding major morphological features related to vascular branching patterns and their relationships to metabolic scaling. These predictions are suggestive of evolutionary convergence in vascular branching. To test these predictions, I will present an analysis of real mammalian and plant vascular data that shows: (i) broad patterns in vascular networks across entire animal kingdoms and (ii) within these patterns, plant and mammalian vascular networks can be uniquely distinguished from one another (publication in preparation by Brummer et al.). I will also present results from a computational study in support of point (i). Namely, that asymmetric branching may be the optimal strategy to

  17. Application of random matrix theory to biological networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Feng [Department of Computer Science, Clemson University, 100 McAdams Hall, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Department of Pathology, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. Dallas, TX 75390-9072 (United States); Zhong Jianxin [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: zhongjn@ornl.gov; Yang Yunfeng [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Scheuermann, Richard H. [Department of Pathology, U.T. Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Blvd. Dallas, TX 75390-9072 (United States); Zhou Jizhong [Department of Botany and Microbiology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)]. E-mail: zhouj@ornl.gov

    2006-09-25

    We show that spectral fluctuation of interaction matrices of a yeast protein-protein interaction network and a yeast metabolic network follows the description of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) of random matrix theory (RMT). Furthermore, we demonstrate that while the global biological networks evaluated belong to GOE, removal of interactions between constituents transitions the networks to systems of isolated modules described by the Poisson distribution. Our results indicate that although biological networks are very different from other complex systems at the molecular level, they display the same statistical properties at network scale. The transition point provides a new objective approach for the identification of functional modules.

  18. Optical alignment procedure utilizing neural networks combined with Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adil, Fatime Zehra; Konukseven, Erhan İlhan; Balkan, Tuna; Adil, Ömer Faruk

    2017-05-01

    In the design of pilot helmets with night vision capability, to not limit or block the sight of the pilot, a transparent visor is used. The reflected image from the coated part of the visor must coincide with the physical human sight image seen through the nonreflecting regions of the visor. This makes the alignment of the visor halves critical. In essence, this is an alignment problem of two optical parts that are assembled together during the manufacturing process. Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is commonly used for the determination of the misalignments through wavefront measurements, which are quantified in terms of the Zernike polynomials. Although the Zernike polynomials provide very useful feedback about the misalignments, the corrective actions are basically ad hoc. This stems from the fact that there exists no easy inverse relation between the misalignment measurements and the physical causes of the misalignments. This study aims to construct this inverse relation by making use of the expressive power of the neural networks in such complex relations. For this purpose, a neural network is designed and trained in MATLAB® regarding which types of misalignments result in which wavefront measurements, quantitatively given by Zernike polynomials. This way, manual and iterative alignment processes relying on trial and error will be replaced by the trained guesses of a neural network, so the alignment process is reduced to applying the counter actions based on the misalignment causes. Such a training requires data containing misalignment and measurement sets in fine detail, which is hard to obtain manually on a physical setup. For that reason, the optical setup is completely modeled in Zemax® software, and Zernike polynomials are generated for misalignments applied in small steps. The performance of the neural network is experimented and found promising in the actual physical setup.

  19. Alignment of paired molecules of C60 within a hexagonal platform networked through hydrogen-bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaki, Ichiro; Nakagawa, Shoichi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Tohnai, Norimitsu

    2016-07-28

    We demonstrate, for the first time, that a hydrogen-bonded low-density organic framework can be applied as a platform to achieve periodic alignment of paired molecules of C60, which is the smallest example of a finite-numbered cluster of C60. The framework is a layered assembly of a hydrogen-bonded 2D hexagonal network (LA-H-HexNet) composed of dodecadehydrotribenzo[18]annulene derivatives.

  20. Langevin dynamics modeling of the water diffusion tensor in partially aligned collagen networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Sean K.; Momot, Konstantin I.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, a Langevin dynamics model of the diffusion of water in articular cartilage was developed. Numerical simulations of the translational dynamics of water molecules and their interaction with collagen fibers were used to study the quantitative relationship between the organization of the collagen fiber network and the diffusion tensor of water in model cartilage. Langevin dynamics was used to simulate water diffusion in both ordered and partially disordered cartilage models. In addition, an analytical approach was developed to estimate the diffusion tensor for a network comprising a given distribution of fiber orientations. The key findings are that (1) an approximately linear relationship was observed between collagen volume fraction and the fractional anisotropy of the diffusion tensor in fiber networks of a given degree of alignment, (2) for any given fiber volume fraction, fractional anisotropy follows a fiber alignment dependency similar to the square of the second Legendre polynomial of cos(θ), with the minimum anisotropy occurring at approximately the magic angle (θMA), and (3) a decrease in the principal eigenvalue and an increase in the transverse eigenvalues is observed as the fiber orientation angle θ progresses from 0∘ to 90∘. The corresponding diffusion ellipsoids are prolate for θθMA. Expansion of the model to include discrimination between the combined effects of alignment disorder and collagen fiber volume fraction on the diffusion tensor is discussed.

  1. Natalie 2.0: Sparse Global Network Alignment as a Special Case of Quadratic Assignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Kebir, M.; Heringa, J.; Klau, G.W.

    2015-01-01

    Data on molecular interactions is increasing at a tremendous pace, while the development of solid methods for analyzing this network data is still lagging behind. This holds in particular for the field of comparative network analysis, where one wants to identify commonalities between biological

  2. Biology Question Generation from a Semantic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lishan

    Science instructors need questions for use in exams, homework assignments, class discussions, reviews, and other instructional activities. Textbooks never have enough questions, so instructors must find them from other sources or generate their own questions. In order to supply instructors with biology questions, a semantic network approach was developed for generating open response biology questions. The generated questions were compared to professional authorized questions. To boost students' learning experience, adaptive selection was built on the generated questions. Bayesian Knowledge Tracing was used as embedded assessment of the student's current competence so that a suitable question could be selected based on the student's previous performance. A between-subjects experiment with 42 participants was performed, where half of the participants studied with adaptive selected questions and the rest studied with mal-adaptive order of questions. Both groups significantly improved their test scores, and the participants in adaptive group registered larger learning gains than participants in the control group. To explore the possibility of generating rich instructional feedback for machine-generated questions, a question-paragraph mapping task was identified. Given a set of questions and a list of paragraphs for a textbook, the goal of the task was to map the related paragraphs to each question. An algorithm was developed whose performance was comparable to human annotators. A multiple-choice question with high quality distractors (incorrect answers) can be pedagogically valuable as well as being much easier to grade than open-response questions. Thus, an algorithm was developed to generate good distractors for multiple-choice questions. The machine-generated multiple-choice questions were compared to human-generated questions in terms of three measures: question difficulty, question discrimination and distractor usefulness. By recruiting 200 participants from

  3. Coverage probability of cellular networks using interference alignment under imperfect CSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raoul F. Guiazon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Interference alignment (IA is well understood to approach the capacity of interference channels, and believed to be crucial in cellular networks in which the ability to control and exploit interference is key. However, the achievable performance of IA in cellular networks depends on the quality of channel state information (CSI and how effective IA is in practical settings is not known. This paper studies the use of IA to mitigate inter-cell interference of cellular networks under imperfect CSI conditions. Our analysis is based on stochastic geometry where the structure of the base station (BS locations is considered by a Poisson point process (PPP. Our main contribution is the coverage probability of the network and simulation results confirm the accuracy.

  4. Alignment and integration of complex networks by hypergraph-based spectral clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michoel, Tom; Nachtergaele, Bruno

    2012-11-01

    Complex networks possess a rich, multiscale structure reflecting the dynamical and functional organization of the systems they model. Often there is a need to analyze multiple networks simultaneously, to model a system by more than one type of interaction, or to go beyond simple pairwise interactions, but currently there is a lack of theoretical and computational methods to address these problems. Here we introduce a framework for clustering and community detection in such systems using hypergraph representations. Our main result is a generalization of the Perron-Frobenius theorem from which we derive spectral clustering algorithms for directed and undirected hypergraphs. We illustrate our approach with applications for local and global alignment of protein-protein interaction networks between multiple species, for tripartite community detection in folksonomies, and for detecting clusters of overlapping regulatory pathways in directed networks.

  5. Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosak, Marko; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Slak Rupnik, Marjan; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Perc, Matjaž

    2018-03-01

    Network science is today established as a backbone for description of structure and function of various physical, chemical, biological, technological, and social systems. Here we review recent advances in the study of complex biological systems that were inspired and enabled by methods of network science. First, we present

  6. Optimization Techniques for Analysis of Biological and Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    This project focused on a multifaceted study of a class of cluster-detection problems arising in biological and social networks . This includes...and heuristics. Originally, clusters (complexes, modules, cohesive subgroups) in biological and social networks were described by cliques (complete

  7. A generic algorithm for layout of biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Falk; Dwyer, Tim; Marriott, Kim; Wybrow, Michael

    2009-11-12

    Biological networks are widely used to represent processes in biological systems and to capture interactions and dependencies between biological entities. Their size and complexity is steadily increasing due to the ongoing growth of knowledge in the life sciences. To aid understanding of biological networks several algorithms for laying out and graphically representing networks and network analysis results have been developed. However, current algorithms are specialized to particular layout styles and therefore different algorithms are required for each kind of network and/or style of layout. This increases implementation effort and means that new algorithms must be developed for new layout styles. Furthermore, additional effort is necessary to compose different layout conventions in the same diagram. Also the user cannot usually customize the placement of nodes to tailor the layout to their particular need or task and there is little support for interactive network exploration. We present a novel algorithm to visualize different biological networks and network analysis results in meaningful ways depending on network types and analysis outcome. Our method is based on constrained graph layout and we demonstrate how it can handle the drawing conventions used in biological networks. The presented algorithm offers the ability to produce many of the fundamental popular drawing styles while allowing the exibility of constraints to further tailor these layouts.

  8. A generic algorithm for layout of biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwyer Tim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological networks are widely used to represent processes in biological systems and to capture interactions and dependencies between biological entities. Their size and complexity is steadily increasing due to the ongoing growth of knowledge in the life sciences. To aid understanding of biological networks several algorithms for laying out and graphically representing networks and network analysis results have been developed. However, current algorithms are specialized to particular layout styles and therefore different algorithms are required for each kind of network and/or style of layout. This increases implementation effort and means that new algorithms must be developed for new layout styles. Furthermore, additional effort is necessary to compose different layout conventions in the same diagram. Also the user cannot usually customize the placement of nodes to tailor the layout to their particular need or task and there is little support for interactive network exploration. Results We present a novel algorithm to visualize different biological networks and network analysis results in meaningful ways depending on network types and analysis outcome. Our method is based on constrained graph layout and we demonstrate how it can handle the drawing conventions used in biological networks. Conclusion The presented algorithm offers the ability to produce many of the fundamental popular drawing styles while allowing the exibility of constraints to further tailor these layouts.

  9. Activating and inhibiting connections in biological network dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Rob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of biochemical networks have analyzed network topology. Such work has suggested that specific types of network wiring may increase network robustness and therefore confer a selective advantage. However, knowledge of network topology does not allow one to predict network dynamical behavior – for example, whether deleting a protein from a signaling network would maintain the network's dynamical behavior, or induce oscillations or chaos. Results Here we report that the balance between activating and inhibiting connections is important in determining whether network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. We use a simple dynamical model of a network of interacting genes or proteins. Using the model, we study random networks, networks selected for robust dynamics, and examples of biological network topologies. The fraction of activating connections influences whether the network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. Conclusion The activating fraction may predispose a network to oscillate or reach steady state, and neutral evolution or selection of this parameter may affect the behavior of biological networks. This principle may unify the dynamics of a wide range of cellular networks. Reviewers Reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Eugene Koonin, and Yu (Brandon Xia (nominated by Mark Gerstein. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  10. Power Laws, Scale-Free Networks and Genome Biology

    CERN Document Server

    Koonin, Eugene V; Karev, Georgy P

    2006-01-01

    Power Laws, Scale-free Networks and Genome Biology deals with crucial aspects of the theoretical foundations of systems biology, namely power law distributions and scale-free networks which have emerged as the hallmarks of biological organization in the post-genomic era. The chapters in the book not only describe the interesting mathematical properties of biological networks but moves beyond phenomenology, toward models of evolution capable of explaining the emergence of these features. The collection of chapters, contributed by both physicists and biologists, strives to address the problems in this field in a rigorous but not excessively mathematical manner and to represent different viewpoints, which is crucial in this emerging discipline. Each chapter includes, in addition to technical descriptions of properties of biological networks and evolutionary models, a more general and accessible introduction to the respective problems. Most chapters emphasize the potential of theoretical systems biology for disco...

  11. Mining biological networks from full-text articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Jan; Shepherd, Adrian J

    2014-01-01

    The study of biological networks is playing an increasingly important role in the life sciences. Many different kinds of biological system can be modelled as networks; perhaps the most important examples are protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, metabolic pathways, gene regulatory networks, and signalling networks. Although much useful information is easily accessible in publicly databases, a lot of extra relevant data lies scattered in numerous published papers. Hence there is a pressing need for automated text-mining methods capable of extracting such information from full-text articles. Here we present practical guidelines for constructing a text-mining pipeline from existing code and software components capable of extracting PPI networks from full-text articles. This approach can be adapted to tackle other types of biological network.

  12. An efficient grid layout algorithm for biological networks utilizing various biological attributes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kato Mitsuru

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clearly visualized biopathways provide a great help in understanding biological systems. However, manual drawing of large-scale biopathways is time consuming. We proposed a grid layout algorithm that can handle gene-regulatory networks and signal transduction pathways by considering edge-edge crossing, node-edge crossing, distance measure between nodes, and subcellular localization information from Gene Ontology. Consequently, the layout algorithm succeeded in drastically reducing these crossings in the apoptosis model. However, for larger-scale networks, we encountered three problems: (i the initial layout is often very far from any local optimum because nodes are initially placed at random, (ii from a biological viewpoint, human layouts still exceed automatic layouts in understanding because except subcellular localization, it does not fully utilize biological information of pathways, and (iii it employs a local search strategy in which the neighborhood is obtained by moving one node at each step, and automatic layouts suggest that simultaneous movements of multiple nodes are necessary for better layouts, while such extension may face worsening the time complexity. Results We propose a new grid layout algorithm. To address problem (i, we devised a new force-directed algorithm whose output is suitable as the initial layout. For (ii, we considered that an appropriate alignment of nodes having the same biological attribute is one of the most important factors of the comprehension, and we defined a new score function that gives an advantage to such configurations. For solving problem (iii, we developed a search strategy that considers swapping nodes as well as moving a node, while keeping the order of the time complexity. Though a naïve implementation increases by one order, the time complexity, we solved this difficulty by devising a method that caches differences between scores of a layout and its possible updates

  13. Interference Alignment Based on Rank Constraint in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibing Li

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we focus on the interference management in the cognitive radio (CR network comprised of multiple primary users (PUs and multiple secondary users (SUs. Firstly, two interference alignment (IA schemes are proposed to mitigate the interference among PUs. The first one is an interference rank minimization (IRM scheme, which aims to minimize the rank of the joint interference matrix via alternating between the forward and reverse communication links. Considering the overhead of information exchanged between the transmitters and receivers in the IRM scheme, we further develop an interference subspace distance minimization (ISDM scheme which runs at the transmitters only. The ISDM scheme focuses on aligning the subspaces spanned by interference with an aligned subspace introduced in this paper. For the secondary network, though IRM and ISDM mitigate the received interference at secondary receivers, they make no attempt to eliminate the interference from SUs to PUs. To address this, we improve the IRM and ISDM schemes by putting a rank constraint into their optimizations, where the rank constraint forces the ranks of the interference matrices from SUs to PUs to be zero. Simulation results validate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes in terms of the average sum rate.

  14. Stability from Structure : Metabolic Networks Are Unlike Other Biological Networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, P.; Bellomo, D.; Reinders, M.J.T.; De Ridder, D.

    2009-01-01

    In recent work, attempts have been made to link the structure of biochemical networks to their complex dynamics. It was shown that structurally stable network motifs are enriched in such networks. In this work, we investigate to what extent these findings apply to metabolic networks. To this end, we

  15. Communication on the structure of biological networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Networks are widely used to represent interaction pattern among the components in complex systems. Structures of real networks from different domains may vary quite significantly. As there is an interplay between network architecture and dynamics, structure plays an important role in communication and spreading of ...

  16. Improving accountability through alignment: the role of academic health science centres and networks in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovseiko, Pavel V; Heitmueller, Axel; Allen, Pauline; Davies, Stephen M; Wells, Glenn; Ford, Gary A; Darzi, Ara; Buchan, Alastair M

    2014-01-20

    As in many countries around the world, there are high expectations on academic health science centres and networks in England to provide high-quality care, innovative research, and world-class education, while also supporting wealth creation and economic growth. Meeting these expectations increasingly depends on partnership working between university medical schools and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers. However, academic-clinical relationships in England are still characterised by the "unlinked partners" model, whereby universities and their partner teaching hospitals are neither fiscally nor structurally linked, creating bifurcating accountabilities to various government and public agencies. This article focuses on accountability relationships in universities and teaching hospitals, as well as other healthcare providers that form core constituent parts of academic health science centres and networks. The authors analyse accountability for the tripartite mission of patient care, research, and education, using a four-fold typology of accountability relationships, which distinguishes between hierarchical (bureaucratic) accountability, legal accountability, professional accountability, and political accountability. Examples from North West London suggest that a number of mechanisms can be used to improve accountability for the tripartite mission through alignment, but that the simple creation of academic health science centres and networks is probably not sufficient. At the heart of the challenge for academic health science centres and networks is the separation of accountabilities for patient care, research, and education in different government departments. Given that a fundamental top-down system redesign is now extremely unlikely, local academic and clinical leaders face the challenge of aligning their institutions as a matter of priority in order to improve accountability for the tripartite mission from the bottom up. It remains to be

  17. Identification of important nodes in directed biological networks: a network motif approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    Full Text Available Identification of important nodes in complex networks has attracted an increasing attention over the last decade. Various measures have been proposed to characterize the importance of nodes in complex networks, such as the degree, betweenness and PageRank. Different measures consider different aspects of complex networks. Although there are numerous results reported on undirected complex networks, few results have been reported on directed biological networks. Based on network motifs and principal component analysis (PCA, this paper aims at introducing a new measure to characterize node importance in directed biological networks. Investigations on five real-world biological networks indicate that the proposed method can robustly identify actually important nodes in different networks, such as finding command interneurons, global regulators and non-hub but evolutionary conserved actually important nodes in biological networks. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curves for the five networks indicate remarkable prediction accuracy of the proposed measure. The proposed index provides an alternative complex network metric. Potential implications of the related investigations include identifying network control and regulation targets, biological networks modeling and analysis, as well as networked medicine.

  18. High-accuracy local positioning network for the alignment of the Mu2e experiment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejdukova, Jana B. [Czech Technical Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-01

    This Diploma thesis describes the establishment of a high-precision local positioning network and accelerator alignment for the Mu2e physics experiment. The process of establishing new network consists of few steps: design of the network, pre-analysis, installation works, measurements of the network and making adjustments. Adjustments were performed using two approaches. First is a geodetic approach of taking into account the Earth’s curvature and the metrological approach of a pure 3D Cartesian system on the other side. The comparison of those two approaches is performed and evaluated in the results and compared with expected differences. The effect of the Earth’s curvature was found to be significant for this kind of network and should not be neglected. The measurements were obtained with Absolute Tracker AT401, leveling instrument Leica DNA03 and gyrotheodolite DMT Gyromat 2000. The coordinates of the points of the reference network were determined by the Least Square Meth od and the overall view is attached as Annexes.

  19. Systems biology of plant molecular networks: from networks to models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentim, F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Developmental processes are controlled by regulatory networks (GRNs), which are tightly coordinated networks of transcription factors (TFs) that activate and repress gene expression within a spatial and temporal context. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the key components and network structures of the GRNs

  20. Ontology- and graph-based similarity assessment in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiying; Zheng, Huiru; Azuaje, Francisco

    2010-10-15

    A standard systems-based approach to biomarker and drug target discovery consists of placing putative biomarkers in the context of a network of biological interactions, followed by different 'guilt-by-association' analyses. The latter is typically done based on network structural features. Here, an alternative analysis approach in which the networks are analyzed on a 'semantic similarity' space is reported. Such information is extracted from ontology-based functional annotations. We present SimTrek, a Cytoscape plugin for ontology-based similarity assessment in biological networks. http://rosalind.infj.ulst.ac.uk/SimTrek.html francisco.azuaje@crp-sante.lu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. SBEToolbox: A Matlab Toolbox for Biological Network Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konganti, Kranti; Wang, Gang; Yang, Ence; Cai, James J

    2013-01-01

    We present SBEToolbox (Systems Biology and Evolution Toolbox), an open-source Matlab toolbox for biological network analysis. It takes a network file as input, calculates a variety of centralities and topological metrics, clusters nodes into modules, and displays the network using different graph layout algorithms. Straightforward implementation and the inclusion of high-level functions allow the functionality to be easily extended or tailored through developing custom plugins. SBEGUI, a menu-driven graphical user interface (GUI) of SBEToolbox, enables easy access to various network and graph algorithms for programmers and non-programmers alike. All source code and sample data are freely available at https://github.com/biocoder/SBEToolbox/releases.

  2. A conceptual review on systems biology in health and diseases: from biological networks to modern therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Somvanshi, Pramod Rajaram; Venkatesh, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    Human physiology is an ensemble of various biological processes spanning from intracellular molecular interactions to the whole body phenotypic response. Systems biology endures to decipher these multi-scale biological networks and bridge the link between genotype to phenotype. The structure and dynamic properties of these networks are responsible for controlling and deciding the phenotypic state of a cell. Several cells and various tissues coordinate together to generate an organ level respo...

  3. Alternate MIMO AF relaying networks with interference alignment: Spectral efficient protocol and linear filter design

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Kihong

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, we study a two-hop relaying network consisting of one source, one destination, and three amplify-and-forward (AF) relays with multiple antennas. To compensate for the capacity prelog factor loss of 1/2$ due to the half-duplex relaying, alternate transmission is performed among three relays, and the inter-relay interference due to the alternate relaying is aligned to make additional degrees of freedom. In addition, suboptimal linear filter designs at the nodes are proposed to maximize the achievable sum rate for different fading scenarios when the destination utilizes a minimum mean-square error filter. © 1967-2012 IEEE.

  4. Controllability and observability of Boolean networks arising from biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Yang, Meng; Chu, Tianguang

    2015-02-01

    Boolean networks are currently receiving considerable attention as a computational scheme for system level analysis and modeling of biological systems. Studying control-related problems in Boolean networks may reveal new insights into the intrinsic control in complex biological systems and enable us to develop strategies for manipulating biological systems using exogenous inputs. This paper considers controllability and observability of Boolean biological networks. We propose a new approach, which draws from the rich theory of symbolic computation, to solve the problems. Consequently, simple necessary and sufficient conditions for reachability, controllability, and observability are obtained, and algorithmic tests for controllability and observability which are based on the Gröbner basis method are presented. As practical applications, we apply the proposed approach to several different biological systems, namely, the mammalian cell-cycle network, the T-cell activation network, the large granular lymphocyte survival signaling network, and the Drosophila segment polarity network, gaining novel insights into the control and/or monitoring of the specific biological systems.

  5. Exploring community structure in biological networks with random graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Community structure is ubiquitous in biological networks. There has been an increased interest in unraveling the community structure of biological systems as it may provide important insights into a system’s functional components and the impact of local structures on dynamics at a global scale. Choosing an appropriate community detection algorithm to identify the community structure in an empirical network can be difficult, however, as the many algorithms available are based on a variety of cost functions and are difficult to validate. Even when community structure is identified in an empirical system, disentangling the effect of community structure from other network properties such as clustering coefficient and assortativity can be a challenge. Results Here, we develop a generative model to produce undirected, simple, connected graphs with a specified degrees and pattern of communities, while maintaining a graph structure that is as random as possible. Additionally, we demonstrate two important applications of our model: (a) to generate networks that can be used to benchmark existing and new algorithms for detecting communities in biological networks; and (b) to generate null models to serve as random controls when investigating the impact of complex network features beyond the byproduct of degree and modularity in empirical biological networks. Conclusion Our model allows for the systematic study of the presence of community structure and its impact on network function and dynamics. This process is a crucial step in unraveling the functional consequences of the structural properties of biological systems and uncovering the mechanisms that drive these systems. PMID:24965130

  6. Macrocell Protection Interference Alignment in Two-Tier Downlink Heterogeneous Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jongpil Seo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional interference alignment (IA has been developed to mitigate interference problems for the coexistence of picocells and macrocells. This paper proposes a macrocell protection interference alignment (MCP-IA in two-tier MIMO downlink heterogeneous networks. The proposed method aligns the interference of the macro user equipment (UE and mitigates the interference of the pico-UEs with a minimum mean squared error interference rejection combining (MMSE-IRC receiver. Compared to the conventional IA, the proposed MCP-IA provides an additional array gain obtained by the precoder design of the macro BS and a diversity gain achieved by signal space selections. The degrees of freedom (DoF of the proposed MCP-IA are equal to or greater than that of the conventional IA and are derived theoretically. Link level simulations show the link capacity and the DoF of the macro UE, and also exhibit the proposed MCP-IA attaining additional array gain and diversity gain. The system level simulation illustrates that the proposed method prevents the interference of the macro UE completely and preserves the throughput of the pico-UE irrespective of the number of picocells. For 4×2 antenna configuration, the system level simulation demonstrates that the proposed MCP-IA throughput of the macro UE is not affected by the number of picocells and that the proposed MCP-IA throughput of the picocells approaches that of single-user MIMO (SU-MIMO with a 3% loss.

  7. Systems biology: properties of reconstructed networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Palsson, Bernhard

    2006-01-01

    ... between the mathematical ideas and biological processes are made clear, the book reflects the irreversible trend of increasing mathematical content in biology education. Therefore to assist both teacher and student, Palsson provides problem sets, projects, and PowerPoint slides in an associated web site and keeps the presentation in the book concrete with illustrat...

  8. Exploring the Alignment of the Intended and Implemented Curriculum through Teachers' Interpretation: A Case Study of A-Level Biology Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phaeton, Mukaro Joe; Stears, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    The research reported on here is part of a larger study exploring the alignment of the intended, implemented and attained curriculum with regard to practical work in the Zimbabwean A-level Biology curriculum. In this paper we focus on the alignment between the intended and implemented A-Level Biology curriculum through the lens of teachers'…

  9. Epigenetics and Why Biological Networks are More Controllable than Expected

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Adilson

    2013-03-01

    A fundamental property of networks is that perturbations to one node can affect other nodes, potentially causing the entire system to change behavior or fail. In this talk, I will show that it is possible to exploit this same principle to control network behavior. This approach takes advantage of the nonlinear dynamics inherent to real networks, and allows bringing the system to a desired target state even when this state is not directly accessible or the linear counterpart is not controllable. Applications show that this framework permits both reprogramming a network to a desired task as well as rescuing networks from the brink of failure, which I will illustrate through various biological problems. I will also briefly review the progress our group has made over the past 5 years on related control of complex networks in non-biological domains.

  10. High-speed all-optical DNA local sequence alignment based on a three-dimensional artificial neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Ehsan; Babashah, Hossein; Koohi, Somayyeh; Kavehvash, Zahra

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an optical processing approach for exploring a large number of genome sequences. Specifically, we propose an optical correlator for global alignment and an extended moiré matching technique for local analysis of spatially coded DNA, whose output is fed to a novel three-dimensional artificial neural network for local DNA alignment. All-optical implementation of the proposed 3D artificial neural network is developed and its accuracy is verified in Zemax. Thanks to its parallel processing capability, the proposed structure performs local alignment of 4 million sequences of 150 base pairs in a few seconds, which is much faster than its electrical counterparts, such as the basic local alignment search tool.

  11. The ultimate complex system: networks in molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Andreas W.

    2010-07-01

    This contribution provides a brief survey of networks as they occur in molecular biology. It is intended as an introduction for a physics audience with no prior knowledge of molecular biology. References to key papers and reviews are included for the reader who wishes to explore this fascinating area further.

  12. Cytoscape ESP: simple search of complex biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi, Maital; Bader, Gary D; Kuchinsky, Allan; Moshelion, Menachem; States, David J

    2008-06-15

    Cytoscape enhanced search plugin (ESP) enables searching complex biological networks on multiple attribute fields using logical operators and wildcards. Queries use an intuitive syntax and simple search line interface. ESP is implemented as a Cytoscape plugin and complements existing search functions in the Cytoscape network visualization and analysis software, allowing users to easily identify nodes, edges and subgraphs of interest, even for very large networks. Availabiity: http://chianti.ucsd.edu/cyto_web/plugins/ ashkenaz@agri.huji.ac.il.

  13. The electronics industry in central and eastern Europe: an emerging production location in the alignment of networks perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Radošević, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyses the emergence of central Europe as a new location for the production of electronics. The main factors that drive integration in the region into global production networks are also analysed, as well as prospects for upgrading the industry by using network alignment perspectives. Foreign investment is the primary vehicle of integration of CEE electronics firms into global production networks, and Hungary has moved furthest along this path, positioning itself as a major lo...

  14. GASOLINE: a Cytoscape app for multiple local alignment of PPI networks [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4f7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Micale

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparing protein interaction networks can reveal interesting patterns of interactions for a specific function or process in distantly related species. In this paper we present GASOLINE, a Cytoscape app for multiple local alignments of PPI (protein-protein interaction networks. The app is based on the homonymous greedy and stochastic algorithm. GASOLINE starts with the identification of sets of similar nodes, called seeds of the alignment. Alignments are then extended in a greedy manner and finally refined. Both the identification of seeds and the extension of alignments are performed through an iterative Gibbs sampling strategy. GASOLINE is a Cytoscape app for computing and visualizing local alignments, without requiring any post-processing operations. GO terms can be easily attached to the aligned proteins for further functional analysis of alignments. GASOLINE can perform the alignment task in few minutes, even for a large number of input networks.

  15. Two classes of bipartite networks: nested biological and social systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Enrique; Ceva, Horacio; Hernández, Laura; Perazzo, R P J; Devoto, Mariano; Medan, Diego

    2008-10-01

    Bipartite graphs have received some attention in the study of social networks and of biological mutualistic systems. A generalization of a previous model is presented, that evolves the topology of the graph in order to optimally account for a given contact preference rule between the two guilds of the network. As a result, social and biological graphs are classified as belonging to two clearly different classes. Projected graphs, linking the agents of only one guild, are obtained from the original bipartite graph. The corresponding evolution of its statistical properties is also studied. An example of a biological mutualistic network is analyzed in detail, and it is found that the model provides a very good fitting of all the main statistical features. The model also provides a proper qualitative description of the same features observed in social webs, suggesting the possible reasons underlying the difference in the organization of these two kinds of bipartite networks.

  16. Networks in biological systems: An investigation of the Gene Ontology as an evolving network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronnello, C; Tumminello, M; Micciche, S; Mantegna, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Many biological systems can be described as networks where different elements interact, in order to perform biological processes. We introduce a network associated with the Gene Ontology. Specifically, we construct a correlation-based network where the vertices are the terms of the Gene Ontology and the link between each two terms is weighted on the basis of the number of genes that they have in common. We analyze a filtered network obtained from the correlation-based network and we characterize its evolution over different releases of the Gene Ontology.

  17. Biological Network Inference and analysis using SEBINI and CABIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Ronald; Singhal, Mudita

    2009-01-01

    Attaining a detailed understanding of the various biological networks in an organism lies at the core of the emerging discipline of systems biology. A precise description of the relationships formed between genes, mRNA molecules, and proteins is a necessary step toward a complete description of the dynamic behavior of an organism at the cellular level, and toward intelligent, efficient, and directed modification of an organism. The importance of understanding such regulatory, signaling, and interaction networks has fueled the development of numerous in silico inference algorithms, as well as new experimental techniques and a growing collection of public databases. The Software Environment for BIological Network Inference (SEBINI) has been created to provide an interactive environment for the deployment, evaluation, and improvement of algorithms used to reconstruct the structure of biological regulatory and interaction networks. SEBINI can be used to analyze high-throughput gene expression, protein abundance, or protein activation data via a suite of state-of-the-art network inference algorithms. It also allows algorithm developers to compare and train network inference methods on artificial networks and simulated gene expression perturbation data. SEBINI can therefore be used by software developers wishing to evaluate, refine, or combine inference techniques, as well as by bioinformaticians analyzing experimental data. Networks inferred from the SEBINI software platform can be further analyzed using the Collective Analysis of Biological Interaction Networks (CABIN) tool, which is an exploratory data analysis software that enables integration and analysis of protein-protein interaction and gene-to-gene regulatory evidence obtained from multiple sources. The collection of edges in a public database, along with the confidence held in each edge (if available), can be fed into CABIN as one "evidence network," using the Cytoscape SIF file format. Using CABIN, one may

  18. Biological impacts and context of network theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaas, E

    2007-01-05

    Many complex systems can be represented and analyzed as networks, and examples that have benefited from this approach span the natural sciences. For instance, we now know that systems as disparate as the World-Wide Web, the Internet, scientific collaborations, food webs, protein interactions and metabolism all have common features in their organization, the most salient of which are their scale-free connectivity distributions and their small-world behavior. The recent availability of large scale datasets that span the proteome or metabolome of an organism have made it possible to elucidate some of the organizational principles and rules that govern their function, robustness and evolution. We expect that combining the currently separate layers of information from gene regulatory-, signal transduction-, protein interaction- and metabolic networks will dramatically enhance our understanding of cellular function and dynamics.

  19. Using biological networks to improve our understanding of infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J. Mulder

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Infectious diseases are the leading cause of death, particularly in developing countries. Although many drugs are available for treating the most common infectious diseases, in many cases the mechanism of action of these drugs or even their targets in the pathogen remain unknown. In addition, the key factors or processes in pathogens that facilitate infection and disease progression are often not well understood. Since proteins do not work in isolation, understanding biological systems requires a better understanding of the interconnectivity between proteins in different pathways and processes, which includes both physical and other functional interactions. Such biological networks can be generated within organisms or between organisms sharing a common environment using experimental data and computational predictions. Though different data sources provide different levels of accuracy, confidence in interactions can be measured using interaction scores. Connections between interacting proteins in biological networks can be represented as graphs and edges, and thus studied using existing algorithms and tools from graph theory. There are many different applications of biological networks, and here we discuss three such applications, specifically applied to the infectious disease tuberculosis, with its causative agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host, Homo sapiens. The applications include the use of the networks for function prediction, comparison of networks for evolutionary studies, and the generation and use of host–pathogen interaction networks.

  20. A Novel Joint Power and Feedback Bit Allocation Interference Alignment Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibao Li

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available It is necessary to improve the energy efficiency of batteries in wireless sensor networks (WSNs. The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO technique has become an important means to ameliorate WSNs, and interference management is the core of improving energy efficiency. A promising approach is interference alignment (IA, which effectively reduces the interference and improves the throughput of a system in the MIMO interference channels. However, the IA scheme requires perfect channel state information (CSI at all transceivers in practice, which results in considerable feedback overhead. Thus, limited IA feedback has attracted much attention. In this paper, we analyze the throughput loss of the K-user MIMO interference channels when each transmitter delivers multiple streams in one slot, and derives the upper-bound of the system interference leakage and throughput loss. Then, to reduce the interference leakage and throughput loss for the MIMO interference alignment with limited feedback, a joint power and feedback bit allocation optimization scheme is proposed. The simulation results show that, compared with the conventional schemes, the presented optimal scheme achieves less residual interference and better performance in the system throughput.

  1. A Novel Joint Power and Feedback Bit Allocation Interference Alignment Scheme for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shibao; He, Chang; Wang, Yixin; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Jianhang; Huang, Tingpei

    2017-03-10

    It is necessary to improve the energy efficiency of batteries in wireless sensor networks (WSNs). The multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) technique has become an important means to ameliorate WSNs, and interference management is the core of improving energy efficiency. A promising approach is interference alignment (IA), which effectively reduces the interference and improves the throughput of a system in the MIMO interference channels. However, the IA scheme requires perfect channel state information (CSI) at all transceivers in practice, which results in considerable feedback overhead. Thus, limited IA feedback has attracted much attention. In this paper, we analyze the throughput loss of the K-user MIMO interference channels when each transmitter delivers multiple streams in one slot, and derives the upper-bound of the system interference leakage and throughput loss. Then, to reduce the interference leakage and throughput loss for the MIMO interference alignment with limited feedback, a joint power and feedback bit allocation optimization scheme is proposed. The simulation results show that, compared with the conventional schemes, the presented optimal scheme achieves less residual interference and better performance in the system throughput.

  2. Applying differential dynamic logic to reconfigurable biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Daniel; Martins, Manuel A; Chaves, Madalena

    2017-09-01

    Qualitative and quantitative modeling frameworks are widely used for analysis of biological regulatory networks, the former giving a preliminary overview of the system's global dynamics and the latter providing more detailed solutions. Another approach is to model biological regulatory networks as hybrid systems, i.e., systems which can display both continuous and discrete dynamic behaviors. Actually, the development of synthetic biology has shown that this is a suitable way to think about biological systems, which can often be constructed as networks with discrete controllers, and present hybrid behaviors. In this paper we discuss this approach as a special case of the reconfigurability paradigm, well studied in Computer Science (CS). In CS there are well developed computational tools to reason about hybrid systems. We argue that it is worth applying such tools in a biological context. One interesting tool is differential dynamic logic (dL), which has recently been developed by Platzer and applied to many case-studies. In this paper we discuss some simple examples of biological regulatory networks to illustrate how dL can be used as an alternative, or also as a complement to methods already used. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Min-Max MSE-based Interference Alignment for Transceiver Designs in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Kha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with an optimal design of the precoders and receive filters for cognitive radio (CR networks in which multiple secondary users (SUs share the same frequency band with multiple primary users (PUs. To cope with interference and to achieve fairness among users, we develop an interference alignment (IA scheme by minimizing the maximum mean squared error (Min-Max MSE of the received signals. Since the Min-Max MSE design problems are nonconvex in the design matrix variables of the precoders and receive filters, we develop an alternating optimization algorithm with provable convergence to iteratively find the optimal solutions. In each iteration, the precoder design problems can be recast as second order cone program (SOCP while the optimal receive filters can be derived in closed-form solutions. Finally, numerical results are provided to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method as compared to previous work in terms of the information rate and bit error rate.

  4. In-drilling alignment scheme for borehole assembly trajectory tracking over a wireless ad hoc network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odei-Lartey, E.; Hartmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the feasibility and implementation of an In-drilling alignment method for an inertia navigation system based measurement while drilling system as applied to the vertical drilling process, where there is seldom direct access to a reference measurement due the communication network architecture and telemetry framework constraints. It involves the sequential measurement update of multiple nodes by the propagation of the reference measurement sequentially over nodes, each of which has an integrated inertia measurement unit sensor and runs the extended Kalman filter based signal processing unit, until the final measurement update of the main sensor node embedded in the borehole assembly is done. This is done particularly to keep track of the yaw angle position during the drilling process.

  5. Non-Hermitian localization in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel; Hatano, Naomichi; Nelson, David R

    2016-04-01

    We explore the spectra and localization properties of the N-site banded one-dimensional non-Hermitian random matrices that arise naturally in sparse neural networks. Approximately equal numbers of random excitatory and inhibitory connections lead to spatially localized eigenfunctions and an intricate eigenvalue spectrum in the complex plane that controls the spontaneous activity and induced response. A finite fraction of the eigenvalues condense onto the real or imaginary axes. For large N, the spectrum has remarkable symmetries not only with respect to reflections across the real and imaginary axes but also with respect to 90^{∘} rotations, with an unusual anisotropic divergence in the localization length near the origin. When chains with periodic boundary conditions become directed, with a systematic directional bias superimposed on the randomness, a hole centered on the origin opens up in the density-of-states in the complex plane. All states are extended on the rim of this hole, while the localized eigenvalues outside the hole are unchanged. The bias-dependent shape of this hole tracks the bias-independent contours of constant localization length. We treat the large-N limit by a combination of direct numerical diagonalization and using transfer matrices, an approach that allows us to exploit an electrostatic analogy connecting the "charges" embodied in the eigenvalue distribution with the contours of constant localization length. We show that similar results are obtained for more realistic neural networks that obey "Dale's law" (each site is purely excitatory or inhibitory) and conclude with perturbation theory results that describe the limit of large directional bias, when all states are extended. Related problems arise in random ecological networks and in chains of artificial cells with randomly coupled gene expression patterns.

  6. Emergence of communication in socio-biological networks

    CERN Document Server

    Berea, Anamaria

    2018-01-01

    This book integrates current advances in biology, economics of information and linguistics research through applications using agent-based modeling and social network analysis to develop scenarios of communication and language emergence in the social aspects of biological communications. The book presents a model of communication emergence that can be applied both to human and non-human living organism networks. The model is based on economic concepts and individual behavior fundamental for the study of trust and reputation networks in social science, particularly in economics; it is also based on the theory of the emergence of norms and historical path dependence that has been influential in institutional economics. Also included are mathematical models and code for agent-based models to explore various scenarios of language evolution, as well as a computer application that explores language and communication in biological versus social organisms, and the emergence of various meanings and grammars in human ...

  7. Engineering survey planning for the alignment of a particle accelerator: part II. Design of a reference network and measurement strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira Leão, Rodrigo; Raffaelo Baldo, Crhistian; Collucci da Costa Reis, Maria Luisa; Alves Trabanco, Jorge Luiz

    2018-03-01

    The building blocks of particle accelerators are magnets responsible for keeping beams of charged particles at a desired trajectory. Magnets are commonly grouped in support structures named girders, which are mounted on vertical and horizontal stages. The performance of this type of machine is highly dependent on the relative alignment between its main components. The length of particle accelerators ranges from small machines to large-scale national or international facilities, with typical lengths of hundreds of meters to a few kilometers. This relatively large volume together with micrometric positioning tolerances make the alignment activity a classical large-scale dimensional metrology problem. The alignment concept relies on networks of fixed monuments installed on the building structure to which all accelerator components are referred. In this work, the Sirius accelerator is taken as a case study, and an alignment network is optimized via computational methods in terms of geometry, densification, and surveying procedure. Laser trackers are employed to guide the installation and measure the girders’ positions, using the optimized network as a reference and applying the metric developed in part I of this paper. Simulations demonstrate the feasibility of aligning the 220 girders of the Sirius synchrotron to better than 0.080 mm, at a coverage probability of 95%.

  8. Directional Freezing of Nanocellulose Dispersions Aligns the Rod-Like Particles and Produces Low-Density and Robust Particle Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munier, Pierre; Gordeyeva, Korneliya; Bergström, Lennart; Fall, Andreas B

    2016-05-09

    We show that unidirectional freezing of nanocellulose dispersions produces cellular foams with high alignment of the rod-like nanoparticles in the freezing direction. Quantification of the alignment in the long direction of the tubular pores with X-ray diffraction shows high orientation of cellulose nanofibrils (CNF) and cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) at particle concentrations above 0.2 wt % (CNC) and 0.08 wt % (CNF). Aggregation of CNF by pH decrease or addition of salt significantly reduces the particle orientation; in contrast, exceeding the concentration where particles gel by mobility constraints had a relatively small effect on the orientation. The dense nanocellulose network formed by directional freezing was sufficiently strong to resist melting. The formed hydrogels were birefringent and displayed anisotropic laser diffraction patterns, suggesting preserved nanocellulose alignment and cellular structure. Nondirectional freezing of the hydrogels followed by sublimation generates foams with a pore structure and nanocellulose alignment resembling the structure of the initial directional freezing.

  9. Neural network models: from biology to many - body phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Theoretical work in neural networks has a strange feel for most physicists. In some cases the aspect of design becomes paramount. More comfortable ground at least for many body theorists may be found in realistic biological simulation, although the complexity of most problems is so awesome that incisive results will be hard won. It has also shown the impressive capabilities of artificial networks in pattern recognition and classification may be exploited to solve management problems in experimental physics and for discovery of radically new theoretical description of physical systems. This advance represents an important step towards the ultimate goal of neuro biological paradigm. (A.B.)

  10. Ising models of strongly coupled biological networks with multivariate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan, Lina; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-03-01

    Biological networks consist of a large number of variables that can be coupled by complex multivariate interactions. However, several neuroscience and cell biology experiments have reported that observed statistics of network states can be approximated surprisingly well by maximum entropy models that constrain correlations only within pairs of variables. We would like to verify if this reduction in complexity results from intricacies of biological organization, or if it is a more general attribute of these networks. We generate random networks with p-spin (p > 2) interactions, with N spins and M interaction terms. The probability distribution of the network states is then calculated and approximated with a maximum entropy model based on constraining pairwise spin correlations. Depending on the M/N ratio and the strength of the interaction terms, we observe a transition where the pairwise approximation is very good to a region where it fails. This resembles the sat-unsat transition in constraint satisfaction problems. We argue that the pairwise model works when the number of highly probable states is small. We argue that many biological systems must operate in a strongly constrained regime, and hence we expect the pairwise approximation to be accurate for a wide class of problems. This research has been partially supported by the James S McDonnell Foundation grant No.220020321.

  11. Transplantable living scaffolds comprised of micro-tissue engineered aligned astrocyte networks to facilitate central nervous system regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Carla C.; Katiyar, Kritika S.; Hernandez, Nicole S.; Song, Yeri J.; Struzyna, Laura A.; Harris, James P.; Cullen, D. Kacy

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease may result in widespread loss of neural cells as well as the complex interconnectivity necessary for proper central nervous system function, generally resulting in permanent functional deficits. Potential regenerative strategies involve the recruitment of endogenous neural stem cells and/or directed axonal regeneration through the use of tissue engineered “living scaffolds” built to mimic features of three-dimensional (3-D) in vivo migratory or guidance pathways. Accordingly, we devised a novel biomaterial encasement scheme using tubular hydrogel-collagen micro-columns that facilitated the self-assembly of seeded astrocytes into 3-D living scaffolds consisting of long, cable-like aligned astrocytic networks. Here, robust astrocyte alignment was achieved within a micro-column inner diameter (ID) of 180 μm or 300–350 μm but not 1.0 mm, suggesting that radius of curvature dictated the extent of alignment. Moreover, within small ID micro-columns, >70% of the astrocytes assumed a bi-polar morphology, versus ~10% in larger micro-columns or planar surfaces. Cell–cell interactions also influenced the aligned architecture, as extensive astrocyte-collagen contraction was achieved at high (9–12 × 105 cells/mL) but not lower (2–6 × 105 cells/mL) seeding densities. This high density micro-column seeding led to the formation of ultra-dense 3-D “bundles” of aligned bi-polar astrocytes within collagen measuring up to 150 μm in diameter yet extending to a remarkable length of over 2.5 cm. Importantly, co-seeded neurons extended neurites directly along the aligned astrocytic bundles, demonstrating permissive cues for neurite extension. These transplantable cable-like astrocytic networks structurally mimic the glial tube that guides neuronal progenitor migration in vivo along the rostral migratory stream, and therefore may be useful to guide progenitor cells to repopulate sites of widespread neurodegeneration

  12. Mechanical property and biological performance of electrospun silk fibroin-polycaprolactone scaffolds with aligned fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Shi, Hongfei; Qiu, Xushen; Chen, Yixin

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and sterilizability of silk fibroin allow it to be a possible candidate as a natural bone regenerate material. To improve mechanical character and reinforce the cell movement induction, silk fibroin (SF)-polycaprolactone (PCL) alloy was fabricated by electrospinning techniques with a rotating collector to form aligned fibrous scaffolds and random-oriented scaffolds. The scanning electron microscope image of the scaffold and the mechanical properties of the scaffold were investigated by tensile mechanical tests, which were compared to random-oriented scaffolds. Furthermore, mesenchymal stem cells were planted on these scaffolds to investigate the biocompatibility, elongation, and cell movement in situ. Scanning electron microscopy shows that 91% fibers on the aligned fibroin scaffold were distributed between the dominant direction ±10°. With an ideal support for stem cell proliferation in vitro, the aligned fibrous scaffold induces cell elongation at a length of 236.46 ± 82 μm and distribution along the dominant fiber direction with a cell alignment angle at 6.57° ± 4.45°. Compared with random-oriented scaffolds made by artificial materials, aligned SF-PCL scaffolds could provide a moderate mesenchymal stem cell engraftment interface and speed up early stage cell movement toward the bone defect.

  13. Decentralized control of ecological and biological networks through Evolutionary Network Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Network Control (ENC has been recently introduced to allow the control of any kind of ecological and biological networks, with an arbitrary number of nodes and links, acting from inside and/or outside. To date, ENC has been applied using a centralized approach where an arbitrary number of network nodes and links could be tamed. This approach has shown to be effective in the control of ecological and biological networks. However a decentralized control, where only one node and the correspondent input/output links are controlled, could be more economic from a computational viewpoint, in particular when the network is very large (i.e. big data. In this view, ENC is upgraded here to realize the decentralized control of ecological and biological nets.

  14. Evolution of biological sequences implies an extreme value distribution of type I for both global and local pairwise alignment scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maréchal Eric

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Confidence in pairwise alignments of biological sequences, obtained by various methods such as Blast or Smith-Waterman, is critical for automatic analyses of genomic data. Two statistical models have been proposed. In the asymptotic limit of long sequences, the Karlin-Altschul model is based on the computation of a P-value, assuming that the number of high scoring matching regions above a threshold is Poisson distributed. Alternatively, the Lipman-Pearson model is based on the computation of a Z-value from a random score distribution obtained by a Monte-Carlo simulation. Z-values allow the deduction of an upper bound of the P-value (1/Z-value2 following the TULIP theorem. Simulations of Z-value distribution is known to fit with a Gumbel law. This remarkable property was not demonstrated and had no obvious biological support. Results We built a model of evolution of sequences based on aging, as meant in Reliability Theory, using the fact that the amount of information shared between an initial sequence and the sequences in its lineage (i.e., mutual information in Information Theory is a decreasing function of time. This quantity is simply measured by a sequence alignment score. In systems aging, the failure rate is related to the systems longevity. The system can be a machine with structured components, or a living entity or population. "Reliability" refers to the ability to operate properly according to a standard. Here, the "reliability" of a sequence refers to the ability to conserve a sufficient functional level at the folded and maturated protein level (positive selection pressure. Homologous sequences were considered as systems 1 having a high redundancy of information reflected by the magnitude of their alignment scores, 2 which components are the amino acids that can independently be damaged by random DNA mutations. From these assumptions, we deduced that information shared at each amino acid position evolved with a

  15. Uncovering Biological Network Function via Graphlet Degree Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Pržulj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivation: Proteins are essential macromolecules of life and thus understanding their function is of great importance. The number of functionally unclassified proteins is large even for simple and well studied organisms such as baker’s yeast. Methods for determining protein function have shifted their focus from targeting specific proteins based solely on sequence homology to analyses of the entire proteome based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Since proteins interact to perform a certain function, analyzing structural properties of PPI networks may provide useful clues about the biological function of individual proteins, protein complexes they participate in, and even larger subcellular machines.Results: We design a sensitive graph theoretic method for comparing local structures of node neighborhoods that demonstrates that in PPI networks, biological function of a node and its local network structure are closely related. The method summarizes a protein’s local topology in a PPI network into the vector of graphlet degrees called the signature of the protein and computes the signature similarities between all protein pairs. We group topologically similar proteins under this measure in a PPI network and show that these protein groups belong to the same protein complexes, perform the same biological functions, are localized in the same subcellular compartments, and have the same tissue expressions. Moreover, we apply our technique on a proteome-scale network data and infer biological function of yet unclassified proteins demonstrating that our method can provide valuable guidelines for future experimental research such as disease protein prediction.Availability: Data is available upon request.

  16. The effect of network biology on drug toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gautier, Laurent; Taboureau, Olivier; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The high failure rate of drug candidates due to toxicity, during clinical trials, is a critical issue in drug discovery. Network biology has become a promising approach, in this regard, using the increasingly large amount of biological and chemical data available and combining...... biology has the opportunity to contribute to a better understanding of a drug's safety profile. The authors believe that considering a drug action and protein's function in a global physiological environment may benefit our understanding of the impact some chemicals have on human health and toxicity...

  17. Yeast systems biology to unravel the network of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustacchi, Roberta; Hohmann, S; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Systems biology focuses on obtaining a quantitative description of complete biological systems, even complete cellular function. In this way, it will be possible to perform computer-guided design of novel drugs, advanced therapies for treatment of complex diseases, and to perform in silico design....... Furthermore, it serves as an industrial workhorse for production of a wide range of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Systems biology involves the combination of novel experimental techniques from different disciplines as well as functional genomics, bioinformatics and mathematical modelling, and hence no single...... laboratory has access to all the necessary competences. For this reason the Yeast Systems Biology Network (YSBN) has been established. YSBN will coordinate research efforts, in yeast systems biology and, through the recently obtained EU funding for a Coordination Action, it will be possible to set...

  18. The impact of network biology in pharmacology and toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Taboureau, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    With the need to investigate alternative approaches and emerging technologies in order to increase drug efficacy and reduce adverse drug effects, network biology offers a novel way of approaching drug discovery by considering the effect of a molecule and protein's function in a global physiologic...

  19. Autocatalytic, bistable, oscillatory networks of biologically relevant organic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Sergey N.; Kraft, Lewis J.; Ainla, Alar; Zhao, Mengxia; Baghbanzadeh, Mostafa; Campbell, Victoria E.; Kang, Kyungtae; Fox, Jerome M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2016-09-01

    Networks of organic chemical reactions are important in life and probably played a central part in its origin. Network dynamics regulate cell division, circadian rhythms, nerve impulses and chemotaxis, and guide the development of organisms. Although out-of-equilibrium networks of chemical reactions have the potential to display emergent network dynamics such as spontaneous pattern formation, bistability and periodic oscillations, the principles that enable networks of organic reactions to develop complex behaviours are incompletely understood. Here we describe a network of biologically relevant organic reactions (amide formation, thiolate-thioester exchange, thiolate-disulfide interchange and conjugate addition) that displays bistability and oscillations in the concentrations of organic thiols and amides. Oscillations arise from the interaction between three subcomponents of the network: an autocatalytic cycle that generates thiols and amides from thioesters and dialkyl disulfides; a trigger that controls autocatalytic growth; and inhibitory processes that remove activating thiol species that are produced during the autocatalytic cycle. In contrast to previous studies that have demonstrated oscillations and bistability using highly evolved biomolecules (enzymes and DNA) or inorganic molecules of questionable biochemical relevance (for example, those used in Belousov-Zhabotinskii-type reactions), the organic molecules we use are relevant to metabolism and similar to those that might have existed on the early Earth. By using small organic molecules to build a network of organic reactions with autocatalytic, bistable and oscillatory behaviour, we identify principles that explain the ways in which dynamic networks relevant to life could have developed. Modifications of this network will clarify the influence of molecular structure on the dynamics of reaction networks, and may enable the design of biomimetic networks and of synthetic self-regulating and evolving

  20. [Application of network biology on study of traditional Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Sai-Sai; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2018-01-01

    With the completion of the human genome project, people have gradually recognized that the functions of the biological system are fulfilled through network-type interaction between genes, proteins and small molecules, while complex diseases are caused by the imbalance of biological processes due to a number of gene expression disorders. These have contributed to the rise of the concept of the "multi-target" drug discovery. Treatment and diagnosis of traditional Chinese medicine are based on holism and syndrome differentiation. At the molecular level, traditional Chinese medicine is characterized by multi-component and multi-target prescriptions, which is expected to provide a reference for the development of multi-target drugs. This paper reviews the application of network biology in traditional Chinese medicine in six aspects, in expectation to provide a reference to the modernized study of traditional Chinese medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  1. Integrative network biology: graph prototyping for co-expression cancer networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl G Kugler

    Full Text Available Network-based analysis has been proven useful in biologically-oriented areas, e.g., to explore the dynamics and complexity of biological networks. Investigating a set of networks allows deriving general knowledge about the underlying topological and functional properties. The integrative analysis of networks typically combines networks from different studies that investigate the same or similar research questions. In order to perform an integrative analysis it is often necessary to compare the properties of matching edges across the data set. This identification of common edges is often burdensome and computational intensive. Here, we present an approach that is different from inferring a new network based on common features. Instead, we select one network as a graph prototype, which then represents a set of comparable network objects, as it has the least average distance to all other networks in the same set. We demonstrate the usefulness of the graph prototyping approach on a set of prostate cancer networks and a set of corresponding benign networks. We further show that the distances within the cancer group and the benign group are statistically different depending on the utilized distance measure.

  2. Dissecting the Molecular Mechanisms of Neurodegenerative Diseases through Network Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose A. Santiago

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are rarely caused by a mutation in a single gene but rather influenced by a combination of genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. Emerging high-throughput technologies such as RNA sequencing have been instrumental in deciphering the molecular landscape of neurodegenerative diseases, however, the interpretation of such large amounts of data remains a challenge. Network biology has become a powerful platform to integrate multiple omics data to comprehensively explore the molecular networks in the context of health and disease. In this review article, we highlight recent advances in network biology approaches with an emphasis in brain-networks that have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms leading to the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s (AD, Parkinson’s (PD and Huntington’s diseases (HD. We discuss how integrative approaches using multi-omics data from different tissues have been valuable for identifying biomarkers and therapeutic targets. In addition, we discuss the challenges the field of network medicine faces toward the translation of network-based findings into clinically actionable tools for personalized medicine applications.

  3. Harnessing systems biology approaches to engineer functional microvascular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sefcik, Lauren S; Wilson, Jennifer L; Papin, Jason A; Botchwey, Edward A

    2010-06-01

    Microvascular remodeling is a complex process that includes many cell types and molecular signals. Despite a continued growth in the understanding of signaling pathways involved in the formation and maturation of new blood vessels, approximately half of all compounds entering clinical trials will fail, resulting in the loss of much time, money, and resources. Most pro-angiogenic clinical trials to date have focused on increasing neovascularization via the delivery of a single growth factor or gene. Alternatively, a focus on the concerted regulation of whole networks of genes may lead to greater insight into the underlying physiology since the coordinated response is greater than the sum of its parts. Systems biology offers a comprehensive network view of the processes of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis that might enable the prediction of drug targets and whether or not activation of the targets elicits the desired outcome. Systems biology integrates complex biological data from a variety of experimental sources (-omics) and analyzes how the interactions of the system components can give rise to the function and behavior of that system. This review focuses on how systems biology approaches have been applied to microvascular growth and remodeling, and how network analysis tools can be utilized to aid novel pro-angiogenic drug discovery.

  4. Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer for MIMO Interference Channel Networks Based on Interference Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anming Dong

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers power splitting (PS-based simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT for multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO interference channel networks where multiple transceiver pairs share the same frequency spectrum. As the PS model is adopted, an individual receiver splits the received signal into two parts for information decoding (ID and energy harvesting (EH, respectively. Aiming to minimize the total transmit power, transmit precoders, receive filters and PS ratios are jointly designed under a predefined signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR and EH constraints. The formulated joint transceiver design and power splitting problem is non-convex and thus difficult to solve directly. In order to effectively obtain its solution, the feasibility conditions of the formulated non-convex problem are first analyzed. Based on the analysis, an iterative algorithm is proposed by alternatively optimizing the transmitters together with the power splitting factors and the receivers based on semidefinite programming (SDP relaxation. Moreover, considering the prohibitive computational cost of the SDP for practical applications, a low-complexity suboptimal scheme is proposed by separately designing interference-suppressing transceivers based on interference alignment (IA and optimizing the transmit power allocation together with splitting factors. The transmit power allocation and receive power splitting problem is then recast as a convex optimization problem and solved efficiently. To further reduce the computational complexity, a low-complexity scheme is proposed by calculating the transmit power allocation and receive PS ratios in closed-form. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed schemes in achieving SWIPT for MIMO interference channel (IC networks.

  5. A Rapid Convergent Low Complexity Interference Alignment Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lihui; Wu, Zhilu; Ren, Guanghui; Wang, Gangyi; Zhao, Nan

    2015-07-29

    Interference alignment (IA) is a novel technique that can effectively eliminate the interference and approach the sum capacity of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high, by casting the desired signal and interference into different signal subspaces. The traditional alternating minimization interference leakage (AMIL) algorithm for IA shows good performance in high SNR regimes, however, the complexity of the AMIL algorithm increases dramatically as the number of users and antennas increases, posing limits to its applications in the practical systems. In this paper, a novel IA algorithm, called directional quartic optimal (DQO) algorithm, is proposed to minimize the interference leakage with rapid convergence and low complexity. The properties of the AMIL algorithm are investigated, and it is discovered that the difference between the two consecutive iteration results of the AMIL algorithm will approximately point to the convergence solution when the precoding and decoding matrices obtained from the intermediate iterations are sufficiently close to their convergence values. Based on this important property, the proposed DQO algorithm employs the line search procedure so that it can converge to the destination directly. In addition, the optimal step size can be determined analytically by optimizing a quartic function. Numerical results show that the proposed DQO algorithm can suppress the interference leakage more rapidly than the traditional AMIL algorithm, and can achieve the same level of sum rate as that of AMIL algorithm with far less iterations and execution time.

  6. A Rapid Convergent Low Complexity Interference Alignment Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Interference alignment (IA is a novel technique that can effectively eliminate the interference and approach the sum capacity of wireless sensor networks (WSNs when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR is high, by casting the desired signal and interference into different signal subspaces. The traditional alternating minimization interference leakage (AMIL algorithm for IA shows good performance in high SNR regimes, however, the complexity of the AMIL algorithm increases dramatically as the number of users and antennas increases, posing limits to its applications in the practical systems. In this paper, a novel IA algorithm, called directional quartic optimal (DQO algorithm, is proposed to minimize the interference leakage with rapid convergence and low complexity. The properties of the AMIL algorithm are investigated, and it is discovered that the difference between the two consecutive iteration results of the AMIL algorithm will approximately point to the convergence solution when the precoding and decoding matrices obtained from the intermediate iterations are sufficiently close to their convergence values. Based on this important property, the proposed DQO algorithm employs the line search procedure so that it can converge to the destination directly. In addition, the optimal step size can be determined analytically by optimizing a quartic function. Numerical results show that the proposed DQO algorithm can suppress the interference leakage more rapidly than the traditional AMIL algorithm, and can achieve the same level of sum rate as that of AMIL algorithm with far less iterations and execution time.

  7. Adaptation, Growth, and Resilience in Biological Distribution Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    Highly optimized complex transport networks serve crucial functions in many man-made and natural systems such as power grids and plant or animal vasculature. Often, the relevant optimization functional is nonconvex and characterized by many local extrema. In general, finding the global, or nearly global optimum is difficult. In biological systems, it is believed that such an optimal state is slowly achieved through natural selection. However, general coarse grained models for flow networks with local positive feedback rules for the vessel conductivity typically get trapped in low efficiency, local minima. We show how the growth of the underlying tissue, coupled to the dynamical equations for network development, can drive the system to a dramatically improved optimal state. This general model provides a surprisingly simple explanation for the appearance of highly optimized transport networks in biology such as plant and animal vasculature. In addition, we show how the incorporation of spatially collective fluctuating sources yields a minimal model of realistic reticulation in distribution networks and thus resilience against damage.

  8. Integrated Network Analysis and Effective Tools in Plant Systems Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eFukushima

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the ultimate goals in plant systems biology is to elucidate the genotype-phenotype relationship in plant cellular systems. Integrated network analysis that combines omics data with mathematical models has received particular attention. Here we focus on the latest cutting-edge computational advances that facilitate their combination. We highlight (1 network visualization tools, (2 pathway analyses, (3 genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, and (4 the integration of high-throughput experimental data and mathematical models. Multi-omics data that contain the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome and mathematical models are expected to integrate and expand our knowledge of complex plant metabolisms.

  9. Cyclic mechanical stretch contributes to network development of osteocyte-like cells with morphological change and autophagy promotion but without preferential cell alignment in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Nao; Kuroshima, Shinichiro; Uto, Yusuke; Sasaki, Muneteru; Sawase, Takashi

    2017-09-01

    Osteocytes play important roles in controlling bone quality as well as preferential alignment of biological apatite c -axis/collagen fibers. However, the relationship between osteocytes and mechanical stress remains unclear due to the difficulty of three-dimensional (3D) culture of osteocytes in vitro . The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch on 3D-cultured osteocyte-like cells. Osteocyte-like cells were established using rat calvarial osteoblasts cultured in a 3D culture system. Cyclic mechanical stretch (8% amplitude at a rate of 2 cycles min -1 ) was applied for 24, 48 and 96 consecutive hours. Morphology, cell number and preferential cell alignment were evaluated. Apoptosis- and autophagy-related gene expression levels were measured using quantitative PCR. 3D-cultured osteoblasts became osteocyte-like cells that expressed osteocyte-specific genes such as Dmp1 , Cx43 , Sost , Fgf23 and RANKL , with morphological changes similar to osteocytes. Cell number was significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner under non-loaded conditions, whereas cyclic mechanical stretch significantly prevented decreased cell numbers with increased expression of anti-apoptosis-related genes. Moreover, cyclic mechanical stretch significantly decreased cell size and ellipticity with increased expression of autophagy-related genes, LC3b and atg7 . Interestingly, preferential cell alignment did not occur, irrespective of mechanical stretch. These findings suggest that an anti-apoptotic effect contributes to network development of osteocyte-like cells under loaded condition. Spherical change of osteocyte-like cells induced by mechanical stretch may be associated with autophagy upregulation. Preferential alignment of osteocytes induced by mechanical load in vivo may be partially predetermined before osteoblasts differentiate into osteocytes and embed into bone matrix.

  10. Analysis of complex networks from biology to linguistics

    CERN Document Server

    Dehmer, Matthias

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical problems such as graph theory problems are of increasing importance for the analysis of modelling data in biomedical research such as in systems biology, neuronal network modelling etc. This book follows a new approach of including graph theory from a mathematical perspective with specific applications of graph theory in biomedical and computational sciences. The book is written by renowned experts in the field and offers valuable background information for a wide audience.

  11. Impact of heuristics in clustering large biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafin, Md Kishwar; Kabir, Kazi Lutful; Ridwan, Iffatur; Anannya, Tasmiah Tamzid; Karim, Rashid Saadman; Hoque, Mohammad Mozammel; Rahman, M Sohel

    2015-12-01

    Traditional clustering algorithms often exhibit poor performance for large networks. On the contrary, greedy algorithms are found to be relatively efficient while uncovering functional modules from large biological networks. The quality of the clusters produced by these greedy techniques largely depends on the underlying heuristics employed. Different heuristics based on different attributes and properties perform differently in terms of the quality of the clusters produced. This motivates us to design new heuristics for clustering large networks. In this paper, we have proposed two new heuristics and analyzed the performance thereof after incorporating those with three different combinations in a recently celebrated greedy clustering algorithm named SPICi. We have extensively analyzed the effectiveness of these new variants. The results are found to be promising. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predicting genetic interactions with random walks on biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Ambuj K

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have demonstrated that synthetic lethal genetic interactions between gene mutations provide an indication of functional redundancy between molecular complexes and pathways. These observations help explain the finding that organisms are able to tolerate single gene deletions for a large majority of genes. For example, system-wide gene knockout/knockdown studies in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans revealed non-viable phenotypes for a mere 18% and 10% of the genome, respectively. It has been postulated that the low percentage of essential genes reflects the extensive amount of genetic buffering that occurs within genomes. Consistent with this hypothesis, systematic double-knockout screens in S. cerevisiae and C. elegans show that, on average, 0.5% of tested gene pairs are synthetic sick or synthetic lethal. While knowledge of synthetic lethal interactions provides valuable insight into molecular functionality, testing all combinations of gene pairs represents a daunting task for molecular biologists, as the combinatorial nature of these relationships imposes a large experimental burden. Still, the task of mapping pairwise interactions between genes is essential to discovering functional relationships between molecular complexes and pathways, as they form the basis of genetic robustness. Towards the goal of alleviating the experimental workload, computational techniques that accurately predict genetic interactions can potentially aid in targeting the most likely candidate interactions. Building on previous studies that analyzed properties of network topology to predict genetic interactions, we apply random walks on biological networks to accurately predict pairwise genetic interactions. Furthermore, we incorporate all published non-interactions into our algorithm for measuring the topological relatedness between two genes. We apply our method to S. cerevisiae and C. elegans datasets and, using a decision tree

  13. Windows .NET Network Distributed Basic Local Alignment Search Toolkit (W.ND-BLAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Melvin J

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background BLAST is one of the most common and useful tools for Genetic Research. This paper describes a software application we have termed Windows .NET Distributed Basic Local Alignment Search Toolkit (W.ND-BLAST, which enhances the BLAST utility by improving usability, fault recovery, and scalability in a Windows desktop environment. Our goal was to develop an easy to use, fault tolerant, high-throughput BLAST solution that incorporates a comprehensive BLAST result viewer with curation and annotation functionality. Results W.ND-BLAST is a comprehensive Windows-based software toolkit that targets researchers, including those with minimal computer skills, and provides the ability increase the performance of BLAST by distributing BLAST queries to any number of Windows based machines across local area networks (LAN. W.ND-BLAST provides intuitive Graphic User Interfaces (GUI for BLAST database creation, BLAST execution, BLAST output evaluation and BLAST result exportation. This software also provides several layers of fault tolerance and fault recovery to prevent loss of data if nodes or master machines fail. This paper lays out the functionality of W.ND-BLAST. W.ND-BLAST displays close to 100% performance efficiency when distributing tasks to 12 remote computers of the same performance class. A high throughput BLAST job which took 662.68 minutes (11 hours on one average machine was completed in 44.97 minutes when distributed to 17 nodes, which included lower performance class machines. Finally, there is a comprehensive high-throughput BLAST Output Viewer (BOV and Annotation Engine components, which provides comprehensive exportation of BLAST hits to text files, annotated fasta files, tables, or association files. Conclusion W.ND-BLAST provides an interactive tool that allows scientists to easily utilizing their available computing resources for high throughput and comprehensive sequence analyses. The install package for W.ND-BLAST is

  14. Chemical and Biological Defense: Designated Entity Needed to Identify, Align, and Manage DOD’s Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    PAIO) , the analytical arm of the CBDP Enterprise, assessed the physical infrastructure capabilities that support the CBDP Enterprise’s mission and...of the physical infrastructure of the CBDP Enterprise. Page 3 GAO-15-257 Chemical and Biological Defense use threat data and the results...PAIO study made recommendations to address “ physical ” infrastructure capabilities, whereas the 2008 Chemical and Biological Defense Program (CBDP

  15. From biological neural networks to thinking machines: Transitioning biological organizational principles to computer technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the vestibular macula is under study by computer assisted reconstruction and simulation methods as a model for more complex neural systems. One goal of this research is to transition knowledge of biological neural network architecture and functioning to computer technology, to contribute to the development of thinking computers. Maculas are organized as weighted neural networks for parallel distributed processing of information. The network is characterized by non-linearity of its terminal/receptive fields. Wiring appears to develop through constrained randomness. A further property is the presence of two main circuits, highly channeled and distributed modifying, that are connected through feedforward-feedback collaterals and biasing subcircuit. Computer simulations demonstrate that differences in geometry of the feedback (afferent) collaterals affects the timing and the magnitude of voltage changes delivered to the spike initiation zone. Feedforward (efferent) collaterals act as voltage followers and likely inhibit neurons of the distributed modifying circuit. These results illustrate the importance of feedforward-feedback loops, of timing, and of inhibition in refining neural network output. They also suggest that it is the distributed modifying network that is most involved in adaptation, memory, and learning. Tests of macular adaptation, through hyper- and microgravitational studies, support this hypothesis since synapses in the distributed modifying circuit, but not the channeled circuit, are altered. Transitioning knowledge of biological systems to computer technology, however, remains problematical.

  16. PREFACE: Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrat, A.; Boccaletti, S.; Caldarelli, G.; Chessa, A.; Latora, V.; Motter, A. E.

    2008-06-01

    The field of complex networks is one of the most active areas in contemporary statistical physics. Ten years after seminal work initiated the modern study of networks, interest in the field is in fact still growing, as indicated by the ever increasing number of publications in network science. The reason for such a resounding success is most likely the simplicity and broad significance of the approach that, through graph theory, allows researchers to address a variety of different complex systems within a common framework. This special issue comprises a selection of contributions presented at the workshop 'Complex Networks: from Biology to Information Technology' held in July 2007 in Pula (Cagliari), Italy as a satellite of the general conference STATPHYS23. The contributions cover a wide range of problems that are currently among the most important questions in the area of complex networks and that are likely to stimulate future research. The issue is organised into four sections. The first two sections describe 'methods' to study the structure and the dynamics of complex networks, respectively. After this methodological part, the issue proceeds with a section on applications to biological systems. The issue closes with a section concentrating on applications to the study of social and technological networks. The first section, entitled Methods: The Structure, consists of six contributions focused on the characterisation and analysis of structural properties of complex networks: The paper Motif-based communities in complex networks by Arenas et al is a study of the occurrence of characteristic small subgraphs in complex networks. These subgraphs, known as motifs, are used to define general classes of nodes and their communities by extending the mathematical expression of the Newman-Girvan modularity. The same line of research, aimed at characterising network structure through the analysis of particular subgraphs, is explored by Bianconi and Gulbahce in Algorithm

  17. The Default Mode Network Differentiates Biological From Non-Biological Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayan, Eran; Sella, Irit; Mukovskiy, Albert; Douek, Yehonatan; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael; Flash, Tamar

    2016-01-01

    The default mode network (DMN) has been implicated in an array of social-cognitive functions, including self-referential processing, theory of mind, and mentalizing. Yet, the properties of the external stimuli that elicit DMN activity in relation to these domains remain unknown. Previous studies suggested that motion kinematics is utilized by the brain for social-cognitive processing. Here, we used functional MRI to examine whether the DMN is sensitive to parametric manipulations of observed motion kinematics. Preferential responses within core DMN structures differentiating non-biological from biological kinematics were observed for the motion of a realistically looking, human-like avatar, but not for an abstract object devoid of human form. Differences in connectivity patterns during the observation of biological versus non-biological kinematics were additionally observed. Finally, the results additionally suggest that the DMN is coupled more strongly with key nodes in the action observation network, namely the STS and the SMA, when the observed motion depicts human rather than abstract form. These findings are the first to implicate the DMN in the perception of biological motion. They may reflect the type of information used by the DMN in social-cognitive processing. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks: overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Minbaek; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Hyungwoo; Lee, Byung Yang; Hong, Seunghun; Park, June; Seong, Maeng-Je; Jhon, Young Min

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100 nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ∼1 pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.

  19. 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on aligned carbon nanotube networks: overcoming the fundamental limitation of network-based sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minbaek; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Hyungwoo; Lee, Byung Yang; Park, June; Jhon, Young Min; Seong, Maeng-Je; Hong, Seunghun

    2010-02-01

    Nanoscale sensors based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) networks have been considered impractical due to several fundamental limitations such as a poor sensitivity and small signal-to-noise ratio. Herein, we present a strategy to overcome these fundamental problems and build highly-sensitive low-noise nanoscale sensors simply by controlling the structure of the SWNT networks. In this strategy, we prepared nanoscale width channels based on aligned SWNT networks using a directed assembly strategy. Significantly, the aligned network-based sensors with narrower channels exhibited even better signal-to-noise ratio than those with wider channels, which is opposite to conventional random network-based sensors. As a proof of concept, we demonstrated 100 nm scale low-noise sensors to detect mercury ions with the detection limit of ~1 pM, which is superior to any state-of-the-art portable detection system and is below the allowable limit of mercury ions in drinking water set by most government environmental protection agencies. This is the first demonstration of 100 nm scale low-noise sensors based on SWNT networks. Considering the increased interests in high-density sensor arrays for healthcare and environmental protection, our strategy should have a significant impact on various industrial applications.

  20. Biological instability in a chlorinated drinking water distribution network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nescerecka, Alina; Rubulis, Janis; Vital, Marius; Juhna, Talis; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of a drinking water distribution system is to deliver drinking water to the consumer, preferably with the same quality as when it left the treatment plant. In this context, the maintenance of good microbiological quality is often referred to as biological stability, and the addition of sufficient chlorine residuals is regarded as one way to achieve this. The full-scale drinking water distribution system of Riga (Latvia) was investigated with respect to biological stability in chlorinated drinking water. Flow cytometric (FCM) intact cell concentrations, intracellular adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), heterotrophic plate counts and residual chlorine measurements were performed to evaluate the drinking water quality and stability at 49 sampling points throughout the distribution network. Cell viability methods were compared and the importance of extracellular ATP measurements was examined as well. FCM intact cell concentrations varied from 5×10(3) cells mL(-1) to 4.66×10(5) cells mL(-1) in the network. While this parameter did not exceed 2.1×10(4) cells mL(-1) in the effluent from any water treatment plant, 50% of all the network samples contained more than 1.06×10(5) cells mL(-1). This indisputably demonstrates biological instability in this particular drinking water distribution system, which was ascribed to a loss of disinfectant residuals and concomitant bacterial growth. The study highlights the potential of using cultivation-independent methods for the assessment of chlorinated water samples. In addition, it underlines the complexity of full-scale drinking water distribution systems, and the resulting challenges to establish the causes of biological instability.

  1. Assessment of network perturbation amplitudes by applying high-throughput data to causal biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Florian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput measurement technologies produce data sets that have the potential to elucidate the biological impact of disease, drug treatment, and environmental agents on humans. The scientific community faces an ongoing challenge in the analysis of these rich data sources to more accurately characterize biological processes that have been perturbed at the mechanistic level. Here, a new approach is built on previous methodologies in which high-throughput data was interpreted using prior biological knowledge of cause and effect relationships. These relationships are structured into network models that describe specific biological processes, such as inflammatory signaling or cell cycle progression. This enables quantitative assessment of network perturbation in response to a given stimulus. Results Four complementary methods were devised to quantify treatment-induced activity changes in processes described by network models. In addition, companion statistics were developed to qualify significance and specificity of the results. This approach is called Network Perturbation Amplitude (NPA scoring because the amplitudes of treatment-induced perturbations are computed for biological network models. The NPA methods were tested on two transcriptomic data sets: normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE cells treated with the pro-inflammatory signaling mediator TNFα, and HCT116 colon cancer cells treated with the CDK cell cycle inhibitor R547. Each data set was scored against network models representing different aspects of inflammatory signaling and cell cycle progression, and these scores were compared with independent measures of pathway activity in NHBE cells to verify the approach. The NPA scoring method successfully quantified the amplitude of TNFα-induced perturbation for each network model when compared against NF-κB nuclear localization and cell number. In addition, the degree and specificity to which CDK

  2. Boolean Networks in Inference and Dynamic Modeling of Biological Systems at the Molecular and Physiological Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakar, Juilee; Albert, Réka

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Boolean Network Concepts and History * Extensions of the Classical Boolean Framework * Boolean Inference Methods and Examples in Biology * Dynamic Boolean Models: Examples in Plant Biology, Developmental Biology and Immunology * Conclusions * References

  3. Application of the Strategic Alignment Model and Information Technology Governance Concepts to Support Network Centric Warfare

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valentine, Jennifer R

    2006-01-01

    .... This thesis proposes that while the two areas? success fundamentally resides in the implementation and exploitation of technology, it is only through sound IT Governance policies and strategic alignment practices that success can be measured...

  4. Vertically Aligned and Interconnected SiC Nanowire Networks Leading to Significantly Enhanced Thermal Conductivity of Polymer Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yimin; Zhu, Xiaodong; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2018-03-21

    Efficient heat removal via thermal management materials has become one of the most critical challenges in the development of modern microelectronic devices. However, previously reported polymer composites exhibit limited enhancement of thermal conductivity, even when highly loaded with thermally conductive fillers, because of the lack of efficient heat transfer pathways. Herein, we report vertically aligned and interconnected SiC nanowire (SiCNW) networks as efficient fillers for polymer composites, achieving significantly enhanced thermal conductivity. The SiCNW networks are produced by freeze-casting nanowire aqueous suspensions followed by thermal sintering to consolidate the nanowire junctions, exhibiting a hierarchical architecture in which honeycomb-like SiCNW layers are aligned. The composite obtained by infiltrating SiCNW networks with epoxy resin, at a relatively low SiCNW loading of 2.17 vol %, represents a high through-plane thermal conductivity (1.67 W m -1 K -1 ) compared to the pure matrix, which is equivalent to a significant enhancement of 406.6% per 1 vol % loading. The orderly SiCNW network which can act as a macroscopic expressway for phonon transport is believed to be the main contributor for the excellent thermal performance. This strategy provides insights for the design of high-performance composites with potential to be used in advanced thermal management materials.

  5. Biologically-inspired Learning in Pulsed Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Woodburn, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Self-learning chips to implement many popular ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms are very difficult to design. We explain why this is so and say what lessons previous work teaches us in the design of self-learning systems. We offer a contribution to the `biologically-inspired' approach......, explaining what we mean by this term and providing an example of a robust, self-learning design that can solve simple classical-conditioning tasks. We give details of the design of individual circuits to perform component functions, which can then be combined into a network to solve the task. We argue...... that useful conclusions as to the future of on-chip learning can be drawn from this work....

  6. Methods of information theory and algorithmic complexity for network biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenil, Hector; Kiani, Narsis A; Tegnér, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    We survey and introduce concepts and tools located at the intersection of information theory and network biology. We show that Shannon's information entropy, compressibility and algorithmic complexity quantify different local and global aspects of synthetic and biological data. We show examples such as the emergence of giant components in Erdös-Rényi random graphs, and the recovery of topological properties from numerical kinetic properties simulating gene expression data. We provide exact theoretical calculations, numerical approximations and error estimations of entropy, algorithmic probability and Kolmogorov complexity for different types of graphs, characterizing their variant and invariant properties. We introduce formal definitions of complexity for both labeled and unlabeled graphs and prove that the Kolmogorov complexity of a labeled graph is a good approximation of its unlabeled Kolmogorov complexity and thus a robust definition of graph complexity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High Performance Biological Pairwise Sequence Alignment: FPGA versus GPU versus Cell BE versus GPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Benkrid

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the pros and cons of reconfigurable computing in the form of FPGAs for high performance efficient computing. In particular, the paper presents the results of a comparative study between three different acceleration technologies, namely, Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs, Graphics Processor Units (GPUs, and IBM’s Cell Broadband Engine (Cell BE, in the design and implementation of the widely-used Smith-Waterman pairwise sequence alignment algorithm, with general purpose processors as a base reference implementation. Comparison criteria include speed, energy consumption, and purchase and development costs. The study shows that FPGAs largely outperform all other implementation platforms on performance per watt criterion and perform better than all other platforms on performance per dollar criterion, although by a much smaller margin. Cell BE and GPU come second and third, respectively, on both performance per watt and performance per dollar criteria. In general, in order to outperform other technologies on performance per dollar criterion (using currently available hardware and development tools, FPGAs need to achieve at least two orders of magnitude speed-up compared to general-purpose processors and one order of magnitude speed-up compared to domain-specific technologies such as GPUs.

  8. Application of Federal Kalman Filter with Neural Networks in the Velocity and Attitude Matching of Transfer Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Song

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The centralized Kalman filter is always applied in the velocity and attitude matching of Transfer Alignment (TA. But the centralized Kalman has many disadvantages, such as large amount of calculation, poor real-time performance, and low reliability. In the paper, the federal Kalman filter (FKF based on neural networks is used in the velocity and attitude matching of TA, the Kalman filter is adjusted by the neural networks in the two subfilters, the federal filter is used to fuse the information of the two subfilters, and the global suboptimal state estimation is obtained. The result of simulation shows that the federal Kalman filter based on neural networks is better in estimating the initial attitude misalignment angle of inertial navigation system (INS when the system dynamic model and noise statistics characteristics of inertial navigation system are unclear, and the estimation error is smaller and the accuracy is higher.

  9. Curriculum alignment and higher order thinking in introductory biology in Arkansas public two-year colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crandall, Elizabeth Diane

    This dissertation identified the cognitive levels of lecture objectives, lab objectives, and test questions in introductory majors' biology. The study group included courses offered by 27 faculty members at 18 of the 22 community colleges in Arkansas. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to identify cognitive levels, the median lecture learning outcomes were at level 2 (Comprehension) and test assessments at Level 1 (Knowledge). Lab learning outcomes were determined to have a median of level 3 (Analysis). A correlation analysis was performed using SPSS software to determine if there was an association between the Bloom's level of lecture objectives and test assessments. The only significant difference found was at the Analysis level, or Bloom's level 4 (p=.043). Correlation analyses were run for two other data sets. Years of college teaching experience and hours of training in writing objectives and assessments were compared to the Bloom's Taxonomy level of lecture objectives and test items. No significant difference was found for either of these independent variables. This dissertation provides Arkansas two-year college biology faculty with baseline information about the levels of cognitive skills that are required in freshman biology for majors courses. It can serve to initiate conversations about where we are compared to a national study, where we need to be, and how we get there.

  10. Multilayer network modeling of integrated biological systems. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Domenico, Manlio

    2018-03-01

    Biological systems, from a cell to the human brain, are inherently complex. A powerful representation of such systems, described by an intricate web of relationships across multiple scales, is provided by complex networks. Recently, several studies are highlighting how simple networks - obtained by aggregating or neglecting temporal or categorical description of biological data - are not able to account for the richness of information characterizing biological systems. More complex models, namely multilayer networks, are needed to account for interdependencies, often varying across time, of biological interacting units within a cell, a tissue or parts of an organism.

  11. Quantum Processes and Dynamic Networks in Physical and Biological Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudziak, Martin Joseph

    Quantum theory since its earliest formulations in the Copenhagen Interpretation has been difficult to integrate with general relativity and with classical Newtonian physics. There has been traditionally a regard for quantum phenomena as being a limiting case for a natural order that is fundamentally classical except for microscopic extrema where quantum mechanics must be applied, more as a mathematical reconciliation rather than as a description and explanation. Macroscopic sciences including the study of biological neural networks, cellular energy transports and the broad field of non-linear and chaotic systems point to a quantum dimension extending across all scales of measurement and encompassing all of Nature as a fundamentally quantum universe. Theory and observation lead to a number of hypotheses all of which point to dynamic, evolving networks of fundamental or elementary processes as the underlying logico-physical structure (manifestation) in Nature and a strongly quantized dimension to macroscalar processes such as are found in biological, ecological and social systems. The fundamental thesis advanced and presented herein is that quantum phenomena may be the direct consequence of a universe built not from objects and substance but from interacting, interdependent processes collectively operating as sets and networks, giving rise to systems that on microcosmic or macroscopic scales function wholistically and organically, exhibiting non-locality and other non -classical phenomena. The argument is made that such effects as non-locality are not aberrations or departures from the norm but ordinary consequences of the process-network dynamics of Nature. Quantum processes are taken to be the fundamental action-events within Nature; rather than being the exception quantum theory is the rule. The argument is also presented that the study of quantum physics could benefit from the study of selective higher-scale complex systems, such as neural processes in the brain

  12. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Arat

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2, nitric oxide (NO and nitrous oxide (N2O. This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2, nitrate (NO3, and phosphate (PO4 suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA. Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  13. A network biology approach to denitrification in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arat, Seda; Bullerjahn, George S; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a metabolically flexible member of the Gammaproteobacteria. Under anaerobic conditions and the presence of nitrate, P. aeruginosa can perform (complete) denitrification, a respiratory process of dissimilatory nitrate reduction to nitrogen gas via nitrite (NO2), nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O). This study focuses on understanding the influence of environmental conditions on bacterial denitrification performance, using a mathematical model of a metabolic network in P. aeruginosa. To our knowledge, this is the first mathematical model of denitrification for this bacterium. Analysis of the long-term behavior of the network under changing concentration levels of oxygen (O2), nitrate (NO3), and phosphate (PO4) suggests that PO4 concentration strongly affects denitrification performance. The model provides three predictions on denitrification activity of P. aeruginosa under various environmental conditions, and these predictions are either experimentally validated or supported by pertinent biological literature. One motivation for this study is to capture the effect of PO4 on a denitrification metabolic network of P. aeruginosa in order to shed light on mechanisms for greenhouse gas N2O accumulation during seasonal oxygen depletion in aquatic environments such as Lake Erie (Laurentian Great Lakes, USA). Simulating the microbial production of greenhouse gases in anaerobic aquatic systems such as Lake Erie allows a deeper understanding of the contributing environmental effects that will inform studies on, and remediation strategies for, other hypoxic sites worldwide.

  14. Notes on a PDE system for biological network formation

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2016-01-22

    We present new analytical and numerical results for the elliptic–parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai, which models the formation of biological transport networks. The model describes the pressure field using a Darcy’s type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects. Randomness in the material structure is represented by a linear diffusion term and conductance relaxation by an algebraic decay term. The analytical part extends the results of Haskovec et al. (2015) regarding the existence of weak and mild solutions to the whole range of meaningful relaxation exponents. Moreover, we prove finite time extinction or break-down of solutions in the spatially one-dimensional setting for certain ranges of the relaxation exponent. We also construct stationary solutions for the case of vanishing diffusion and critical value of the relaxation exponent, using a variational formulation and a penalty method. The analytical part is complemented by extensive numerical simulations. We propose a discretization based on mixed finite elements and study the qualitative properties of network structures for various parameter values. Furthermore, we indicate numerically that some analytical results proved for the spatially one-dimensional setting are likely to be valid also in several space dimensions.

  15. Mining Functional Modules in Heterogeneous Biological Networks Using Multiplex PageRank Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhao, Patrick X

    2016-01-01

    Identification of functional modules/sub-networks in large-scale biological networks is one of the important research challenges in current bioinformatics and systems biology. Approaches have been developed to identify functional modules in single-class biological networks; however, methods for systematically and interactively mining multiple classes of heterogeneous biological networks are lacking. In this paper, we present a novel algorithm (called mPageRank) that utilizes the Multiplex PageRank approach to mine functional modules from two classes of biological networks. We demonstrate the capabilities of our approach by successfully mining functional biological modules through integrating expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks. We first compared the performance of our method with that of other methods using simulated data. We then applied our method to identify the cell division cycle related functional module and plant signaling defense-related functional module in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Our results demonstrated that the mPageRank method is effective for mining sub-networks in both expression-based gene-gene association networks and protein-protein interaction networks, and has the potential to be adapted for the discovery of functional modules/sub-networks in other heterogeneous biological networks. The mPageRank executable program, source code, the datasets and results of the presented two case studies are publicly and freely available at http://plantgrn.noble.org/MPageRank/.

  16. Multilayer network modeling creates opportunities for novel network statistics. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Sarah Feldt

    2018-03-01

    As described in the review by Gosak et al., the field of network science has had enormous success in providing new insights into the structure and function of biological systems [1]. In the complex networks framework, system elements are network nodes, and connections between nodes represent some form of interaction between system elements [2]. The flexibility to define network nodes and edges to represent different aspects of biological systems has been employed to model numerous diverse systems at multiple scales.

  17. CellNet: network biology applied to stem cell engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahan, Patrick; Li, Hu; Morris, Samantha A; Lummertz da Rocha, Edroaldo; Daley, George Q; Collins, James J

    2014-08-14

    Somatic cell reprogramming, directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells, and direct conversions between differentiated cell lineages represent powerful approaches to engineer cells for research and regenerative medicine. We have developed CellNet, a network biology platform that more accurately assesses the fidelity of cellular engineering than existing methodologies and generates hypotheses for improving cell derivations. Analyzing expression data from 56 published reports, we found that cells derived via directed differentiation more closely resemble their in vivo counterparts than products of direct conversion, as reflected by the establishment of target cell-type gene regulatory networks (GRNs). Furthermore, we discovered that directly converted cells fail to adequately silence expression programs of the starting population and that the establishment of unintended GRNs is common to virtually every cellular engineering paradigm. CellNet provides a platform for quantifying how closely engineered cell populations resemble their target cell type and a rational strategy to guide enhanced cellular engineering. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The promise of targeted proteomics for quantitative network biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Masaki; Nakayama, Keiichi I

    2018-03-15

    Proteomics is a powerful tool for obtaining information on a large number of proteins with regard to their expression levels, interactions with other molecules, and posttranslational modifications. Whereas nontargeted, discovery proteomics uncovers differences in the proteomic landscape under different conditions, targeted proteomics has been developed to overcome the limitations of this approach with regard to quantitation. In addition to technical advances in instruments and informatics tools, the advent of the synthetic proteome composed of synthetic peptides or recombinant proteins has advanced the adoption of targeted proteomics across a wide range of research fields. Targeted proteomics can now be applied to measurement of the dynamics of any proteins of interest under a variety of conditions as well as to estimation of the absolute abundance or stoichiometry of proteins in a given network. Multiplexed targeted proteomics assays of high reproducibility and accuracy can provide insight at the quantitative level into entire networks that govern biological phenomena or diseases. Such assays will establish a new paradigm for data-driven science. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Parameterized algorithmics for finding connected motifs in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzler, Nadja; van Bevern, René; Fellows, Michael R; Komusiewicz, Christian; Niedermeier, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    We study the NP-hard LIST-COLORED GRAPH MOTIF problem which, given an undirected list-colored graph G = (V, E) and a multiset M of colors, asks for maximum-cardinality sets S ⊆ V and M' ⊆ M such that G[S] is connected and contains exactly (with respect to multiplicity) the colors in M'. LIST-COLORED GRAPH MOTIF has applications in the analysis of biological networks. We study LIST-COLORED GRAPH MOTIF with respect to three different parameterizations. For the parameters motif size |M| and solution size |S|, we present fixed-parameter algorithms, whereas for the parameter |V| - |M|, we show W[1]-hardness for general instances and achieve fixed-parameter tractability for a special case of LIST-COLORED GRAPH MOTIF. We implemented the fixed-parameter algorithms for parameters |M| and |S|, developed further speed-up heuristics for these algorithms, and applied them in the context of querying protein-interaction networks, demonstrating their usefulness for realistic instances. Furthermore, we show that extending the request for motif connectedness to stronger demands, such as biconnectedness or bridge-connectedness leads to W[1]-hard problems when the parameter is the motif size |M|.

  20. Biologically plausible learning in neural networks with modulatory feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, W Shane; Tanner, James; Itti, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    Although Hebbian learning has long been a key component in understanding neural plasticity, it has not yet been successful in modeling modulatory feedback connections, which make up a significant portion of connections in the brain. We develop a new learning rule designed around the complications of learning modulatory feedback and composed of three simple concepts grounded in physiologically plausible evidence. Using border ownership as a prototypical example, we show that a Hebbian learning rule fails to properly learn modulatory connections, while our proposed rule correctly learns a stimulus-driven model. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a border ownership network has been learned. Additionally, we show that the rule can be used as a drop-in replacement for a Hebbian learning rule to learn a biologically consistent model of orientation selectivity, a network which lacks any modulatory connections. Our results predict that the mechanisms we use are integral for learning modulatory connections in the brain and furthermore that modulatory connections have a strong dependence on inhibition. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Systems biology in physiology: the vasopressin signaling network in kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knepper, Mark A

    2012-12-01

    Over the past 80 years, physiological research has moved progressively in a reductionist direction, providing mechanistic information on a smaller and smaller scale. This trend has culminated in the present focus on "molecular physiology," which deals with the function of single molecules responsible for cellular function. There is a need to assemble the information from the molecular level into models that explain physiological function at cellular, tissue, organ, and whole organism levels. Such integration is the major focus of an approach called "systems biology." The genome sequencing projects provide a basis for a new kind of systems biology called "data-rich" systems biology that is based on large-scale data acquisition methods including protein mass spectrometry, DNA microarrays, and deep sequencing of nucleic acids. These techniques allow investigators to measure thousands of variables simultaneously in response to an external stimulus. My laboratory is applying such an approach to the question: "How does the peptide hormone vasopressin regulate water permeability in the renal collecting duct?" We are using protein mass spectrometry to identify and quantify the phosphoproteome of collecting duct cells. The response to vasopressin, presented in the form of a network model, includes a general downregulation of proline-directed kinases (MAP kinases and cyclin-dependent kinases) and upregulation of basophilic kinases (ACG kinases and calmodulin-dependent kinases). Further progress depends on characterization and localization of candidate protein kinases in these families. The ultimate goal is to use multivariate statistical techniques and differential equations to obtain predictive models describing vasopressin signaling in the renal collecting duct.

  2. Natalie 2.0: Sparse Global Network Alignment as a Special Case of Quadratic Assignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. El-Kebir (Mohammed); J. Heringa (Jaap); G.W. Klau (Gunnar)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractData on molecular interactions is increasing at a tremendous pace, while the development of solid methods for analyzing this network data is still lagging behind. This holds in particular for the field of comparative network analysis, where one wants to identify commonalities between

  3. Network Biology (http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    networkbiology@iaees.org

    Full Text Available Network Biology ISSN 2220-8879 URL: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/online-version.asp RSS: http://www.iaees.org/publications/journals/nb/rss.xml E-mail: networkbiology@iaees.org Editor-in-Chief: WenJun Zhang Aims and Scope NETWORK BIOLOGY (ISSN 2220-8879; CODEN NBEICS is an open access, peer-reviewed international journal that considers scientific articles in all different areas of network biology. It is the transactions of the International Society of Network Biology. It dedicates to the latest advances in network biology. The goal of this journal is to keep a record of the state-of-the-art research and promote the research work in these fast moving areas. The topics to be covered by Network Biology include, but are not limited to: •Theories, algorithms and programs of network analysis •Innovations and applications of biological networks •Ecological networks, food webs and natural equilibrium •Co-evolution, co-extinction, biodiversity conservation •Metabolic networks, protein-protein interaction networks, biochemical reaction networks, gene networks, transcriptional regulatory networks, cell cycle networks, phylogenetic networks, network motifs •Physiological networksNetwork regulation of metabolic processes, human diseases and ecological systems •Social networks, epidemiological networks •System complexity, self-organized systems, emergence of biological systems, agent-based modeling, individual-based modeling, neural network modeling, and other network-based modeling, etc. We are also interested in short communications that clearly address a specific issue or completely present a new ecological network, food web, or metabolic or gene network, etc. Authors can submit their works to the email box of this journal, networkbiology@iaees.org. All manuscripts submitted to this journal must be previously unpublished and may not be considered for publication elsewhere at any time during review period of this journal

  4. Managing biological networks by using text mining and computer-aided curation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Seok Jong; Cho, Yongseong; Lee, Min-Ho; Lim, Jongtae; Yoo, Jaesoo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand a biological mechanism in a cell, a researcher should collect a huge number of protein interactions with experimental data from experiments and the literature. Text mining systems that extract biological interactions from papers have been used to construct biological networks for a few decades. Even though the text mining of literature is necessary to construct a biological network, few systems with a text mining tool are available for biologists who want to construct their own biological networks. We have developed a biological network construction system called BioKnowledge Viewer that can generate a biological interaction network by using a text mining tool and biological taggers. It also Boolean simulation software to provide a biological modeling system to simulate the model that is made with the text mining tool. A user can download PubMed articles and construct a biological network by using the Multi-level Knowledge Emergence Model (KMEM), MetaMap, and A Biomedical Named Entity Recognizer (ABNER) as a text mining tool. To evaluate the system, we constructed an aging-related biological network that consist 9,415 nodes (genes) by using manual curation. With network analysis, we found that several genes, including JNK, AP-1, and BCL-2, were highly related in aging biological network. We provide a semi-automatic curation environment so that users can obtain a graph database for managing text mining results that are generated in the server system and can navigate the network with BioKnowledge Viewer, which is freely available at http://bioknowledgeviewer.kisti.re.kr.

  5. Novel recurrent neural network for modelling biological networks: oscillatory p53 interaction dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hong; Samarasinghe, Sandhya; Kulasiri, Don

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the control of cellular networks consisting of gene and protein interactions and their emergent properties is a central activity of Systems Biology research. For this, continuous, discrete, hybrid, and stochastic methods have been proposed. Currently, the most common approach to modelling accurate temporal dynamics of networks is ordinary differential equations (ODE). However, critical limitations of ODE models are difficulty in kinetic parameter estimation and numerical solution of a large number of equations, making them more suited to smaller systems. In this article, we introduce a novel recurrent artificial neural network (RNN) that addresses above limitations and produces a continuous model that easily estimates parameters from data, can handle a large number of molecular interactions and quantifies temporal dynamics and emergent systems properties. This RNN is based on a system of ODEs representing molecular interactions in a signalling network. Each neuron represents concentration change of one molecule represented by an ODE. Weights of the RNN correspond to kinetic parameters in the system and can be adjusted incrementally during network training. The method is applied to the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system - a crucial component of the DNA damage response pathways activated by a damage signal. Simulation results indicate that the proposed RNN can successfully represent the behaviour of the p53-Mdm2 oscillation system and solve the parameter estimation problem with high accuracy. Furthermore, we presented a modified form of the RNN that estimates parameters and captures systems dynamics from sparse data collected over relatively large time steps. We also investigate the robustness of the p53-Mdm2 system using the trained RNN under various levels of parameter perturbation to gain a greater understanding of the control of the p53-Mdm2 system. Its outcomes on robustness are consistent with the current biological knowledge of this system. As more

  6. Alignment of global supply networks based on strategic groups of supply chains

    OpenAIRE

    Nikos G. Moraitakis; Jiazhen Huo; Hans-Christian Pfohl

    2017-01-01

    Background: From a supply chain perspective, often big differences exist between global raw material suppliers’ approaches to supply their respective local markets. The progressing complexity of large centrally managed global supply networks and their often-unknown upstream ramifications increase the likelihood of undetected bottlenecks and inefficiencies. It is therefore necessary to develop an approach to strategically master the upstream complexity of such networks from a holistic su...

  7. Biological mechanisms beyond network analysis via mathematical modeling. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by Marko Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2018-03-01

    Methods from network theory are increasingly used in research spanning from engineering and computer science to psychology and the social sciences. In this issue, Gosak et al. [1] provide a thorough review of network science applications to biological systems ranging from the subcellular world via neuroscience to ecosystems, with special attention to the insulin-secreting beta-cells in pancreatic islets.

  8. The redox biology network in cancer pathophysiology and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Manda

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The review pinpoints operational concepts related to the redox biology network applied to the pathophysiology and therapeutics of solid tumors. A sophisticated network of intrinsic and extrinsic cues, integrated in the tumor niche, drives tumorigenesis and tumor progression. Critical mutations and distorted redox signaling pathways orchestrate pathologic events inside cancer cells, resulting in resistance to stress and death signals, aberrant proliferation and efficient repair mechanisms. Additionally, the complex inter-cellular crosstalk within the tumor niche, mediated by cytokines, redox-sensitive danger signals (HMGB1 and exosomes, under the pressure of multiple stresses (oxidative, inflammatory, metabolic, greatly contributes to the malignant phenotype. The tumor-associated inflammatory stress and its suppressive action on the anti-tumor immune response are highlighted. We further emphasize that ROS may act either as supporter or enemy of cancer cells, depending on the context. Oxidative stress-based therapies, such as radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy, take advantage of the cytotoxic face of ROS for killing tumor cells by a non-physiologically sudden, localized and intense oxidative burst. The type of tumor cell death elicited by these therapies is discussed. Therapy outcome depends on the differential sensitivity to oxidative stress of particular tumor cells, such as cancer stem cells, and therefore co-therapies that transiently down-regulate their intrinsic antioxidant system hold great promise. We draw attention on the consequences of the damage signals delivered by oxidative stress-injured cells to neighboring and distant cells, and emphasize the benefits of therapeutically triggered immunologic cell death in metastatic cancer. An integrative approach should be applied when designing therapeutic strategies in cancer, taking into consideration the mutational, metabolic, inflammatory and oxidative status of tumor cells, cellular

  9. Optimal synchronization in small-world biological neural networks with time-varying weights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hongyu; Luo Xiaoshu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new model of small-world biological neural networks based on biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-varying weights is proposed. Then the synchronization phenomenon of small-world biological neural networks evoked by the learning rate is studied. The study shows that there exists an optimal synchronization state by changing the learning rate.

  10. Simultaneous Wireless Information and Power Transfer Mechanism in Interference Alignment Relay Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahui Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a simultaneous wireless information and power transfer (SWIPT mechanism in an interference alignment (IA relay system, in which source nodes send wireless information and energy simultaneously to relay nodes, and relay nodes forward the received signal to destination nodes powered by harvested energy. To manage interference and utilize interference as energy source, two-SWIPT receiver is designed, namely, power splitting (PS, and antennas switching (AS has been considered for relay system. The performance of AS- and PS-based IA relay systems is considered, as is a new energy cooperation (ECop scheme that is proposed to improve system performance. Numerical results are provided to evaluate the performance of all schemes and it is shown from the simulations that the performance of proposed ECop outperformed both AS and PS.

  11. A simulation model for aligning smart home networks and deploying smart objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggaard, Per

    is the interferences produced by WiFi access points in smart home networks which are expensive to overcome in terms of battery energy. Currently, different method exists to handle this. However, they use complex mechanisms such as sharing frequencies, sharing time slots, and spatial reuse of frequencies. This paper...

  12. Title: Using Alignment and 2D Network Simulations to Study Charge Transport Through Doped ZnO Nanowire Thin Film Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Phadke, Sujay

    2011-09-30

    Factors affecting charge transport through ZnO nanowire mat films were studied by aligning ZnO nanowires on substrates and coupling experimental measurements with 2D nanowire network simulations. Gallium doped ZnO nanowires were aligned on thermally oxidized silicon wafer by shearing a nanowire dispersion in ethanol. Sheet resistances of nanowire thin films that had current flowing parallel to nanowire alignment direction were compared to thin films that had current flowing perpendicular to nanowire alignment direction. Perpendicular devices showed ∼5 fold greater sheet resistance than parallel devices supporting the hypothesis that aligning nanowires would increase conductivity of ZnO nanowire electrodes. 2-D nanowire network simulations of thin films showed that the device sheet resistance was dominated by inter-wire contact resistance. For a given resistivity of ZnO nanowires, the thin film electrodes would have the lowest possible sheet resistance if the inter-wire contact resistance was one order of magnitude lower than the single nanowire resistance. Simulations suggest that the conductivity of such thin film devices could be further enhanced by using longer nanowires. Solution processed Gallium doped ZnO nanowires are aligned on substrates using an innovative shear coating technique. Nanowire alignment has shown improvement in ZnO nanowire transparent electrode conductivity. 2D network simulations in conjunction with electrical measurements have revealed different regimes of operation of nanowire thin films and provided a guideline for improving electrical performance of nanowire electrodes. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. NFP: An R Package for Characterizing and Comparing of Annotated Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yang; Xu, Wenjian; Niu, Chao; Bo, Xiaochen; Li, Fei

    2017-01-01

    Large amounts of various biological networks exist for representing different types of interaction data, such as genetic, metabolic, gene regulatory, and protein-protein relationships. Recent approaches on biological network study are based on different mathematical concepts. It is necessary to construct a uniform framework to judge the functionality of biological networks. We recently introduced a knowledge-based computational framework that reliably characterized biological networks in system level. The method worked by making systematic comparisons to a set of well-studied "basic networks," measuring both the functional and topological similarities. A biological network could be characterized as a spectrum-like vector consisting of similarities to basic networks. Here, to facilitate the application, development, and adoption of this framework, we present an R package called NFP. This package extends our previous pipeline, offering a powerful set of functions for Network Fingerprint analysis. The software shows great potential in biological network study. The open source NFP R package is freely available under the GNU General Public License v2.0 at CRAN along with the vignette.

  14. NFP: An R Package for Characterizing and Comparing of Annotated Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Cao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Large amounts of various biological networks exist for representing different types of interaction data, such as genetic, metabolic, gene regulatory, and protein-protein relationships. Recent approaches on biological network study are based on different mathematical concepts. It is necessary to construct a uniform framework to judge the functionality of biological networks. We recently introduced a knowledge-based computational framework that reliably characterized biological networks in system level. The method worked by making systematic comparisons to a set of well-studied “basic networks,” measuring both the functional and topological similarities. A biological network could be characterized as a spectrum-like vector consisting of similarities to basic networks. Here, to facilitate the application, development, and adoption of this framework, we present an R package called NFP. This package extends our previous pipeline, offering a powerful set of functions for Network Fingerprint analysis. The software shows great potential in biological network study. The open source NFP R package is freely available under the GNU General Public License v2.0 at CRAN along with the vignette.

  15. A novel joint spatial-code clustered interference alignment scheme for large-scale wireless sensor networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhilu; Jiang, Lihui; Ren, Guanghui; Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Yaqin

    2015-01-16

    Interference alignment (IA) has been put forward as a promising technique which can mitigate interference and effectively increase the throughput of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, the number of users is strictly restricted by the IA feasibility condition, and the interference leakage will become so strong that the quality of service will degrade significantly when there are more users than that IA can support. In this paper, a novel joint spatial-code clustered (JSCC)-IA scheme is proposed to solve this problem. In the proposed scheme, the users are clustered into several groups so that feasible IA can be achieved within each group. In addition, each group is assigned a pseudo noise (PN) code in order to suppress the inter-group interference via the code dimension. The analytical bit error rate (BER) expressions of the proposed JSCC-IA scheme are formulated for the systems with identical and different propagation delays, respectively. To further improve the performance of the JSCC-IA scheme in asymmetric networks, a random grouping selection (RGS) algorithm is developed to search for better grouping combinations. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed JSCC-IA scheme is capable of accommodating many more users to communicate simultaneously in the same frequency band with better performance.

  16. A Novel Joint Spatial-Code Clustered Interference Alignment Scheme for Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilu Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interference alignment (IA has been put forward as a promising technique which can mitigate interference and effectively increase the throughput of wireless sensor networks (WSNs. However, the number of users is strictly restricted by the IA feasibility condition, and the interference leakage will become so strong that the quality of service will degrade significantly when there are more users than that IA can support. In this paper, a novel joint spatial-code clustered (JSCC-IA scheme is proposed to solve this problem. In the proposed scheme, the users are clustered into several groups so that feasible IA can be achieved within each group. In addition, each group is assigned a pseudo noise (PN code in order to suppress the inter-group interference via the code dimension. The analytical bit error rate (BER expressions of the proposed JSCC-IA scheme are formulated for the systems with identical and different propagation delays, respectively. To further improve the performance of the JSCC-IA scheme in asymmetric networks, a random grouping selection (RGS algorithm is developed to search for better grouping combinations. Numerical results demonstrate that the proposed JSCC-IA scheme is capable of accommodating many more users to communicate simultaneously in the same frequency band with better performance.

  17. NDEx: A Community Resource for Sharing and Publishing of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillich, Rudolf T; Chen, Jing; Rynkov, Vladimir; Welker, David; Pratt, Dexter

    2017-01-01

    Networks are a powerful and flexible paradigm that facilitate communication and computation about interactions of any type, whether social, economic, or biological. NDEx, the Network Data Exchange, is an online commons to enable new modes of collaboration and publication using biological networks. NDEx creates an access point and interface to a broad range of networks, whether they express molecular interactions, curated relationships from literature, or the outputs of systematic analysis of big data. Research organizations can use NDEx as a distribution channel for networks they generate or curate. Developers of bioinformatic applications can store and query NDEx networks via a common programmatic interface. NDEx can also facilitate the integration of networks as data in electronic publications, thus making a step toward an ecosystem in which networks bearing data, hypotheses, and findings flow seamlessly between scientists.

  18. Inferring hidden causal relations between pathway members using reduced Google matrix of directed biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Signaling pathways represent parts of the global biological molecular network which connects them into a seamless whole through complex direct and indirect (hidden) crosstalk whose structure can change during development or in pathological conditions. We suggest a novel methodology, called Googlomics, for the structural analysis of directed biological networks using spectral analysis of their Google matrices, using parallels with quantum scattering theory, developed for nuclear and mesoscopic physics and quantum chaos. We introduce analytical “reduced Google matrix” method for the analysis of biological network structure. The method allows inferring hidden causal relations between the members of a signaling pathway or a functionally related group of genes. We investigate how the structure of hidden causal relations can be reprogrammed as a result of changes in the transcriptional network layer during cancerogenesis. The suggested Googlomics approach rigorously characterizes complex systemic changes in the wiring of large causal biological networks in a computationally efficient way. PMID:29370181

  19. Elucidation of time-dependent systems biology cell response patterns with time course network enrichment

    OpenAIRE

    Wiwie, Christian; Rauch, Alexander; Haakonsson, Anders; Barrio-Hernandez, Inigo; Blagoev, Blagoy; Mandrup, Susanne; Röttger, Richard; Baumbach, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Advances in OMICS technologies emerged both massive expression data sets and huge networks modelling the molecular interplay of genes, RNAs, proteins and metabolites. Network enrichment methods combine these two data types to extract subnetwork responses from case/control setups. However, no methods exist to integrate time series data with networks, thus preventing the identification of time-dependent systems biology responses. We close this gap with Time Course Network Enrichment (TiCoNE). I...

  20. Using Pathfinder networks to discover alignment between expert and consumer conceptual knowledge from online vaccine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amith, Muhammad; Cunningham, Rachel; Savas, Lara S; Boom, Julie; Schvaneveldt, Roger; Tao, Cui; Cohen, Trevor

    2017-10-01

    This study demonstrates the use of distributed vector representations and Pathfinder Network Scaling (PFNETS) to represent online vaccine content created by health experts and by laypeople. By analyzing a target audience's conceptualization of a topic, domain experts can develop targeted interventions to improve the basic health knowledge of consumers. The underlying assumption is that the content created by different groups reflects the mental organization of their knowledge. Applying automated text analysis to this content may elucidate differences between the knowledge structures of laypeople (heath consumers) and professionals (health experts). This paper utilizes vaccine information generated by laypeople and health experts to investigate the utility of this approach. We used an established technique from cognitive psychology, Pathfinder Network Scaling to infer the structure of the associational networks between concepts learned from online content using methods of distributional semantics. In doing so, we extend the original application of PFNETS to infer knowledge structures from individual participants, to infer the prevailing knowledge structures within communities of content authors. The resulting graphs reveal opportunities for public health and vaccination education experts to improve communication and intervention efforts directed towards health consumers. Our efforts demonstrate the feasibility of using an automated procedure to examine the manifestation of conceptual models within large bodies of free text, revealing evidence of conflicting understanding of vaccine concepts among health consumers as compared with health experts. Additionally, this study provides insight into the differences between consumer and expert abstraction of domain knowledge, revealing vaccine-related knowledge gaps that suggest opportunities to improve provider-patient communication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Ronald C. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese`s group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  2. Automated insertion of sequences into a ribosomal RNA alignment: An application of computational linguistics in molecular biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, R.C.

    1991-11-01

    This thesis involved the construction of (1) a grammar that incorporates knowledge on base invariancy and secondary structure in a molecule and (2) a parser engine that uses the grammar to position bases into the structural subunits of the molecule. These concepts were combined with a novel pinning technique to form a tool that semi-automates insertion of a new species into the alignment for the 16S rRNA molecule (a component of the ribosome) maintained by Dr. Carl Woese's group at the University of Illinois at Urbana. The tool was tested on species extracted from the alignment and on a group of entirely new species. The results were very encouraging, and the tool should be substantial aid to the curators of the 16S alignment. The construction of the grammar was itself automated, allowing application of the tool to alignments for other molecules. The logic programming language Prolog was used to construct all programs involved. The computational linguistics approach used here was found to be a useful way to attach the problem of insertion into an alignment.

  3. Professional networks and the alignment of individual perceptions about medical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacopino, Valentina; Mascia, Daniele; Cicchetti, Americo

    In recent decades, the role of technology in health care organizations has become increasingly relevant because it enhances health care outcomes and the achievement of clinical goals. Extant research demonstrates that the effectiveness of a medical innovation depends largely on health care professionals' perceptions of its usefulness and impact on their activities and practices. We also know that interaction among social actors contributes to the shaping of their judgments and opinions regarding innovation. This study investigated the role of professionals' social networks and social capital in the formation of similar individual perceptions about a highly innovative robotic surgical system. We collected data from a sample of 50 professionals, including both physicians and nurses, working in three hospital wards belonging to an Italian hospital organization. Using a survey, we gathered data on professionals' demographic characteristics, the adoption and impact of the new technology, and social networks. We tested our hypotheses using a dyadic perspective and logistic regression quadratic assignment procedures. Our findings document that professionals' perceptions regarding technological change were more likely to be similar when they were connected and exhibited similarity in some social capital characteristics and adoption behavior. These results have important implications for health care executives and administrators, as well as for health professionals characterized by high degrees of autonomy and for which organizational change can be affected by professional or organizational resistance.

  4. Interference Alignment and Cancellation

    OpenAIRE

    Gollakota, Shyamnath; Perli, Samuel David; Katabi, Dina

    2009-01-01

    The throughput of existing MIMO LANs is limited by the number of antennas on the AP. This paper shows how to overcome this limit. It presents interference alignment and cancellation (IAC), a new approach for decoding concurrent sender-receiver pairs in MIMO networks. IAC synthesizes two signal processing techniques, interference alignment and interference cancellation, showing that the combination applies to scenarios where neither interference alignment nor cancellation applies alone. We sho...

  5. Global stability analysis and robust design of multi-time-scale biological networks under parametric uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Baese, Anke; Koshkouei, Ali J; Emmett, Mark R; Goodall, David P

    2009-01-01

    Biological networks are prone to internal parametric fluctuations and external noises. Robustness represents a crucial property of these networks, which militates the effects of internal fluctuations and external noises. In this paper biological networks are formulated as coupled nonlinear differential systems operating at different time-scales under vanishing perturbations. In contrast to previous work viewing biological parametric uncertain systems as perturbations to a known nominal linear system, the perturbed biological system is modeled as nonlinear perturbations to a known nonlinear idealized system and is represented by two time-scales (subsystems). In addition, conditions for the existence of a global uniform attractor of the perturbed biological system are presented. By using an appropriate Lyapunov function for the coupled system, a maximal upper bound for the fast time-scale associated with the fast state is derived. The proposed robust system design principles are potentially applicable to robust biosynthetic network design. Finally, two examples of two important biological networks, a neural network and a gene regulatory network, are presented to illustrate the applicability of the developed theoretical framework.

  6. Human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN): a systems biology perspective on topology, stability and functionality of the network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Avijit; Jatana, Nidhi; Latha, N

    2014-09-21

    Dopamine receptors (DR) are one of the major neurotransmitter receptors present in human brain. Malfunctioning of these receptors is well established to trigger many neurological and psychiatric disorders. Taking into consideration that proteins function collectively in a network for most of the biological processes, the present study is aimed to depict the interactions between all dopamine receptors following a systems biology approach. To capture comprehensive interactions of candidate proteins associated with human dopamine receptors, we performed a protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analysis of all five receptors and their protein partners by mapping them into human interactome and constructed a human Dopamine Receptors Interaction Network (DRIN). We explored the topology of dopamine receptors as molecular network, revealing their characteristics and the role of central network elements. More to the point, a sub-network analysis was done to determine major functional clusters in human DRIN that govern key neurological pathways. Besides, interacting proteins in a pathway were characterized and prioritized based on their affinity for utmost drug molecules. The vulnerability of different networks to the dysfunction of diverse combination of components was estimated under random and direct attack scenarios. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is unique to put all five dopamine receptors together in a common interaction network and to understand the functionality of interacting proteins collectively. Our study pinpointed distinctive topological and functional properties of human dopamine receptors that have helped in identifying potential therapeutic drug targets in the dopamine interaction network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. MicroRNAs and gene regulatory networks: managing the impact of noise in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Héctor; Cohen, Stephen M

    2010-07-01

    Biological systems are continuously challenged by an environment that is variable. Yet, a key feature of developmental and physiological processes is their remarkable stability. This review considers how microRNAs contribute to gene regulatory networks that confer robustness.

  8. Commentary: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Educators Launch National Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Cheryl; Bell, Ellis; Johnson, Margaret; Mattos, Carla; Sears, Duane; White, Harold B.

    2010-01-01

    The American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) has launched an National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded 5 year project to support biochemistry and molecular biology educators learning what and how students learn. As a part of this initiative, hundreds of life scientists will plan and develop a rich central resource for…

  9. A Unifying Mathematical Framework for Genetic Robustness, Environmental Robustness, Network Robustness and their Trade-off on Phenotype Robustness in Biological Networks Part I: Gene Regulatory Networks in Systems and Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Lin, Ying-Po

    2013-01-01

    Robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are ubiquitous systematic properties observed in biological systems at different levels. The underlying principles for robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation are universal to both complex biological systems and sophisticated engineering systems. In many biological networks, network robustness should be enough to confer intrinsic robustness in order to tolerate intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic robustness for buffering genetic variations, and environmental robustness for resisting environmental disturbances. With this, the phenotypic stability of biological network can be maintained, thus guaranteeing phenotype robustness. This paper presents a survey on biological systems and then develops a unifying mathematical framework for investigating the principles of both robust stabilization and environmental disturbance attenuation in systems and evolutionary biology. Further, from the unifying mathematical framework, it was discovered that the phenotype robustness criterion for biological networks at different levels relies upon intrinsic robustness + genetic robustness + environmental robustness ≦ network robustness. When this is true, the phenotype robustness can be maintained in spite of intrinsic parameter fluctuations, genetic variations, and environmental disturbances. Therefore, the trade-offs between intrinsic robustness, genetic robustness, environmental robustness, and network robustness in systems and evolutionary biology can also be investigated through their corresponding phenotype robustness criterion from the systematic point of view.

  10. Mathematical Analysis of a PDE System for Biological Network Formation

    KAUST Repository

    Haskovec, Jan

    2015-02-04

    Motivated by recent physics papers describing rules for natural network formation, we study an elliptic-parabolic system of partial differential equations proposed by Hu and Cai [13, 15]. The model describes the pressure field thanks to Darcy\\'s type equation and the dynamics of the conductance network under pressure force effects with a diffusion rate D >= 0 representing randomness in the material structure. We prove the existence of global weak solutions and of local mild solutions and study their long term behavior. It turns out that, by energy dissipation, steady states play a central role to understand the network formation capacity of the system. We show that for a large diffusion coefficient D, the zero steady state is stable, while network formation occurs for small values of D due to the instability of the zero steady state, and the borderline case D = 0 exhibits a large class of dynamically stable (in the linearized sense) steady states.

  11. Integrating data from biological experiments into metabolic networks with the DBE information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Klukas, Christian; Rolletschek, Hardy; Schreiber, Falk

    2005-01-01

    Modern 'omics'-technologies result in huge amounts of data about life processes. For analysis and data mining purposes this data has to be considered in the context of the underlying biological networks. This work presents an approach for integrating data from biological experiments into metabolic networks by mapping the data onto network elements and visualising the data enriched networks automatically. This methodology is implemented in DBE, an information system that supports the analysis and visualisation of experimental data in the context of metabolic networks. It consists of five parts: (1) the DBE-Database for consistent data storage, (2) the Excel-Importer application for the data import, (3) the DBE-Website as the interface for the system, (4) the DBE-Pictures application for the up- and download of binary (e. g. image) files, and (5) DBE-Gravisto, a network analysis and graph visualisation system. The usability of this approach is demonstrated in two examples.

  12. Polynomial-Time Algorithm for Controllability Test of a Class of Boolean Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Kobayashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Boolean-network-model-based approaches to dynamical analysis of complex biological networks such as gene regulatory networks have been extensively studied. One of the fundamental problems in control theory of such networks is the problem of determining whether a given substance quantity can be arbitrarily controlled by operating the other substance quantities, which we call the controllability problem. This paper proposes a polynomial-time algorithm for solving this problem. Although the algorithm is based on a sufficient condition for controllability, it is easily computable for a wider class of large-scale biological networks compared with the existing approaches. A key to this success in our approach is to give up computing Boolean operations in a rigorous way and to exploit an adjacency matrix of a directed graph induced by a Boolean network. By applying the proposed approach to a neurotransmitter signaling pathway, it is shown that it is effective.

  13. Vicus: Exploiting local structures to improve network-based analysis of biological data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Biological networks entail important topological features and patterns critical to understanding interactions within complicated biological systems. Despite a great progress in understanding their structure, much more can be done to improve our inference and network analysis. Spectral methods play a key role in many network-based applications. Fundamental to spectral methods is the Laplacian, a matrix that captures the global structure of the network. Unfortunately, the Laplacian does not take into account intricacies of the network's local structure and is sensitive to noise in the network. These two properties are fundamental to biological networks and cannot be ignored. We propose an alternative matrix Vicus. The Vicus matrix captures the local neighborhood structure of the network and thus is more effective at modeling biological interactions. We demonstrate the advantages of Vicus in the context of spectral methods by extensive empirical benchmarking on tasks such as single cell dimensionality reduction, protein module discovery and ranking genes for cancer subtyping. Our experiments show that using Vicus, spectral methods result in more accurate and robust performance in all of these tasks.

  14. Vicus: Exploiting local structures to improve network-based analysis of biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Huang, Lin; Zhu, Yuke; Kundaje, Anshul; Batzoglou, Serafim; Goldenberg, Anna

    2017-10-01

    Biological networks entail important topological features and patterns critical to understanding interactions within complicated biological systems. Despite a great progress in understanding their structure, much more can be done to improve our inference and network analysis. Spectral methods play a key role in many network-based applications. Fundamental to spectral methods is the Laplacian, a matrix that captures the global structure of the network. Unfortunately, the Laplacian does not take into account intricacies of the network's local structure and is sensitive to noise in the network. These two properties are fundamental to biological networks and cannot be ignored. We propose an alternative matrix Vicus. The Vicus matrix captures the local neighborhood structure of the network and thus is more effective at modeling biological interactions. We demonstrate the advantages of Vicus in the context of spectral methods by extensive empirical benchmarking on tasks such as single cell dimensionality reduction, protein module discovery and ranking genes for cancer subtyping. Our experiments show that using Vicus, spectral methods result in more accurate and robust performance in all of these tasks.

  15. Automatic compilation from high-level biologically-oriented programming language to genetic regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Jacob; Lu, Ting; Weiss, Ron

    2011-01-01

    The field of synthetic biology promises to revolutionize our ability to engineer biological systems, providing important benefits for a variety of applications. Recent advances in DNA synthesis and automated DNA assembly technologies suggest that it is now possible to construct synthetic systems of significant complexity. However, while a variety of novel genetic devices and small engineered gene networks have been successfully demonstrated, the regulatory complexity of synthetic systems that have been reported recently has somewhat plateaued due to a variety of factors, including the complexity of biology itself and the lag in our ability to design and optimize sophisticated biological circuitry. To address the gap between DNA synthesis and circuit design capabilities, we present a platform that enables synthetic biologists to express desired behavior using a convenient high-level biologically-oriented programming language, Proto. The high level specification is compiled, using a regulatory motif based mechanism, to a gene network, optimized, and then converted to a computational simulation for numerical verification. Through several example programs we illustrate the automated process of biological system design with our platform, and show that our compiler optimizations can yield significant reductions in the number of genes (~ 50%) and latency of the optimized engineered gene networks. Our platform provides a convenient and accessible tool for the automated design of sophisticated synthetic biological systems, bridging an important gap between DNA synthesis and circuit design capabilities. Our platform is user-friendly and features biologically relevant compiler optimizations, providing an important foundation for the development of sophisticated biological systems.

  16. The Stochastic Evolutionary Game for a Population of Biological Networks Under Natural Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Ho, Shih-Ju

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a population of evolutionary biological networks is described by a stochastic dynamic system with intrinsic random parameter fluctuations due to genetic variations and external disturbances caused by environmental changes in the evolutionary process. Since information on environmental changes is unavailable and their occurrence is unpredictable, they can be considered as a game player with the potential to destroy phenotypic stability. The biological network needs to develop an evolutionary strategy to improve phenotypic stability as much as possible, so it can be considered as another game player in the evolutionary process, ie, a stochastic Nash game of minimizing the maximum network evolution level caused by the worst environmental disturbances. Based on the nonlinear stochastic evolutionary game strategy, we find that some genetic variations can be used in natural selection to construct negative feedback loops, efficiently improving network robustness. This provides larger genetic robustness as a buffer against neutral genetic variations, as well as larger environmental robustness to resist environmental disturbances and maintain a network phenotypic traits in the evolutionary process. In this situation, the robust phenotypic traits of stochastic biological networks can be more frequently selected by natural selection in evolution. However, if the harbored neutral genetic variations are accumulated to a sufficiently large degree, and environmental disturbances are strong enough that the network robustness can no longer confer enough genetic robustness and environmental robustness, then the phenotype robustness might break down. In this case, a network phenotypic trait may be pushed from one equilibrium point to another, changing the phenotypic trait and starting a new phase of network evolution through the hidden neutral genetic variations harbored in network robustness by adaptive evolution. Further, the proposed evolutionary game is extended to

  17. Robustness leads close to the edge of chaos in coupled map networks: toward the understanding of biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nen; Kikuchi, Macoto

    2013-05-01

    Dynamics in biological networks are, in general, robust against several perturbations. We investigate a coupled map network as a model motivated by gene regulatory networks and design systems that are robust against phenotypic perturbations (perturbations in dynamics), as well as systems that are robust against mutation (perturbations in network structure). To achieve such a design, we apply a multicanonical Monte Carlo method. Analysis based on the maximum Lyapunov exponent and parameter sensitivity shows that systems with marginal stability, which are regarded as systems at the edge of chaos, emerge when robustness against network perturbations is required. This emergence of the edge of chaos is a self-organization phenomenon and does not need a fine tuning of parameters.

  18. Information theory in systems biology. Part I: Gene regulatory and metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Kavousi, Kaveh; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", was published in 1948 by Claude Shannon to establish a framework that is now known as information theory. In recent decades, information theory has gained much attention in the area of systems biology. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of those contributions that have applied information theory in inferring or understanding of biological systems. Based on the type of system components and the interactions between them, we classify the biological systems into 4 main classes: gene regulatory, metabolic, protein-protein interaction and signaling networks. In the first part of this review, we attempt to introduce most of the existing studies on two types of biological networks, including gene regulatory and metabolic networks, which are founded on the concepts of information theory. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bernstein approximations in glasso-based estimation of biological networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purutcuoglu, Vilda; Agraz, Melih; Wit, Ernst

    The Gaussian graphical model (GGM) is one of the common dynamic modelling approaches in the construction of gene networks. In inference of this modelling the interaction between genes can be detected mainly via graphical lasso (glasso) or coordinate descent-based approaches. Although these methods

  20. A network biology model of micronutrient related health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ommen, B. van; Fairweather-Tait, S.; Freidig, A.; Kardinaal, A.; Scalbert, A.; Wopereis, S.

    2008-01-01

    Micronutrients are involved in specific biochemical pathways and have dedicated functions in the body, but they are also interconnected in complex metabolic networks, such as oxidative-reductive and inflammatory pathways and hormonal regulation, in which the overarching function is to optimise

  1. Integration of biological networks and gene expression data using Cytoscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cline, M.S.; Smoot, M.; Cerami, E.

    2007-01-01

    Cytoscape is a free software package for visualizing, modeling and analyzing molecular and genetic interaction networks. This protocol explains how to use Cytoscape to analyze the results of mRNA expression profiling, and other functional genomics and proteomics experiments, in the context of an ...

  2. Biologically Inspired Target Recognition in Radar Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qilian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the great mysteries of the brain is cognitive control. How can the interactions between millions of neurons result in behavior that is coordinated and appears willful and voluntary? There is consensus that it depends on the prefrontal cortex (PFC. Many PFC areas receive converging inputs from at least two sensory modalities. Inspired by human's innate ability to process and integrate information from disparate, network-based sources, we apply human-inspired information integration mechanisms to target detection in cognitive radar sensor network. Humans' information integration mechanisms have been modelled using maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE or soft-max approaches. In this paper, we apply these two algorithms to cognitive radar sensor networks target detection. Discrete-cosine-transform (DCT is used to process the integrated data from MLE or soft-max. We apply fuzzy logic system (FLS to automatic target detection based on the AC power values from DCT. Simulation results show that our MLE-DCT-FLS and soft-max-DCT-FLS approaches perform very well in the radar sensor network target detection, whereas the existing 2D construction algorithm does not work in this study.

  3. Importance of randomness in biological networks: A random matrix ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-01-29

    Jan 29, 2015 ... Random matrix theory, initially proposed to understand the complex interactions in nuclear spectra, has demonstrated its success in diverse domains of science ranging from quantum chaos to galaxies. We demonstrate the applicability of random matrix theory for networks by providing a new dimension to ...

  4. Making the right connections: Network biology and plant immune system dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie E. McCormack

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Network analysis has been a recent focus in biological sciences due to its ability to synthesize global visualizations of cellular processes and predict functions based on inferences from network properties. A protein–protein interaction network, or interactome, captures the emergent cellular states from gene regulation and environmental conditions. Given that proteins are involved in extensive local and systemic molecular interactions such as signaling and metabolism, understanding protein functions and interactions are essential for a systems view of biology. However, in plant sciences these network-based approaches to data integration have been few and far between due to limited data, especially protein–protein interaction data. In this review, we cover network construction from experimental data, network analysis based on topological properties, and finally we discuss advances in networks in plants and other organisms in a comparative approach. We focus on applications of network biology to discover the dynamics of host–pathogen interactions as these have potential agricultural uses in improving disease resistance in commercial crops.

  5. A Reconfigurable and Biologically Inspired Paradigm for Computation Using Network-On-Chip and Spiking Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jim Harkin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGA devices have emerged as a popular platform for the rapid prototyping of biological Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs applications, offering the key requirement of reconfigurability. However, FPGAs do not efficiently realise the biologically plausible neuron and synaptic models of SNNs, and current FPGA routing structures cannot accommodate the high levels of interneuron connectivity inherent in complex SNNs. This paper highlights and discusses the current challenges of implementing scalable SNNs on reconfigurable FPGAs. The paper proposes a novel field programmable neural network architecture (EMBRACE, incorporating low-power analogue spiking neurons, interconnected using a Network-on-Chip architecture. Results on the evaluation of the EMBRACE architecture using the XOR benchmark problem are presented, and the performance of the architecture is discussed. The paper also discusses the adaptability of the EMBRACE architecture in supporting fault tolerant computing.

  6. Modeling Wireless Sensor Networks for Monitoring in Biological Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nadimi, Esmaeil

    (MMAE) approach to the data resulted in the highest classification success rate, due to the use of precise forth-order mathematical models which relate the feed offer to the pitch angle of the neck. This thesis shows that wireless sensor networks can be successfully employed to monitor the behavior...... parameters, as the use of wired sensors is impractical. In this thesis, a ZigBee based wireless sensor network was employed and only a part of the herd was monitored, as monitoring each individual animal in a large herd under practical conditions is inefficient. Investigations to show that the monitored...... signal strength). Fusing the two measured behavioral data resulted in an improvement of the classification results regarding the animal behavior mode (activity/inactivity), compared to the results achieved by only monitoring one of the behavioral parameters. Applying a multiple-model adaptive estimation...

  7. ABS: Sequence alignment by scanning

    KAUST Repository

    Bonny, Mohamed Talal

    2011-08-01

    Sequence alignment is an essential tool in almost any computational biology research. It processes large database sequences and considered to be high consumers of computation time. Heuristic algorithms are used to get approximate but fast results. We introduce fast alignment algorithm, called Alignment By Scanning (ABS), to provide an approximate alignment of two DNA sequences. We compare our algorithm with the well-known alignment algorithms, the FASTA (which is heuristic) and the \\'Needleman-Wunsch\\' (which is optimal). The proposed algorithm achieves up to 76% enhancement in alignment score when it is compared with the FASTA Algorithm. The evaluations are conducted using different lengths of DNA sequences. © 2011 IEEE.

  8. Biological Implications of Dynamical Phases in Non-equilibrium Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Arvind; Vaikuntanathan, Suriyanarayanan

    2016-03-01

    Biology achieves novel functions like error correction, ultra-sensitivity and accurate concentration measurement at the expense of free energy through Maxwell Demon-like mechanisms. The design principles and free energy trade-offs have been studied for a variety of such mechanisms. In this review, we emphasize a perspective based on dynamical phases that can explain commonalities shared by these mechanisms. Dynamical phases are defined by typical trajectories executed by non-equilibrium systems in the space of internal states. We find that coexistence of dynamical phases can have dramatic consequences for function vs free energy cost trade-offs. Dynamical phases can also provide an intuitive picture of the design principles behind such biological Maxwell Demons.

  9. A swarm intelligence framework for reconstructing gene networks: searching for biologically plausible architectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentzoglanakis, Kyriakos; Poole, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of reverse engineering the topology of gene regulatory networks from temporal gene expression data. We adopt a computational intelligence approach comprising swarm intelligence techniques, namely particle swarm optimization (PSO) and ant colony optimization (ACO). In addition, the recurrent neural network (RNN) formalism is employed for modeling the dynamical behavior of gene regulatory systems. More specifically, ACO is used for searching the discrete space of network architectures and PSO for searching the corresponding continuous space of RNN model parameters. We propose a novel solution construction process in the context of ACO for generating biologically plausible candidate architectures. The objective is to concentrate the search effort into areas of the structure space that contain architectures which are feasible in terms of their topological resemblance to real-world networks. The proposed framework is initially applied to the reconstruction of a small artificial network that has previously been studied in the context of gene network reverse engineering. Subsequently, we consider an artificial data set with added noise for reconstructing a subnetwork of the genetic interaction network of S. cerevisiae (yeast). Finally, the framework is applied to a real-world data set for reverse engineering the SOS response system of the bacterium Escherichia coli. Results demonstrate the relative advantage of utilizing problem-specific knowledge regarding biologically plausible structural properties of gene networks over conducting a problem-agnostic search in the vast space of network architectures.

  10. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, F.; Murabito, E.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out throughin silicotheoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement furtherin vitroandin vivoexperimental

  11. AN INTEGRATED NETWORK APPROACH TO IDENTIFYING BIOLOGICAL PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE INTERACTIONS IN COMPLEX DISEASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabos, Christian; Qiu, Jingya; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Complex diseases are the result of intricate interactions between genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors. In previous studies, we used epidemiological and genetic data linking environmental exposure or genetic variants to phenotypic disease to construct Human Phenotype Networks and separately analyze the effects of both environment and genetic factors on disease interactions. To better capture the intricacies of the interactions between environmental exposure and the biological pathways in complex disorders, we integrate both aspects into a single "tripartite" network. Despite extensive research, the mechanisms by which chemical agents disrupt biological pathways are still poorly understood. In this study, we use our integrated network model to identify specific biological pathway candidates possibly disrupted by environmental agents. We conjecture that a higher number of co-occurrences between an environmental substance and biological pathway pair can be associated with a higher likelihood that the substance is involved in disrupting that pathway. We validate our model by demonstrating its ability to detect known arsenic and signal transduction pathway interactions and speculate on candidate cell-cell junction organization pathways disrupted by cadmium. The validation was supported by distinct publications of cell biology and genetic studies that associated environmental exposure to pathway disruption. The integrated network approach is a novel method for detecting the biological effects of environmental exposures. A better understanding of the molecular processes associated with specific environmental exposures will help in developing targeted molecular therapies for patients who have been exposed to the toxicity of environmental chemicals.

  12. Spatial-Frequency Azimuthally Stable Cartography of Biological Polycrystalline Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Ushenko

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new azimuthally stable polarimetric technique processing microscopic images of optically anisotropic structures of biological tissues histological sections is proposed. It has been used as a generalized model of phase anisotropy definition of biological tissues by using superposition of Mueller matrices of linear birefringence and optical activity. The matrix element M44 has been chosen as the main information parameter, whose value is independent of the rotation angle of both sample and probing beam polarization plane. For the first time, the technique of concerted spatial-frequency filtration has been used in order to separate the manifestation of linear birefringence and optical activity. Thereupon, the method of azimuthally stable spatial-frequency cartography of biological tissues histological sections has been elaborated. As the analyzing tool, complex statistic, correlation, and fractal analysis of coordinate distributions of M44 element has been performed. The possibility of using the biopsy of the uterine wall tissue in order to differentiate benign (fibromyoma and malignant (adenocarcinoma conditions has been estimated.

  13. Reverse engineering biological networks :applications in immune responses to bio-toxins.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, Anthony A.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Thomas, Edward Victor; Slepoy, Alexander; Zhang, Zhaoduo; May, Elebeoba Eni; Martin, Shawn Bryan; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel

    2005-12-01

    Our aim is to determine the network of events, or the regulatory network, that defines an immune response to a bio-toxin. As a model system, we are studying T cell regulatory network triggered through tyrosine kinase receptor activation using a combination of pathway stimulation and time-series microarray experiments. Our approach is composed of five steps (1) microarray experiments and data error analysis, (2) data clustering, (3) data smoothing and discretization, (4) network reverse engineering, and (5) network dynamics analysis and fingerprint identification. The technological outcome of this study is a suite of experimental protocols and computational tools that reverse engineer regulatory networks provided gene expression data. The practical biological outcome of this work is an immune response fingerprint in terms of gene expression levels. Inferring regulatory networks from microarray data is a new field of investigation that is no more than five years old. To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first attempt that integrates experiments, error analyses, data clustering, inference, and network analysis to solve a practical problem. Our systematic approach of counting, enumeration, and sampling networks matching experimental data is new to the field of network reverse engineering. The resulting mathematical analyses and computational tools lead to new results on their own and should be useful to others who analyze and infer networks.

  14. 3-D components of a biological neural network visualized in computer generated imagery. II - Macular neural network organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Meyer, Glenn; Lam, Tony; Cutler, Lynn; Vaziri, Parshaw

    1990-01-01

    Computer-assisted reconstructions of small parts of the macular neural network show how the nerve terminals and receptive fields are organized in 3-dimensional space. This biological neural network is anatomically organized for parallel distributed processing of information. Processing appears to be more complex than in computer-based neural network, because spatiotemporal factors figure into synaptic weighting. Serial reconstruction data show anatomical arrangements which suggest that (1) assemblies of cells analyze and distribute information with inbuilt redundancy, to improve reliability; (2) feedforward/feedback loops provide the capacity for presynaptic modulation of output during processing; (3) constrained randomness in connectivities contributes to adaptability; and (4) local variations in network complexity permit differing analyses of incoming signals to take place simultaneously. The last inference suggests that there may be segregation of information flow to central stations subserving particular functions.

  15. Deep Neural Networks: A New Framework for Modeling Biological Vision and Brain Information Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2015-11-24

    Recent advances in neural network modeling have enabled major strides in computer vision and other artificial intelligence applications. Human-level visual recognition abilities are coming within reach of artificial systems. Artificial neural networks are inspired by the brain, and their computations could be implemented in biological neurons. Convolutional feedforward networks, which now dominate computer vision, take further inspiration from the architecture of the primate visual hierarchy. However, the current models are designed with engineering goals, not to model brain computations. Nevertheless, initial studies comparing internal representations between these models and primate brains find surprisingly similar representational spaces. With human-level performance no longer out of reach, we are entering an exciting new era, in which we will be able to build biologically faithful feedforward and recurrent computational models of how biological brains perform high-level feats of intelligence, including vision.

  16. Information theory in systems biology. Part II: protein-protein interaction and signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavian, Zaynab; Díaz, José; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-03-01

    By the development of information theory in 1948 by Claude Shannon to address the problems in the field of data storage and data communication over (noisy) communication channel, it has been successfully applied in many other research areas such as bioinformatics and systems biology. In this manuscript, we attempt to review some of the existing literatures in systems biology, which are using the information theory measures in their calculations. As we have reviewed most of the existing information-theoretic methods in gene regulatory and metabolic networks in the first part of the review, so in the second part of our study, the application of information theory in other types of biological networks including protein-protein interaction and signaling networks will be surveyed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Integrated analysis of multiple data sources reveals modular structure of biological networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Hongchao; Shi Baochen; Wu Gaowei; Zhang Yong; Zhu Xiaopeng; Zhang Zhihua; Liu Changning; Zhao, Yi; Wu Tao; Wang Jie; Chen Runsheng

    2006-01-01

    It has been a challenging task to integrate high-throughput data into investigations of the systematic and dynamic organization of biological networks. Here, we presented a simple hierarchical clustering algorithm that goes a long way to achieve this aim. Our method effectively reveals the modular structure of the yeast protein-protein interaction network and distinguishes protein complexes from functional modules by integrating high-throughput protein-protein interaction data with the added subcellular localization and expression profile data. Furthermore, we take advantage of the detected modules to provide a reliably functional context for the uncharacterized components within modules. On the other hand, the integration of various protein-protein association information makes our method robust to false-positives, especially for derived protein complexes. More importantly, this simple method can be extended naturally to other types of data fusion and provides a framework for the study of more comprehensive properties of the biological network and other forms of complex networks

  18. Construction of biological networks from unstructured information based on a semi-automated curation workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szostak, Justyna; Ansari, Sam; Madan, Sumit; Fluck, Juliane; Talikka, Marja; Iskandar, Anita; De Leon, Hector; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Peitsch, Manuel C; Hoeng, Julia

    2015-06-17

    Capture and representation of scientific knowledge in a structured format are essential to improve the understanding of biological mechanisms involved in complex diseases. Biological knowledge and knowledge about standardized terminologies are difficult to capture from literature in a usable form. A semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow is presented that was developed to allow users to extract causal and correlative relationships from scientific literature and to transcribe them into the computable and human readable Biological Expression Language (BEL). The workflow combines state-of-the-art linguistic tools for recognition of various entities and extraction of knowledge from literature sources. Unlike most other approaches, the workflow outputs the results to a curation interface for manual curation and converts them into BEL documents that can be compiled to form biological networks. We developed a new semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow that was designed to capture and organize scientific knowledge and reduce the required curation skills and effort for this task. The workflow was used to build a network that represents the cellular and molecular mechanisms implicated in atherosclerotic plaque destabilization in an apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mouse model. The network was generated using knowledge extracted from the primary literature. The resultant atherosclerotic plaque destabilization network contains 304 nodes and 743 edges supported by 33 PubMed referenced articles. A comparison between the semi-automated and conventional curation processes showed similar results, but significantly reduced curation effort for the semi-automated process. Creating structured knowledge from unstructured text is an important step for the mechanistic interpretation and reusability of knowledge. Our new semi-automated knowledge extraction workflow reduced the curation skills and effort required to capture and organize scientific knowledge. The

  19. The BIOSCI electronic newsgroup network for the biological sciences. Final report, October 1, 1992--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofferson, D.; Mack, D.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report for a DOE funded project on BIOSCI Electronic Newsgroup Network for the biological sciences. A usable network for scientific discussion, major announcements, problem solving, etc. has been created.

  20. Stochastic noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies of a population of biological networks under natural selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Yeh, Chin-Hsun

    2017-12-01

    We review current static and dynamic evolutionary game strategies of biological networks and discuss the lack of random genetic variations and stochastic environmental disturbances in these models. To include these factors, a population of evolving biological networks is modeled as a nonlinear stochastic biological system with Poisson-driven genetic variations and random environmental fluctuations (stimuli). To gain insight into the evolutionary game theory of stochastic biological networks under natural selection, the phenotypic robustness and network evolvability of noncooperative and cooperative evolutionary game strategies are discussed from a stochastic Nash game perspective. The noncooperative strategy can be transformed into an equivalent multi-objective optimization problem and is shown to display significantly improved network robustness to tolerate genetic variations and buffer environmental disturbances, maintaining phenotypic traits for longer than the cooperative strategy. However, the noncooperative case requires greater effort and more compromises between partly conflicting players. Global linearization is used to simplify the problem of solving nonlinear stochastic evolutionary games. Finally, a simple stochastic evolutionary model of a metabolic pathway is simulated to illustrate the procedure of solving for two evolutionary game strategies and to confirm and compare their respective characteristics in the evolutionary process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploitation of complex network topology for link prediction in biological interactomes

    KAUST Repository

    Alanis Lobato, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    The network representation of the interactions between proteins and genes allows for a holistic perspective of the complex machinery underlying the living cell. However, the large number of interacting entities within the cell makes network construction a daunting and arduous task, prone to errors and missing information. Fortunately, the structure of biological networks is not different from that of other complex systems, such as social networks, the world-wide web or power grids, for which growth models have been proposed to better understand their structure and function. This means that we can design tools based on these models in order to exploit the topology of biological interactomes with the aim to construct more complete and reliable maps of the cell. In this work, we propose three novel and powerful approaches for the prediction of interactions in biological networks and conclude that it is possible to mine the topology of these complex system representations and produce reliable and biologically meaningful information that enriches the datasets to which we have access today.

  2. Wavelet analysis of polarization maps of polycrystalline biological fluids networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenko, Y. A.

    2011-12-01

    The optical model of human joints synovial fluid is proposed. The statistic (statistic moments), correlation (autocorrelation function) and self-similar (Log-Log dependencies of power spectrum) structure of polarization two-dimensional distributions (polarization maps) of synovial fluid has been analyzed. It has been shown that differentiation of polarization maps of joint synovial fluid with different physiological state samples is expected of scale-discriminative analysis. To mark out of small-scale domain structure of synovial fluid polarization maps, the wavelet analysis has been used. The set of parameters, which characterize statistic, correlation and self-similar structure of wavelet coefficients' distributions of different scales of polarization domains for diagnostics and differentiation of polycrystalline network transformation connected with the pathological processes, has been determined.

  3. Modeling Cancer Metastasis using Global, Quantitative and Integrative Network Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine

    computational analysis, it is possible to gain a better understanding of colorectal cancer metastasis, and obtain potential clinical benefits. Chapter IV briefly summarizes the findings of the thesis and closes by proposing some future directions based on the work that was presented. Overall, the thesis aims...... a particular tumor, but also the phenotypic response to perturbations. Thus, there is a critical need for an integrative global approach, which assesses a biological system such as cancer from several molecular aspects in an un-biased fashion. This thesis summarizes the efforts that were undertaken as part...... of my PhD in an attempt to positively contribute to this fundamental challenge. The thesis is divided into four parts. In Chapter I, we introduce the complexity of cancer, and describe some underlying causes and ways to study the disease from different molecular perspectives. There is a nearly infinite...

  4. A biologically inspired neural network controller for ballistic arm movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Maurizio

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In humans, the implementation of multijoint tasks of the arm implies a highly complex integration of sensory information, sensorimotor transformations and motor planning. Computational models can be profitably used to better understand the mechanisms sub-serving motor control, thus providing useful perspectives and investigating different control hypotheses. To this purpose, the use of Artificial Neural Networks has been proposed to represent and interpret the movement of upper limb. In this paper, a neural network approach to the modelling of the motor control of a human arm during planar ballistic movements is presented. Methods The developed system is composed of three main computational blocks: 1 a parallel distributed learning scheme that aims at simulating the internal inverse model in the trajectory formation process; 2 a pulse generator, which is responsible for the creation of muscular synergies; and 3 a limb model based on two joints (two degrees of freedom and six muscle-like actuators, that can accommodate for the biomechanical parameters of the arm. The learning paradigm of the neural controller is based on a pure exploration of the working space with no feedback signal. Kinematics provided by the system have been compared with those obtained in literature from experimental data of humans. Results The model reproduces kinematics of arm movements, with bell-shaped wrist velocity profiles and approximately straight trajectories, and gives rise to the generation of synergies for the execution of movements. The model allows achieving amplitude and direction errors of respectively 0.52 cm and 0.2 radians. Curvature values are similar to those encountered in experimental measures with humans. The neural controller also manages environmental modifications such as the insertion of different force fields acting on the end-effector. Conclusion The proposed system has been shown to properly simulate the development of

  5. Automatic compilation from high-level biologically-oriented programming language to genetic regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Beal

    Full Text Available The field of synthetic biology promises to revolutionize our ability to engineer biological systems, providing important benefits for a variety of applications. Recent advances in DNA synthesis and automated DNA assembly technologies suggest that it is now possible to construct synthetic systems of significant complexity. However, while a variety of novel genetic devices and small engineered gene networks have been successfully demonstrated, the regulatory complexity of synthetic systems that have been reported recently has somewhat plateaued due to a variety of factors, including the complexity of biology itself and the lag in our ability to design and optimize sophisticated biological circuitry.To address the gap between DNA synthesis and circuit design capabilities, we present a platform that enables synthetic biologists to express desired behavior using a convenient high-level biologically-oriented programming language, Proto. The high level specification is compiled, using a regulatory motif based mechanism, to a gene network, optimized, and then converted to a computational simulation for numerical verification. Through several example programs we illustrate the automated process of biological system design with our platform, and show that our compiler optimizations can yield significant reductions in the number of genes (~ 50% and latency of the optimized engineered gene networks.Our platform provides a convenient and accessible tool for the automated design of sophisticated synthetic biological systems, bridging an important gap between DNA synthesis and circuit design capabilities. Our platform is user-friendly and features biologically relevant compiler optimizations, providing an important foundation for the development of sophisticated biological systems.

  6. Alignment for CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Shoujin; Man Kaidi; Guo Yizhen; Cai Guozhu; Guo Yuhui

    2002-01-01

    Cooled Storage Ring of Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) belongs to China great scientific project in China. The alignment for it is very difficult because of very large area and very high accuracy. For the special case in HIRFL-CSR, some new methods and new instruments are used, including the construction of survey control network, the usage of laser tracker, and CSR alignment database system with applications developed to store and analyze data. The author describes the whole procedure of CSR alignment

  7. RANKING RELATIONS USING ANALOGIES IN BIOLOGICAL AND INFORMATION NETWORKS1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ricardo; Heller, Katherine; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Airoldi, Edoardo M.

    2013-01-01

    Analogical reasoning depends fundamentally on the ability to learn and generalize about relations between objects. We develop an approach to relational learning which, given a set of pairs of objects S = {A(1) : B(1), A(2) : B(2), …, A(N) : B(N)}, measures how well other pairs A : B fit in with the set S. Our work addresses the following question: is the relation between objects A and B analogous to those relations found in S? Such questions are particularly relevant in information retrieval, where an investigator might want to search for analogous pairs of objects that match the query set of interest. There are many ways in which objects can be related, making the task of measuring analogies very challenging. Our approach combines a similarity measure on function spaces with Bayesian analysis to produce a ranking. It requires data containing features of the objects of interest and a link matrix specifying which relationships exist; no further attributes of such relationships are necessary. We illustrate the potential of our method on text analysis and information networks. An application on discovering functional interactions between pairs of proteins is discussed in detail, where we show that our approach can work in practice even if a small set of protein pairs is provided. PMID:24587838

  8. Discriminating Different Classes of Biological Networks by Analyzing the Graphs Spectra Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Daniel Yasumasa; Sato, João Ricardo; Ferreira, Carlos Eduardo; Fujita, André

    2012-01-01

    The brain's structural and functional systems, protein-protein interaction, and gene networks are examples of biological systems that share some features of complex networks, such as highly connected nodes, modularity, and small-world topology. Recent studies indicate that some pathologies present topological network alterations relative to norms seen in the general population. Therefore, methods to discriminate the processes that generate the different classes of networks (e.g., normal and disease) might be crucial for the diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment of the disease. It is known that several topological properties of a network (graph) can be described by the distribution of the spectrum of its adjacency matrix. Moreover, large networks generated by the same random process have the same spectrum distribution, allowing us to use it as a “fingerprint”. Based on this relationship, we introduce and propose the entropy of a graph spectrum to measure the “uncertainty” of a random graph and the Kullback-Leibler and Jensen-Shannon divergences between graph spectra to compare networks. We also introduce general methods for model selection and network model parameter estimation, as well as a statistical procedure to test the nullity of divergence between two classes of complex networks. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed methods by applying them to (1) protein-protein interaction networks of different species and (2) on networks derived from children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and typically developing children. We conclude that scale-free networks best describe all the protein-protein interactions. Also, we show that our proposed measures succeeded in the identification of topological changes in the network while other commonly used measures (number of edges, clustering coefficient, average path length) failed. PMID:23284629

  9. A biological network-based regularized artificial neural network model for robust phenotype prediction from gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tianyu; Ding, Wei; Zhang, Luoyan; Ziemek, Daniel; Zarringhalam, Kourosh

    2017-12-19

    Stratification of patient subpopulations that respond favorably to treatment or experience and adverse reaction is an essential step toward development of new personalized therapies and diagnostics. It is currently feasible to generate omic-scale biological measurements for all patients in a study, providing an opportunity for machine learning models to identify molecular markers for disease diagnosis and progression. However, the high variability of genetic background in human populations hampers the reproducibility of omic-scale markers. In this paper, we develop a biological network-based regularized artificial neural network model for prediction of phenotype from transcriptomic measurements in clinical trials. To improve model sparsity and the overall reproducibility of the model, we incorporate regularization for simultaneous shrinkage of gene sets based on active upstream regulatory mechanisms into the model. We benchmark our method against various regression, support vector machines and artificial neural network models and demonstrate the ability of our method in predicting the clinical outcomes using clinical trial data on acute rejection in kidney transplantation and response to Infliximab in ulcerative colitis. We show that integration of prior biological knowledge into the classification as developed in this paper, significantly improves the robustness and generalizability of predictions to independent datasets. We provide a Java code of our algorithm along with a parsed version of the STRING DB database. In summary, we present a method for prediction of clinical phenotypes using baseline genome-wide expression data that makes use of prior biological knowledge on gene-regulatory interactions in order to increase robustness and reproducibility of omic-scale markers. The integrated group-wise regularization methods increases the interpretability of biological signatures and gives stable performance estimates across independent test sets.

  10. What do interaction network metrics tell us about specialization and biological traits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüthgen, Nico; Fründ, Jochen; Vázquez, Diego P; Menzel, Florian

    2008-12-01

    The structure of ecological interaction networks is often interpreted as a product of meaningful ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that shape the degree of specialization in community associations. However, here we show that both unweighted network metrics (connectance, nestedness, and degree distribution) and weighted network metrics (interaction evenness, interaction strength asymmetry) are strongly constrained and biased by the number of observations. Rarely observed species are inevitably regarded as "specialists," irrespective of their actual associations, leading to biased estimates of specialization. Consequently, a skewed distribution of species observation records (such as the lognormal), combined with a relatively low sampling density typical for ecological data, already generates a "nested" and poorly "connected" network with "asymmetric interaction strengths" when interactions are neutral. This is confirmed by null model simulations of bipartite networks, assuming that partners associate randomly in the absence of any specialization and any variation in the correspondence of biological traits between associated species (trait matching). Variation in the skewness of the frequency distribution fundamentally changes the outcome of network metrics. Therefore, interpretation of network metrics in terms of fundamental specialization and trait matching requires an appropriate control for such severe constraints imposed by information deficits. When using an alternative approach that controls for these effects, most natural networks of mutualistic or antagonistic systems show a significantly higher degree of reciprocal specialization (exclusiveness) than expected under neutral conditions. A higher exclusiveness is coherent with a tighter coevolution and suggests a lower ecological redundancy than implied by nested networks.

  11. A robust and biologically plausible spike pattern recognition network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric; Perrone, Ben P; Sen, Kamal; Billimoria, Cyrus P

    2010-11-17

    The neural mechanisms that enable recognition of spiking patterns in the brain are currently unknown. This is especially relevant in sensory systems, in which the brain has to detect such patterns and recognize relevant stimuli by processing peripheral inputs; in particular, it is unclear how sensory systems can recognize time-varying stimuli by processing spiking activity. Because auditory stimuli are represented by time-varying fluctuations in frequency content, it is useful to consider how such stimuli can be recognized by neural processing. Previous models for sound recognition have used preprocessed or low-level auditory signals as input, but complex natural sounds such as speech are thought to be processed in auditory cortex, and brain regions involved in object recognition in general must deal with the natural variability present in spike trains. Thus, we used neural recordings to investigate how a spike pattern recognition system could deal with the intrinsic variability and diverse response properties of cortical spike trains. We propose a biologically plausible computational spike pattern recognition model that uses an excitatory chain of neurons to spatially preserve the temporal representation of the spike pattern. Using a single neural recording as input, the model can be trained using a spike-timing-dependent plasticity-based learning rule to recognize neural responses to 20 different bird songs with >98% accuracy and can be stimulated to evoke reverse spike pattern playback. Although we test spike train recognition performance in an auditory task, this model can be applied to recognize sufficiently reliable spike patterns from any neuronal system.

  12. MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    malignancy. [Wang J and Sen S 2011 MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to biomarkers of disease. J. Biosci. 36 481–491] ... aid in improving clinical management and therapeutic outcome for the patients. ..... 133a is a characteristic of pancreatic tissue and that a total of. 26 miRs are aberrantly ...

  13. Imaging Analysis of Collagen Fiber Networks in Cusps of Porcine Aortic Valves: Effect of their Local Distribution and Alignment on Valve Functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Mor; Marom, Gil; Halevi, Rotem; Hamdan, Ashraf; Bluestein, Danny; Haj-Ali, Rami

    2015-01-01

    The cusps of native Aortic Valve (AV) are composed of collagen bundles embedded in soft tissue, creating a heterogenic tissue with asymmetric alignment in each cusp. This study compares native collagen fiber networks (CFNs) with a goal to better understand their influence on stress distribution and valve kinematics. Images of CFNs from five porcine tricuspid AVs are analyzed and fluid-structure interaction models are generated based on them. Although the valves had similar overall kinematics, the CFNs had distinctive influence on local mechanics. The regions with dilute CFN are more prone to damage since they are subjected to higher stress magnitudes. PMID:26406926

  14. Biological network extraction from scientific literature: state of the art and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Liakata, Maria; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2014-09-01

    Networks of molecular interactions explain complex biological processes, and all known information on molecular events is contained in a number of public repositories including the scientific literature. Metabolic and signalling pathways are often viewed separately, even though both types are composed of interactions involving proteins and other chemical entities. It is necessary to be able to combine data from all available resources to judge the functionality, complexity and completeness of any given network overall, but especially the full integration of relevant information from the scientific literature is still an ongoing and complex task. Currently, the text-mining research community is steadily moving towards processing the full body of the scientific literature by making use of rich linguistic features such as full text parsing, to extract biological interactions. The next step will be to combine these with information from scientific databases to support hypothesis generation for the discovery of new knowledge and the extension of biological networks. The generation of comprehensive networks requires technologies such as entity grounding, coordination resolution and co-reference resolution, which are not fully solved and are required to further improve the quality of results. Here, we analyse the state of the art for the extraction of network information from the scientific literature and the evaluation of extraction methods against reference corpora, discuss challenges involved and identify directions for future research. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Constraints of Biological Neural Networks and Their Consideration in AI Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Stafford

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Biological organisms do not evolve to perfection, but to out compete others in their ecological niche, and therefore survive and reproduce. This paper reviews the constraints imposed on imperfect organisms, particularly on their neural systems and ability to capture and process information accurately. By understanding biological constraints of the physical properties of neurons, simpler and more efficient artificial neural networks can be made (e.g., spiking networks will transmit less information than graded potential networks, spikes only occur in nature due to limitations of carrying electrical charges over large distances. Furthermore, understanding the behavioural and ecological constraints on animals allows an understanding of the limitations of bio-inspired solutions, but also an understanding of why bio-inspired solutions may fail and how to correct these failures.

  16. Synthetic biology and regulatory networks: where metabolic systems biology meets control engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Murabito, Ettore; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2016-04-01

    Metabolic pathways can be engineered to maximize the synthesis of various products of interest. With the advent of computational systems biology, this endeavour is usually carried out through in silico theoretical studies with the aim to guide and complement further in vitro and in vivo experimental efforts. Clearly, what counts is the result in vivo, not only in terms of maximal productivity but also robustness against environmental perturbations. Engineering an organism towards an increased production flux, however, often compromises that robustness. In this contribution, we review and investigate how various analytical approaches used in metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are related to concepts developed by systems and control engineering. While trade-offs between production optimality and cellular robustness have already been studied diagnostically and statically, the dynamics also matter. Integration of the dynamic design aspects of control engineering with the more diagnostic aspects of metabolic, hierarchical control and regulation analysis is leading to the new, conceptual and operational framework required for the design of robust and productive dynamic pathways. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Systems Biology Modeling of the Radiation Sensitivity Network: A Biomarker Discovery Platform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschrich, Steven; Zhang Hongling; Zhao Haiyan; Boulware, David; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Bloom, Gregory; Torres-Roca, Javier F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The discovery of effective biomarkers is a fundamental goal of molecular medicine. Developing a systems-biology understanding of radiosensitivity can enhance our ability of identifying radiation-specific biomarkers. Methods and Materials: Radiosensitivity, as represented by the survival fraction at 2 Gy was modeled in 48 human cancer cell lines. We applied a linear regression algorithm that integrates gene expression with biological variables, including ras status (mut/wt), tissue of origin and p53 status (mut/wt). Results: The biomarker discovery platform is a network representation of the top 500 genes identified by linear regression analysis. This network was reduced to a 10-hub network that includes c-Jun, HDAC1, RELA (p65 subunit of NFKB), PKC-beta, SUMO-1, c-Abl, STAT1, AR, CDK1, and IRF1. Nine targets associated with radiosensitization drugs are linked to the network, demonstrating clinical relevance. Furthermore, the model identified four significant radiosensitivity clusters of terms and genes. Ras was a dominant variable in the analysis, as was the tissue of origin, and their interaction with gene expression but not p53. Overrepresented biological pathways differed between clusters but included DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, and metabolism. The c-Jun network hub was validated using a knockdown approach in 8 human cell lines representing lung, colon, and breast cancers. Conclusion: We have developed a novel radiation-biomarker discovery platform using a systems biology modeling approach. We believe this platform will play a central role in the integration of biology into clinical radiation oncology practice.

  18. Evaluation of gene association methods for coexpression network construction and biological knowledge discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Kumari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Constructing coexpression networks and performing network analysis using large-scale gene expression data sets is an effective way to uncover new biological knowledge; however, the methods used for gene association in constructing these coexpression networks have not been thoroughly evaluated. Since different methods lead to structurally different coexpression networks and provide different information, selecting the optimal gene association method is critical. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we compared eight gene association methods - Spearman rank correlation, Weighted Rank Correlation, Kendall, Hoeffding's D measure, Theil-Sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Distance Covariance, and Pearson - and focused on their true knowledge discovery rates in associating pathway genes and construction coordination networks of regulatory genes. We also examined the behaviors of different methods to microarray data with different properties, and whether the biological processes affect the efficiency of different methods. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the Spearman, Hoeffding and Kendall methods are effective in identifying coexpressed pathway genes, whereas the Theil-sen, Rank Theil-Sen, Spearman, and Weighted Rank methods perform well in identifying coordinated transcription factors that control the same biological processes and traits. Surprisingly, the widely used Pearson method is generally less efficient, and so is the Distance Covariance method that can find gene pairs of multiple relationships. Some analyses we did clearly show Pearson and Distance Covariance methods have distinct behaviors as compared to all other six methods. The efficiencies of different methods vary with the data properties to some degree and are largely contingent upon the biological processes, which necessitates the pre-analysis to identify the best performing method for gene association and coexpression network construction.

  19. Prediction of biological motion perception performance from intrinsic brain network regional efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengjian Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological motion perception (BMP is a vivid perception of the moving form of a human figure from a few light points on the joints of the body. BMP is commonplace and important, but there is great inter-individual variability in this ability. This study used multiple regression model analysis to explore the association between the BMP performance and intrinsic brain activity, in order to investigate the neural substrates underlying inter-individual variability of BMP performance. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI and BMP performance data were collected from 24 healthy participants. For each participant, the intrinsic brain network was constructed, and a graph-based network efficiency metric was measured. Then, a multiple linear regression model was used to explore the association between network regional efficiency and BMP performance. We found that the local and global network efficiency of many regions was significantly correlated with the BMP performance. Further analysis showed that the local efficiency rather than global efficiency could be used to explain most of the BMP inter-individual variability, and the regions involved were predominately located at the Default Mode Network (DMN. Additionally, the discrimination analysis showed that the local efficiency over regions including thalamus could be used to classify BMP performance across participants. Notably, the association pattern between the network nodal efficiency and the BMP was different from the association pattern that of the static directional/gender information perception. Overall, these findings showed that intrinsic brain network efficiency may be considered as a neural factor that explains BMP inter-individual variability. Keywords: Biological motion; Resting-state network; Network efficiency; Multiple linear regression model; Brain-behavior analysis

  20. A comparative analysis on computational methods for fitting an ERGM to biological network data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudipta Saha

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Exponential random graph models (ERGM based on graph theory are useful in studying global biological network structure using its local properties. However, computational methods for fitting such models are sensitive to the type, structure and the number of the local features of a network under study. In this paper, we compared computational methods for fitting an ERGM with local features of different types and structures. Two commonly used methods, such as the Markov Chain Monte Carlo Maximum Likelihood Estimation and the Maximum Pseudo Likelihood Estimation are considered for estimating the coefficients of network attributes. We compared the estimates of observed network to our random simulated network using both methods under ERGM. The motivation was to ascertain the extent to which an observed network would deviate from a randomly simulated network if the physical numbers of attributes were approximately same. Cut-off points of some common attributes of interest for different order of nodes were determined through simulations. We implemented our method to a known regulatory network database of Escherichia coli (E. coli.

  1. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of atorvastatin calcium in pharmaceutical and biological samples using a vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago Almeida; Zanin, Hudson; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Corat, Evaldo José; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-06-07

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide (VACNT-GO) electrode is proposed, and its ability to determine atorvastatin calcium (ATOR) in pharmaceutical and biological samples by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) is evaluated. VACNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method and then treated with oxygen plasma to produce the VACNT-GO electrode. The oxygen plasma treatment exfoliates the carbon nanotube tips exposing graphene foils and inserting oxygen functional groups, these effects improved the VACNT wettability (super-hydrophobic) which is crucial for its electrochemical application. The electrochemical behaviour of ATOR on the VACNT-GO electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed that it underwent an irreversible oxidation process at a potential of +1.08 V in pHcond 2.0 (0.2 mol L(-1) buffer phosphate solution). By applying DPAdSV under optimized experimental conditions the analytical curve was found to be linear in the ATOR concentration range of 90 to 3.81 × 10(3) nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 9.4 nmol L(-1). The proposed DPAdSV method was successfully applied in the determination of ATOR in pharmaceutical and biological samples, and the results were in close agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method at a confidence level of 95%.

  2. MODA: an efficient algorithm for network motif discovery in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, Saeed; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, interest has been growing in the study of complex networks. Since Erdös and Rényi (1960) proposed their random graph model about 50 years ago, many researchers have investigated and shaped this field. Many indicators have been proposed to assess the global features of networks. Recently, an active research area has developed in studying local features named motifs as the building blocks of networks. Unfortunately, network motif discovery is a computationally hard problem and finding rather large motifs (larger than 8 nodes) by means of current algorithms is impractical as it demands too much computational effort. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (MODA) that incorporates techniques such as a pattern growth approach for extracting larger motifs efficiently. We have tested our algorithm and found it able to identify larger motifs with more than 8 nodes more efficiently than most of the current state-of-the-art motif discovery algorithms. While most of the algorithms rely on induced subgraphs as motifs of the networks, MODA is able to extract both induced and non-induced subgraphs simultaneously. The MODA source code is freely available at: http://LBB.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/MODA/

  3. An novel frequent probability pattern mining algorithm based on circuit simulation method in uncertain biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Motif mining has always been a hot research topic in bioinformatics. Most of current research on biological networks focuses on exact motif mining. However, due to the inevitable experimental error and noisy data, biological network data represented as the probability model could better reflect the authenticity and biological significance, therefore, it is more biological meaningful to discover probability motif in uncertain biological networks. One of the key steps in probability motif mining is frequent pattern discovery which is usually based on the possible world model having a relatively high computational complexity. Methods In this paper, we present a novel method for detecting frequent probability patterns based on circuit simulation in the uncertain biological networks. First, the partition based efficient search is applied to the non-tree like subgraph mining where the probability of occurrence in random networks is small. Then, an algorithm of probability isomorphic based on circuit simulation is proposed. The probability isomorphic combines the analysis of circuit topology structure with related physical properties of voltage in order to evaluate the probability isomorphism between probability subgraphs. The circuit simulation based probability isomorphic can avoid using traditional possible world model. Finally, based on the algorithm of probability subgraph isomorphism, two-step hierarchical clustering method is used to cluster subgraphs, and discover frequent probability patterns from the clusters. Results The experiment results on data sets of the Protein-Protein Interaction (PPI) networks and the transcriptional regulatory networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae show that the proposed method can efficiently discover the frequent probability subgraphs. The discovered subgraphs in our study contain all probability motifs reported in the experiments published in other related papers. Conclusions The algorithm of probability graph isomorphism

  4. Insights into biological information processing: structural and dynamical analysis of a human protein signalling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, Alberto de la; Fotia, Giorgio; Maggio, Fabio; Mancosu, Gianmaria; Pieroni, Enrico [CRS4 Bioinformatica, Parco Tecnologico POLARIS, Ed.1, Loc Piscinamanna, Pula (Italy)], E-mail: alf@crs4.it

    2008-06-06

    We present an investigation on the structural and dynamical properties of a 'human protein signalling network' (HPSN). This biological network is composed of nodes that correspond to proteins and directed edges that represent signal flows. In order to gain insight into the organization of cell information processing this network is analysed taking into account explicitly the edge directions. We explore the topological properties of the HPSN at the global and the local scale, further applying the generating function formalism to provide a suitable comparative model. The relationship between the node degrees and the distribution of signals through the network is characterized using degree correlation profiles. Finally, we analyse the dynamical properties of small sub-graphs showing high correlation between their occurrence and dynamic stability.

  5. Networks In Real Space: Characteristics and Analysis for Biology and Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modes, Carl; Magnasco, Marcelo; Katifori, Eleni

    Functional networks embedded in physical space play a crucial role in countless biological and physical systems, from the efficient dissemination of oxygen, blood sugars, and hormonal signals in vascular systems to the complex relaying of informational signals in the brain to the distribution of stress and strain in architecture or static sand piles. Unlike their more-studied abstract cousins, such as the hyperlinked internet, social networks, or economic and financial connections, these networks are both constrained by and intimately connected to the physicality of their real, embedding space. We report on the results of new computational and analytic approaches tailored to these physical networks with particular implications and insights for mammalian organ vasculature.

  6. A Systems’ Biology Approach to Study MicroRNA-Mediated Gene Regulatory Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Lai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are potent effectors in gene regulatory networks where aberrant miRNA expression can contribute to human diseases such as cancer. For a better understanding of the regulatory role of miRNAs in coordinating gene expression, we here present a systems biology approach combining data-driven modeling and model-driven experiments. Such an approach is characterized by an iterative process, including biological data acquisition and integration, network construction, mathematical modeling and experimental validation. To demonstrate the application of this approach, we adopt it to investigate mechanisms of collective repression on p21 by multiple miRNAs. We first construct a p21 regulatory network based on data from the literature and further expand it using algorithms that predict molecular interactions. Based on the network structure, a detailed mechanistic model is established and its parameter values are determined using data. Finally, the calibrated model is used to study the effect of different miRNA expression profiles and cooperative target regulation on p21 expression levels in different biological contexts.

  7. MSD-MAP: A Network-Based Systems Biology Platform for Predicting Disease-Metabolite Links.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathieu, Henri; Issa, Naiem T; Mohandoss, Manisha; Byers, Stephen W; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan

    2017-01-01

    Cancer-associated metabolites result from cell-wide mechanisms of dysregulation. The field of metabolomics has sought to identify these aberrant metabolites as disease biomarkers, clues to understanding disease mechanisms, or even as therapeutic agents. This study was undertaken to reliably predict metabolites associated with colorectal, esophageal, and prostate cancers. Metabolite and disease biological action networks were compared in a computational platform called MSD-MAP (Multi Scale Disease-Metabolite Association Platform). Using differential gene expression analysis with patient-based RNAseq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, genes up- or down-regulated in cancer compared to normal tissue were identified. Relational databases were used to map biological entities including pathways, functions, and interacting proteins, to those differential disease genes. Similar relational maps were built for metabolites, stemming from known and in silico predicted metabolite-protein associations. The hypergeometric test was used to find statistically significant relationships between disease and metabolite biological signatures at each tier, and metabolites were assessed for multi-scale association with each cancer. Metabolite networks were also directly associated with various other diseases using a disease functional perturbation database. Our platform recapitulated metabolite-disease links that have been empirically verified in the scientific literature, with network-based mapping of jointly-associated biological activity also matching known disease mechanisms. This was true for colorectal, esophageal, and prostate cancers, using metabolite action networks stemming from both predicted and known functional protein associations. By employing systems biology concepts, MSD-MAP reliably predicted known cancermetabolite links, and may serve as a predictive tool to streamline conventional metabolomic profiling methodologies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any

  8. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrgård, Markus J; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B; Arga, K Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Le Novère, Nicolas; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasić, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S; Westerhoff, Hans V; Kirdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B

    2008-10-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and content, and use different terminologies to describe the same chemical entities. This makes comparisons between them difficult and underscores the desirability of a consolidated metabolic network that collects and formalizes the 'community knowledge' of yeast metabolism. We describe how we have produced a consensus metabolic network reconstruction for S. cerevisiae. In drafting it, we placed special emphasis on referencing molecules to persistent databases or using database-independent forms, such as SMILES or InChI strings, as this permits their chemical structure to be represented unambiguously and in a manner that permits automated reasoning. The reconstruction is readily available via a publicly accessible database and in the Systems Biology Markup Language (http://www.comp-sys-bio.org/yeastnet). It can be maintained as a resource that serves as a common denominator for studying the systems biology of yeast. Similar strategies should benefit communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms.

  9. Resource Alignment ANADP

    OpenAIRE

    Grindley, Neil; Cramer, Tom; Schrimpf, Sabine; Wilson, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation: An Action Assembly Biblioteca de Catalunya (National Library of Catalonia) November 18-20, 2013, Barcelona, Spain Auburn University Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Digital Preservation Network (DPN) Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) University of North Texas Virginia Tech Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Innovative Inte...

  10. Capacity Alignment ANADP

    OpenAIRE

    Davidson, Joy; Whitehead, Martha; Molloy, Laura; Molinaro, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Aligning National Approaches to Digital Preservation: An Action Assembly Biblioteca de Catalunya (National Library of Catalonia) November 18-20, 2013, Barcelona, Spain Auburn University Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) Digital Curation Centre (DCC) Digital Preservation Network (DPN) Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) University of North Texas Virginia Tech Interuniversity Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) Innovative Inte...

  11. Visual analysis of transcriptome data in the context of anatomical structures and biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid eJunker

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity and temporal as well as spatial resolution of transcriptome datasets is constantly increasing due to extensive technological developments. Here we present methods for advanced visualization and intuitive exploration of transcriptomics data as necessary prerequisites in order to facilitate the gain of biological knowledge. Color-coding of structural images based on the expression level enables a fast visual data analysis in the background of the examined biological system. The network-based exploration of these visualizations allows for comparative analysis of genes with specific transcript patterns and supports the extraction of functional relationships even from large datasets. In order to illustrate the presented methods, the tool HIVE was applied for visualization and exploration of database-retrieved expression data for master regulators of Arabidopsis thaliana flower and seed development in the context of corresponding tissue-specific regulatory networks.

  12. CUFID-query: accurate network querying through random walk based network flow estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyundoo; Qian, Xiaoning; Yoon, Byung-Jun

    2017-12-28

    Functional modules in biological networks consist of numerous biomolecules and their complicated interactions. Recent studies have shown that biomolecules in a functional module tend to have similar interaction patterns and that such modules are often conserved across biological networks of different species. As a result, such conserved functional modules can be identified through comparative analysis of biological networks. In this work, we propose a novel network querying algorithm based on the CUFID (Comparative network analysis Using the steady-state network Flow to IDentify orthologous proteins) framework combined with an efficient seed-and-extension approach. The proposed algorithm, CUFID-query, can accurately detect conserved functional modules as small subnetworks in the target network that are expected to perform similar functions to the given query functional module. The CUFID framework was recently developed for probabilistic pairwise global comparison of biological networks, and it has been applied to pairwise global network alignment, where the framework was shown to yield accurate network alignment results. In the proposed CUFID-query algorithm, we adopt the CUFID framework and extend it for local network alignment, specifically to solve network querying problems. First, in the seed selection phase, the proposed method utilizes the CUFID framework to compare the query and the target networks and to predict the probabilistic node-to-node correspondence between the networks. Next, the algorithm selects and greedily extends the seed in the target network by iteratively adding nodes that have frequent interactions with other nodes in the seed network, in a way that the conductance of the extended network is maximally reduced. Finally, CUFID-query removes irrelevant nodes from the querying results based on the personalized PageRank vector for the induced network that includes the fully extended network and its neighboring nodes. Through extensive

  13. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Bineng; Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of tra...

  14. Contextual Hub Analysis Tool (CHAT): A Cytoscape app for identifying contextually relevant hubs in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muetze, Tanja; Goenawan, Ivan H; Wiencko, Heather L; Bernal-Llinares, Manuel; Bryan, Kenneth; Lynn, David J

    2016-01-01

    Highly connected nodes (hubs) in biological networks are topologically important to the structure of the network and have also been shown to be preferentially associated with a range of phenotypes of interest. The relative importance of a hub node, however, can change depending on the biological context. Here, we report a Cytoscape app, the Contextual Hub Analysis Tool (CHAT), which enables users to easily construct and visualize a network of interactions from a gene or protein list of interest, integrate contextual information, such as gene expression or mass spectrometry data, and identify hub nodes that are more highly connected to contextual nodes (e.g. genes or proteins that are differentially expressed) than expected by chance. In a case study, we use CHAT to construct a network of genes that are differentially expressed in Dengue fever, a viral infection. CHAT was used to identify and compare contextual and degree-based hubs in this network. The top 20 degree-based hubs were enriched in pathways related to the cell cycle and cancer, which is likely due to the fact that proteins involved in these processes tend to be highly connected in general. In comparison, the top 20 contextual hubs were enriched in pathways commonly observed in a viral infection including pathways related to the immune response to viral infection. This analysis shows that such contextual hubs are considerably more biologically relevant than degree-based hubs and that analyses which rely on the identification of hubs solely based on their connectivity may be biased towards nodes that are highly connected in general rather than in the specific context of interest. CHAT is available for Cytoscape 3.0+ and can be installed via the Cytoscape App Store ( http://apps.cytoscape.org/apps/chat).

  15. NeAT: a toolbox for the analysis of biological networks, clusters, classes and pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohée, Sylvain; Faust, Karoline; Lima-Mendez, Gipsi; Sand, Olivier; Janky, Rekin's; Vanderstocken, Gilles; Deville, Yves; van Helden, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The network analysis tools (NeAT) (http://rsat.ulb.ac.be/neat/) provide a user-friendly web access to a collection of modular tools for the analysis of networks (graphs) and clusters (e.g. microarray clusters, functional classes, etc.). A first set of tools supports basic operations on graphs (comparison between two graphs, neighborhood of a set of input nodes, path finding and graph randomization). Another set of programs makes the connection between networks and clusters (graph-based clustering, cliques discovery and mapping of clusters onto a network). The toolbox also includes programs for detecting significant intersections between clusters/classes (e.g. clusters of co-expression versus functional classes of genes). NeAT are designed to cope with large datasets and provide a flexible toolbox for analyzing biological networks stored in various databases (protein interactions, regulation and metabolism) or obtained from high-throughput experiments (two-hybrid, mass-spectrometry and microarrays). The web interface interconnects the programs in predefined analysis flows, enabling to address a series of questions about networks of interest. Each tool can also be used separately by entering custom data for a specific analysis. NeAT can also be used as web services (SOAP/WSDL interface), in order to design programmatic workflows and integrate them with other available resources. PMID:18524799

  16. A Multilevel Gamma-Clustering Layout Algorithm for Visualization of Biological Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hruz, Tomas; Lucas, Christoph; Laule, Oliver; Zimmermann, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Visualization of large complex networks has become an indispensable part of systems biology, where organisms need to be considered as one complex system. The visualization of the corresponding network is challenging due to the size and density of edges. In many cases, the use of standard visualization algorithms can lead to high running times and poorly readable visualizations due to many edge crossings. We suggest an approach that analyzes the structure of the graph first and then generates a new graph which contains specific semantic symbols for regular substructures like dense clusters. We propose a multilevel gamma-clustering layout visualization algorithm (MLGA) which proceeds in three subsequent steps: (i) a multilevel γ-clustering is used to identify the structure of the underlying network, (ii) the network is transformed to a tree, and (iii) finally, the resulting tree which shows the network structure is drawn using a variation of a force-directed algorithm. The algorithm has a potential to visualize very large networks because it uses modern clustering heuristics which are optimized for large graphs. Moreover, most of the edges are removed from the visual representation which allows keeping the overview over complex graphs with dense subgraphs. PMID:23864855

  17. Recurrent Convolutional Neural Networks: A Better Model of Biological Object Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerer, Courtney J; McClure, Patrick; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2017-01-01

    Feedforward neural networks provide the dominant model of how the brain performs visual object recognition. However, these networks lack the lateral and feedback connections, and the resulting recurrent neuronal dynamics, of the ventral visual pathway in the human and non-human primate brain. Here we investigate recurrent convolutional neural networks with bottom-up (B), lateral (L), and top-down (T) connections. Combining these types of connections yields four architectures (B, BT, BL, and BLT), which we systematically test and compare. We hypothesized that recurrent dynamics might improve recognition performance in the challenging scenario of partial occlusion. We introduce two novel occluded object recognition tasks to test the efficacy of the models, digit clutter (where multiple target digits occlude one another) and digit debris (where target digits are occluded by digit fragments). We find that recurrent neural networks outperform feedforward control models (approximately matched in parametric complexity) at recognizing objects, both in the absence of occlusion and in all occlusion conditions. Recurrent networks were also found to be more robust to the inclusion of additive Gaussian noise. Recurrent neural networks are better in two respects: (1) they are more neurobiologically realistic than their feedforward counterparts; (2) they are better in terms of their ability to recognize objects, especially under challenging conditions. This work shows that computer vision can benefit from using recurrent convolutional architectures and suggests that the ubiquitous recurrent connections in biological brains are essential for task performance.

  18. From systems biology to photosynthesis and whole-plant physiology: a conceptual model for integrating multi-scale networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David J; Hanson, Paul J; Norby, Richard J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Wullschleger, Stan D

    2012-02-01

    Network analysis is now a common statistical tool for molecular biologists. Network algorithms are readily used to model gene, protein and metabolic correlations providing insight into pathways driving biological phenomenon. One output from such an analysis is a candidate gene list that can be responsible, in part, for the biological process of interest. The question remains, however, as to whether molecular network analysis can be used to inform process models at higher levels of biological organization. In our previous work, transcriptional networks derived from three plant species were constructed, interrogated for orthology and then correlated with photosynthetic inhibition at elevated temperature. One unique aspect of that study was the link from co-expression networks to net photosynthesis. In this addendum, we propose a conceptual model where traditional network analysis can be linked to whole-plant models thereby informing predictions on key processes such as photosynthesis, nutrient uptake and assimilation, and C partitioning.

  19. Process-driven inference of biological network structure: feasibility, minimality, and multiplicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanyu Wang

    Full Text Available A common problem in molecular biology is to use experimental data, such as microarray data, to infer knowledge about the structure of interactions between important molecules in subsystems of the cell. By approximating the state of each molecule as "on" or "off", it becomes possible to simplify the problem, and exploit the tools of boolean analysis for such inference. Amongst boolean techniques, the process-driven approach has shown promise in being able to identify putative network structures, as well as stability and modularity properties. This paper examines the process-driven approach more formally, and makes four contributions about the computational complexity of the inference problem, under the "dominant inhibition" assumption of molecular interactions. The first is a proof that the feasibility problem (does there exist a network that explains the data? can be solved in polynomial-time. Second, the minimality problem (what is the smallest network that explains the data? is shown to be NP-hard, and therefore unlikely to result in a polynomial-time algorithm. Third, a simple polynomial-time heuristic is shown to produce near-minimal solutions, as demonstrated by simulation. Fourth, the theoretical framework explains how multiplicity (the number of network solutions to realize a given biological process, which can take exponential-time to compute, can instead be accurately estimated by a fast, polynomial-time heuristic.

  20. Iterative Systems Biology for Medicine – time for advancing from network signature to mechanistic equations

    KAUST Repository

    Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2017-05-09

    The rise and growth of Systems Biology following the sequencing of the human genome has been astounding. Early on, an iterative wet-dry methodology was formulated which turned out as a successful approach in deciphering biological complexity. Such type of analysis effectively identified and associated molecular network signatures operative in biological processes across different systems. Yet, it has proven difficult to distinguish between causes and consequences, thus making it challenging to attack medical questions where we require precise causative drug targets and disease mechanisms beyond a web of associated markers. Here we review principal advances with regard to identification of structure, dynamics, control, and design of biological systems, following the structure in the visionary review from 2002 by Dr. Kitano. Yet, here we find that the underlying challenge of finding the governing mechanistic system equations enabling precision medicine remains open thus rendering clinical translation of systems biology arduous. However, stunning advances in raw computational power, generation of high-precision multi-faceted biological data, combined with powerful algorithms hold promise to set the stage for data-driven identification of equations implicating a fundamental understanding of living systems during health and disease.

  1. Quantitative utilization of prior biological knowledge in the Bayesian network modeling of gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Shouguo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bayesian Network (BN is a powerful approach to reconstructing genetic regulatory networks from gene expression data. However, expression data by itself suffers from high noise and lack of power. Incorporating prior biological knowledge can improve the performance. As each type of prior knowledge on its own may be incomplete or limited by quality issues, integrating multiple sources of prior knowledge to utilize their consensus is desirable. Results We introduce a new method to incorporate the quantitative information from multiple sources of prior knowledge. It first uses the Naïve Bayesian classifier to assess the likelihood of functional linkage between gene pairs based on prior knowledge. In this study we included cocitation in PubMed and schematic similarity in Gene Ontology annotation. A candidate network edge reservoir is then created in which the copy number of each edge is proportional to the estimated likelihood of linkage between the two corresponding genes. In network simulation the Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling algorithm is adopted, and samples from this reservoir at each iteration to generate new candidate networks. We evaluated the new algorithm using both simulated and real gene expression data including that from a yeast cell cycle and a mouse pancreas development/growth study. Incorporating prior knowledge led to a ~2 fold increase in the number of known transcription regulations recovered, without significant change in false positive rate. In contrast, without the prior knowledge BN modeling is not always better than a random selection, demonstrating the necessity in network modeling to supplement the gene expression data with additional information. Conclusion our new development provides a statistical means to utilize the quantitative information in prior biological knowledge in the BN modeling of gene expression data, which significantly improves the performance.

  2. Landauer in the Age of Synthetic Biology: Energy Consumption and Information Processing in Biochemical Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Lang, Alex H.; Schwab, David J.

    2016-03-01

    A central goal of synthetic biology is to design sophisticated synthetic cellular circuits that can perform complex computations and information processing tasks in response to specific inputs. The tremendous advances in our ability to understand and manipulate cellular information processing networks raises several fundamental physics questions: How do the molecular components of cellular circuits exploit energy consumption to improve information processing? Can one utilize ideas from thermodynamics to improve the design of synthetic cellular circuits and modules? Here, we summarize recent theoretical work addressing these questions. Energy consumption in cellular circuits serves five basic purposes: (1) increasing specificity, (2) manipulating dynamics, (3) reducing variability, (4) amplifying signal, and (5) erasing memory. We demonstrate these ideas using several simple examples and discuss the implications of these theoretical ideas for the emerging field of synthetic biology. We conclude by discussing how it may be possible to overcome these limitations using "post-translational" synthetic biology that exploits reversible protein modification.

  3. Architecture and biological applications of artificial neural networks: a tuberculosis perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsey, Jerry A; Griffin, William O; Joginipelli, Sravanthi; Melapu, Venkata Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Advancement of science and technology has prompted researchers to develop new intelligent systems that can solve a variety of problems such as pattern recognition, prediction, and optimization. The ability of the human brain to learn in a fashion that tolerates noise and error has attracted many researchers and provided the starting point for the development of artificial neural networks: the intelligent systems. Intelligent systems can acclimatize to the environment or data and can maximize the chances of success or improve the efficiency of a search. Due to massive parallelism with large numbers of interconnected processers and their ability to learn from the data, neural networks can solve a variety of challenging computational problems. Neural networks have the ability to derive meaning from complicated and imprecise data; they are used in detecting patterns, and trends that are too complex for humans, or other computer systems. Solutions to the toughest problems will not be found through one narrow specialization; therefore we need to combine interdisciplinary approaches to discover the solutions to a variety of problems. Many researchers in different disciplines such as medicine, bioinformatics, molecular biology, and pharmacology have successfully applied artificial neural networks. This chapter helps the reader in understanding the basics of artificial neural networks, their applications, and methodology; it also outlines the network learning process and architecture. We present a brief outline of the application of neural networks to medical diagnosis, drug discovery, gene identification, and protein structure prediction. We conclude with a summary of the results from our study on tuberculosis data using neural networks, in diagnosing active tuberculosis, and predicting chronic vs. infiltrative forms of tuberculosis.

  4. Content-rich biological network constructed by mining PubMed abstracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharp Burt M

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of the rapidly expanding corpus of information about the genome, transcriptome, and proteome, engendered by powerful technological advances, such as microarrays, and the availability of genomic sequence from multiple species, challenges the grasp and comprehension of the scientific community. Despite the existence of text-mining methods that identify biological relationships based on the textual co-occurrence of gene/protein terms or similarities in abstract texts, knowledge of the underlying molecular connections on a large scale, which is prerequisite to understanding novel biological processes, lags far behind the accumulation of data. While computationally efficient, the co-occurrence-based approaches fail to characterize (e.g., inhibition or stimulation, directionality biological interactions. Programs with natural language processing (NLP capability have been created to address these limitations, however, they are in general not readily accessible to the public. Results We present a NLP-based text-mining approach, Chilibot, which constructs content-rich relationship networks among biological concepts, genes, proteins, or drugs. Amongst its features, suggestions for new hypotheses can be generated. Lastly, we provide evidence that the connectivity of molecular networks extracted from the biological literature follows the power-law distribution, indicating scale-free topologies consistent with the results of previous experimental analyses. Conclusions Chilibot distills scientific relationships from knowledge available throughout a wide range of biological domains and presents these in a content-rich graphical format, thus integrating general biomedical knowledge with the specialized knowledge and interests of the user. Chilibot http://www.chilibot.net can be accessed free of charge to academic users.

  5. Using chemistry and microfluidics to understand the spatial dynamics of complex biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastrup, Christian J; Runyon, Matthew K; Lucchetta, Elena M; Price, Jessica M; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the spatial dynamics of biochemical networks is both fundamentally important for understanding life at the systems level and also has practical implications for medicine, engineering, biology, and chemistry. Studies at the level of individual reactions provide essential information about the function, interactions, and localization of individual molecular species and reactions in a network. However, analyzing the spatial dynamics of complex biochemical networks at this level is difficult. Biochemical networks are nonequilibrium systems containing dozens to hundreds of reactions with nonlinear and time-dependent interactions, and these interactions are influenced by diffusion, flow, and the relative values of state-dependent kinetic parameters. To achieve an overall understanding of the spatial dynamics of a network and the global mechanisms that drive its function, networks must be analyzed as a whole, where all of the components and influential parameters of a network are simultaneously considered. Here, we describe chemical concepts and microfluidic tools developed for network-level investigations of the spatial dynamics of these networks. Modular approaches can be used to simplify these networks by separating them into modules, and simple experimental or computational models can be created by replacing each module with a single reaction. Microfluidics can be used to implement these models as well as to analyze and perturb the complex network itself with spatial control on the micrometer scale. We also describe the application of these network-level approaches to elucidate the mechanisms governing the spatial dynamics of two networkshemostasis (blood clotting) and early patterning of the Drosophila embryo. To investigate the dynamics of the complex network of hemostasis, we simplified the network by using a modular mechanism and created a chemical model based on this mechanism by using microfluidics. Then, we used the mechanism and the model to

  6. Biological conservation law as an emerging functionality in dynamical neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobnik, Boris; Jusup, Marko; Tiganj, Zoran; Wang, Wen-Xu; Buldú, Javier M; Stanley, H Eugene

    2017-11-07

    Scientists strive to understand how functionalities, such as conservation laws, emerge in complex systems. Living complex systems in particular create high-ordered functionalities by pairing up low-ordered complementary processes, e.g., one process to build and the other to correct. We propose a network mechanism that demonstrates how collective statistical laws can emerge at a macro (i.e., whole-network) level even when they do not exist at a unit (i.e., network-node) level. Drawing inspiration from neuroscience, we model a highly stylized dynamical neuronal network in which neurons fire either randomly or in response to the firing of neighboring neurons. A synapse connecting two neighboring neurons strengthens when both of these neurons are excited and weakens otherwise. We demonstrate that during this interplay between the synaptic and neuronal dynamics, when the network is near a critical point, both recurrent spontaneous and stimulated phase transitions enable the phase-dependent processes to replace each other and spontaneously generate a statistical conservation law-the conservation of synaptic strength. This conservation law is an emerging functionality selected by evolution and is thus a form of biological self-organized criticality in which the key dynamical modes are collective.

  7. Metabolic networks of Sodalis glossinidius: a systems biology approach to reductive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belda, Eugeni; Silva, Francisco J; Peretó, Juli; Moya, Andrés

    2012-01-01

    Genome reduction is a common evolutionary process affecting bacterial lineages that establish symbiotic or pathogenic associations with eukaryotic hosts. Such associations yield highly reduced genomes with greatly streamlined metabolic abilities shaped by the type of ecological association with the host. Sodalis glossinidius, the secondary endosymbiont of tsetse flies, represents one of the few complete genomes available of a bacterium at the initial stages of this process. In the present study, genome reduction is studied from a systems biology perspective through the reconstruction and functional analysis of genome-scale metabolic networks of S. glossinidius. The functional profile of ancestral and extant metabolic networks sheds light on the evolutionary events underlying transition to a host-dependent lifestyle. Meanwhile, reductive evolution simulations on the extant metabolic network can predict possible future evolution of S. glossinidius in the context of genome reduction. Finally, knockout simulations in different metabolic systems reveal a gradual decrease in network robustness to different mutational events for bacterial endosymbionts at different stages of the symbiotic association. Stoichiometric analysis reveals few gene inactivation events whose effects on the functionality of S. glossinidius metabolic systems are drastic enough to account for the ecological transition from a free-living to host-dependent lifestyle. The decrease in network robustness across different metabolic systems may be associated with the progressive integration in the more stable environment provided by the insect host. Finally, reductive evolution simulations reveal the strong influence that external conditions exert on the evolvability of metabolic systems.

  8. Biological modelling of a computational spiking neural network with neuronal avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiumin; Chen, Qing; Xue, Fangzheng

    2017-05-01

    In recent years, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that networks in the brain can self-organize into a critical state where dynamics exhibit a mixture of ordered and disordered patterns. This critical branching phenomenon is termed neuronal avalanches. It has been hypothesized that the homeostatic level balanced between stability and plasticity of this critical state may be the optimal state for performing diverse neural computational tasks. However, the critical region for high performance is narrow and sensitive for spiking neural networks (SNNs). In this paper, we investigated the role of the critical state in neural computations based on liquid-state machines, a biologically plausible computational neural network model for real-time computing. The computational performance of an SNN when operating at the critical state and, in particular, with spike-timing-dependent plasticity for updating synaptic weights is investigated. The network is found to show the best computational performance when it is subjected to critical dynamic states. Moreover, the active-neuron-dominant structure refined from synaptic learning can remarkably enhance the robustness of the critical state and further improve computational accuracy. These results may have important implications in the modelling of spiking neural networks with optimal computational performance. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  9. Main activities of the Latin American Network of Biological Dosimetry (LBDNet)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.B.; Radl, A.; Taja, M.R.; Stuck Oliveira, M.; Valdivia, P.; Garcia Lima, O.; Lamadrid, A.; Gonzalez Mesa, J.E.; Romero Aguilera, I.; Mandina Cardoso, T.; Guerrero Carbajal, C.; Arceo Maldonado, C.; Espinoza, M.; Martinez Lopez, W.; Di Tomasso, M.; Barquinero, F.; Roy, L.

    2010-01-01

    The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNET) was constituted in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of a radiation emergency in the region supported by IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/054 and RLA/9/061. The main objectives are: a) to strengthen the technical capacities of Biological Dosimetry Services belonging to laboratories existing in the region (Argentine, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay) integrated in National Radiological Emergency Plans to provide a rapid biodosimetric response in a coordinated manner between countries and with RANET-IAEA/BioDoseNet-WHO, b) to provide support to other countries in the region lacking Biological Dosimetry laboratories, c) to consolidate the organization of the Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network for mutual assistance. The activities developed include technical meetings for protocols and chromosomal aberration scoring criteria unification, blood samples cultures exercises, chromosomal aberrations analysis at microscope, discussion of statistical methods and specialized software for dose calculation, the intercomparison between laboratory data after the analysis of slides with irradiated material and the intercomparison of the analysis of captured images distributed electronically in the WEB. The last exercise was the transportation of an irradiated human blood sample to countries inside and outside of the region. At the moment the exercises are concluded and they are pending to be published in reference journals. Results obtained show the capacity in the region for a biodosimetric response to a radiological accident. In the future the network will integrate techniques for high dose exposure evaluation and will enhance the interaction with other emergency systems in the region. (authors) [es

  10. Prediction of Biological Motion Perception Performance from Intrinsic Brain Network Regional Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zengjian; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Chang, Song; Pan, Jinghua; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Biological motion perception (BMP) refers to the ability to perceive the moving form of a human figure from a limited amount of stimuli, such as from a few point lights located on the joints of a moving body. BMP is commonplace and important, but there is great inter-individual variability in this ability. This study used multiple regression model analysis to explore the association between BMP performance and intrinsic brain activity, in order to investigate the neural substrates underlying inter-individual variability of BMP performance. The resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and BMP performance data were collected from 24 healthy participants, for whom intrinsic brain networks were constructed, and a graph-based network efficiency metric was measured. Then, a multiple linear regression model was used to explore the association between network regional efficiency and BMP performance. We found that the local and global network efficiency of many regions was significantly correlated with BMP performance. Further analysis showed that the local efficiency rather than global efficiency could be used to explain most of the BMP inter-individual variability, and the regions involved were predominately located in the Default Mode Network (DMN). Additionally, discrimination analysis showed that the local efficiency of certain regions such as the thalamus could be used to classify BMP performance across participants. Notably, the association pattern between network nodal efficiency and BMP was different from the association pattern of static directional/gender information perception. Overall, these findings show that intrinsic brain network efficiency may be considered a neural factor that explains BMP inter-individual variability. PMID:27853427

  11. Alignment validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  12. Formal modeling and analysis of ER-α associated Biological Regulatory Network in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samra Khalid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Breast cancer (BC is one of the leading cause of death among females worldwide. The increasing incidence of BC is due to various genetic and environmental changes which lead to the disruption of cellular signaling network(s. It is a complex disease in which several interlinking signaling cascades play a crucial role in establishing a complex regulatory network. The logical modeling approach of René Thomas has been applied to analyze the behavior of estrogen receptor-alpha (ER-α associated Biological Regulatory Network (BRN for a small part of complex events that leads to BC metastasis. Methods A discrete model was constructed using the kinetic logic formalism and its set of logical parameters were obtained using the model checking technique implemented in the SMBioNet software which is consistent with biological observations. The discrete model was further enriched with continuous dynamics by converting it into an equivalent Petri Net (PN to analyze the logical parameters of the involved entities. Results In-silico based discrete and continuous modeling of ER-α associated signaling network involved in BC provides information about behaviors and gene-gene interaction in detail. The dynamics of discrete model revealed, imperative behaviors represented as cyclic paths and trajectories leading to pathogenic states such as metastasis. Results suggest that the increased expressions of receptors ER-α, IGF-1R and EGFR slow down the activity of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs such as BRCA1, p53 and Mdm2 which can lead to metastasis. Therefore, IGF-1R and EGFR are considered as important inhibitory targets to control the metastasis in BC. Conclusion The in-silico approaches allow us to increase our understanding of the functional properties of living organisms. It opens new avenues of investigations of multiple inhibitory targets (ER-α, IGF-1R and EGFR for wet lab experiments as well as provided valuable insights in the treatment of cancers

  13. Quantitative Evaluation of Biologic Therapy Options for Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbar-Lopez, Zarif K; Yiu, Zenas Z N; Ward, Victoria; Exton, Lesley S; Mohd Mustapa, M Firouz; Samarasekera, Eleanor; Burden, A David; Murphy, Ruth; Owen, Caroline M; Parslew, Richard; Venning, Vanessa; Warren, Richard B; Smith, Catherine H

    2017-08-01

    Multiple biologic treatments are licensed for psoriasis. The lack of head-to-head randomized controlled trials makes choosing between them difficult for patients, clinicians, and guideline developers. To establish their relative efficacy and tolerability, we searched MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane for randomized controlled trials of licensed biologic treatments for skin psoriasis. We performed a network meta-analysis to identify direct and indirect evidence comparing biologics with one another, methotrexate, or placebo. We combined this with hierarchical cluster analysis to consider multiple outcomes related to efficacy and tolerability in combination for each treatment. Study quality, heterogeneity, and inconsistency were evaluated. Direct comparisons from 41 randomized controlled trials (20,561 participants) were included. All included biologics were efficacious compared with placebo or methotrexate at 3-4 months. Overall, cluster analysis showed adalimumab, secukinumab, and ustekinumab were comparable in terms of high efficacy and tolerability. Ixekizumab and infliximab were differentiated by very high efficacy but poorer tolerability. The lack of longer term controlled data limited our analysis to short-term outcomes. Trial performance may not equate to real-world performance, and so results need to be considered alongside real-world, long-term safety and effectiveness data. These data suggest that it is possible to discriminate between biologics to inform clinical practice and decision making (PROSPERO 2015:CRD42015017538). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Multilevel functional genomics data integration as a tool for understanding physiology: a network biology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidsen, Peter K; Turan, Nil; Egginton, Stuart; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    The overall aim of physiological research is to understand how living systems function in an integrative manner. Consequently, the discipline of physiology has since its infancy attempted to link multiple levels of biological organization. Increasingly this has involved mathematical and computational approaches, typically to model a small number of components spanning several levels of biological organization. With the advent of "omics" technologies, which can characterize the molecular state of a cell or tissue (intended as the level of expression and/or activity of its molecular components), the number of molecular components we can quantify has increased exponentially. Paradoxically, the unprecedented amount of experimental data has made it more difficult to derive conceptual models underlying essential mechanisms regulating mammalian physiology. We present an overview of state-of-the-art methods currently used to identifying biological networks underlying genomewide responses. These are based on a data-driven approach that relies on advanced computational methods designed to "learn" biology from observational data. In this review, we illustrate an application of these computational methodologies using a case study integrating an in vivo model representing the transcriptional state of hypoxic skeletal muscle with a clinical study representing muscle wasting in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. The broader application of these approaches to modeling multiple levels of biological data in the context of modern physiology is discussed. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Interfacing a biosurveillance portal and an international network of institutional analysts to detect biological threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardo, Flavia; Shigematsu, Mika; Chow, Catherine; McKnight, C Jason; Linge, Jens; Doherty, Brian; Dente, Maria Grazia; Declich, Silvia; Barker, Mike; Barboza, Philippe; Vaillant, Laetitia; Donachie, Alastair; Mawudeku, Abla; Blench, Michael; Arthur, Ray

    2014-01-01

    The Early Alerting and Reporting (EAR) project, launched in 2008, is aimed at improving global early alerting and risk assessment and evaluating the feasibility and opportunity of integrating the analysis of biological, chemical, radionuclear (CBRN), and pandemic influenza threats. At a time when no international collaborations existed in the field of event-based surveillance, EAR's innovative approach involved both epidemic intelligence experts and internet-based biosurveillance system providers in the framework of an international collaboration called the Global Health Security Initiative, which involved the ministries of health of the G7 countries and Mexico, the World Health Organization, and the European Commission. The EAR project pooled data from 7 major internet-based biosurveillance systems onto a common portal that was progressively optimized for biological threat detection under the guidance of epidemic intelligence experts from public health institutions in Canada, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The group became the first end users of the EAR portal, constituting a network of analysts working with a common standard operating procedure and risk assessment tools on a rotation basis to constantly screen and assess public information on the web for events that could suggest an intentional release of biological agents. Following the first 2-year pilot phase, the EAR project was tested in its capacity to monitor biological threats, proving that its working model was feasible and demonstrating the high commitment of the countries and international institutions involved. During the testing period, analysts using the EAR platform did not miss intentional events of a biological nature and did not issue false alarms. Through the findings of this initial assessment, this article provides insights into how the field of epidemic intelligence can advance through an

  16. Endogenous Molecular-Cellular Network Cancer Theory: A Systems Biology Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gaowei; Yuan, Ruoshi; Zhu, Xiaomei; Ao, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In light of ever apparent limitation of the current dominant cancer mutation theory, a quantitative hypothesis for cancer genesis and progression, endogenous molecular-cellular network hypothesis has been proposed from the systems biology perspective, now for more than 10 years. It was intended to include both the genetic and epigenetic causes to understand cancer. Its development enters the stage of meaningful interaction with experimental and clinical data and the limitation of the traditional cancer mutation theory becomes more evident. Under this endogenous network hypothesis, we established a core working network of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) according to the hypothesis and quantified the working network by a nonlinear dynamical system. We showed that the two stable states of the working network reproduce the main known features of normal liver and HCC at both the modular and molecular levels. Using endogenous network hypothesis and validated working network, we explored genetic mutation pattern in cancer and potential strategies to cure or relieve HCC from a totally new perspective. Patterns of genetic mutations have been traditionally analyzed by posteriori statistical association approaches in light of traditional cancer mutation theory. One may wonder the possibility of a priori determination of any mutation regularity. Here, we found that based on the endogenous network theory the features of genetic mutations in cancers may be predicted without any prior knowledge of mutation propensities. Normal hepatocyte and cancerous hepatocyte stable states, specified by distinct patterns of expressions or activities of proteins in the network, provide means to directly identify a set of most probable genetic mutations and their effects in HCC. As the key proteins and main interactions in the network are conserved through cell types in an organism, similar mutational features may also be found in other cancers. This analysis yielded straightforward and testable

  17. Modeling a Complex Biological Network with Temporal Heterogeneity: Cardiac Myocyte Plasticity as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloom, Amin R.; Basu, Kalyan; Mandal, Subhrangsu S.; Das, Sajal K.

    Complex biological systems often characterize nonlinear dynamics. Employing traditional deterministic or stochastic approaches to quantify these dynamics either fail to capture their existing deviant effects or lead to combinatorial explosion. In this work we devised a novel approach that projects the biological functions within a pathway to a network of stochastic events that are random in time and space. By applying this approach recursively to the object system we build the event network of the entire system. The dynamics of the system evolves through the execution of the event network by a simulation engine which comprised of a time prioritized event queue. As a case study we utilized the current method and conducted an in-silico experiment on the metabolic plasticity of a cardiac myocyete. We aimed to quantify the down stream effects of insulin signaling that predominantly controls the plasticity in myocardium. Intriguingly, our in-silico results on transcription regulatory effect of insulin showed a good agreement with experimental data. Meanwhile we were able to characterize the flux change across major metabolic pathways over 48 hours of the in-silico experiment. Our simulation performed a remarkable efficiency by conducting 48 hours of simulation-time in less that 2 hours of processor time.

  18. A Network Biology Approach to Discover the Molecular Biomarker Associated with Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Zhuang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, high throughput technologies such as microarray platform have provided a new avenue for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC investigation. Traditionally, gene sets enrichment analysis of survival related genes is commonly used to reveal the underlying functional mechanisms. However, this approach usually produces too many candidate genes and cannot discover detailed signaling transduction cascades, which greatly limits their clinical application such as biomarker development. In this study, we have proposed a network biology approach to discover novel biomarkers from multidimensional omics data. This approach effectively combines clinical survival data with topological characteristics of human protein interaction networks and patients expression profiling data. It can produce novel network based biomarkers together with biological understanding of molecular mechanism. We have analyzed eighty HCC expression profiling arrays and identified that extracellular matrix and programmed cell death are the main themes related to HCC progression. Compared with traditional enrichment analysis, this approach can provide concrete and testable hypothesis on functional mechanism. Furthermore, the identified subnetworks can potentially be used as suitable targets for therapeutic intervention in HCC.

  19. Students Mental Representation of Biology Diagrams/Pictures Conventions Based on Formation of Causal Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampurno, A. W.; Rahmat, A.; Diana, S.

    2017-09-01

    Diagrams/pictures conventions is one form of visual media that often used to assist students in understanding the biological concepts. The effectiveness of use diagrams/pictures in biology learning at school level has also been mostly reported. This study examines the ability of high school students in reading diagrams/pictures biological convention which is described by Mental Representation based on formation of causal networks. The study involved 30 students 11th grade MIA senior high school Banten Indonesia who are studying the excretory system. MR data obtained by Instrument worksheet, developed based on CNET-protocol, in which there are diagrams/drawings of nephron structure and urinary mechanism. Three patterns formed MR, namely Markov chain, feedback control with a single measurement, and repeated feedback control with multiple measurement. The third pattern is the most dominating pattern, differences in the pattern of MR reveal the difference in how and from which point the students begin to uncover important information contained in the diagram to establish a causal networks. Further analysis shows that a difference in the pattern of MR relate to how complex the students process the information contained in the diagrams/pictures.

  20. Building the process-drug–side effect network to discover the relationship between biological Processes and side effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Side effects are unwanted responses to drug treatment and are important resources for human phenotype information. The recent development of a database on side effects, the side effect resource (SIDER), is a first step in documenting the relationship between drugs and their side effects. It is, however, insufficient to simply find the association of drugs with biological processes; that relationship is crucial because drugs that influence biological processes can have an impact on phenotype. Therefore, knowing which processes respond to drugs that influence the phenotype will enable more effective and systematic study of the effect of drugs on phenotype. To the best of our knowledge, the relationship between biological processes and side effects of drugs has not yet been systematically researched. Methods We propose 3 steps for systematically searching relationships between drugs and biological processes: enrichment scores (ES) calculations, t-score calculation, and threshold-based filtering. Subsequently, the side effect-related biological processes are found by merging the drug-biological process network and the drug-side effect network. Evaluation is conducted in 2 ways: first, by discerning the number of biological processes discovered by our method that co-occur with Gene Ontology (GO) terms in relation to effects extracted from PubMed records using a text-mining technique and second, determining whether there is improvement in performance by limiting response processes by drugs sharing the same side effect to frequent ones alone. Results The multi-level network (the process-drug-side effect network) was built by merging the drug-biological process network and the drug-side effect network. We generated a network of 74 drugs-168 side effects-2209 biological process relation resources. The preliminary results showed that the process-drug-side effect network was able to find meaningful relationships between biological processes and side effects in an

  1. A Non-Homogeneous Dynamic Bayesian Network with Sequentially Coupled Interaction Parameters for Applications in Systems and Synthetic Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    An important and challenging problem in systems biology is the inference of gene regulatory networks from short non-stationary time series of transcriptional profiles. A popular approach that has been widely applied to this end is based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), although traditional

  2. Social insect colony as a biological regulatory system: modelling information flow in dominance networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Anjan K; Sumana, Annagiri; Bhattacharya, Kunal

    2014-12-06

    Social insects provide an excellent platform to investigate flow of information in regulatory systems since their successful social organization is essentially achieved by effective information transfer through complex connectivity patterns among the colony members. Network representation of such behavioural interactions offers a powerful tool for structural as well as dynamical analysis of the underlying regulatory systems. In this paper, we focus on the dominance interaction networks in the tropical social wasp Ropalidia marginata-a species where behavioural observations indicate that such interactions are principally responsible for the transfer of information between individuals about their colony needs, resulting in a regulation of their own activities. Our research reveals that the dominance networks of R. marginata are structurally similar to a class of naturally evolved information processing networks, a fact confirmed also by the predominance of a specific substructure-the 'feed-forward loop'-a key functional component in many other information transfer networks. The dynamical analysis through Boolean modelling confirms that the networks are sufficiently stable under small fluctuations and yet capable of more efficient information transfer compared to their randomized counterparts. Our results suggest the involvement of a common structural design principle in different biological regulatory systems and a possible similarity with respect to the effect of selection on the organization levels of such systems. The findings are also consistent with the hypothesis that dominance behaviour has been shaped by natural selection to co-opt the information transfer process in such social insect species, in addition to its primal function of mediation of reproductive competition in the colony. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Collaboration Networks in the Brazilian Scientific Output in Evolutionary Biology: 2000-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Dirce M; Vanz, Samile A S; Stumpf, Ida R C

    2016-03-01

    This article analyzes the existing collaboration networks in the Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology, considering articles published during the period from 2000 to 2012 in journals indexed by Web of Science. The methodology integrates bibliometric techniques and Social Network Analysis resources to describe the growth of Brazilian scientific output and understand the levels, dynamics and structure of collaboration between authors, institutions and countries. The results unveil an enhancement and consolidation of collaborative relationships over time and suggest the existence of key institutions and authors, whose influence on research is expressed by the variety and intensity of the relationships established in the co-authorship of articles. International collaboration, present in more than half of the publications, is highly significant and unusual in Brazilian science. The situation indicates the internationalization of scientific output and the ability of the field to take part in the science produced by the international scientific community.

  4. Collaboration Networks in the Brazilian Scientific Output in Evolutionary Biology: 2000-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce M. Santin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the existing collaboration networks in the Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology, considering articles published during the period from 2000 to 2012 in journals indexed by Web of Science. The methodology integrates bibliometric techniques and Social Network Analysis resources to describe the growth of Brazilian scientific output and understand the levels, dynamics and structure of collaboration between authors, institutions and countries. The results unveil an enhancement and consolidation of collaborative relationships over time and suggest the existence of key institutions and authors, whose influence on research is expressed by the variety and intensity of the relationships established in the co-authorship of articles. International collaboration, present in more than half of the publications, is highly significant and unusual in Brazilian science. The situation indicates the internationalization of scientific output and the ability of the field to take part in the science produced by the international scientific community.

  5. Biologically-inspired On-chip Learning in Pulsed Neural Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Torsten; Woodburn, Robin

    1999-01-01

    Self-learning chips to implement many popular ANN (artificial neural network) algorithms are very difficult to design. We explain why this is so and say what lessons previous work teaches us in the design of self-learning systems. We offer a contribution to the "biologically-inspired" approach......, explaining what we mean by this term and providing an example of a robust, self-learning design that can solve simple classical-conditioning tasks, We give details of the design of individual circuits to perform component functions, which can then be combined into a network to solve the task. We argue...... that useful conclusions as to the future of on-chip learning can be drawn from this work....

  6. International Institute for Collaborative Cell Biology and Biochemistry—History and Memoirs from an International Network for Biological Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, L. C.

    2013-01-01

    I was invited to write this essay on the occasion of my selection as the recipient of the 2012 Bruce Alberts Award for Excellence in Science Education from the American Society for Cell Biology (ASCB). Receiving this award is an enormous honor. When I read the email announcement for the first time, it was more than a surprise to me, it was unbelievable. I joined ASCB in 1996, when I presented a poster and received a travel award. Since then, I have attended almost every ASCB meeting. I will try to use this essay to share with readers one of the best experiences in my life. Because this is an essay, I take the liberty of mixing some of my thoughts with data in a way that it not usual in scientific writing. I hope that this sacrifice of the format will achieve the goal of conveying what I have learned over the past 20 yr, during which time a group of colleagues and friends created a nexus of knowledge and wisdom. We have worked together to build a network capable of sharing and inspiring science all over the world. PMID:24006381

  7. Biological neural networks as model systems for designing future parallel processing computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.

    1991-01-01

    One of the more interesting debates of the present day centers on whether human intelligence can be simulated by computer. The author works under the premise that neurons individually are not smart at all. Rather, they are physical units which are impinged upon continuously by other matter that influences the direction of voltage shifts across the units membranes. It is only the action of a great many neurons, billions in the case of the human nervous system, that intelligent behavior emerges. What is required to understand even the simplest neural system is painstaking analysis, bit by bit, of the architecture and the physiological functioning of its various parts. The biological neural network studied, the vestibular utricular and saccular maculas of the inner ear, are among the most simple of the mammalian neural networks to understand and model. While there is still a long way to go to understand even this most simple neural network in sufficient detail for extrapolation to computers and robots, a start was made. Moreover, the insights obtained and the technologies developed help advance the understanding of the more complex neural networks that underlie human intelligence.

  8. Exploring candidate biological functions by Boolean Function Networks for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Simak

    Full Text Available The great amount of gene expression data has brought a big challenge for the discovery of Gene Regulatory Network (GRN. For network reconstruction and the investigation of regulatory relations, it is desirable to ensure directness of links between genes on a map, infer their directionality and explore candidate biological functions from high-throughput transcriptomic data. To address these problems, we introduce a Boolean Function Network (BFN model based on techniques of hidden Markov model (HMM, likelihood ratio test and Boolean logic functions. BFN consists of two consecutive tests to establish links between pairs of genes and check their directness. We evaluate the performance of BFN through the application to S. cerevisiae time course data. BFN produces regulatory relations which show consistency with succession of cell cycle phases. Furthermore, it also improves sensitivity and specificity when compared with alternative methods of genetic network reverse engineering. Moreover, we demonstrate that BFN can provide proper resolution for GO enrichment of gene sets. Finally, the Boolean functions discovered by BFN can provide useful insights for the identification of control mechanisms of regulatory processes, which is the special advantage of the proposed approach. In combination with low computational complexity, BFN can serve as an efficient screening tool to reconstruct genes relations on the whole genome level. In addition, the BFN approach is also feasible to a wide range of time course datasets.

  9. Why Traditional Expository Teaching-Learning Approaches May Founder? An Experimental Examination of Neural Networks in Biology Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Ki; Kwon, Yong-Ju

    2011-01-01

    Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), this study investigates and discusses neurological explanations for, and the educational implications of, the neural network activations involved in hypothesis-generating and hypothesis-understanding for biology education. Two sets of task paradigms about biological phenomena were designed:…

  10. Indoleamines and the UV-light-sensitive photoperiodic responses of the melanocyte network: a biological calendar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyengar, B

    1994-08-15

    The pineal, serotoninergic and pigmented neurons are associated with light-dependent sleep/arousal, serving as a biological clock with a circadian rhythm. This rhythm is maintained by melatonin which serves to recognise the 'dark' phase. The neural network that responds to seasonal variations in day/night length has not been identified. The present study demonstrates that melanocytes in human skin respond to changes in the duration of UV exposure, and can serve as a biological calendar. These responses are mediated by two indoleamines, serotonin and melatonin. Higher melatonin levels correspond to long nights and short days (short UV pulse), while high serotonin levels in the presence of melatonin reflect short nights and long days (long UV exposure). This response recapitulates the sleep/arousal patterns in animals exposed to large variations in day/night cycle that cause changes in coat colour from pure white in winter to complete repigmentation in summer.

  11. Aligning everyday life priorities with people's self-management support networks: an exploration of the work and implementation of a needs-led telephone support system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blickem, Christian; Kennedy, Anne; Jariwala, Praksha; Morris, Rebecca; Bowen, Robert; Vassilev, Ivaylo; Brooks, Helen; Blakeman, Tom; Rogers, Anne

    2014-06-17

    Recent initiatives to target the personal, social and clinical needs of people with long-term health conditions have had limited impact within primary care. Evidence of the importance of social networks to support people with long-term conditions points to the need for self-management approaches which align personal circumstances with valued activities. The Patient-Led Assessment for Network Support (PLANS) intervention is a needs-led assessment for patients to prioritise their health and social needs and provide access to local community services and activities. Exploring the work and practices of patients and telephone workers are important for understanding and evaluating the workability and implementation of new interventions. Qualitative methods (interviews, focus group, observations) were used to explore the experience of PLANS from the perspectives of participants and the telephone support workers who delivered it (as part of an RCT) and the reasons why the intervention worked or not. Normalisation Process Theory (NPT) was used as a sensitising tool to evaluate: the relevance of PLANS to patients (coherence); the processes of engagement (cognitive participation); the work done for PLANS to happen (collective action); the perceived benefits and costs of PLANS (reflexive monitoring). 20 patients in the intervention arm of a clinical trial were interviewed and their telephone support calls were recorded and a focus group with 3 telephone support workers was conducted. Analysis of the interviews, support calls and focus group identified three themes in relation to the delivery and experience of PLANS. These are: formulation of 'health' in the context of everyday life; trajectories and tipping points: disrupting everyday routines; precarious trust in networks. The relevance of these themes are considered using NPT constructs in terms of the work that is entailed in engaging with PLANS, taking action, and who is implicated this process. PLANS gives scope to align

  12. Convolutional Deep Belief Networks for Single-Cell/Object Tracking in Computational Biology and Computer Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bineng; Pan, Shengnan; Zhang, Hongbo; Wang, Tian; Du, Jixiang; Chen, Duansheng; Cao, Liujuan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose deep architecture to dynamically learn the most discriminative features from data for both single-cell and object tracking in computational biology and computer vision. Firstly, the discriminative features are automatically learned via a convolutional deep belief network (CDBN). Secondly, we design a simple yet effective method to transfer features learned from CDBNs on the source tasks for generic purpose to the object tracking tasks using only limited amount of training data. Finally, to alleviate the tracker drifting problem caused by model updating, we jointly consider three different types of positive samples. Extensive experiments validate the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  13. The need to connect: on the cell biology of synapses, behaviors, and networks in science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Ramos, Daniel A

    2016-11-01

    My laboratory is interested in the cell biology of the synapse. Synapses, which are points of cellular communication between neurons, were first described by Santiago Ramón y Cajal as "protoplasmic kisses that appear to constitute the final ecstasy of an epic love story." Who would not want to work on that?! My lab examines the biological mechanisms neurons use to find and connect to each other. How are synapses formed during development, maintained during growth, and modified during learning? In this essay, I reflect about my scientific journey to the synapse, the cell biological one, but also a metaphorical synapse-my role as a point of contact between the production of knowledge and its dissemination. In particular, I discuss how the architecture of scientific networks propels knowledge production but can also exclude certain groups in science. © 2016 Colón-Ramos This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet): Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C.; Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.; Radl, A.; Taja, M.; Seoane, A.; De Luca, J.; Stuck O, M.; Valdivia, P.

    2010-10-01

    Biological dosimetry is a necessary support for national radiation protection programs and emergency response schemes. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet) was formally founded in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of radiation emergencies and for providing support to other Latin American countries that do not have bio dosimetry laboratories. In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/54 and RLA/9/61 the following activities have been performed: a) An international intercomparison exercise organized during 2007-2008 included six European countries and LBDNet laboratories. Relevant parameters related with dose assessment were evaluated through triage and conventional scoring criteria. A new approach for statistical data analysis was developed including assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and intra-laboratory repeatability. Overall, the laboratory performance was satisfactory for mutual cooperation purposes. b) In 2009, LBDNet and two European countries carried out a digital image intercomparison exercise involving dose assessment from metaphase images distributed electronically through internet. The main objectives were to evaluate scoring feasibility on metaphase images and time response. In addition a re-examination phase was considered in which the most controversial images were discussed jointly, this allowed for the development of a homogeneous scoring criteria within the network. c) A further exercise was performed during 2009 involving the shipment of biological samples for biological dosimetry assessment. The aim of this exercise was to test the timely and properly sending and receiving blood samples under national and international regulations. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this joint IAEA, PAHO and WHO. (Author)

  15. The Annotation, Mapping, Expression and Network (AMEN suite of tools for molecular systems biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primig Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput genome biological experiments yield large and multifaceted datasets that require flexible and user-friendly analysis tools to facilitate their interpretation by life scientists. Many solutions currently exist, but they are often limited to specific steps in the complex process of data management and analysis and some require extensive informatics skills to be installed and run efficiently. Results We developed the Annotation, Mapping, Expression and Network (AMEN software as a stand-alone, unified suite of tools that enables biological and medical researchers with basic bioinformatics training to manage and explore genome annotation, chromosomal mapping, protein-protein interaction, expression profiling and proteomics data. The current version provides modules for (i uploading and pre-processing data from microarray expression profiling experiments, (ii detecting groups of significantly co-expressed genes, and (iii searching for enrichment of functional annotations within those groups. Moreover, the user interface is designed to simultaneously visualize several types of data such as protein-protein interaction networks in conjunction with expression profiles and cellular co-localization patterns. We have successfully applied the program to interpret expression profiling data from budding yeast, rodents and human. Conclusion AMEN is an innovative solution for molecular systems biological data analysis freely available under the GNU license. The program is available via a website at the Sourceforge portal which includes a user guide with concrete examples, links to external databases and helpful comments to implement additional functionalities. We emphasize that AMEN will continue to be developed and maintained by our laboratory because it has proven to be extremely useful for our genome biological research program.

  16. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet): Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerrero C, C.; Arceo M, C. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Di Giorgio, M.; Vallerga, M.; Radl, A. [Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear, Av. del Libertador 8250, C1429 BNP CABA (Argentina); Taja, M.; Seoane, A.; De Luca, J. [Universidad Nacionald de La Plata, Av. 7 No. 1776, La Plata 1900, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Stuck O, M. [Instituto de Radioproteccion y Dosimetria, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Valdivia, P., E-mail: lbdnet@googlegroups.co [Comision Chilena de Energia, Amutanegui 95, Santiago Centro, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-10-15

    Biological dosimetry is a necessary support for national radiation protection programs and emergency response schemes. The Latin American Biological Dosimetry Network (LBDNet) was formally founded in 2007 for mutual assistance in case of radiation emergencies and for providing support to other Latin American countries that do not have bio dosimetry laboratories. In the frame of the IAEA Technical Cooperation Projects RLA/9/54 and RLA/9/61 the following activities have been performed: a) An international intercomparison exercise organized during 2007-2008 included six European countries and LBDNet laboratories. Relevant parameters related with dose assessment were evaluated through triage and conventional scoring criteria. A new approach for statistical data analysis was developed including assessment of inter-laboratory reproducibility and intra-laboratory repeatability. Overall, the laboratory performance was satisfactory for mutual cooperation purposes. b) In 2009, LBDNet and two European countries carried out a digital image intercomparison exercise involving dose assessment from metaphase images distributed electronically through internet. The main objectives were to evaluate scoring feasibility on metaphase images and time response. In addition a re-examination phase was considered in which the most controversial images were discussed jointly, this allowed for the development of a homogeneous scoring criteria within the network. c) A further exercise was performed during 2009 involving the shipment of biological samples for biological dosimetry assessment. The aim of this exercise was to test the timely and properly sending and receiving blood samples under national and international regulations. A total of 14 laboratories participated in this joint IAEA, PAHO and WHO. (Author)

  17. A network biology approach to understanding the importance of chameleon proteins in human physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramali, Golnaz; Goliaei, Bahram; Minuchehr, Zarrin; Marashi, Sayed-Amir

    2017-02-01

    Chameleon proteins are proteins which include sequences that can adopt α-helix-β-strand (HE-chameleon) or α-helix-coil (HC-chameleon) or β-strand-coil (CE-chameleon) structures to operate their crucial biological functions. In this study, using a network-based approach, we examined the chameleon proteins to give a better knowledge on these proteins. We focused on proteins with identical chameleon sequences with more than or equal to seven residues long in different PDB entries, which adopt HE-chameleon, HC-chameleon, and CE-chameleon structures in the same protein. One hundred and ninety-one human chameleon proteins were identified via our in-house program. Then, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks, Gene ontology (GO) enrichment, disease network, and pathway enrichment analyses were performed for our derived data set. We discovered that there are chameleon sequences which reside in protein-protein interaction regions between two proteins critical for their dual function. Analysis of the PPI networks for chameleon proteins introduced five hub proteins, namely TP53, EGFR, HSP90AA1, PPARA, and HIF1A, which were presented in four PPI clusters. The outcomes demonstrate that the chameleon regions are in critical domains of these proteins and are important in the development and treatment of human cancers. The present report is the first network-based functional study of chameleon proteins using computational approaches and might provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanisms of diseases helping us in developing new medical therapies along with discovering new proteins with chameleon properties which are highly important in cancer.

  18. Biological dosimetry by the triage dicentric chromosome assay - Further validation of international networking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkins, Ruth C., E-mail: Ruth.Wilkins@hc-sc.gc.ca [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Romm, Horst; Oestreicher, Ursula [Bundesamt fur Strahlenschutz, 38226 Salzgitter (Germany); Marro, Leonora [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department Radiation Biology, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki, Aomori 036-8564 (Japan); Suto, Y. [Biological Dosimetry Section, Dept. of Dose Assessment, Research Center for Radiation Emergency Medicine, NIRS, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Prasanna, Pataje G.S. [National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis, Radiation Research Program, 6130 Executive Blvd., MSC 7440, Bethesda, MD 20892-7440 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Biological dosimetry is an essential tool for estimating radiation doses received to personnel when physical dosimetry is not available or inadequate. The current preferred biodosimetry method is based on the measurement of radiation-specific dicentric chromosomes in exposed individuals' peripheral blood lymphocytes. However, this method is labor-, time- and expertise-demanding. Consequently, for mass casualty applications, strategies have been developed to increase its throughput. One such strategy is to develop validated cytogenetic biodosimetry laboratory networks, both national and international. In a previous study, the dicentric chromosome assay (DCA) was validated in our cytogenetic biodosimetry network involving five geographically dispersed laboratories. A complementary strategy to further enhance the throughput of the DCA among inter-laboratory networks is to use a triage DCA where dose assessments are made by truncating the labor-demanding and time-consuming metaphase spread analysis to 20 - 50 metaphase spreads instead of routine 500 - 1000 metaphase spread analysis. Our laboratory network also validated this triage DCA, however, these dose estimates were made using calibration curves generated in each laboratory from the blood samples irradiated in a single laboratory. In an emergency situation, dose estimates made using pre-existing calibration curves which may vary according to radiation type and dose rate and therefore influence the assessed dose. Here, we analyze the effect of using a pre-existing calibration curve on assessed dose among our network laboratories. The dose estimates were made by analyzing 1000 metaphase spreads as well as triage quality scoring and compared to actual physical doses applied to the samples for validation. The dose estimates in the laboratory partners were in good agreement with the applied physical doses and determined to be adequate for guidance in the treatment of acute radiation syndrome.

  19. BEAMS: backbone extraction and merge strategy for the global many-to-many alignment of multiple PPI networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkan, Ferhat; Erten, Cesim

    2014-01-01

    on backbone extraction and merge strategy (BEAMS) for the problem. We finally show, through experiments based on biological significance tests, that the proposed BEAMS algorithm performs better than the state-of-the-art approaches. Furthermore, the computational burden of the BEAMS algorithm in terms...... of execution speed and memory requirements is more reasonable than the competing algorithms. AVAILABILITY AND IMPLEMENTATION: Supplementary material including code implementations in LEDA C++, experimental data and the results are available at http://webprs.khas.edu.tr/~cesim/BEAMS.tar.gz....

  20. Interconnection between biological abnormalities in borderline personality disorder: use of the Bayesian networks model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, José Manuel; Bengoetxea, Endika; Navarro, Felipe; Bobes, Julio; Alarcón, Renato Daniel

    2011-04-30

    There is agreement in that strengthening the sets of neurobiological data would reinforce the diagnostic objectivity of many psychiatric entities. This article attempts to use this approach in borderline personality disorder (BPD). Assuming that most of the biological findings in BPD reflect common underlying pathophysiological processes we hypothesized that most of the data involved in the findings would be statistically interconnected and interdependent, indicating biological consistency for this diagnosis. Prospectively obtained data on scalp and sleep electroencephalography (EEG), clinical neurologic soft signs, the dexamethasone suppression and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation tests of 20 consecutive BPD patients were used to generate a Bayesian network model, an artificial intelligence paradigm that visually illustrates eventual associations (or inter-dependencies) between otherwise seemingly unrelated variables. The Bayesian network model identified relationships among most of the variables. EEG and TSH were the variables that influence most of the others, especially sleep parameters. Neurological soft signs were linked with EEG, TSH, and sleep parameters. The results suggest the possibility of using objective neurobiological variables to strengthen the validity of future diagnostic criteria and nosological characterization of BPD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reticular alignment: A progressive corner-cutting method for multiple sequence alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novák Ádám

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we introduce a progressive corner cutting method called Reticular Alignment for multiple sequence alignment. Unlike previous corner-cutting methods, our approach does not define a compact part of the dynamic programming table. Instead, it defines a set of optimal and suboptimal alignments at each step during the progressive alignment. The set of alignments are represented with a network to store them and use them during the progressive alignment in an efficient way. The program contains a threshold parameter on which the size of the network depends. The larger the threshold parameter and thus the network, the deeper the search in the alignment space for better scored alignments. Results We implemented the program in the Java programming language, and tested it on the BAliBASE database. Reticular Alignment can outperform ClustalW even if a very simple scoring scheme (BLOSUM62 and affine gap penalty is implemented and merely the threshold value is increased. However, this set-up is not sufficient for outperforming other cutting-edge alignment methods. On the other hand, the reticular alignment search strategy together with sophisticated scoring schemes (for example, differentiating gap penalties for hydrophobic and hydrophylic amino acids overcome FSA and in some accuracy measurement, even MAFFT. The program is available from http://phylogeny-cafe.elte.hu/RetAlign/ Conclusions Reticular alignment is an efficient search strategy for finding accurate multiple alignments. The highest accuracy achieved when this searching strategy is combined with sophisticated scoring schemes.

  2. Beyond Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyond Alignment: Applying Systems Thinking to Architecting Enterprises is a comprehensive reader about how enterprises can apply systems thinking in their enterprise architecture practice, for business transformation and for strategic execution. The book's contributors find that systems thinking...... is a valuable way of thinking about the viable enterprise and how to architect it....

  3. Exploring Neural Network Models with Hierarchical Memories and Their Use in Modeling Biological Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusuluri, Sai Teja

    Energy landscapes are often used as metaphors for phenomena in biology, social sciences and finance. Different methods have been implemented in the past for the construction of energy landscapes. Neural network models based on spin glass physics provide an excellent mathematical framework for the construction of energy landscapes. This framework uses a minimal number of parameters and constructs the landscape using data from the actual phenomena. In the past neural network models were used to mimic the storage and retrieval process of memories (patterns) in the brain. With advances in the field now, these models are being used in machine learning, deep learning and modeling of complex phenomena. Most of the past literature focuses on increasing the storage capacity and stability of stored patterns in the network but does not study these models from a modeling perspective or an energy landscape perspective. This dissertation focuses on neural network models both from a modeling perspective and from an energy landscape perspective. I firstly show how the cellular interconversion phenomenon can be modeled as a transition between attractor states on an epigenetic landscape constructed using neural network models. The model allows the identification of a reaction coordinate of cellular interconversion by analyzing experimental and simulation time course data. Monte Carlo simulations of the model show that the initial phase of cellular interconversion is a Poisson process and the later phase of cellular interconversion is a deterministic process. Secondly, I explore the static features of landscapes generated using neural network models, such as sizes of basins of attraction and densities of metastable states. The simulation results show that the static landscape features are strongly dependent on the correlation strength and correlation structure between patterns. Using different hierarchical structures of the correlation between patterns affects the landscape features

  4. Ontology-supported research on vaccine efficacy, safety and integrative biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongqun

    2014-07-01

    While vaccine efficacy and safety research has dramatically progressed with the methods of in silico prediction and data mining, many challenges still exist. A formal ontology is a human- and computer-interpretable set of terms and relations that represent entities in a specific domain and how these terms relate to each other. Several community-based ontologies (including Vaccine Ontology, Ontology of Adverse Events and Ontology of Vaccine Adverse Events) have been developed to support vaccine and adverse event representation, classification, data integration, literature mining of host-vaccine interaction networks, and analysis of vaccine adverse events. The author further proposes minimal vaccine information standards and their ontology representations, ontology-based linked open vaccine data and meta-analysis, an integrative One Network ('OneNet') Theory of Life, and ontology-based approaches to study and apply the OneNet theory. In the Big Data era, these proposed strategies provide a novel framework for advanced data integration and analysis of fundamental biological networks including vaccine immune mechanisms.

  5. ProteoLens: a visual analytic tool for multi-scale database-driven biological network data mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huan, Tianxiao; Sivachenko, Andrey Y; Harrison, Scott H; Chen, Jake Y

    2008-08-12

    New systems biology studies require researchers to understand how interplay among myriads of biomolecular entities is orchestrated in order to achieve high-level cellular and physiological functions. Many software tools have been developed in the past decade to help researchers visually navigate large networks of biomolecular interactions with built-in template-based query capabilities. To further advance researchers' ability to interrogate global physiological states of cells through multi-scale visual network explorations, new visualization software tools still need to be developed to empower the analysis. A robust visual data analysis platform driven by database management systems to perform bi-directional data processing-to-visualizations with declarative querying capabilities is needed. We developed ProteoLens as a JAVA-based visual analytic software tool for creating, annotating and exploring multi-scale biological networks. It supports direct database connectivity to either Oracle or PostgreSQL database tables/views, on which SQL statements using both Data Definition Languages (DDL) and Data Manipulation languages (DML) may be specified. The robust query languages embedded directly within the visualization software help users to bring their network data into a visualization context for annotation and exploration. ProteoLens supports graph/network represented data in standard Graph Modeling Language (GML) formats, and this enables interoperation with a wide range of other visual layout tools. The architectural design of ProteoLens enables the de-coupling of complex network data visualization tasks into two distinct phases: 1) creating network data association rules, which are mapping rules between network node IDs or edge IDs and data attributes such as functional annotations, expression levels, scores, synonyms, descriptions etc; 2) applying network data association rules to build the network and perform the visual annotation of graph nodes and edges

  6. SECLAF: A Webserver and Deep Neural Network Design Tool for Hierarchical Biological Sequence Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalkai, Balázs; Grolmusz, Vince

    2018-02-27

    Artificial intelligence (AI) tools are gaining more and more ground each year in bioinformatics. Learning algorithms can be taught for specific tasks by using the existing enormous biological databases, and the resulting models can be used for the high-quality classification of novel, un-categorized data in numerous areas, including biological sequence analysis. Here we introduce SECLAF, a webserver that uses deep neural networks for hierarchical biological sequence classification. By applying SECLAF for residue-sequences, we have reported (Methods (2018), https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ymeth.2017.06.034) the most accurate multi-label protein classifier to date (UniProt -into 698 classes- AUC 99.99%; Gene Ontology -into 983 classes- AUC 99.45%). Our framework SECLAF can be applied for other sequence classification tasks, as we describe in the present contribution. The program SECLAF is implemented in Python, and is available for download, with example datasets at the website https://pitgroup.org/seclaf/. For Gene Ontology and UniProt based classifications a webserver is also available at the address above. grolmusz@pitgroup.org and szalkai@pitgroup.org.

  7. Loosening the shackles of scientific disciplines with network science. Reply to comments on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosak, Marko; Markovič, Rene; Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Marhl, Marko; Stožer, Andraž; Perc, Matjaž

    2018-03-01

    We would like to thank all the experts for their insightful and very interesting comments that have been submitted in response to our review "Network science of biological systems at different scales" [1]. We are delighted with the number of comments that have been written, and even more so with the positive opinions that these comments communicate to the wider audience [2-9]. Although methods of network science have long proven their value in relevantly addressing various challenges in the biological sciences, such interdisciplinary research often still struggles for funding and recognition at many academic levels.

  8. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  9. Integrative network analysis highlights biological processes underlying GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion: A DIRECT study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valborg Gudmundsdottir

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion has a considerable heritable component as estimated from twin studies, yet few genetic variants influencing this phenotype have been identified. We performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS of GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion in non-diabetic individuals from the Netherlands Twin register (n = 126. This GWAS was enhanced using a tissue-specific protein-protein interaction network approach. We identified a beta-cell protein-protein interaction module that was significantly enriched for low gene scores based on the GWAS P-values and found support at the network level in an independent cohort from Tübingen, Germany (n = 100. Additionally, a polygenic risk score based on SNPs prioritized from the network was associated (P < 0.05 with glucose-stimulated insulin secretion phenotypes in up to 5,318 individuals in MAGIC cohorts. The network contains both known and novel genes in the context of insulin secretion and is enriched for members of the focal adhesion, extracellular-matrix receptor interaction, actin cytoskeleton regulation, Rap1 and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Adipose tissue is, like the beta-cell, one of the target tissues of GLP-1 and we thus hypothesized that similar networks might be functional in both tissues. In order to verify peripheral effects of GLP-1 stimulation, we compared the transcriptome profiling of ob/ob mice treated with liraglutide, a clinically used GLP-1 receptor agonist, versus baseline controls. Some of the upstream regulators of differentially expressed genes in the white adipose tissue of ob/ob mice were also detected in the human beta-cell network of genes associated with GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion. The findings provide biological insight into the mechanisms through which the effects of GLP-1 may be modulated and highlight a potential role of the beta-cell expressed genes RYR2, GDI2, KIAA0232, COL4A1 and COL4A2 in GLP-1 stimulated

  10. Progressive multiple sequence alignments from triplets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality of progressive sequence alignments strongly depends on the accuracy of the individual pairwise alignment steps since gaps that are introduced at one step cannot be removed at later aggregation steps. Adjacent insertions and deletions necessarily appear in arbitrary order in pairwise alignments and hence form an unavoidable source of errors. Research Here we present a modified variant of progressive sequence alignments that addresses both issues. Instead of pairwise alignments we use exact dynamic programming to align sequence or profile triples. This avoids a large fractions of the ambiguities arising in pairwise alignments. In the subsequent aggregation steps we follow the logic of the Neighbor-Net algorithm, which constructs a phylogenetic network by step-wisely replacing triples by pairs instead of combining pairs to singletons. To this end the three-way alignments are subdivided into two partial alignments, at which stage all-gap columns are naturally removed. This alleviates the "once a gap, always a gap" problem of progressive alignment procedures. Conclusion The three-way Neighbor-Net based alignment program aln3nn is shown to compare favorably on both protein sequences and nucleic acids sequences to other progressive alignment tools. In the latter case one easily can include scoring terms that consider secondary structure features. Overall, the quality of resulting alignments in general exceeds that of clustalw or other multiple alignments tools even though our software does not included heuristics for context dependent (mismatch scores.

  11. Strategy-aligned fuzzy approach for market segment evaluation and selection: a modular decision support system by dynamic network process (DNP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi Nasrabadi, Ali; Hosseinpour, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimnejad, Sadoullah

    2013-05-01

    In competitive markets, market segmentation is a critical point of business, and it can be used as a generic strategy. In each segment, strategies lead companies to their targets; thus, segment selection and the application of the appropriate strategies over time are very important to achieve successful business. This paper aims to model a strategy-aligned fuzzy approach to market segment evaluation and selection. A modular decision support system (DSS) is developed to select an optimum segment with its appropriate strategies. The suggested DSS has two main modules. The first one is SPACE matrix which indicates the risk of each segment. Also, it determines the long-term strategies. The second module finds the most preferred segment-strategies over time. Dynamic network process is applied to prioritize segment-strategies according to five competitive force factors. There is vagueness in pairwise comparisons, and this vagueness has been modeled using fuzzy concepts. To clarify, an example is illustrated by a case study in Iran's coffee market. The results show that success possibility of segments could be different, and choosing the best ones could help companies to be sure in developing their business. Moreover, changing the priority of strategies over time indicates the importance of long-term planning. This fact has been supported by a case study on strategic priority difference in short- and long-term consideration.

  12. ALIGNING JIG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  13. Defending Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Schwarz

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available After the rise to power of the German National Socialist Party (January 30, 1933, German academia soon realized that a requirement for “muddling through” was to avoid the stigma of being regarded as “politically unreliable,” thus to appear aligned and loyal to the state policies. The focus is here on the physics community. A rhetoric of alignment developed with the objective to justify collaboration as a rational and morally justified strategy. In the early post-war years, the rhetoric was reoriented to deny any involvement (other than as resistance systematically using a conceptual framework foreshadowing the principles of Cognitive Dissonance Reduction (CDR and the related framework of Rhetorical (Informal Fallacies. This affinity is here studied with reference to statements from the period.

  14. Using Nonlinear Stochastic Evolutionary Game Strategy to Model an Evolutionary Biological Network of Organ Carcinogenesis Under a Natural Selection Scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bor-Sen; Tsai, Kun-Wei; Li, Cheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Molecular biologists have long recognized carcinogenesis as an evolutionary process that involves natural selection. Cancer is driven by the somatic evolution of cell lineages. In this study, the evolution of somatic cancer cell lineages during carcinogenesis was modeled as an equilibrium point (ie, phenotype of attractor) shifting, the process of a nonlinear stochastic evolutionary biological network. This process is subject to intrinsic random fluctuations because of somatic genetic and epigenetic variations, as well as extrinsic disturbances because of carcinogens and stressors. In order to maintain the normal function (ie, phenotype) of an evolutionary biological network subjected to random intrinsic fluctuations and extrinsic disturbances, a network robustness scheme that incorporates natural selection needs to be developed. This can be accomplished by selecting certain genetic and epigenetic variations to modify the network structure to attenuate intrinsic fluctuations efficiently and to resist extrinsic disturbances in order to maintain the phenotype of the evolutionary biological network at an equilibrium point (attractor). However, during carcinogenesis, the remaining (or neutral) genetic and epigenetic variations accumulate, and the extrinsic disturbances become too large to maintain the normal phenotype at the desired equilibrium point for the nonlinear evolutionary biological network. Thus, the network is shifted to a cancer phenotype at a new equilibrium point that begins a new evolutionary process. In this study, the natural selection scheme of an evolutionary biological network of carcinogenesis was derived from a robust negative feedback scheme based on the nonlinear stochastic Nash game strategy. The evolvability and phenotypic robustness criteria of the evolutionary cancer network were also estimated by solving a Hamilton-Jacobi inequality - constrained optimization problem. The simulation revealed that the phenotypic shift of the lung cancer

  15. Image alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  16. A systems biology approach identifies molecular networks defining skeletal muscle abnormalities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nil Turan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD is an inflammatory process of the lung inducing persistent airflow limitation. Extensive systemic effects, such as skeletal muscle dysfunction, often characterize these patients and severely limit life expectancy. Despite considerable research efforts, the molecular basis of muscle degeneration in COPD is still a matter of intense debate. In this study, we have applied a network biology approach to model the relationship between muscle molecular and physiological response to training and systemic inflammatory mediators. Our model shows that failure to co-ordinately activate expression of several tissue remodelling and bioenergetics pathways is a specific landmark of COPD diseased muscles. Our findings also suggest that this phenomenon may be linked to an abnormal expression of a number of histone modifiers, which we discovered correlate with oxygen utilization. These observations raised the interesting possibility that cell hypoxia may be a key factor driving skeletal muscle degeneration in COPD patients.

  17. [RESAOLAB: West African network of laboratories to enhance the quality of clinical biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, L; Machuron, J L; Sow, I; Diagne, R; Sakandé, J; Nikiéma, A; Bougoudogo, F; Keita, A; Longuet, C

    2015-02-01

    The Fondation Mérieux, in partnership with the Ministries of Health of Burkina Faso, Mali and Senegal, implemented for four years a project to reinforce the laboratory sector in the three participating countries: the RESAOLAB project (West African Network of Biomedical Analysis Laboratories).The objective of RESAOLAB project, in partnership with the WHO Office for West Africa and the West African Health Organization, was to strengthen the systems of biomedical laboratories to improve diagnostic services, access, monitoring and management of infectious diseases. Following the successful results achieved under the RESAOLAB project and due to the demand of the neighbour countries ministries, the RESAOLAB project is now extended to four other countries of the West African region: Benin, Guinea-Conakry, Niger and Togo. The RESAOLAB project has become the RESAOLAB programme, its purpose is to strengthen the quality of the medical biology services thanks to a regional and transversal approach.

  18. Compensatory interactions to stabilize multiple steady states or mitigate the effects of multiple deregulations in biological networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gang; Campbell, Colin; Albert, RéKa

    Complex diseases can be modeled as damage to intra-cellular networks that results in abnormal cell behaviors. Network-based dynamic models such as Boolean models have been employed to model a variety of biological systems including those corresponding to disease. Previous work designed compensatory interactions to stabilize an attractor of a Boolean network after single node damage. We generalize this method to a multi-node damage scenario and to the simultaneous stabilization of multiple steady state attractors. We presents three key results. First, we use analytical and computational methods to study how network structure and regulatory logic affect the resilience of the network's steady states to single node perturbation. Second, we present an algorithm to design compensatory interventions to stabilize a steady state of the network after double node damage and evaluate it on random Boolean networks and two intra-cellular network models relevant to cancer. Third, we apply the algorithm on stabilizing two steady states simultaneously after a single node damage and discuss the emerging situations and their corresponding frequencies. We also apply the algorithm to the biological examples.

  19. Sieve-based relation extraction of gene regulatory networks from biological literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žitnik, Slavko; Žitnik, Marinka; Zupan, Blaž; Bajec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    Relation extraction is an essential procedure in literature mining. It focuses on extracting semantic relations between parts of text, called mentions. Biomedical literature includes an enormous amount of textual descriptions of biological entities, their interactions and results of related experiments. To extract them in an explicit, computer readable format, these relations were at first extracted manually from databases. Manual curation was later replaced with automatic or semi-automatic tools with natural language processing capabilities. The current challenge is the development of information extraction procedures that can directly infer more complex relational structures, such as gene regulatory networks. We develop a computational approach for extraction of gene regulatory networks from textual data. Our method is designed as a sieve-based system and uses linear-chain conditional random fields and rules for relation extraction. With this method we successfully extracted the sporulation gene regulation network in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis for the information extraction challenge at the BioNLP 2013 conference. To enable extraction of distant relations using first-order models, we transform the data into skip-mention sequences. We infer multiple models, each of which is able to extract different relationship types. Following the shared task, we conducted additional analysis using different system settings that resulted in reducing the reconstruction error of bacterial sporulation network from 0.73 to 0.68, measured as the slot error rate between the predicted and the reference network. We observe that all relation extraction sieves contribute to the predictive performance of the proposed approach. Also, features constructed by considering mention words and their prefixes and suffixes are the most important features for higher accuracy of extraction. Analysis of distances between different mention types in the text shows that our choice of transforming

  20. Toward Building Hybrid Biological/in silico Neural Networks for Motor Neuroprosthetic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaturk, Mehmet; Gulcur, Halil Ozcan; Canbeyli, Resit

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the Bioinspired Neuroprosthetic Design Environment (BNDE) as a practical platform for the development of novel brain-machine interface (BMI) controllers, which are based on spiking model neurons. We built the BNDE around a hard real-time system so that it is capable of creating simulated synapses from extracellularly recorded neurons to model neurons. In order to evaluate the practicality of the BNDE for neuroprosthetic control experiments, a novel, adaptive BMI controller was developed and tested using real-time closed-loop simulations. The present controller consists of two in silico medium spiny neurons, which receive simulated synaptic inputs from recorded motor cortical neurons. In the closed-loop simulations, the recordings from the cortical neurons were imitated using an external, hardware-based neural signal synthesizer. By implementing a reward-modulated spike timing-dependent plasticity rule, the controller achieved perfect target reach accuracy for a two-target reaching task in one-dimensional space. The BNDE combines the flexibility of software-based spiking neural network (SNN) simulations with powerful online data visualization tools and is a low-cost, PC-based, and all-in-one solution for developing neurally inspired BMI controllers. We believe that the BNDE is the first implementation, which is capable of creating hybrid biological/in silico neural networks for motor neuroprosthetic control and utilizes multiple CPU cores for computationally intensive real-time SNN simulations.

  1. Efficient reconstruction of biological networks via transitive reduction on general purpose graphics processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bošnački, Dragan; Odenbrett, Maximilian R; Wijs, Anton; Ligtenberg, Willem; Hilbers, Peter

    2012-10-30

    Techniques for reconstruction of biological networks which are based on perturbation experiments often predict direct interactions between nodes that do not exist. Transitive reduction removes such relations if they can be explained by an indirect path of influences. The existing algorithms for transitive reduction are sequential and might suffer from too long run times for large networks. They also exhibit the anomaly that some existing direct interactions are also removed. We develop efficient scalable parallel algorithms for transitive reduction on general purpose graphics processing units for both standard (unweighted) and weighted graphs. Edge weights are regarded as uncertainties of interactions. A direct interaction is removed only if there exists an indirect interaction path between the same nodes which is strictly more certain than the direct one. This is a refinement of the removal condition for the unweighted graphs and avoids to a great extent the erroneous elimination of direct edges. Parallel implementations of these algorithms can achieve speed-ups of two orders of magnitude compared to their sequential counterparts. Our experiments show that: i) taking into account the edge weights improves the reconstruction quality compared to the unweighted case; ii) it is advantageous not to distinguish between positive and negative interactions since this lowers the complexity of the algorithms from NP-complete to polynomial without loss of quality.

  2. FUSE: a profit maximization approach for functional summarization of biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seah, Boon-Siew; Bhowmick, Sourav S; Dewey, C Forbes; Yu, Hanry

    2012-03-21

    The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein interaction network (PPI) using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of PPIS remains a daunting task as it is challenging to make sense out of the deluge of high-dimensional interaction data. Specifically, techniques that automatically abstract and summarize PPIS at multiple resolutions to provide high level views of its functional landscape are still lacking. We present a novel data-driven and generic algorithm called FUSE (Functional Summary Generator) that generates functional maps of a PPI at different levels of organization, from broad process-process level interactions to in-depth complex-complex level interactions, through a pro t maximization approach that exploits Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle to maximize information gain of the summary graph while satisfying the level of detail constraint. We evaluate the performance of FUSE on several real-world PPIS. We also compare FUSE to state-of-the-art graph clustering methods with GO term enrichment by constructing the biological process landscape of the PPIS. Using AD network as our case study, we further demonstrate the ability of FUSE to quickly summarize the network and identify many different processes and complexes that regulate it. Finally, we study the higher-order connectivity of the human PPI. By simultaneously evaluating interaction and annotation data, FUSE abstracts higher-order interaction maps by reducing the details of the underlying PPI to form a functional summary graph of interconnected functional clusters. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness and superiority over state-of-the-art graph clustering methods with GO term enrichment.

  3. FUSE: a profit maximization approach for functional summarization of biological networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seah Boon-Siew

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of large-scale curated protein interaction datasets has given rise to the opportunity to investigate higher level organization and modularity within the protein interaction network (PPI using graph theoretic analysis. Despite the recent progress, systems level analysis of PPIS remains a daunting task as it is challenging to make sense out of the deluge of high-dimensional interaction data. Specifically, techniques that automatically abstract and summarize PPIS at multiple resolutions to provide high level views of its functional landscape are still lacking. We present a novel data-driven and generic algorithm called FUSE (Functional Summary Generator that generates functional maps of a PPI at different levels of organization, from broad process-process level interactions to in-depth complex-complex level interactions, through a pro t maximization approach that exploits Minimum Description Length (MDL principle to maximize information gain of the summary graph while satisfying the level of detail constraint. Results We evaluate the performance of FUSE on several real-world PPIS. We also compare FUSE to state-of-the-art graph clustering methods with GO term enrichment by constructing the biological process landscape of the PPIS. Using AD network as our case study, we further demonstrate the ability of FUSE to quickly summarize the network and identify many different processes and complexes that regulate it. Finally, we study the higher-order connectivity of the human PPI. Conclusion By simultaneously evaluating interaction and annotation data, FUSE abstracts higher-order interaction maps by reducing the details of the underlying PPI to form a functional summary graph of interconnected functional clusters. Our results demonstrate its effectiveness and superiority over state-of-the-art graph clustering methods with GO term enrichment.

  4. Ancestral sequence alignment under optimal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Daniel G

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple genome alignment is an important problem in bioinformatics. An important subproblem used by many multiple alignment approaches is that of aligning two multiple alignments. Many popular alignment algorithms for DNA use the sum-of-pairs heuristic, where the score of a multiple alignment is the sum of its induced pairwise alignment scores. However, the biological meaning of the sum-of-pairs of pairs heuristic is not obvious. Additionally, many algorithms based on the sum-of-pairs heuristic are complicated and slow, compared to pairwise alignment algorithms. An alternative approach to aligning alignments is to first infer ancestral sequences for each alignment, and then align the two ancestral sequences. In addition to being fast, this method has a clear biological basis that takes into account the evolution implied by an underlying phylogenetic tree. In this study we explore the accuracy of aligning alignments by ancestral sequence alignment. We examine the use of both maximum likelihood and parsimony to infer ancestral sequences. Additionally, we investigate the effect on accuracy of allowing ambiguity in our ancestral sequences. Results We use synthetic sequence data that we generate by simulating evolution on a phylogenetic tree. We use two different types of phylogenetic trees: trees with a period of rapid growth followed by a period of slow growth, and trees with a period of slow growth followed by a period of rapid growth. We examine the alignment accuracy of four ancestral sequence reconstruction and alignment methods: parsimony, maximum likelihood, ambiguous parsimony, and ambiguous maximum likelihood. Additionally, we compare against the alignment accuracy of two sum-of-pairs algorithms: ClustalW and the heuristic of Ma, Zhang, and Wang. Conclusion We find that allowing ambiguity in ancestral sequences does not lead to better multiple alignments. Regardless of whether we use parsimony or maximum likelihood, the

  5. Exploring biological and social networks to better understand and treat diabetes mellitus. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgardt, Bengt-Frederik; Jarasch, Alexander; Lammert, Eckhard

    2018-03-01

    Improvements and breakthroughs in computational sciences in the last 20 years have paralleled the rapid gain of influence of social networks on our daily life. As timely reviewed by Perc and colleagues [1], understanding and treating complex human diseases, such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), from which already more than 5% of the global population suffer, will necessitate analyzing and understanding the multi-layered and interconnected networks that usually keep physiological functions intact, but are disturbed in disease states. These networks range from intra- and intercellular networks influencing cell behavior (e.g., secretion of insulin in response to food intake and anabolic response to insulin) to social networks influencing human behavior (e.g., food intake and physical activity). This commentary first expands on the background of pancreatic beta cell networks in human health and T2D, briefly introduces exosomes as novel signals exchanged between distant cellular networks, and finally discusses potential pitfalls and chances in network analyses with regards to experimental data acquisition and processing.

  6. Biology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I am particularly happy that the Academy is bringing out this document by Professor M S. Valiathan on Ayurvedic Biology. It is an effort to place before the scientific community, especially that of India, the unique scientific opportunities that arise out of viewing Ayurveda from the perspective of contemporary science, its tools ...

  7. Integrating biological indicators in a Soil Monitoring Network to improve soil quality diagnosis - a study case in Southern Belgium (Wallonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Inken; Chartin, Caroline; van Wesemael, Bas; Carnol, Monique

    2017-04-01

    Soil organisms and their activities are essential for soil ecosystem functioning and are thus pertinent indicators of soil quality. Recent efforts have been undertaken to include biological indicators of soil quality into regional/national monitoring networks. The aim of this study was to establish baseline values for six biological indicators and two eco-physiological quotients for agricultural soils in the CARBIOSOL network and to assess small scale spatial and seasonal variability. Potential respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen, net nitrogen mineralization, metabolic diversity of soil bacteria, earthworm abundance, microbial quotient and metabolic quotient were measured at 60 sites across contrasting agricultural regions (different soil types and climate) and land use types (grasslands and croplands). Eleven additional cropland sites, the same biological indicators were measured at four sampling points within the same farm plot at four dates during the vegetation period (April, June, August, October of 2016) to assess temporal variability and small-scale spatial variability. Four of the six selected biological indicators (potential respiration, microbial biomass carbon and nitrogen as well as metabolic diversity of soil bacteria) were significantly higher under grassland than under cropland. Ranges of values were generally wider under grasslands than under croplands. Agricultural region did not significantly influence the biological indicators tested. Date of sampling had a significant effect on five of the six selected biological indicators (potential respiration, microbial nitrogen, metabolic diversity of soil bacteria, and net nitrogen mineralization). Temporal variability within one year was slightly higher than variability within one farm plot, with the biological indicators having the highest seasonal variability also showing the highest small-scale spatial variability. This study defined baseline values for agricultural soils at the scale of

  8. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems.

  9. Application of hierarchical dissociated neural network in closed-loop hybrid system integrating biological and mechanical intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcheng Li

    Full Text Available Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including 'random' and '4Q' (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the '4Q' cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the '4Q' network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems.

  10. Towards the prediction of essential genes by integration of network topology, cellular localization and biological process information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemke Ney

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of essential genes is important for the understanding of the minimal requirements for cellular life and for practical purposes, such as drug design. However, the experimental techniques for essential genes discovery are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Considering these experimental constraints, a computational approach capable of accurately predicting essential genes would be of great value. We therefore present here a machine learning-based computational approach relying on network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information for prediction of essential genes. Results We constructed a decision tree-based meta-classifier and trained it on datasets with individual and grouped attributes-network topological features, cellular compartments and biological processes-to generate various predictors of essential genes. We showed that the predictors with better performances are those generated by datasets with integrated attributes. Using the predictor with all attributes, i.e., network topological features, cellular compartments and biological processes, we obtained the best predictor of essential genes that was then used to classify yeast genes with unknown essentiality status. Finally, we generated decision trees by training the J48 algorithm on datasets with all network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information to discover cellular rules for essentiality. We found that the number of protein physical interactions, the nuclear localization of proteins and the number of regulating transcription factors are the most important factors determining gene essentiality. Conclusion We were able to demonstrate that network topological features, cellular localization and biological process information are reliable predictors of essential genes. Moreover, by constructing decision trees based on these data, we could discover cellular rules governing

  11. Examining the limits of cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms in biologically-based excitatory networks of the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, K A; Njap, F; Nicola, W; Skinner, F K; Campbell, S A

    2015-12-01

    Determining the biological details and mechanisms that are essential for the generation of population rhythms in the mammalian brain is a challenging problem. This problem cannot be addressed either by experimental or computational studies in isolation. Here we show that computational models that are carefully linked with experiment provide insight into this problem. Using the experimental context of a whole hippocampus preparation in vitro that spontaneously expresses theta frequency (3-12 Hz) population bursts in the CA1 region, we create excitatory network models to examine whether cellular adaptation bursting mechanisms could critically contribute to the generation of this rhythm. We use biologically-based cellular models of CA1 pyramidal cells and network sizes and connectivities that correspond to the experimental context. By expanding our mean field analyses to networks with heterogeneity and non all-to-all coupling, we allow closer correspondence with experiment, and use these analyses to greatly extend the range of parameter values that are explored. We find that our model excitatory networks can produce theta frequency population bursts in a robust fashion.Thus, even though our networks are limited by not including inhibition at present, our results indicate that cellular adaptation in pyramidal cells could be an important aspect for the occurrence of theta frequency population bursting in the hippocampus. These models serve as a starting framework for the inclusion of inhibitory cells and for the consideration of additional experimental features not captured in our present network models.

  12. Enhancement of COPD biological networks using a web-based collaboration interface [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/5ew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The sbv IMPROVER project team (in alphabetical order

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The construction and application of biological network models is an approach that offers a holistic way to understand biological processes involved in disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive inflammatory disease of the airways for which therapeutic options currently are limited after diagnosis, even in its earliest stage. COPD network models are important tools to better understand the biological components and processes underlying initial disease development. With the increasing amounts of literature that are now available, crowdsourcing approaches offer new forms of collaboration for researchers to review biological findings, which can be applied to the construction and verification of complex biological networks. We report the construction of 50 biological network models relevant to lung biology and early COPD using an integrative systems biology and collaborative crowd-verification approach. By combining traditional literature curation with a data-driven approach that predicts molecular activities from transcriptomics data, we constructed an initial COPD network model set based on a previously published non-diseased lung-relevant model set. The crowd was given the opportunity to enhance and refine the networks on a website (https://bionet.sbvimprover.com/ and to add mechanistic detail, as well as critically review existing evidence and evidence added by other users, so as to enhance the accuracy of the biological representation of the processes captured in the networks. Finally, scientists and experts in the field discussed and refined the networks during an in-person jamboree meeting. Here, we describe examples of the changes made to three of these networks: Neutrophil Signaling, Macrophage Signaling, and Th1-Th2 Signaling. We describe an innovative approach to biological network construction that combines literature and data mining and a crowdsourcing approach to generate a comprehensive set of COPD

  13. The structural molecular biology network of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A.R.G. Barbosa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the achievements of the Structural Molecular Biology Network (SMolBNet, a collaborative program of structural molecular biology, centered in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and supported by São Paulo State Funding Agency (FAPESP. It gathers twenty scientific groups and is coordinated by the scientific staff of the Center of Structural Molecular Biology, at the National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS, in Campinas. The SMolBNet program has been aimed at 1 solving the structure of proteins of interest related to the research projects of the groups. In some cases, the choice has been to select proteins of unknown function or of possible novel structure obtained from the sequenced genomes of the FAPESP genomic program; 2 providing the groups with training in all the steps of the protein structure determination: gene cloning, protein expression, protein purification, protein crystallization and structure determination. Having begun in 2001, the program has been successful in both aims. Here, four groups reveal their participation in the program and describe the structural aspects of the proteins they have selected to study.Esse artigo descreve realizações do Programa SMolBNet (Rede de Biologia Molecular Estrutural do Estado de São Paulo, apoiado pela FAPESP (Fundação de Apoio à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. Ele reúne vinte grupos de pesquisa e é coordenado pelos pesquisadores do Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS, em Campinas. O Programa SMolBNet tem como metas: Elucidar a estrutura tridimensional de proteínas de interesse aos grupos de pesquisa componentes do Programa; Prover os grupos com treinamento em todas as etapas de determinação de estrutura: clonagem gênica, expressão de proteínas, purificação de proteínas, cristalização de proteínas e elucidação de suas estruturas. Tendo começado em 2001, o Programa alcançou sucesso em ambas as metas. Neste artigo, quatro dos grupos

  14. Research Coordination Network: Geothermal Biology and Geochemistry in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inskeep, W. P.; Young, M. J.; Jay, Z.

    2006-12-01

    The number and diversity of geothermal features in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) represent a fascinating array of high temperature geochemical environments that host a corresponding number of unique and potentially novel organisms in all of the three recognized domains of life: Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya. The geothermal features of YNP have long been the subject of scientific inquiry, especially in the fields of microbiology, geochemistry, geothermal hydrology, microbial ecology, and population biology. However, there are no organized forums for scientists working in YNP geothermal areas to present research results, exchange ideas, discuss research priorities, and enhance synergism among research groups. The primary goal of the YNP Research Coordination Network (GEOTHERM) is to develop a more unified effort among scientists and resource agencies to characterize, describe, understand and inventory the diverse biota associated with geothermal habitats in YNP. The YNP RCN commenced in January 2005 as a collaborative effort among numerous university scientists, governmental agencies and private industry. The YNP RCN hosted a workshop in February 2006 to discuss research results and to form three working groups focused on (i) web-site and digital library content, (ii) metagenomics of thermophilic microbial communities and (iii) development of geochemical methods appropriate for geomicrobiological studies. The working groups represent one strategy for enhancing communication, collaboration and most importantly, productivity among the RCN participants. If you have an interest in the geomicrobiology of geothermal systems, please feel welcome to join and or participate in the YNP RCN.

  15. Strategic Integration of Multiple Bioinformatics Resources for System Level Analysis of Biological Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Mark; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Wang, Sheng; Xie, Bing; Hashemifar, Somaye; Taylor, Andrew; Dubchak, Inna; Conrad Gilliam, T; Maltsev, Natalia

    2017-01-01

    Recent technological advances in genomics allow the production of biological data at unprecedented tera- and petabyte scales. Efficient mining of these vast and complex datasets for the needs of biomedical research critically depends on a seamless integration of the clinical, genomic, and experimental information with prior knowledge about genotype-phenotype relationships. Such experimental data accumulated in publicly available databases should be accessible to a variety of algorithms and analytical pipelines that drive computational analysis and data mining.We present an integrated computational platform Lynx (Sulakhe et al., Nucleic Acids Res 44:D882-D887, 2016) ( http://lynx.cri.uchicago.edu ), a web-based database and knowledge extraction engine. It provides advanced search capabilities and a variety of algorithms for enrichment analysis and network-based gene prioritization. It gives public access to the Lynx integrated knowledge base (LynxKB) and its analytical tools via user-friendly web services and interfaces. The Lynx service-oriented architecture supports annotation and analysis of high-throughput experimental data. Lynx tools assist the user in extracting meaningful knowledge from LynxKB and experimental data, and in the generation of weighted hypotheses regarding the genes and molecular mechanisms contributing to human phenotypes or conditions of interest. The goal of this integrated platform is to support the end-to-end analytical needs of various translational projects.

  16. The SOL Genomics Network. A Comparative Resource for Solanaceae Biology and Beyond1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Lukas A.; Solow, Teri H.; Taylor, Nicolas; Skwarecki, Beth; Buels, Robert; Binns, John; Lin, Chenwei; Wright, Mark H.; Ahrens, Robert; Wang, Ying; Herbst, Evan V.; Keyder, Emil R.; Menda, Naama; Zamir, Dani; Tanksley, Steven D.

    2005-01-01

    The SOL Genomics Network (SGN; http://sgn.cornell.edu) is a rapidly evolving comparative resource for the plants of the Solanaceae family, which includes important crop and model plants such as potato (Solanum tuberosum), eggplant (Solanum melongena), pepper (Capsicum annuum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). The aim of SGN is to relate these species to one another using a comparative genomics approach and to tie them to the other dicots through the fully sequenced genome of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). SGN currently houses map and marker data for Solanaceae species, a large expressed sequence tag collection with computationally derived unigene sets, an extensive database of phenotypic information for a mutagenized tomato population, and associated tools such as real-time quantitative trait loci. Recently, the International Solanaceae Project (SOL) was formed as an umbrella organization for Solanaceae research in over 30 countries to address important questions in plant biology. The first cornerstone of the SOL project is the sequencing of the entire euchromatic portion of the tomato genome. SGN is collaborating with other bioinformatics centers in building the bioinformatics infrastructure for the tomato sequencing project and implementing the bioinformatics strategy of the larger SOL project. The overarching goal of SGN is to make information available in an intuitive comparative format, thereby facilitating a systems approach to investigations into the basis of adaptation and phenotypic diversity in the Solanaceae family, other species in the Asterid clade such as coffee (Coffea arabica), Rubiaciae, and beyond. PMID:16010005

  17. Insights into TREM2 biology by network analysis of human brain gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forabosco, Paola; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Trabzuni, Daniah; Walker, Robert; Smith, Colin; Bras, Jose; Levine, Adam P; Hardy, John; Pocock, Jennifer M; Guerreiro, Rita; Weale, Michael E; Ryten, Mina

    2013-12-01

    Rare variants in TREM2 cause susceptibility to late-onset Alzheimer's disease. Here we use microarray-based expression data generated from 101 neuropathologically normal individuals and covering 10 brain regions, including the hippocampus, to understand TREM2 biology in human brain. Using network analysis, we detect a highly preserved TREM2-containing module in human brain, show that it relates to microglia, and demonstrate that TREM2 is a hub gene in 5 brain regions, including the hippocampus, suggesting that it can drive module function. Using enrichment analysis we show significant overrepresentation of genes implicated in the adaptive and innate immune system. Inspection of genes with the highest connectivity to TREM2 suggests that it plays a key role in mediating changes in the microglial cytoskeleton necessary not only for phagocytosis, but also migration. Most importantly, we show that the TREM2-containing module is significantly enriched for genes genetically implicated in Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease, implying that these diseases share common pathways centered on microglia and that among the genes identified are possible new disease-relevant genes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Systems Biology Analysis Unfolds the Molecular Pathways and Networks of Two Proteobacteria in Spaceflight and Simulated Microgravity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Raktim; Shilpa, P Phani; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria are important organisms for space missions due to their increased pathogenesis in microgravity that poses risks to the health of astronauts and for projected synthetic biology applications at the space station. We understand little about the effect, at the molecular systems level, of microgravity on bacteria, despite their significant incidence. In this study, we proposed a systems biology pipeline and performed an analysis on published gene expression data sets from multiple seminal studies on Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium under spaceflight and simulated microgravity conditions. By applying gene set enrichment analysis on the global gene expression data, we directly identified a large number of new, statistically significant cellular and metabolic pathways involved in response to microgravity. Alteration of metabolic pathways in microgravity has rarely been reported before, whereas in this analysis metabolic pathways are prevalent. Several of those pathways were found to be common across studies and species, indicating a common cellular response in microgravity. We clustered genes based on their expression patterns using consensus non-negative matrix factorization. The genes from different mathematically stable clusters showed protein-protein association networks with distinct biological functions, suggesting the plausible functional or regulatory network motifs in response to microgravity. The newly identified pathways and networks showed connection with increased survival of pathogens within macrophages, virulence, and antibiotic resistance in microgravity. Our work establishes a systems biology pipeline and provides an integrated insight into the effect of microgravity at the molecular systems level. Systems biology-Microgravity-Pathways and networks-Bacteria. Astrobiology 16, 677-689.

  19. An additional k-means clustering step improves the biological features of WGCNA gene co-expression networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botía, Juan A; Vandrovcova, Jana; Forabosco, Paola; Guelfi, Sebastian; D'Sa, Karishma; Hardy, John; Lewis, Cathryn M; Ryten, Mina; Weale, Michael E

    2017-04-12

    Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) is a widely used R software package for the generation of gene co-expression networks (GCN). WGCNA generates both a GCN and a derived partitioning of clusters of genes (modules). We propose k-means clustering as an additional processing step to conventional WGCNA, which we have implemented in the R package km2gcn (k-means to gene co-expression network, https://github.com/juanbot/km2gcn ). We assessed our method on networks created from UKBEC data (10 different human brain tissues), on networks created from GTEx data (42 human tissues, including 13 brain tissues), and on simulated networks derived from GTEx data. We observed substantially improved module properties, including: (1) few or zero misplaced genes; (2) increased counts of replicable clusters in alternate tissues (x3.1 on average); (3) improved enrichment of Gene Ontology terms (seen in 48/52 GCNs) (4) improved cell type enrichment signals (seen in 21/23 brain GCNs); and (5) more accurate partitions in simulated data according to a range of similarity indices. The results obtained from our investigations indicate that our k-means method, applied as an adjunct to standard WGCNA, results in better network partitions. These improved partitions enable more fruitful downstream analyses, as gene modules are more biologically meaningful.

  20. Study Under AC Stimulation on Excitement Properties of Weighted Small-World Biological Neural Networks with Side-Restrain Mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Wujie; Luo Xiaoshu; Jiang Pinqun

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new model of weighted small-world biological neural networks based on biophysical Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with side-restrain mechanism. Then we study excitement properties of the model under alternating current (AC) stimulation. The study shows that the excitement properties in the networks are preferably consistent with the behavior properties of a brain nervous system under different AC stimuli, such as refractory period and the brain neural excitement response induced by different intensities of noise and coupling. The results of the study have reference worthiness for the brain nerve electrophysiology and epistemological science.

  1. Tissue culture on a chip: Developmental biology applications of self-organized capillary networks in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    2016-08-01

    Organ culture systems are used to elucidate the mechanisms of pattern formation in developmental biology. Various organ culture techniques have been used, but the lack of microcirculation in such cultures impedes the long-term maintenance of larger tissues. Recent advances in microfluidic devices now enable us to utilize self-organized perfusable capillary networks in organ cultures. In this review, we will overview past approaches to organ culture and current technical advances in microfluidic devices, and discuss possible applications of microfluidics towards the study of developmental biology. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  2. MicroRNA functional network in pancreatic cancer: From biology to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-06-07

    Jun 7, 2011 ... Cellular pathways; genetic network; microRNA; pancreatic cancer; tumorigenic transformation; 3' untranslated region ... components of the complex functional pathway networks controlling important cellular processes, such as proliferation, development, differentiation, stress response' and apoptosis.

  3. The Ocean Tracking Network and its contribution to ocean biological observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whoriskey, F. G.

    2016-02-01

    Animals move to meet their needs for food, shelter, reproduction and to avoid unfavorable environments. In aquatic systems, it is essential that we understand these movements if we are to sustainably manage populations and maintain healthy ecosystems. Thus the ability to document and monitor changes in aquatic animal movements is a biological observing system need. The Ocean Tracking Network (OTN) is a global research, technology development, and data management platform headquartered at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, Nova Scotia working to fill this need. OTN uses electronic telemetry to document the local-to-global movements and survival of aquatic animals, and to correlate them to oceanographic or limnological variables that are influencing movements. Such knowledge can assist with planning for and managing of anthropogenic impacts on present and future animal distributions, including those due to climate change. OTN works with various tracking methods including satellite and data storage tag systems, but its dominant focus is acoustic telemetry. OTN is built on global partnerships for the sharing of equipment and data, and has stimulated technological development in telemetry by bringing researchers with needs for new capabilities together with manufacturers to generate, test, and operationalize new technologies. This has included pioneering work into the use of marine autonomous vehicles (Slocum electric gliders; Liquid Robotics Wave Glider) in animal telemetry research. Similarly, OTN scientists worked with the Sea Mammal Research Unit to develop mobile acoustic receiver that have been placed on grey seals and linked via Bluetooth to a satellite transmitter/receiver. This provided receiver coverage in areas occupied by the seals during their typically extensive migrations and allowed for the examination of ecosystem linkages by documenting behavioral interactions the seals had with the physical environment, conspecifics, and other tagged species.

  4. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Victor; Cassese, Alberto; Nagy, Zsuzsanna; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Herbert, John; Antczak, Philipp; Clarke, Kim; Davies, Nicholas; Rahman, Ayesha; Campbell, Moray J; Guindani, Michele; Bicknell, Roy; Vannucci, Marina; Falciani, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell communication networks

  5. A Network Biology Approach Identifies Molecular Cross-Talk between Normal Prostate Epithelial and Prostate Carcinoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Trevino

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The advent of functional genomics has enabled the genome-wide characterization of the molecular state of cells and tissues, virtually at every level of biological organization. The difficulty in organizing and mining this unprecedented amount of information has stimulated the development of computational methods designed to infer the underlying structure of regulatory networks from observational data. These important developments had a profound impact in biological sciences since they triggered the development of a novel data-driven investigative approach. In cancer research, this strategy has been particularly successful. It has contributed to the identification of novel biomarkers, to a better characterization of disease heterogeneity and to a more in depth understanding of cancer pathophysiology. However, so far these approaches have not explicitly addressed the challenge of identifying networks representing the interaction of different cell types in a complex tissue. Since these interactions represent an essential part of the biology of both diseased and healthy tissues, it is of paramount importance that this challenge is addressed. Here we report the definition of a network reverse engineering strategy designed to infer directional signals linking adjacent cell types within a complex tissue. The application of this inference strategy to prostate cancer genome-wide expression profiling data validated the approach and revealed that normal epithelial cells exert an anti-tumour activity on prostate carcinoma cells. Moreover, by using a Bayesian hierarchical model integrating genetics and gene expression data and combining this with survival analysis, we show that the expression of putative cell communication genes related to focal adhesion and secretion is affected by epistatic gene copy number variation and it is predictive of patient survival. Ultimately, this study represents a generalizable approach to the challenge of deciphering cell

  6. A systems biology model of the regulatory network in Populus leaves reveals interacting regulators and conserved regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hvidsten Torgeir R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green plant leaves have always fascinated biologists as hosts for photosynthesis and providers of basic energy to many food webs. Today, comprehensive databases of gene expression data enable us to apply increasingly more advanced computational methods for reverse-engineering the regulatory network of leaves, and to begin to understand the gene interactions underlying complex emergent properties related to stress-response and development. These new systems biology methods are now also being applied to organisms such as Populus, a woody perennial tree, in order to understand the specific characteristics of these species. Results We present a systems biology model of the regulatory network of Populus leaves. The network is reverse-engineered from promoter information and expression profiles of leaf-specific genes measured over a large set of conditions related to stress and developmental. The network model incorporates interactions between regulators, such as synergistic and competitive relationships, by evaluating increasingly more complex regulatory mechanisms, and is therefore able to identify new regulators of leaf development not found by traditional genomics methods based on pair-wise expression similarity. The approach is shown to explain available gene function information and to provide robust prediction of expression levels in new data. We also use the predictive capability of the model to identify condition-specific regulation as well as conserved regulation between Populus and Arabidopsis. Conclusions We outline a computationally inferred model of the regulatory network of Populus leaves, and show how treating genes as interacting, rather than individual, entities identifies new regulators compared to traditional genomics analysis. Although systems biology models should be used with care considering the complexity of regulatory programs and the limitations of current genomics data, methods describing interactions

  7. In-silico prediction of drug targets, biological activities, signal pathways and regulating networks of dioscin based on bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lianhong; Zheng, Lingli; Xu, Lina; Dong, Deshi; Han, Xu; Qi, Yan; Zhao, Yanyan; Xu, Youwei; Peng, Jinyong

    2015-03-05

    Inverse docking technology has been a trend of drug discovery, and bioinformatics approaches have been used to predict target proteins, biological activities, signal pathways and molecular regulating networks affected by drugs for further pharmacodynamic and mechanism studies. In the present paper, inverse docking technology was applied to screen potential targets from potential drug target database (PDTD). Then, the corresponding gene information of the obtained drug-targets was applied to predict the related biological activities, signal pathways and processes networks of the compound by using MetaCore platform. After that, some most relevant regulating networks were considered, which included the nodes and relevant pathways of dioscin. 71 potential targets of dioscin from humans, 7 from rats and 8 from mice were screened, and the prediction results showed that the most likely targets of dioscin were cyclin A2, calmodulin, hemoglobin subunit beta, DNA topoisomerase I, DNA polymerase lambda, nitric oxide synthase and UDP-N-acetylhexosamine pyrophosphorylase, etc. Many diseases including experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis of human, temporal lobe epilepsy of rat and ankylosing spondylitis of mouse, may be inhibited by dioscin through regulating immune response alternative complement pathway, G-protein signaling RhoB regulation pathway and immune response antiviral actions of interferons, etc. The most relevant networks (5 from human, 3 from rat and 5 from mouse) indicated that dioscin may be a TOP1 inhibitor, which can treat cancer though the cell cycle- transition and termination of DNA replication pathway. Dioscin can down regulate EGFR and EGF to inhibit cancer, and also has anti-inflammation activity by regulating JNK signaling pathway. The predictions of the possible targets, biological activities, signal pathways and relevant regulating networks of dioscin provide valuable information to guide further investigation of dioscin on pharmacodynamics and

  8. The potential of text mining in data integration and network biology for plant research: a case study on Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Landeghem, Sofie; De Bodt, Stefanie; Drebert, Zuzanna J; Inzé, Dirk; Van de Peer, Yves

    2013-03-01

    Despite the availability of various data repositories for plant research, a wealth of information currently remains hidden within the biomolecular literature. Text mining provides the necessary means to retrieve these data through automated processing of texts. However, only recently has advanced text mining methodology been implemented with sufficient computational power to process texts at a large scale. In this study, we assess the potential of large-scale text mining for plant biology research in general and for network biology in particular using a state-of-the-art text mining system applied to all PubMed abstracts and PubMed Central full texts. We present extensive evaluation of the textual data for Arabidopsis thaliana, assessing the overall accuracy of this new resource for usage in plant network analyses. Furthermore, we combine text mining information with both protein-protein and regulatory interactions from experimental databases. Clusters of tightly connected genes are delineated from the resulting network, illustrating how such an integrative approach is essential to grasp the current knowledge available for Arabidopsis and to uncover gene information through guilt by association. All large-scale data sets, as well as the manually curated textual data, are made publicly available, hereby stimulating the application of text mining data in future plant biology studies.

  9. Comparative analysis of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in human based on network topologies and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Shiyuan; Zhou, Meng; Chen, Xiaowen; Zuo, Yongchun; Sun, Dianjun; Lv, Yingli

    2016-06-01

    Housekeeping genes are genes that are turned on most of the time in almost every tissue to maintain cellular functions. Tissue-selective genes are predominantly expressed in one or a few biologically relevant tissue types. Benefitting from the massive gene expression microarray data obtained over the past decades, the properties of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes can now be investigated on a large-scale manner. In this study, we analyzed the topological properties of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. Furthermore, we compared the biological properties and amino acid usage between these two gene groups. The results indicated that there were significant differences in topological properties between housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in the PPI network, and housekeeping genes had higher centrality properties and may play important roles in the complex biological network environment. We also found that there were significant differences in multiple biological properties and many amino acid compositions. The functional genes enrichment and subcellular localizations analysis was also performed to investigate the characterization of housekeeping and tissue-selective genes. The results indicated that the two gene groups showed significant different enrichment in drug targets, disease genes and toxin targets, and located in different subcellular localizations. At last, the discriminations between the properties of two gene groups were measured by the F-score, and expression stage had the most discriminative index in all properties. These findings may elucidate the biological mechanisms for understanding housekeeping and tissue-selective genes and may contribute to better annotate housekeeping and tissue-selective genes in other organisms.

  10. A Novel Robot System Integrating Biological and Mechanical Intelligence Based on Dissociated Neural Network-Controlled Closed-Loop Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongcheng; Sun, Rong; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi; Zheng, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    We propose the architecture of a novel robot system merging biological and artificial intelligence based on a neural controller connected to an external agent. We initially built a framework that connected the dissociated neural network to a mobile robot system to implement a realistic vehicle. The mobile robot system characterized by a camera and two-wheeled robot was designed to execute the target-searching task. We modified a software architecture and developed a home-made stimulation generator to build a bi-directional connection between the biological and the artificial components via simple binomial coding/decoding schemes. In this paper, we utilized a specific hierarchical dissociated neural network for the first time as the neural controller. Based on our work, neural cultures were successfully employed to control an artificial agent resulting in high performance. Surprisingly, under the tetanus stimulus training, the robot performed better and better with the increasement of training cycle because of the short-term plasticity of neural network (a kind of reinforced learning). Comparing to the work previously reported, we adopted an effective experimental proposal (i.e. increasing the training cycle) to make sure of the occurrence of the short-term plasticity, and preliminarily demonstrated that the improvement of the robot's performance could be caused independently by the plasticity development of dissociated neural network. This new framework may provide some possible solutions for the learning abilities of intelligent robots by the engineering application of the plasticity processing of neural networks, also for the development of theoretical inspiration for the next generation neuro-prostheses on the basis of the bi-directional exchange of information within the hierarchical neural networks.

  11. A Novel Robot System Integrating Biological and Mechanical Intelligence Based on Dissociated Neural Network-Controlled Closed-Loop Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongcheng Li

    Full Text Available We propose the architecture of a novel robot system merging biological and artificial intelligence based on a neural controller connected to an external agent. We initially built a framework that connected the dissociated neural network to a mobile robot system to implement a realistic vehicle. The mobile robot system characterized by a camera and two-wheeled robot was designed to execute the target-searching task. We modified a software architecture and developed a home-made stimulation generator to build a bi-directional connection between the biological and the artificial components via simple binomial coding/decoding schemes. In this paper, we utilized a specific hierarchical dissociated neural network for the first time as the neural controller. Based on our work, neural cultures were successfully employed to control an artificial agent resulting in high performance. Surprisingly, under the tetanus stimulus training, the robot performed better and better with the increasement of training cycle because of the short-term plasticity of neural network (a kind of reinforced learning. Comparing to the work previously reported, we adopted an effective experimental proposal (i.e. increasing the training cycle to make sure of the occurrence of the short-term plasticity, and preliminarily demonstrated that the improvement of the robot's performance could be caused independently by the plasticity development of dissociated neural network. This new framework may provide some possible solutions for the learning abilities of intelligent robots by the engineering application of the plasticity processing of neural networks, also for the development of theoretical inspiration for the next generation neuro-prostheses on the basis of the bi-directional exchange of information within the hierarchical neural networks.

  12. A systems biology approach to construct the gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation via microarray and databases mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Chung-Yu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is a hallmark of many human diseases. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying systemic inflammation has long been an important topic in basic and clinical research. When primary pathogenetic events remains unclear due to its immense complexity, construction and analysis of the gene regulatory network of inflammation at times becomes the best way to understand the detrimental effects of disease. However, it is difficult to recognize and evaluate relevant biological processes from the huge quantities of experimental data. It is hence appealing to find an algorithm which can generate a gene regulatory network of systemic inflammation from high-throughput genomic studies of human diseases. Such network will be essential for us to extract valuable information from the complex and chaotic network under diseased conditions. Results In this study, we construct a gene regulatory network of inflammation using data extracted from the Ensembl and JASPAR databases. We also integrate and apply a number of systematic algorithms like cross correlation threshold, maximum likelihood estimation method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC on time-lapsed microarray data to refine the genome-wide transcriptional regulatory network in response to bacterial endotoxins in the context of dynamic activated genes, which are regulated by transcription factors (TFs such as NF-κB. This systematic approach is used to investigate the stochastic interaction represented by the dynamic leukocyte gene expression profiles of human subject exposed to an inflammatory stimulus (bacterial endotoxin. Based on the kinetic parameters of the dynamic gene regulatory network, we identify important properties (such as susceptibility to infection of the immune system, which may be useful for translational research. Finally, robustness of the inflammatory gene network is also inferred by analyzing the hubs and "weak ties" structures of the gene network

  13. Usefulness and limitations of dK random graph models to predict interactions and functional homogeneity in biological networks under a pseudo-likelihood parameter estimation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luan Yihui

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many aspects of biological functions can be modeled by biological networks, such as protein interaction networks, metabolic networks, and gene coexpression networks. Studying the statistical properties of these networks in turn allows us to infer biological function. Complex statistical network models can potentially more accurately describe the networks, but it is not clear whether such complex models are better suited to find biologically meaningful subnetworks. Results Recent studies have shown that the degree distribution of the nodes is not an adequate statistic in many molecular networks. We sought to extend this statistic with 2nd and 3rd order degree correlations and developed a pseudo-likelihood approach to estimate the parameters. The approach was used to analyze the MIPS and BIOGRID yeast protein interaction networks, and two yeast coexpression networks. We showed that 2nd order degree correlation information gave better predictions of gene interactions in both protein interaction and gene coexpression networks. However, in the biologically important task of predicting functionally homogeneous modules, degree correlation information performs marginally better in the case of the MIPS and BIOGRID protein interaction networks, but worse in the case of gene coexpression networks. Conclusion Our use of dK models showed that incorporation of degree correlations could increase predictive power in some contexts, albeit sometimes marginally, but, in all contexts, the use of third-order degree correlations decreased accuracy. However, it is possible that other parameter estimation methods, such as maximum likelihood, will show the usefulness of incorporating 2nd and 3rd degree correlations in predicting functionally homogeneous modules.

  14. VAN: an R package for identifying biologically perturbed networks via differential variability analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaswal, Vivek; Schramm, Sarah-Jane; Mann, Graham J; Wilkins, Marc R; Yang, Yee Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Background Large-scale molecular interaction networks are dynamic in nature and are of special interest in the analysis of complex diseases, which are characterized by network-level perturbations rather than changes in individual genes/proteins. The methods developed for the identification of differentially expressed genes or gene sets are not suitable for network-level analyses. Consequently, bioinformatics approaches that enable a joint analysis of high-throughput transcriptomics datasets a...

  15. A consensus yeast metabolic network obtained from a community approach to systems biology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrgard, M.J.; Swainston, N.; Dobson, P.; Dunn, W.B.; Arga, K.Y.; Arvas, M.; Bluthgen, N.; Borger, S.; Costenoble, E.R.; Heinemann, M.; Hucka, M.; Li, P.; Liebermeister, W.; Mo, M.L.; Oliveira, A.P.; Petranovic, D.; Pettifer, S.; Simeonides, E.; Smallbone, K.; Spasi, I.; Weichart, D.; Brent, R.; Broomhead, D.S.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Kirdar, B.; Penttila, M.; Klipp, E.; Paton, N.; Palsson, B.O.; Sauer, U.; Oliver, S.G.; Mendes, P.; Nielsen, J.; Kell, D.B.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and

  16. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrgård, Markus J.; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B.; Arga, K. Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Novère, Nicolas Le; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L.; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasić, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kırdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and

  17. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrgard, Markus; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul

    2008-01-01

    a consensus metabolic network reconstruction for S. cerevisiae. In drafting it, we placed special emphasis on referencing molecules to persistent databases or using database-independent forms, such as SMILES or InChI strings, as this permits their chemical structure to be represented unambiguously...... of yeast. Similar strategies should benefit communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms....

  18. Critical controllability analysis of directed biological networks using efficient graph reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishitsuka, Masayuki; Akutsu, Tatsuya; Nacher, Jose C

    2017-10-30

    Network science has recently integrated key concepts from control theory and has applied them to the analysis of the controllability of complex networks. One of the proposed frameworks uses the Minimum Dominating Set (MDS) approach, which has been successfully applied to the identification of cancer-related proteins and in analyses of large-scale undirected networks, such as proteome-wide protein interaction networks. However, many real systems are better represented by directed networks. Therefore, fast algorithms are required for the application of MDS to directed networks. Here, we propose an algorithm that utilises efficient graph reduction to identify critical control nodes in large-scale directed complex networks. The algorithm is 176-fold faster than existing methods and increases the computable network size to 65,000 nodes. We then applied the developed algorithm to metabolic pathways consisting of 70 plant species encompassing major plant lineages ranging from algae to angiosperms and to signalling pathways from C. elegans, D. melanogaster and H. sapiens. The analysis not only identified functional pathways enriched with critical control molecules but also showed that most control categories are largely conserved across evolutionary time, from green algae and early basal plants to modern angiosperm plant lineages.

  19. FiBi - A French network of facilities for irradiation in biology: The organisation of the network and the research opportunities associated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaillard-Lecanu, E.; Coffigny, H.; Poncy, J.L.; Authier, N.; Verrey, B.; Bailly, I.; Baldacchino, G.; Bordy, J.M.; Carriere, M.; Leplat, J.J.; Pin, S.; Pommeret, S.; Thuret, J.Y.; Renault, J.P.; Cortella, I.; Duval, D.; Khodja, H.; Testard, I.

    2006-01-01

    The Life Science Division of the Atomic Energy Commission has developed a national network of available irradiation facilities for biological studies. One aim is to optimise the irradiation of biological samples, through a compendium of existing facilities allowing for the preserving and the irradiation of these samples in good conditions, and for providing an appropriate and reliable dosimetry. Given the high cost of the facilities and their specialization (nature and precision of irradiation on a cell scale, dose and dose rate), closeness is no longer the only criteria of choice for biologists. Development is leaning towards the implementation of irradiation platforms gathering irradiation tools associated with specific methods belonging to biology: cell culture, molecular biology and even animal care houses. The aim is to be able to offer biologists the most appropriate experimental tools, and to modify them according to the changing needs of radiobiology. This work is currently in progress and the database is still not exhaustive and shall be implemented as and when new documents are drawn up and new facilities are opened. (author)

  20. Using probabilistic graphical models to reconstruct biological networks and linkage maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Huange

    2017-01-01

    Probabilistic graphical models (PGMs) offer a conceptual architecture where biological and mathematical objects can be expressed with a common, intuitive formalism. This facilitates the joint development of statistical and computational tools for quantitative analysis of biological data. Over the

  1. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  2. Application of Hierarchical Dissociated Neural Network in Closed-Loop Hybrid System Integrating Biological and Mechanical Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bin; Wang, Yuechao; Li, Hongyi

    2015-01-01

    Neural networks are considered the origin of intelligence in organisms. In this paper, a new design of an intelligent system merging biological intelligence with artificial intelligence was created. It was based on a neural controller bidirectionally connected to an actual mobile robot to implement a novel vehicle. Two types of experimental preparations were utilized as the neural controller including ‘random’ and ‘4Q’ (cultured neurons artificially divided into four interconnected parts) neural network. Compared to the random cultures, the ‘4Q’ cultures presented absolutely different activities, and the robot controlled by the ‘4Q’ network presented better capabilities in search tasks. Our results showed that neural cultures could be successfully employed to control an artificial agent; the robot performed better and better with the stimulus because of the short-term plasticity. A new framework is provided to investigate the bidirectional biological-artificial interface and develop new strategies for a future intelligent system using these simplified model systems. PMID:25992579

  3. A Parallel Supercomputer Implementation of a Biological Inspired Neural Network and its use for Pattern Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ladurantaye, Vincent; Lavoie, Jean; Bergeron, Jocelyn; Parenteau, Maxime; Lu Huizhong; Pichevar, Ramin; Rouat, Jean

    2012-01-01

    A parallel implementation of a large spiking neural network is proposed and evaluated. The neural network implements the binding by synchrony process using the Oscillatory Dynamic Link Matcher (ODLM). Scalability, speed and performance are compared for 2 implementations: Message Passing Interface (MPI) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) running on clusters of multicore supercomputers and NVIDIA graphical processing units respectively. A global spiking list that represents at each instant the state of the neural network is described. This list indexes each neuron that fires during the current simulation time so that the influence of their spikes are simultaneously processed on all computing units. Our implementation shows a good scalability for very large networks. A complex and large spiking neural network has been implemented in parallel with success, thus paving the road towards real-life applications based on networks of spiking neurons. MPI offers a better scalability than CUDA, while the CUDA implementation on a GeForce GTX 285 gives the best cost to performance ratio. When running the neural network on the GTX 285, the processing speed is comparable to the MPI implementation on RQCHP's Mammouth parallel with 64 notes (128 cores).

  4. Exploring the topological sources of robustness against invasion in biological and technological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde Cuesta, Fernando; González Sequeiros, Pablo; Lozano Rojo, Álvaro

    2016-02-10

    For a network, the accomplishment of its functions despite perturbations is called robustness. Although this property has been extensively studied, in most cases, the network is modified by removing nodes. In our approach, it is no longer perturbed by site percolation, but evolves after site invasion. The process transforming resident/healthy nodes into invader/mutant/diseased nodes is described by the Moran model. We explore the sources of robustness (or its counterpart, the propensity to spread favourable innovations) of the US high-voltage power grid network, the Internet2 academic network, and the C. elegans connectome. We compare them to three modular and non-modular benchmark networks, and samples of one thousand random networks with the same degree distribution. It is found that, contrary to what happens with networks of small order, fixation probability and robustness are poorly correlated with most of standard statistics, but they depend strongly on the degree distribution. While community detection techniques are able to detect the existence of a central core in Internet2, they are not effective in detecting hierarchical structures whose topological complexity arises from the repetition of a few rules. Box counting dimension and Rent's rule are applied to show a subtle trade-off between topological and wiring complexity.

  5. Dynamics on and of complex networks applications to biology, computer science, and the social sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Ganguly, Niloy; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2009-01-01

    This self-contained book systematically explores the statistical dynamics on and of complex networks having relevance across a large number of scientific disciplines. The theories related to complex networks are increasingly being used by researchers for their usefulness in harnessing the most difficult problems of a particular discipline. The book is a collection of surveys and cutting-edge research contributions exploring the interdisciplinary relationship of dynamics on and of complex networks. Towards this goal, the work is thematically organized into three main sections: Part I studies th

  6. Adverse effects of biologics: a network meta-analysis and Cochrane overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, J. A.; Wells, G. A.; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard

    2011-01-01

    Background Biologics are used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and many other conditions. While the efficacy of biologics has been established, there is uncertainty regarding the adverse effects of this treatment. Since serious risks such as tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, serious...... results We included 163 RCTs with 50,010 participants and 46 extension studies with 11,954 participants. The median duration of RCTs was six months and 13 months for OLEs. Data were limited for tuberculosis (TB) reactivation, lymphoma, and congestive heart failure. Adjusted for dose, biologics as a group...

  7. Biological network analysis with CentiScaPe: centralities and experimental dataset integration [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/55u

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Scardoni

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing dimension and complexity of the available experimental data generating biological networks have increased the need for tools that help in categorizing nodes by their topological relevance. Here we present CentiScaPe, a Cytoscape app specifically designed to calculate centrality indexes used for the identification of the most important nodes in a network. CentiScaPe is a comprehensive suite of algorithms dedicated to network nodes centrality analysis, computing several centralities for undirected, directed and weighted networks. The results of the topological analysis can be integrated with data set from lab experiments, like expression or phosphorylation levels for each protein represented in the network. Our app opens new perspectives in the analysis of biological networks, since the integration of topological analysis with lab experimental data enhance the predictive power of the bioinformatics analysis.

  8. Advanced models of neural networks nonlinear dynamics and stochasticity in biological neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Rigatos, Gerasimos G

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a complete study on neural structures exhibiting nonlinear and stochastic dynamics, elaborating on neural dynamics by introducing advanced models of neural networks. It overviews the main findings in the modelling of neural dynamics in terms of electrical circuits and examines their stability properties with the use of dynamical systems theory. It is suitable for researchers and postgraduate students engaged with neural networks and dynamical systems theory.

  9. Reconstruction of biological pathways and metabolic networks from in silico labeled metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadadi, Noushin; Hafner, Jasmin; Soh, Keng Cher; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2017-01-01

    Reaction atom mappings track the positional changes of all of the atoms between the substrates and the products as they undergo the biochemical transformation. However, information on atom transitions in the context of metabolic pathways is not widely available in the literature. The understanding of metabolic pathways at the atomic level is of great importance as it can deconvolute the overlapping catabolic/anabolic pathways resulting in the observed metabolic phenotype. The automated identification of atom transitions within a metabolic network is a very challenging task since the degree of complexity of metabolic networks dramatically increases when we transit from metabolite-level studies to atom-level studies. Despite being studied extensively in various approaches, the field of atom mapping of metabolic networks is lacking an automated approach, which (i) accounts for the information of reaction mechanism for atom mapping and (ii) is extendable from individual atom-mapped reactions to atom-mapped reaction networks. Hereby, we introduce a computational framework, iAM.NICE (in silico Atom Mapped Network Integrated Computational Explorer), for the systematic atom-level reconstruction of metabolic networks from in silico labelled substrates. iAM.NICE is to our knowledge the first automated atom-mapping algorithm that is based on the underlying enzymatic biotransformation mechanisms, and its application goes beyond individual reactions and it can be used for the reconstruction of atom-mapped metabolic networks. We illustrate the applicability of our method through the reconstruction of atom-mapped reactions of the KEGG database and we provide an example of an atom-level representation of the core metabolic network of E. coli. Copyright © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synchronization in material flow networks with biologically inspired self-organized control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donner, Reik; Laemmer, Stefan [TU Dresden (Germany); Helbing, Dirk [ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    The efficient operation of material flows in traffic or production networks is a subject of broad economic interest. Traditional centralized as well as decentralized approaches to operating material flow networks are known to have severe disadvantages. As an alternative approach that may help to overcome these problems, we propose a simple self-organization mechanism of conflicting flows that is inspired by oscillatory phenomena of pedestrian or animal counter-flows at bottlenecks. As a result, one may observe a synchronization of the switching dynamics at different intersections in the network. For regular grid topologies, we find different synchronization regimes depending on the inertia of the switching from one service state to the next one. In order to test the robustness of our corresponding observations, we study how the detailed properties of the network as well as dynamic feedbacks between the relevant state variables affect the degree of achievable synchronization and the resulting performance of the network. Our results yield an improved understanding of the conditions that have to be present for efficiently operating material flow networks by a decentralized control, which is of paramount importance for future implementations in real-world traffic or production systems.

  11. Dynamic transcriptional signatures and network responses for clinical symptoms in influenza-infected human subjects using systems biology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linel, Patrice; Wu, Shuang; Deng, Nan; Wu, Hulin

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies demonstrate that human blood transcriptional signatures may be used to support diagnosis and clinical decisions for acute respiratory viral infections such as influenza. In this article, we propose to use a newly developed systems biology approach for time course gene expression data to identify significant dynamically response genes and dynamic gene network responses to viral infection. We illustrate the methodological pipeline by reanalyzing the time course gene expression data from a study with healthy human subjects challenged by live influenza virus. We observed clear differences in the number of significant dynamic response genes (DRGs) between the symptomatic and asymptomatic subjects and also identified DRG signatures for symptomatic subjects with influenza infection. The 505 common DRGs shared by the symptomatic subjects have high consistency with the signature genes for predicting viral infection identified in previous works. The temporal response patterns and network response features were carefully analyzed and investigated.

  12. A systems biology approach to reconcile metabolic network models with application to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for biofuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Reza; Fallah-Mehrabadi, Jalil; Bidkhori, Gholamreza; Zahiri, Javad; Javad Niroomand, Mohammad; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-07-19

    Production of biofuels has been one of the promising efforts in biotechnology in the past few decades. The perspective of these efforts can be reduction of increasing demands for fossil fuels and consequently reducing environmental pollution. Nonetheless, most previous approaches did not succeed in obviating many big challenges in this way. In recent years systems biology with the help of microorganisms has been trying to overcome these challenges. Unicellular cyanobacteria are widespread phototrophic microorganisms that have capabilities such as consuming solar energy and atmospheric carbon dioxide for growth and thus can be a suitable chassis for the production of valuable organic materials such as biofuels. For the ultimate use of metabolic potential of cyanobacteria, it is necessary to understand the reactions that are taking place inside the metabolic network of these microorganisms. In this study, we developed a Java tool to reconstruct an integrated metabolic network of a cyanobacterium (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803). We merged three existing reconstructed metabolic networks of this microorganism. Then, after modeling for biofuel production, the results from flux balance analysis (FBA) disclosed an increased yield in biofuel production for ethanol, isobutanol, 3-methyl-1-butanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, and propanol. The numbers of blocked reactions were also decreased for 2-methyl-1-butanol production. In addition, coverage of the metabolic network in terms of the number of metabolites and reactions was increased in the new obtained model.

  13. From cell biology to immunology: Controlling metastatic progression of cancer via microRNA regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae Hyon; Theodoratou, Evropi; Calin, George A; Shin, Jae Il

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the study of microRNAs has expanded our knowledge of the fundamental processes of cancer biology and the underlying mechanisms behind tumor metastasis. Extensive research in the fields of microRNA and its novel mechanisms of actions against various cancers has more recently led to the trial of a first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34. Yet, these microRNAs are mostly being studied and clinically trialed solely based on the understanding of their cell biologic effects, thus, neglecting the important immunologic effects that are sometimes opposite of the cell biologic effects. Here, we summarize both the cell biologic and immunologic effects of various microRNAs and discuss the importance of considering both effects before using them in clinical settings. We stress the importance of understanding the miRNA's effect on cancer metastasis from a "systems" perspective before developing a miRNA-targeted therapeutic in treating cancer metastasis.

  14. PANET: a GPU-based tool for fast parallel analysis of robustness dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures in large-scale biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Cuong Trinh

    Full Text Available It has been a challenge in systems biology to unravel relationships between structural properties and dynamic behaviors of biological networks. A Cytoscape plugin named NetDS was recently proposed to analyze the robustness-related dynamics and feed-forward/feedback loop structures of biological networks. Despite such a useful function, limitations on the network size that can be analyzed exist due to high computational costs. In addition, the plugin cannot verify an intrinsic property which can be induced by an observed result because it has no function to simulate the observation on a large number of random networks. To overcome these limitations, we have developed a novel software tool, PANET. First, the time-consuming parts of NetDS were redesigned to be processed in parallel using the OpenCL library. This approach utilizes the full computing power of multi-core central processing units and graphics processing units. Eventually, this made it possible to investigate a large-scale network such as a human signaling network with 1,609 nodes and 5,063 links. We also developed a new function to perform a batch-mode simulation where it generates a lot of random networks and conducts robustness calculations and feed-forward/feedback loop examinations of them. This helps us to determine if the findings in real biological networks are valid in arbitrary random networks or not. We tested our plugin in two case studies based on two large-scale signaling networks and found interesting results regarding relationships between coherently coupled feed-forward/feedback loops and robustness. In addition, we verified whether or not those findings are consistently conserved in random networks through batch-mode simulations. Taken together, our plugin is expected to effectively investigate various relationships between dynamics and structural properties in large-scale networks. Our software tool, user manual and example datasets are freely available at http://panet-csc.sourceforge.net/.

  15. Artificial Neural Networks, and Evolutionary Algorithms as a systems biology approach to a data-base on fetal growth restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Maria E; Buscema, Massimo; Smerieri, Arianna; Montanini, Luisa; Grossi, Enzo

    2013-12-01

    One of the specific aims of systems biology is to model and discover properties of cells, tissues and organisms functioning. A systems biology approach was undertaken to investigate possibly the entire system of intra-uterine growth we had available, to assess the variables of interest, discriminate those which were effectively related with appropriate or restricted intrauterine growth, and achieve an understanding of the systems in these two conditions. The Artificial Adaptive Systems, which include Artificial Neural Networks and Evolutionary Algorithms lead us to the first analyses. These analyses identified the importance of the biochemical variables IL-6, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 protein concentrations in placental lysates, and offered a new insight into placental markers of fetal growth within the IGF and cytokine systems, confirmed they had relationships and offered a critical assessment of studies previously performed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. CeFunMO: A centrality based method for discovering functional motifs with application in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouhsar, Morteza; Razaghi-Moghadam, Zahra; Mousavian, Zaynab; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Detecting functional motifs in biological networks is one of the challenging problems in systems biology. Given a multiset of colors as query and a list-colored graph (an undirected graph with a set of colors assigned to each of its vertices), the problem is reduced to finding connected subgraphs, which best cover the multiset of query. To solve this NP-complete problem, we propose a new color-based centrality measure for list-colored graphs. Based on this newly-defined measure of centrality, a novel polynomial time algorithm is developed to discover functional motifs in list-colored graphs, using a greedy strategy. This algorithm, called CeFunMO, has superior running time and acceptable accuracy in comparison with other well-known algorithms, such as RANGI and GraMoFoNe. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Regulatory dynamics of network architecture and function in tristable genetic circuit of Leishmania: a mathematical biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandlik, Vineetha; Gurav, Mayuri; Singh, Shailza

    2015-01-01

    The emerging field of synthetic biology has led to the design of tailor-made synthetic circuits for several therapeutic applications. Biological networks can be reprogramed by designing synthetic circuits that modulate the expression of target proteins. IPCS (inositol phosphorylceramide synthase) has been an attractive target in the sphingolipid metabolism of the parasite Leishmania. In this study, we have constructed a tristable circuit for the IPCS protein. The circuit has been validated and its long-term behavior has been assessed. The robustness and evolvability of the circuit has been estimated using evolutionary algorithms. The tristable synthetic circuit has been specifically designed to improve the rate of production of phosphatidylcholine: ceramide cholinephosphotransferase 4 (SLS4 protein). Site-specific delivery of the circuit into the parasite-infected macrophages could serve as a possible therapeutic intervention of the infectious disease 'Leishmaniasis'.

  18. Towards a comprehensive understanding of emerging dynamics and function of pancreatic islets: A complex network approach. Comment on "Network science of biological systems at different scales: A review" by Gosak et al.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppini, Alessandro

    2018-03-01

    Complex network theory represents a comprehensive mathematical framework to investigate biological systems, ranging from sub-cellular and cellular scales up to large-scale networks describing species interactions and ecological systems. In their exhaustive and comprehensive work [1], Gosak et al. discuss several scenarios in which the network approach was able to uncover general properties and underlying mechanisms of cells organization and regulation, tissue functions and cell/tissue failure in pathology, by the study of chemical reaction networks, structural networks and functional connectivities.

  19. MetNetAPI: A flexible method to access and manipulate biological network data from MetNet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucaet Yves

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Convenient programmatic access to different biological databases allows automated integration of scientific knowledge. Many databases support a function to download files or data snapshots, or a webservice that offers "live" data. However, the functionality that a database offers cannot be represented in a static data download file, and webservices may consume considerable computational resources from the host server. Results MetNetAPI is a versatile Application Programming Interface (API to the MetNetDB database. It abstracts, captures and retains operations away from a biological network repository and website. A range of database functions, previously only available online, can be immediately (and independently from the website applied to a dataset of interest. Data is available in four layers: molecular entities, localized entities (linked to a specific organelle, interactions, and pathways. Navigation between these layers is intuitive (e.g. one can request the molecular entities in a pathway, as well as request in what pathways a specific entity participates. Data retrieval can be customized: Network objects allow the construction of new and integration of existing pathways and interactions, which can be uploaded back to our server. In contrast to webservices, the computational demand on the host server is limited to processing data-related queries only. Conclusions An API provides several advantages to a systems biology software platform. MetNetAPI illustrates an interface with a central repository of data that represents the complex interrelationships of a metabolic and regulatory network. As an alternative to data-dumps and webservices, it allows access to a current and "live" database and exposes analytical functions to application developers. Yet it only requires limited resources on the server-side (thin server/fat client setup. The API is available for Java, Microsoft.NET and R programming environments and offers

  20. Novel insights into embryonic stem cell self-renewal revealed through comparative human and mouse systems biology networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowell, Karen G; Simons, Allen K; Bai, Hao; Kell, Braden; Wang, Zack Z; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A

    2014-05-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), characterized by their ability to both self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell lineages, are a powerful model for biomedical research and developmental biology. Human and mouse ESCs share many features, yet have distinctive aspects, including fundamental differences in the signaling pathways and cell cycle controls that support self-renewal. Here, we explore the molecular basis of human ESC self-renewal using Bayesian network machine learning to integrate cell-type-specific, high-throughput data for gene function discovery. We integrated high-throughput ESC data from 83 human studies (~1.8 million data points collected under 1,100 conditions) and 62 mouse studies (~2.4 million data points collected under 1,085 conditions) into separate human and mouse predictive networks focused on ESC self-renewal to analyze shared and distinct functional relationships among protein-coding gene orthologs. Computational evaluations show that these networks are highly accurate, literature validation confirms their biological relevance, and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) validation supports our predictions. Our results reflect the importance of key regulatory genes known to be strongly associated with self-renewal and pluripotency in both species (e.g., POU5F1, SOX2, and NANOG), identify metabolic differences between species (e.g., threonine metabolism), clarify differences between human and mouse ESC developmental signaling pathways (e.g., leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF)-activated JAK/STAT in mouse; NODAL/ACTIVIN-A-activated fibroblast growth factor in human), and reveal many novel genes and pathways predicted to be functionally associated with self-renewal in each species. These interactive networks are available online at www.StemSight.org for stem cell researchers to develop new hypotheses, discover potential mechanisms involving sparsely annotated genes, and prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation

  1. Defining Biological Networks for Noise Buffering and Signaling Sensitivity Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqiang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable information processing in cells requires high sensitivity to changes in the input signal but low sensitivity to random fluctuations in the transmitted signal. There are often many alternative biological circuits qualifying for this biological function. Distinguishing theses biological models and finding the most suitable one are essential, as such model ranking, by experimental evidence, will help to judge the support of the working hypotheses forming each model. Here, we employ the approximate Bayesian computation (ABC method based on sequential Monte Carlo (SMC to search for biological circuits that can maintain signaling sensitivity while minimizing noise propagation, focusing on cases where the noise is characterized by rapid fluctuations. By systematically analyzing three-component circuits, we rank these biological circuits and identify three-basic-biological-motif buffering noise while maintaining sensitivity to long-term changes in input signals. We discuss in detail a particular implementation in control of nutrient homeostasis in yeast. The principal component analysis of the posterior provides insight into the nature of the reaction between nodes.

  2. Use of artificial neural networks to predict biological outcomes for patients receiving radical radiotherapy of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulliford, Sarah L.; Webb, Steve; Rowbottom, Carl G.; Corne, David W.; Dearnaley, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper discusses the application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in predicting biological outcomes following prostate radiotherapy. A number of model-based methods have been developed to correlate the dose distributions calculated for a patient receiving radiotherapy and the radiobiological effect this will produce. Most widely used are the normal tissue complication probability and tumour control probability models. An alternative method for predicting specific examples of tumour control and normal tissue complications is to use an ANN. One of the advantages of this method is that there is no need for a priori information regarding the relationship between the data being correlated. Patients and methods: A set of retrospective clinical data from patients who received radical prostate radiotherapy was used to train ANNs to predict specific biological outcomes by learning the relationship between the treatment plan prescription, dose distribution and the corresponding biological effect. The dose and volume were included as a differential dose-volume histogram in order to provide a holistic description of the available data. Results: It was shown that the ANNs were able to predict biochemical control and specific bladder and rectum complications with sensitivity and specificity of above 55% when the outcomes were dichotomised. It was also possible to analyse information from the ANNs to investigate the effect of individual treatment parameters on the outcome. Conclusion: ANNs have been shown to learn something of the complex relationship between treatment parameters and outcome which, if developed further, may prove to be a useful tool in predicting biological outcomes

  3. Hubba: hub objects analyzer--a framework of interactome hubs identification for network biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Yen; Chin, Chia-Hao; Wu, Hsin-Hung; Chen, Shu-Hwa; Ho, Chin-Wen; Ko, Ming-Tat

    2008-07-01

    One major task in the post-genome era is to reconstruct proteomic and genomic interacting networks using high-throughput experiment data. To identify essential nodes/hubs in these interactomes is a way to decipher the critical keys inside biochemical pathways or complex networks. These essential nodes/hubs may serve as potential drug-targets for developing novel therapy of human diseases, such as cancer or infectious disease caused by emerging pathogens. Hub Objects Analyzer (Hubba) is a web-based service for exploring important nodes in an interactome network generated from specific small- or large-scale experimental methods based on graph theory. Two characteristic analysis algorithms, Maximum Neighborhood Component (MNC) and Density of Maximum Neighborhood Component (DMNC) are developed for exploring and identifying hubs/essential nodes from interactome networks. Users can submit their own interaction data in PSI format (Proteomics Standards Initiative, version 2.5 and 1.0), tab format and tab with weight values. User will get an email notification of the calculation complete in minutes or hours, depending on the size of submitted dataset. Hubba result includes a rank given by a composite index, a manifest graph of network to show the relationship amid these hubs, and links for retrieving output files. This proposed method (DMNC || MNC) can be applied to discover some unrecognized hubs from previous dataset. For example, most of the Hubba high-ranked hubs (80% in top 10 hub list, and >70% in top 40 hub list) from the yeast protein interactome data (Y2H experiment) are reported as essential proteins. Since the analysis methods of Hubba are based on topology, it can also be used on other kinds of networks to explore the essential nodes, like networks in yeast, rat, mouse and human. The website of Hubba is freely available at http://hub.iis.sinica.edu.tw/Hubba.

  4. New Algorithm and Software (BNOmics) for Inferring and Visualizing Bayesian Networks from Heterogeneous Big Biological and Genetic Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoshin, Grigoriy; Boerwinkle, Eric; Rodin, Andrei S

    2017-04-01

    Bayesian network (BN) reconstruction is a prototypical systems biology data analysis approach that has been successfully used to reverse engineer and model networks reflecting different layers of biological organization (ranging from genetic to epigenetic to cellular pathway to metabolomic). It is especially relevant in the context of modern (ongoing and prospective) studies that generate heterogeneous high-throughput omics datasets. However, there are both theoretical and practical obstacles to the seamless application of BN modeling to such big data, including computational inefficiency of optimal BN structure search algorithms, ambiguity in data discretization, mixing data types, imputation and validation, and, in general, limited scalability in both reconstruction and visualization of BNs. To overcome these and other obstacles, we present BNOmics, an improved algorithm and software toolkit for inferring and analyzing BNs from omics datasets. BNOmics aims at comprehensive systems biology-type data exploration, including both generating new biological hypothesis and testing and validating the existing ones. Novel aspects of the algorithm center around increasing scalability and applicability to varying data types (with different explicit and implicit distributional assumptions) within the same analysis framework. An output and visualization interface to widely available graph-rendering software is also included. Three diverse applications are detailed. BNOmics was originally developed in the context of genetic epidemiology data and is being continuously optimized to keep pace with the ever-increasing inflow of available large-scale omics datasets. As such, the software scalability and usability on the less than exotic computer hardware are a priority, as well as the applicability of the algorithm and software to the heterogeneous datasets containing many data types-single-nucleotide polymorphisms and other genetic/epigenetic/transcriptome variables, metabolite

  5. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez.

    Since June of 2009, the muon alignment group has focused on providing new alignment constants and on finalizing the hardware alignment reconstruction. Alignment constants for DTs and CSCs were provided for CRAFT09 data reprocessing. For DT chambers, the track-based alignment was repeated using CRAFT09 cosmic ray muons and validated using segment extrapolation and split cosmic tools. One difference with respect to the previous alignment is that only five degrees of freedom were aligned, leaving the rotation around the local x-axis to be better determined by the hardware system. Similarly, DT chambers poorly aligned by tracks (due to limited statistics) were aligned by a combination of photogrammetry and hardware-based alignment. For the CSC chambers, the hardware system provided alignment in global z and rotations about local x. Entire muon endcap rings were further corrected in the transverse plane (global x and y) by the track-based alignment. Single chamber track-based alignment suffers from poor statistic...

  6. Statistical Mechanics of Complex Networks: From the Internet to Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabási, Albert-László

    2006-03-01

    Networks with complex topology describe systems as diverse as the cell, the World Wide Web or the society. In the past few years we have learned that their evolution is driven by self-organizing processes that are governed by simple but generic scaling laws, leading to the emergence of a vibrant interdisciplinary field that uses the tools of statistical physics to explain the origin and the dynamics of real networks. One of the most surprising finding is that despite their apparent differences, cells and complex man-made networks, such as the Internet or the World Wide Web, and many communication networks share the same large-scale topology, each having a scale-free structure. I will show that the scale-free topology of these complex webs have important consequences on their robustness against failures and attacks, with implications on drug design, the Internet's ability to survive attacks and failures, and our ability to understand the functional role of genes. For further information and papers, see http://www.nd.edu/˜networks

  7. CellNetVis: a web tool for visualization of biological networks using force-directed layout constrained by cellular components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Henry; Carazzolle, Marcelo Falsarella; Telles, Guilherme P; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Minghim, Rosane

    2017-09-13

    The advent of "omics" science has brought new perspectives in contemporary biology through the high-throughput analyses of molecular interactions, providing new clues in protein/gene function and in the organization of biological pathways. Biomolecular interaction networks, or graphs, are simple abstract representations where the components of a cell (e.g. proteins, metabolites etc.) are represented by nodes and their interactions are represented by edges. An appropriate visualization of data is crucial for understanding such networks, since pathways are related to functions that occur in specific regions of the cell. The force-directed layout is an important and widely used technique to draw networks according to their topologies. Placing the networks into cellular compartments helps to quickly identify where network elements are located and, more specifically, concentrated. Currently, only a few tools provide the capability of visually organizing networks by cellular compartments. Most of them cannot handle large and dense networks. Even for small networks with hundreds of nodes the available tools are not able to reposition the network while the user is interacting, limiting the visual exploration capability. Here we propose CellNetVis, a web tool to easily display biological networks in a cell diagram employing a constrained force-directed layout algorithm. The tool is freely available and open-source. It was originally designed for networks generated by the Integrated Interactome System and can be used with networks from others databases, like InnateDB. CellNetVis has demonstrated to be applicable for dynamic investigation of complex networks over a consistent representation of a cell on the Web, with capabilities not matched elsewhere.

  8. Biologically inspired intelligent decision making: a commentary on the use of artificial neural networks in bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Timmy; Sleator, Roy D; Walsh, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) are a class of powerful machine learning models for classification and function approximation which have analogs in nature. An ANN learns to map stimuli to responses through repeated evaluation of exemplars of the mapping. This learning approach results in networks which are recognized for their noise tolerance and ability to generalize meaningful responses for novel stimuli. It is these properties of ANNs which make them appealing for applications to bioinformatics problems where interpretation of data may not always be obvious, and where the domain knowledge required for deductive techniques is incomplete or can cause a combinatorial explosion of rules. In this paper, we provide an introduction to artificial neural network theory and review some interesting recent applications to bioinformatics problems.

  9. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez and J. Pivarski

    2011-01-01

    Alignment efforts in the first few months of 2011 have shifted away from providing alignment constants (now a well established procedure) and focussed on some critical remaining issues. The single most important task left was to understand the systematic differences observed between the track-based (TB) and hardware-based (HW) barrel alignments: a systematic difference in r-φ and in z, which grew as a function of z, and which amounted to ~4-5 mm differences going from one end of the barrel to the other. This difference is now understood to be caused by the tracker alignment. The systematic differences disappear when the track-based barrel alignment is performed using the new “twist-free” tracker alignment. This removes the largest remaining source of systematic uncertainty. Since the barrel alignment is based on hardware, it does not suffer from the tracker twist. However, untwisting the tracker causes endcap disks (which are aligned ...

  10. Biological and theoretical relevance of some connectionist assumptions. The development of conceptual networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delgado, JFR; Dalenoort, GJ; Gracia, AP

    2000-01-01

    For the study of psychological processes in cognitive science modelling two general approaches rule nowadays research: Artificial Intelligence (top-down) functional symbolic models, and Connectionist (bottom-up) neural networks modelling. Our goal in this paper is to show that analyzing the

  11. Models of neural networks temporal aspects of coding and information processing in biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmen, J; Schulten, Klaus

    1994-01-01

    Since the appearance of Vol. 1 of Models of Neural Networks in 1991, the theory of neural nets has focused on two paradigms: information coding through coherent firing of the neurons and functional feedback. Information coding through coherent neuronal firing exploits time as a cardinal degree of freedom. This capacity of a neural network rests on the fact that the neuronal action potential is a short, say 1 ms, spike, localized in space and time. Spatial as well as temporal correlations of activity may represent different states of a network. In particular, temporal correlations of activity may express that neurons process the same "object" of, for example, a visual scene by spiking at the very same time. The traditional description of a neural network through a firing rate, the famous S-shaped curve, presupposes a wide time window of, say, at least 100 ms. It thus fails to exploit the capacity to "bind" sets of coherently firing neurons for the purpose of both scene segmentation and figure-ground segregatio...

  12. A Biologically-Inspired Power Control Algorithm for Energy-Efficient Cellular Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Ho Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most of the energy used to operate a cellular network is consumed by a base station (BS, and reducing the transmission power of a BS can therefore afford a substantial reduction in the amount of energy used in a network. In this paper, we propose a distributed transmit power control (TPC algorithm inspired by bird flocking behavior as a means of improving the energy efficiency of a cellular network. Just as each bird in a flock attempts to match its velocity with the average velocity of adjacent birds, in the proposed algorithm, each mobile station (MS in a cell matches its rate with the average rate of the co-channel MSs in adjacent cells by controlling the transmit power of its serving BS. We verify that this bio-inspired TPC algorithm using a local rate-average process achieves an exponential convergence and maximizes the minimum rate of the MSs concerned. Simulation results show that the proposed TPC algorithm follows the same convergence properties as the flocking algorithm and also effectively reduces the power consumption at the BSs while maintaining a low outage probability as the inter-cell interference increases; in so doing, it significantly improves the energy efficiency of a cellular network.

  13. A Simulated Annealing Algorithm for Maximum Common Edge Subgraph Detection in Biological Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon; Alkærsig, Frederik G.; Ditzel, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    introduce a heuristic algorithm for the multiple maximum common edge subgraph problem that is able to detect large common substructures shared across multiple, real-world size networks efficiently. Our algorithm uses a combination of iterated local search, simulated annealing and a pheromone...... apply it to unravel a biochemical backbone inherent in different species, modeled as multiple maximum common subgraphs....

  14. Integrative network analysis highlights biological processes underlying GLP-1 stimulated insulin secretion: A DIRECT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Allebrandt, Karla Viviani

    2018-01-01

    cohorts. The network contains both known and novel genes in the context of insulin secretion and is enriched for members of the focal adhesion, extracellular-matrix receptor interaction, actin cytoskeleton regulation, Rap1 and PI3K-Akt signaling pathways. Adipose tissue is, like the beta-cell, one...

  15. Network motif-based identification of transcription factor-target gene relationships by integrating multi-source biological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de los Reyes Benildo G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Integrating data from multiple global assays and curated databases is essential to understand the spatio-temporal interactions within cells. Different experiments measure cellular processes at various widths and depths, while databases contain biological information based on established facts or published data. Integrating these complementary datasets helps infer a mutually consistent transcriptional regulatory network (TRN with strong similarity to the structure of the underlying genetic regulatory modules. Decomposing the TRN into a small set of recurring regulatory patterns, called network motifs (NM, facilitates the inference. Identifying NMs defined by specific transcription factors (TF establishes the framework structure of a TRN and allows the inference of TF-target gene relationship. This paper introduces a computational framework for utilizing data from multiple sources to infer TF-target gene relationships on the basis of NMs. The data include time course gene expression profiles, genome-wide location analysis data, binding sequence data, and gene ontology (GO information. Results The proposed computational framework was tested using gene expression data associated with cell cycle progression in yeast. Among 800 cell cycle related genes, 85 were identified as candidate TFs and classified into four previously defined NMs. The NMs for a subset of TFs are obtained from literature. Support vector machine (SVM classifiers were used to estimate NMs for the remaining TFs. The potential downstream target genes for the TFs were clustered into 34 biologically significant groups. The relationships between TFs and potential target gene clusters were examined by training recurrent neural networks whose topologies mimic the NMs to which the TFs are classified. The identified relationships between TFs and gene clusters were evaluated using the following biological validation and statistical analyses: (1 Gene set enrichment

  16. Genetic networking of the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex reveals pattern of biological invasions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul De Barro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A challenge within the context of cryptic species is the delimitation of individual species within the complex. Statistical parsimony network analytics offers the opportunity to explore limits in situations where there are insufficient species-specific morphological characters to separate taxa. The results also enable us to explore the spread in taxa that have invaded globally. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a 657 bp portion of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 from 352 unique haplotypes belonging to the Bemisia tabaci cryptic species complex, the analysis revealed 28 networks plus 7 unconnected individual haplotypes. Of the networks, 24 corresponded to the putative species identified using the rule set devised by Dinsdale et al. (2010. Only two species proposed in Dinsdale et al. (2010 departed substantially from the structure suggested by the analysis. The analysis of the two invasive members of the complex, Mediterranean (MED and Middle East - Asia Minor 1 (MEAM1, showed that in both cases only a small number of haplotypes represent the majority that have spread beyond the home range; one MEAM1 and three MED haplotypes account for >80% of the GenBank records. Israel is a possible source of the globally invasive MEAM1 whereas MED has two possible sources. The first is the eastern Mediterranean which has invaded only the USA, primarily Florida and to a lesser extent California. The second are western Mediterranean haplotypes that have spread to the USA, Asia and South America. The structure for MED supports two home range distributions, a Sub-Saharan range and a Mediterranean range. The MEAM1 network supports the Middle East - Asia Minor region. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The network analyses show a high level of congruence with the species identified in a previous phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of the two globally invasive members of the complex support the view that global invasion often involve very small portions of

  17. Elucidation of time-dependent systems biology cell response patterns with time course network enrichment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiwie, Christian; Rauch, Alexander; Haakonsson, Anders

    2018-01-01

    distinguishing temporal systems biology profiles in time series gene expression data of human lung cells after infection with Influenza and Rhino virus. TiCoNE is available online (https://ticone.compbio.sdu.dk) and as Cytoscape app in the Cytoscape App Store (http://apps.cytoscape.org/)....

  18. Towards a system level understanding of non-model organisms sampled from the environment: a network biology approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim D Williams

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The acquisition and analysis of datasets including multi-level omics and physiology from non-model species, sampled from field populations, is a formidable challenge, which so far has prevented the application of systems biology approaches. If successful, these could contribute enormously to improving our understanding of how populations of living organisms adapt to environmental stressors relating to, for example, pollution and climate. Here we describe the first application of a network inference approach integrating transcriptional, metabolic and phenotypic information representative of wild populations of the European flounder fish, sampled at seven estuarine locations in northern Europe with different degrees and profiles of chemical contaminants. We identified network modules, whose activity was predictive of environmental exposure and represented a link between molecular and morphometric indices. These sub-networks represented both known and candidate novel adverse outcome pathways representative of several aspects of human liver pathophysiology such as liver hyperplasia, fibrosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. At the molecular level these pathways were linked to TNF alpha, TGF beta, PDGF, AGT and VEGF signalling. More generally, this pioneering study has important implications as it can be applied to model molecular mechanisms of compensatory adaptation to a wide range of scenarios in wild populations.

  19. A non-homogeneous dynamic Bayesian network with sequentially coupled interaction parameters for applications in systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzegorczyk, Marco; Husmeier, Dirk

    2012-07-12

    An important and challenging problem in systems biology is the inference of gene regulatory networks from short non-stationary time series of transcriptional profiles. A popular approach that has been widely applied to this end is based on dynamic Bayesian networks (DBNs), although traditional homogeneous DBNs fail to model the non-stationarity and time-varying nature of the gene regulatory processes. Various authors have therefore recently proposed combining DBNs with multiple changepoint processes to obtain time varying dynamic Bayesian networks (TV-DBNs). However, TV-DBNs are not without problems. Gene expression time series are typically short, which leaves the model over-flexible, leading to over-fitting or inflated inference uncertainty. In the present paper, we introduce a Bayesian regularization scheme that addresses this difficulty. Our approach is based on the rationale that changes in gene regulatory processes appear gradually during an organism's life cycle or in response to a changing environment, and we have integrated this notion in the prior distribution of the TV-DBN parameters. We have extensively tested our regularized TV-DBN model on synthetic data, in which we have simulated short non-homogeneous time series produced from a system subject to gradual change. We have then applied our method to real-world gene expression time series, measured during the life cycle of Drosophila melanogaster, under artificially generated constant light condition in Arabidopsis thaliana, and from a synthetically designed strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae exposed to a changing environment.

  20. MORPHIN: a web tool for human disease research by projecting model organism biology onto a human integrated gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sohyun; Kim, Eiru; Yang, Sunmo; Marcotte, Edward M; Lee, Insuk

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent advances in human genetics, model organisms are indispensable for human disease research. Most human disease pathways are evolutionally conserved among other species, where they may phenocopy the human condition or be associated with seemingly unrelated phenotypes. Much of the known gene-to-phenotype association information is distributed across diverse databases, growing rapidly due to new experimental techniques. Accessible bioinformatics tools will therefore facilitate translation of discoveries from model organisms into human disease biology. Here, we present a web-based discovery tool for human disease studies, MORPHIN (model organisms projected on a human integrated gene network), which prioritizes the most relevant human diseases for a given set of model organism genes, potentially highlighting new model systems for human diseases and providing context to model organism studies. Conceptually, MORPHIN investigates human diseases by an orthology-based projection of a set of model organism genes onto a genome-scale human gene network. MORPHIN then prioritizes human diseases by relevance to the projected model organism genes using two distinct methods: a conventional overlap-based gene set enrichment analysis and a network-based measure of closeness between the query and disease gene sets capable of detecting associations undetectable by the conventional overlap-based methods. MORPHIN is freely accessible at http://www.inetbio.org/morphin. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. A microbiology-based multi-parametric approach towards assessing biological stability in drinking water distribution networks

    KAUST Repository

    Lautenschläger, Karin

    2013-06-01

    Biological stability of drinking water implies that the concentration of bacterial cells and composition of the microbial community should not change during distribution. In this study, we used a multi-parametric approach that encompasses different aspects of microbial water quality including microbial growth potential, microbial abundance, and microbial community composition, to monitor biological stability in drinking water of the non-chlorinated distribution system of Zürich. Drinking water was collected directly after treatment from the reservoir and in the network at several locations with varied average hydraulic retention times (6-52h) over a period of four months, with a single repetition two years later. Total cell concentrations (TCC) measured with flow cytometry remained remarkably stable at 9.5 (±0.6)×104cells/ml from water in the reservoir throughout most of the distribution network, and during the whole time period. Conventional microbial methods like heterotrophic plate counts, the concentration of adenosine tri-phosphate, total organic carbon and assimilable organic carbon remained also constant. Samples taken two years apart showed more than 80% similarity for the microbial communities analysed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454 pyrosequencing. Only the two sampling locations with the longest water retention times were the exceptions and, sofar for unknown reasons, recorded a slight but significantly higher TCC (1.3(±0.1)×105cells/ml) compared to the other locations. This small change in microbial abundance detected by flow cytometry was also clearly observed in a shift in the microbial community profiles to a higher abundance of members from the Comamonadaceae (60% vs. 2% at other locations). Conventional microbial detection methods were not able to detect changes as observed with flow cytometric cell counts and microbial community analysis. Our findings demonstrate that the multi-parametric approach used provides a powerful

  2. NatalieQ: a web server for protein-protein interaction network querying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kebir, Mohammed; Brandt, Bernd W; Heringa, Jaap; Klau, Gunnar W

    2014-04-01

    Molecular interactions need to be taken into account to adequately model the complex behavior of biological systems. These interactions are captured by various types of biological networks, such as metabolic, gene-regulatory, signal transduction and protein-protein interaction networks. We recently developed Natalie, which computes high-quality network alignments via advanced methods from combinatorial optimization. Here, we present NatalieQ, a web server for topology-based alignment of a specified query protein-protein interaction network to a selected target network using the Natalie algorithm. By incorporating similarity at both the sequence and the network level, we compute alignments that allow for the transfer of functional annotation as well as for the prediction of missing interactions. We illustrate the capabilities of NatalieQ with a biological case study involving the Wnt signaling pathway. We show that topology-based network alignment can produce results complementary to those obtained by using sequence similarity alone. We also demonstrate that NatalieQ is able to predict putative interactions. The server is available at: http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/natalieq/.

  3. [Bone Cell Biology Assessed by Microscopic Approach. Response to mechanical stress by osteocyte network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komori, Toshihisa

    2015-10-01

    Osteocytes were considered to be involved in the response to mechanical stress from their network structure. However, it was difficult to prove the function because of the lack of animal models for a long time. Recently, the function of osteocytes was clarified using various knockout and transgenic mice. Osteocyte death causes bone remodeling, which is a repair process induced by osteocyte necrosis but not by the loss of the function of live osteocytes. The osteocyte network mildly inhibits bone formation and mildly stimulates bone resorption in physiological condition. In unloaded condition, it strongly inhibits bone formation and strongly stimulates bone resorption, at least in part, through the induction of Sost in osteocytes and Rankl in osteoblasts.

  4. Parametric motion control of robotic arms: A biologically based approach using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, O.; D'Eleuterio, G. M. T.; Lipitkas, J.; Grodski, J. J.

    1993-01-01

    A neural network based system is presented which is able to generate point-to-point movements of robotic manipulators. The foundation of this approach is the use of prototypical control torque signals which are defined by a set of parameters. The parameter set is used for scaling and shaping of these prototypical torque signals to effect a desired outcome of the system. This approach is based on neurophysiological findings that the central nervous system stores generalized cognitive representations of movements called synergies, schemas, or motor programs. It has been proposed that these motor programs may be stored as torque-time functions in central pattern generators which can be scaled with appropriate time and magnitude parameters. The central pattern generators use these parameters to generate stereotypical torque-time profiles, which are then sent to the joint actuators. Hence, only a small number of parameters need to be determined for each point-to-point movement instead of the entire torque-time trajectory. This same principle is implemented for controlling the joint torques of robotic manipulators where a neural network is used to identify the relationship between the task requirements and the torque parameters. Movements are specified by the initial robot position in joint coordinates and the desired final end-effector position in Cartesian coordinates. This information is provided to the neural network which calculates six torque parameters for a two-link system. The prototypical torque profiles (one per joint) are then scaled by those parameters. After appropriate training of the network, our parametric control design allowed the reproduction of a trained set of movements with relatively high accuracy, and the production of previously untrained movements with comparable accuracy. We conclude that our approach was successful in discriminating between trained movements and in generalizing to untrained movements.

  5. Biological signatures of dynamic river networks from a coupled landscape evolution and neutral community model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, M.; Perron, J. T.

    2017-12-01

    Freshwater systems host exceptionally species-rich communities whose spatial structure is dictated by the topology of the river networks they inhabit. Over geologic time, river networks are dynamic; drainage basins shrink and grow, and river capture establishes new connections between previously separated regions. It has been hypothesized that these changes in river network structure influence the evolution of life by exchanging and isolating species, perhaps boosting biodiversity in the process. However, no general model exists to predict the evolutionary consequences of landscape change. We couple a neutral community model of freshwater organisms to a landscape evolution model in which the river network undergoes drainage divide migration and repeated river capture. Neutral community models are macro-ecological models that include stochastic speciation and dispersal to produce realistic patterns of biodiversity. We explore the consequences of three modes of speciation - point mutation, time-protracted, and vicariant (geographic) speciation - by tracking patterns of diversity in time and comparing the final result to an equilibrium solution of the neutral model on the final landscape. Under point mutation, a simple model of stochastic and instantaneous speciation, the results are identical to the equilibrium solution and indicate the dominance of the species-area relationship in forming patterns of diversity. The number of species in a basin is proportional to its area, and regional species richness reaches its maximum when drainage area is evenly distributed among sub-basins. Time-protracted speciation is also modeled as a stochastic process, but in order to produce more realistic rates of diversification, speciation is not assumed to be instantaneous. Rather, each new species must persist for a certain amount of time before it is considered to be established. When vicariance (geographic speciation) is included, there is a transient signature of increased

  6. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    2010-01-01

    The main developments in muon alignment since March 2010 have been the production, approval and deployment of alignment constants for the ICHEP data reprocessing. In the barrel, a new geometry, combining information from both hardware and track-based alignment systems, has been developed for the first time. The hardware alignment provides an initial DT geometry, which is then anchored as a rigid solid, using the link alignment system, to a reference frame common to the tracker. The “GlobalPositionRecords” for both the Tracker and Muon systems are being used for the first time, and the initial tracker-muon relative positioning, based on the link alignment, yields good results within the photogrammetry uncertainties of the Tracker and alignment ring positions. For the first time, the optical and track-based alignments show good agreement between them; the optical alignment being refined by the track-based alignment. The resulting geometry is the most complete to date, aligning all 250 DTs, ...

  7. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Z. Szillasi and G. Gomez.

    2013-01-01

    When CMS is opened up, major components of the Link and Barrel Alignment systems will be removed. This operation, besides allowing for maintenance of the detector underneath, is needed for making interventions that will reinforce the alignment measurements and make the operation of the alignment system more reliable. For that purpose and also for their general maintenance and recalibration, the alignment components will be transferred to the Alignment Lab situated in the ISR area. For the track-based alignment, attention is focused on the determination of systematic uncertainties, which have become dominant, since now there is a large statistics of muon tracks. This will allow for an improved Monte Carlo misalignment scenario and updated alignment position errors, crucial for high-momentum muon analysis such as Z′ searches.

  8. MORE: mixed optimization for reverse engineering--an application to modeling biological networks response via sparse systems of nonlinear differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambo, Francesco; de Oca, Marco A Montes; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toffolo, Gianna; Stützle, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Reverse engineering is the problem of inferring the structure of a network of interactions between biological variables from a set of observations. In this paper, we propose an optimization algorithm, called MORE, for the reverse engineering of biological networks from time series data. The model inferred by MORE is a sparse system of nonlinear differential equations, complex enough to realistically describe the dynamics of a biological system. MORE tackles separately the discrete component of the problem, the determination of the biological network topology, and the continuous component of the problem, the strength of the interactions. This approach allows us both to enforce system sparsity, by globally constraining the number of edges, and to integrate a priori information about the structure of the underlying interaction network. Experimental results on simulated and real-world networks show that the mixed discrete/continuous optimization approach of MORE significantly outperforms standard continuous optimization and that MORE is competitive with the state of the art in terms of accuracy of the inferred networks.

  9. A canonical correlation analysis-based dynamic bayesian network prior to infer gene regulatory networks from multiple types of biological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, Brittany; Bozdag, Serdar

    2015-04-01

    One of the challenging and important computational problems in systems biology is to infer gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of biological systems. Several methods that exploit gene expression data have been developed to tackle this problem. In this study, we propose the use of copy number and DNA methylation data to infer GRNs. We developed an algorithm that scores regulatory interactions between genes based on canonical correlation analysis. In this algorithm, copy number or DNA methylation variables are treated as potential regulator variables, and expression variables are treated as potential target variables. We first validated that the canonical correlation analysis method is able to infer true interactions in high accuracy. We showed that the use of DNA methylation or copy number datasets leads to improved inference over steady-state expression. Our results also showed that epigenetic and structural information could be used to infer directionality of regulatory interactions. Additional improvements in GRN inference can be gleaned from incorporating the result in an informative prior in a dynamic Bayesian algorithm. This is the first study that incorporates copy number and DNA methylation into an informative prior in dynamic Bayesian framework. By closely examining top-scoring interactions with different sources of epigenetic or structural information, we also identified potential novel regulatory interactions.

  10. Control rod housing alignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.C.; Deaver, G.A.; Punches, J.R.; Singleton, G.E.; Erbes, J.G.; Offer, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a process for measuring the vertical alignment between a hole in a core plate and the top of a corresponding control rod drive housing within a boiling water reactor. It comprises: providing an alignment apparatus. The alignment apparatus including a lower end for fitting to the top of the control rod drive housing; an upper end for fitting to the aperture in the core plate, and a leveling means attached to the alignment apparatus to read out the difference in angularity with respect to gravity, and alignment pin registering means for registering to the alignment pin on the core plate; lowering the alignment device on a depending support through a lattice position in the top guide through the hole in the core plate down into registered contact with the top of the control rod drive housing; registering the upper end to the sides of the hole in the core plate; registering the alignment pin registering means to an alignment pin on the core plate to impart to the alignment device the required angularity; and reading out the angle of the control rod drive housing with respect to the hole in the core plate through the leveling devices whereby the angularity of the top of the control rod drive housing with respect to the hole in the core plate can be determined

  11. Direct calculation of elementary flux modes satisfying several biological constraints in genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pey, Jon; Planes, Francisco J

    2014-08-01

    The concept of Elementary Flux Mode (EFM) has been widely used for the past 20 years. However, its application to genome-scale metabolic networks (GSMNs) is still under development because of methodological limitations. Therefore, novel approaches are demanded to extend the application of EFMs. A novel family of methods based on optimization is emerging that provides us with a subset of EFMs. Because the calculation of the whole set of EFMs goes beyond our capacity, performing a selective search is a proper strategy. Here, we present a novel mathematical approach calculating EFMs fulfilling additional linear constraints. We validated our approach based on two metabolic networks in which all the EFMs can be obtained. Finally, we analyzed the performance of our methodology in the GSMN of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by calculating EFMs producing ethanol with a given minimum carbon yield. Overall, this new approach opens new avenues for the calculation of EFMs in GSMNs. Matlab code is provided in the supplementary online materials fplanes@ceit.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Network Biology Approach to Decipher Stress Response in Bacteria Using Escherichia coli As a Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Shashwat Deepali; Aggarwal, Bhavye; Joon, Shikha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The development of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria poses challenges to global health for their treatment and control. In this context, stress response enables bacterial populations to survive extreme perturbations in the environment but remains poorly understood. Specific modules are activated for unique stressors with few recognized global regulators. The phenomenon of cross-stress protection strongly suggests the presence of central proteins that control the diverse stress responses. In this work, Escherichia coli was used to model the bacterial stress response. A Protein-Protein Interaction Network was generated by integrating differentially expressed genes in eight stress conditions of pH, temperature, and antibiotics with relevant gene ontology terms. Topological analysis identified 24 central proteins. The well-documented role of 16 central proteins in stress indicates central control of the response, while the remaining eight proteins may have a novel role in stress response. Cluster analysis of the generated network implicated RNA binding, flagellar assembly, ABC transporters, and DNA repair as important processes during response to stress. Pathway analysis showed crosstalk of Two Component Systems with metabolic processes, oxidative phosphorylation, and ABC transporters. The results were further validated by analysis of an independent cross-stress protection dataset. This study also reports on the ways in which bacterial stress response can progress to biofilm formation. In conclusion, we suggest that drug targets or pathways disrupting bacterial stress responses can potentially be exploited to combat antibiotic tolerance and multidrug resistance in the future. PMID:27195968

  13. Biologics or tofacitinib for people with rheumatoid arthritis naive to methotrexate: a systematic review and network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasvinder A; Hossain, Alomgir; Mudano, Amy S; Tanjong Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Suarez-Almazor, Maria E; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Maxwell, Lara J; Tugwell, Peter; Wells, George A

    2017-05-08

    Biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (biologics) are highly effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA), however there are few head-to-head biologic comparison studies. We performed a systematic review, a standard meta-analysis and a network meta-analysis (NMA) to update the 2009 Cochrane Overview. This review is focused on the adults with RA who are naive to methotrexate (MTX) that is, receiving their first disease-modifying agent. To compare the benefits and harms of biologics (abatacept, adalimumab, anakinra, certolizumab pegol, etanercept, golimumab, infliximab, rituximab, tocilizumab) and small molecule tofacitinib versus comparator (methotrexate (MTX)/other DMARDs) in people with RA who are naive to methotrexate. In June 2015 we searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in CENTRAL, MEDLINE and Embase; and trials registers. We used standard Cochrane methods. We calculated odds ratios (OR) and mean differences (MD) along with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for traditional meta-analyses and 95% credible intervals (CrI) using a Bayesian mixed treatment comparisons approach for network meta-analysis (NMA). We converted OR to risk ratios (RR) for ease of interpretation. We also present results in absolute measures as risk difference (RD) and number needed to treat for an additional beneficial or harmful outcome (NNTB/H). Nineteen RCTs with 6485 participants met inclusion criteria (including five studies from the original 2009 review), and data were available for four TNF biologics (adalimumab (six studies; 1851 participants), etanercept (three studies; 678 participants), golimumab (one study; 637 participants) and infliximab (seven studies; 1363 participants)) and two non-TNF biologics (abatacept (one study; 509 participants) and rituximab (one study; 748 participants)).Less than 50% of the studies were judged to be at low risk of bias for allocation sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, 21% were at low risk for selective

  14. Identification of biological functions and gene networks regulated by heat stress in U937 human lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furusawa, Yukihiro; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Wada, Shigehito; Takasaki, Ichiro; Ohtsuka, Kenzo; Kondo, Takashi

    2011-08-01

    Although cancer cells exposed to temperatures >42.5°C undergo cell death as the temperature rises, exposure of up to 42.5°C induces slight or no cytotoxicity. The temperature of 42.5°C is, therefore, well known to be the inflection point of hyperthermia. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular responses to heat stress at temperatures higher and lower than the inflection point, we carried out global scale microarray and computational gene expression analyses. Human leukemia U937 cells were incubated at 42°C or 44°C for 15 min and cultured at 37°C for 0-6 h. Apoptosis accompanied by the activation of caspase-3 and DNA fragmentation was only observed in cells treated with heat stress at 44°C, but not at 42°C. Although a large number of genes were differentially expressed by a factor of 2.0 or greater, we found substantial differences with respect to the biological functions and gene networks of the genes differentially expressed at the two temperatures examined. Interestingly, we identified temperature-specific gene networks that were considered to be mainly associated with cell death or cellular compromise and cellular function and maintenance at 44°C or 42°C, respectively, by using the Ingenuity pathway analysis tools. These findings provide the molecular basis for a further understanding of the mechanisms of the biological changes that are responsive to heat stress in human lymphoma cells.

  15. Chemokines and Heart Disease: A Network Connecting Cardiovascular Biology to Immune and Autonomic Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusi, Veronica; Ghidoni, Alice; Ravera, Alice; De Ferrari, Gaetano M.; Calvillo, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Among the chemokines discovered to date, nineteen are presently considered to be relevant in heart disease and are involved in all stages of cardiovascular response to injury. Chemokines are interesting as biomarkers to predict risk of cardiovascular events in apparently healthy people and as possible therapeutic targets. Moreover, they could have a role as mediators of crosstalk between immune and cardiovascular system, since they seem to act as a “working-network” in deep linkage with the autonomic nervous system. In this paper we will describe the single chemokines more involved in heart diseases; then we will present a comprehensive perspective of them as a complex network connecting the cardiovascular system to both the immune and the autonomic nervous systems. Finally, some recent evidences indicating chemokines as a possible new tool to predict cardiovascular risk will be described. PMID:27242392

  16. Biomine: predicting links between biological entities using network models of heterogeneous databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eronen Lauri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological databases contain large amounts of data concerning the functions and associations of genes and proteins. Integration of data from several such databases into a single repository can aid the discovery of previously unknown connections spanning multiple types of relationships and databases. Results Biomine is a system that integrates cross-references from several biological databases into a graph model with multiple types of edges, such as protein interactions, gene-disease associations and gene ontology annotations. Edges are weighted based on their type, reliability, and informativeness. We present Biomine and evaluate its performance in link prediction, where the goal is to predict pairs of nodes that will be connected in the future, based on current data. In particular, we formulate protein interaction prediction and disease gene prioritization tasks as instances of link prediction. The predictions are based on a proximity measure computed on the integrated graph. We consider and experiment with several such measures, and perform a parameter optimization procedure where different edge types are weighted to optimize link prediction accuracy. We also propose a novel method for disease-gene prioritization, defined as finding a subset of candidate genes that cluster together in the graph. We experimentally evaluate Biomine by predicting future annotations in the source databases and prioritizing lists of putative disease genes. Conclusions The experimental results show that Biomine has strong potential for predicting links when a set of selected candidate links is available. The predictions obtained using the entire Biomine dataset are shown to clearly outperform ones obtained using any single source of data alone, when different types of links are suitably weighted. In the gene prioritization task, an established reference set of disease-associated genes is useful, but the results show that under favorable

  17. Five Years of Designing Wireless Sensor Networks in the Doñana Biological Reserve (Spain): An Applications Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larios, Diego F.; Barbancho, Julio; Sevillano, José L.; Rodríguez, Gustavo; Molina, Francisco J.; Gasull, Virginia G.; Mora-Merchan, Javier M.; León, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are a technology that is becoming very popular for many applications, and environmental monitoring is one of its most important application areas. This technology solves the lack of flexibility of wired sensor installations and, at the same time, reduces the deployment costs. To demonstrate the advantages of WSN technology, for the last five years we have been deploying some prototypes in the Doñana Biological Reserve, which is an important protected area in Southern Spain. These prototypes not only evaluate the technology, but also solve some of the monitoring problems that have been raised by biologists working in Doñana. This paper presents a review of the work that has been developed during these five years. Here, we demonstrate the enormous potential of using machine learning in wireless sensor networks for environmental and animal monitoring because this approach increases the amount of useful information and reduces the effort that is required by biologists in an environmental monitoring task. PMID:24025554

  18. Improving neural network prediction of effluent from biological wastewater treatment plant of industrial park using fuzzy learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Tzu-Yi; Wang, S C; Chiang, C F; Su, H C; Yu, L F; Sung, P J; Lin, C Y; Hu, H C

    2009-10-01

    Three types of adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) in which the online monitoring parameters served as the input variable were employed to predict suspended solids (SS(eff)), chemical oxygen demand (COD(eff)), and pH(eff) in the effluent from a biological wastewater treatment plant in industrial park. Artificial neural network (ANN) was also used for comparison. The results indicated that ANFIS statistically outperforms ANN in terms of effluent prediction. When predicting, the minimum mean absolute percentage errors of 2.90, 2.54 and 0.36% for SS(eff), COD(eff) and pH(eff) could be achieved using ANFIS. The maximum values of correlation coefficient for SS(eff), COD(eff), and pH(eff) were 0.97, 0.95, and 0.98, respectively. The minimum mean square errors of 0.21, 1.41 and 0.00, and the minimum root mean square errors of 0.46, 1.19 and 0.04 for SS(eff), COD(eff), and pH(eff) could also be achieved.

  19. Erasing errors due to alignment ambiguity when estimating positive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelings, Benjamin

    2014-08-01

    Current estimates of diversifying positive selection rely on first having an accurate multiple sequence alignment. Simulation studies have shown that under biologically plausible conditions, relying on a single estimate of the alignment from commonly used alignment software can lead to unacceptably high false-positive rates in detecting diversifying positive selection. We present a novel statistical method that eliminates excess false positives resulting from alignment error by jointly estimating the degree of positive selection and the alignment under an evolutionary model. Our model treats both substitutions and insertions/deletions as sequence changes on a tree and allows site heterogeneity in the substitution process. We conduct inference starting from unaligned sequence data by integrating over all alignments. This approach naturally accounts for ambiguous alignments without requiring ambiguously aligned sites to be identified and removed prior to analysis. We take a Bayesian approach and conduct inference using Markov chain Monte Carlo to integrate over all alignments on a fixed evolutionary tree topology. We introduce a Bayesian version of the branch-site test and assess the evidence for positive selection using Bayes factors. We compare two models of differing dimensionality using a simple alternative to reversible-jump methods. We also describe a more accurate method of estimating the Bayes factor using Rao-Blackwellization. We then show using simulated data that jointly estimating the alignment and the presence of positive selection solves the problem with excessive false positives from erroneous alignments and has nearly the same power to detect positive selection as when the true alignment is known. We also show that samples taken from the posterior alignment distribution using the software BAli-Phy have substantially lower alignment error compared with MUSCLE, MAFFT, PRANK, and FSA alignments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on

  20. MP-GeneticSynth: inferring biological network regulations from time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellini, Alberto; Paltrinieri, Daniele; Manca, Vincenzo

    2015-03-01

    MP-GeneticSynth is a Java tool for discovering the logic and regulation mechanisms responsible for observed biological dynamics in terms of finite difference recurrent equations. The software makes use of: (i) metabolic P systems as a modeling framework, (ii) an evolutionary approach to discover flux regulation functions as linear combinations of given primitive functions, (iii) a suitable reformulation of the least squares method to estimate function parameters considering simultaneously all the reactions involved in complex dynamics. The tool is available as a plugin for the virtual laboratory MetaPlab. It has graphical and interactive interfaces for data preparation, a priori knowledge integration, and flux regulator analysis. Availability and implementation: Source code, binaries, documentation (including quick start guide and videos) and case studies are freely available at http://mplab.sci.univr.it/plugins/mpgs/index.html. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Cancer systems biology in the genome sequencing era: part 2, evolutionary dynamics of tumor clonal networks and drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zou, Jinfeng; Zaman, Naif; Beitel, Lenore K; Trifiro, Mark; Paliouras, Miltiadis

    2013-08-01

    A tumor often consists of multiple cell subpopulations (clones). Current chemo-treatments often target one clone of a tumor. Although the drug kills that clone, other clones overtake it and the tumor recurs. Genome sequencing and computational analysis allows to computational dissection of clones from tumors, while singe-cell genome sequencing including RNA-Seq allows profiling of these clones. This opens a new window for treating a tumor as a system in which clones are evolving. Future cancer systems biology studies should consider a tumor as an evolving system with multiple clones. Therefore, topics discussed in Part 2 of this review include evolutionary dynamics of clonal networks, early-warning signals (e.g., genome duplication events) for formation of fast-growing clones, dissecting tumor heterogeneity, and modeling of clone-clone-stroma interactions for drug resistance. The ultimate goal of the future systems biology analysis is to obtain a 'whole-system' understanding of a tumor and therefore provides a more efficient and personalized management strategies for cancer patients. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. TOLKIN--Tree of Life Knowledge and Information Network: filling a gap for collaborative research in biological systematics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reed S Beaman

    Full Text Available The development of biological informatics infrastructure capable of supporting growing data management and analysis environments is an increasing need within the systematics biology community. Although significant progress has been made in recent years on developing new algorithms and tools for analyzing and visualizing large phylogenetic data and trees, implementation of these resources is often carried out by bioinformatics experts, using one-off scripts. Therefore, a gap exists in providing data management support for a large set of non-technical users. The TOLKIN project (Tree of Life Knowledge and Information Network addresses this need by supporting capabilities to manage, integrate, and provide public access to molecular, morphological, and biocollections data and research outcomes through a collaborative, web application. This data management framework allows aggregation and import of sequences, underlying documentation about their source, including vouchers, tissues, and DNA extraction. It combines features of LIMS and workflow environments by supporting management at the level of individual observations, sequences, and specimens, as well as assembly and versioning of data sets used in phylogenetic inference. As a web application, the system provides multi-user support that obviates current practices of sharing data sets as files or spreadsheets via email.

  3. Characterization of TATA-containing genes and TATA-less genes in S. cerevisiae by network topologies and biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Wang, Jizhe; Lv, Yingli; Hao, Dapeng; Zuo, Yongchun; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Wei

    2014-12-01

    The TATA box is the core sequence of the promoter and the binding site of many transcription factors. Based on the presence or absence of TATA box, genes can be defined as TATA-containing or TATA-less genes. Many important stress-response functions and highly variable expression patterns are found to be correlated with the TATA box. However, until now, the relationships and differences between TATA-containing and TATA-less genes remain unclear. In this study, based on the transcriptional profiling of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, the perturbation sensitivity (PS) network is constructed. The topological and biological properties are used to investigate differences between TATA-containing and TATA-less genes. Significant differences are found in all topological properties and most of the biological properties. Notably, the TF number, determined mathematically by the number of transcription factors regulating a gene, demonstrates the highest discrimination between TATA-containing and TATA-less genes when all properties are estimated by the F-score. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigating the Impact of Biological Impurities on the Liquid Vein Network in Polycrystalline Ice Using Magnetic Resonance Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brox, T. I.; Vogt, S. J.; Brown, J. R.; Skidmore, M. L.; Codd, S. L.; Seymour, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Recent work has demonstrated that microorganisms can occupy the liquid filled inter-crystalline vein network in ice and maintain their metabolic activity under these conditions. Additionally, certain cold tolerant microorganisms produce extra-cellular proteins (i.e., ice-binding proteins) that have the ability to bind to the prism face of an ice crystal and inhibit ice recrystallization. One such microorganism is Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10, a bacterium isolated from a depth of 3519 m in the Vostok Ice Core, Antarctica. While such an adaptation can impact ice crystal structure, it is not known what effect these proteins may have on the liquid vein network and to what extent these organisms may control their habitat. This study uses magnetic resonance techniques to investigate the effects of chemical and biological impurities on the liquid vein structure in ice. Magnetic resonance techniques are powerful tools for probing pore structure and transport dynamics in porous media systems, however, their ability to characterize ice as a porous media has not yet been fully explored. Three experimental conditions were evaluated in this study. Ices were prepared from 7 g/L NaCl solutions with; 1) addition of a quantified amount of extra-cellular proteins (>30kDa) extracted from Chryseobacterium sp. V3519-10 2) addition of equivalent concentrations of the protein, Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and 3) no protein addition. Samples were frozen and analyzed at -15°C. The liquid vein structure, as a function of salt and protein concentrations, was characterized to obtain information on liquid water content, vein surface to volume ratios and tortuosity as a measure of vein network interconnectivity. These measurements were non-destructive and made at various time intervals after freezing to monitor the evolution of microstructure due to recrystallization and assess the effects of the added proteins.

  5. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Document Server

    G.Gomez

    2010-01-01

    Most of the work in muon alignment since December 2009 has focused on the geometry reconstruction from the optical systems and improvements in the internal alignment of the DT chambers. The barrel optical alignment system has progressively evolved from reconstruction of single active planes to super-planes (December 09) to a new, full barrel reconstruction. Initial validation studies comparing this full barrel alignment at 0T with photogrammetry provide promising results. In addition, the method has been applied to CRAFT09 data, and the resulting alignment at 3.8T yields residuals from tracks (extrapolated from the tracker) which look smooth, suggesting a good internal barrel alignment with a small overall offset with respect to the tracker. This is a significant improvement, which should allow the optical system to provide a start-up alignment for 2010. The end-cap optical alignment has made considerable progress in the analysis of transfer line data. The next set of alignment constants for CSCs will there...

  6. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  7. A microbiology-based multi-parametric approach towards assessing biological stability in drinking water distribution networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschlager, Karin; Hwang, Chiachi; Liu, Wen-Tso; Boon, Nico; Köster, Oliver; Vrouwenvelder, Hans; Egli, Thomas; Hammes, Frederik

    2013-06-01

    Biological stability of drinking water implies that the concentration of bacterial cells and composition of the microbial community should not change during distribution. In this study, we used a multi-parametric approach that encompasses different aspects of microbial water quality including microbial growth potential, microbial abundance, and microbial community composition, to monitor biological stability in drinking water of the non-chlorinated distribution system of Zürich. Drinking water was collected directly after treatment from the reservoir and in the network at several locations with varied average hydraulic retention times (6-52 h) over a period of four months, with a single repetition two years later. Total cell concentrations (TCC) measured with flow cytometry remained remarkably stable at 9.5 (± 0.6) × 10(4) cells/ml from water in the reservoir throughout most of the distribution network, and during the whole time period. Conventional microbial methods like heterotrophic plate counts, the concentration of adenosine tri-phosphate, total organic carbon and assimilable organic carbon remained also constant. Samples taken two years apart showed more than 80% similarity for the microbial communities analysed with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 454 pyrosequencing. Only the two sampling locations with the longest water retention times were the exceptions and, so far for unknown reasons, recorded a slight but significantly higher TCC (1.3 (± 0.1) × 10(5) cells/ml) compared to the other locations. This small change in microbial abundance detected by flow cytometry was also clearly observed in a shift in the microbial community profiles to a higher abundance of members from the Comamonadaceae (60% vs. 2% at other locations). Conventional microbial detection methods were not able to detect changes as observed with flow cytometric cell counts and microbial community analysis. Our findings demonstrate that the multi-parametric approach used

  8. The Importance of the mTOR Regulatory Network in Chondrocyte Biology and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Tchetina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is a chronic disorder associated mainly with pain, limited range of motion, stiffness, joint inflammation, and articular cartilage (AC destruction. Recent studies demonstrated the involvement of chondrocyte differentiation (hypertrophy as one of the mechanisms of cartilage degradation in OA. This indicates the involvement of profound alterations in chondrocyte metabolism in the course of cartilage resorption orchestrated by principal changes in the regulation of cellular function. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR controls critical cellular processes such as growth, proliferation, and protein synthesis, and integrates extracellular signals from growth factors and hormones with amino acid availability and intracellular energy status. The importance of mTOR activity during AC destruction in OA is supported by considerable alterations in the mTOR regulatory network, involving multiple intracellular (availability of growth factors, adenosine triphosphate [ATP], and oxygen as well as autophagy and extracellular (glucose, amino acid, lipid, and hexosamine signals. Moreover, variable mTOR gene expression in the peripheral blood of OA patients is associated with increases in pain or synovitis, and indicates a profound metabolic dissimilarity among patients that might require differential approaches to treatment. These issues are discussed in the present review article.

  9. Long-Term Prediction of Biological Wastewater Treatment Process Behavior via Wiener-Laguerre Network Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasaman Sanayei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A Wiener-Laguerre model with artificial neural network (ANN as its nonlinear static part was employed to describe the dynamic behavior of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR used for the treatment of dye-containing wastewater. The model was developed based on the experimental data obtained from the treatment of an effluent containing a reactive textile azo dye, Cibacron yellow FN-2R, by Sphingomonas paucimobilis bacterium. The influent COD, MLVSS, and reaction time were selected as the process inputs and the effluent COD and BOD as the process outputs. The best possible result for the discrete pole parameter was α=0.44. In order to adjust the parameters of ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM algorithm was employed. The results predicted by the model were compared to the experimental data and showed a high correlation with R2>0.99 and a low mean absolute error (MAE. The results from this study reveal that the developed model is accurate and efficacious in predicting COD and BOD parameters of the dye-containing wastewater treated by SBR. The proposed modeling approach can be applied to other industrial wastewater treatment systems to predict effluent characteristics.

  10. A template for constructing Bayesian networks in forensic biology cases when considering activity level propositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Duncan; Biedermann, Alex; Hicks, Tacha; Champod, Christophe

    2018-03-01

    The hierarchy of propositions has been accepted amongst the forensic science community for some time. It is also accepted that the higher up the hierarchy the propositions are, against which the scientist are competent to evaluate their results, the more directly useful the testimony will be to the court. Because each case represents a unique set of circumstances and findings, it is difficult to come up with a standard structure for evaluation. One common tool that assists in this task is Bayesian networks (BNs). There is much diversity in the way that BN can be constructed. In this work, we develop a template for BN construction that allows sufficient flexibility to address most cases, but enough commonality and structure that the flow of information in the BN is readily recognised at a glance. We provide seven steps that can be used to construct BNs within this structure and demonstrate how they can be applied, using a case example. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Predicting potential drug-drug interactions by integrating chemical, biological, phenotypic and network data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Yanlin; Liu, Feng; Luo, Fei; Tian, Gang; Li, Xiaohong

    2017-01-05

    Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are one of the major concerns in drug discovery. Accurate prediction of potential DDIs can help to reduce unexpected interactions in the entire lifecycle of drugs, and are important for the drug safety surveillance. Since many DDIs are not detected or observed in clinical trials, this work is aimed to predict unobserved or undetected DDIs. In this paper, we collect a variety of drug data that may influence drug-drug interactions, i.e., drug substructure data, drug target data, drug enzyme data, drug transporter data, drug pathway data, drug indication data, drug side effect data, drug off side effect data and known drug-drug interactions. We adopt three representative methods: the neighbor recommender method, the random walk method and the matrix perturbation method to build prediction models based on different data. Thus, we evaluate the usefulness of different information sources for the DDI prediction. Further, we present flexible frames of integrating different models with suitable ensemble rules, including weighted average ensemble rule and classifier ensemble rule, and develop ensemble models to achieve better performances. The experiments demonstrate that different data sources provide diverse information, and the DDI network based on known DDIs is one of most important information for DDI prediction. The ensemble methods can produce better performances than individual methods, and outperform existing state-of-the-art methods. The datasets and source codes are available at https://github.com/zw9977129/drug-drug-interaction/ .

  12. The Childhood Solid Tumor Network: A new resource for the developmental biology and oncology research communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Elizabeth; Federico, Sara; Karlstrom, Asa; Shelat, Anang; Sablauer, Andras; Pappo, Alberto; Dyer, Michael A

    2016-03-15

    Significant advances have been made over the past 25 years in our understanding of the most common adult solid tumors such as breast, colon, lung and prostate cancer. Much less is known about childhood solid tumors because they are rare and because they originate in developing organs during fetal development, childhood and adolescence. It can be very difficult to study the cellular origins of pediatric solid tumors in developing organs characterized by rapid proliferative expansion, growth factor signaling, developmental angiogenesis, programmed cell death, tissue reorganization and cell migration. Not only has the etiology of pediatric cancer remained elusive because of their developmental origins, but it also makes it more difficult to treat. Molecular targeted therapeutics that alter developmental pathway signaling may have devastating effects on normal organ development. Therefore, basic research focused on the mechanisms of development provides an essential foundation for pediatric solid tumor translational research. In this article, we describe new resources available for the developmental biology and oncology research communities. In a companion paper, we present the detailed characterization of an orthotopic xenograft of a pediatric solid tumor derived from sympathoadrenal lineage during development. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Quantitative modeling of gene networks of biological systems using fuzzy Petri nets and fuzzy sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed I. Hamed

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative demonstrating of organic frameworks has turned into an essential computational methodology in the configuration of novel and investigation of existing natural frameworks. Be that as it may, active information that portrays the framework's elements should be known keeping in mind the end goal to get pertinent results with the routine displaying strategies. This information is frequently robust or even difficult to get. Here, we exhibit a model of quantitative fuzzy rational demonstrating approach that can adapt to obscure motor information and hence deliver applicable results despite the fact that dynamic information is fragmented or just dubiously characterized. Besides, the methodology can be utilized as a part of the blend with the current cutting edge quantitative demonstrating strategies just in specific parts of the framework, i.e., where the data are absent. The contextual analysis of the methodology suggested in this paper is performed on the model of nine-quality genes. We propose a kind of FPN model in light of fuzzy sets to manage the quantitative modeling of biological systems. The tests of our model appear that the model is practical and entirely powerful for information impersonation and thinking of fuzzy expert frameworks.

  14. New Markov-autocorrelation indices for re-evaluation of links in chemical and biological complex networks used in metabolomics, parasitology, neurosciences, and epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Riera-Fernández, Pablo

    2012-12-21

    The development of new methods for the computational re-evaluation of links in chemical and biological complex networks is very important to save time and resources. The Moreau-Broto autocorrelation indices (MBis) are well-known topological indices (TIs) used in QSAR/QSPR studies to encode the structural information contained in molecular graphs. In addition, MBis and similar autocorrelation measures have been used to study other systems like, for example, proteins. In the present work, MBis are combined with Markov chains to develop a general class of stochastic MBis of order k (MB(k)) that is used to encode the structural information contained in different types of large complex networks. The MB(k) values obtained for the nodes (centralities) of these networks are used as input variables to seek QSPR-like equations (by means of linear discriminant analysis) in which the outputs are numerical scores S(L(ij)) that allow us to discriminate between connected and nonconnected nodes and therefore re-evaluate the connectivity of the whole network. The models developed in this work produced the following results in terms of overall accuracy for network reconstruction: metabolic networks (72.10%), parasite-host networks (88.70%), CoCoMac brain cortex coactivation network (81.89%), and fasciolosis spreading network (86.39%).

  15. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    Gervasio Gomez

    The main progress of the muon alignment group since March has been in the refinement of both the track-based alignment for the DTs and the hardware-based alignment for the CSCs. For DT track-based alignment, there has been significant improvement in the internal alignment of the superlayers inside the DTs. In particular, the distance between superlayers is now corrected, eliminating the residual dependence on track impact angles, and good agreement is found between survey and track-based corrections. The new internal geometry has been approved to be included in the forthcoming reprocessing of CRAFT samples. The alignment of DTs with respect to the tracker using global tracks has also improved significantly, since the algorithms use the latest B-field mapping, better run selection criteria, optimized momentum cuts, and an alignment is now obtained for all six degrees of freedom (three spatial coordinates and three rotations) of the aligned DTs. This work is ongoing and at a stage where we are trying to unders...

  16. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G.Gomez

    2011-01-01

    The Muon Alignment work now focuses on producing a new track-based alignment with higher track statistics, making systematic studies between the results of the hardware and track-based alignment methods and aligning the barrel using standalone muon tracks. Currently, the muon track reconstruction software uses a hardware-based alignment in the barrel (DT) and a track-based alignment in the endcaps (CSC). An important task is to assess the muon momentum resolution that can be achieved using the current muon alignment, especially for highly energetic muons. For this purpose, cosmic ray muons are used, since the rate of high-energy muons from collisions is very low and the event statistics are still limited. Cosmics have the advantage of higher statistics in the pT region above 100 GeV/c, but they have the disadvantage of having a mostly vertical topology, resulting in a very few global endcap muons. Only the barrel alignment has therefore been tested so far. Cosmic muons traversing CMS from top to bottom are s...

  17. Hole-Aligning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Frank A.; Saude, Frank; Sep, Martin J.

    1996-01-01

    Tool designed for use in aligning holes in plates or other structural members to be joined by bolt through holes. Holes aligned without exerting forces perpendicular to planes of holes. Tool features screw-driven-wedge design similar to (but simpler than) that of some automotive exhaust-pipe-expanding tools.

  18. Alignement experience in STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Margetis, S; Lauret, J; Perevozchikov, V; Van Buren, G; Bouchef, J

    2007-01-01

    The STAR experiment at RHIC uses four layers of silicon strip and silicon drift detectors for secondary vertex reconstruction. An attempt for a direct charm meson measurement put stringent requirements on alignment and calibration. We report on recent alignment and drift velocity calibration work performed on the inner silicon tracking system.

  19. MUON DETECTORS: ALIGNMENT

    CERN Multimedia

    G. Gomez

    Since December, the muon alignment community has focused on analyzing the data recorded so far in order to produce new DT and CSC Alignment Records for the second reprocessing of CRAFT data. Two independent algorithms were developed which align the DT chambers using glo