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Sample records for alh84001 carbonate disks

  1. The Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth, S. J.; McKay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  2. New Insights into the Origin of Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keptra, Katie L.; Clemett, S. J.; Wentworth S. J.; Mckay, D. S.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks believed to have formed approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose ori gins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of magnetite and carbonate may be unrelated: that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships between the carbonate disks, their associated magnetites and the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. Comparison of these results with experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates conducted under a range of heating scenarios suggests that the magnetite nanocrystals in the ALH84001 carbonate disks are not the products of thermal decomposition.

  3. Origin of Magnetite Crystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E. K.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks which are believed to have precipitated approx.3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these Fe3O4 are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of Fe3O4 and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compositional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded [1]. We focus this discussion on the composition of ALH84001 magnetites and then compare these observations with those from our thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios.

  4. Thermal Decomposition of an Impure (Roxbury) Siderite: Relevance to the Presence of Chemically Pure Magnetite Crystals in ALH84001 Carbonate Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D.S.; Gibson, E.K.; Thomas-Keprta, K.L.; Clemett, S.J.; Wentworth, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    The question of the origin of nanophase magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been widely debated for nearly a decade. Golden et al. have reported producing nearly chemically pure magnetite from thermal decomposition of chemically impure siderite [(Fe, Mg, Mn)CO3]. This claim is significant for three reasons: first, it has been argued that chemically pure magnetite present in the carbonate disks in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could have formed by the thermal decomposition of the impure carbonate matrix in which they are embedded; second, the chemical purity of magnetite has been previously used to identify biogenic magnetite; and, third, previous studies of thermal decomposition of impure (Mg,Ca,Mn)-siderites, which have been investigated under a wide variety of conditions by numerous researchers, invariably yields a mixed metal oxide phase as the product and not chemically pure magnetite. The explanation for this observation is that these siderites all possess the same crystallographic structure (Calcite; R3c) so solid solutions between these carbonates are readily formed and can be viewed on an atomic scale as two chemically different but structurally similar lattices.

  5. Magnetite and Carbonate Textures in ALH84001: Experimental Insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2001-01-01

    Synthetic siderite and synthetic siderite-magnesite carbonates were equilibrated with hematite, magnetite, and CO2 at elevated pressure and temperature. Comparisons are made to textures seen in the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Kinetic model of carbonate dissolution in Martian meteorite ALH84001

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Robert E.; Humayun, Munir

    2003-01-01

    The magnetites and sulfides located in the rims of carbonate globules in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been claimed as evidence of past life on Mars. Here, we consider the possibility that the rims were formed by dissolution and reprecipitation of the primary carbonate by the action of water. To estimate the rate of these solution-precipitation reactions, a kinetic model of magnesite-siderite carbonate dissolution was applied and used to examine the physicochemical conditions under whic...

  7. Oxygen isotopic constraints on the genesis of carbonates from Martian meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshin, Laurie A.; McKeegan, Kevin D.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1997-03-01

    With a crystallization age of 4.5 Ga, ALH84001 is unique among the Martian meteorites. It is also the only Martian meteorite that contains an appreciable amount of carbonate, and significantly, this carbonate occurs without associated secondary hydrated minerals. Moreover, McKay et al. (1996) have suggested that ALH84001 contains evidence of past Martian life in the form of nanofossils, biogenic minerals, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The presence of carbonate in ALH84001 is especially significant. The early Martian environment is thought to have been more hospitable to life than todays cold, dry climate. In order to better assess the true delta-O-18 values, as well as the isotopic diversity and complexity of the ALH84001 carbonates, direct measurements of the oxygen and carbon isotopic compositions of individual carbonate phases are needed. Here we report in situ analyses of delta-O-18 values in carbonates from two polished thin sections of ALH84001.

  8. The temperature of formation of carbonate in Martian meteorite ALH84001: constraints from cation diffusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutcheon, I D; Kent, A; Phinney, D L; Ryerson, F J

    1999-08-13

    An important test of the hypothesis that Martian meteorite ALH84001 contains fossil remnants of an ancient Martian biota is the thermal history of the carbonate rosettes associated with the proposed biomarkers. If carbonates formed at temperatures over {approximately} 110 C (the limit for terrestrial life), it is unlikely that these minerals are associated with a terrestrial-like biota.

  9. Petrography and bulk chemistry of Martian orthopyroxenite ALH84001: implications for the origin of secondary carbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleason, J D; Kring, D A; Hill, D H; Boynton, W V

    1997-08-01

    New petrologic and bulk geochemical data for the SNC-related (Martian) meteorite ALH84001 suggest a relatively simple igneous history overprinted by complex shock and hydrothermal processes. ALH84001 is an igneous orthopyroxene cumulate containing penetrative shock deformation textures and a few percent secondary extraterrestrial carbonates. Rare earth element (REE) patterns for several splits of the meteorite reveal substantial heterogeneity in REE abundances and significant fractionation of the REEs between crushed and uncrushed domains within the meteorite. Complex zoning in carbonates indicates nonequilibrium processes were involved in their formation, suggesting that CO2-rich fluids of variable composition infiltrated the rock while on Mars. We interpret petrographic textures to be consistent with an inorganic origin for the carbonate involving dissolution-replacement reactions between CO2-charged fluids and feldspathic glass in the meteorite. Carbonate formation clearly postdated processes that last redistributed the REE in the meteorite. PMID:11540477

  10. Coordinated In Situ Nanosims Analyses of H-C-O Isotopes in ALH 84001 Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, T.; Alexander, C. M. O'D.; Wang, J.; Simon, J. I.; Jones, J. H.

    2016-01-01

    The surface geology and geomorphology of Mars indicate that it was once warm enough to maintain a large body of liquid water on its surface, though such a warm environment might have been transient. This study reports the hydrogen, carbon, and oxygen isotope compositions of the ancient atmosphere/hydrosphere of Mars based on in situ ion microprobe analyses of approximately 4 Ga-old carbonates in Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The ALH 84001 carbonates are the most promising targets because they are thought to have formed from fluid that was closely associated with the Noachian atmosphere. While there are a number of carbon and oxygen isotope studies of the ALH 84001 carbonates, in situ hydrogen isotope analyses of these carbonates are limited and were reported more than a decade ago. Well-documented coordinated in situ analyses of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotopes provide an internally consistent dataset that can be used to constrain the nature of the Noachian atmosphere/hydrosphere and may eventually shed light on the hypothesis of ancient watery Mars.

  11. Paleomagnetic evidence of a low-temperature origin of carbonate in the Martian meteorite ALH84001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, J L; Maine, A T; Vali, H

    1997-03-14

    Indirect evidence for life on Mars has been reported from the study of meteorite ALH84001. The formation temperature of the carbonates is controversial; some estimates suggest 20 degrees to 80 degrees C, whereas others exceed 650 degrees C. Paleomagnetism can be used to distinguish between these possibilities because heating can remagnetize ferrimagnetic minerals. Study of two adjacent pyroxene grains from the crushed zone of ALH84001 shows that each possesses a stable natural remanent magnetization (NRM), implying that Mars had a substantial magnetic field when the grains cooled. However, NRM directions from these particles differ, implying that the meteorite has not been heated significantly since the formation of the internal crushed zone about 4 billion years ago. The carbonate globules postdate this brecciation, and thus formed at low temperatures. PMID:9054354

  12. Biogenic Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Bazylinski, Dennis; Wentworth, Susan J.; McKay, David S.; Kirschvink, Joseph L.; Clemett, SImon J.; Bell, Mary Sue; Golden, D. C.; Gibson, Everett K., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Fine-grained magnetite (Fe3O4) in martian meteorite ALH84001, generally less than 200 nm in size, is located primarily in the rims that surround the carbonate globules. There are two populations of ALH84001 magnetites, which are likely formed at low temperature by inorganic and biogenic processes. Nearly 27% of ALH84001 magnetite particles, also called elongated prisms, have characteristics which make them uniquely identifiable as biological precipitates. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. Two populations of carbonate in ALH84001: geochemical evidence for discrimination and genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiler, John M.; Valley, John W.; Graham, Colin M.; Fournelle, John

    2002-04-01

    We present major and trace-element, oxygen isotope, textural, and structural data for carbonates and related phases in the SNC meteorite ALH84001. These data document the existence of at least two distinct carbonate populations: one composed of finely zoned, chemically and isotopically heterogeneous concretions of magnesio-siderite with distinct white magnesite rims, and a second composed of relatively homogeneous, isotopically and compositionally simple domains of ankeritic carbonate and intimately intergrown glass and fine-grained pyroxene. We suggest on the basis of textural evidence and geochemical systematics that the first population consists of low-temperature aqueous precipitates, and the second is produced by shock melting of the first. Values of δ 18O and Sr/Ca ratios are correlated with one another in magnesio-siderite concretions; the trend formed by these data is consistent with the predicted relationship for inorganic precipitation of carbonate from a solution of constant composition between temperatures of ˜190°C (for concretion cores) to 20°C (for magnesite-rich concretion rims). Given the assumptions inherent in this temperature estimate, the aqueous fluid parental to carbonate concretions is constrained to have a δ 18O of -5‰ VSMOW (significantly mass fractionated compared with expected juvenile martian volatiles) and minor-element abundances broadly similar to terrestrial seawater.

  14. Formation of "Chemically Pure" Magnetite from Mg-Fe-Carbonates Implications for the Exclusively Inorganic Origin of Magnetite and Sulfides in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Ming, Douglas W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Morris, R. V.; Trieman, A. H.; McKay, G. A.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetite and sulfides in the black rims of carbonate globules in Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al. that they are biogenic in origin. However, exclusively inorganic (abiotic) processes are able to account for the occurrence of carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblages in the meteorite. We have previously precipitated chemically zoned and sulfide-bearing carbonate globules analogous to those in ALH84001 (at less than or equal to 150 C) from multiple fluxes of variable-composition Ca-Mg-Fe-CO2-S-H2O solutions. Brief heating of precipitated globules to approx. 470 C produced magnetite and pyrrhotite within the globules by thermal decomposition of siderite and pyrite, respectively. We have also shown that morphology of magnetite formed by inorganic thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate is similar to the morphology of so-called biogenic magnetite in the carbonate globules of ALH84001. Magnetite crystals in the rims of carbonate globules in ALH84001 are chemically pure [Note: "Chemically pure" is defined here as magnetite with Mg at levels comparable or lower than Mg detected by [8] in ALH84001 magnetite]. A debate continues on whether or not chemically pure magnetite can form by the thermal decomposition of mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates that have formed under abiotic conditions. Thomas-Keprta et al. argue that it is not possible to form Mg-free magnetite from Mg-Fe-carbonate based on thermodynamic data. We previously suggested that chemically pure magnetite could form by the thermal decomposition of relatively pure siderite in the outer rims of the globules. Mg-Fe-carbonates may also thermally decompose under conditions conducive for formation of chemically pure magnetite. In this paper we show through laboratory experiments that chemically pure magnetite can form by an inorganic process from mixed Mg-Fe-carbonates.

  15. Origins of Magnetite Nanocrystals in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie L.; Clemett, Simon J.; Mckay, David S.; Gibson, Everett K.; Wentworth, Susan J.

    2009-01-01

    The Martian meteorite ALH84001 preserves evidence of interaction with aqueous fluids while on Mars in the form of microscopic carbonate disks. These carbonate disks are believed to have precipitated 3.9 Ga ago at beginning of the Noachian epoch on Mars during which both the oldest extant Martian surfaces were formed, and perhaps the earliest global oceans. Intimately associated within and throughout these carbonate disks are nanocrystal magnetites (Fe3O4) with unusual chemical and physical properties, whose origins have become the source of considerable debate. One group of hypotheses argues that these magnetites are the product of partial thermal decomposition of the host carbonate. Alternatively, the origins of mag- netite and carbonate may be unrelated; that is, from the perspective of the carbonate the magnetite is allochthonous. For example, the magnetites might have already been present in the aqueous fluids from which the carbonates were believed to have been deposited. We have sought to resolve between these hypotheses through the detailed characterized of the compo- sitional and structural relationships of the carbonate disks and associated magnetites with the orthopyroxene matrix in which they are embedded. Extensive use of focused ion beam milling techniques has been utilized for sample preparation. We then compared our observations with those from experimental thermal decomposition studies of sideritic carbonates under a range of plausible geological heating scenarios. We conclude that the vast majority of the nanocrystal magnetites present in the car- bonate disks could not have formed by any of the currently proposed thermal decomposition scenarios. Instead, we find there is considerable evidence in support of an alternative allochthonous origin for the magnetite unrelated to any shock or thermal processing of the carbonates.

  16. Nanophase Magnetite and Pyrrhotite in ALH84001 Martian Meteorite: Evidence for an Abiotic Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, D. C.; Lauer, H. V., Jr. III; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.

    2006-01-01

    The nanophase magnetite crystals in the black rims of pancake-shaped carbonate globules of the Martian meteorite ALH84001 have been studied extensively because of the claim by McKay et al.that they are biogenic in origin. A subpopulation of these magnetite crystals are reported to conform to a unique elongated shape called "truncated hexa-octahedral" or "THO" by Thomas-Keprta et al. They claim these THO magnetite crystals can only be produced by living bacteria thus forming a biomarker in the meteorite. In contrast, thermal decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate has been suggested as an alternate hypothesis for the elongated magnetite formation in ALH84001 carbonates. The experimental and observational evidence for the inorganic formation of nanophase magnetite and pyrrhotite in ALH84001 by decomposition of Fe-rich carbonate in the presence of pyrite are provided.

  17. Sulfide isotopic compositions in shergottites and ALH84001, and possible implications for life on Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shergottite and ALH84001 meteorites hold keys for understanding geologic and possibly biologic processes on Mars. Recently, it has been proposed that carbonates in ALH84001, and the Fe-sulfides they contain, are products of extraterrestrial biogenic activity. Here we report ion microprobe analyses of sulfides in shergottites and ALH84001. The sulfur isotope ratios of igneous pyrrhotites in shergottites (mean δ34SCDT: Shergotty = -0.4 per-thousand, Zagami = +2.7 per-thousand, EETA79001A = 1.9 per-thousand, EETA79001B = -1.7 per-thousand, LEW88516 = -1.9 per-thousand, QUE94201 = +0.8 per-thousand) are similar to those of terrestrial ocean-floor basalts, suggesting that the sulfur isotopic composition of the Martian mantle may be similar to that of the mantle of the Earth. The sulfur isotopic systematics of ALH84001 sulfides are distinct from the shergottites. Measured sulfur isotope ratios of eight pyrite grains (δ34SCDT = +2.0 to +7.3 per-thousand) in crushed zones confirm previously reported analyses of isotopically heavy sulfides and are indistinguishable from an Fe-sulfide zone within a carbonate globule (δ34SCDT = +6.0 per-thousand). Analyses of synthesized, fine-grained mixtures of sulfide, carbonate, and magnetite indicate than the measured sulfur isotope ratio is independent of the presence of carbonate and magnetite in the sputtered volume, confirming the accuracy of the analysis of the fine-grained sulfide in the carbonate globule. Terrestrial biogenic sulfate reduction typically results in light isotopic enrichments. The similarity of δ34S values of the sulfides in ALH84001 imply that the Fe-sulfide zones within ALH84001 carbonates are probably not the result of bacterial reduction of sulfate. 38 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Magnetite-Magnesioferrite Phase Relations and Application to ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2003-01-01

    Oxygen fugacity (fO2) is an important factor in planetary formation and evolution. Certain minerals or assemblages of minerals are stable only under certain fO2 conditions (at a constant T and P) and can be recorders of ambient fO2 during geologic processes. The best estimate of oxygen fugacity from mineral assemblages has implications, from large-scale models of planetary evolution to interpretation of single meteorites. For example, redox conditions are part of the discussion of the origin and history of shergottites, basaltic rocks in meteorites from Mars [1-4]. In addition oxygen fugacity may be an important factor to consider in the interpretation of the carbonate and magnetite assemblages seen in ALH84001 [5].

  19. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite and the Origin of Magnetite in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Mary Sue

    2007-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments to determine whether magnetite could be produced by the decomposition of iron-carbonate were initiated. Naturally occurring siderite was first characterized by electron microprobe (EMP), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements to be sure that the starting material did not contain detectable magnetite. Samples were shocked in tungsten-alloy holders (W=90%, Ni=6%, Cu=4%) to further insure that any iron phases in the shock products were contributed by the siderite rather than the sample holder. Each sample was shocked to a specific pressure between 30 to 49 GPa. Previously reported results of TEM analyses on 49 GPa experiments indicated the presence of nano-phase spinel-structured iron oxide. Transformation of siderite to magnetite as characterized by TEM was found in the 49 GPa shock experiment. Compositions of most magnetites are greater than 50% Fe sup(+2) in the octahedral site of the inverse spinel structure. Magnetites produced in shock experiments display the same range of single-domain, superparamagnetic sizes (approx. 50 100 nm), compositions (100% magnetite to 80% magnetite-20% magnesioferrite), and morphologies (equant, elongated, euhedral to subhedral) as magnetites synthesized by Golden et al. (2001) or magnetites grown naturally by MV1 magnetotactic bacteria, and as the magnetites in Martian meteorite ALH84001. Fritz et al. (2005) previously concluded that ALH84001 experienced approx. 32 GPa pressure and a resultant thermal pulse of approx. 100 - 110 C. However, ALH84001 contains evidence of local temperature excursions high enough to 1 melt feldspar, pyroxene, and a silica-rich phase. This 49 GPa experiment demonstrates that magnetite can be produced by the shock decomposition of siderite as a result of local heating to greater than 470 C. Therefore, magnetite in the rims of carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001 could be a product of shock devolatilization of

  20. LU-HF Age and Isotope Systematics of ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, M.; Lapen, T. J.; Brandon, A. D.; Beard, B. L.; Shafer, J. T.; Peslier, A. H.

    2009-01-01

    Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is an orthopyroxenite that is unique among the Martian meteorites in having the oldest inferred crystallization age (approx..4.5 to 4.0 Gyr) [e.g., 1-6 and references therein 7]. Its ancient origin makes this stone a critical constraint on early history of Mars, in particular the evolution of different planetary crust and mantle reservoirs. However, because there is significant variability in reported crystallization ages, determination of initial isotope compositions is imprecise making assessment of planetary reservoirs difficult. Here we report a new Lu-Hf mineral isochron age, initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope composition, and inferred Martian mantle source compositions for ALH84001 that place constraints on longlived source reservoirs for the enriched shergottite suite of Martian meteorites including Shergotty, Zagami, NWA4468, NWA856, RBT04262, LAR06319, and Los Angeles. Sm-Nd isotope analyses are under way for the same mineral aliquots analyzed for Lu-Hf. The Lu-Hf system was utilized because Lu and Hf are both lithophile and refractory and are not easily redistributed during short-lived thermal pulses associated with shock metamorphism. Moreover, chromite has relatively modest Hf concentrations with very low Lu/Hf ratios [9] yielding tight constraints on initial Hf-176/Hf-177 isotope compositions

  1. Rock Magnetic and Ferromagnetic Resonance Tests of Biogenic Magnetite in ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirschvink, J. L.; Kim, S.; Weiss, B. P.; Shannon, D. M.; Kobayashi, A. K.

    2002-01-01

    Three separate rock magnetic and ferromagnetic resonance tests support the hypothesis that between 25 and 50% of the fine-grained magnetite in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 was formed via biological processes. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Magnetite Formation from Thermal Decomposition of Siderite: Implications for Inorganic Magnetite Formation in Martian Meteorite ALH84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, RIchard V.

    2002-01-01

    A biogenic mechanism for formation of a subpopulation magnetite in Martian meteorite ALH84001 has been suggested [McKay et al., 1996; Thomas-Keprta, et al., 2000]. We are developing experimental evidence for an alternating working hypothesis, that the subpopulation was produced inorganically by the thermal decomposition of siderite [Golden et al., 2000].

  3. Micro-Spectroscopy as a Tool for Detecting Micron-Scale Mineral Variations Across a Rock Surface: An Example Using a Thin Section of Martian Meteorite ALH 84001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J. B.; Bishop, J. L.

    2003-03-01

    Visible and near-infrared spectra of a portion of martian meteorite ALH84001 were acquired using a high resolution imaging microscope to investigate imaging spectroscopy for mineral detection at small scales.

  4. Study of a possible magnetite biosignature in Martian meteorite ALH84001: Implications for the biological toxicology of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas-Keprta, Kathie Louise

    "Why do we have such a longstanding fascination with Mars? Very simply put, it's about life. The search for life elsewhere in our Solar System has been a major driver for exploring Mars, pretty much since we began seriously looking at that planet."1 The major objective of this work is to describe signs of possible life, that is biosignatures, in rocks from Mars if indeed they are present. Biosignatures are specific identifiable properties that result from living things; they may be implanted in the environment and may persist even if the living thing is no longer present. Over 100 mineral biosignatures have been discussed in the literature; however, only one, magnetite, is addressed by this study. Magnetite is found in many rock types on earth and in meteorites. Previous studies of terrestrial magnetite have used few properties, such as size and chemical composition, to determine one of the modes of origins for magnetite (e.g., biogenic, inorganic). This study has established a rigorous set of six criteria for the identification of intracellularly precipitated biogenic magnetite. These criteria have been applied to a subpopulation of magnetites embedded within carbonates in Martian meteorite ALH84001. These magnetites are found to be chemically and physically indistinguishable from those produced by magnetotactic bacteria strain MV-1, hence, they were likely formed by biogenic processes on ancient Mars. These criteria may be also used to distinguish origins for magnetites from terrestrial samples with complex or unknown histories. The presence of purported past life on early Mars suggests that, if life once began it may still exist today, possibly in oases in the Martian subsurface. Future manned missions should consider potential hazards of an extant biological environment(s) on Mars. 1 Quote attributed to Jack Farmer of Arizona State University in discussing NASA's program of Mars Exploration (see "Deciphering Mars: Follow the Water," Astrobiology Magazine Sept

  5. FTIR Analysis of Water in Pyroxene and Plagioclase in ALH 84001 and Nakhlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Cintala, M. J.; Montes, R.; Cardenas, F.

    2016-01-01

    with crustal reservoirs or hydrothermal fluids. Here, nominally anhydrous minerals (pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, or maskelynite) in orthopyroxenite ALH 84001 and selected nakhlites are analyzed for water and major elements, in order to determine 1) whether they contain any water; 2) if they do, what controls its distribution (crystallization, degassing, hydrothermal or impact processes); and 3) if any of these measurements can be used to infer the water contents of the parent magma and their mantle sources. A shock-reverberation experiment was also performed on terrestrial orthopyroxenes (opx) to simulate the heavily shocked conditions of ALH 84001 (> 31 GPa [17]).

  6. Cryogenic Origin for Mars Analog Carbonates in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex Svalbard (Norway)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amundsen, H. E. F.; Benning, L.; Blake, D. F.; Fogel, M.; Ming, D.; Skidmore, M.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell eruptive centers in the Bockfjord Volcanic Complex (BVC) on Svalbard (Norway) formed by subglacial eruptions ca. 1 Ma ago. These eruptive centers carry ubiquitous magnesian carbonate deposits including dolomitemagnesite globules similar to those in the Martian meteorite ALH84001. Carbonates in mantle xenoliths are dominated by ALH84001 type carbonate globules that formed during quenching of CO2-rich mantle fluids. Lava hosted carbonates include ALH84001 type carbonate globules occurring throughout lava vesicles and microfractures and massive carbonate deposits associated with vertical volcanic vents. Massive carbonates include < or equal 5 cm thick magnesite deposits protruding downwards into clear blue ice within volcanic vents and carbonate cemented lava breccias associated with volcanic vents. Carbonate cements comprise layered deposits of calcite, dolomite, huntite, magnesite and aragonite associated with ALH84001 type carbonate globules lining lava vesicles. Combined Mossbauer, XRD and VNIR data show that breccia carbonate cements at Sverrefjell are analog to Comanche carbonates at Gusev crater.

  7. Carbonate and Magnetite Parageneses as Monitors of Carbon Dioxide and Oxygen Fugacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Andrea M.

    2000-01-01

    The stable coexistence of siderite with other key minerals, such as graphite or magnetite, is only possible under certain restrictive conditions of CO2 and O2 fugacity. Carbonate parageneses in Mars meteorite ALH 84001 are analyzed.

  8. Organic Carbon Exists in Mars Meteorites: Where is it on the Martian Surface?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D. S.; Clemett, S. J.; Gibson, E. K., Jr.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    The search for organic carbon on Mars has been a major challenge. The first attempt was the Viking GC-MS in situ experiment which gave inconclusive results at two sites oil. After the discovery that the SNC meteorites were from Mars, reported C isotopic compositional information which suggested a reduced C component present in the Martian meteorites reported the presence of reduced C components (i.e., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) associated with the carbonate globules in ALH84001. Jull et al. noted in Nakhla there was acid insoluble C component present with more than 75% of its C lacking any C-14, which is modern-day terrestrial carbon. This C fraction was believed to be either indigenous martian or ancient meteoritic carbon. Fisk et al. have shown textural evidence along with C-enriched areas within fractures in Nakhla and ALH84001. Westall et al. have shown the presence of a large irregular fragment of organic material completely embedded within a chip of ALH84001. Interior samples from the Naklnla SNC made available by the British Museum of Natural History, were analyzed. Petrographic examination of Nakhla showed evidence of fractures (approx.0.5 microns wide) filled with dark brown to black dendritic material with characteristics similar to those observed by. Iddingsite is also present along fractures in olivine. Fracture filling and dendritic material was examined by SEM-EDX, TEM-EDX, Focused Electron Beam microscopy, Laser Raman Spectroscopy, Nano-SIMS Ion Micro-probe, and Stepped-Combustion Static Mass Spectrometry. Observations from the first three techniques are discussed.

  9. Nature of Reduced Carbon in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Everett K., Jr.; McKay, D. S.; Thomas-Keprta, K. L.; Clemett, S. J.; White, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Martian meteorites provide important information on the nature of reduced carbon components present on Mars throughout its history. The first in situ analyses for carbon on the surface of Mars by the Viking landers yielded disappointing results. With the recognition of Martian meteorites on Earth, investigations have shown carbon-bearing phases exist on Mars. Studies have yielded presence of reduced carbon, carbonates and inferred graphitic carbon phases. Samples ranging in age from the first approximately 4 Ga of Mars history [e.g. ALH84001] to nakhlites with a crystallization age of 1.3 Ga [e.g. Nakhla] with aqueous alteration processes occurring 0.5-0.7 Ga after crystallizaton. Shergottites demonstrate formation ages around 165-500 Ma with younger aqueous alterations events. Only a limited number of the Martian meteorites do not show evidence of significance terrestrial alterations. Selected areas within ALH84001, Nakhla, Yamato 000593 and possibly Tissint are suitable for study of their indigenous reduced carbon bearing phases. Nakhla possesses discrete, well-defined carbonaceous phases present within iddingsite alteration zones. Based upon both isotopic measurements and analysis of Nakhla's organic phases the presence of pre-terrestrial organics is now recognized. The reduced carbon-bearing phases appear to have been deposited during preterrestrial aqueous alteration events that produced clays. In addition, the microcrystalline layers of Nakhla's iddingsite have discrete units of salt crystals suggestive of evaporation processes. While we can only speculate on the origin of these unique carbonaceous structures, we note that the significance of such observations is that it may allow us to understand the role of Martian carbon as seen in the Martian meteorites with obvious implications for astrobiology and the pre-biotic evolution of Mars. In any case, our observations strongly suggest that reduced organic carbon exists as micrometer- size, discrete structures

  10. AASPT Carbon/Carbon Aircraft Brake Disk Granted MPA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Xi'an Chaoma Technology Co. Ltd. was issued Parts Manufacturer Approval (PMA) for Carbon/Carbon aircraft brake disk for Airbus 320 series by Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC). The company is held by Academy of Aerospace Solid Propulsion Technology (AASPT), a subsidiary of China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (CASC). It is the first approval given to a Chinese company to design and produce brakes for main civilian aircraft.

  11. Radial mixing in protoplanetary accretion disks. II. Time dependent disk models with annealing and carbon combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrstedt, M.; Gail, H.-P.

    2002-04-01

    This work investigates the annealing of silicate dust, the combustion of carbon dust and radial mixing of both dust species within protoplanetary disks. For this purpose the diffusion-transport-reaction equations of both dust species (including annealing of silicate and carbon combustion) are simultaneously solved with the equations for the global evolution of an alpha -disk within an one-zone, time-dependent numerical model. The protostar-disk system is assumed to be in a quiescent stage which corresponds with the class II phase of evolution of star-disk systems. The results suggest that the diffusive transport spreads the dust globally throughout the disk, and therefore provides an explanation for the existence of crystalline silicate and methane within the primordial bodies of the solar system.

  12. Carbonate Cements from the Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell Volcanoes, Svalbard Norway: Analogs for Martian Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, D. F.; Treiman, A. H.; Morris, R.; Bish, D.; Amundsen, H.E.F.; Steele, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfjell volcanic complexes erupted at 1Ma on Svalbard, Norway. Sverrefjell is a cone of cinders, pillow lavas and dikes; Sigurdfjell is elongate in outcrop and may represent a fissure eruption [1]. The lavas of both volcanos were volatile rich. The volcanos erupted under ice and were subsequently dissected by glaciation (glacial eratics are present on most of Sverrefjell, even on its summit). Eruption beneath an ice sheet is inferred, based on the presence of pillow lavas from near sea level to 1000 m above sea level. Sverrefjell contains the largest fraction of ultramafic xenoliths of any volcanic complex in the world, in places accounting for as much as 50% of the volume of the outcrop. The Sverrefjell and Sigurdfell volcanos contain carbonate cements of several varieties: (1) Amundsen [2] reported Mg-Fe-rich carbonate in sub-mm globules in basalts and ultramafic xenoliths from the volcanos. These globules are the best terrestrial analogs to the carbonate globules in the Mars meteorite ALH84001 [3]. (2) Thick (1-3 cm) coatings of carbonate cement drape the walls of vertical volcanic pipes or conduits on the flanks and near the present summit of Sverrefjell. Similar occurrences are found on Sigurdfjell. (3) Breccia-filled pipes or vents occur on Sverrefjell and Siggurdfjell in which the breccia fragments are cemented by carbonate. The fragments themselves commonly contain carbonate globules similar to those found in the basalts and ultramafic xenoliths.

  13. Carbon-rich planet formation in a solar composition disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The C to O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C- and O-bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation, and coagulation in a multi-iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline, with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should then display C/O values larger than those of their parent stars, making them members of the class of so-called carbon-rich planets.

  14. Carbon-rich planet formation in a solar composition disk

    CERN Document Server

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Petit, Jean-Marc; Lunine, Jonathan I

    2014-01-01

    The C--to--O ratio is a crucial determinant of the chemical properties of planets. The recent observation of WASP 12b, a giant planet with a C/O value larger than that estimated for its host star, poses a conundrum for understanding the origin of this elemental ratio in any given planetary system. In this paper, we propose a mechanism for enhancing the value of C/O in the disk through the transport and distribution of volatiles. We construct a model that computes the abundances of major C and O bearing volatiles under the influence of gas drag, sublimation, vapor diffusion, condensation and coagulation in a multi--iceline 1+1D protoplanetary disk. We find a gradual depletion in water and carbon monoxide vapors inside the water's iceline with carbon monoxide depleting slower than water. This effect increases the gaseous C/O and decreases the C/H ratio in this region to values similar to those found in WASP 12b's day side atmosphere. Giant planets whose envelopes were accreted inside the water's iceline should ...

  15. Chains of Magnetite Crystals in the Meteorite ALH84001: Evidence of Biological Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedmann, E. I.; Wierzchos, J.; Ascaso, C.; Winklhofer, M.

    2001-01-01

    The presence of magnetite crystal chains, missing evidence for their biological origin, as well as five morphological characteristics incompatible with a nonbiological origin are demonstrated by high-power stereo backscattered scanning electron microscopy. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  16. Experimental Shock Decomposition of Siderite to Magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. S.; Golden, D. C.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2005-01-01

    The debate about fossil life on Mars includes the origin of magnetites of specific sizes and habits in the siderite-rich portions of the carbonate spheres in ALH 84001 [1,2]. Specifically [2] were able to demonstrate that inorganic synthesis of these compositionally zoned spheres from aqueous solutions of variable ion-concentrations is possible. They further demonstrated the formation of magnetite from siderite upon heating at 550 C under a Mars-like CO2-rich atmosphere according to 3FeCO3 = Fe3O4 + 2CO2 + CO [3] and they postulated that the carbonates in ALH 84001 were heated to these temperatures by some shock event. The average shock pressure for ALH 84001, substantially based on the refractive index of diaplectic feldspar glasses [3,4,5] is some 35-40 GPa and associated temperatures are some 300-400 C [4]. However, some of the feldspar is melted [5], requiring local deviations from this average as high as 45-50 GPa. Indeed, [5] observes the carbonates in ALH 84001 to be melted locally, requiring pressures in excess of 60 GPa and temperatures > 600 C. Combining these shock studies with the above inorganic synthesis of zoned carbonates it seems possible to produce the ALH 84001 magnetites by the shock-induced decomposition of siderite.

  17. Volatile carbon locking and release in protoplanetary disks. A study of TW Hya and HD 100546

    CERN Document Server

    Kama, M; van Dishoeck, E F; Hogerheijde, M; Folsom, C P; Miotello, A; Fedele, D; Belloche, A; Güsten, R; Wyrowski, F

    2016-01-01

    The composition of planetary solids and gases is largely rooted in the processing of volatile elements in protoplanetary disks. To shed light on the key processes, we carry out a comparative analysis of the gas-phase carbon abundance in two systems with a similar age and disk mass, but different central stars: HD 100546 and TW Hya. We combine our recent detections of C$^{0}$ in these disks with observations of other carbon reservoirs (CO, C$^{+}$, C$_{2}$H) and gas mass and warm gas tracers (HD, O$^{0}$), as well as spatially resolved ALMA observations and the spectral energy distribution. The disks are modelled with the DALI 2D physical-chemical code. Stellar abundances for HD 100546 are derived from archival spectra. Upper limits on HD emission from HD 100546 place an upper limit on the total disk mass of $\\leq0.1\\,M_{\\odot}$. The gas-phase carbon abundance in the atmosphere of this warm Herbig disk is at most moderately depleted compared to the interstellar medium, with [C]/[H]$_{\\rm gas}=(0.1-1.5)\\times 1...

  18. Reprocessing of Ices in Turbulent Protoplanetary Disks: Carbon and Nitrogen Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r < 30 AU, because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) are two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The fo...

  19. Reprocessing of ices in turbulent protoplanetary disks: Carbon and nitrogen chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri, E-mail: furuya@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-08-01

    We study the influence of the turbulent transport on ice chemistry in protoplanetary disks, focusing on carbon- and nitrogen-bearing molecules. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking the turbulent mixing in the vertical direction. Turbulence can bring ice-coated dust grains from the midplane to the warm irradiated disk surface, and the ice mantles are reprocessed by photoreactions, thermal desorption, and surface reactions. The upward transport decreases the abundance of methanol and ammonia ices at r ≲ 30 AU because warm dust temperature prohibits their reformation on grain surfaces. This reprocessing could explain the smaller abundances of carbon and nitrogen bearing molecules in cometary coma than those in low-mass protostellar envelopes. We also show the effect of mixing on the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) in two ways: (1) transport of ices from the midplane to the disk surface and (2) transport of atomic hydrogen from the surface to the midplane. The former enhances the COMs formation in the disk surface, while the latter suppresses it in the midplane. Then, when mixing is strong, COMs are predominantly formed in the disk surface, while their parent molecules are (re)formed in the midplane. This cycle expands the COMs distribution both vertically and radially outward compared with that in the non-turbulent model. We derive the timescale of the sink mechanism by which CO and N{sub 2} are converted to less volatile molecules to be depleted from the gas phase and find that the vertical mixing suppresses this mechanism in the inner disks.

  20. Analysis of Siderite Thermal Decomposition by Differential Scanning Calorimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, M. S.; Lin, I.-C.; McKay, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    Characterization of carbonate devolitilization has important implications for atmospheric interactions and climatic effects related to large meteorite impacts in platform sediments. On a smaller scale, meteorites contain carbonates which have witnessed shock metamorphic events and may record pressure/temperature histories of impact(s). ALH84001 meteorite contains zoned Ca-Mg-Fe-carbonates which formed on Mars. Magnetite crystals are found in the rims and cores of these carbonates and some are associated with void spaces leading to the suggestion by Brearley et al. that the crystals were produced by thermal decomposition of the carbonate at high temperature, possibly by incipient shock melting or devolitilization. Golden et al. recently synthesized spherical Mg-Fe-Ca-carbonates from solution under mild hydrothermal conditions that have similar carbonate compositional zoning to those of ALH84001. They have shown experimental evidence that the carbonate-sulfide-magnetite assemblage in ALH84001 can result from a multistep inorganic process involving heating possibly due to shock events. Experimental shock studies on calcium carbonate prove its stability to approx. 60 GPa, well in excess of the approx. 45 GPa peak pressures indicated by other shock features in ALH84001. In addition, Raman spectroscopy of carbonate globules in ALH84001 indicates no presence of CaO and MgO. Such oxide phases should be found associated with the magnetites in voids if these magnetites are high temperature shock products, the voids resulting from devolitilization of CO2 from calcium or magnesium carbonate. However, if the starting material was siderite (FeCO3), thermal breakdown of the ALH84001 carbonate at 470 C would produce iron oxide + CO2. As no documentation of shock effects in siderite exists, we have begun shock experiments to determine whether or not magnetite is produced by the decomposition of siderite within the < 45GPa pressure window and by the resultant thermal pulse to approx

  1. Field Characterization of the Mineralogy and Organic Chemistry of Carbonates from the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition by Evolved Gas Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdam, A. C.; Ten Kate, I. L.; Stern, J. C.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Blake, D. F.; Morris, R. V.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two geologic settings using methodologies and techniques being developed or considered for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return. The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) [1] instrument suite, which will be on MSL, consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph (GC), and a tunable laser mass spectrometer (TLS); all will be applied to analyze gases created by pyrolysis of samples. During AMASE, a Hiden Evolved Gas Analysis-Mass Spectrometer (EGA-MS) system represented the EGA-MS capability of SAM. Another MSL instrument, CheMin, will use x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) to perform quantitative mineralogical characterization of samples [e.g., 2]. Field-portable versions of CheMin were used during AMASE. AMASE 2010 focused on two sites that represented biotic and abiotic analogs. The abiotic site was the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex, which contains Mars-analog carbonate cements including carbonate globules which are excellent analogs for the globules in the ALH84001 martian meteorite [e.g., 3, 4]. The biotic site was the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, which featured carbonates precipitated in a methane-supported chemosynthetic community [5]. This contribution focuses on EGA-MS analyses of samples from each site, with mineralogy comparisons to CheMin team results. The results give insight into organic content and organic-mineral associations, as well as some constraints on the minerals present.

  2. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks: the gas-phase CO/H2 ratio and the Carbon reservoir

    CERN Document Server

    Reboussin, L; Guilloteau, S; Hersant, F; Dutrey, A

    2015-01-01

    The gas mass of protoplanetary disks, and the gas-to-dust ratio, are two key elements driving the evolution of these disks and the formation of planetary system. We explore here to what extent CO (or its isotopologues) can be used as a tracer of gas mass. We use a detailed gas-grain chemical model and study the evolution of the disk composition, starting from a dense pre-stellar core composition. We explore a range of disk temperature profiles, cosmic rays ionization rates, and disk ages for a disk model representative of T Tauri stars. At the high densities that prevail in disks, we find that, due to fast reactions on grain surfaces, CO can be converted to less volatile forms (principally s-CO$_2$, and to a lesser extent s-CH$_4$) instead of being evaporated over a wide range of temperature. The canonical gas-phase abundance of 10$^{-4}$ is only reached above about 30-35 K. The dominant Carbon bearing entity depends on the temperature structure and age of the disk. The chemical evolution of CO is also sensit...

  3. Observations and modelling of CO and [CI] in disks. First detections of [CI] and constraints on the carbon abundance

    CERN Document Server

    Kama, M; Carney, M; Hogerheijde, M; van Dishoeck, E F; Fedele, D; Baryshev, A; Boland, W; Güsten, R; Aikutalp, A; Choi, Y; Endo, A; Frieswijk, W; Karska, A; Klaassen, P; Koumpia, E; Kristensen, L; Leurini, S; Nagy, Z; Beaupuits, J -P Perez; Risacher, C; van der Marel, N; van Kempen, T A; van Weeren, R J; Wyrowski, F; Yıldız, U A

    2016-01-01

    The gas-solid budget of carbon in protoplanetary disks is related to the composition of the cores and atmospheres of the planets forming in them. The key gas-phase carbon carriers CO, C$^{0}$ and C$^{+}$ can now be observed in disks. The gas-phase carbon abundance in disks has not yet been well characterized, we aim to obtain new constraints on the [C]/[H] ratio in a sample of disks, and to get an overview of the strength of [CI] and warm CO emission. We carried out a survey of the CO$\\,6$--$5$ and [CI]$\\,1$--$0$ and $2$--$1$ lines towards $37$ disks with APEX, and supplemented it with [CII] data from the literature. The data are interpreted using a grid of models produced with the DALI code. We also investigate how well the gas-phase carbon abundance can be determined in light of parameter uncertainties. The CO$\\,6$--$5$ line is detected in $13$ out of $33$ sources, the [CI]$\\,1$--$0$ in $6$ out of $12$, and the [CI]$\\,2$--$1$ in $1$ out of $33$. With deep integrations, the first unambiguous detections of [C...

  4. Volatile-carbon locking and release in protoplanetary disks. A study of TW Hya and HD 100546

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Hogerheijde, M.; Folsom, C. P.; Miotello, A.; Fedele, D.; Belloche, A.; Güsten, R.; Wyrowski, F.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: The composition of planetary solids and gases is largely rooted in the processing of volatile elements in protoplanetary disks. To shed light on the key processes, we carry out a comparative analysis of the gas-phase carbon abundance in two systems with a similar age and disk mass, but different central stars: HD 100546 and TW Hya. Methods: We combine our recent detections of C0 in these disks with observations of other carbon reservoirs (CO, C+, C2H) and gas-mass and warm-gas tracers (HD, O0), as well as spatially resolved ALMA observations and the spectral energy distribution. The disks are modelled with the DALI 2D physical-chemical code. Stellar abundances for HD 100546 are derived from archival spectra. Results: Upper limits on HD emission from HD 100546 place an upper limit on the total disk mass of ≤0.1 M⊙. The gas-phase carbon abundance in the atmosphere of this warm Herbig disk is, at most, moderately depleted compared to the interstellar medium, with [C]/[H]gas = (0.1-1.5) × 10-4. HD 100546 itself is a λBoötis star, with solar abundances of C and O but a strong depletion of rock-forming elements. In the gas of the T Tauri disk TW Hya, both C and O are strongly underabundant, with [C]/[H]gas = (0.2-5.0) × 10-6 and C / O > 1. We discuss evidence that the gas-phase C and O abundances are high in the warm inner regions of both disks. Our analytical model, including vertical mixing and a grain size distribution, reproduces the observed [C]/[H]gas in the outer disk of TW Hya and allows to make predictions for other systems. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programmes 093.C-0926, 093.F-0015, 077.D-0092, 084.A-9016, and 085.A-9027.Spectra and models are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/592/A83

  5. A Significantly Low CO Abundance Toward the TW Hya Protoplanetary Disk: A Path to Active Carbon Chemistry?

    CERN Document Server

    Favre, Cécile; Bergin, Edwin A; Qi, Chunhua; Blake, Geoffrey A

    2013-01-01

    In this Letter we report the CO abundance relative to H2 derived toward the circumstellar disk of the T-Tauri star TW Hya from the HD (1-0) and C18O (2-1) emission lines. The HD (1-0) line was observed by the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer whereas C18O (2-1) observations were carried out with the Submillimeter Array at a spatial resolution of 2.8" x 1.9" (corresponding to 142 x 97 AU). In the disk's warm molecular layer (T>20 K) we measure a disk-averaged gas-phase CO abundance relative to H2 of $\\chi{\\rm(CO)}=(0.1-3)x10^{-5}$, substantially lower than the canonical value of $\\chi{\\rm(CO)}=10^{-4}$. We infer that the best explanation of this low $\\chi$(CO) is the chemical destruction of CO followed by rapid formation of carbon chains, or perhaps CO2, that can subsequently freeze-out, resulting in the bulk mass of carbon locked up in ice grain mantles and oxygen in water. As a consequence of this likely time-dependent carbon sink mechanism, CO may be an unreliable tracer...

  6. A SIGNIFICANTLY LOW CO ABUNDANCE TOWARD THE TW Hya PROTOPLANETARY DISK: A PATH TO ACTIVE CARBON CHEMISTRY?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we report the CO abundance relative to H2 derived toward the circumstellar disk of the T-Tauri star TW Hya from the HD (1 – 0) and C18O (2 – 1) emission lines. The HD (1 – 0) line was observed by the Herschel Space Observatory Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer whereas C18O (2 – 1) observations were carried out with the Submillimeter Array at a spatial resolution of 2.''8 × 1.''9 (corresponding to ∼151 × 103 AU). In the disk's warm molecular layer (T > 20 K) we measure a disk-averaged gas-phase CO abundance relative to H2 of χ(CO) = (0.1-3) × 10–5, substantially lower than the canonical value of χ(CO) = 10–4. We infer that the best explanation of this low χ(CO) is the chemical destruction of CO followed by rapid formation of carbon chains, or perhaps CO2, that can subsequently freeze-out, resulting in the bulk mass of carbon locked up in ice grain mantles and oxygen in water. As a consequence of this likely time-dependent carbon sink mechanism, CO may be an unreliable tracer of H2 gas mass

  7. Observations and modelling of CO and [C i] in protoplanetary disks. First detections of [C i] and constraints on the carbon abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Carney, M.; Hogerheijde, M.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Fedele, D.; Baryshev, A.; Boland, W.; Güsten, R.; Aikutalp, A.; Choi, Y.; Endo, A.; Frieswijk, W.; Karska, A.; Klaassen, P.; Koumpia, E.; Kristensen, L.; Leurini, S.; Nagy, Z.; Perez Beaupuits, J.-P.; Risacher, C.; van der Marel, N.; van Kempen, T. A.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wyrowski, F.; Yıldız, U. A.

    2016-04-01

    Context. The gas-solid budget of carbon in protoplanetary disks is related to the composition of the cores and atmospheres of the planets forming in them. The principal gas-phase carbon carriers CO, C0, and C+ can now be observed regularly in disks. Aims: The gas-phase carbon abundance in disks has thus far not been well characterized observationally. We obtain new constraints on the [C]/[H] ratio in a large sample of disks, and compile an overview of the strength of [C i] and warm CO emission. Methods: We carried out a survey of the CO 6-5 line and the [C i] 1-0 and 2-1 lines towards 37 disks with the APEX telescope, and supplemented it with [C ii] data from the literature. The data are interpreted using a grid of models produced with the DALI disk code. We also investigate how well the gas-phase carbon abundance can be determined in light of parameter uncertainties. Results: The CO 6-5 line is detected in 13 out of 33 sources, [C i] 1-0 in 6 out of 12, and [C i] 2-1 in 1 out of 33. With separate deep integrations, the first unambiguous detections of the [C i] 1-0 line in disks are obtained, in TW Hya and HD 100546. Conclusions: Gas-phase carbon abundance reductions of a factor of 5-10 or more can be identified robustly based on CO and [C i] detections, assuming reasonable constraints on other parameters. The atomic carbon detection towards TW Hya confirms a factor of 100 reduction of [C]/[H]gas in that disk, while the data are consistent with an ISM-like carbon abundance for HD 100546. In addition, BP Tau, T Cha, HD 139614, HD 141569, and HD 100453 are either carbon-depleted or gas-poor disks. The low [C i] 2-1 detection rates in the survey mostly reflect insufficient sensitivity for T Tauri disks. The Herbig Ae/Be disks with CO and [C ii] upper limits below the models are debris-disk-like systems. An increase in sensitivity of roughly order of magnitude compared to our survey is required to obtain useful constraints on the gas-phase [C]/[H] ratio in most of the

  8. Multiple Carbon Monoxide Snow Lines in Disks Sculpted by Radial Drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeves, L. Ilsedore

    2016-01-01

    Observations of protoplanetary disks suggest that the gas and dust follow significantly different radial distributions. This finding can be theoretically explained by a combination of radial drift and gas drag of intermediate-sized dust grains. Using a simple parametric model to approximate the different distributions of the gas and dust components, we calculate and examine the impact of radial drift on the global dust temperature structure. We find that the removal of large grains beyond the “truncation radius” allows this region to become significantly warmer from reprocessed stellar radiation shining down from the disk upper layers, increasing the outer disk temperature by ˜10%-30%. This change is sufficient to raise the local temperature to a value exceeding the CO desorption temperature. These findings imply that the disk density structures induced by radial drift are able to create multiple CO snow lines. The inner disk CO is in the gas phase, freezing out near the classical snow line at R˜ 20{--}40 {{AU}}. Moving outward, the CO sublimates once again beyond the truncation radius (80 AU in our models) and subsequently re-freezes out at sufficiently large stellar distances beyond R≳ 130{--}200 {{AU}}. We find that thermal desorption of CO in the outer disk becomes competitive with external UV photodesorption and that this additional transition from solid state CO to the gas phase has significant implications for the C/O ratio in the outer disk.

  9. Herniated disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated intervertebral disk; Prolapsed intervertebral disk; Slipped disk; Ruptured disk; Herniated nucleus pulposus

  10. The History of Allan Hills 84001 Revised: Multiple Shock Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treiman, Allan H.

    1998-01-01

    The geologic history of Martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001 is more complex than previously recognized, with evidence for four or five crater-forming impacts onto Mars. This history of repeated deformation and shock metamorphism appears to weaken some arguments that have been offered for and against the hypothesis of ancient Martian life in ALH 84001. Allan Hills 84001 formed originally from basaltic magma. Its first impact event (I1) is inferred from the deformation (D1) that produced the granular-textured bands ("crush zones") that transect the original igneous fabric. Deformation D1 is characterized by intense shear and may represent excavation or rebound flow of rock beneath a large impact crater. An intense thermal metamorphism followed D1 and may be related to it. The next impact (I2) produced fractures, (Fr2) in which carbonate "pancakes" were deposited and produced feldspathic glass from some of the igneous feldspars and silica. After I2, carbonate pancakes and globules were deposited in Fr2 fractures and replaced feldspathic glass and possibly crystalline silicates. Next, feldspars, feldspathic glass, and possibly some carbonates were mobilized and melted in the third impact (I3). Microfaulting, intense fracturing, and shear are also associated with 13. In the fourth impact (I4), the rock was fractured and deformed without significant heating, which permitted remnant magnetization directions to vary across fracture surfaces. Finally, ALH 84001 was ejected from Mars in event I5, which could be identical to I4. This history of multiple impacts is consistent with the photogeology of the Martian highlands and may help resolve some apparent contradictions among recent results on ALH 84001. For example, the submicron rounded magnetite grains in the carbonate globules could be contemporaneous with carbonate deposition, whereas the elongate magnetite grains, epitaxial on carbonates, could be ascribed to vapor-phase deposition during I3.

  11. Herschel HIFI observations of ionised carbon in the {\\beta} Pictoris debris disk

    CERN Document Server

    Cataldi, G; Olofsson, G; Larsson, B; Liseau, R; Blommaert, J; Fridlund, M; Ivison, R; Pantin, E; Sibthorpe, B; Vandenbussche, B; Wu, Y

    2013-01-01

    Context: The dusty debris disk around the ~20 Myr old main-sequence A-star beta Pic is known to contain gas. Evidence points towards a secondary origin of the gas as opposed to being a direct remnant from the initial protoplanetary disk, although the dominant gas production mechanism is so far no identified. The origin of the observed overabundance of C and O compared to e.g. Na and Fe is also unclear. Aims: Our goal is to constrain the spatial distribution of C in the disk, and thereby the gas origin and its abundance pattern. Methods: We used the HIFI instrument aboard Herschel to observe and spectrally resolve C II 158 micron emission from the beta Pic debris disk. Assuming Keplerian rotation and a model for the line emission from the disk, we used the spectrally line profile to constrain the spatial distribution of the gas. Results: We detect the C II 158 micron emission. Modelling the shape of the emission line shows that most of the gas is located around ~100 AU or beyond. We estimate a total C gas mass...

  12. Multiple Carbon monoxide Snow-lines in Disks Sculpted by Radial Drift

    CERN Document Server

    Cleeves, L Ilsedore

    2015-01-01

    Observations of protoplanetary disks suggest that the gas and dust follow significantly different radial distributions. This finding can be theoretically explained by a combination of radial drift and gas drag of intermediate-sized dust grains. Using a simple parametric model to approximate the different distributions of the gas and dust components, we calculate and examine the impact of radial drift on the global dust temperature structure. We find that the removal of large grains beyond the "truncation radius" allows this region to become significantly warmer from reprocessed stellar radiation shining down from the disk upper layers, increasing the outer disk temperature by $\\sim10-30\\%$. This change is sufficient to raise the local temperature to a value exceeding the CO desorption temperature. These findings imply that the disk density structures induced by radial drift are able to create multiple CO snow-lines. The inner disk CO is in the gas phase, freezing out near the classical snow-line at $R\\sim20-4...

  13. Connecting the dots: Investigating planet formation and composition through observations of carbon and oxygen species in stars, disks, and planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teske, Johanna Kavanagh

    What physical processes and sources of material contribute to exoplanet compositions? Specifically, what roles do the protoplanetary disk composition and structure, and host star abundances play in the different stages of planet formation? In this thesis, beginning with a brief literature review in Chapter 2, I trace oxygen and carbon species through these stages to inform how, when, and where planets form. In Chapter 3 I describe a study of the molecular emission from the warm inner disks of T Tauri stars, where terrestrial planets likely form. I report moderate correlations between HCN emission strength and both stellar accretion rate (measured from UV or optical excess emission associated with accretion) and X-ray luminosity. These correlations point towards accretion related processes being an important source of disk atmosphere heating, and suggests that efficient H2O formation and/or UV dissociation of N2 (both also associated with higher stellar accretion rates) may aid in the production of HCN. Studies following mine have further connected the abundance of HCN versus H2O to the growth and migration of planetesimals in the disk, which helps control the formation of both giant and terrestrial planets. I shift to an already-formed exoplanet in Chapter 4, where I present optical photometry of the best-observed transiting super-Earth GJ 1214b with the goal of constraining the short-wavelength slope of its transmission spectrum. Most previous observations suggested a flat spectrum from the near-IR to the optical, corresponding to a low-scale-height, high-molecular-weight atmosphere. My observations are in general agreement with these findings, keeping the "door open" for a H2O-rich atmosphere for GJ 1214b, which other published g-band observations appeared to contradict. Chapters 5-7 of my thesis focus on measuring stellar abundances, particularly C/O ratios, in transiting (mostly) hot Jupiter exoplanet host stars from high resolution optical spectroscopy. Host

  14. Preparation and characterization of platinum/carbon and ruthenium/platinum/carbon nanocatalyst using the novel rotating disk-slurry electrode (RoDSE) technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago de Jesus, Diana

    An effort to develop electrochemically smaller and well-dispersed catalytic material on a high surface area carbon material is required for fuel cell applications. In terms of pure metal catalysts, platinum has shown to be the most common catalyst used in fuel cells, but suffers from poisoning when carbon monoxide is strongly adsorbed on its surface when used for direct methanol fuel cell applications. The addition of a metal with the ability to form oxides, such as ruthenium, helps to oxidize the carbon monoxide, freeing the platinum surface for new methanol oxidation. The deposition of catalysts of PtRu onto a carbon support helps to increase the active surface area of the catalyst. Vulcan X is the most commonly used of the amorphous carbon materials for fuel cell applications. Also, a high-surface-area carbon material of interest is carbon nano-onions (CNOs), also known as multilayer fullerenes. The most convenient synthetic method for CNOs is annealing nanodiamond particles, thus retaining the size of the precursors and providing the possibility to prepare very small nanocatalysts using electrochemical techniques. A rotating disk-slurry electrode (RoDSE) technique was developed as a unique method to electrochemically prepare bulk Pt/Carbon and PtRu/Carbon nanocatalysts avoiding a constant contact of the carbon support to an electrode surface during the electrodeposition process. The nanocatalysts were prepared by using a slurry that was saturated with functionalized Vulcan XC-72R and the metal precursor in sulfuric acid. The electrochemically prepared Pt/C and PtRu/C catalysts were characterized by using TEM, STEM, XRD, XRF, TGA, XPS and electrochemical techniques. A computational analysis also was done.

  15. Carbon, nitrogen and $\\alpha$-element abundances determine the formation sequence of the Galactic thick and thin disks

    CERN Document Server

    Masseron, T

    2015-01-01

    Using the DR12 public release of APOGEE data, we show that thin and thick disk separate very well in the space defined by [$\\alpha$/Fe], [Fe/H] and [C/N]. Thick disk giants have both higher [C/N] and higher [$\\alpha$/Fe] than do thin disk stars with similar [Fe/H]. We deduce that the thick disk is composed of lower mass stars than the thin disk. Considering the fact that at a given metallicity there is a one-to-one relation between stellar mass and age, we are then able to infer the chronology of disk formation. Both the thick and the thin disks - defined by [$\\alpha$/Fe] -- converge in their dependance on [C/N] and [C+N/Fe] at [Fe/H]$\\approx$-0.7. We conclude that 1) the majority of thick disk stars formed earlier than did the thin disk stars 2) the formation histories of the thin and thick disks diverged early on, even when the [Fe/H] abundances are similar 3) that the star formation rate in the thin disk has been lower than in the thick disk, at all metallicities. Although these general conclusions remain ...

  16. An examination of trace surface on diamond-like carbon film after ball-on disk measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogenated diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were prepared by the radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method on silicon substrates using methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2) gas. The wear track on DLC films was examined after the ball-on disk (BOD) measurement with a Raman mapping method. The BOD measurement of DLC films was performed for 1 to 3 h with a 1-hour step time. The sliding traces on the hydrogenated DLC film after the BOD measurement were also observed using an optical microscope. The films synthesized in this work had a very low friction coefficient (about 0.06) and were adhered very well without peeling off during the BOD measurement even with very thin thickness. Energy dispersive X-ray spectra show the decrease of C atomic % and the increase of O atomic % according to the sliding time. The novel Raman mapping method effectively showed the graphitization of DLC films according to the sliding time

  17. Water in protoplanetary disks : Line flux modeling and disk structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonellini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks are the places in which planets form around young stars. These environments consist of dust and gas mainly in forms of molecules. Simple and abundant molecules such as water, carbon monoxide, ammonia, play an important role in the disk thermal balance, and allow also observers t

  18. Disk Chemistry*

    OpenAIRE

    Thi Wing-Fai

    2015-01-01

    The chemical species in protoplanetary disks react with each other. The chemical species control part of the thermal balance in those disks. How the chemistry proceeds in the varied conditions encountered in disks relies on detailed microscopic understanding of the reactions through experiments or theoretical studies. This chapter strives to summarize and explain in simple terms the different types of chemical reactions that can lead to complex species. The first part of the chapter deals wit...

  19. Superhard carbon deposited by pulsed high-current arc as protective nanocoating for magnetic hard disks; Superharter Kohlenstoff abgeschieden mit gepulstem Hochstrombogen als Nanoschutzschicht fuer Magnetspeicherplatten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuhaeuser, M.; Hilgers, H. [IBM Mainz (Germany). Abt. 4627; Witke, T. [Infenion Dresden (Germany). Bereich PVD; Siemroth, P. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie (IWS), Dresden (Germany)

    2001-08-01

    Superhard amorphous carbon films (ta-C) deposited by pulsed high-current arc (HCA) possess a good perspective to be used as future ultrathin protective coatings for magnetic hard disks. The ta-C coatings meet all demands concerning the mechanical, chemical and tribological properties required for corrosion and wear protective coatings with thicknesses of 2-3 nm. From the current point of view the deposition technique also qualifies for an industrial mass production. Consequently there is a very good prospect that in near future the high-current arc technique will be the method of choice for carbon deposition in industrial hard disk drive production. (orig.) [German] Superharte amorphe Kohlenstoffschichten (ta-C), die mit gepulstem Hochstrombogen (high-current arc, HCA) abgeschieden werden, besitzen ein hohes Potential als zukuenftige ultraduenne Schutzschichten fuer Magnetspeicherplatten. Die ta-C-Schichten erfuellen alle wesentlichen Anforderungen, die in mechanischer, chemischer und tribologischer Hinsicht an 2-3 nm dicke Verschleiss- und Korrosionsschutzschichten gestellt werden. Auch die Beschichtungstechnik ist aus jetziger Sicht fuer die Massenproduktion geeignet. Damit bestehen sehr gute Aussichten, dass in naher Zukunft die Hochstrombogenverdampfung die Methode der Wahl fuer die Kohlenstoffabscheidung in der industriellen Festplattenproduktion darstellt. (orig.)

  20. An abiotic origin for hydrocarbons in the Allan Hills 84001 martian meteorite through cooling of magmatic and impact-generated gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E. L.

    2000-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of metastable equilibria were used to evaluate the potential for abiotic synthesis of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the martian meteorite Allan Hills (ALH) 84001. The calculations show that PAHs and normal alkanes could form metastably from CO, CO2, and H2 below approximately 250-300 degrees C during rapid cooling of trapped magmatic or impact-generated gases. Depending on temperature, bulk composition, and oxidation-reduction conditions, PAHs and normal alkanes can form simultaneously or separately. Moreover, PAHs can form at lower H/C ratios, higher CO/CO2 ratios, and higher temperatures than normal alkanes. Dry conditions with H/C ratios less than approximately 0.01-0.001 together with high CO/CO2 ratios also favor the formation of unalkylated PAHs. The observed abundance of PAHs, their low alkylation, and a variable but high aromatic to aliphatic ratio in ALH 84001 all correspond to low H/C and high CO/CO2 ratios in magmatic and impact gases and can be used to deduce spatial variations of these ratios. Some hydrocarbons could have been formed from trapped magmatic gases, especially if the cooling was fast enough to prevent reequilibration. We propose that subsequent impact heating(s) in ALH 84001 could have led to dissociation of ferrous carbonates to yield fine-grain magnetite, formation of a CO-rich local gas phase, reduction of water vapor to H2, reequilibration of the trapped magmatic gases, aromatization of hydrocarbons formed previously, and overprinting of the synthesis from magmatic gases, if any. Rapid cooling and high-temperature quenching of CO-, H2-rich impact gases could have led to magnetite-catalyzed hydrocarbon synthesis.

  1. Mechanistic Switching by Hydronium Ion Activity for Hydrogen Evolution and Oxidation over Polycrystalline Platinum Disk and Platinum/Carbon Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2014-07-22

    Fundamental electrochemical reactions, namely the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR), are re-evaluated under various pH conditions over polycrystalline Pt disk electrodes and Pt/C electrodes to investigate the overpotential and Tafel relations. Kinetic trends are observed and can be classified into three pH regions: acidic (1-5), neutral (5-9), and alkaline (9-13). Under neutral conditions, in which H2O becomes the primary reactant, substantial overpotential, which is not affected by pH and the supporting electrolyte type, is required for electrocatalysis in both directions. This ion independence, including pH, suggests that HER/HOR performance under neutral conditions solely reflects the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity of Pt in the rate determining steps, which involve electron transfer with water molecules. A global picture of the HER/HOR, resulting from mechanistic switching accompanied by change in pH, is detailed.

  2. Accretion Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Spruit, H.C.

    1995-01-01

    This is an introduction to accretion disk theory, with emphasis on aspects relevant for X-ray Binaries and Cataclysmic Variables. The text corrects some mistakes in an earlier version, which appeared in 'Lives of Neutron Stars', A. Alpar, \\"U. Kizilo\\u glu and J. van Paradijs (eds.), Kluwer, Dordrecht (NATO ASI series, 1994).

  3. Volatiles in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Bergin, Edwin A; Brittain, Sean; Marty, Bernard; Mousis, Olvier; Oberg, Karin L

    2014-01-01

    Volatiles are compounds with low sublimation temperatures, and they make up most of the condensible mass in typical planet-forming environments. They consist of relatively small, often hydrogenated, molecules based on the abundant elements carbon, nitrogen and oxygen. Volatiles are central to the process of planet formation, forming the backbone of a rich chemistry that sets the initial conditions for the formation of planetary atmospheres, and act as a solid mass reservoir catalyzing the formation of planets and planetesimals. This growth has been driven by rapid advances in observations and models of protoplanetary disks, and by a deepening understanding of the cosmochemistry of the solar system. Indeed, it is only in the past few years that representative samples of molecules have been discovered in great abundance throughout protoplanetary disks - enough to begin building a complete budget for the most abundant elements after hydrogen and helium. The spatial distributions of key volatiles are being mapped...

  4. Application of hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy to material science using synchrotron radiation. Lubricant molecule on diamond like carbon (DLC) for hard disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Third generation [3G] high-intensity synchrotron X-ray source combined with a high-energy electron analyzer has enabled us to perform photoelectron spectroscopy with high-resolution at hard X-ray regions. The detection depth of the apparatus installed to SPring-8/BL-47XU is 5-20 nm in the solid sample compared to ∼1 nm in case of conventional XPS. Thus, the method has a much broader range of application in the study of electronic structure of the materials. The present paper introduces the system component of the apparatus of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), its main features and performance. Furthermore, as an application example, the research results on a thin A20H film, which consists of perfluoropolyether (PFPE) as lubricant molecule developed on DLC (Diamond-like Carbon) substrate, used for hard disk is demonstrated. From the comparison of the various C 1s peaks observed, the author concluded that P-N ring structure in the end group of phosphazene selectively absorbed chemically to DLC. (S. Ohno)

  5. Is there a metallicity ceiling to form carbon stars? - A novel technique reveals a scarcity of C stars in the inner M31 disk

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, M L; Marigo, P; Williams, B F; Aringer, B; Nowotny, W; Rosenfield, P; Dorman, C E; Guhathakurta, P; Dalcanton, J J; Melbourne, J L; Olsen, K A G; Weisz, D R

    2013-01-01

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only 1 candidate C star (plus up to 6 additional, less certain C stars candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M = (3.3(+20,-0.1))x10^-4) that is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is ...

  6. Is There a Metallicity Ceiling to Form Carbon Stars? - A Novel Technique Reveals a Scarcity of C-Stars in the Inner M31 Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Girardi, L.; Marigo, P.; Williams, B. F.; Aringer, B.; Nowotny, W.; Rosenfield, P.; Dorman, C. E.; Guhathakurta, P.; Dalcanton, J. J.; Melbourne, J. L.; Olsen, K. A. G.; Weisz, D. R.

    2013-01-01

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguish- ing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we nd a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the ndings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We nd only 1 candidate C star (plus up to 6 additional, less certain C stars candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C=M = (3.3(sup +20)(sub - 0.1) x 10(sup -4)) that is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints to evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies.

  7. IS THERE A METALLICITY CEILING TO FORM CARBON STARS?—A NOVEL TECHNIQUE REVEALS A SCARCITY OF C STARS IN THE INNER M31 DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use medium-band near-infrared (NIR) Hubble Space Telescope WFC3 photometry with model NIR spectra of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars to develop a new tool for efficiently distinguishing carbon-rich (C-type) AGB stars from oxygen-rich (M-type) AGB stars in galaxies at the edge of and outside the Local Group. We present the results of a test of this method on a region of the inner disk of M31, where we find a surprising lack of C stars, contrary to the findings of previous C star searches in other regions of M31. We find only one candidate C star (plus up to six additional, less certain C star candidates), resulting in an extremely low ratio of C to M stars (C/M= (3.3+20-0.1)×10-4) that is one to two orders of magnitude lower than other C/M estimates in M31. The low C/M ratio is likely due to the high metallicity in this region which impedes stars from achieving C/O > 1 in their atmospheres. These observations provide stringent constraints to evolutionary models of metal-rich AGB stars and suggest that there is a metallicity threshold above which M stars are unable to make the transition to C stars, dramatically affecting AGB mass loss and dust production and, consequently, the observed global properties of metal-rich galaxies

  8. Secure Disk Mixed System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myongchol Ri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a disk encryption method, called Secure Disk Mixed System (SDMS in this paper, for data protection of disk storages such as USB flash memory, USB hard disk and CD/DVD. It is aimed to solve temporal and spatial limitations of existing disk encryption methods and to control security performance flexibly according to the security requirement of system.

  9. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXVI, Part 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The topics include: 1) The abundances of Iron-60 in Pyroxene Chondrules from Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites; 2) LL-Ordinary Chondrite Impact on the Moon: Results from the 3.9 Ga Impact Melt at the Landing Site of Appolo 17; 3) Evaluation of Chemical Methods for Projectile Identification in Terrestrial and Lunar Impactites; 4) Impact Cratering Experiments in Microgravity Environment; 5) New Achondrites with High-Calcium Pyroxene and Its implication for Igneous Differentiation of Asteroids; 6) Climate History of the Polar Regions of Mars Deduced form Geologic Mapping Results; 7) The crater Production Function for Mars: A-2 Cumulative Power-Law Slope for Pristine Craters Greater than 5 km in Diameter Based on Crater Distribution for Northern Plains Materials; 8) High Resolution Al-26 Chronology: Resolved Time Interval Between Rim and Interior of a Highly Fractionated Compact Type a CAI from Efremovka; 9) Assessing Aqueous Alteration on Mars Using Global Distributions of K and Th; 10) FeNi Metal Grains in LaPaz Mare Basalt Meteorites and Appolo 12 Basalts; 11) Unique Properties of Lunar Soil for In Situ Resource Utilization on the Moon; 12) U-Pb Systematics of Phosphates in Nakhlites; 13) Measurements of Sound Speed in Granular Materials Simulated Regolith; 14) The Effects of Oxygen, Sulphur and Silicon on the Dihedral Angles Between Fe-rich Liquid Metal and Olivine, Ringwoodite and Silicate Perovskite: Implications for Planetary Core Formation; 15) Seismic Shaking Removal of Craters 0.2-0.5 km in Diameter on Asteroid 433 Eros; 16) Focused Ion Beam Microscoopy of ALH84001 Carbonate Disks; 17) Simulating Micro-Gravity in the Laboratory; 18) Mars Atmospheric Sample Return Instrument Development; 19) Combined Remote LIBS and Raman Spectroscopy Measurements; 20) Unusual Radar Backscatter Properties Along the Northern Rim of Imbrium Basin; 21) The Mars Express/NASAS Project at JPL; 22) The Geology of the Viking 2 Lander Site Revisited; 23) An Impact Genesis for Loki

  10. The conducting disk, revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    1999-01-01

    The classical formula for the charge distribution on a conducting circular disk is proved by establishing the constancy of the potential on the disk, utilizing known properties of hypergeometric functions......The classical formula for the charge distribution on a conducting circular disk is proved by establishing the constancy of the potential on the disk, utilizing known properties of hypergeometric functions...

  11. The conducting disk, revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Per W.

    2000-01-01

    The classical formula for the charge distribution on a conducting disk is proved by establishing the constancy of the potential on the disk, utilizing known properties of hypergeometric functions.......The classical formula for the charge distribution on a conducting disk is proved by establishing the constancy of the potential on the disk, utilizing known properties of hypergeometric functions....

  12. Stability and Evolution of Supernova Fallback Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, K; Hernquist, L E; Menou, Kristen; Perna, Rosalba; Hernquist, Lars

    2001-01-01

    We show that thin accretion disks made of Carbon or Oxygen are subject to the same thermal ionization instability as Hydrogen and Helium disks. We argue that the instability applies to disks of any metal content. The relevance of the instability to supernova fallback disks probably means that their power-law evolution breaks down when they first become neutral. We construct simple analytical models for the viscous evolution of fallback disks to show that they become neutral when they are still young (ages of a few 10^3 to 10^4 years), compact in size (a few 10^9 cm to 10^11 cm) and generally accreting at sub-Eddington rates (Mdot ~ a few 10^14 - 10^18 g/s). Based on recent results on the nature of viscosity in the disks of close binaries, we argue that this time may also correspond to the end of the disk activity period. Indeed, in the absence of a significant source of viscosity in the neutral phase, the entire disk will likely turn to dust and become passive. We discuss various applications of the evolution...

  13. Accretion disk electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroniti, F. V.

    1985-01-01

    Accretion disk electrodynamic phenomena are separable into two classes: (1) disks and coronas with turbulent magnetic fields; (2) disks and black holes which are connected to a large-scale external magnetic field. Turbulent fields may originate in an alpha-omega dynamo, provide anomalous viscous transport, and sustain an active corona by magnetic buoyancy. The large-scale field can extract energy and angular momentum from the disk and black hole, and be dynamically configured into a collimated relativistic jet.

  14. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Henning, Thomas; Semenov, Dmitry

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensive review summarizes our current understanding of the evolution of gas, solids and molecular ices in protoplanetary disks. Key findings related to disk physics and chemistry, both observationally and theoretically, are highlighted. We discuss which molecular probes are used to derive gas temperature, density, ionization state, kinematics, deuterium fractionation, and study organic matter in protoplanetary disks.

  15. Understanding Floppy Disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Pamela

    1980-01-01

    The author describes the floppy disk with an analogy to the phonograph record, and discusses the advantages, disadvantages, and capabilities of hard-sectored and soft-sectored floppy disks. She concludes that, at present, the floppy disk will continue to be the primary choice of personal computer manufacturers and their customers. (KC)

  16. Disk mass determination through CO isotopologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotello, Anna; Kama, Mihkel; van Dishoeck, Ewine

    2015-08-01

    One of the key properties for understanding how disks evolve to planetary systems is their overall mass, combined with their surface density distribution. So far, virtually all disk mass determinations are based on observations of the millimeter continuum dust emission.To derive the total gas + dust disk mass from these data involves however several big assumptions. The alternative method is to directly derive the gas mass through the detection of carbon monoxide (CO) and its less abundant isotopologues. CO chemistry is well studied and easily implemented in chemical models, provided that isotope-selective processes are properly accounted for.CO isotope-selective photodissociation was implemented for the first time in a full physical-chemical code in Miotello et al. (2014). The main result is that if isotope-selective effects are not considered in the data analysis, disk masses can be underestimated by an order of magnitude or more. For example, the mass discrepancy found for the renowned TW Hya disk may be explained or at least mitigated by this implementation. In this poster, we present new results for a large grid of disk models. We derive mass correction factors for different disk, stellar and grain properties in order to account for isotope-selective effects in analyzing ALMA data of CO isotopologues (Miotello et al., in prep.).

  17. Galaxy Disks are Submaximal

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A; Verheijen, Marc A W; Westfall, Kyle B; Andersen, David R; Swaters, Rob A

    2011-01-01

    We measure the contribution of galaxy disks to the overall gravitational potential of 30 nearly face-on intermediate-to-late-type spirals from the DiskMass Survey. The central vertical velocity dispersion of the disk stars, sigma(z,R=0), is related to the maximum rotation speed (Vmax) as sigma(z,R=0) ~ 0.26 Vmax, consistent with previous measurements for edge-on disk galaxies and a mean stellar velocity ellipsoid axial ratio sigma(z) / sigma(R) = 0.6. For reasonable values of disk oblateness, this relation implies these galaxy disks are submaximal. We find disks in our sample contribute only 15% to 30% of the dynamical mass within 2.2 disk scale-lengths (hR), with percentages increasing systematically with luminosity, rotation speed and redder color. These trends indicate the mass ratio of disk-to-total matter remains at or below 50% at 2.2 hR even for the most extreme, fast-rotating disks (Vmax > 300 km/s), of the reddest rest-frame, face-on color (B-K ~ 4 mag), and highest luminosity (M(K)<-26.5 mag). Th...

  18. Evidence for a Noachian-Aged Ephemeral Lake in Gusev Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, S. W.; Niles, P. B.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Gusev crater was selected as the landing site for the Spirit rover because of the likelihood that it contained an ancient lake. Although outcrops rich in Mg-Fe carbonate dubbed Comanche were discovered in the Noachian-aged Columbia Hills, they were inferred to result from volcanic hydrothermal activity. Spirit encountered other mineral and chemical indicators of aqueous activity, but none was recognized as definitive evidence for a former lake in part because none was associated with obvious lacustrine sedimentary deposits. However, water discharge into Martian crater basins like Gusev may have been episodic, producing only small amounts of sediment and shallow ephemeral lakes. Evaporative precipitation from such water bodies has been suggested as a way of producing the Mg- and Fe-rich carbonates found in ALH84001 and carbonates and salts in some nakhlites a hypothesis we examine for the Comanche carbonate.

  19. REMARKS ON JOHN DISKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chu Yuming; Cheng Jinfa; Wang Gendi

    2009-01-01

    Let D R2 be a Jordan domain, D* = -R2 \\ -D, the exterior of D. In this article, the authors obtained the following results: (1) If D is a John disk, then D is an outer linearly locally connected domain; (2) If D* is a John disk, then D is an inner linearly locally connected domain; (3) A homeomorphism f: R2→R2 is a quasiconformal mapping if and only if f(D) is a John disk for any John disk D(∈)R2; and (4) If D is a bounded quasidisk, then D is a John disk, and there exists an unbounded quasidisk which is not a John disk.

  20. Percutaneous laser disk decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental data show that a small change in volume is associated with a disproportionately large change in intradiskal pressure. The authors of this paper conducted a clinical study toe valuate a new method of treating lumbar disk disease by vaporizing a small volume of the protruding disk with a Nd:YAG laser applied percutaneously. Patients with symptoms of disk herniation were selected after failure of conservative therapy. A complete neurologic examination was performed in all patients before and after therapy. Disk disease was confirmed with CT or MR imaging. Sixty-three treatments of 56 disks in 47 patients have been performed to date, all on an outpatient basis. Under fluoroscopic control, ND:YAG laser energy (600-1,200 J) is delivered into the disk through a 3-F fiber passed through the needle

  1. Isolated unilateral disk edema

    OpenAIRE

    Varner P

    2011-01-01

    Paul VarnerJohn J Pershing VAMC, Poplar Bluff, MO, USAAbstract: Isolated unilateral disk edema is a familiar clinical presentation with myriad associations. Related, non-consensus terminology is a barrier to understanding a common pathogenesis. Mechanisms for the development of disk edema are reviewed, and a new framework for clinical differentiation of medical associations is presented.Keywords: disk edema, axoplasmic flow, clinical multiplier, optic neuritis, ischemic optic neuropathy, papi...

  2. Review: Accretion Disk Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Montesinos, Matias

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I review and discuss the basic concepts of accretion disks, focused especially on the case of accretion disks around black holes. The well known alpha-model is revisited, showing the strengths and weaknesses of the model. Other turbulent viscosity prescription, based on the Reynolds number, that may improve our understanding of the accretion paradigm is discussed. A simple but efficient mathematical model of a self-gravitating accretion disk, as well as observational evidence of...

  3. HNC in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Graninger, Dawn; Qi, Chunhua; Kastner, Joel

    2015-01-01

    The distributions and abundances of small organics in protoplanetary disks are potentially powerful probes of disk physics and chemistry. HNC is a common probe of dense interstellar regions and the target of this study. We use the Submillimeter Array (SMA) to observe HNC 3--2 towards the protoplanetary disks around the T Tauri star TW Hya and the Herbig Ae star HD 163296. HNC is detected toward both disks, constituting the first spatially resolved observations of HNC in disks. We also present SMA observations of HCN 3--2, and IRAM 30m observations of HCN and HNC 1--0 toward HD 163296. The disk-averaged HNC/HCN emission ratio is 0.1--0.2 toward both disks. Toward TW Hya, the HNC emission is confined to a ring. The varying HNC abundance in the TW Hya disk demonstrates that HNC chemistry is strongly linked to the disk physical structure. In particular, the inner rim of the HNC ring can be explained by efficient destruction of HNC at elevated temperatures, similar to what is observed in the ISM. To realize the fu...

  4. Coupled Evolution of the Martian Atmosphere and Crust Through Geologic Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kevin Sean

    1998-09-01

    This dissertation investigates the coupled evolution of the Martian atmosphere and crust throughout geologic time and the implications for Martian sample analysis and exobiology. Abundant geological and atmospheric evidence suggests that Mars has changed significantly throughout time. Removal of volatiles from the atmosphere may have been the trigger for the dramatic transition from that scenario to the present cold, harsh climate. Previous modeling work has shown that loss to space enriches the residual atmosphere in the heavier isotopes. Furthermore, stable isotope measurements from secondary mineral deposits within the Martian meteorites indicate exchange with an isotopically-enriched atmosphere. To investigate the Martian climate history, we developed an atmospheric evolution model for argon and neon considering a mass balance between the mantle, atmosphere, and loss to space by sputtering. Sputtering loss is particularly relevant for noble gases which have few mechanisms of escape. Due to substantial loss, our model is only capable of explaining sputtering loss. A strong magnetic field could limit sputtering loss by deflecting the solar wind around the upper atmosphere. We found that a magnetic field that persists until 1-2 Ga could affect the loss of light noble gases from the atmosphere. Nonetheless, our model predicts additional sources to balance the atmospheric volatile budgets. Therefore, we investigated outgassing from the Martian crust via groundwater circulation. We found that a crustal reservoir 5-25 km thick could satisfy the atmospheric argon budget. Recently, putative evidence of life has been purported for the Martian meteorite ALH84001. We examined the stable isotope measurements from carbonate and organic deposits found in ALH84001. Due to atmosphere-crust exchange, δ13C and δ18O measurements indicate that the carbonates may have formed at T ~ 50-300oC and, thus, may not harbor evidence of life. Further, we investigated abiotic organic

  5. Planet-disk interactions in non-isothermal disks

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo Gomes, Aiara

    2015-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks control the formation and evolution of planets, in reaction the planets also influence the disk structure. Disk gas and dust are the building materials of planets. Tidal forces between planet and disk determine the radial movement of the planet (migration); the planets simultaneously influence the disk, possibly carving out a gap. The interplay between planets and disks is important to understand the variety of exoplanets observed and constrain planet formation theories....

  6. The Milky Way disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, G.

    2015-08-01

    This review summarises the invited presentation I gave on the Milky Way disc. The idea underneath was to touch those topics that can be considered hot nowadays in the Galactic disk research: the reality of the thick disk, the spiral structure of the Milky Way, and the properties of the outer Galactic disk. A lot of work has been done in recent years on these topics, but a coherent and clear picture is still missing. Detailed studies with high quality spectroscopic data seem to support a dual Galactic disk, with a clear separation into a thin and a thick component. Much confusion and very discrepant ideas still exist concerning the spiral structure of the Milky Way. Our location in the disk makes it impossible to observe it, and we can only infer it. This process of inference is still far from being mature, and depends a lot on the selected tracers, the adopted models and their limitations, which in many cases are neither properly accounted for, nor pondered enough. Finally, there are very different opinions on the size (scale length, truncation radius) of the Galactic disk, and on the interpretation of the observed outer disk stellar populations in terms either of external entities (Monoceros, Triangulus-Andromeda, Canis Major), or as manifestations of genuine disk properties (e.g., warp and flare).

  7. Gluing pseudoholomorphic quilted disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ma'u, Sikimeti

    2009-01-01

    We construct families of quilted surfaces parametrized by the multiplihedra, and define moduli spaces of pseudoholomorphic quilted disks using the theory of pseudoholomorphic quilts of Wehrheim and Woodward. We prove a gluing theorem for regular, isolated pseudoholomorphic quilted disks. This analytical result is a fundamental ingredient for the construction of A-infinity functors associated to Lagrangian correspondences.

  8. Planetesimals in Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, Andrew N

    2015-01-01

    Planetesimals form in gas-rich protoplanetary disks around young stars. However, protoplanetary disks fade in about 10 Myr. The planetesimals (and also many of the planets) left behind are too dim to study directly. Fortunately, collisions between planetesimals produce dusty debris disks. These debris disks trace the processes of terrestrial planet formation for 100 Myr and of exoplanetary system evolution out to 10 Gyr. This chapter begins with a summary of planetesimal formation as a prelude to the epoch of planetesimal destruction. Our review of debris disks covers the key issues, including dust production and dynamics, needed to understand the observations. Our discussion of extrasolar debris keeps an eye on similarities to and differences from Solar System dust.

  9. Radio pulsar disk electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Macroscopic physics are discussed for the case of a disk close to an isolated, magnetized, rotating neutron star that acts as a Faraday disk dynamo, while the disk acts as both a load and a neutral sheet. This sheet allows the polar cap current to return to the neutron star, splitting a dipolar field into two monopolar halves. The dominant energy loss is from the stellar wind torque, and the next contribution is dissipation in the auroral zones, where the current returns to the star in a 5 cm-thick sheet. The disk itself may be a source of visible radiation comparable to that in pulsed radio frequency emission. As the pulsar ages, the disk expands and narrows into a ring which, it is suggested, may lead to a cessation of pulsed emission at periods of a few sec.

  10. Magnetohydrodynamics of accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis consists of an introduction and summary, and five research papers. The introduction and summary provides the background in accretion disk physics and magnetohydrodynamics. The research papers describe numerical studies of magnetohydrodynamical processes in accretion disks. Paper 1 is a one-dimensional study of the effect of magnetic buoyancy on a flux tube in an accretion disk. The stabilizing influence of an accretion disk corona on the flux tube is demonstrated. Paper 2-4 present numerical simulations of mean-field dynamos in accretion disks. Paper 11 verifies the correctness of the numerical code by comparing linear models to previous work by other groups. The results are also extended to somewhat modified disk models. A transition from an oscillatory mode of negative parity for thick disks to a steady mode of even parity for thin disks is found. Preliminary results for nonlinear dynamos at very high dynamo numbers are also presented. Paper 3 describes the bifurcation behaviour of the nonlinear dynamos. For positive dynamo numbers it is found that the initial steady solution is replaced by an oscillatory solution of odd parity. For negative dynamo numbers the solution becomes chaotic at sufficiently high dynamo numbers. Paper 4 continues the studies of nonlinear dynamos, and it is demonstrated that a chaotic solution appears even for positive dynamo numbers, but that it returns to a steady solution of mixed parity at very high dynamo numbers. Paper 5 describes a first attempt at simulating the small-scale turbulence of an accretion disk in three dimensions. There is only find cases of decaying turbulence, but this is rather due to limitations of the simulations than that turbulence is really absent in accretion disks

  11. Truncations in stellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Kruit, P C

    2000-01-01

    The presence of radial truncations in stellar disks is reviewed. There is ample evidence that many disk galaxies have relatively shaprt truncations in their disks. These often are symmetric and independent of the wavelength band of the observations. The ratio of the truncation radius R_{max} to the disk scalelength h appears often less then 4.5, as expected on a simple model for the disk collapse. Current samples of galaxies observed may however not be representative and heavily biased towards sisks witht he largest scalelengths. Many spiral galaxies also have HI warps and these generally start at the truncation radius of the stellar disk. The HI surface density suddenly becomes much flatter with radius. In some galaxies the start of the warp and the position of the disk truncation radius is accompanied by a drop in the rotation velocity. In the regiosn beyond the dis truncation in the HI layer some star formation does occur, but the heavy element abundance and the dust content are very low. All evidence is c...

  12. Disk-satellite interaction in disks with density gaps

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovich, Cristobal

    2012-01-01

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them which can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly nonuniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existin...

  13. Disk Defect Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — How Data Was Acquired: The data presented is from a physical simulator that simulated engine disks. Sample Rates and Parameter Description: All parameters are...

  14. More approximation on disks

    OpenAIRE

    Paepe, de, P.J.I.M.; Wiegerinck, J.J.O.O.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: In this article we study the function algebra generated by z2 and g2 on a small closed disk centred at the origin of the complex plane. We prove, using a biholomorphic change of coordinates and already developed techniques in this area, that for a large class of functions g this algebra consists of all continuous functions on the disk. Keywords: 2000 Mathematics Subject Classifications: 46J10; 32E20

  15. Young Planetary disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecavelier Des Etangs, A.

    2007-07-01

    The present review focuses on UV observations of young planetary disks and consequently mostly on the gaseous content of those disks. Few examples are taken to illustrate the capability of the UV observatories to scrutinize in detail the gas content of low density circumstellar disks if they are seen edge-on or nearly edge-on. For instance, in the case of HD100546, FUSE observations re- vealed signatures of outflow and infall in the disk caused by interaction of the stellar magnetosphere with the circumstellar disk. Observations of numerous absorption lines from H2 around young stars give constrains on the gas temper- ature and density, and physical size of the absorbing layer. In the case of T-Tauri stars and one brown dwarf, emissions from exited H2 have been detected. In the case of Beta Pictoris, the observation of CO in the UV and search for H2 with FUSE demonstrated that the evaporation of frozen bodies like comets must produce the CO seen in the disk. Extensive observations of spectral variability of Beta Pictoris are now interpreted by extrasolar comets evaporating in the vicinity of the central star of this young planetary system.

  16. Disk Precession in Pleione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, R.

    2007-03-01

    From the polarimetric observation of Pleione, we found that the intrinsic polarization angle varied from 60° to 130° in 1974-2003. The Hα profile also changed dramatically from the edge-on type (shell-line profile) to the surface-on type (wine-bottle profile). These facts clearly indicate the spatial motion of the disk axis. We interpret these variations in terms of the disk precession, caused by the secondary of this spectroscopic binary with a period of 218d. We performed the χ^2 minimization for the polarization angle, assuming uniform precession with an imposed condition that the shell maximum occurred at edge-on view. The resulting precession angle is 59° with a period of 81 years. Then, we can describe chronologically the spatial motion of disk axis. We also derived the Hα disk radius from the peak separation, assuming the Keplerian disk. The precession of the disk gives natural explanation of the mysterious long-term spectroscopic behaviors of this star.

  17. Vortices in circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, F; Adams, Fred; Watkins, Richard

    1995-01-01

    We discuss the physics of vortices in the circumstellar disks associated with young stellar objects. We elucidate the basic physical properties of these localized storm systems. In particular, we consider point vortices, linear vortices, the effects of self-gravity, magnetic fields, and nonlinear aspects of the problem. We find that these vortices can exist in many different forms in the disks of young stellar objects and may play a role in the formation of binary companions and/or giant planets. Vortices may enhance giant planet formation via gravitational instability by allowing dust grains (heavy elements) to settle to the center on a short timescale; the gravitational instability itself is also enhanced because the vortices also create a larger local surface density in the disk. In addition, vortices can enhance energy dissipation in disks and thereby affect disk accretion. Finally, we consider the possibility that vortices of this type exist in molecular clouds and in the disk of the galaxy itself. On al...

  18. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The presentations in this session are: 1. A Prototype Life Detection Chip 2. The Geology of Atlantis Basin, Mars, and Its Astrobiological Interest 3. Collecting Bacteria Together with Aerosols in the Martian Atmosphere by the FOELDIX Experimental Instrument Developed with a Nutrient Detector Pattern: Model Measurements of Effectivity 4. 2D and 3D X-ray Imaging of Microorganisms in Meteorites Using Complexity Analysis to Distinguish Field Images of Stromatoloids from Surrounding Rock Matrix in 3.45 Ga Strelley Pool Chert, Western Australia 4. Characterization of Two Isolates from Andean Lakes in Bolivia Short Time Scale Evolution of Microbiolites in Rapidly Receding Altiplanic Lakes: Learning How to Recognize Changing Signatures of Life 5. The Effect of Salts on Electrospray Ionization of Amino Acids in the Negative Mode 6. Determination of Aromatic Ring Number Using Multi-Channel Deep UV Native Fluorescence 7. Microbial D/H Fractionation in Extraterrestrial Materials: Application to Micrometeorites and Mars 8. Carbon Isotope Characteristics of Spring-fed Iron-precipitating Microbial Mats 9. Amino Acid Survival Under Ambient Martian Surface UV Lighting Extraction of Organic Molecules from Terrestrial Material: Quantitative Yields from Heat and Water Extractions 10. Laboratory Detection and Analysis of Organic Compounds in Rocks Using HPLC and XRD Methods 11. Thermal Decomposition of Siderite-Pyrite Assemblages: Implications for Sulfide Mineralogy in Martian Meteorite ALH84001 Carbonate Globules 12. Determination of the Three-Dimensional Morphology of ALH84001 and Biogenic MV-1 Magnetite: Comparison of Results from Electron Tomography and Classical Transmission Electron Microscopy 13. On the Possibility of a Crypto-Biotic Crust on Mars Based on Northern and Southern Ringed Polar Dune Spots 14. Comparative Planetology of the Terrestrial Inner Planets: Implications for Astrobiology 15. A Possible Europa Exobiology 16. A Possible Biogeochemical Model for Titan

  19. Supersized Disk (Artist's Concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated ImageData Graph This illustration compares the size of a gargantuan star and its surrounding dusty disk (top) to that of our solar system. Monstrous disks like this one were discovered around two 'hypergiant' stars by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Astronomers believe these disks might contain the early 'seeds' of planets, or possibly leftover debris from planets that already formed. The hypergiant stars, called R 66 and R 126, are located about 170,000 light-years away in our Milky Way's nearest neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud. The stars are about 100 times wider than the sun, or big enough to encompass an orbit equivalent to Earth's. The plump stars are heavy, at 30 and 70 times the mass of the sun, respectively. They are the most massive stars known to sport disks. The disks themselves are also bloated, with masses equal to several Jupiters. The disks begin at a distance approximately 120 times greater than that between Earth and the sun, or 120 astronomical units, and terminate at a distance of about 2,500 astronomical units. Hypergiant stars are the puffed-up, aging descendants of the most massive class of stars, called 'O' stars. The stars are so massive that their cores ultimately collapse under their own weight, triggering incredible explosions called supernovae. If any planets circled near the stars during one of these blasts, they would most likely be destroyed. The orbital distances in this picture are plotted on a logarithmic scale. This means that a given distance shown here represents proportionally larger actual distances as you move to the right. The sun and planets in our solar system have been scaled up in size for better viewing. Little Dust Grains in Giant Stellar Disks The graph above of data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the composition of a monstrous disk of what may be planet-forming dust circling the colossal 'hypergiant' star called R 66. The disk contains

  20. Silica in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, B A; Tayrien, C; McClure, M K; Li, A; Basu, A R; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Bohac, C J; Furlan, E; Kim, K H; Green, J D; Sloan, G C

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of a few T Tauri stars (TTS) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope show prominent narrow emission features indicating silica (crystalline silicon dioxide). Silica is not a major constituent of the interstellar medium; therefore, any silica present in the circumstellar protoplanetary disks of TTS must be largely the result of processing of primitive dust material in the disks surrouding these stars. We model the silica emission features in our spectra using the opacities of various polymorphs of silica and their amorphous versions computed from earth-based laboratory measurements. This modeling indicates that the two polymorphs of silica, tridymite and cristobalite, which form at successively higher temperatures and low pressures, are the dominant forms of silica in the TTS of our sample. These high temperature, low pressure polymorphs of silica present in protoplanetary disks are consistent with a grain composed mostly of tridymite named Ada found...

  1. Chemistry in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Semenov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks (PPDs) surrounding young stars are short-lived (~0.3-10 Myr), compact (~10-1000 AU) rotating reservoirs of gas and dust. PPDs are believed to be birthplaces of planetary systems, where tiny grains are assembled into pebbles, then rocks, planetesimals, and eventually planets, asteroids, and comets. Strong variations of physical conditions (temperature, density, ionization rate, UV/X-rays intensities) make a variety of chemical processes active in disks, producing simple molecules in the gas phase and complex polyatomic (organic) species on the surfaces of dust particles. In this entry, we summarize the major modern observational methods and theoretical paradigms used to investigate disk chemical composition and evolution, and present the most important results. Future research directions that will become possible with the advent of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and other forthcoming observational facilities are also discussed.

  2. Observations of Protostellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, F.

    2004-12-01

    Accretion disks are pivotal elements in the formation and early evolution of solar-like stars. On top of supplying the raw material, their internal conditions also regulate the formation of planets. Their study therefore holds the key to solve the mystery of the formation of our Solar System. This chapter focuses on observational studies of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence solar-like stars. The direct measurement of disk parameters poses an obvious challenge: at the distance of typical star forming regions (e.g., ˜140pc for Taurus), a planetary system like ours (with diameter ≃ 50AU out to Pluto, but excluding the Kuiper belt) subtends only 0.35". Yet its surface brightness is low in comparison to the bright central star and high angular and high contrast imaging techniques are required if one hopes to resolve and measure these protoplanetary disks. Fortunately, capable instruments providing 0.1" resolution or better and high contrast have been available for just about 10 years now. They are covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the UV/Optical with HST and the near-infrared from ground-based adaptive optics systems, to the millimetric range with long-baseline radio interferometers. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge of the structure of the disks surrounding low-mass stars has made a gigantic leap forward in the last decade. In the following pages I will attempt to give an overview of the structural and physical parameters of protoplanetary disks that can be estimated today from direct observations.

  3. Observing planet-disk interaction in debris disks

    OpenAIRE

    Ertel, S.; Wolf, S; Rodmann, J.

    2012-01-01

    Context. Debris disks are commonly considered to be a by-product of planet formation. Structures in debris disks induced by planetdisk interaction are promising to provide valuable constraints on the existence and properties of embedded planets. Aims. We investigate the observability of structures in debris disks induced by planet-disk interaction with future facilities in a systematic way. High-sensitivity, high angular resolution observations with large (sub-)mm interferometers and...

  4. Stress corrosion cracking of A471 turbine disk steels: Effects of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide in high-purity water: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of dilute impurities in high purity water on the rate of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks in NiCrMoV steels. 3.5 NiCrMoV steels of commercial quality, high purity, and high purity with intentionally added tramp elements were investigated. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were the primary water impurities investigated. The tests were conducted on constant load, smooth bar tensile specimens of the NiCrMoV steels in flowing 1600C high purity water containing various dilute levels of impurities. It was determined that the initiation rate is very sensitive to changes in dissolved oxygen content; the peak initiation rate are achieved between 20 and 80 ppB dissolved oxygen. The initiation rate is less sensitive to dissolved CO2 content. The crack growth rate in high purity water is only weakly dependent on dissolved O2 and CO2. This work shows that the crack growth rate is strongly dependent on the yield strength (and therefore the microstructure that develops as a result of tempering) of the turbine disc alloy, whereas the initiation rate is only weakly dependent on material yield strength. In addition, crack growth rates decrease as grain sizes are decreased. In general, crack growth rates are very slow (less than 10-10 m/s) in these dilute environments in materials with yield strengths below 690 Mpa (100 ksi). The results of these experiments indicate that a hydrogen-assisted process may be an important cracking mechanism in these alloys in these dilute environments. Implication of a hydrogen-assisted mechanism could have important consequences in the design and selection of turbine disc alloys

  5. Stress corrosion cracking of A471 turbine disk steels: Effects of dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide in high-purity water: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eiselstein, L.E.; Caligiuri, R.D.

    1987-06-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effect of dilute impurities in high purity water on the rate of initiation and growth of stress corrosion cracks in NiCrMoV steels. 3.5 NiCrMoV steels of commercial quality, high purity, and high purity with intentionally added tramp elements were investigated. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide were the primary water impurities investigated. The tests were conducted on constant load, smooth bar tensile specimens of the NiCrMoV steels in flowing 160C high purity water containing various dilute levels of impurities. It was determined that the initiation rate is very sensitive to changes in dissolved oxygen content; the peak initiation rate are achieved between 20 and 80 ppB dissolved oxygen. The initiation rate is less sensitive to dissolved CO2 content. The crack growth rate in high purity water is only weakly dependent on dissolved O2 and CO2. This work shows that the crack growth rate is strongly dependent on the yield strength (and therefore the microstructure that develops as a result of tempering) of the turbine disc alloy, whereas the initiation rate is only weakly dependent on material yield strength. In addition, crack growth rates decrease as grain sizes are decreased. In general, crack growth rates are very slow (less than 10 m/s) in these dilute environments in materials with yield strengths below 690 Mpa (100 ksi). The results of these experiments indicate that a hydrogen-assisted process may be an important cracking mechanism in these alloys in these dilute environments. Implication of a hydrogen-assisted mechanism could have important consequences in the design and selection of turbine disc alloys.

  6. Volatile depletion in the TW Hydrae disk atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Fujun; Hogerheijde, Michiel R

    2015-01-01

    An abundance decrease in carbon- and oxygen-bearing species relative to dust has been frequently found in planet-forming disks, which can be attributed to an overall reduction of gas mass. However, in the case of TW Hya, the only disk with gas mass measured directly with HD rotational lines, the inferred gas mass ($\\lesssim$0.005 solar mass) is significantly below the directly measured value ($\\gtrsim$0.05 solar mass). We show that this apparent conflict can be resolved if the elemental abundances of carbon and oxygen are reduced in the upper layers of the outer disk but are normal elsewhere (except for a possible enhancement of their abundances in the inner disk). The implication is that in the outer disk, the main reservoir of the volatiles (CO, water, ...) resides close to the midplane, locked up inside solid bodies that are too heavy to be transported back to the atmosphere by turbulence. An enhancement in the carbon and oxygen abundances in the inner disk can be caused by inward migration of these solid ...

  7. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2013-01-01

    Disk galaxies evolve over time through processes that may rearrange both the radial mass profile and the metallicity distribution within the disk. This review of such slow changes is largely, though not entirely, restricted to internally-driven processes that can be distinguished from evolution driven by galaxy interactions. It both describes our current understanding of disk evolution, and identifies areas where more work is needed. Stellar disks are heated through spiral scattering, which increases random motion components in the plane, while molecular clouds redirect some fraction of the random energy into vertical motion. The recently discovered process of radial migration at the corotation resonance of a transient spiral mode does not alter the underlying structure of the disk, since it neither heats the disk nor causes it to spread, but it does have a profound effect on the expected distribution of metallicities among the disk stars. Bars in disks are believed to be major drivers of secular evolution th...

  8. Disk Scheduling: Selection of Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Yashvir, S.; Prakash, Om

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to take some aspects of disk scheduling and scheduling algorithms. The disk scheduling is discussed with a sneak peak in general and selection of algorithm in particular.

  9. Solar disk sextant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofia, S.; Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Minott, P.; Endal, A. S.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents the conceptual design of an instrument, called the solar disk sextant, to be used in space to measure the shape and the size of the sun and their variations. The instrumental parameters required to produce sufficient sensitivity to address the problems of solar oblateness, solar pulsations, and global size changes of climatic importance are given.

  10. Selfgravity and QSO disks

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, J

    2003-01-01

    It is well known that the outer parts of QSO accretion disks are prone to selfgravity if heated solely by orbital dissipation. Such disks might be expected to form stars rather than accrete onto the black hole. The arguments leading to this conclusion are reviewed. Conversion of a part of the gas into high-mass stars or stellar-mass black holes, and the release of energy in these objects by fusion or accretion, may help to stabilize the remaining gas. If the disk extends beyond a parsec, however, more energy is probably required for stability than is available by turning half the gas into high-mass stars. Small black holes are perhaps marginally viable energy sources, with important implications (not pursued here) for the QSO spectral energy distribution, the metallicity of the gas, microlensing of QSO disks, and perhaps gravitational-wave searches. Other possible palliatives for selfgravity include accretion driven by nonviscous torques that allow near-sonic accretion speeds and hence lower surface densities...

  11. More approximation on disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J.I.M. de Paepe; J.J.O.O. Wiegerinck

    2007-01-01

    Abstract: In this article we study the function algebra generated by z2 and g2 on a small closed disk centred at the origin of the complex plane. We prove, using a biholomorphic change of coordinates and already developed techniques in this area, that for a large class of functions g this algebra co

  12. CO gas inside the protoplanetary disk cavity in HD 142527: disk structure from ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Perez, Sebastian; Ménard, F; Roman, P; van der Plas, G; Cieza, L; Pinte, C; Christiaens, V; Hales, A S

    2014-01-01

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 au from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J=2-1 line of 12CO, 13CO and C18O, obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the 12CO emission is optically thick, while 13CO and C18O emission are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is about 1.5-2 Jupiter masses. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best fit model shows t...

  13. The Tilt between Acretion Disk and Stellar Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shiyin Shen; Zhengyi Shao; Minfeng Gu

    2011-03-01

    The orientations of the accretion disk of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and the stellar disk of its host galaxy are both determined by the angular momentum of their forming gas, but on very different physical environments and spatial scales. Here we show the evidence that the orientation of the stellar disk is correlated with the accretion disk by comparing the inclinations of the stellar disks of a large sample of Type 2 AGNs selected from Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS, York et al. 2000) to a control galaxy sample. Given that the Type 2 AGN fraction is in the range of 70–90 percent for low luminosity AGNs as a priori, we find that the mean tilt between the accretion disk and stellar disk is ∼ 30 degrees (Shen et al. 2010).

  14. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, L.; Isella, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Testi, L.; De Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Natta, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Scholz, A., E-mail: lricci@astro.caltech.edu [School of Cosmic Physics, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2014-08-10

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array continuum and spectral line data at 0.89 mm and 3.2 mm for three disks surrounding young brown dwarfs and very low mass stars in the Taurus star forming region. Dust thermal emission is detected and spatially resolved for all the three disks, while CO(J = 3-2) emission is seen in two disks. We analyze the continuum visibilities and constrain the disks' physical structure in dust. The results of our analysis show that the disks are relatively large; the smallest one has an outer radius of about 70 AU. The inferred disk radii, radial profiles of the dust surface density, and disk to central object mass ratios lie within the ranges found for disks around more massive young stars. We derive from our observations the wavelength dependence of the millimeter dust opacity. In all the three disks, data are consistent with the presence of grains with at least millimeter sizes, as also found for disks around young stars, and confirm that the early stages of the solid growth toward planetesimals occur also around very low-mass objects. We discuss the implications of our findings on models of solids evolution in protoplanetary disks, the main mechanisms proposed for the formation of brown dwarfs and very low-mass stars, as well as the potential of finding rocky and giant planets around very low-mass objects.

  15. Evolution of Disk Accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Calvet, Nuria; Hartmann, Lee; Strom, Stephen E.

    1999-01-01

    We review the present knowledge of disk accretion in young low mass stars, and in particular, the mass accretion rate and its evolution with time. The methods used to obtain mass accretion rates from ultraviolet excesses and emission lines are described, and the current best estimates of mass accretion rate for Classical T Tauri stars and for objects still surrounded by infalling envelopes are given. We argue that the low mass accretion rates of the latter objects require episodes of high mas...

  16. The Evolution of Inner Disk Gas in Transition Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hoadley, Keri; Alexander, Richard D; McJunkin, Matthew; Schneider, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the molecular gas in the inner regions of protoplanetary disks provides insight into how the molecular disk environment changes during the transition from primordial to debris disk systems. We conduct a small survey of molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) fluorescent emission, using 14 well-studied Classical T Tauri stars at two distinct dust disk evolutionary stages, to explore how the structure of the inner molecular disk changes as the optically thick warm dust dissipates. We simulate the observed HI-Lyman $\\alpha$-pumped H$_2$ disk fluorescence by creating a 2D radiative transfer model that describes the radial distributions of H$_{2}$ emission in the disk atmosphere and compare these to observations from the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the radial distributions that best describe the observed H$_2$ FUV emission arising in primordial disk targets (full dust disk) are demonstrably different than those of transition disks (little-to-no warm dust observed). For each best-fit model, we estimate inner a...

  17. DISK-SATELLITE INTERACTION IN DISKS WITH DENSITY GAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational coupling between a gaseous disk and an orbiting perturber leads to angular momentum exchange between them that can result in gap opening by planets in protoplanetary disks and clearing of gas by binary supermassive black holes (SMBHs) embedded in accretion disks. Understanding the co-evolution of the disk and the orbit of the perturber in these circumstances requires knowledge of the spatial distribution of the torque exerted by the latter on a highly non-uniform disk. Here we explore disk-satellite interaction in disks with gaps in linear approximation both in Fourier and in physical space, explicitly incorporating the disk non-uniformity in the fluid equations. Density gradients strongly displace the positions of Lindblad resonances in the disk (which often occur at multiple locations), and the waveforms of modes excited close to the gap edge get modified compared to the uniform disk case. The spatial distribution of the excitation torque density is found to be quite different from the existing prescriptions: most of the torque is exerted in a rather narrow region near the gap edge where Lindblad resonances accumulate, followed by an exponential falloff with the distance from the perturber. Despite these differences, for a given gap profile, the full integrated torque exerted on the disk agrees with the conventional uniform disk theory prediction at the level of ∼10%. The nonlinearity of the density wave excited by the perturber is shown to decrease as the wave travels out of the gap, slowing down its nonlinear evolution and damping. Our results suggest that gap opening in protoplanetary disks and gas clearing around SMBH binaries can be more efficient than the existing theories predict. They pave the way for self-consistent calculations of the gap structure and the orbital evolution of the perturber using accurate prescription for the torque density behavior.

  18. Fabrication of β-cyclodextrin-coated poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-functionalized graphene composite film modified glassy carbon-rotating disk electrode and its application for simultaneous electrochemical determination colorants of sunset yellow and tartrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xiaoliang; Du, Yongling; Lu, Daban; Wang, Chunming, E-mail: wangcm@lzu.edu.cn

    2013-05-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A green and facile approach for synthesis of β-CD-PDDA-Gr at room temperature. •We present the β-CD-PDDA-Gr modified GC-RDE for simultaneous detection of SY and TT. •SY and TT's electrooxidations are both the one-electron-one-proton-transfer process. •Diffusion coefficients and standard rate constants of SY and TT were discussed. -- Abstract: We proposed a green and facile approach for the synthesis of β-cyclodextrin-coated poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)-functionalized graphene composite film (β-CD-PDDA-Gr) by using L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) as the reducing agent at room temperature. The β-CD-PDDA-Gr composite film modified glassy carbon-rotating disk electrode (GC-RDE) was then developed for the sensitive simultaneous determination of two synthetic food colorants: sunset yellow (SY) and tartrazine (TT). By cyclic voltammetry (CV), the peak currents of SY and TT increased obviously on the developed electrochemical sensor. The kinetic parameters, such as diffusion coefficient D and standard heterogeneous rate constant k{sub b}, were estimated by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV). Under the optimal conditions, the differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) signals of SY and TT on the β-CD-PDDA-Gr modified GC-RDE were significantly enhanced. The enhanced anodic peak currents represented the excellent analytical performance of simultaneous detection of SY and TT in the range of 5.0 × 10{sup −8} to 2.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1}, with a low limit of detection (LOD) of 1.25 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} for SY and 1.43 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1} for TT (S N{sup −1} = 3). This proposed method displayed outstanding selectivity, good stability and acceptable repeatability and reproducibility, and also has been used to simultaneously determine SY and TT in some commercial soft drinks with satisfactory results. The obtained results were compared to HPLC of analysis for those two colorants and no significant

  19. Audit: Automated Disk Investigation Toolkit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umit Karabiyik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Software tools designed for disk analysis play a critical role today in forensics investigations. However, these digital forensics tools are often difficult to use, usually task specific, and generally require professionally trained users with IT backgrounds. The relevant tools are also often open source requiring additional technical knowledge and proper configuration. This makes it difficult for investigators without some computer science background to easily conduct the needed disk analysis. In this paper, we present AUDIT, a novel automated disk investigation toolkit that supports investigations conducted by non-expert (in IT and disk technology and expert investigators. Our proof of concept design and implementation of AUDIT intelligently integrates open source tools and guides non-IT professionals while requiring minimal technical knowledge about the disk structures and file systems of the target disk image.

  20. Ringed accretion disks: equilibrium configurations

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, D

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a model of ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the General Relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can be then determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We pr...

  1. Three-dimensional holographic disks

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hsin-Yu Sidney; Psaltis, Demetri

    1994-01-01

    We describe optical disks that store data holographically in three dimensions by using either angle multiplexing or wavelength multiplexing. Data are stored and retrieved in parallel blocks or pages, and each page consists of approximately 106 bits. The storage capacity of such disks is derived as a function of disk thickness, pixel size, page size, and scanning parameters. The optimum storage density is approximately 120 bits/µm^2 .

  2. Ringed accretion disks: instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, D

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczy\\'nski mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider recently proposed model of ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) which can be corotating or counterrotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  3. Ringed Accretion Disks: Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the possibility that several instability points may be formed, due to the Paczyński mechanism of violation of mechanical equilibrium, in the orbiting matter around a supermassive Kerr black hole. We consider a recently proposed model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several tori (rings) that can be corotating or counter-rotating relative to the Kerr attractor due to the history of the accretion process. Each torus is governed by the general relativistic hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. We prove that the number of the instability points is generally limited and depends on the dimensionless spin of the rotating attractor.

  4. High Power Thin Disk Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Giesen, Adolf

    2011-01-01

    In this talk, the latest results for thin disk lasers will be presented. Thin disk lasers can be operated in cw-mode as well as in pulsed mode with pulse durations from 100 fs to microseconds. Results from different institutes and companies will be shown demonstrating the power/energy scalability of the thin disk laser design with good beam quality and high efficiency, simultaneously. Several German companies are selling thin disk lasers with up to 16 kW output power (cw) and with up to 1 kW...

  5. Foraminal and extraforaminal disk herniations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a study of thirty-three patients with persistent radiculopathy and with CT findings suggestive of a far lateral disk herniation at 34 disk levels with MR imaging. In 33 cases, the disk fragment was identified and its separation with the nerve root was possible. One case of enlarged nerve root was misdiagnosed as a free fragment. A cephalad migration was noted on the sagittal lateral facet plane in 23 cases. Surgical correlations were available in 25 cases. Three cases had false-positive findings for disk herniation. Enlarged foraminal veins were responsible for these images, as confirmed in one case by Gd-DTPA infusion

  6. Infrared Variability of Protoplanetary Disks: Signs of Complex Disk Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Kevin M.; Muzerolle, J.; Rieke, G.; Gutermuth, R.; Balog, Z.; Herbst, W.; Megeath, S.; Kun, M.

    2012-01-01

    Circumstellar disks around newly formed stars are the sites of planet formation, and their structure can have a large influence on the formation and early evolution of planets. We have obtained multi-wavelength multi-epoch infrared observations of the IC348 cluster, focusing on six transition disks, to look for rapid changes in the structure of these systems. These measurements include optical, near-infrared and mid-infrared spectra, along with intensive mid-infrared photometry covering timescales of days to years. We find that 70% of the stars with disks are variable, with infrared fluctuations up to a few tenths of a magnitude on timescales of days to weeks. The transition disks, characterized by an SED that indicates clearing of the inner disk, display a 'seesaw' behavior in which the short-wavelength (8μm) flux vary in opposite directions by as much as 60% in as little as one week. Our observations show that this can be explained by varying the scale height of the inner disk. We can rule out accretion and disk winds, leaving an embedded planet or a dynamic magnetic field as the likely physical source of the disk perturbation.

  7. [Disk calcifications in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P; Fauré, C; Denarnaud, L

    1985-05-01

    It is not unusual for intervertebral disk calcifications to be detected in pediatric practice, the 150 or so cases reported in the literature probably representing only a small proportion of lesions actually diagnosed. Case reports of 33 children with intervertebral disk calcifications were analyzed. In the majority of these patients (31 of 33) a diagnosis of "idiopathic" calcifications had been made, the cervical localization of the lesions being related to repeated ORL infections and/or trauma. A pre-existing pathologic factor was found in two cases (one child with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treated by corticoids and one child with Williams and Van Beuren's syndrome). An uncomplicated course was noted in 31 cases, the symptomatology (pain, spinal stiffness and febricula) improving after several days. Complications developed in two cases: one child had very disabling dysphagia due to an anteriorly protruding cervical herniated disc and surgery was necessary; the other child developed cervicobrachial neuralgia due to herniated disc protrusion into the cervical spinal canal, but symptoms regressed within several days although calcifications persisted unaltered. These findings and the course of the rare complications documented in the literature suggest the need for the most conservative treatment possible in cases of disc calcifications in children. PMID:4032343

  8. Disk storage at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mascetti, L; Chan, B; Espinal, X; Fiorot, A; Labrador, H Gonz; Iven, J; Lamanna, M; Presti, G Lo; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S; Rousseau, H; van der Ster, D

    2015-01-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  9. Myelographic differentiation of bulging disk from herniated disk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the many causes producing lower back pain herniated nucleus pulposus and bulging disk have occupied large percentages and uniformly showed defect on lateral aspect of contrast filled thecal sac. But it is essential to differentiate each conditions from the other because of their different treatment methods. Differentiation at metrizamide myelography between a diffusely bulging disk (unlikely to cause nerve root compression) and a herniated disk is based on the curvature, extent, and multiplicity of the extradural deformity of the anterolateral margin of the contrast filled sac and on the presence of fusiform widening of the most distal part of the affected nerve root. The deformities caused by a bulging disk are round, usually symmetrical (although occasionally more prominent on one side), do not extend above or below the disk space, and can show multiple level involvement; the nerve root is uniform in caliber and normal in size (although some of severe bulging show fusiform sidening of the most distal part of the affected nerve root). The deformities caused by a herniated disk is angular and extends cephadol and/or caudal to the level of the disk space; the affected nerve root is usually widened in its most distal visible part. A consecutive series of 50 patients with low back pain and no past history of back surgery who did metrizamide myelography underwent spine CT and/or laminectomy. Using the criteria listed above for differentiation of bulging from herniated disk on metrizamide myelography, the myelographic diagnosis was correct in 32 (22 patients) of 34 (24 patients) (95%) surgically and/or computed tomographically confirmed bulging disks and in all 26 (100%) surgically and/or computed tomographically confirmed herniated disks.

  10. An Old Disk That Can Still Form a Planetary System

    CERN Document Server

    Bergin, Edwin A; Gorti, Uma; Zhang, Ke; Blake, Geoffrey A; Green, Joel D; Andrews, Sean M; Evans, Neal J; Henning, Thomas; Oberg, Karin; Pontoppidan, Klaus; Qi, Chunhua; Salyk, Colette; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    From the masses of planets orbiting our Sun, and relative elemental abundances, it is estimated that at birth our Solar System required a minimum disk mass of ~0.01 solar masses within ~100 AU of the star. The main constituent, gaseous molecular hydrogen, does not emit from the disk mass reservoir, so the most common measure of the disk mass is dust thermal emission and lines of gaseous carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide emission generally probes the disk surface, while the conversion from dust emission to gas mass requires knowledge of the grain properties and gas-to-dust mass ratio, which likely differ from their interstellar values. Thus, mass estimates vary by orders of magnitude, as exemplified by the relatively old (3--10 Myr) star TW Hya, with estimates ranging from 0.0005 to 0.06 solar masses. Here we report the detection the fundamental rotational transition of hydrogen deuteride, HD, toward TW Hya. HD is a good tracer of disk gas because it follows the distribution of molecular hydrogen and its emissi...

  11. Chemistry in an evolving protoplanetary disk: Effects on terrestrial planet composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The composition of planets is largely determined by the chemical and dynamical evolution of the disk during planetesimal formation and growth. To predict the diversity of exoplanet compositions, previous works modeled planetesimal composition as the equilibrium chemical composition of a protoplanetary disk at a single time. However, planetesimals form over an extended period of time, during which elements sequentially condense out of the gas as the disk cools and are accreted onto planetesimals. To account for the evolution of the disk during planetesimal formation, we couple models of disk chemistry and dynamics with a prescription for planetesimal formation. We then follow the growth of these planetesimals into terrestrial planets with N-body simulations of late-stage planet formation to evaluate the effect of sequential condensation on the bulk composition of planets. We find that our model produces results similar to those of earlier models for disks with C/O ratios close to the solar value (0.54). However, in disks with C/O ratios greater than 0.8, carbon-rich planetesimals form throughout a much larger radial range of the disk. Furthermore, our model produces carbon-rich planetesimals in disks with C/O ratios as low as ∼0.65, which is not possible in the static equilibrium chemistry case. These results suggest that (1) there may be a large population of short-period carbon-rich planets around moderately carbon-enhanced stars (0.65 < C/O < 0.8) and (2) carbon-rich planets can form throughout the terrestrial planet region around carbon-rich stars (C/O > 0.8).

  12. Melting of polydisperse hard disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, S.; Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The melting of a polydisperse hard-disk system is investigated by Monte Carlo simulations in the semigrand canonical ensemble. This is done in the context of possible continuous melting by a dislocation-unbinding mechanism, as an extension of the two-dimensional hard-disk melting problem. We find th

  13. Friction characteristics of floppy disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This note presents the principle and structure of a tribological measure for floppy disks.The precision of the force measuring system is 1 mN in loading and 3×10-6 N in friction.The resolution of the film thickness between head and floppy disk is 0.5 nm in the vertical and 1.5 nm in the horizontal direction.In order to investigate the tribological characteristics of floppy disks,six types of floppy disks have been tested and the floating properties of these disks are also studied with film measuring system.The experimental results of the surface morphology and friction coefficient of these floppy disks using the atomic force microscope/friction force mcroscope (AFM/FFM) are in accordance with the conclusion made by our own measuring system.The experimental results show that the air film thickness between head and disk is of the same order as the surface roughness of floppy disks.

  14. Ringed Accretion Disks: Equilibrium Configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  15. Physical processes in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Armitage, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    This review introduces physical processes in protoplanetary disks relevant to accretion and the initial stages of planet formation. After reprising the elementary theory of disk structure and evolution, I discuss the gas-phase physics of angular momentum transport through turbulence and disk winds, and how this may be related to episodic accretion observed in Young Stellar Objects. Turning to solids, I review the evolution of single particles under aerodynamic forces, and describe the conditions necessary for the development of collective gas-particle instabilities. Observations show that disks are not always radially smooth axisymmetric structures, and I discuss how gas and particle processes can interact to form observable large-scale structure (at ice lines, vortices and in zonal flows). I conclude with disk dispersal.

  16. Debris Disks and Hidden Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2008-01-01

    When a planet orbits inside a debris disk like the disk around Vega or Beta Pictoris, the planet may be invisible, but the patterns it creates in the disk may give it away. Observing and decoding these patterns may be the only way we can detect exo-Neptunes orbiting more than 20 AU from their stars, and the only way we can spot planets in systems undergoing the late stages of planet formation. Fortunately, every few months, a new image of a debris disk appears with curious structures begging for explanation. I'll describe some new ideas in the theory of these planet-disk interactions and provide a buyers guide to the latest models (and the planets they predict).

  17. Detection of precessing circumpulsar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Grimani, C

    2014-01-01

    Experimental evidences indicate that formations of disks and planetary systems around pulsars are allowed. Unfortunately, direct detections through electromagnetic observations appear to be quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24, the hypothesis of a rigid precessing disk penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio transient observations from this star. Disk self-occultation and precession may limit electromagnetic observations. Conversely, we show here that gravitational waves generated by disk precessing near the light cylinder of young and middle aged pulsars would be detected by future space interferometers with sensitivities like those expected for DECIGO (DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) and BBO (Big Bang Observer). The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing disks are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar System. Speculations on upper limits to detection rates are presented.

  18. TRANSITIONAL DISKS AROUND YOUNG LOW MASS STARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D'Alessio

    2009-01-01

    have been interpreted as produced by disks with inner holes, which have been classi ed as \\Transitional Disks". These disks are considered the evolutionary link between the full disks typically found around the young T Tauri and Herbig Ae stars, and the debris disks, found around some main sequence stars. In this contribution we summarize the observed/inferred characteristics of these transitional disks and also some of the models proposed to explain their peculiar geometry.

  19. Accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from protoplanetary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the accretion of solid materials onto circumplanetary disks from heliocentric orbits rotating in protoplanetary disks, which is a key process for the formation of regular satellite systems. In the late stage of the gas-capturing phase of giant planet formation, the accreting gas from protoplanetary disks forms circumplanetary disks. Since the accretion flow toward the circumplanetary disks affects the particle motion through gas drag force, we use hydrodynamic simulation data for the gas drag term to calculate the motion of solid materials. We consider a wide range of size for the solid particles (10–2-106 m), and find that the accretion efficiency of the solid particles peaks around 10 m sized particles because energy dissipation of drag with circum-planetary disk gas in this size regime is most effective. The efficiency for particles larger than 10 m becomes lower because gas drag becomes less effective. For particles smaller than 10 m, the efficiency is lower because the particles are strongly coupled with the background gas flow, which prevents particles from accretion. We also find that the distance from the planet where the particles are captured by the circumplanetary disks is in a narrow range and well described as a function of the particle size.

  20. CO GAS INSIDE THE PROTOPLANETARY DISK CAVITY IN HD 142527: DISK STRUCTURE FROM ALMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, S.; Casassus, S.; Van der Plas, G.; Christiaens, V. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Ménard, F.; Roman, P.; Cieza, L.; Hales, A. S. [Millenium Nucleus " Protoplanetary Disks in ALMA Early Science," Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Pinte, C. [UMI-FCA 3386, CNRS/INSU, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-01-10

    Inner cavities and annular gaps in circumstellar disks are possible signposts of giant planet formation. The young star HD 142527 hosts a massive protoplanetary disk with a large cavity that extends up to 140 AU from the central star, as seen in continuum images at infrared and millimeter wavelengths. Estimates of the survival of gas inside disk cavities are needed to discriminate between clearing scenarios. We present a spatially and spectrally resolved carbon monoxide isotopologue observations of the gas-rich disk HD 142527, in the J = 2-1 line of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O obtained with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We detect emission coming from inside the dust-depleted cavity in all three isotopologues. Based on our analysis of the gas in the dust cavity, the {sup 12}CO emission is optically thick, while {sup 13}CO and C{sup 18}O emissions are both optically thin. The total mass of residual gas inside the cavity is ∼1.5-2 M {sub Jup}. We model the gas with an axisymmetric disk model. Our best-fit model shows that the cavity radius is much smaller in CO than it is in millimeter continuum and scattered light observations, with a gas cavity that does not extend beyond 105 AU (at 3σ). The gap wall at its outer edge is diffuse and smooth in the gas distribution, while in dust continuum it is manifestly sharper. The inclination angle, as estimated from the high velocity channel maps, is 28 ± 0.5 deg, higher than in previous estimates, assuming a fix central star mass of 2.2 M {sub ☉}.

  1. Protoplanetary and Debris Disk Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomax, Jamie R.; Wisniewski, John P.; Grady, Carol A.; McElwain, Michael W.; Hashimoto, Jun; Donaldson, Jessica; Debes, John H.; Malumuth, Eliot; Roberge, Aki; Weinberger, Alycia J.; SEEDS Team

    2016-01-01

    The types of planets that form around other stars are highly dependent on their natal disk conditions. Therefore, the composition, morphology, and distribution of material in protoplanetary and debris disks are important for planet formation. Here we present the results of studies of two disk systems: AB Aur and AU Mic.The circumstellar disk around the Herbig Ae star AB Aur has many interesting features, including spirals, asymmetries, and non-uniformities. However, comparatively little is known about the envelope surrounding the system. Recent work by Tang et al (2012) has suggested that the observed spiral armss may not in fact be in the disk, but instead are due to areas of increased density in the envelope and projection effects. Using Monte Carlo modeling, we find that it is unlikely that the envelope holds enough material to be responsible for such features and that it is more plausible that they form from disk material. Given the likelihood that gravitational perturbations from planets cause the observed spiral morphology, we use archival H band observations of AB Aur with a baseline of 5.5 years to determine the locations of possible planets.The AU Mic debris disk also has many interesting morphological features. Because its disk is edge on, the system is an ideal candidate for color studies using coronagraphic spectroscopy. Spectra of the system were taken by placing a HST/STIS long slit parallel to and overlapping the disk while blocking out the central star with an occulting fiducial bar. Color gradients may reveal the chemical processing that is occuring within the disk. In addition, it may trace the potential composition and architecture of any planetary bodies in the system because collisional break up of planetesimals produces the observed dust in the system. We present the resulting optical reflected spectra (5200 to 10,200 angstroms) from this procedure at several disk locations. We find that the disk is bluest at the innermost locations of the

  2. Herschel detects oxygen in the beta Pictoris debris disk

    OpenAIRE

    Brandeker, A.; Cataldi, G.; Olofsson, G.; Vandenbussche, B.; Acke, B.; Barlow, M.J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; M.Cohen; Dent, W. R. F.; Dominik, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W. K.; Glauser, A. M.; Greaves, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    The young star beta Pictoris is well known for its dusty debris disk, produced through the grinding down by collisions of planetesimals, kilometre-sized bodies in orbit around the star. In addition to dust, small amounts of gas are also known to orbit the star, likely the result from vaporisation of violently colliding dust grains. The disk is seen edge on and from previous absorption spectroscopy we know that the gas is very rich in carbon relative to other elements. The oxygen content has b...

  3. DiskJockey: Protoplanetary disk modeling for dynamical mass derivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czekala, Ian

    2016-03-01

    DiskJockey derives dynamical masses for T Tauri stars using the Keplerian motion of their circumstellar disks, applied to radio interferometric data from the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). The package relies on RADMC-3D (ascl:1202.015) to perform the radiative transfer of the disk model. DiskJockey is designed to work in a parallel environment where the calculations for each frequency channel can be distributed to independent processors. Due to the computationally expensive nature of the radiative synthesis, fitting sizable datasets (e.g., SMA and ALMA) will require a substantial amount of CPU cores to explore a posterior distribution in a reasonable timeframe.

  4. Magneto-thermal Disk Wind from Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is governed by disk angular momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a 1D model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on 1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfv\\'en speed $v_{Ap}$, 2) the sound speed $c_s$ near the wind base, and 3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve $R^{-2}$ scaling). When $v_{Ap}\\gg c_s$, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accel...

  5. Disk evolution: dust and gas*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Disks are a natural by-product of start formation. Just like the formation if a star is a lengthy process that goes through many stages, disks around young stars evolve my processing matter through the disk and dumping it onto the star. The solid and gaseous components of disks do not always evolve together - dust-gas separation can take place, dust grains may grow. In this chapter we attempt a brief overview of processes that shape this evolution, in a way that is useful as a background to the other chapters in this lecture series. As such, the chapter does not aim for completeness or being up to date with some of the most recent developments.

  6. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Kormendy, John

    2013-01-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via available evolution processes. The inner parts shrink and the outer parts expand, provided that some physical process transports energy or angular momentum outward. The evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks, and galaxy disks are all fundamentally similar. These processes for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. Part 1 discusses formation, growth, and death of bars. Part 2 details the slow ("secular") rearrangement of angular momentum that results from interactions between stars or gas and nonaxisymmetries such as bars. We have a heuristic understanding of how this forms outer rings, inner rings, and stuff dumped into the center. Observations show that barred galaxies have central concentrations of gas and star formation. Timescales imply that they grow central "pseudobulges" that get mistaken for ellip...

  7. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability, and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability, supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the non-linear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analyt...

  8. Chondrule Transport in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Goldberg, Aaron Z; Jacquet, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Chondrule formation remains one of the most elusive early Solar System events. Here, we take the novel approach of employing numerical simulations to investigate chondrule origin beyond purely cosmochemical methods. We model the transport of generically-produced chondrules and dust in a 1D viscous protoplanetary disk model, in order to constrain the chondrule formation events. For a single formation event we are able to match analytical predictions of the memory chondrule and dust populations retain of each other (complementarity), finding that a large mass accretion rate ($\\gtrsim 10^{-7}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$) allows for delays on the order of the disk's viscous timescale between chondrule formation and chondrite accretion. Further, we find older disks to be severely diminished of chondrules, with accretion rates $\\lesssim 10^{-9}$~M$_\\odot$~yr$^{-1}$ for nominal parameters. We then characterize the distribution of chondrule origins in both space and time, as functions of disk parameters and chondrule format...

  9. Spiral Waves in Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaftis, Emilios

    A review with the most characteristic spiral waves in accretion disks of cataclysmic variables will be presented. Recent work on experiments targeting the detection of spiral waves from time lapse movies of real disks and the study of permanent spiral waves will be discussed. The relevance of spiral waves with other systems such as star-planet X-ray binaries and Algols will be reviewed.

  10. Resolved observations of transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Casassus, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Resolved observations are bringing new constraints on the origin of radial gaps in protoplanetary disks. The kinematics, sampled in detail in one case-study, are indicative of non-Keplerian flows, corresponding to warped structures and accretion which may both play a role in the development of cavities. Disk asymmetries seen in the radio continuum are being interpreted in the context of dust segregation via aerodynamic trapping. We summarise recent observational progress, and also describe prospects for improvements in the near term.

  11. Planet-Disk Interaction revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Illenseer T. F.; Jung Manuel; Duschl W. J.

    2013-01-01

    We present results on our investigations of planet–disk interaction in protoplanetary disks. For the hydrodynamic simulations we use a second order semi–discrete total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme for systems of hyperbolic conservation laws on curvilinear grids. Our previously used method conserves the momentum in two dimensional systems with rotational symmetry. Additionally, we modified our simulation techniques for inertial angular momentum conservation even in two dimensional ...

  12. Jets from magnetized accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ryoji

    When an accretion disk is threaded by large scale poloidal magnetic fields, the injection of magnetic helicity from the accretion disk drives bipolar outflows. We present the results of global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of jet formation from a torus initially threaded by vertical magnetic fields. After the torsional Alfvén waves generated by the injected magnetic twists propagate along the large-scale magnetic field lines, magnetically driven jets emanate from the surface of the torus. Due to the magnetic pinch effect, the jets are collimated along the rotation axis. Since the jet formation process extracts angular momentum from the disk, it enhances the accretion rate of the disk material. Through three-dimensional (3D) global MHD simulations, we confirmed previous 2D results that the magnetically braked surface of the disk accretes like an avalanche. Owing to the growth of non-axisymmetric perturbations, the avalanche flow breaks up into spiral channels. Helical structure also appears inside the jet. When magnetic helicity is injected into closed magnetic loops connecting the central object and the accretion disk, it drives recurrent magnetic reconnection and outflows.

  13. Disk eccentricity and embedded planets

    CERN Document Server

    Kley, W; Kley, Wilhelm; Dirksen, Gerben

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the response of an accretion disk to the presence of a perturbing protoplanet embedded in the disk through time dependent hydrodynamical simulations. The disk is treated as a two-dimensional viscous fluid and the planet is kept on a fixed orbit. We run a set of simulations varying the planet mass, and the viscosity and temperature of the disk. All runs are followed until they reach a quasi-equilibrium state. We find that for planetary masses above a certain minimum mass, already 3 M_Jup for a viscosity of nu = 10^{-5}, the disk makes a transition from a nearly circular state into an eccentric state. Increasing the planetary mass leads to a saturation of disk eccentricity with a maximum value of around 0.25. The transition to the eccentric state is driven by the excitation of an m=2 spiral wave at the outer 1:3 Lindblad resonance. The effect occurs only if the planetary masses are large enough to clear a sufficiently wide and deep gap to reduce the damping effect of the outer 1:2 Lindblad resona...

  14. Fragmentation of Massive Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, K M; Kratter, Kaitlin M.; Matzner, Christopher D.

    2006-01-01

    We examine whether massive-star accretion disks are likely to fragment due to self-gravity. Rapid accretion and high angular momentum push these disks toward fragmentation, whereas viscous heating and the high protostellar luminosity stabilize them. We find that for a broad range of protostar masses and for reasonable accretion times, massive disks larger than ~150 AU are prone to fragmentation. We develop an analytical estimate for the angular momentum of accreted material, extending the analysis of Matzner and Levin (2005) to account for strongly turbulent initial conditions. In a core-collapse model, we predict that disks are marginally prone to fragmentation around stars of about four to 15 solar masses -- even if we adopt conservative estimates of the disks' radii and tendency to fragment. More massive stars are progressively more likely to fragment, and there is a sharp drop in the stability of disk accretion at the very high accretion rates expected above 110 solar masses. Fragmentation may starve accr...

  15. Disks around young stellar objects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H C Bhatt

    2011-07-01

    By 1939, when Chandrasekhar’s classic monograph on the theory of Stellar Structure was published, although the need for recent star formation was fully acknowledged, no one had yet recognized an object that could be called a star in the process of being born. Young stellar objects (YSOs), as pre-main-sequence stars, were discovered in the 1940s and 1950s. Infrared excess emission and intrinsic polarization observed in these objects in the 1960s and 1970s indicated that they are surrounded by flattened disks. The YSO disks were seen in direct imaging only in the 1980s. Since then, high-resolution optical imaging with HST, near-infrared adaptive optics on large groundbased telescopes, mm and radiowave interferometry have been used to image disks around a large number of YSOs revealing disk structure with ever-increasing detail and variety. The disks around YSOs are believed to be the sites of planet formation and a few such associations have now been confirmed. The observed properties of the disk structure and their evolution, that have very important consequences for the theory of star and planet formation, are discussed.

  16. Relativistic Self-similar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, M J; Cai, Mike J.; Shu, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate and solve by semi-analytic means the axisymmetric equilibria of relativistic self-similar disks of infinitesimal vertical thickness. These disks are supported in the horizontal directions against their self-gravity by a combination of isothermal (two-dimensional) pressure and a flat rotation curve. The dragging of inertial frames restricts possible solutions to rotation speeds that are always less than 0.438 times the speed of light, a result first obtained by Lynden-Bell and Pineault in 1978 for a cold disk. We show that prograde circular orbits of massive test particles exist and are stable for all of our model disks, but retrograde circular orbits cannot be maintained with particle velocities less than the speed of light once the disk develops an ergoregion. We also compute photon trajectories, planar and non-planar, in the resulting spacetime, for disks with and without ergoregions. We find that all photon orbits, except for a set of measure zero, tend to be focused by the gravity of the flat...

  17. Global Models for Embedded, Accreting Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M; Krumholz, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    Most analytic work to date on protostellar disks has focused on disks in isolation from their environments. However, observations are now beginning to probe the earliest, most embedded phases of star formation, during which disks are rapidly accreting from their parent cores and cannot be modeled in isolation. We present a simple, one-zone model of protostellar accretion disks with high mass infall rates. Our model combines a self-consistent calculation of disk temperatures with an approximate treatment of angular momentum transport via several mechanisms. We use this model to survey the properties of protostellar disks across a wide range of stellar masses and evolutionary times, and make predictions for disks' masses, sizes, spiral structure, and fragmentation that will be directly testable by future large-scale surveys of deeply embedded disks. We define a dimensionless accretion-rotation parameter which, in conjunction with the disk's temperature, controls the disk evolution. We track the dominant mode of...

  18. Magneto-thermal Disk Winds from Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Ye, Jiani; Goodman, Jeremy; Yuan, Feng

    2016-02-01

    The global evolution and dispersal of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) are governed by disk angular-momentum transport and mass-loss processes. Recent numerical studies suggest that angular-momentum transport in the inner region of PPDs is largely driven by magnetized disk wind, yet the wind mass-loss rate remains unconstrained. On the other hand, disk mass loss has conventionally been attributed to photoevaporation, where external heating on the disk surface drives a thermal wind. We unify the two scenarios by developing a one-dimensional model of magnetized disk winds with a simple treatment of thermodynamics as a proxy for external heating. The wind properties largely depend on (1) the magnetic field strength at the wind base, characterized by the poloidal Alfvén speed vAp, (2) the sound speed cs near the wind base, and (3) how rapidly poloidal field lines diverge (achieve {R}-2 scaling). When {v}{Ap}\\gg {c}{{s}}, corotation is enforced near the wind base, resulting in centrifugal acceleration. Otherwise, the wind is accelerated mainly by the pressure of the toroidal magnetic field. In both cases, the dominant role played by magnetic forces likely yields wind outflow rates that exceed purely hydrodynamical mechanisms. For typical PPD accretion-rate and wind-launching conditions, we expect vAp to be comparable to cs at the wind base. The resulting wind is heavily loaded, with a total wind mass-loss rate likely reaching a considerable fraction of the wind-driven accretion rate. Implications for modeling global disk evolution and planet formation are also discussed.

  19. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2011-01-01

    We consider new versions of the two-center problem where the input consists of a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. We give exact and approximation algorithms for these versions. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  20. Nonlinear resonant traveling waves in rotating disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AlbertC.J.LUO; ChinAnTAN

    2000-01-01

    The resonant conditions for traveling waves in rotating disks are derived. The nonlinear resonant spectrum of a rotating disk is computed from the resonant conditions.Such a resonant spectrum is useful for the disk drive industry to determine the range of operational rotation speed. The resonant wave motions for linear and nonlinear, rotating disks are simulated numerically for a 3.5-inch diameter computer memory disk.

  1. Tissue Engineering for Intervertebral Disk Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, VYL; Chan, D; Chan, BP; Cheung, KMC; Tam, V

    2011-01-01

    Many challenges confront intervertebral disk engineering owing to complexity and the presence of extraordinary stresses. Rebuilding a disk of native function could be useful for removal of the symptoms and correction of altered spine kinematics. Improvement in understanding of disk properties and techniques for disk engineering brings promise to the fabrication of a functional motion segment for the treatment of disk degeneration. Increasing sophistication of techniques available in biomedica...

  2. Covering and piercing disks with two centers

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Heekap

    2013-04-01

    We give exact and approximation algorithms for two-center problems when the input is a set D of disks in the plane. We first study the problem of finding two smallest congruent disks such that each disk in D intersects one of these two disks. Then we study the problem of covering the set D by two smallest congruent disks. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  3. ACCRETING CIRCUMPLANETARY DISKS: OBSERVATIONAL SIGNATURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Zhaohuan, E-mail: zhzhu@astro.princeton.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2015-01-20

    I calculate the spectral energy distributions of accreting circumplanetary disks using atmospheric radiative transfer models. Circumplanetary disks only accreting at 10{sup –10} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} around a 1 M{sub J} planet can be brighter than the planet itself. A moderately accreting circumplanetary disk ( M-dot ∼10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}; enough to form a 10 M{sub J} planet within 1 Myr) around a 1 M{sub J} planet has a maximum temperature of ∼2000 K, and at near-infrared wavelengths (J, H, K bands), this disk is as bright as a late-M-type brown dwarf or a 10 M{sub J} planet with a ''hot start''. To use direct imaging to find the accretion disks around low-mass planets (e.g., 1 M{sub J} ) and distinguish them from brown dwarfs or hot high-mass planets, it is crucial to obtain photometry at mid-infrared bands (L', M, N bands) because the emission from circumplanetary disks falls off more slowly toward longer wavelengths than those of brown dwarfs or planets. If young planets have strong magnetic fields (≳100 G), fields may truncate slowly accreting circumplanetary disks ( M-dot ≲10{sup −9} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}) and lead to magnetospheric accretion, which can provide additional accretion signatures, such as UV/optical excess from the accretion shock and line emission.

  4. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, L. B. F. M.

    2015-09-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV) wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness), the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution), a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014). 2nd Lecture of the Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  5. Quantification of the association between intervertebral disk calcification and disk herniation in Dachshunds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vibeke Frøkjær; Beck, S.; Christensen, K.A.;

    2008-01-01

    predictor of clinical disk herniation (odds ratio per calcified disk, 1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.19 to 1.81). Number of calcified disks in the full vertebral column was a better predictor than number of calcified disks between vertebrae T10 and L3. Numbers of calcified disks at >= 8 years of age and......Objective-To quantify the association between intervertebral disk calcification and disk herniation in Dachshunds. Design-Longitudinal study. Animals-61 Dachshunds that had been radiographically screened for calcification of intervertebral disks at 2 years of age in other studies. Thirty-seven of....... Information on occurrence of disk herniation between 2 and 8 years of age was obtained from owners via questionnaire. Associations between numbers of calcified disks and disk herniation were analyzed via maximum likelihood logistic regression. Results-Disk calcification at 2 years of age was a significant...

  6. The Debris Disk Explorer: a balloon-borne coronagraph for observing debris disks

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts Jr., Lewis C.; Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk struct...

  7. Barred disks in dense environments

    CERN Document Server

    Marinova, I; Heiderman, A; Barazza, F D; Gray, M E; Barden, M; Wolf, C; Peng, C Y; Bacon, D; Balogh, M; Bell, E F; Bohm, A; Caldwell, J A R; Haussler, B; Heymans, C; Jahnke, K; van Kampen, E; Koposov, S; Lane, K; McIntosh, D H; Meisenheimer, K; Rix, H -W; Sanchez, S F; Taylor, A; Wisotzki, L; Zheng, X

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the properties of bright (MV <= -18) barred and unbarred disks in the Abell 901/902 cluster system at z~0.165 with the STAGES HST ACS survey. To identify and characterize bars, we use ellipse-fitting. We use visual classification, a Sersic cut, and a color cut to select disk galaxies, and find that the latter two methods miss 31% and 51%, respectively of disk galaxies identified through visual classification. This underscores the importance of carefully selecting the disk sample in cluster environments. However, we find that the global optical bar fraction in the clusters is ~30% regardless of the method of disk selection. We study the relationship of the optical bar fraction to host galaxy properties, and find that the optical bar fraction depends strongly on the luminosity of the galaxy and whether it hosts a prominent bulge or is bulgeless. Within a given absolute magnitude bin, the optical bar fraction increases for galaxies with no significant bulge component. Within each morphological ...

  8. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Espaillat, Catherine; Najita, Joan; Andrews, Sean; Zhu, Zhaohuan; Calvet, Nuria; Kraus, Stefan; Hashimoto, Jun; Kraus, Adam; D'Alessio, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about...

  9. C/C composite brake disk nondestructive evaluation by IR thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tsuchin P.; Poudel, Anish; Filip, Peter

    2012-06-01

    This paper discusses the non-destructive evaluation of thick Carbon/Carbon (C/C) composite aircraft brake disks by using transient infrared thermography (IRT) approach. Thermal diffusivity measurement technique was applied to identify the subsurface anomalies in thick C/C brake disks. In addition, finite element analysis (FEA) modeling tool was used to determine the transient thermal response of the C/C disks that were subjected to flash heating. For this, series of finite element models were built and thermal responses with various thermal diffusivities subjected to different heating conditions were investigated. Experiments were conducted to verify the models by using custom built in-house IRT system and commercial turnkey system. The analysis and experimental results showed good correlation between thermal diffusivity value and anomalies within the disk. It was demonstrated that the step-heating transient thermal approach could be effectively applied to obtain the whole field thermal diffusivity value of C/C composites.

  10. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  11. Theory of Protostellar Disk Fromation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Disk formation, once thought to be a simple consequence of the conservation of angular momentum during the hydrodynamic core collapse, is far more subtle in magnetized gas. In this case, the rotation can be strongly magnetically braked. Indeed, both analytic arguments and numerical simulations have shown that disk formation is suppressed in strict ideal MHD for the observed level of core magnetization. I will discuss the physical reason for this so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe," and review possible resolutions to this problem that have been proposed so far, including non-ideal MHD effects, misalignment between the magnetic field and rotation axis, and especially turbulence.

  12. Creation of ultra-high-pressure shocks by the collision of laser-accelerated disks: experiment and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used the SHIVA laser system to accelerate carbon disks to speeds in excess of 100 km/sec. The 3KJ/3 ns pulse, on a 1 mm diameter spot of a single disk produced a conventional shock of about 5 MB. The laser energy can, however, be stored in kinetic motion of this accelerated disk and delivered (reconverted to thermal energy) upon impact with another carbon disk. This collision occurs in a time much shorter than the 3 ns pulse, thus acting as a power amplifier. The shock pressures measured upon impact are estimated to be in the 20 MB range, thus demonstrating the amplification power of this colliding disk technique in creating ultra-high pressures. Theory and computer simulations of this process will be discussed, and compared with the experiment

  13. Planet-disk interaction and orbital evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kley, W

    2012-01-01

    As planets form and grow within gaseous protoplanetary disks, the mutual gravitational interaction between the disk and planet leads to the exchange of angular momentum, and migration of the planet. We review current understanding of disk-planet interactions, focussing in particular on physical processes that determine the speed and direction of migration. We describe the evolution of low mass planets embedded in protoplanetary disks, and examine the influence of Lindblad and corotation torques as a function of the disk properties. The role of the disk in causing the evolution of eccentricities and inclinations is also discussed. We describe the rapid migration of intermediate mass planets that may occur as a runaway process, and examine the transition to gap formation and slower migration driven by the viscous evolution of the disk for massive planets. The roles and influence of disk self-gravity and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence are discussed in detail, as a function of the planet mass, as is the evolution...

  14. Vortex migration in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Paardekooper, S -J; Papaloizou, J C B

    2010-01-01

    We consider the radial migration of vortices in two-dimensional isothermal gaseous disks. We find that a vortex core, orbiting at the local gas velocity, induces velocity perturbations that propagate away from the vortex as density waves. The resulting spiral wave pattern is reminiscent of an embedded planet. There are two main causes for asymmetries in these wakes: geometrical effects tend to favor the outer wave, while a radial vortensity gradient leads to an asymmetric vortex core, which favors the wave at the side that has the lowest density. In the case of asymmetric waves, which we always find except for a disk of constant pressure, there is a net exchange of angular momentum between the vortex and the surrounding disk, which leads to orbital migration of the vortex. Numerical hydrodynamical simulations show that this migration can be very rapid, on a time scale of a few thousand orbits, for vortices with a size comparable to the scale height of the disk. We discuss the possible effects of vortex migrat...

  15. Spaceflight optical disk recorder development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurczyk, Stephen G.; Hines, Glenn D.; Shull, Thomas A.

    1992-01-01

    Mass memory systems based on rewriteable optical disk media are expected to play an important role in meeting the data system requirements for future NASA spaceflight missions. NASA has established a program to develop a high performance (high rate, large capacity) optical disk recorder focused on use aboard unmanned Earth orbiting platforms. An expandable, adaptable system concept is proposed based on disk drive modules and a modular controller. Drive performance goals are 10 gigabyte capacity, 300 megabit/s transfer rate, 10 exp -12 corrected bit error rate, and 150 millisec access time. This performance is achieved by writing eight data tracks in parallel on both sides of a 14 in. optical disk using two independent heads. System goals are 160 gigabyte capacity, 1.2 gigabits/s data rate with concurrent I/O, 250 millisec access time, and two to five year operating life on orbit. The system can be configured to meet various applications. This versatility is provided by the controller. The controller provides command processing, multiple drive synchronization, data buffering, basic file management, error processing, and status reporting. Technology developments, design concepts, current status including a computer model of the system and a Controller breadboard, and future plans for the Drive and Controller are presented.

  16. Gravitating Disks Around Black Holes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karas, Vladimír; Šubr, Ladislav

    Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2010 - (Peterson, B.), s. 332-332 ISBN 978-0-521-76502-2. - (IAU Symposium Proceedings Series. 267). [Symposium of the International Astronomical Union /267./. Rio de Janeiro (BR), 10.08.2009-14.08.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : accretion disks * gravitation * black hole physics Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  17. Accretion Disks, Jets and Blazar Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Wiita, Paul J.

    2005-01-01

    Although blazar variability is probably dominated by emission from relativistic jets, accretion disks should be present in all blazars. These disks produce emission over most of the electromagnetic spectrum; various unstable processes operate in those disks which lead to variable emission. Here I summarize some of the most relevant disk mechanisms for AGN variability. I also discuss some aspects of jet variability, focusing on the possibility that ultrarelativisitic jets of modest opening ang...

  18. A Note on Bimodal Accretion Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Dullemond, C.P.; Turolla, R.

    1998-01-01

    The existence of bimodal disks is investigated. Following a simple argument based on energetic considerations we show that stationary, bimodal accretion disk models in which a Shakura--Sunyaev disk (SSD) at large radii matches an advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) at smaller radii are never possible using the standard slim disk approach, unless some extra energy flux is present. The same argument, however, predicts the possibility of a transition from an outer Shapiro--Lightman--Eardle...

  19. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Herniated Disk Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    José Ramón Tejera del Valle; Joaquín Aguilar Trujillo; Danny Barrueta Reyes; José Gómez Cruz; Líder Tejera Sánchez

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Herniated Disk Treatment. The current concept is not only limited to the disorder caused by the rupture of the intervertebral disk, it also includes primary disk degeneration and the resulting spondylosis, and disk disorders associated with this degeneration, traumas and aseptic and granulomatous discitis. Concept, diagnosis, treatment and aetiology are defined and commented stressing the neurosurgical aspects. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the ...

  20. Optimization of the Processing of Mo Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Harvey, James [NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Madison, WI (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to decrease the processing time for irradiated disks of enriched Mo for the production of 99Mo. Results are given for the dissolution of nonirradiated Mo disks, optimization of the process for large-scale dissolution of sintered disks, optimization of the removal of the main side products (Zr and Nb) from dissolved targets, and dissolution of irradiated Mo disks.

  1. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Fujun; Bergin, Edwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of L...

  2. Electromagnetic design of a conducting disk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astakhov, V.I.

    1985-07-01

    Materials are presented which can serve as the basis for calculation of the electromagnetic process occurring in a conducting disk, an important part of many electrical devices. An integral equation is derived for the eddy currents in the disk and the transient electromagnetic process in the disk resulting from a change in applied magnetic field upon switching or disconnection of power sources is calculated.

  3. Growing and moving planets in disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, Sijme-Jan

    2006-01-01

    Planets form in disks that are commonly found around young stars. The intimate relationship that exists between planet and disk can account for a lot of the exotic extrasolar planetary systems known today. In this thesis we explore disk-planet interaction using numerical hydrodynamical simulations.

  4. Thermal radiation from an accretion disk

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, F. V.

    2003-01-01

    An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasi-periodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a two-temperature plasma of an accretion disk.

  5. Clinical application of percutaneous laser disk decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effects of lumbar disk herniation treated by semiconductor laser. Methods: One-hundred cases of lumbar disk herniation diagnosed by clinic and CT or MRI within three months underwent percutaneous laser disk decompression, including 65 cases of L4-5 and 35 cases of L5-S1 disk. Results: In this group of patients, the successful rate of penetration was 100% and the rate of efficiency was 72%. There was no complication in the following 6-18 months. Conclusion: Percutaneous laser disk decompression with semiconductor laser was a convenient, safe, efficient and minimally invasive technique

  6. Impact of the initial disk mass function on the disk fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsawa, Ryou; Yasui, Chikako

    2015-01-01

    The disk fraction, the percentage of stars with disks in a young cluster, is widely used to investigate the lifetime of the protoplanetary disk, which can impose an important constraint on the planet formation mechanism. The relationship between the decay timescale of the disk fraction and the mass dissipation timescale of an individual disk, however, remains unclear. Here we investigate the effect of the disk mass function (DMF) on the evolution of the disk fraction. We show that the time variation in the disk fraction depends on the spread of the DMF and the detection threshold of the disk. In general, the disk fraction decreases more slowly than the disk mass if a typical initial DMF and a detection threshold are assumed. We find that, if the disk mass decreases exponentially, {the mass dissipation timescale of the disk} can be as short as $1\\,{\\rm Myr}$ even when the disk fraction decreases with the time constant of ${\\sim}2.5\\,{\\rm Myr}$. The decay timescale of the disk fraction can be an useful paramete...

  7. Warped circumbinary disks in active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study a warping instability of a geometrically thin, non-self-gravitating disk surrounding binary supermassive black holes on a circular orbit. Such a circumbinary disk is subject to not only tidal torques due to the binary gravitational potential but also radiative torques due to radiation emitted from an accretion disk around each black hole. We find that a circumbinary disk initially aligned with the binary orbital plane is unstable to radiation-driven warping beyond the marginally stable warping radius, which is sensitive to both the ratio of vertical to horizontal shear viscosities and the mass-to-energy conversion efficiency. As expected, the tidal torques give no contribution to the growth of warping modes but tend to align the circumbinary disk with the orbital plane. Since the tidal torques can suppress the warping modes in the inner part of circumbinary disk, the circumbinary disk starts to be warped at radii larger than the marginally stable warping radius. If the warping radius is of the order of 0.1 pc, a resultant semi-major axis is estimated to be of the order of 10–2 pc to 10–4 pc for 107 M☉ black hole. We also discuss the possibility that the central objects of observed warped maser disks in active galactic nuclei are binary supermassive black holes with a triple disk: two accretion disks around the individual black holes and one circumbinary disk surrounding them.

  8. Meridional circulation in turbulent protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Fromang, Sebastien; Masset, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Based on viscous disk theory, a number of recent studies have suggested the existence of a large scale meridional circulation in protoplanetary disks. Such a flow could account for the presence of crystalline silicates, among which Calcium and Aluminium-rich Inclusions (CAIs), at large distances from the sun. This paper aims at examining whether such large scale flows exist in turbulent protoplanetary disks. High resolution global hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical numerical simulations of turbulent protoplanetary disks are used to infer the properties of the flow in such disks. By performing hydrodynamic simulations using explicit viscosity, we demonstrate that our numerical setup does not suffer from any numerical artifact. The aforementioned meridional circulation is readily recovered in viscous and laminar disks. In MHD simulations, the magneto-rotational instability drives turbulence in the disks. Averaging out the turbulent fluctuations over long timescale, the results fail to show any large scale...

  9. Accretion disks in Algols: progenitors and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Van Rensbergen, W

    2016-01-01

    There are only a few Algols with measured accretion disk parameters. These measurements provide additional constraints for tracing the origin of individual systems, narrowing down the initial parameter space. We investigate the origin and evolution of 6 Algol systems with accretion disks to find the initial parameters and evolutionary constraints for them. With a modified binary evolution code, series of close binary evolution are calculated to obtain the best match for observed individual systems. Initial parameters for 6 Algol systems with accretion disks were determined matching both the present system parameters and the observed disk characteristics. When RLOF starts during core hydrogen burning of the donor, the disk lifetime was found to be short. The disk luminosity is comparable to the luminosity of the gainer during a large fraction of the disk lifetime.

  10. Solar disk sextant optical configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, H.-Y.; Maier, E.; Schatten, K. H.; Sofia, S.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper the performance of a plausible configuration for the solar disk sextant, an instrument to be used to monitor the solar diameter, is evaluated. Overall system requirements are evaluated, and tolerable uncertainties are obtained. It is concluded that by using a beam splitting wedge, a folded optics design can be used to measure the solar diameter to an accuracy of 10 to the -6th, despite the greater aberrations present in such optical systems.

  11. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    OpenAIRE

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies) that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity ...

  12. A Supersymmetric Dark Disk Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Fischler, Willy; Tangarife, Walter

    2014-01-01

    We present a model of partially interacting dark matter (PIDM) within the framework of supersymmetry with gauge mediated symmetry breaking. Dark sector atoms are produced through Affleck-Dine baryogenesis in the dark sector while avoiding the production of Q-ball relics. We discuss the astrophysical constraints relevant for this model and the possibility of dark galactic disk formation. In addition, jet emission from rotating black holes is discussed in the context of this class of models.

  13. A Major Asymmetric Dust Trap in a Transition Disk

    CERN Document Server

    van der Marel, Nienke; Bruderer, Simon; Birnstiel, Til; van Kempen, Tim A; Schmalzl, Markus; Brown, Joanna M; Herczeg, Gregory J; Mathews, Geoffrey S; Geers, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    The statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently. However, there are fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of particles in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. Recent theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem. We report the detection of a dust trap in the disk around the star Oph IRS 48 using observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The 0.44-millimeter-wavelength continuum map shows high-contrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star originating from millimeter-sized grains, whereas both the mid-infrared image (micrometer-sized dust) and the gas traced by the carbon monoxide 6-5 rotational line suggest rings centered on the star. The difference in distribution of big grains versus small grains/gas can be modeled with a vortex-shaped dust trap triggered by a companion.

  14. A major asymmetric dust trap in a transition disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Marel, Nienke; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bruderer, Simon; Birnstiel, Til; Pinilla, Paola; Dullemond, Cornelis P; van Kempen, Tim A; Schmalzl, Markus; Brown, Joanna M; Herczeg, Gregory J; Mathews, Geoffrey S; Geers, Vincent

    2013-06-01

    The statistics of discovered exoplanets suggest that planets form efficiently. However, there are fundamental unsolved problems, such as excessive inward drift of particles in protoplanetary disks during planet formation. Recent theories invoke dust traps to overcome this problem. We report the detection of a dust trap in the disk around the star Oph IRS 48 using observations from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The 0.44-millimeter-wavelength continuum map shows high-contrast crescent-shaped emission on one side of the star, originating from millimeter-sized grains, whereas both the mid-infrared image (micrometer-sized dust) and the gas traced by the carbon monoxide 6-5 rotational line suggest rings centered on the star. The difference in distribution of big grains versus small grains/gas can be modeled with a vortex-shaped dust trap triggered by a companion. PMID:23744942

  15. Heating and Cooling Protostellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirose, S

    2011-01-01

    We examine heating and cooling in protostellar disks using 3-D radiation-MHD calculations of a patch of the Solar nebula at 1 AU, employing the shearing-box and flux-limited radiation diffusion approximations. The disk atmosphere is ionized by stellar X-rays, well-coupled to magnetic fields, and sustains a turbulent accretion flow driven by magneto-rotational instability, while the interior is resistive and magnetically dead. The turbulent layers heat by absorbing the light from the central star and by dissipating the magnetic fields. They are optically-thin to their own radiation and cool inefficiently. The optically-thick interior in contrast is heated only weakly, by re-emission from the atmosphere. The interior is colder than a classical viscous model, and isothermal. The magnetic fields support an extended atmosphere that absorbs the starlight 1.5 times higher than the hydrostatic viscous model. The disk thickness thus measures not the internal temperature, but the magnetic field strength. Fluctuations i...

  16. Regression of lumbar disk herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yu Evzikov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Compression of the spinal nerve root, giving rise to pain and sensory and motor disorders in the area of its innervation is the most vivid manifestation of herniated intervertebral disk. Different treatment modalities, including neurosurgery, for evolving these conditions are discussed. There has been recent evidence that spontaneous regression of disk herniation can regress. The paper describes a female patient with large lateralized disc extrusion that has caused compression of the nerve root S1, leading to obvious myotonic and radicular syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging has shown that the clinical manifestations of discogenic radiculopathy, as well myotonic syndrome and morphological changes completely regressed 8 months later. The likely mechanism is inflammation-induced resorption of a large herniated disk fragment, which agrees with the data available in the literature. A decision to perform neurosurgery for which the patient had indications was made during her first consultation. After regression of discogenic radiculopathy, there was only moderate pain caused by musculoskeletal diseases (facet syndrome, piriformis syndrome that were successfully eliminated by minimally invasive techniques. 

  17. A Pulsar and a Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Recent, unusual X-ray observations from our galactic neighbor, the Small Magellanic Cloud, have led to an interesting model for SXP 214, a pulsar in a binary star system.Artists illustration of the magnetic field lines of a pulsar, a highly magnetized, rotating neutron star. [NASA]An Intriguing BinaryAn X-ray pulsar is a magnetized, rotating neutron star in a binary system with a stellar companion. Material is fed from the companion onto the neutron star, channeled by the objects magnetic fields onto a hotspot thats millions of degrees. This hotspot rotating past our line of sight is what produces the pulsations that we observe from X-ray pulsars.Located in the Small Magellanic Cloud, SXP 214 is a transient X-ray pulsar in a binary with a Be-type star. This star is spinning so quickly that material is thrown off of it to form a circumstellar disk.Recently, a team of authors led by JaeSub Hong (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) have presented new Chandra X-ray observations of SXP 214, tracking it for 50 ks (~14 hours) in January 2013. These observations reveal some very unexpected behavior for this pulsar.X-ray PuzzleThe energy distribution of the X-ray emission from SXP 214 over time. Dark shades or blue colors indicate high counts, and light shades or yellow colors indicate low counts. Lower-energy X-ray emission appeared only later, after about 20 ks. [Hong et al. 2016]Three interesting pieces of information came from the Chandra observations:SXP 214s rotation period was measured to be 211.5 s an increase in the spin rate since the discovery measurement of a 214-second period. Pulsars usually spin down as they lose angular momentum over time so what caused this one to spin up?Its overall X-ray luminosity steadily increased over the 50 ks of observations.Its spectrum became gradually softer (lower energy) over time; in the first 20 ks, the spectrum only consisted of hard X-ray photons above 3 keV, but after 20 ks, softer X-ray photons below 2 ke

  18. Digital droplet PCR on disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Geltman, Marcel; Schwemmer, Frank; Wadle, Simon; Domínguez-Garrido, Elena; López, María; Cervera-Acedo, Cristina; Santibáñez, Paula; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Paust, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Existing systems for digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) either suffer from low integration or are difficult to introduce to mass fabrication. Here we present an integrated system that is compatible to mass fabrication and combines emulsification, PCR, and fluorescence readout in a single chamber within a disposable cartridge (disk). Droplets are generated by injecting the sample into fluorinated oil via centrifugal step emulsification. The resulting emulsion is aligned in the PCR and readout zone by capillary action. During thermocycling, gas bubbles generated by degassing are removed by capillary driven transport through tapered regions in the PCR chamber. Thereby, the positioning of the emulsion within the readout zone of the PCR chamber is ensured at any time and no bubbles are present during readout. Manual handling of the disk solely requires pipetting of oil and PCR mix into the inlet structures, placing the disk into the thermocycler and subsequently into a microarray scanner. The functionality of the ddPCR process chain is demonstrated by quantitative detection of the cystic fibrosis causing mutation p.Phe508del, which is of interest for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). The mutation was detected in a concentration range spanning four orders of magnitude. We envision that this work will lay the base for the development of highly integrated sample-to-digital-answer PCR systems that can be employed in routine clinical diagnosis. PMID:26610263

  19. Non-LTE spectral models for the gaseous debris-disk component of Ton 345

    CERN Document Server

    Hartmann, S; Rauch, T; Werner, K

    2014-01-01

    For a fraction of single white dwarfs with debris disks, an additional gaseous disk was discovered. Both dust and gas are thought to be created by the disruption of planetary bodies. The composition of the extrasolar planetary material can directly be analyzed in the gaseous disk component, and the disk dynamics might be accessible by investigating the temporal behavior of the Ca II infrared emission triplet, hallmark of the gas disk. We obtained new optical spectra for the first helium-dominated white dwarf for which a gas disk was discovered (Ton 345) and modeled the non-LTE spectra of viscous gas disks composed of carbon, oxygen, magnesium, silicon, sulfur, and calcium with chemical abundances typical for solar system asteroids. Iron and its possible line-blanketing effects on the model structure and spectral energy distribution was still neglected. A set of models with different radii, effective temperatures, and surface densities as well as chondritic and bulk-Earth abundances was computed and compared w...

  20. The Earliest Stage of Planet Formation: Disk-Planet Interactions in Protoplanetary Disks and Observations of Transitional Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ruobing; Rafikov, R.; Stone, J. M.; Hartmann, L. W.; SEEDS Team

    2013-01-01

    I will first talk about numerical simulations of disk-planet interactions in protoplanetary disks. Particularly, I’ll discuss the damping of the density waves excited by planets due to the nonlinearity in their propagation, which can result in gap opening in a low viscosity disk by low mass planets. I'll also discuss the effects of various numerical algorithms and parameters in simulations of disk-planet interaction, and address the question of how to produce correct simulations. Then I’ll move on to recent Subaru observations of transitional disks, which are protoplanetary disks with central depleted regions (cavities). Several ideas on the formation of transitional disks have been proposed, including gaps opened by planet(s). Recently, Subaru directly imaged a number of such disks at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths (the SEEDS project) with high spatial resolution and small inner working angles. Using radiative transfer simulations, we study the structure of transitional disks by modeling the NIR images, the SED, and the sub-mm observations from literature (whenever available) simultaneously. We obtain physical disk+cavity structures, and constrain the spatial distribution of the dust grains, particularly inside the cavity and at the cavity edge. Interestingly, we find that in some cases cavities are not present in the scattered light. In such cases we present a new transitional disk model to simultaneously account for all observations. Decoupling between the sub-um-sized and mm-sized grains inside the cavity is required, which may necessitate the dust filtration mechanism. For another group of transitional disks in which Subaru does reveal the cavities at NIR, we focus on whether grains at different sizes have the same spatial distribution or not. We use our modeling results to constrain transitional disk formation theories, particularly to comment on their possible planets origin.

  1. Herschel detects oxygen in the β Pictoris debris disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandeker, A.; Cataldi, G.; Olofsson, G.; Vandenbussche, B.; Acke, B.; Barlow, M. J.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L.; Cohen, M.; Dent, W. R. F.; Dominik, C.; Di Francesco, J.; Fridlund, M.; Gear, W. K.; Glauser, A. M.; Greaves, J. S.; Harvey, P. M.; Heras, A. M.; Hogerheijde, M. R.; Holland, W. S.; Huygen, R.; Ivison, R. J.; Leeks, S. J.; Lim, T. L.; Liseau, R.; Matthews, B. C.; Pantin, E.; Pilbratt, G. L.; Royer, P.; Sibthorpe, B.; Waelkens, C.; Walker, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    The young star β Pictoris is well known for its dusty debris disk produced through collisional grinding of planetesimals, kilometre-sized bodies in orbit around the star. In addition to dust, small amounts of gas are also known to orbit the star; this gas is likely the result of vaporisation of violently colliding dust grains. The disk is seen edge on and from previous absorption spectroscopy we know that the gas is very rich in carbon relative to other elements. The oxygen content has been more difficult to assess, however, with early estimates finding very little oxygen in the gas at a C/O ratio that is 20 × higher than the cosmic value. A C/O ratio that high is difficult to explain and would have far-reaching consequences for planet formation. Here we report on observations by the far-infrared space telescope Herschel, using PACS, of emission lines from ionised carbon and neutral oxygen. The detected emission from C+ is consistent withthat previously reported observed by the HIFI instrument on Herschel, while the emission from O is hard to explain without assuming a higher density region in the disk, perhaps in the shape of a clump or a dense torus required to sufficiently excite the O atoms. A possible scenario is that the C/O gas is produced by the same process responsible for the CO clump recently observed by the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array in the disk and that the redistribution of the gas takes longer than previously assumed. A more detailed estimate of the C/O ratio and the mass of O will have to await better constraints on the C/O gas spatial distribution. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  2. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek A. Abramowicz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads us to the four primary accretion disk models that we review: Polish doughnuts (thick disks, Shakura-Sunyaev (thin disks, slim disks, and advection-dominated accretion flows (ADAFs. After presenting the models we discuss issues of stability, oscillations, and jets. Following our review of the analytic work, we take a parallel approach in reviewing numerical studies of black hole accretion disks. We finish with a few select applications that highlight particular astrophysical applications: measurements of black hole mass and spin, black hole vs. neutron star accretion disks, black hole accretion disk spectral states, and quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs.

  3. Debris Disk Explorer : Exploring Stellar Dust Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lewis C.; Bryden, G.; Traub, W. A.; Unwin, S. C.; Trauger, J. T.; Krist, J. E.; Star Halo Team

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how are debris disks shaped by planets; what materials are debris disks made of; how much dust do debris disks make as they grind down; and how long do debris disks live? The DDX instrument is a 0.7-m diameter ultra-light weight off-axis telescope and an imaging coronagraph on a gondola carried by a stratospheric balloon. Its data product is a set of images of each targeted debris disk in multiple broad visible wavelength bands. DDX will address its science questions by taking high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a half-global flight in the Southern Hemisphere. This longer flight is needed to fully explore the set of known debris disks accessible only to DDX. It will achieve a raw contrast of 10^-7, with a processed contrast of 10^-8. No existing telescope can match the DDX contrast and resolution performance. A second objective of DDX is to use the near-space environment to raise the Technology Readiness Level (TRL) internal coronagraphs, deformable mirrors, and wavefront sensing and control, all potentially needed for a future space-based telescope for high-contrast exoplanet imaging, for example the Astrophysics Focused Telescope Asset (AFTA) Design Reference study.

  4. Disk diffusion and disk elution tests with A-56268 and erythromycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, A L; Jones, R N; Thornsberry, C

    1987-02-01

    Zones of inhibition around 15 micrograms A-56268 disks were essentially the same size as those around 15 micrograms erythromycin disks. If the same MIC breakpoints are to be used for defining susceptible categories for both macrolides, interpretive zone size standards for erythromycin disk tests may also be used for A-56268 disk tests. Against anaerobic bacteria, the two macrolides were only marginally effective when broth dilution tests were incubated in anaerobic jars. The aerobically incubated thioglycolate broth disk elution test indicated that both macrolides were much more effective against anaerobes. Three 15 micrograms disks eluted in 5 ml thioglycolate provided satisfactory results. PMID:2952500

  5. Magnetosomal matrix: ultrafine structure may template biomineralization of magnetosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A P; Barry, J C

    2004-02-01

    The organic matrix surrounding bullet-shaped, cubo-octahedral, D-shaped, irregular arrowhead-shaped, and truncated hexa-octahedral magnetosomes was analysed in a variety of uncultured magnetotactic bacteria. The matrix was examined using low- (80 kV) and intermediate- (400 kV) voltage TEM. It encapsulated magnetosomes in dehydrated cells, ultraviolet-B-irradiated dehydrated cells and stained resin-embedded fixed cells, so the apparent structure of the matrix does not appear to be an artefact of specimen preparation. High-resolution images revealed lattice fringes in the matrix surrounding magnetite and greigite magnetosomes that were aligned with lattice fringes in the encapsulated magnetosomes. In all except one case, the lattice fringes had widths equal to or twice the width of the corresponding lattice fringes in the magnetosomes. The lattice fringes in the matrix were aligned with the [311], [220], [331], [111] and [391] related lattice planes of magnetite and the [222] lattice plane of greigite. An unidentified material, possibly an iron hydroxide, was detected in two immature magnetosomes containing magnetite. The unidentified phase had a structure similar to that of the matrix as it contained [311], [220] and [111] lattice fringes, which indicates that the matrix acts as a template for the spatially controlled biomineralization of the unidentified phase, which itself transforms into magnetite. The unidentified phase was thus called pre-magnetite. The presence of the magnetosomal matrix explains all of the five properties of the biosignature of the magnetosomal chain proposed previously by Friedmann et al. and supports their claim that some of the magnetite particles in the carbonate globules in the Martian meteorite ALH84001 are biogenic. Two new morphologies of magnetite magnetosomes are also reported here (i.e. tooth-shaped and hexa-octahedral magnetosomes). Tooth-shaped magnetite magnetosomes elongated in the [110] direction are reported, and are distinct

  6. Secular Evolution in Disk Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kormendy, John

    2013-10-01

    Self-gravitating systems evolve toward the most tightly bound configuration that is reachable via the evolution processes that are available to them. They do this by spreading -- the inner parts shrink while the outer parts expand -- provided that some physical process efficiently transports energy or angular momentum outward. The reason is that self-gravitating systems have negative specific heats. As a result, the evolution of stars, star clusters, protostellar and protoplanetary disks, black hole accretion disks and galaxy disks are fundamentally similar. How evolution proceeds then depends on the evolution processes that are available to each kind of self-gravitating system. These processes and their consequences for galaxy disks are the subjects of my lectures and of this Canary Islands Winter School. I begin with a review of the formation, growth and death of bars. Then I review the slow (`secular') rearrangement of energy, angular momentum, and mass that results from interactions between stars or gas clouds and collective phenomena such as bars, oval disks, spiral structure and triaxial dark haloes. The `existence-proof' phase of this work is largely over: we have a good heuristic understanding of how nonaxisymmetric structures rearrange disk gas into outer rings, inner rings and stuff dumped onto the centre. The results of simulations correspond closely to the morphology of barred and oval galaxies. Gas that is transported to small radii reaches high densities. Observations confirm that many barred and oval galaxies have dense central concentrations of gas and star formation. The result is to grow, on timescales of a few Gyr, dense central components that are frequently mistaken for classical (elliptical-galaxy-like) bulges but that were grown slowly out of the disk (not made rapidly by major mergers). The resulting picture of secular galaxy evolution accounts for the richness observed in galaxy structure. We can distinguish between classical and pseudo

  7. An Observational Perspective of Transitional Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espaillat, C.; Muzerolle, J.; Najita, J.; Andrews, S.; Zhu, Z.; Calvet, N.; Kraus, S.; Hashimoto, J.; Kraus, A.; D'Alessio, P.

    Transitional disks are objects whose inner disk regions have undergone substantial clearing. The Spitzer Space Telescope produced detailed spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of transitional disks that allowed us to infer their radial dust disk structure in some detail, revealing the diversity of this class of disks. The growing sample of transitional disks also opened up the possibility of demographic studies, which provided unique insights. There now exist (sub)millimeter and infrared images that confirm the presence of large clearings of dust in transitional disks. In addition, protoplanet candidates have been detected within some of these clearings. Transitional disks are thought to be a strong link to planet formation around young stars and are a key area to study if further progress is to be made on understanding the initial stages of planet formation. Here we provide a review and synthesis of transitional disk observations to date with the aim of providing timely direction to the field, which is about to undergo its next burst of growth as the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) reaches its full potential. We discuss what we have learned about transitional disks from SEDs, color-color diagrams, and imaging in the (sub)millimeter and infrared. We note the limitations of these techniques, particularly with respect to the sizes of the clearings currently detectable, and highlight the need for pairing broadband SEDs with multi-wavelength images to paint a more detailed picture of transitional disk structure. We review the gas in transitional disks, keeping in mind that future observations with ALMA will give us unprecedented access to gas in disks, and also observed infrared variability pointing to variable transitional disk structure, which may have implications for disks in general. We then distill the observations into constraints for the main disk-clearing mechanisms proposed to date (i.e., photoevaporation, grain growth, and companions) and

  8. The Origin of Keplerian Megamaser Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Wardle, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Several examples of thin, Keplerian, sub-parsec megamaser disks have been discovered in the nuclei of active galaxies and used to precisely determine the mass of their host black holes. We show that there is an empirical linear correlation between the disk radius and black hole mass and that such disks are naturally formed as molecular clouds pass through the galactic nucleus and temporarily engulf the central supermassive black hole. For initial cloud column densities below about 10^{23.5} cm^{-2} the disk is non-self gravitating, but for higher cloud columns the disk would fragment and produce a compact stellar disk similar to that observed around Sgr A* at the galactic centre.

  9. Counterrotating Stars in Simulated Galaxy Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Algorry, David G; Abadi, Mario G; Sales, Laura V; Steinmetz, Matthias; Piontek, Franziska

    2013-01-01

    Counterrotating stars in disk galaxies are a puzzling dynamical feature whose origin has been ascribed to either satellite accretion events or to disk instabilities triggered by deviations from axisymmetry. We use a cosmological simulation of the formation of a disk galaxy to show that counterrotating stellar disk components may arise naturally in hierarchically-clustering scenarios even in the absence of merging. The simulated disk galaxy consists of two coplanar, overlapping stellar components with opposite spins: an inner counterrotating bar-like structure made up mostly of old stars surrounded by an extended, rotationally-supported disk of younger stars. The opposite-spin components originate from material accreted from two distinct filamentary structures which at turn around, when their net spin is acquired, intersect delineating a "V"-like structure. Each filament torques the other in opposite directions; the filament that first drains into the galaxy forms the inner counterrotating bar, while material ...

  10. Non-isothermal effects on Be disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vieira, Rodrigo G; Bjorkman, Jon E

    2016-01-01

    In the last decade, the viscous decretion disk model has emerged as the new paradigm for Be star disks. In this contribution, we propose a simple analytical model to estimate the continuum infrared excess arising from these circumstellar disks, in the light of the currently accepted scenario. We demonstrate that the disk can be satisfactorily described by a two component system: an inner optically thick region, which we call the pseudo-photosphere, and a diffuse outer part. In particular, a direct connexion between the disk brightness profile and the thermal structure is derived, and then confronted to realistic numerical simulations. This result quantifies how the non-isothermality of the disk ultimately affects both infrared measured fluxes and visibilities.

  11. VOLATILE-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS IN THE UNUSUAL 49 CETI DEBRIS DISK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of β Pictoris

  12. VOLATILE-RICH CIRCUMSTELLAR GAS IN THE UNUSUAL 49 CETI DEBRIS DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberge, Aki; Grady, Carol A. [Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Welsh, Barry Y. [Eureka Scientific, 2452 Delmer, Suite 100, Oakland, CA 96002 (United States); Kamp, Inga [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Weinberger, Alycia J., E-mail: Aki.Roberge@nasa.gov [Department of Terrestrial Magnitism, Carnegie Institution for Science, 5241 Broad Branch Road NW, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2014-11-20

    We present Hubble Space Telescope Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing submillimeter CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight C I column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the O I column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of β Pictoris.

  13. Volatile-Rich Circumstellar Gas in the Unusual 49 Ceti Debris Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Roberge, Aki; Kamp, Inga; Weinberger, Alycia J; Grady, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope STIS far-UV spectra of the edge-on disk around 49 Ceti, one of the very few debris disks showing sub-mm CO emission. Many atomic absorption lines are present in the spectra, most of which arise from circumstellar gas lying along the line-of-sight to the central star. We determined the line-of-sight CI column density, estimated the total carbon column density, and set limits on the OI column density. Surprisingly, no line-of-sight CO absorption was seen. We discuss possible explanations for this non-detection, and present preliminary estimates of the carbon abundances in the line-of-sight gas. The C/Fe ratio is much greater than the solar value, suggesting that 49 Cet harbors a volatile-rich gas disk similar to that of Beta Pictoris.

  14. Meridional circulation in turbulent protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Fromang, Sebastien; Lyra, Wladimir; Masset, Frederic

    2011-01-01

    Based on the viscous disk theory, a number of recent studies have suggested there is large scale meridional circulation in protoplanetary disks. Such a flow could account for the presence of crystalline silicates, including calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs), at large distances from the sun. This paper aims at examining whether such large-scale flows exist in turbulent protoplanetary disks. High-resolution global hydrodynamical and magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) numerical simulations o...

  15. Disk access controller for Multi 8 computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having presented the initial characteristics and weaknesses of the software provided for the control of a memory disk coupled with a Multi 8 computer, the author reports the development and improvement of this controller software. He presents the different constitutive parts of the computer and the operation of the disk coupling and of the direct access to memory. He reports the development of the disk access controller: software organisation, loader, subprograms and statements

  16. Unsteady Compressible Stokes Layers on a Disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.N. Venkatasiva Murthy

    1983-04-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady motion of a viscous compressible rotating gas bounded by a single infinite disk is studied when small amplitude torsional oscillations are superimposed on the disk. The generation and propagation of waves due to the interactions of compressibility, viscosity and rotation during the transient evolution is discussed. In comparison with the non-oscillatory case, the forcing frequency of the disk is capable of inducing several additional interesting features.

  17. Theory of Disk Accretion onto Magnetic Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Dong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disk accretion onto magnetic stars occurs in a variety of systems, including accreting neutron stars (with both high and low magnetic fields, white dwarfs, and protostars. We review some of the key physical processes in magnetosphere-disk interaction, highlighting the theoretical uncertainties. We also discuss some applications to the observations of accreting neutron star and protostellar systems, as well as possible connections to protoplanetary disks and exoplanets.

  18. Molecular Gas in Young Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, A.; Abraham, P.; Juhasz, A.; Kiss, Cs.; Pascucci, I.; Kospal, A.; Apai, D.; Henning, T.; Csengeri, T.; Grady, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old > or approx.8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordia1 origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesima1s can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk ofHD21997.

  19. On a family of pseudohyperbolic disks

    OpenAIRE

    Mortini, Raymond; Rupp, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Hyperbolic geometry plays an important role within function theory of the disk. For example, via the Schwarz-Pick Lemma, the isometries of the unit disk $\\mathbb D$ with respect to this geometry are the conformal self-maps of $\\mathbb D$. In this elementary classroom note, we are interested in the collection of the pseudohyperbolic disks $D_\\rho(x,r)$ (with fixed radius $r$ and variable hyperbolic centers $-1

  20. Local Magnetohydrodynamical Models of Layered Accretion Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming, Timothy; Stone, James M.

    2002-01-01

    Using numerical MHD simulations, we have studied the evolution of the magnetorotational instability in stratified accretion disks in which the ionization fraction (and therefore resistivity) varies substantially with height. This model is appropriate to dense, cold disks around protostars or dwarf nova systems which are ionized by external irradiation of cosmic rays or high-energy photons. We find the growth and saturation of the MRI occurs only in the upper layers of the disk where the magne...

  1. Vertical dynamics of disk galaxies in MOND

    OpenAIRE

    Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Zhao, HongSheng; Ciotti, Luca

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of discriminating between Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) and Newtonian gravity with dark matter, by studying the vertical dynamics of disk galaxies. We consider models with the same circular velocity in the equatorial plane (purely baryonic disks in MOND and the same disks in Newtonian gravity embedded in spherical dark matter haloes), and we construct their intrinsic and projected kinematical fields by solving the Jeans equations under the assumption of a t...

  2. Quasar Accretion Disks Are Strongly Inhomogeneous

    OpenAIRE

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been observed to vary stochastically with 10-20 rms amplitudes over a range of optical wavelengths where the emission arises in an accretion disk. Since the accretion disk is unlikely to vary coherently, local fluctuations may be significantly larger than the global rms variability. We investigate toy models of quasar accretion disks consisting of a number of regions, n, whose temperatures vary independently with an amplitude of \\sigma_T in dex. Models with l...

  3. MOLECULAR GAS IN YOUNG DEBRIS DISKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J = 3-2 survey with the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities of HD21997 and 49 Ceti are not particularly high, these objects seem to harbor the most extended disks within our sample. The double-peaked profiles of HD21997 were reproduced by a Keplerian disk model combined with the LIME radiative transfer code. Based on their similarities, 49 Ceti and HD21997 may be the first representatives of a so far undefined new class of relatively old (∼>8 Myr), gaseous dust disks. From our results, neither primordial origin nor steady secondary production from icy planetesimals can unequivocally explain the presence of CO gas in the disk of HD21997.

  4. The canine intervertebral disk. 2. Degenerative changes: nonchondrodystrophoid versus chondrodystrophoid disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the second of a two-part article on the canine intervertebral disk, the morphological changes which occur within the disk during aging and degeneration are described. Degeneration of the intervertebral disk appears to be a self-perpetuating process as a consequence of disruption to the annulus fibrous, cellular remodeling, altered biomechanical loading, and nutritional deficiencies. In the nonchondrodystrophoid disk, premature acceleration of the aging process can occur following traumatic disruption to the annulus fibrous. This degeneration usually occurs in isolated disks along the length of the vertebral column, By contrast, disk degeneration in the chondrodystrophoid breeds occurs simultaneously in all disks along the vertebral column and usually is well advanced by two years of age, Ultrastructural differences between the intervertebral disk of the nonchondrodystrophoid dog and that of the chondrodystrophoid dog may explain the rapidity and severity of degenerative changes in the latter breeds

  5. Evaluation of powder metallurgy superalloy disk materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to develop nickel-base superalloy disk material using prealloyed powder metallurgy techniques. The program included fabrication of test specimens and subscale turbine disks from four different prealloyed powders (NASA-TRW-VIA, AF2-1DA, Mar-M-432 and MERL 80). Based on evaluation of these specimens and disks, two alloys (AF2-1DA and Mar-M-432) were selected for scale-up evaluation. Using fabricating experience gained in the subscale turbine disk effort, test specimens and full scale turbine disks were formed from the selected alloys. These specimens and disks were then subjected to a rigorous test program to evaluate their physical properties and determine their suitability for use in advanced performance turbine engines. A major objective of the program was to develop processes which would yield alloy properties that would be repeatable in producing jet engine disks from the same powder metallurgy alloys. The feasibility of manufacturing full scale gas turbine engine disks by thermomechanical processing of pre-alloyed metal powders was demonstrated. AF2-1DA was shown to possess tensile and creep-rupture properties in excess of those of Astroloy, one of the highest temperature capability disk alloys now in production. It was determined that metallographic evaluation after post-HIP elevated temperature exposure should be used to verify the effectiveness of consolidation of hot isostatically pressed billets.

  6. Chemical history of molecules in circumstellar disks

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Ruud; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Doty, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    The chemical composition of a protoplanetary disk is determined not only by in situ chemical processes during the disk phase, but also by the history of the gas and dust before it accreted from the natal envelope. In order to understand the disk's chemical composition at the time of planet formation, especially in the midplane, one has to go back in time and retrace the chemistry to the molecular cloud that collapsed to form the disk and the central star. Here we present a new astrochemical m...

  7. The Galactic Thick Disk Stellar Abundances

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, J X; Carney, B W; McWilliam, A; Wolfe, A M; Prochaska, Jason X.; Naumov, Sergei O.; Carney, Bruce W.; William, Andrew Mc; Wolfe, Arthur M.

    2000-01-01

    We present first results from a program to measure the chemical abundances of a large (N>30) sample of thick disk stars with the principal goal of investigating the formation history of the Galactic thick disk. Our analysis confirms previous studies of O and Mg in the thick disk stars which reported enhancements in excess of the thin disk population. Furthermore, the observations of Si, Ca, Ti, Mn, Co, V, Zn, Al, and Eu all argue that the thick disk population has a distinct chemical history from the thin disk. With the exception of V and Co, the thick disk abundance patterns match or tend towards the values observed for halo stars with [Fe/H]~-1. This suggests that the thick disk stars had a chemical enrichment history similar to the metal-rich halo stars. With the possible exception of Si, the thick disk abundance patterns are in excellent agreement with the chemical abundances observed in the metal-poor bulge stars suggesting the two populations formed from the same gas reservoir at a common epoch. We disc...

  8. Characterisation of the Galactic thick disk

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Thick disks appear to be common in external large spiral galaxies and our own Milky Way also hosts one. The existence of a thick disk is possibly directly linked to the formation history of the host galaxy and if its properties is known it can constrain models of galaxy formation and help us to better understand galaxy formation and evolution. This brief review attempts to highlight some of the characteristics of the Galactic thick disk and how it relates to other stellar populations such as the thin disk and the Galactic bulge. Focus has been put on results from high-resolution spectroscopic data obtained during the last 10 to 15 years.

  9. Strength of Cracked Reinforced Concrete Disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoang, Cao Linh; Nielsen, Mogens Peter

    1999-01-01

    The paper deals with models, based on the theory of plasticity, to be used in strength assessments of reinforced concrete disks suffering from different kinds of cracking. Based on the assumption that the sliding strength of concrete is reduced in sections where cracks are located, solutions for...... the shear strength of disks with initial cracks and disks suffering from isotropic cracking are presented. Furthermore, in the case of isotropicly cracked disks subjected to arbitrary in-plane loading, a general yield condition is derived....

  10. Generalized Similarity for Accretion/Decretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, Roman R

    2016-01-01

    Decretion (or external) disks are gas disks freely expanding to large radii due to their internal stresses. They are expected to naturally arise in tidal disruption events, around Be stars, in mass-losing post main sequence binaries, as a result of supernova fallback, etc. Their evolution is theoretically understood in two regimes: when the central object does not exert torque on the disk (a standard assumption for conventional accretion disks) or when no mass inflow (or outflow) occurs at the disk center. However, many astrophysical objects - circumbinary disks, Be stars, neutron stars accreting in a propeller regime, etc. - feature non-zero torque simultaneously with the non-zero accretion (or ejection of mass) at the disk center. We provide a general description for the evolution of such disks (both linear and non-linear) in the self-similar regime, to which the disk should asymptotically converge with time. We identify a similarity parameter $\\lambda$, which is uniquely related to the degree, to which the...

  11. Circumstellar Debris Disks: Diagnosing the Unseen Perturber

    CERN Document Server

    Nesvold, Erika R; Vican, Laura; Farr, Will M

    2016-01-01

    The first indication of the presence of a circumstellar debris disk is usually the detection of excess infrared emission from the population of small dust grains orbiting the star. This dust is short-lived, requiring continual replenishment, and indicating that the disk must be excited by an unseen perturber. Previous theoretical studies have demonstrated that an eccentric planet orbiting interior to the disk will stir the larger bodies in the belt and produce dust via interparticle collisions. However, motivated by recent observations, we explore another possible mechanism for heating a debris disk: a stellar-mass perturber orbiting exterior to and inclined to the disk and exciting the disk particles' eccentricities and inclinations via the Kozai-Lidov mechanism. We explore the consequences of an exterior perturber on the evolution of a debris disk using secular analysis and collisional N-body simulations. We demonstrate that a Kozai-Lidov excited disk can generate a dust disk via collisions and we compare t...

  12. Hyperaccreting Neutron-Star Disks, Magnetized Disks and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dong

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the study of the hyperaccreting neutron-star disks and magnetized accretion flows. It is usually proposed that hyperaccreting disks surrounding stellar-mass black holes with a huge accretion rate are central engines of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, hyperaccretion disks around neutron stars may exist in some GRB formation scenarios. We study the structure and neutrino emission of a hyperaccretion disk around a neutron star. We consider a steady-state hyperaccretion d...

  13. Femtosecond mode-locked holmium fiber laser pumped by semiconductor disk laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamorovskiy, A; Marakulin, A V; Ranta, S; Tavast, M; Rautiainen, J; Leinonen, T; Kurkov, A S; Okhotnikov, O G

    2012-05-01

    We report on a 2085 nm holmium-doped silica fiber laser passively mode-locked by semiconductor saturable absorber mirror and carbon nanotube absorber. The laser, pumped by a 1.16 μm semiconductor disk laser, produces 890 femtosecond pulses with the average power of 46 mW and the repetition rate of 15.7 MHz. PMID:22555700

  14. The chemical history of molecules in circumstellar disks. I. Ices

    CERN Document Server

    Visser, R; Doty, S D; Dullemond, C P

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) Aims & Methods. A two-dimensional, semi-analytical model is presented that follows, for the first time, the chemical evolution from a collapsing molecular cloud (a pre-stellar core) to a protostar and circumstellar disk. The model computes infall trajectories from any point in the cloud and tracks the radial and vertical motion of material in the viscously evolving disk. It includes a full time-dependent radiative transfer treatment of the dust temperature, which controls much of the chemistry. A small parameter grid is explored to understand the effects of the sound speed and the mass and rotation of the cloud. The freeze-out and evaporation of carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H2O), as well as the potential for forming complex organic molecules in ices, are considered as important first steps to illustrate the full chemistry. Results. Both species freeze out towards the centre before the collapse begins. Pure CO ice evaporates during the infall phase and re-adsorbs in those parts of the disk th...

  15. The Orientation of Accretion Disks Relative to Dust Disks in Radio Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Schmitt, H R

    2002-01-01

    We study the orientation of accretion disks, traced by the position angle of the jet, relative to the dust disk major axis in a sample of 20 nearby Radio Galaxies. We find that the observed distribution of angles between the jet and dust disk major axis is consistent with jets homogeneously distributed over a polar cap of 77 degrees.

  16. Thick-disk evolution induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk

    CERN Document Server

    Villalobos, Álvaro; Helmi, Amina

    2009-01-01

    We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate the evolution of the structural and kinematical properties of simulated thick disks induced by the growth of an embedded thin disk. The thick disks used in the present study originate from cosmologically-common 5:1 encounters between initially-thin primary disk galaxies and infalling satellites. The growing thin disks are modeled as static gravitational potentials and we explore a variety of growing-disk parameters that are likely to influence the response of thick disks. We find that the final thick-disk properties depend strongly on the total mass and radial scale-length of the growing thin disk, and much less sensitively on its growth timescale and vertical scale-height as well as the initial sense of thick-disk rotation. Overall, the growth of an embedded thin disk can cause a substantial contraction in both the radial and vertical direction, resulting in a significant decrease in the scale-lengths and scale-heights of thick disks. Kinematically, ...

  17. The physical and chemical evolution of protostellar disks. The growth of protostellar disks: Progress to date

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahler, Steven W.

    1993-01-01

    This study constitutes one part of our multi-disciplinary approach to the evolution of planet-forming disks. The goal is to establish the disks' thermal and mechanical properties as they grow by the infall of their parent interstellar clouds. Thus far, significant advances toward establishing the evolving surface density of such disks was made.

  18. Dust amorphization in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Glauser, Adrian M; Watson, Dan M; Henning, Thomas; Schegerer, Alexander A; Wolf, Sebastian; Audard, Marc; Baldovin-Saavedra, Carla

    2009-01-01

    High-energy irradiation of the circumstellar material might impact the structure and the composition of a protoplanetary disk and hence the process of planet formation. In this paper, we present a study on the possible influence of the stellar irradiation, indicated by X-ray emission, on the crystalline structure of the circumstellar dust. The dust crystallinity is measured for 42 class II T Tauri stars in the Taurus star-forming region using a decomposition fit of the 10 micron silicate feature, measured with the Spitzer IRS instrument. Since the sample includes objects with disks of various evolutionary stages, we further confine the target selection, using the age of the objects as a selection parameter. We correlate the X-ray luminosity and the X-ray hardness of the central object with the crystalline mass fraction of the circumstellar dust and find a significant anti-correlation for 20 objects within an age range of approx. 1 to 4.5 Myr. We postulate that X-rays represent the stellar activity and consequ...

  19. Improving actuator disk wake model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wind energy industry has traditionally relied on simple wake models for estimating Wind Turbine (WT) wake losses. Despite limitations, low requirements in terms of detailed rotor information makes their use feasible, unlike more complex models, such as Blade Element Method (BEM) or Actuator Line. Froude's Actuator Disk (AD) does not suffer the simpler model's limitation of prescribing the wake through a closed set of equations, while sharing with them the low rotor data requirements. On the other hand they require some form of parametrization to close the model and calculate total thrust acting on the flow. An Actuator Disk model was developed, using an iterative algorithm based on Froude's one-dimensional momentum theory to determine the WT's performance, proving to be successful in estimating the performance of both machines in undisturbed flow and in the wake of an upstream machines. Before Froude's AD limitations compared to more complex rotor models, load distributions emulating those of a BEM model were tested. The results show that little impact is obtained at 3 rotor diameters downstream and beyond, agreeing with common definition of a far-wake that starts at 1-2 diameters downstream, where rotor characteristics become negligible and atmospheric flow effects dominate

  20. Hard disks with SCSI interface

    CERN Document Server

    Denisov, O Yu

    1999-01-01

    The testing of 20 models of hard SCSI-disks is carried out: the Fujitsu MAE3091LP; the IBM DDRS-39130, DGHS-318220, DNES-318350, DRHS-36V and DRVS-18V; the Quantum Atlas VI 18.2; the Viking 11 9.1; the Seagate ST118202LW, ST118273LW, ST118273W, ST318203LW, ST318275LW, ST34520W, ST39140LW and ST39173W; and the Western Digital WDE9100-0007, WDE9100-AV0016, WDE9100-AV0030 and WDE9180-0048. All tests ran under the Windows NT 4.0 workstation operating system with Service Pack 4, under video mode with 1024*768 pixel resolution, 32- bit colour depth and V-frequency equal to 85 Hz. The detailed description and characteristics of SCSI stores are presented. Test results (ZD Winstone 99 and ZD WinBench 99 tests) are given in both table and diagram (disk transfer rate) forms. (0 refs).

  1. Circumplanetary disk or circumplanetary envelope?

    CERN Document Server

    Szulágyi, J; Lega, E; Crida, A; Morbidelli, A; Guillot, T

    2016-01-01

    We present three-dimensional simulations with nested meshes of the dynamics of the gas around a Jupiter mass planet with the JUPITER and FARGOCA codes. We implemented a radiative transfer module into the JUPITER code to account for realistic heating and cooling of the gas. We focus on the circumplanetary gas flow, determining its characteristics at very high resolution ($80\\%$ of Jupiter's diameter). In our nominal simulation where the temperature evolves freely by the radiative module and reaches 13000 K at the planet, a circumplanetary envelope was formed filling the entire Roche-lobe. Because of our equation of state is simplified and probably overestimates the temperature, we also performed simulations with limited maximal temperatures in the planet region (1000 K, 1500 K, and 2000 K). In these fixed temperature cases circumplanetary disks (CPDs) were formed. This suggests that the capability to form a circumplanetary disk is not simply linked to the mass of the planet and its ability to open a gap. Inste...

  2. Star formation in rotating, magnetized molecular disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of dense, rotating molecular disks associated with protostars and bipolar outflows suggests that massive (M/sub d/approx.10/sup 1.5/ M/sub sun/) objects have not shed their excessive (happrox.1022 cm2 s-1) angular momentum by the time protostellar activity begins. This paper presents a theory for star formation in rotating disks in which accretion onto the protostellar core produces FUV radiation which heats the disk surfaces out to large radii. A hydromagnetic wind results in which heated gas is driven out along field lines which thread the disk and are aligned with the disk rotation axis. For accretion luminosities of 4 x 1037 ergs s-1, a highly ionized flow inside 1015 cm with M/sub ion/ up to 10-6 M/sub sun/ yr-1 is expected, and a much more massive, neutral component carrying M/sub w/ = 1022 g s-1 from disk radii r>1015 cm. Terminal wind speeds of 50 km s-1 are achieved in this bipolar outflow. The centrifugally driven wind removes angular momentum from the disk at rates high enough to brake it down to protostellar specific values in 105 yr. The wind drives an accretion rate through the disk at rates which are consistent with the accretion luminosity. This global analysis of star formation in a rotating, magnetized disk offers a unifying scheme for understanding both star formation and bipolar outflows. The disks are ''flywheels'' that store rotational energy which is released at a rate dictated self-consistently by the rate at which accretion onto the central protostellar core occurs. The disks in which massive stars form are predicted to be dense (108 cm-3) and have rotation speeds of 4 km s -1, scales of order 5 x 1016 cm, masses of order 102 M/sub sun/, and axial ratios of 0.2

  3. Lifetimes and Accretion Rates of Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Xiao, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Protoplanetary disks originate in the collapse of molecular cloud cores. The formation and evolution of disks are influenced by the properties of molecular cloud cores. In this paper we investigate the dependence of disk lifetimes and accretion rates on cloud core properties. We find that the lifetime increases as the angular velocities and the mass of cloud cores increase and that the lifetime decreases as the core temperature increases. We have calculated the distribution of disk lifetimes and disk fractions with stellar age. Our calculations show that the lifetime is in the range of 1-15 Myr and that the typical lifetime is 1-3 Myr. There are a few disks with lifetimes greater than 10 Myr and ˜ 30% of the disks have lifetimes less than 1 Myr. We also fit the disk fraction by an exponential decay curve with characteristic time ˜3.7 Myr. Our results explain the observations of disk lifetimes. We also find that the accretion rate does not change significantly with ω and generally decreases with {T}{{cd}}. At the early evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-2. Since the effects of the photoevaporation are weak at this stage, this relation is the consequence of the cloud core properties. At the late evolution of the disks, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation is about \\dot{M}\\propto {M}*1.2-1.7. For low accretion rates at this stage, the \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relation results from the effects of X-ray photoevaporation. The calculated \\dot{M}{--}{M}* relations are consistent with the observations.

  4. The molecular composition of the planet-forming regions of protoplanetary disks across the luminosity regime

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) Near- to mid-IR observations of protoplanetary disks show that the inner regions (<10AU) are rich in small organic volatiles (e.g., C2H2 and HCN). Trends in the data suggest that disks around cooler stars (~3000K) are potentially more carbon- and molecule-rich than their hotter counterparts. Our aims are to explore the composition of the planet-forming region of disks around stars from M dwarf to Herbig Ae and compare with the observed trends. Models of the disk physical structure are coupled with a gas-grain chemical network to map the abundances in the planet-forming zone. N2 self shielding, X-ray-induced chemistry, and initial abundances, are investigated. The composition in the 'observable' atmosphere is compared with that in the midplane where the planet-building reservoir resides. M dwarf disk atmospheres are relatively more molecule rich than those for T Tauri or Herbig Ae disks. The weak far-UV flux helps retain this complexity which is enhanced by X-ray-induced ion-molecule chemistry. N...

  5. Resolving the gap and AU-scale asymmetries in the pre-transitional disk of V1247 Orionis

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Stefan; Sitko, Michael L; Monnier, John D; Calvet, Nuria; Espaillat, Catherine; Grady, Carol A; Harries, Tim J; Hoenig, Sebastian F; Russell, Ray W; Swearingen, Jeremy R; Werren, Chelsea; Wilner, David J

    2013-01-01

    Pre-transitional disks are protoplanetary disks with a gapped disk structure, potentially indicating the presence of young planets in these systems. In order to explore the structure of these objects and their gap-opening mechanism, we observed the pre-transitional disk V1247 Orionis using the Very Large Telescope Interferometer, the Keck Interferometer, Keck-II, Gemini South, and IRTF. This allows us spatially resolve the AU-scale disk structure from near- to mid-infrared wavelengths (1.5 to 13 {\\mu}m), tracing material at different temperatures and over a wide range of stellocentric radii. Our observations reveal a narrow, optically-thick inner-disk component (located at 0.18 AU from the star) that is separated from the optically thick outer disk (radii >46 AU), providing unambiguous evidence for the existence of a gap in this pre-transitional disk. Surprisingly, we find that the gap region is filled with significant amounts of optically thin material with a carbon-dominated dust mineralogy. The presence of...

  6. Development of Powered Disk Type Sugar Cane Stubble Saver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radite P.A.S.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to design, fabricate and test a prototype of sugar cane stubble saver based on powered disk mechanism. In this research, a heavy duty disk plow or disk harrow was used as a rotating knife to cut the sugarcane stubble. The parabolic disk was chosen because it is proven reliable as soil working tools and it is available in the market as spare part of disk plow or disk harrow unit. The prototype was mounted on the four wheel tractor’s three point hitch, and powered by PTO of the tractor. Two kinds of disks were used in these experiments, those were disk with regular edge or plain disk and disk with scalloped edge or scalloped disk. Both disks had diameter of 28 inch. Results of field test showed that powered disk mechanism could satisfy cut sugar cane’s stubble. However, scalloped disk type gave smoother stubble cuts compared to that of plain disk. Plain disk type gave broken stubble cut. Higher rotation (1000 rpm resulted better cuts as compared to lower rotation (500 rpm both either on plain disk and scalloped disk. The developed prototype could work below the soil surface at depth of 5 to 10 cm. With tilt angle setting 20O and disk angle 45O the width of cut was about 25 cm.

  7. Recent development of disk lasers at TRUMPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schad, Sven-Silvius; Gottwald, Tina; Kuhn, Vincent; Ackermann, Matthias; Bauer, Dominik; Scharun, Michael; Killi, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    The disk laser is one of the most important laser concepts for today's industrial laser market. Offering high brilliance at low cost, high optical efficiency and great application flexibility the disk laser paved the way for many industrial laser applications. Over the past years power and brightness increased and the disk laser turned out to be a very versatile laser source, not only for welding but also for cutting. Both, the quality and speed of cutting are superior to CO2-based lasers for a vast majority of metals, and, most important, in a broad thickness range. In addition, due to the insensitivity against back reflections the disk laser is well suited for cutting highly reflective metal such as brass or copper. These advantages facilitate versatile cutting machines and explain the high and growing demand for disk lasers for applications besides welding applications that can be observed today. From a today's perspective the disk principle has not reached any fundamental limits regarding output power per disk or beam quality, and offers numerous advantages over other high power resonator concepts, especially over fiber lasers or direct diode lasers. This paper will give insight in the latest progress in kilowatt class cw disk laser technology at TRUMPF and will discuss recent power scaling results as well.

  8. A Primer on Unifying Debris Disk Morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eve J.; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-08-01

    A “minimum model” for debris disks consists of a narrow ring of parent bodies, secularly forced by a single planet on a possibly eccentric orbit, colliding to produce dust grains that are perturbed by stellar radiation pressure. We demonstrate how this minimum model can reproduce a wide variety of disk morphologies imaged in scattered starlight. Five broad categories of disk shape can be captured: “rings,” “needles,” “ships-and-wakes,” “bars,” and “moths (a.k.a. fans),” depending on the viewing geometry. Moths can also sport “double wings.” We explain the origin of morphological features from first principles, exploring the dependence on planet eccentricity, disk inclination dispersion, and the parent body orbital phases at which dust grains are born. A key determinant in disk appearance is the degree to which dust grain orbits are apsidally aligned. Our study of a simple steady-state (secularly relaxed) disk should serve as a reference for more detailed models tailored to individual systems. We use the intuition gained from our guidebook of disk morphologies to interpret, informally, the images of a number of real-world debris disks. These interpretations suggest that the farthest reaches of planetary systems are perturbed by eccentric planets, possibly just a few Earth masses each.

  9. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10–4 M ☉. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of Fmm∝M∗1.5--2.0 to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  10. Circumstellar disks around binary stars in Taurus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akeson, R. L. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, IPAC/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Jensen, E. L. N. [Swarthmore College, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Swarthmore, PA 19081 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have conducted a survey of 17 wide (>100 AU) young binary systems in Taurus with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) at two wavelengths. The observations were designed to measure the masses of circumstellar disks in these systems as an aid to understanding the role of multiplicity in star and planet formation. The ALMA observations had sufficient resolution to localize emission within the binary system. Disk emission was detected around all primaries and 10 secondaries, with disk masses as low as 10{sup –4} M {sub ☉}. We compare the properties of our sample to the population of known disks in Taurus and find that the disks from this binary sample match the scaling between stellar mass and millimeter flux of F{sub mm}∝M{sub ∗}{sup 1.5--2.0} to within the scatter found in previous studies. We also compare the properties of the primaries to those of the secondaries and find that the secondary/primary stellar and disk mass ratios are not correlated; in three systems, the circumsecondary disk is more massive than the circumprimary disk, counter to some theoretical predictions.

  11. Molecular gas in young debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moór, A; Juhász, A; Kiss, Cs; Pascucci, I; Kóspál, Á; Apai, D; Henning, Th; Csengeri, T; Grady, C

    2011-01-01

    Gas-rich primordial disks and tenuous gas-poor debris disks are usually considered as two distinct evolutionary phases of the circumstellar matter. Interestingly, the debris disk around the young main-sequence star 49 Ceti possesses a substantial amount of molecular gas, and possibly represents the missing link between the two phases. Motivated to understand the evolution of the gas component in circumstellar disks via finding more 49 Ceti-like systems, we carried out a CO J=3-2 survey with Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment, targeting 20 infrared-luminous debris disks. These systems fill the gap between primordial and old tenuous debris disks in terms of fractional luminosity. Here we report on the discovery of a second 49 Ceti-like disk around the 30 Myr old A3-type star HD21997, a member of the Columba Association. This system was also detected in the CO(2-1) transition, and the reliable age determination makes it an even clearer example of an old gas-bearing disk than 49 Ceti. While the fractional luminosities...

  12. Circular plate capacitor with different disks

    CERN Document Server

    Paffuti, Giampiero; Di Lieto, Alberto; Maccarrone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we write a system of integral equations for a capacitor composed by two disks of different radii, generalizing Love's equation for equal disks. We compute the complete asymptotic form of the capacitance matrix both for large and small distances obtaining a generalization of Kirchhoff's formula for the latter case.

  13. Disks and Planets Around Massive White Dwarfs

    OpenAIRE

    Livio, M.; Pringle, J. E.; Wood, K.

    2005-01-01

    We predict the existence of dusty disks and possibly CO planets around massive white dwarfs. We show that the thermal emission from these disks should be detectable in the infrared. The planets may also be detectable either by direct IR imaging, spectroscopy, or using the pulsations of the white dwarfs.

  14. Sporadically Torqued Accretion Disks Around Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Garofalo, D; Garofalo, David; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    The assumption that black hole accretion disks possess an untorqued inner boundary, the so-called zero torque boundary condition, has been employed by models of black hole disks for many years. However, recent theoretical and observational work suggests that magnetic forces may appreciably torque the inner disk. This raises the question of the effect that a time-changing magnetic torque may have on the evolution of such a disk. In particular, we explore the suggestion that the ``Deep Minimum State'' of the Seyfert galaxy MCG--6-30-15 can be identified as a sporadic inner disk torquing event. This suggestion is motivated by detailed analyses of changes in the profile of the broad fluorescence iron line in XMM-Newton spectra. We find that the response of such a disk to a torquing event has two phases; an initial damming of the accretion flow together with a partial draining of the disk interior to the torque location, followed by a replenishment of the inner disk as the system achieves a new (torqued) steady-st...

  15. A recipe for making hot accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A powerful new method to determine the structure of effectively optically thin accretion disks is described. The method reduces the set of equations needed to be numerically solved to the microphysical equations only and reduces the dimension of the parameter space needed to be explored from three to two. It is shown why proton optical depth and compactness are natural parameters in studying hot plasma clouds (HPCs), and the structure equations of geometrically thin alpha disk are studied and the accretion disk parameters are related to the HPC parameters. As an example, the method is applied to an effectively optically thin bremsstrahlung disk. It is shown how a full disk solution is constructed from the generic solution profile. 17 refs

  16. Vague Logic Approach to Disk Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Hooda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vague sets theory separates the evidences in favour and against of an element in a set which provides better mechanism to handle impreciseness and uncertainty. This research paper aims to handle the incompleteness and impreciseness of data associated with the disk access requests. Here, we propose a new disk scheduling algorithm, Vague Disk Scheduling (VDS Algorithm, based on vague logic. The proposed framework includes Vague-Fuzzification Technique, Priority Expression, and VDS Algorithm. The Vague-Fuzzification Technique is applied to the input data of each disk access request and generates a priority for each request in the queue. Based on the priority allotted the requests are serviced. Finally work is evaluated on different datasets and finally compared with Fuzzy Disk Scheduling (FDS Algorithm. The results prove that VDS algorithm performs better than FDS Algorithm.

  17. Magnetic fields in early protostellar disk formation

    CERN Document Server

    González-Casanova, Diego F; Lazarian, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We consider formation of accretion disks from a realistically turbulent molecular gas using 3D MHD simulations. In particular, we analyze the effect of the fast turbulent reconnection described by the Lazarian & Vishniac (1999) model for the removal of magnetic flux from a disk. With our numerical simulations we demonstrate how the fast reconnection enables protostellar disk formation resolving the so-called "magnetic braking catastrophe". In particular, we provide a detailed study of the dynamics of a 0.5 M$_\\odot$ protostar and the formation of its disk for up to several thousands years. We measure the evolution of the mass, angular momentum, magnetic field, and turbulence around the star. We consider effects of two processes that strongly affect the magnetic transfer of angular momentum, both of which are based on turbulent reconnection: the first, "reconnection diffusion", removes the magnetic flux from the disk, the other involves the change of the magnetic field's topology, but does not change the a...

  18. Quasar Accretion Disks Are Strongly Inhomogeneous

    CERN Document Server

    Dexter, Jason

    2010-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been observed to vary stochastically with 10-20 rms amplitudes over a range of optical wavelengths where the emission arises in an accretion disk. Since the accretion disk is unlikely to vary coherently, local fluctuations may be significantly larger than the global rms variability. We investigate toy models of quasar accretion disks consisting of a number of regions, n, whose temperatures vary independently with an amplitude of \\sigma_T in dex. Models with large fluctuations (\\sigma_T=0.35-0.50) in 100-1000 independently fluctuating zones for every factor of two in radius can explain the observed discrepancy between thin accretion disk sizes inferred from microlensing events and optical luminosity while matching the observed optical variability. For the same range of \\sigma_T, inhomogeneous disk spectra provide excellent fits to the HST quasar composite without invoking global Compton scattering atmospheres to explain the high levels of observed UV emission. Simulated microl...

  19. Structures of magnetized thin accretion disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓卿; 季海生

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) process in thin accretion disks. Therelevant momentum as well as magnetic reduction equations in the thin disk approximation areincluded. On the basis of these equations, we examine numerically the stationary structures, includingdistributions of the surface mass density, temperature and flow velocities of a disk around a youngstellar object (YSO). The numerical results are as follows: (i) There should be an upper limit to themagnitude of magnetic field, such an upper limit corresponds to the equipartition field. For relevantmagnitude of magnetic field of the disk's interior the disk remains approximately Keplerian. (ii) Thedistribution of effective temperature T(r) is a smoothly decreasing function of radius with power 1 corresponding to the observed radiation flux density, provided that the magnetic fieldindex γ= -1/2,is suitably chosen.

  20. About detection of precessing circumpulsar disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimani, Catia

    2016-05-01

    Detections of circumpulsar disks and planetary systems through electromagnetic observations appear quite rare. In the case of PSR 1931+24 and B0656+14, the hypothesis of a precessing disk penetrating the pulsar light cylinder is found consistent with radio and gamma observations from these stars. Disk self-occultation and precession may affect electromagnetic measurements. We investigate here under which conditions gravitational waves generated by circumpulsar disk precession may be detected by the proposed second generation space interferometers DECIGO (DECI-hertz Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) and BBO (Big Bang Observer). The characteristics of circumpulsar detectable precessing disks are estimated as a function of distance from the Solar System. Speculations on detection rates are presented.

  1. Double-Disk Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, JiJi; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Based on observational tests and constraints on halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant component's interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar ...

  2. Neutrino transport in accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sawyer, R F

    2003-01-01

    We test approximate approaches to solving a neutrino transport problem that presents itself in the analysis of some accretion-disk models. Approximation #1 consists of replacing the full, angular- dependent, distribution function by a two-stream simulation, where the streams are respectively outwardly and inwardly directed, with angles $\\cos \\theta=\\pm 1/\\sqrt{3}$ to the vertical. In this approximation the full energy dependence of the distribution function is retained, as are the energy and temperature dependences of the scattering rates. Approximation #2, used in recent works on the subject, replaces the distribution function by an intensity function and the scattering rates by temperature-energy-averaged quantities. We compare the approximations to the results of solving the full Boltzmann equation. Under some interesting conditions, approximation #1 passes the test; approximation #2 does not. We utilize the results of our analysis to construct a toy model of a disc at a temperature and density such that r...

  3. Double-Disk Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, JiJi; Katz, Andrey; Randall, Lisa; Reece, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Based on observational tests of large scale structure and constraints on halo structure, dark matter is generally taken to be cold and essentially collisionless. On the other hand, given the large number of particles and forces in the visible world, a more complex dark sector could be a reasonable or even likely possibility. This hypothesis leads to testable consequences, perhaps portending the discovery of a rich hidden world neighboring our own. We consider a scenario that readily satisfies current bounds that we call Partially Interacting Dark Matter (PIDM). This scenario contains self-interacting dark matter, but it is not the dominant component. Even if PIDM contains only a fraction of the net dark matter density, comparable to the baryonic fraction, the subdominant component’s interactions can lead to interesting and potentially observable consequences. Our primary focus will be the special case of Double-Disk Dark Matter (DDDM), in which self-interactions allow the dark matter to lose enough energy to lead to dynamics similar to those in the baryonic sector. We explore a simple model in which DDDM can cool efficiently and form a disk within galaxies, and we evaluate some of the possible observational signatures. The most prominent signal of such a scenario could be an enhanced indirect detection signature with a distinctive spatial distribution. Even though subdominant, the enhanced density at the center of the galaxy and possibly throughout the plane of the galaxy (depending on precise alignment) can lead to large boost factors, and could even explain a signature as large as the 130 GeV Fermi line. Such scenarios also predict additional dark radiation degrees of freedom that could soon be detectable and would influence the interpretation of future data, such as that from Planck and from the Gaia satellite. We consider this to be the first step toward exploring a rich array of new possibilities for dark matter dynamics.

  4. Herschel detects oxygen in the beta Pictoris debris disk

    CERN Document Server

    Brandeker, A; Olofsson, G; Vandenbussche, B; Acke, B; Barlow, M J; Blommaert, J A D L; Cohen, M; Dent, W R F; Dominik, C; Di Francesco, J; Fridlund, M; Gear, W K; Glauser, A M; Greaves, J S; Harvey, P M; Heras, A M; Hogerheijde, M R; Holland, W S; Huygen, R; Ivison, R J; Leeks, S J; Lim, T L; Liseau, R; Matthews, B C; Pantin, E; Pilbratt, G L; Royer, P; Sibthorpe, B; Waelkens, C; Walker, H J

    2016-01-01

    The young star beta Pictoris is well known for its dusty debris disk, produced through the grinding down by collisions of planetesimals, kilometre-sized bodies in orbit around the star. In addition to dust, small amounts of gas are also known to orbit the star, likely the result from vaporisation of violently colliding dust grains. The disk is seen edge on and from previous absorption spectroscopy we know that the gas is very rich in carbon relative to other elements. The oxygen content has been more difficult to assess, however, with early estimates finding very little oxygen in the gas at a C/O ratio 20x higher than the cosmic value. A C/O ratio that high is difficult to explain and would have far-reaching consequences for planet formation. Here we report on observations by the far-infrared space telescope Herschel, using PACS, of emission lines from ionised carbon and neutral oxygen. The detected emission from C+ is consistent with that previously reported being observed by the HIFI instrument on Herschel,...

  5. Disk-loss and disk-renewal phases in classical Be stars. II. Contrasting with stable and variable disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observational and theoretical studies of classical Be stars have established the utility of polarization color diagrams (PCDs) in helping to constrain the time-dependent mass decretion rates of these systems. We expand on our pilot observational study of this phenomenon, and report the detailed analysis of a long-term (1989-2004) spectropolarimetric survey of nine additional classical Be stars, including systems exhibiting evidence of partial disk-loss/disk-growth episodes as well as systems exhibiting long-term stable disks. After carefully characterizing and removing the interstellar polarization along the line of sight to each of these targets, we analyze their intrinsic polarization behavior. We find that many steady-state Be disks pause at the top of the PCD, as predicted by theory. We also observe sharp declines in the Balmer jump polarization for later spectral type, near edge-on steady-state disks, again as recently predicted by theory, likely caused when the base density of the disk is very high, and the outer region of the edge-on disk starts to self absorb a significant number of Balmer jump photons. The intrinsic V-band polarization and polarization position angle of γ Cas exhibits variations that seem to phase with the orbital period of a known one-armed density structure in this disk, similar to the theoretical predictions of Halonen and Jones. We also observe stochastic jumps in the intrinsic polarization across the Balmer jump of several known Be+sdO systems, and speculate that the thermal inflation of part of the outer region of these disks could be responsible for producing this observational phenomenon. Finally, we estimate the base densities of this sample of stars to be between ≈8 × 10–11 and ≈4 × 10–12 g cm–3 during quasi steady state periods given there maximum observed polarization.

  6. A Gap in TW Hydrae's Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Located a mere 176 light-years away, TW Hydrae is an 8-million-year-old star surrounded by a nearly face-on disk of gas and dust. Recent observations have confirmed the existence of a gap within that disk a particularly intriguing find, since gaps can sometimes signal the presence of a planet.Gaps and PlanetsNumerical simulations have shown that newly-formed planets orbiting within dusty disks can clear the gas and dust out of their paths. This process results in pressure gradients that can be seen in the density structure of the disk, in the form of visible gaps, rings, or spirals.For this reason, finding a gap in a protoplanetary disk can be an exciting discovery. Previous observations of the disk around TW Hydrae had indicated that there might be a gap present, but they were limited in their resolution; despite TW Hydraes relative nearness, attempting to observe the dim light scattered off dust particles in a disk surrounding a distant, bright star is difficult!But a team led by Valerie Rapson (Rochester Institute of Technology, Dudley Observatory) recently set out to follow up on this discovery using a powerful tool: the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI).New ObservationsComparison of the actual image of TW Hydraes disk from GPI (right) to a simulated scattered-light image from a model of a ~0.2 Jupiter-mass planet orbiting in the disk at ~21 AU (left) in two different bands (top: J, bottom: K1).[Adapted from Rapson et al. 2015]GPI is an instrument on the Gemini South Telescope in Chile. Its near-infrared imagers, equipped with extreme adaptive optics, allowed it to probe the disk from ~80 AU all the way in to ~10 AU from the central star, with an unprecedented resolution of ~1.5 AU.These observations from GPI allowed Rapson and collaborators to unambiguously confirm the presence of a gap in TW Hydraes disk. The gap lies at a distance of ~23 AU from the central star (roughly the same distance as Uranus to the Sun), and its ~5 AU wide.Modeled PossibilitiesThere are a

  7. The effects of viscosity on circumplanetary disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Fu Bu; Hsien Shang; Feng Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disks residing in the vicinity of protoplanets are investigated through two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations with the shearing sheet model.We find that viscosity can considerably affect properties of the circumplanetary disk when the mass of the protoplanet Mp (<) 33 M(⊙),where M(⊙) is the Earth's mass.However,effects of viscosity on the circumplanetary disk are negligibly small when the mass of the protoplanet Mp(>) 33 M(⊙).We find that when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙),viscosity can markedly disrupt the spiral structure of the gas around the planet and smoothly distribute the gas,which weakens the torques exerted on the protoplanet.Thus,viscosity can slow the migration speed of a protoplanet.After including viscosity,the size of the circumplanetary disk can be decreased by a factor of (>) 20%.Viscosity helps to transport gas into the circumplanetary disk from the differentially rotating circumstellar disk.The mass of the circumplanetary disk can be increased by a factor of 50% after viscosity is taken into account when Mp(<) 33 M(⊙).Effects of viscosity on the formation of planets and satellites are briefly discussed.

  8. Modelling Molecular Emission from Young Embedded Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsono, D.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L.; Bruderer, S.; Brinch, C. Hogerheijde, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks play an important role in the formation of stars and planets. Recent observations and models have placed strong constraints on the later stages of their evolution (the T Tauri or Herbig Ae/Be phase), when an envelope is no longer present. However, little is known of the disk structure and evolution during the embedded phase of star formation. With Herschel and the VLT, and soon ALMA, we will be able to detect and characterize the early stages of disk formation. Sophisticated modeling including both physical and chemical structure of the system would be needed to interpret the high quality of data. We present a two-dimensional, semi-analytical model of disk formation as also used in Visser et al. (2009) and Visser and Dullemond (2010). The dust temperature is determined using a three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer code (RADMC-3D). Molecular abundances are calculated by following freeze-out and evaporation from the pre-stellar core up to the formation of the circumstellar disk. Synthetic spectra of CO and H2O within the wavelength ranges observable with Herschel and VLT-CRIRES are then produced at a series of time steps, tracing the different stages of disk formation. We also present simulated ALMA images. We discuss the evolution of the molecular emission and the possibility of identifying the presence of embedded disks.

  9. Dynamics of acoustically levitated disk samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, W J; Wei, B

    2004-10-01

    The acoustic levitation force on disk samples and the dynamics of large water drops in a planar standing wave are studied by solving the acoustic scattering problem through incorporating the boundary element method. The dependence of levitation force amplitude on the equivalent radius R of disks deviates seriously from the R3 law predicted by King's theory, and a larger force can be obtained for thin disks. When the disk aspect ratio gamma is larger than a critical value gamma(*) ( approximately 1.9 ) and the disk radius a is smaller than the critical value a(*) (gamma) , the levitation force per unit volume of the sample will increase with the enlargement of the disk. The acoustic levitation force on thin-disk samples ( gammaacoustic field for stable levitation of a large water drop is to adjust the reflector-emitter interval H slightly above the resonant interval H(n) . The simulation shows that the drop is flattened and the central parts of its top and bottom surface become concave with the increase of sound pressure level, which agrees with the experimental observation. The main frequencies of the shape oscillation under different sound pressures are slightly larger than the Rayleigh frequency because of the large shape deformation. The simulated translational frequencies of the vertical vibration under normal gravity condition agree with the theoretical analysis. PMID:15600551

  10. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  11. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chiang, Eugene [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  12. The formation of planets in circumbinary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pelupessy, F I

    2012-01-01

    We examine the formation of planets around binary stars in light of the recently discovered systems Kepler 16, 34 and 35. We conduct hydrodynamical simulations of self gravitating disks around binary systems. The selected binary and disk parameters are chosen consistent with observed systems. The disks are evolved until they settle in a quasi-equilibrium and the resulting systems are compared with the parameters of Kepler 16, 34 and 35. We find a close correspondence of the peak density at the inner disk gap and the orbit of the observed planets. We conclude, based on our simulations, that the orbits of the observed Kepler planets are determined by the size of the inner disk gap which for these systems results from the binary driving. This mediates planet formation either through the density enhancement or through planetary trapping at the density gradient inversion in the inner disk. For all three systems the current eccentricity of the planetary orbit is less than the disk eccentricity in the simulations. T...

  13. The Hot Inner Disk of FU Ori

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Zhaohuan; Calvet, Nuria; Hernandez, Jesus; Muzerolle, James; Tannirkulam, Ajay-Kumar

    2007-01-01

    We have constructed a detailed radiative transfer disk model which reproduces the main features of the spectrum of the outbursting young stellar object FU Orionis from ~ 4000 angstrom, to ~ 8 micron. Using an estimated visual extinction Av~1.5, a steady disk model with a central star mass ~0.3 Msun and a mass accretion rate ~ 2e-4 Msun/yr, we can reproduce the spectral energy distribution of FU Ori quite well. With the mid-infrared spectrum obtained by the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope, we estimate that the outer radius of the hot, rapidly accreting inner disk is ~ 1 AU using disk models truncated at this outer radius. Inclusion of radiation from a cooler irradiated outer disk might reduce the outer limit of the hot inner disk to ~ 0.5 AU. In either case, the radius is inconsistent with a pure thermal instability model for the outburst. Our radiative transfer model implies that the central disk temperature Tc > 1000 K out to ~ 0.5 - 1 AU, suggesting that the magnetorotationa...

  14. Quasar Accretion Disks are Strongly Inhomogeneous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Jason; Agol, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei have been observed to vary stochastically with 10%-20% rms amplitudes over a range of optical wavelengths where the emission arises in an accretion disk. Since the accretion disk is unlikely to vary coherently, local fluctuations may be significantly larger than the global rms variability. We investigate toy models of quasar accretion disks consisting of a number of regions, n, whose temperatures vary independently with an amplitude of σ T in dex. Models with large fluctuations (σ T = 0.35-0.50) in 102-103 independently fluctuating zones for every factor of two in radius can explain the observed discrepancy between thin accretion disk sizes inferred from microlensing events and optical luminosity while matching the observed optical variability. For the same range of σ T , inhomogeneous disk spectra provide excellent fits to the Hubble Space Telescope quasar composite without invoking global Compton scattering atmospheres to explain the high levels of observed UV emission. Simulated microlensing light curves for the Einstein cross from our time-varying toy models are well fit using a time-steady power-law temperature disk and produce magnification light curves that are consistent with current microlensing observations. Deviations due to the inhomogeneous, time-dependent disk structure should occur above the 1% level in the light curves, detectable in future microlensing observations with millimagnitude sensitivity.

  15. Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk for Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, Suzanne; Luckey, M.; McInturff, B.; Allen, J.; Kascak, A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has the unique responsibility to curate NASA's extraterrestrial samples from past and future missions. Curation includes documentation, preservation, preparation and distribution of samples for research, education and public outreach. Between 1969 and 1972 six Apollo missions brought back 382 kilograms of lunar rocks, core and regolith samples, from the lunar surface. JSC also curates meteorites collected from a US cooperative effort among NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution that funds expeditions to Antarctica. The meteorites that are collected include rocks from Moon, Mars, and many asteroids including Vesta. The sample disks for educational use include these different samples. Active relevant learning has always been important to teachers and the Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disk Program provides this active style of learning for students and the general public. The Lunar and Meteorite Sample Disks permit students to conduct investigations comparable to actual scientists. The Lunar Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Basalt, Breccia, Highland Regolith, Anorthosite, Mare Regolith and Orange Soil. The Meteorite Sample Disk contains 6 samples; Chondrite L3, Chondrite H5, Carbonaceous Chondrite, Basaltic Achondrite, Iron and Stony-Iron. Teachers are given different activities that adhere to their standards with the disks. During a Sample Disk Certification Workshop, teachers participate in the activities as students gain insight into the history, formation and geologic processes of the moon, asteroids and meteorites.

  16. The Spitzer IRS Debris Disk Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C.

    2014-04-01

    During the Spitzer Space Telescope cryogenic mission, Guaranteed Time Observers, Legacy Teams, and General Observers obtained Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) observations of hundreds of debris disk candidates. We calibrated the spectra of 571 candidates, including 64 new IRAS and MIPS debris disks candidates, modeled their stellar photospheres, and produced a catalog of excess spectra for unresolved debris disks. We carried out two separate SED analyses. (1) For all targets, we modeled the IRS and MIPS 70 micron data (where available) assuming that the SEDs were well-described using, zero, one or two temperature black bodies. We calculated the probability for each model and computed the average probability to select among models. (2) For a subset of 120 targets with 10 and/or 20 micron silicate features, we modeled the data using spherical silicate (olivine, pyroxene, forsterite, and enstatite) grains located either in a continuous disk with power-law size and surface density distributions or two thin rings that are well-characterized using two separate dust grain temperatures. We present a demographic analysis of the disk properties. For example, we find that the majority of debris disks are better fit using two dust components, suggesting that planetary systems are common in debris disks and that the size distribution of dust grains is consistent with a collisional cascade.

  17. The observational appearance of slim accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Szuszkiewicz, E; Abramowicz, M A; Szuszkiewicz, Ewa; Malkan, Matthew A; Abramowicz, Marek Artur

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine the hypothesis that the optical/UV/soft X-ray continuum of Active Galactic Nuclei is thermal emission from an accretion disk. Previous studies have shown that fitting the spectra with the standard, optically thick and geometrically thin accretion disk models often led to luminosities which contradict the basic assumptions adopted in the standard model. There is no known reason why the accretion rates in AGN should not be larger than the thin disk limit. In fact, more general, slim accretion disk models are self-consistent even for moderately super-Eddington luminosities. We calculate here spectra from a set of thin and slim, optically thick accretion disks. We discuss the differences between the thin and slim disk models, stressing the implications of these differences for the interpretation of the observed properties of AGN. We found that the spectra can be fitted not only by models with a high mass and a low accretion rate (as in the case of thin disk fitting) but also by models with a low mass...

  18. The $Spitzer$ infrared spectrograph survey of protoplanetary disks in Orion A: I. disk properties

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K H; Manoj, P; Forrest, W J; Furlan, Elise; Najita, Joan; Sargent, Benjamin; Hernández, Jesús; Calvet, Nuria; Adame, Lucía; Espaillat, Catherine; Megeath, S T; Muzerolle, James; McClure, M K

    2016-01-01

    We present our investigation of 319 Class II objects in Orion A observed by $Spitzer$/IRS. We also present the follow-up observation of 120 of these Class II objects in Orion A from IRTF/SpeX. We measure continuum spectral indices, equivalent widths, and integrated fluxes that pertain to disk structure and dust composition from IRS spectra of Class II objects in Orion A. We estimate mass accretion rates using hydrogen recombination lines in the SpeX spectra of our targets. Utilizing these properties, we compare the distributions of the disk and dust properties of Orion A disks to those of Taurus disks with respect to position within Orion A (ONC and L1641) and to the sub-groups by the inferred radial structures, such as transitional disks vs. radially continuous full disks. Our main findings are as follows. (1) Inner disks evolve faster than the outer disks. (2) Mass accretion rate of transitional disks and that of radially continuous full disks are statistically significantly displaced from each other. The m...

  19. CT-guided percutaneous laser disk decompression for cervical and lumbar disk hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Percutaneous laser disk decompression under X-ray fluoroscopy was first reported in 1987 for minimally invasive therapy of lumbar disk hernia. In patients with disk hernia, laser vaporizes a small portion of the intervertebral disk thereby reducing the volume and pressure of the affected disk. We present the efficacy and safety of this procedure, and analysis of fair or poor response cases. In our study, 226 cases of lumbar disk hernia and 7 cases of cervical disk hernia were treated under CT guided PLDD. Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and Mac-Nab criteria were investigated to evaluate the response to treatment. Improvement ratio based on the JOA score was calculated as follows. Overall success rate was 91.6% in cases lumber disk hernia, and 100% in cases of cervical disk hernia. We experienced two cases with two cases with postoperative complication. Both cases were treated conservatively. The majority of acute cases and post operative cases were reported to be 'good' on Mac-Nab criteria. Cases of fair or poor response on Mac-Nab criteria were lateral type, foraminal stenosis or large disk hernia. CT-guided PLDD is a safe and accurate procedure. The overall success rate can be increased by carefully selecting patients. (author)

  20. Yb Thin-Disk Laser Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zapata, L E; Beach, R A; Mitchell, S; Payne, S A

    2002-05-14

    Thin-disk laser configurations have recently been demonstrated at cw output povters exceeding 1 kW [1]. Thin-disk lasers enable the generation of high average power by minimizing the distance over which waste heat is transported. A disk-laser of transverse dimensions significantly larger than its thickness will sustain laser output with intensity proportional to the thermal flux it dissipates. The fracture strength of the laser material limits the maximum temperature difference of a credible design. Further increases in the heat dissipation capacity of a disk varies inversely with the disk thickness (t) thus, the average laser output intensity of a thin/disk laser scales as 1/t; that is, to maximize the output intensity we must use the thinnest possible disk that is consistent with the pump geometry. The main challenge for the laser designer is then to coerce a thin gain sample into absorbing pump power efficiently. For this purpose, use of a highly absorbing gain medium is desirable in combination with a pumping geometry that allows multi-passing of the pump light. An important feature of the thin-disk laser is that one-dimensional thermal gradients away from the edges are made to align with the extraction beam Thus, as long as pumping and cooling fields are uniformly distributed, the contributions to wavefront error from dn/dT and the stress optic effect integrate along a 1-dimensional thermal gradient and a constant optical path-length-difference across the extent of the beam. The thin-disk laser therefore, holds promise for high beam quality at high average power.

  1. Patterns In Debris Disks: No Planets Required?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Debris disks like those around Fomalhaut and Beta Pictoris show striking dust patterns often attributed to hidden exoplanets. These patterns have been crucial for constraining the masses and orbits of these planets. But adding a bit of gas to our models of debris disks--too little gas to detect--seems to alter this interpretation. Small amounts of gas lead to new dynamical instabilities that may mimic the narrow eccentric rings and other structures planets would create in a gas-free disk. Can we still use dust patterns to find hidden exoplanets?

  2. Disk degeneration in 14 year old children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports low back symptoms of 1,500 school children (14 years old) evaluated with a questionnaire and with a standardized clinical examination. Forty children who complained of recurrent and/or persistent low back pain and 40 matching symptomless controls were randomly chosen to undergo MR imaging of the lumbar spine. Premature disk degeneration was seen in 25.5% of asymptomatic children and in 40% of those with low back pain. The difference was statistically not significant. Disk degeneration is a surprisingly frequent MR finding in symptomless children. Premature disk degeneration may be the cause of low back pain in some children but is not always symptomatic in childhood

  3. Microdiscectomy for a Paracentral Lumbar Herniated Disk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Savage, Jason W

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniations occur frequently and are often associated with leg pain, weakness, and paresthesias. Fortunately, the natural outcomes of radiculopathy due to a disk herniation are generally favorable, and the vast majority of patients improve with nonoperative care. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who have significant pain that is refractory to at least 6 weeks of conservative care, patients who have a severe or progressive motor deficit, or patients who have any symptoms of bowel or bladder dysfunction. This paper reviews the preoperative and postoperative considerations, as well as the surgical technique, for a microdiscectomy for a lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. PMID:26710186

  4. When did round disk galaxies form?

    OpenAIRE

    Takeuchi, Tomoe M.; Ohta, Kouji; Yuma, Suraphong; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    When and how galaxy morphology such as disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe emerged is still not clear. In the universe at $z\\gtrsim 2$, galaxies with various morphology are seen, and star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim2$ show an intrinsic shape of bar-like structure. Then, when did round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on apparent...

  5. Dynamics of Disk Galaxies and Their Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Velázquez

    2001-01-01

    We address the heating and survival of galaxy disks by infalling satellites using self-consistent N-body simulations. We consider satellites with a variety of internal structures as well several orbits with different eccentricities and orientations. Also, the role of the central region of the galaxy (through a bulge) is studied. We found that the analytical results of Toth & Ostriker (1992) overestimate the heating and thickening of the disk by a factor of 2-3. In particular, we found disks a...

  6. Foundations of Black Hole Accretion Disk Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Abramowicz, Marek A.; P. Chris Fragile

    2011-01-01

    This review covers the main aspects of black hole accretion disk theory. We begin with the view that one of the main goals of the theory is to better understand the nature of black holes themselves. In this light we discuss how accretion disks might reveal some of the unique signatures of strong gravity: the event horizon, the innermost stable circular orbit, and the ergosphere. We then review, from a first-principles perspective, the physical processes at play in accretion disks. This leads ...

  7. Analytical models of relativistic accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuravlev, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    We present not a literature review but a description, as detailed and consistent as possible, of two analytic models of disk accretion onto a rotating black hole: a standard relativistic disk and a twisted relativistic disk. Although one of these models is much older than the other, both are of topical current interest for black hole studies. The way the exposition is presented, the reader with only a limited knowledge of general relativity and relativistic hydrodynamics can --- with little or no use of additional sources -- gain good insight into many technical details lacking in the original papers.

  8. Radiative Flow in a Luminous Disk

    OpenAIRE

    Fukue, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Radiatively-driven flow in a luminous disk is examined in the subrelativistic regime of $(v/c)^1$, taking account of radiation transfer. The flow is assumed to be vertical, and the gravity and gas pressure are ignored. When internal heating is dropped, for a given optical depth and radiation pressure at the flow base (disk ``inside''), where the flow speed is zero, the flow is analytically solved under the appropriate boundary condition at the flow top (disk ``surface''), where the optical de...

  9. Black Holes and disk dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two independent approaches are used to place constraints on the amount of dark mass in the galactic disk in the form of black holes. Gas accretion by black holes leads to X-ray emission which should not exceed the upper limits on the observed soft X-ray background. Also, metals produced in stellar processes that lead to black hole formation should not exceed the observed disk metal abundance. Based on these constraints, it appears unlikely that the missing disk mass could be contained in black holes

  10. Development of a 2 1/4 Cr-Mo-V-Nb steel for heavy duty gas turbine rotor disk. Gas turbine disk yo 2 1/4 Cr-Mo-V-Nb tainetsuko no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, I.; Kadoya, Y. (Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan))

    1991-05-01

    A new low alloy steel for gas turbine rotor disk was menufactured as a trial and examined. A target of new low alloy steel development for disk was to have excellent stress rupture strength without taking account of creep below 400 centigrade, and to have excellent both high temperature strength (yield strength at 400 centigrade higher than 60kgf/mm {sup 2}) and fracture toughness (FATT lower than 40 centigrade) at bore of disk. An effect of chemical composition on mechanical properties and heat treatment characteristics of low allow steel were investigated. Consequently, a 2 {sup 1}/{sub 4} Cr-Mo-V-Nb steel containing low silicon manufactured by vacuum carbon deoxidization (VCD) or electroslag remelting (ESR) process showed the best performance for large size disk. On the basis of the results, the 2 {sup 1}/{sub 4} Cr-Mo-V-Nb steel disk for turbine was produced by commercial base. Tensile, impact, and metallurgical tests were conducted on the disk, and it was confirmed that the disk had excellent yield strength and impact properties at both rim and bore. 14 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Perturbed disks get shocked. Binary black hole merger effects on accretion disks

    CERN Document Server

    Megevand, Miguel; Frank, Juhan; Hirschmann, Eric W; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L; Motl, Patrick M; Neilsen, David

    2009-01-01

    The merger process of a binary black hole system can have a strong impact on a circumbinary disk. In the present work we study the effect of both central mass reduction (due to the energy loss through gravitational waves) and a possible black hole recoil (due to asymmetric emission of gravitational radiation). For the mass reduction case and recoil directed along the disk's angular momentum, oscillations are induced in the disk which then modulate the internal energy and bremsstrahlung luminosities. On the other hand, when the recoil direction has a component orthogonal to the disk's angular momentum, the disk's dynamics are strongly impacted, giving rise to relativistic shocks. The shock heating leaves its signature in our proxies for radiation, the total internal energy and bremsstrahlung luminosity. Interestingly, for cases where the kick velocity is below the smallest orbital velocity in the disk (a likely scenario in real AGN), we observe a common, characteristic pattern in the internal energy of the dis...

  12. Effects of inclined star-disk encounter on protoplanetary disk size

    CERN Document Server

    Bhandare, Asmita; Pfalzner, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Most, if not all, young stars are initially surrounded by protoplanetary disks. Owing to the preferential formation of stars in stellar clusters, the protoplanetary disks around these stars may potentially be affected by the cluster environment. Various works have investigated the influence of stellar fly-bys on disks, although many of them consider only the effects due to parabolic, coplanar encounters often for equal-mass stars, which is only a very special case. We perform numerical simulations to study the fate of protoplanetary disks after the impact of parabolic star-disk encounter for the less investigated case of inclined up to coplanar, retrograde encounters, which is a much more common case. Here, we concentrate on the disk size after such encounters because this limits the size of the potentially forming planetary systems. In addition, with the possibilities that ALMA offers, now a direct comparison to observations is possible. Covering a wide range of periastron distances and mass ratios between t...

  13. Perturbed disks get shocked. Binary black hole merger effects on accretion disks

    OpenAIRE

    Megevand, Miguel; Anderson, Matthew; Frank, Juhan; Hirschmann, Eric W.; Lehner, Luis; Liebling, Steven L.; Motl, Patrick M; Neilsen, David

    2009-01-01

    The merger process of a binary black hole system can have a strong impact on a circumbinary disk. In the present work we study the effect of both central mass reduction (due to the energy loss through gravitational waves) and a possible black hole recoil (due to asymmetric emission of gravitational radiation). For the mass reduction case and recoil directed along the disk's angular momentum, oscillations are induced in the disk which then modulate the internal energy and bremsstrahlung lumino...

  14. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics -- the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure -- the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution -- the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state of the art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  15. Ionization and Dust Charging in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Ivlev, A V; Caselli, P

    2016-01-01

    Ionization-recombination balance in dense interstellar and circumstellar environments is a key factor for a variety of important physical processes, such as chemical reactions, dust charging and coagulation, coupling of the gas with magnetic field and the development of magnetorotational instability in protoplanetary disks. We present a self-consistent analytical model which allows us to exactly calculate abundances of charged species in dusty gas, in the regime where the dust-phase recombination dominates over the gas-phase recombination. The model is employed to verify applicability of a conventional approximation of low dust charges in protoplanetary disks, and to discuss the implications for the dust coagulation and the development of the "dead zone" in the disk. Furthermore, the importance of mutually consistent models for the ionization and dust evolution is addressed: These processes are coupled via several mechanisms operating in the disk, and therefore their interplay can be crucial for the ultimate ...

  16. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sean M.

    2015-10-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics—the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure—the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution—the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state-of-the-art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  17. Interstellar Gas and a Dark Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Eric David

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a potentially powerful method for constraining or discovering a thin dark matter disk in the Milky Way. The method relies on the relationship between the midplane densities and scale heights of interstellar gas being determined by the gravitational potential, which is sensitive to the presence of a dark disk. We show how to use the interstellar gas parameters to set a bound on a dark disk and discuss the constraints suggested by the current data. However, current measurements for these parameters are discordant, with the uncertainty in the constraint being dominated by the molecular hydrogen midplane density measurement, as well as by the atomic hydrogen velocity dispersion measurement. Magnetic fields and cosmic ray pressure, which are expected to play a role, are uncertain as well. Although a small dark disk is slightly favored, the current data is inadequate to establish its existence

  18. Advanced disk-type LP turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the application of these design considerations. After twenty years experience with disk-type rotors, the Siemens/KWU ten-disk rotor for low-speed nuclear LP turbines was developed in 1969. Full volumetric disk hub inspections after 83,000 service hours did not reveal any stress corrosion cracking. In the meantime, this rotor design has been further improved. In 1987, two advanced eight-disk rotors went into operation at the Connecticut Yankee station. This rotor design together with the advanced LP turbine blading has been delivered to the Unterweser station. First test results indicated a remarkably improved thermodynamic performance. Avoidance of stress corrosion cracking can be accomplished by a combination of various measures: Proper keyway design; Low metal temperature; Low tensile stressing (by design); Low yield strength; High fracture toughness; Low surface stresses (by manufacturing); Proper steam/water cycle chemistry

  19. Diskoseismology - Signatures of black hole accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Michael; Wagoner, Robert V.

    1992-01-01

    General relativity requires the existence of a spectrum of oscillations which are trapped near the inner edge of accretion disks around black holes. We have developed a general formalism for analyzing the normal modes of such acoustic perturbations of arbitrary thin disk models, approximating the dominant relativistic effects via a modified Newtonian potential (these modes do not exist in Newtonian gravity). The eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of a variety of disk models are found to fall in to two main classes, which are analogous to the p-modes and g-modes in the sun. In this work, we compute the eigenfunctions and eigenfrequencies of isothermal disks. The (relatively small) rates of growth or damping of these oscillations due to gravitational radiation and parameterized models of viscosity are also computed.

  20. Gravitomagnetic acceleration from black hole accretion disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, J.; Mathews, G. J.

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate how the motion of the neutral masses in an accretion disk orbiting a black hole creates a general-relativistic magnetic-like (gravitomagnetic) field that vertically accelerates neutral particles near an accretion disk upward and then inward toward the axis of the accretion disk. Even though this gravitomagnetic field is not the only mechanism contributing to the production of jets, it presents a novel means to identify one general relativistic effect from a much more complicated problem. In addition, as the accelerated material above or below the accretion disk nears the axis with a nearly vertical direction, a frame-dragging effect twists the trajectories around the axis thus contributing to the collimation of the jet.

  1. Optical video disks with undulating tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braat, J J; Bouwhuis, G

    1978-07-01

    The signal components of a video signal (luminance, color, and sound) are modulated on a main carrier and several subcarriers and then recorded on the video master disk. Apart from the signal distortion that can arise during master and disk manufacture, the optical readout of the disk also yields a nonlinear transfer of the signal. The result of nonlinearities is intermodulation between signal components. Intermodulation products affect the quality of the final TV picture. In this paper a method is described which reduces the contribution of the optical readout system to the intermodulation. An optical coding is introduced such that two signal components hardly influence one another. The spacing of the pits in the track direction carries the luminance information, while the undulation of the track carries the color or sound information. A quadrant photodetector positioned in the far field of the video disk restores the luminance and color or sound bands with a very low amount of intermodulation. PMID:20203718

  2. Embedded, Accreting Disks in Massive Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M; Krumholz, Mark R

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of massive star formation have made clear the important role of protostellar disks in mediating accretion. Here we describe a simple, semi-analytic model for young, deeply embedded, massive accretion disks. Our approach enables us to sample a wide parameter space of stellar mass and environmental variables, providing a means to make predictions for a variety of sources that next generation telescopes like ALMA and the EVLA will observe. Moreover we include, at least approximately, multiple mechanisms for angular momentum transport, a comprehensive model for disk heating and cooling, and a realistic estimate for the angular momentum in the gas reservoir. We make predictions for the typical sizes, masses, and temperatures of the disks, and describe the role of gravitational instabilities in determining the binarity fraction and upper mass cut-off.

  3. Exact Relativistic Magnetized Haloes around Rotating Disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio C. Gutiérrez-Piñeres

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the dynamics of magnetic fields in galaxies is one of important problems in formation and evolution of galaxies. In this paper, we present the exact relativistic treatment of a rotating disk surrounded by a magnetized material halo. The features of the halo and disk are described by the distributional energy-momentum tensor of a general fluid in canonical form. All the relevant quantities and the metric and electromagnetic potentials are exactly determined by an arbitrary harmonic function only. For instance, the generalized Kuzmin-disk potential is used. The particular class of solutions obtained is asymptotically flat and satisfies all the energy conditions. Moreover, the motion of a charged particle on the halo is described. As far as we know, this is the first relativistic model describing analytically the magnetized halo of a rotating disk.

  4. Gaps in Protoplanetary Disks as Signatures of Planets: II. Inclined Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jang-Condell, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    We examine the observational appearance of partial gaps being opened by planets in protoplanetary disks, considering the effects of the inclination relative to the line of sight. The gap's trough is darkened by both shadowing and cooling, relative to the uninterrupted disk. The gap's outer wall is brightened by direct illumination and also by heating, which puffs it up so that it intercepts more starlight. In this paper, we examine the effects of inclination on resolved images of disks with and without gaps at a wide range of wavelengths. The scattering surface's offset from the disk midplane creates a brightness asymmetry along the axis of inclination, making the disk's near side appear brighter than the far side in scattered light. Finite disk thickness also causes the projected distances of equidistant points on the disk surface to be smaller on the near side of the disk as compared to the far side. Consequently, the gap shoulder on the near side of the disk should appear brighter and closer to the star th...

  5. YottaYotta announces new world record set for TCP disk-to-disk bulk transfer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The Yottabyte NetStorage(TM) Company, today announced a new world record for TCP disk-to-disk data transfer using the company's NetStorager(R) System. The record-breaking demonstration transferred 5 terabytes of data between Chicago, Il. to Vancouver, BC and Ottawa, ON, at a sustained average throughput of 11.1 gigabits per second. Peak throughput exceeded 11.6 gigabits per second, more than 15-times faster than previous records for TCP transfer from disk-to-disk (1 page).

  6. The Debris Disk Explorer: a balloon-borne coronagraph for observing debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Roberts, Lewis C; Traub, Wesley; Unwin, Stephen; Trauger, John; Krist, John; Aldrich, Jack; Brugarolas, Paul; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Wyatt, Mark; Stuchlik, David; Lanzi, James

    2013-01-01

    The Debris Disk Explorer (DDX) is a proposed balloon-borne investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. DDX will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of tens of disks. These measurements will enable us to place the Solar System in context. By imaging debris disks around nearby stars, DDX will reveal the presence of perturbing planets via their influence on disk structure, and explore the physics and history of debris disks by characterizing the size and composition of disk dust. The DDX instrument is a 0.75-m diameter off-axis telescope and a coronagraph carried by a stratospheric balloon. DDX will take high-resolution, multi-wavelength images of the debris disks around tens of nearby stars. Two flights are planned; an overnight test flight within the United States followed by a month-long science flight launched from New Zealand. The long flight will fully explore the set of known de...

  7. Studies of Gas Disks in Binary Systems

    OpenAIRE

    de Val Borro, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    There are over 300 exoplanets detected through radial velocity surveys and photometric studies showing a tremendous variety of masses, compositions and orbital parameters. Understanding the way these planets formed and evolved within the circumstellar disks they were initially embedded in is a crucial issue. In the first part of this thesis we study the physical interaction between a gaseous protoplanetary disk and an embedded planet using numerical simulations. In order to trust the results ...

  8. Eccentricity Evolution for Planets in Gaseous Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Goldreich, Peter; Sari, Re'em

    2002-01-01

    At least several percent of solar-type stars possess giant planets. Surprisingly, most move on orbits of substantial eccentricity. We investigate the hypothesis that interactions between a giant planet and the disk from which it forms promote eccentricity growth. These interactions are concentrated at discrete Lindblad and corotation resonances. Interactions at principal Lindblad resonances cause the planet's orbit to migrate and open a gap in the disk if the planet is sufficiently massive. T...

  9. A Note on Disk Drag Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Gunther, Neil J

    2012-01-01

    The electrical power consumed by typical magnetic hard disk drives (HDD) not only increases linearly with the number of spindles but, more significantly, it increases as very fast power-laws of speed (RPM) and diameter. Since the theoretical basis for this relationship is neither well-known nor readily accessible in the literature, we show how these exponents arise from aerodynamic disk drag and discuss their import for green storage capacity planning.

  10. LMC Microlensing and Very Thick Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Gyuk, Geza; Gates, Evalyn

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the implications of a very thick (scale height 1.5 - 3.0 kpc) disk population of MACHOs. Such a population represents a reasonable alternative to standard halo configurations of a lensing population. We find that very thick disk distributions can lower the lens mass estimate derived from the microlensing data toward the LMC, although an average lens mass substantially below $0.3\\Msol$ is unlikely. Constraints from direct searches for such lenses imply very low luminosity object...

  11. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Tudorache, Marion; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropi...

  12. Evolution of Massive Protostars via Disk Accretion

    OpenAIRE

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Yorke, Harold W.; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Mass accretion onto (proto-)stars at high accretion rates > 10^-4 M_sun/yr is expected in massive star formation. We study the evolution of massive protostars at such high rates by numerically solving the stellar structure equations. In this paper we examine the evolution via disk accretion. We consider a limiting case of "cold" disk accretion, whereby most of the stellar photosphere can radiate freely with negligible backwarming from the accretion flow, and the accreting material settles ont...

  13. Lumbar Disk Herniation Surgery: Outcome and Predictors

    OpenAIRE

    Sedighi, Mahsa; Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective cohort study. Objectives To determine the outcome and any differences in the clinical results of three different surgical methods for lumbar disk herniation and to assess the effect of factors that could predict the outcome of surgery. Methods We evaluated 148 patients who had operations for lumbar disk herniation from March 2006 to March 2011 using three different surgical techniques (laminectomy, microscopically assisted percutaneous nucleotomy, and spinous proc...

  14. Propeller-driven Outflows and Disk Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of propeller-driven outflows in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations of disk accretion to rapidly rotating magnetized stars. Matter outflows in a wide cone and is centrifugally ejected from the inner regions of the disk. Closer to the axis there is a strong, collimated, magnetically dominated outflow of energy and angular momentum carried by the open magnetic field lines from the star. The ``efficiency'' of the propeller may be very high in the respect that mos...

  15. Internal structure of a thin transonic disk

    CERN Document Server

    Beskin, V S

    2002-01-01

    The internal structure of the thin transonic disk accreting onto a nonrotating black hole inside the last stable orbit ($r < 3r_{\\rm g}$) is considered within the hydrodynamical version of the Grad-Shafranov equation. It is shown that in the vicinity of the sonic surface takes place a sharp diminishing of the disk thickness. As a result, in the vertical balance equation the dynamical forces $\\rho[({\\bf v}\

  16. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    OpenAIRE

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S.; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Velusamy, Thangasamy; Snively, Heather

    2004-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earth-sized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the planet Mars to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra as a f...

  17. An MCMC Circumstellar Disks Modeling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Schuyler; Perrin, Marshall D.; Mazoyer, Johan; Choquet, Elodie; Soummer, Remi; Ren, Bin; Pueyo, Laurent; Debes, John H.; Duchene, Gaspard; Pinte, Christophe; Menard, Francois

    2016-01-01

    We present an enhanced software framework for the Monte Carlo Markov Chain modeling of circumstellar disk observations, including spectral energy distributions and multi wavelength images from a variety of instruments (e.g. GPI, NICI, HST, WFIRST). The goal is to self-consistently and simultaneously fit a wide variety of observables in order to place constraints on the physical properties of a given disk, while also rigorously assessing the uncertainties in the derived properties. This modular code is designed to work with a collection of existing modeling tools, ranging from simple scripts to define the geometry for optically thin debris disks, to full radiative transfer modeling of complex grain structures in protoplanetary disks (using the MCFOST radiative transfer modeling code). The MCMC chain relies on direct chi squared comparison of model images/spectra to observations. We will include a discussion of how best to weight different observations in the modeling of a single disk and how to incorporate forward modeling from PCA PSF subtraction techniques. The code is open source, python, and available from github. Results for several disks at various evolutionary stages will be discussed.

  18. Tilt, Warp, and Simultaneous Precessions in Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2012-01-01

    Warps are suspected in disks around massive compact objects. However, the proposed warping source -- non-axisymmetric radiation pressure -- does not apply to white dwarfs. In this letter we report the first Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamic simulations of accretion disks in SU UMa-type systems that naturally tilt, warp, and simultaneously precess in the prograde and retrograde directions using white dwarf V344 Lyrae in the Kepler field as our model. After ~79 days in V344 Lyrae, the disk angular momentum L_d becomes misaligned to the orbital angular momentum L_o. As the gas stream remains normal to L_o, hydrodynamics (e.g., the lift force) is a likely source to disk tilt. In addition to tilt, the outer disk annuli cyclically change shape from circular to highly eccentric due to tidal torques by the secondary star. The effect of simultaneous prograde and retrograde precession is a warp of the colder, denser midplane as seen along the disk rim. The simulated rate of apsidal advance to nodal regression per orbit ne...

  19. Extra-Solar Kuiper Belt Dust Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Moro-Martin, A; Malhotra, R; Trilling, D E; Moro-Martin, Amaya; Wyatt, Mark C.; Malhotra, Renu; Trilling, David E.

    2007-01-01

    The dust disks observed around mature stars are evidence that plantesimals are present in these systems on spatial scales that are similar to that of the asteroids and the KBOs in the Solar System. These dust disks (a.k.a. ``debris disks'') present a wide range of sizes, morphologies and properties. It is inferred that their dust mass declines with time as the dust-producing planetesimals get depleted, and that this decline can be punctuated by large spikes that are produced as a result of individual collisional events. The lack of solid state features indicate that, generally, the dust in these disks have sizes larger than approximately 10 microns, but exceptionally, strong silicate features in some disks suggest the presence of large quantities of small grains, thought to be the result of recent collisions. Spatially resolved observations of debris disks show a diversity of structural features, such as inner cavities, warps, offsets, brightness asymmetries, spirals, rings and clumps. There is growing eviden...

  20. A Primer on Unifying Debris Disk Morphologies

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Eve J

    2016-01-01

    A "minimum model" for debris disks consists of a narrow ring of parent bodies, secularly forced by a single planet on a possibly eccentric orbit, colliding to produce dust grains that are perturbed by stellar radiation pressure. We demonstrate how this minimum model can reproduce a wide variety of disk morphologies imaged in scattered starlight. Five broad categories of disk shape can be captured: "rings," "needles," "ships-and-wakes," "bars," and "moths (a.k.a. fans)," depending on the viewing geometry. Moths can also sport "double wings." We explain the origin of morphological features from first principles, exploring the dependence on planet eccentricity, disk inclination dispersion, and the parent body orbital phases at which dust grains are born. A key determinant in disk appearance is the degree to which dust grain orbits are apsidally aligned. Our study of a simple steady-state (secularly relaxed) disk should serve as a reference for more detailed models tailored to individual systems. We use the intui...

  1. The Collisional Evolution of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Gaspar, Andras; Balog, Zoltan

    2012-01-01

    We explore the collisional decay of disk mass and infrared emission in debris disks. With models, we show that the rate of the decay varies throughout the evolution of the disks, increasing its rate up to a certain point, which is followed by a leveling off to a slower value. The total disk mass falls off ~ t^-0.35 at its fastest point (where t is time) for our reference model, while the dust mass and its proxy -- the infrared excess emission -- fades significantly faster (~ t^-0.8). These later level off to a decay rate of M_tot(t) ~ t^-0.08 and M_dust(t) or L_ir(t) ~ t^-0.6. This is slower than the ~ t^-1 decay given for all three system parameters by traditional analytic models. We also compile an extensive catalog of Spitzer and Herschel 24, 70, and 100 micron observations. Assuming a log-normal distribution of initial disk masses, we generate model population decay curves for the fraction of debris disk harboring stars observed at 24 micron and also model the distribution of measured excesses at the far-...

  2. A method for rapid testing of the photosynthesis-inhibiting activity of herbicides by leaf disk infiltration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bielecki

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for rapid detection of photosynthesis inhibitors in low concentration (0.25-1.25 ppm was developed. The experiments were performed on disks cut from young bean leaves. The disks were infiltrated with solutions of the tested compounds and placed at the bottom of a crystallizer containing an acidic sodium carbonate solution and then illuminated. The toxicity of the tested substance was measured as the number of disks corning to the surface. It was found that linuron, monolinuron, metoksuron, atrazine and prometrine inhibited floating of the disks, whereas 2,4,5-T, MCPA and chlorpropham gave no effect. This confirms the specificity of the test which is appropriate for determining the phytotoxicity of typical photosynthesis inhibitors.

  3. Disks around stars and the growth of planetary systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, Jane S

    2005-01-01

    Circumstellar disks play a vital evolutionary role, providing a way to move gas inward and onto a young star. The outward transfer of angular momentum allows the star to contract without breaking up, and the remnant disk of gas and particles is the reservoir for forming planets. High-resolution spectroscopy is uncovering planetary dynamics and motion within the remnant disk, and imaging at infrared to millimeter wavelengths resolves disk structure over billions of years of evolution. Most stars are born with a disk, and models of planet formation need to form such bodies from the disk material within the disk's 10-million-year life-span. PMID:15637266

  4. Synchronized Intermittent Motion Induced by the Interaction between Camphor Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, Nobuhiko J.; Tateno, Kurina; Nakata, Satoshi; Nishimori, Hiraku

    2015-03-01

    A new mode of collective motion was discovered in a system of camphor disks floating on the water surface in a circular chamber. The mode was induced by tuning the number of the disks. A single or few disks are known to continuously move on the water surface. Conversely, when many disks are present, motion comes to a stop and the disks form ordered spatial patterns by repulsive interaction. Here we found the third mode that emerged at an intermediate disk number, in which inactive and active motion phases alternated non-periodically. This new mode exhibited synchronization as the disk number increased.

  5. Vertical Structure of Magnetized Accretion Disks around Young Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lizano, S; Boehler, Y; D'Alessio, P

    2015-01-01

    We model the vertical structure of magnetized accretion disks subject to viscous and resistive heating, and irradiation by the central star. We apply our formalism to the radial structure of magnetized accretion disks threaded by a poloidal magnetic field dragged during the process of star formation developed by Shu and coworkers. We consider disks around low mass protostars, T Tauri, and FU Orionis stars. We consider two levels of disk magnetization, $\\lambda_{sys} = 4$ (strongly magnetized disks), and $\\lambda_{sys} = 12$ (weakly magnetized disks). The rotation rates of strongly magnetized disks have large deviations from Keplerian rotation. In these models, resistive heating dominates the thermal structure for the FU Ori disk. The T Tauri disk is very thin and cold because it is strongly compressed by magnetic pressure; it may be too thin compared with observations. Instead, in the weakly magnetized disks, rotation velocities are close to Keplerian, and resistive heating is always less than 7\\% of the visc...

  6. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Science from a Balloon

    OpenAIRE

    Bryden, Geoffrey; Traub, Wesley; Roberts, Lewis C., Jr.; Bruno, Robin; Unwin, Stephen; Backovsky, Stan; Brugarolas, Paul; Chakrabarti, Supriya; Chen, Pin; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Krist, John; Lillie, Charles; Macintosh, Bruce; Mawet, Dimitri; Mennesson, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed balloon-borne science investigation of debris disks around nearby stars. Debris disks are analogs of the Asteroid Belt (mainly rocky) and Kuiper Belt (mainly icy) in our Solar System. Zodiac II will measure the size, shape, brightness, and color of a statistically significant sample of disks. These measurements will enable us to probe these fundamental questions: what do debris disks tell us about the evolution of planetary systems; how are debris disks produced; how a...

  7. Research overview on vibration damping of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Liang; Liu, Tiejian; Li, Xin; Xuyao HUO

    2016-01-01

    Bladed disk assemblies are very important parts in auto engine and gas turbine, and is widely used in practical engineering. The mistuning existing commonly in the bladed disk assemblies can destroy the vibration characteristics of the bladed disk assemblies, which is one of the reasons for the high cycle fatigue failure of bladed disk assemblies, so it is necessary to research how to reduce the vibration of the bladed disk assemblies. On the basis of the review of relevant research at home a...

  8. Intermediate mass black holes in AGN disks: I. Production & Growth

    OpenAIRE

    McKernan, B.; Ford, K. E. S.; Lyra, W.; Perets, H. B.

    2012-01-01

    Here we propose a mechanism for efficiently growing intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in disks around supermassive black holes. Stellar mass objects can efficiently agglomerate when facilitated by the gas disk. Stars, compact objects and binaries can migrate, accrete and merge within disks around supermassive black holes. While dynamical heating by cusp stars excites the velocity dispersion of nuclear cluster objects (NCOs) in the disk, gas in the disk damps NCO orbits. If gas damping domi...

  9. Disk-Planet Interaction: Triggered Formation and Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Lufkin, Graeme; Quinn, Thomas; Governato, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    We present three-dimensional SPH calculations of giant planets embedded in gaseous disks. Our findings are collected into a map of parameter space, exhibiting four distinct regions: Type I migration, gap formation, triggered formation of more planets, and wholly unstable disks. For Type I migration of the planet due to secular interactions with the disk material, the migration rate depends linearly on the disk mass, and is independent of the initial planet mass. For more massive disks, the pl...

  10. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTRACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. he purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. he ...

  11. CALCIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION RATE IN LIMESTONE CONTACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The rate of carbonate mineral dissolution from limestone was studied using a rotating disk apparatus and samples of limestone of varied composition. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of limestone composition on the kinetics of carbonate mineral dissolution. Th...

  12. Snow Lines in Gas Rich Protoplanetary Disks and the Delivery of Volatiles to Planetary Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Geoffrey A.

    2016-06-01

    Compared to the Sun and to the gas+dust composition of the interstellar medium from which the solar system formed, the Carbon and Nitrogen content of the bulk silicate Earth (mantle+hydrosphere+atmosphere) is reduced by several orders of magnitude, relative to Silicon. Evidence from primitive bodies as a function of distance from the Sun suggests that at least part of this depletion must occur early in the process of planetesimal assembly. With combined infrared and (sub)mm observations such as those enabled by ground-based 8-10m class telescopes (and in future the James Webb Space Telescope) and the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), we can now examine the principal volatile reservoirs of gas rich disks as a function position within the disk and evolutionary state. Key to these studies is the concept of condensation fronts, or 'snow lines,' in disks - locations at which key volatiles such as water, carbon monoxide, or nitrogen first condense from the gas. This talk will review the observational characterization of snow lines in protoplanetary disks, especially recent ALMA observations, and highlight the laboratory astrophysics studies and theoretical investigations that are needed to tie the observational results to the delivery of volatiles to planetary surfaces in the habitable zones around Sun-like stars.

  13. Thermal Test on Target with Pressed Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woloshun, Keith Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dale, Gregory E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olivas, Eric Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Romero, Frank Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalmas, Dale Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gromov, Roman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lowden, Rick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-27

    A thorough test of the thermal performance of a target for Mo99 production using solid Mo100 target to produce the Mo99 via a gamma-n reaction has previously been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The results are reported in “Zero Degree Line Mo Target Thermal Test Results and Analysis,” LANL report Number LA-UR-15-23134 dated 3/27/15. This target was comprised of 25 disks 1 mm thick and 12 mm in diameter, separated by helium coolant gaps 0.5 mm wide. The test reported in the above referenced report was conducted with natural Mo disks all cut from commercial rod. The production plant will have Mo100 disks pressed and sintered using a process being developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The structural integrity of press-and-sinter disks is of some concern. The test reported herein included 4 disks made by the ORNL process and placed in the high heat, and therefore high thermal stress, region of the target. The electron beam energy was 23 MeV for these tests. Beam spot size was 3.5 mm horizontal and 3 mm vertical, FWHM. The thermal stress test of pressed-and-sintered disks resulted in no mechanical failures. The induced thermal stresses were below yield stress for natural Mo, indicating that up to that stress state no inherent deficiencies in the mechanical properties of the fabricated disks were evident.

  14. Formation of Organic Molecules and Water in Warm Disk Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Najita, Joan R; Glassgold, Alfred E

    2011-01-01

    Observations from Spitzer and ground-based infrared spectroscopy reveal significant diversity in the molecular emission from the inner few AU of T Tauri disks. We explore theoretically the possible origin of this diversity by expanding on our earlier thermal-chemical model of disk atmospheres. We consider how variations in grain settling, X-ray irradiation, accretion-related mechanical heating, and the oxygen-to-carbon ratio can affect the thermal and chemical properties of the atmosphere at 0.25-40 AU. We find that these model parameters can account for many properties of the detected molecular emission. The column density of the warm (200-2000K) molecular atmosphere is sensitive to grain settling and the efficiency of accretion-related heating, which may account, at least in part, for the large range in molecular emission fluxes that have been observed. The dependence of the atmospheric properties on the model parameters may also help to explain trends that have been reported in the literature between molec...

  15. Disk radii and grain sizes in Herschel-resolved debris disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radii of debris disks and the sizes of their dust grains are important tracers of the planetesimal formation mechanisms and physical processes operating in these systems. Here we use a representative sample of 34 debris disks resolved in various Herschel Space Observatory (Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA) programs to constrain the disk radii and the size distribution of their dust. While we modeled disks with both warm and cold components, and identified warm inner disks around about two-thirds of the stars, we focus our analysis only on the cold outer disks, i.e., Kuiper-belt analogs. We derive the disk radii from the resolved images and find a large dispersion for host stars of any spectral class, but no significant trend with the stellar luminosity. This argues against ice lines as a dominant player in setting the debris disk sizes, since the ice line location varies with the luminosity of the central star. Fixing the disk radii to those inferred from the resolved images, we model the spectral energy distribution to determine the dust temperature and the grain size distribution for each target. While the dust temperature systematically increases toward earlier spectral types, the ratio of the dust temperature to the blackbody temperature at the disk radius decreases with the stellar luminosity. This is explained by a clear trend of typical sizes increasing toward more luminous stars. The typical grain sizes are compared to the radiation pressure blowout limit s blow that is proportional to the stellar luminosity-to-mass ratio and thus also increases toward earlier spectral classes. The grain sizes in the disks of G- to A-stars are inferred to be several times s blow at all stellar luminosities, in agreement with collisional models of debris disks. The sizes, measured in the units of s blow, appear to decrease with the luminosity

  16. Chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks - the effects of viscous accretion, turbulent mixing and disk winds

    CERN Document Server

    Heinzeller, Dominikus; Walsh, Catherine; Millar, Tom J

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the chemical evolution of protoplanetary disks considering radial viscous accretion, vertical turbulent mixing and vertical disk winds. We study the effects on the disk chemical structure when different models for the formation of molecular hydrogen on dust grains are adopted. Our gas-phase chemistry is extracted from the UMIST Database for Astrochemistry (Rate06) to which we have added detailed gas-grain interactions. We use our chemical model results to generate synthetic near- and mid-infrared LTE line emission spectra and compare these with recent Spitzer observations. Our results show that if H2 formation on warm grains is taken into consideration, the H2O and OH abundances in the disk surface increase significantly. We find the radial accretion flow strongly influences the molecular abundances, with those in the cold midplane layers particularly affected. On the other hand, we show that diffusive turbulent mixing affects the disk chemistry in the warm molecular layers, influencing the line ...

  17. Preparation of thin actinide metal disks using a multiple disk casting technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A casting technique has been developed for preparing multiple actinide metal disks which have a minimum thickness of 0.006 inch. This technique was based on an injection casting procedure which utilizes the weight of a tantalum metal rod to force the molten metal into the mold cavity. Using the proper mold design and casting parameters, it has been possible to prepare ten 1/2 inch diameter neptunium or plutonium metal disks in a single casting. This casting technique is capable of producing disks which are very uniform. The average thickness of the disks from a typical casting will vary no more than 0.001 inch and the variation in the thickness of the individual disks will range from 0.0001 to 0.0005 inch. (author)

  18. Milky Way's Thick and Thin disk: Is there distinct thick disk?

    CERN Document Server

    Kawata, D

    2016-01-01

    This article is based on our discussion session on Milky Way models at the 592 WE-Heraeus Seminar, Reconstructing the Milky Way's History: Spectroscopic Surveys, Asteroseismology and Chemodynamical models. The discussion focused on the following question: "Are there distinct thick and thin disks?". The answer to this question depends on the definition one adopts for thin and thick disks. The participants of this discussion converged to the idea that there are at least two different types of disks in the Milky Way. However, there are still important open questions on how to best define these two types of disks (chemically, kinematically, geometrically or by age?). The question of what is the origin of the distinct disks remains open. The future Galactic surveys which are highlighted in this conference should help us answering these questions. The almost one-hour debate involving researchers in the field representing different modelling approaches (Galactic models such as TRILEGAL, Besancon and Galaxia, chemica...

  19. Manipulation of magnetic vortex parameters in disk-on-disk nanostructures with various geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim E. Stebliy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanostructures in the form of a sandwich consisting of two permalloy (Py disks with diameters of 600 and 200 nm separated by a nonmagnetic interlayer are studied. Magnetization reversal of the disk-on-disk nanostructures depends on the distance between centers of the small and big disks and on orientation of an external magnetic field applied during measurements. It is found that manipulation of the magnetic vortex chirality and the trajectory of the vortex core in the big disk is only possible in asymmetric nanostructures. Experimentally studied peculiarities of a motion path of the vortex core and vortex parameters by the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE magnetometer are supported by the magnetic force microscopy imaging and micromagnetic simulations.

  20. Optimization of the Chemical Composition of Cast Iron Used for Casting Ball Bearing Grinding Disks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aurel Crisan; Sorin Ion; Munteanu; Ioan Ciobanu; Iulian Riposan

    2008-01-01

    The chemical composition of cast iron used for casting ball bearing machining disks was varied to optimize the properties such as castability, hardenability, and durability in ball machining. The cast iron characteristics were most strongly dependent on the Ni content and the carbon saturation degree, So. This paper describes the types of test specimens, the working conditions, and the experimental results. The in-crease of the degree of carbon saturation reduces the tendency to form shrinkholes in the castings. The de-crease in the Ni content negatively affects the final hardening treatment. A way to control solidification de-fects in cast iron, by reducing the Ni content, has been verified on cast disks.

  1. Water vapor distribution in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Fujun

    2014-01-01

    Water vapor has been detected in protoplanetary disks. In this work we model the distribution of water vapor in protoplanetary disks with a thermo-chemical code. For a set of parameterized disk models, we calculate the distribution of dust temperature and radiation field of the disk with a Monte Carlo method, and then solve the gas temperature distribution and chemical composition. The radiative transfer includes detailed treatment of scattering by atomic hydrogen and absorption by water of Lyman alpha photons, since the Lyman alpha line dominates the UV spectrum of accreting young stars. In a fiducial model, we find that warm water vapor with temperature around 300 K is mainly distributed in a small and well-confined region in the inner disk. The inner boundary of the warm water region is where the shielding of UV field due to dust and water itself become significant. The outer boundary is where the dust temperature drops below the water condensation temperature. A more luminous central star leads to a more ...

  2. Nucleosynthesis in Gamma Ray Burst Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pruet, J; Hoffman, R D; Pruet, Jason

    2003-01-01

    We follow the nuclear reactions that occur in the accretion disks of stellar mass black holes that are accreting at a very high rate, 0.01 to 1 solar masses per second, as is realized in many current models for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The degree of neutronization in the disk is a sensitive function of the accretion rate, black hole mass, Kerr parameter, and disk viscosity. For high accretion rates and low viscosity, material arriving at the black hole will consist predominantly of neutrons. This degree of neutronization will have important implications for the dynamics of the GRB producing jet and perhaps for the synthesis of the r-process. For lower accretion rates and high viscosity, as might be appropriate for the outer disk in the collapsar model, neutron-proton equality persists allowing the possible synthesis of 56Ni in the disk wind. 56Ni must be present to make any optically bright Type Ib supernova, and in particular those associated with GRBs.

  3. Updated Kinematic Constraints on a Dark Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Kramer, Eric David

    2016-01-01

    We update the method of the Holmberg & Flynn (2000) study, including an updated model of the Milky Way's interstellar gas, radial velocities, an updated reddening map, and a careful statistical analysis, to bound the allowed surface density and scale height of a dark disk. We pay careful attention to the self-consistency of the model, including the gravitational influence of the dark disk on other disk components, and to the net velocity of the tracer stars. We find that the data set exhibits a non-zero bulk velocity in the vertical direction as well as a displacement from the expected location at the Galactic midplane. If not properly accounted for, these features would bias the bound toward low dark disk mass. We therefore perform our analysis two ways. In the first, traditional method, we subtract the mean velocity and displacement from the tracers' phase space distributions. In the second method, we perform a non-equilibrium version of the HF method to derive a bound on the dark disk parameters for an...

  4. Radiative Transfer on Perturbations in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Jang-Condell, H; Jang-Condell, Hannah; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for calculating the radiative tranfer on a protoplanetary disk perturbed by a protoplanet. We apply this method to determine the effect on the temperature structure within the photosphere of a passive circumstellar disk in the vicinity of a small protoplanet of up to 20 Earth masses. The gravitational potential of a protoplanet induces a compression of the disk material near it, resulting in a decrement in the density at the disk's surface. Thus, an isodensity contour at the height of the photosphere takes on the shape of a well. When such a well is illuminated by stellar irradiation at grazing incidence, it results in cooling in a shadowed region and heating in an exposed region. For typical stellar and disk parameters relevant to the epoch of planet formation, we find that the temperature variation due to a protoplanet at 1 AU separation from its parent star is about 4% (5 K) for a planet of 1 Earth mass, about 14% (19 K) for planet of 10 Earth masses, and about 18% (25 K) for planet of ...

  5. Radiative Ablation of Disks Around Massive Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kee, N D

    2015-01-01

    Hot, massive stars (spectral types O and B) have extreme luminosities ($10^4 -10^6 L_\\odot$) that drive strong stellar winds through UV line-scattering. Some massive stars also have disks, formed by either decretion from the star (as in the rapidly rotating "Classical Be stars"), or accretion during the star's formation. This dissertation examines the role of stellar radiation in driving (ablating) material away from these circumstellar disks. A key result is that the observed month to year decay of Classical Be disks can be explained by line-driven ablation without, as previously done, appealing to anomalously strong viscous diffusion. Moreover, the higher luminosity of O stars leads to ablation of optically thin disks on dynamical timescales of order a day, providing a natural explanation for the lack of observed Oe stars. In addition to the destruction of Be disks, this dissertation also introduces a model for their formation by coupling observationally inferred non-radial pulsation modes and rapid stellar...

  6. Radially Magnetized Protoplanetary Disk: Vertical Profile

    CERN Document Server

    Russo, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, is wound up by the disk shear, and is pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and Ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field $B_r \\sim (10^{-4}$-$10^{-2})(r/{\\rm AU})^{-2}$ G. Careful attention is giv...

  7. Single-crystal disk drive miniactuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanardi, Marco; McKenney, Kevin B.; Rule, John A.; Yoshikawa, Shoko

    2001-08-01

    As hard disk drive areal densities increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 60%, disk drives must position the head over increasingly small areas while moving more rapidly to reach the desired position. This results in an increase in vibration disturbance. To meet this demand, many hard disk drive manufactures have created prototype dual-stage actuators employing piezoelectric ceramics for the second stage. These are an attractive means of obtaining higher-bandwidth control due to the low inertia and size of the actuator element. As the technology improves, the next limiting factor will be the amount of displacement obtainable with traditional piezoceramic elements. Under the AXIS (Advanced Crystal Integrated System) Consortium program funded by DARPA, the application of PZN-PT single crystal piezoceramic as a second stage disk drive actuator was studied, based on the fact that the single crystal material provides larger stroke than its traditional PZT counterparts. The transverse (d31) strain of PZN-PT single crystal was measured to be about two times larger than that of PZT-5H ceramic. Both materials were integrated into a disk drive system and compared as second stage actuators. The methodologies used and the servo control techniques applied are also discussed in the paper.

  8. The Migrating Embryo Model for Disk Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Shantanu

    2012-01-01

    A new view of disk evolution is emerging from self-consistent numerical simulation modeling of the formation of circumstellar disks from the direct collapse of prestellar cloud cores. This has implications for many aspects of star and planet formation, including the growth of dust and high-temperature processing of materials. A defining result is that the early evolution of a disk is crucially affected by the continuing mass loading from the core envelope, and is driven into recurrent phases of gravitational instability. Nonlinear spiral arms formed during these episodes fragment to form gaseous clumps in the disk. These clumps generally migrate inward due to gravitational torques arising from their interaction with a trailing spiral arm. Occasionally, a clump can open up a gap in the disk and settle into a stable orbit, revealing a direct pathway to the formation of companion stars, brown dwarfs, or giant planets. At other times, when multiple clumps are present, a low mass clump may even be ejected from the...

  9. Moon formation coupled with the protolular disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnoz, Sebastien; Bugnet, Lisa; Michaut, Chloé

    2015-11-01

    It is thought that the Moon accreted from the protolunar disk that was assembled after the last giant impact on Earth. Due to its high temperature, the protolunar disk may act as a thermochemical reactor in which the material is processed before being incorporated into the Moon. Outstanding issues like devolatilisation and istotopic evolution are tied to the disk evolution, however its lifetime, dynamics and thermodynamics are unknown. Here, we numerically explore the long term viscous evolution of the protolunar disk using a one dimensional model where the different phases (vapor and condensed) are vertically stratified.Our major innovation is that we compute at the same time the proto-moon growth along with the disk evolution, and calculate the thermodynamical equilibrium of the proto-lunar seed as it grows.We will discuss the long term dynamics, thermodynamics, cooling timescale and possibility for volatile depletion. We will show that due to different effective viscosities substantial fractionation of volatiles and refractory material is possible.Finally we will compare different scenarios of moon impacts (standard, sub-earths, fast spinning Earth) and their different advantages for explaining today’s moon material content.

  10. Bar instability in disk-halo systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sellwood, J A

    2016-01-01

    We show that the exponential growth rate of a bar in a stellar disk is substantially greater when the disk is embedded in a live halo than in a rigid one having the same mass distribution. We also find that the vigor of the instability in disk-halo systems varies with the shape of the halo velocity ellipsoid. Disks in rigid halos that are massive enough to be stable by the usual criteria, quickly form bars in isotropic halos and much greater halo mass is needed to avoid a strong bar; thus stability criteria derived for disks in rigid halos do not apply when the halo is responsive. The study presented here is of an idealized family of models with near uniform central rotation and that lack an extended halo; we present more realistic models with extended halos in a companion paper. The puzzle presented by the absence of strong bars in some galaxies having gently rising inner rotation curves is compounded by the results presented here.

  11. Propeller-driven Outflows and Disk Oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Romanova, M M; Koldoba, A V; Lovelace, R V E

    2005-01-01

    We report the discovery of propeller-driven outflows in axisymmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations of disk accretion to rapidly rotating magnetized stars. Matter outflows in a wide cone and is centrifugally ejected from the inner regions of the disk. Closer to the axis there is a strong, collimated, magnetically dominated outflow of energy and angular momentum carried by the open magnetic field lines from the star. The ``efficiency'' of the propeller may be very high in the respect that most of the incoming disk matter is expelled from the system in winds. The star spins-down rapidly due to the magnetic interaction with the disk through closed field lines and with corona through open field lines. Diffusive and viscous interaction between magnetosphere and the disk are important: no outflows were observed for very small values of the diffusivity and viscosity. These simulation results are applicable to the early stages of evolution of classical T Tauri stars and to different stages of evolution of cataclysmi...

  12. Building massive compact planetesimal disks from the accretion of pebbles

    CERN Document Server

    Moriarty, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a model in which planetesimal disks are built from the combination of planetesimal formation and accretion of radially drifting pebbles onto existing planetesimals. In this model, the rate of accretion of pebbles onto planetesimals quickly outpaces the rate of direct planetesimal formation in the inner disk. This allows for the formation of a high mass inner disk without the need for enhanced planetesimal formation or a massive protoplanetary disk. Our proposed mechanism for planetesimal disk growth does not require any special conditions to operate. Consequently, we expect that high mass planetesimal disks form naturally in nearly all systems. The extent of this growth is controlled by the total mass in pebbles that drifts through the inner disk. Anything that reduces the rate or duration of pebble delivery will correspondingly reduce the final mass of the planetesimal disk. Therefore, we expect that low mass stars (with less massive protoplanetary disks), low metallicity stars and stars with gian...

  13. Chemistry in disks. X. The molecular content of protoplanetary disks in Taurus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilloteau, S.; Reboussin, L.; Dutrey, A.; Chapillon, E.; Wakelam, V.; Piétu, V.; Di Folco, E.; Semenov, D.; Henning, Th.

    2016-08-01

    Aims: We attempt to determine the molecular composition of disks around young low-mass stars. Methods: We used the IRAM 30 m radio telescope to perform a sensitive wideband survey of 30 stars in the Taurus Auriga region known to be surrounded by gaseous circumstellar disks. We simultaneously observed HCO+(3-2), HCN(3-2), C2H(3-2), CS(5-4), and two transitions of SO. We combined the results with a previous survey that observed 13CO (2-1), CN(2-1), two o-H2CO lines, and another transition of SO. We used available interferometric data to derive excitation temperatures of CN and C2H in several sources. We determined characteristic sizes of the gas disks and column densities of all molecules using a parametric power-law disk model. Our study is mostly sensitive to molecules at 200-400 au from the stars. We compared the derived column densities to the predictions of an extensive gas-grain chemical disk model under conditions representative of T Tauri disks. Results: This survey provides 20 new detections of HCO+ in disks, 18 in HCN, 11 in C2H, 8 in CS, and 4 in SO. HCO+ is detected in almost all sources and its J = 3-2 line is essentially optically thick, providing good estimates of the disk radii. The other transitions are (at least partially) optically thin. Large variations of the column density ratios are observed, but do not correlate with any specific property of the star or disk. Disks around Herbig Ae stars appear less rich in molecules than those around T Tauri stars, although the sample remains small. SO is only found in the (presumably younger) embedded objects, perhaps reflecting an evolution of the S chemistry due to increasing depletion with time. Overall, the molecular column densities, and in particular the CN/HCN and CN/C2H ratios, are well reproduced by gas-grain chemistry in cold disks. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive census of simple molecules in disks of radii >200-300 au. Extending that to smaller disks, or searching for less

  14. Herschel Observations of Dusty Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Vican, Laura; Bryden, Geoff; Melis, Carl; Zuckerman, B; Rhee, Joseph; Song, Inseok

    2016-01-01

    We present results from two Herschel observing programs using the Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer. During three separate campaigns, we obtained Herschel data for 24 stars at 70, 100, and 160 microns. We chose stars that were already known or suspected to have circumstellar dust based on excess infrared emission previously measured with IRAS or Spitzer, and used Herschel to examine long-wavelength properties of the dust. Fifteen stars were found to be uncontaminated by background sources, and possess infrared emission most likely due to a circumstellar debris disk. We analyzed the properties of these debris disks to better understand the physical mechanisms responsible for dust production and removal. Seven targets were spatially resolved in the Herschel images. Based on fits to their spectral energy distributions, nine disks appear to have two temperature components. Of these nine, in three cases, the warmer dust component is likely the result of a transient process rather than a steady state coll...

  15. The Evolution of FU Orionis Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Joel D.

    2016-06-01

    Do protoplanetary disks undergo regular (or irregular) bursts of accretion? FU Orionis objects (FUors) are the strongest direct evidence for episodic accretion in low mass young stellar objects. FUors exhibit rapid changes in disk chemistry, both because they are temporarily bright IR sources relative to their core mass, and vary on day, month, year, and decade timescales. With improved spatial and spectral resolution from FORCAST, and a ten year time baseline compared with Spitzer-IRS data, we can observe and constrain the properties of silicate dust, and disk profiles, as they are altered by the outburst. We also consider the occurrence of binarity and whether any connection exists between multiplicity and evidence of recent outburst behavior.

  16. Optical disk uses in criminal identification systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypherd, Allen D.

    1990-08-01

    A significant advancement in law enforcement tools has been made possible by the rapid and innovative development of electronic imaging for criminal identification systems. In particular, development of optical disks capable of high-capacity and random-access storage has provided a unique marriage of application and technology. Fast random access to any record, non-destructive reading of stored images, electronic sorting and transmission of images and an accepted legal basis for evidence are a few of the advantages derived from optical disk technology. This paper discusses the application of optical disk technology to both Automated Fingerprint Identification Systems (AFIS) and Automated Mugshot Retrieval Systems (AMRS). The following topics are addressed in light of AFIS and AMRS user requirements and system capabilities: Write once vs. rewritable, gray level and storage requirements, multi-volume library systems, data organization and capacity trends.

  17. Subaru SEEDS Survey of Exoplanets and Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwain, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    The Strategic Exploration of Exoplanets and Disks at Subaru (SEEDS) is the first strategic observing program (SSOPs) awarded by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ). SEEDS targets a broad sample of stars that span a wide range of masses and ages to explore the formation and evolution of planetary systems. This survey has been awarded 120 nights over five years time to observe nearly 500 stars. Currently in the second year, SEEDS has already produced exciting new results for the protoplanetary disk AB Aur, transitional disk LkCa15, and nearby companion to GJ 758. We present the survey architecture, performance, recent results, and the projected sample. Finally, we will discuss planned upgrades to the high contrast instrumentation at the Subaru Telescope

  18. Intelligent multi-unit disk controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This controller has been designed as a link between a 16 bits minicomputer and two types of disks units interface: the SMD interface and an equivalent to the DRI unit interface. Four units of each type can be handled by the controller. A bit slice microprocessor controls the interface with the disks units. The maximum exchange rate is 8 megabits per second. A CRC feature has been provided for error detection. A 16 bits microprocessor implements the interface to the computer, assuring head positioning, the management of bad tracks, as well as the supervision of each transfer. A internal buffer memory allows an asynchronous dialogue with the computer. The implementation of the controller makes easy the adaptation to disks units of various types, and though it has been initially intended for a minicomputer of the MITRA type, its microprocessor based design makes it fitted to any minicomputer. (author)

  19. Earth, Moon, Sun, and CV Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, M M

    2009-01-01

    Net tidal torque by the secondary on a misaligned accretion disk, like the net tidal torque by the Moon and the Sun on the equatorial bulge of the spinning and tilted Earth, is suggested by others to be a source to retrograde precession in non-magnetic, accreting Cataclysmic Variable (CV) Dwarf Novae systems that show negative superhumps in their light curves. We investigate this idea in this work. We generate a generic theoretical expression for retrograde precession in spinning disks that are misaligned with the orbital plane. Our generic theoretical expression matches that which describes the retrograde precession of Earths' equinoxes. By making appropriate assumptions, we reduce our generic theoretical expression to those generated by others, or to those used by others, to describe retrograde precession in protostellar, protoplanetary, X-ray binary, non-magnetic CV DN, quasar and black hole systems. We find that differential rotation and effects on the disk by the accretion stream must be addressed. Our a...

  20. Disk Dispersal: Theoretical Understanding and Observational Constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Gorti, U; Sandor, Zs; clarke, C

    2015-01-01

    Protoplanetary disks dissipate rapidly after the central star forms, on time-scales comparable to those inferred for planet formation. In order to allow the formation of planets, disks must survive the dispersive effects of UV and X-ray photoevaporation for at least a few Myr. Viscous accretion depletes significant amounts of the mass in gas and solids, while photoevaporative flows driven by internal and external irradiation remove most of the gas. A reasonably large fraction of the mass in solids and some gas get incorporated into planets. Here, we review our current understanding of disk evolution and dispersal, and discuss how these might affect planet formation. We also discuss existing observational constraints on dispersal mechanisms and future directions.

  1. Disk Dispersal: Theoretical Understanding and Observational Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorti, U.; Liseau, R.; Sándor, Z.; Clarke, C.

    2016-05-01

    Protoplanetary disks dissipate rapidly after the central star forms, on time-scales comparable to those inferred for planet formation. In order to allow the formation of planets, disks must survive the dispersive effects of UV and X-ray photoevaporation for at least a few Myr. Viscous accretion depletes significant amounts of the mass in gas and solids, while photoevaporative flows driven by internal and external irradiation remove most of the gas. A reasonably large fraction of the mass in solids and some gas get incorporated into planets. Here, we review our current understanding of disk evolution and dispersal, and discuss how these might affect planet formation. We also discuss existing observational constraints on dispersal mechanisms and future directions.

  2. Gravitational Instability in Neutrino Dominated Accretion Disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the vertical structure of neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) in spherical coordinates under a boundary condition based on a mechanical equilibrium. The solutions show that the NDAF is significantly geometrically thick. The Toomre parameter is determined by the mass accretion rate and the viscosity parameter, which is defined as Q = cSΩ/πGΣ, where cS, Ω and Σ are the sound speed, angular velocity and surface density, respectively. According to the distribution of the Toomre parameter, the possible fragments of the disk may appear near the disk surface in the outer region. These possible outflows originating from the gravitational instability of the disk may account for the late-time flares in gamma-ray bursts. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  3. Seeded inert gas driven disk generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report outlines the present status of work being carried out in closed cycle MHD and disk generators. It gives the basic principles and discusses a proposal for setting up an experimental facility to study nonequilibrium plasmas using an inert gas driven disk generator. Disk geometry is a near ideal geometry for plasma studies since it has single or few pair electrodes combined with near perfect insulating walls. The proposed outlay of facility with components and subsystem is given. The facility may also be used to study the concept of fully ionized seed and to develop advanced diagnostic techniques. The absic equation describing the working parameters of such a system is also given in the Appendix. (author). 57 refs

  4. Multimegawatt disk generator system for space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conceptual design of a 100 megawatt - 500 seconds disk MHD generator system suitable as a burst power source for a space based neutral particle beam (NPB) is presented. The system features two disk generators operated in the magnetic field produced by a single circular superconducting magnet. Gelled reactants are used as the energy source. The oxidizer gel includes the alkali seed. The high heat flux areas of the power train are water cooled. Heat is rejected to a hydrogen stream which is also used for cooling of the exit section. The hydrogen is also used to mitigate the effects of the exhaust products of combustion on the platform. The two disk channels are operated in parallel. A dc to dc converter consolidates the channel's output into a single 100 kilovolt dc output

  5. An interferometric view of hot star disks

    CERN Document Server

    Faes, Daniel Moser

    2015-01-01

    Optical long baseline interferometry was recently established as a technique capable of resolving stars and their circumstellar environments at the milliarcsecond (mas) resolution level. This high-resolution opens an entire new window to the study of astrophysical systems, providing information inaccessible by other techniques. Astrophysical disks are observed in a wide variety of systems, from galaxies up to planetary rings, commonly sharing similar physical processes. Two particular disk like systems are studied in the thesis: (i) B He-rich stars that exhibits magnetic fields in order of kG and that trap their winds in structures called magnetospheres; and (ii) Be stars, fast rotating stars that create circumstellar viscous disks. This study uses the interferometric technique to investigate both the photosphere proper and the circumstellar environment of these stars. The objective is to combine interferometry with other observational techniques (such as spectroscopy and polarimetry) to perform a complete an...

  6. Debris Disks in Aggregate: Using Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphic Imagery to Understand the Scattered-Light Disk Detection Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite more than a decade of coronagraphic imaging of debris disk candidate stars, only 16 have been imaged in scattered light. Since imaged disks provide our best insight into processes which sculpt disks, and can provide signposts of the presence of giant planets at distances which would elude radial velocity and transit surveys, we need to understand under what conditions we detect the disks in scattered light, how these disks differ from the majority of debris disks, and how to increase the yield of disks which are imaged with 0.1" angular resolution. In this talk, I will review what we have learned from a shallow HSTINICMOS NIR survey of debris disks, and present first results from our on-going HST /STIS optical imaging of bright scattered-light disks.

  7. Observations of ``Gas-Rich'' Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, François

    2004-06-01

    Accretion disks are pivotal elements in the formation and early evolution of solar-like stars. On top of supplying the raw material, their internal conditions also regulate the formation of planets. Their study therefore holds the key to solve the mystery of the formation of our Solar System. This chapter focuses on observational studies of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence solar-like stars. The direct measurement of disk parameters poses an obvious challenge: at the distance of typical star forming regions (e.g., ~140pc for Taurus), a planetary system like ours (with diameter ~= 50AU out to Pluto, but excluding the Kuiper belt) subtends only 0.35''. Yet its surface brightness is low in comparison to the bright central star and high angular and high contrast imaging techniques are required if one hopes to resolve and measure these protoplanetary disks. Fortunately, capable instruments providing 0.1'' resolution or better and high contrast have been available for just about 10 years now. They are covering a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the UV/Optical with HST and the near-infrared from ground-based adaptive optics systems, to the millimetric range with long-baseline radio interferometers. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge of the structure of the disks surrounding low-mass stars has made a gigantic leap forward in the last decade. In the following pages I will attempt to give an overview of the structural and physical parameters of protoplanetary disks that can be estimated today from direct observations.

  8. 3D-MHD simulations of an accretion disk with star-disk boundary layer

    CERN Document Server

    Steinacker, A; Steinacker, Adriane; Papaloizou, John C.B.

    2002-01-01

    We present global 3D MHD simulations of geometrically thin but unstratified accretion disks in which a near Keplerian disk rotates between two bounding regions with initial rotation profiles that are stable to the MRI. The inner region models the boundary layer between the disk and an assumed more slowly rotating central, non magnetic star. We investigate the dynamical evolution of this system in response to initial vertical and toroidal fields imposed in a variety of domains contained within the near Keplerian disk. Cases with both non zero and zero net magnetic flux are considered and sustained dynamo activity found in runs for up to fifty orbital periods at the outer boundary of the near Keplerian disk. Simulations starting from fields with small radial scale and with zero net flux lead to the lowest levels of turbulence and smoothest variation of disk mean state variables. For our computational set up, average values of the Shakura & Sunyaev (1973) $\\alpha$ parameter in the Keplerian disk are typicall...

  9. Scale Length of the Galactic Thin Disk

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D. Κ. Ojha

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the first 2MASS (The Two Micron All Sky Survey) sampler data as observed at lower Galactic latitude in our Galaxy. These new near-infrared data provide insight into the structure of the thin disk of our Galaxy, The interpretation of star counts and color distributions of stars in the near-infrared with the synthetic stellar population model, gives strong evidence that the Galactic thin disk density scale length, ℎ, is rather short (2.7 ± 0.1 kpc).

  10. The orbital evolution of planets in disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kley, W

    2000-01-01

    The orbital parameters of the observed extrasolar planets differ strongly from those of our own solar system. The differences include planets with high masses, small semi-major axis and large eccentricities. We performed numerical computations of embedded planets in disks and follow their mass growth and orbital evolution over several thousand periods. We find that planets do migrate inwards on timescales of about $10^5$ years on nearly circular orbits, during which they may grow up to about 5 Jupiter masses. The interaction of the disk with several planets may halt the migration process and lead to a system similar to the solar planetary system.

  11. Extended HI disks in nearby spiral galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Bosma, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this short write-up, I will concentrate on a few topics of interest. In the 1970s I found very extended HI disks in galaxies such as NGC 5055 and NGC 2841, out to 2 - 2.5 times the Holmberg radius. Since these galaxies are warped, a "tilted ring model" allows rotation curves to be derived, and evidence for dark matter to be found. The evaluation of the amount of dark matter is hampered by a disk-halo degeneracy, which can possibly be broken by observations of velocity dispersions in both t...

  12. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevezentsev, E A; Mukhin, I B; Kuznetsov, I I; Vadimova, O L; Palashov, O V [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhnii Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-30

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼10{sup 8}. (lasers)

  13. The dust content of protoplanetary disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I review the observed properties of dust in the disks around pre-main sequence stars, with a focus on two specific aspects. The first is the evidence of vertical sedimentation of grains, with smaller particles (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)) on the surface and larger grains closer to the midplane. The second is the evidence of a substantial mass of very large grains (millimeter to centimeter size: 'pebbles') in the outer regions of a number of disks. While the observations are in general agreement with grain growth by collisional coagulation, many details, and the presence of 'pebbles' in particular, still need to be understood

  14. Massive young disks around Herbig Ae stars

    OpenAIRE

    Boissier, Jeremie; Alonso-Albi, Tomas; Fuente, Asuncion; Berne, Olivier; Bachiller, Rafael; Neri, Roberto; Ginard, David

    2011-01-01

    Herbig Ae stars (HAe) are the precursors of Vega-type systems and, therefore, crucial objects in planet formation studies. Thus far, only a few disks associated with HAe stars have been studied using millimetre interferometers. Our aim is to determine the dust evolution and the lifetime of the disks associated with Herbig Ae stars. We imaged the continuum emission at 3 mm and 1.3 mm of the Herbig Ae/Be stars BD+61154, RR Tau, VY Mon and LkHa 198 using the Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI)...

  15. Extended HI disks in nearby spiral galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bosma, A

    2016-01-01

    In this short write-up, I will concentrate on a few topics of interest. In the 1970s I found very extended HI disks in galaxies such as NGC 5055 and NGC 2841, out to 2 - 2.5 times the Holmberg radius. Since these galaxies are warped, a "tilted ring model" allows rotation curves to be derived, and evidence for dark matter to be found. The evaluation of the amount of dark matter is hampered by a disk-halo degeneracy, which can possibly be broken by observations of velocity dispersions in both the MgI region and the CaII region.

  16. Nanosecond cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cryogenic Yb:YAG disk laser is modernised to increase its average and peak power. The master oscillator unit of the laser is considerably modified so that the pulse duration decreases to several nanoseconds with the same pulse energy. A cryogenic disk laser head with a flow-through cooling system is developed. Based on two such laser heads, a new main amplifier is assembled according to an active multipass cell scheme. The total small-signal gain of cryogenic cascades is ∼108. (lasers)

  17. The optimization of Blister Disk geometry for mixing performance in co-rotating twin-screw extruder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Koki; Kayamori, Natsuki; Tanaka, Tatsuya; Arao, Yoshihiko

    2015-05-01

    Extensional flow has been taken notice as the more efficient solution for improving the dispersion of nanocomposites than shear flow. One of the production processes of nanocomposites is melt extrusion with co-rotating twin-screw extruder (TSE) which is superior in terms of productivity and mixing performance. Then, we focused on "Blister Disk" which had many small holes for generating the extensional flow. However, the influences on the mixing performance by changing the geometry of Blister Disk have not been investigated as far as we know. Therefore, the objective of this study is the optimization of Blister Disk geometry (e.g. hole numbers, hole diameter and disk length) for improving the dispersion of nanocomposites. Primary, the extensional flow state was investigated at the Blister Disk with FEM analysis. Secondly, to validate the simulation results experimentally, the polypropylene reinforced multi-walled carbon nanotube (PP/CNT nanocomposite) was used as the model of nanocomposite, and the dispersion state of CNT was investigated by morphological observation. As the result of these experiments, the better dispersion state of CNT was obtained as total permeation area and shorter hole length of Blister Disk was smaller because extensional and shear stress were increased.

  18. Evaluation of Meterorite Amono Acid Analysis Data Using Multivariate Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, G.; Storrie-Lombardi, M.; Nealson, K.

    1999-01-01

    The amino acid distributions in the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite, Mars meteorite ALH84001, and ice from the Allan Hills region of Antarctica are shown, using a multivariate technique known as Principal Component Analysis (PCA), to be statistically distinct from the average amino acid compostion of 101 terrestrial protein superfamilies.

  19. Fission Xenon on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, K. J.; Marti, K.; Marty, B.

    2002-01-01

    Fission Xe components due to Pu-244 decay in the early history of Mars have been identified in nakhlites; as in the case of ALH84001 and Chassigny the fission gas was assimilated into indigenous solar-type Xe. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Towards a Global Evolutionary Model of Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-04-01

    A global picture of the evolution of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard α-disk models have been continually employed for their simplicity. In the meantime, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift toward accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has taken place in recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magnetohydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux during the evolution. In addition, because wind launching requires a sufficient level of ionization at the disk surface (mainly via external far-UV (FUV) radiation), wind kinematics is also affected by the FUV penetration depth and disk geometry. For a typical disk lifetime of a few million years, the disk loses approximately the same amount of mass through the wind as through accretion onto the protostar, and most of the wind mass loss proceeds from the outer disk via a slow wind. Fractional wind mass loss increases with increasing disk lifetime. Significant wind mass loss likely substantially enhances the dust-to-gas mass ratio and promotes planet formation.

  1. Conservative GRMHD simulations of moderately thin, tilted accretion disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents our latest numerical simulations of accretion disks that are misaligned with respect to the rotation axis of a Kerr black hole. In this work, we use a new, fully conservative version of the Cosmos++ general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) code, coupled with an ad hoc cooling function designed to control the thickness of the disk. Together these allow us to simulate the thinnest tilted accretion disks ever using a GRMHD code. In this way, we are able to probe the regime where the dimensionless stress and scale height of the disk become comparable. We present results for both prograde and retrograde cases. The simulated prograde tilted disk shows no sign of Bardeen-Petterson alignment even in the innermost parts of the disk. The simulated retrograde tilted disk, however, does show modest alignment. The implication of these results is that the parameter space associated with Bardeen-Petterson alignment for prograde disks may be rather small, only including very thin disks. Unlike our previous work, we find no evidence for standing shocks in our simulated tilted disks. We ascribe this to the black hole spin, tilt angle, and disk scale height all being small in these simulations. We also add to the growing body of literature pointing out that the turbulence driven by the magnetorotational instability in global simulations of accretion disks is not isotropic. Finally, we provide a comparison between our moderately thin, untilted reference simulation and other numerical simulations of thin disks in the literature.

  2. Evolution of Thick Accretion Disks Produced by Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Ulmer, A

    1997-01-01

    Geometrically thick disks may form after tidal disruption events, and rapid accretion may lead to short flares followed by long-term, lower-level emission. Using a novel accretion disk code which relies primarily on global conservation laws and the assumption that viscosity is everywhere positive, a broad range of physically allowed evolutionary sequences of thick disks is investigated. The main result is that accretion in the thick disk phase can consume only a fraction of the initial disk material before the disk cools and becomes thin. This fraction is ~0.5-0.9 for disruptions around 10^6 to 10^7 M_ødot black holes and is sensitive to the mean angular momentum of the disk. The residual material will accrete in some form of thin disk over a longer period of time. The initial thick disk phase may reduce the dimming timescale of the disk by a factor of ~2 from estimates based on thin disks alone. Assuming an 0.5 M_ødot initial thick disk, even if the thin disks become advection dominated, the black hole mas...

  3. Frequency Correlations of QPOs Based on a Disk Oscillation Model in Warped Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, S

    2007-01-01

    In previous papers we proposed a model that high-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) observed in black-hole and neutron-star X-ray binaries are disk oscillations (inertial-acoustic and/or g-mode oscillations) resonantly excited on warped disks. In this paper we examine whether time variations of the QPOs and their frequency correlations observed in neutron-star X-ray binaries can be accounted for by this disk-oscillation model. By assuming that a warp has a time-dependent precession, we can well describe observed frequency correlations among kHz QPOs and LF QPOs in a wide range of frequencies.

  4. ACCRETION DISK WARPING BY RESONANT RELAXATION: THE CASE OF MASER DISK NGC 4258

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maser disk around the massive black hole (MBH) in active galaxy NGC 4258 exhibits an O(10 deg.) warp on the O(0.1 pc) scale. The physics driving the warp is still debated. Suggested mechanisms include torquing by relativistic frame dragging or by radiation pressure. We propose here a new warping mechanism: resonant torquing of the disk by stars in the dense cusp around the MBH. We show that resonant torquing can induce such a warp over a wide range of observed and deduced physical parameters of the maser disk.

  5. Accretion disk warping by resonant relaxation: The case of maser disk NGC4258

    CERN Document Server

    Bregman, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The maser disk around the massive black hole (MBH) in active galaxy NGC 4258 exhibits an O(10 deg) warp on the O(0.1 pc) scale. The physics driving the warp are still debated. Suggested mechanisms include torquing by relativistic frame dragging or by radiation pressure. We propose here a new warping mechanism: resonant torquing of the disk by stars in the dense cusp around the MBH. We show that resonant torquing can induce such a warp over the range of observed and deduced physical parameters of the maser disk.

  6. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Formalhaut B from Disk Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, E.; Kite, E.; Kalas, P.; Graham, J. R.; Clampin, M.

    2008-01-01

    Following the optical imaging of exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. If Fom b is the dominant perturber of the belt, then to produce the observed disk morphology it must have a mass M(sub pl) 101.5AU, and an orbital eccentricity e(sub pl) = 0.11 - 0.13. These conclusions are independent of Fom b's photometry. To not disrupt the disk, a greater mass for Fom b demands a smaller orbit farther removed from the disk; thus, future astrometric measurement of Fom b's orbit, combined with our model of planet-disk interaction, can be used to determine the mass more precisely. The inner edge of the debris disk at a approximately equals 133AU lies at the periphery of Fom b's chaotic zone, and the mean disk eccentricity of e approximately equals 0.11 is secularly forced by the planet, supporting predictions made prior to the discovery of Fom b. However, previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of approximately 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to approximately 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Fomalhaut b's nominal space velocity does not bear this out, but the astrometric uncertainties are difficult to quantify. Even if the apsidal misalignment proves real, our calculated upper mass limit of 3 M(sub J) still holds. Parent bodies are evacuated from mean

  7. The abundance and thermal history of water ice in the disk surrounding HD 142527 from the DIGIT Herschel Key Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, M.; Bouwman, J.; Dominik, C.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Hony, S.; Mulders, G. D.; Henning, Th.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Woitke, P.; Evans, Neal J., II; Digit Team

    2016-08-01

    Context. The presence or absence of ice in protoplanetary disks is of great importance to the formation of planets. By enhancing solid surface density and increasing sticking efficiency, ice catalyzes the rapid formation of planetesimals and decreases the timescale of giant planet core accretion. Aims: In this paper, we analyze the composition of the outer disk around the Herbig star HD 142527. We focus on the composition of water ice, but also analyze the abundances of previously proposed minerals. Methods: We present new Herschel far-infrared spectra and a re-reduction of archival data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). We modeled the disk using full 3D radiative transfer to obtain the disk structure. Also, we used an optically thin analysis of the outer disk spectrum to obtain firm constraints on the composition of the dust component. Results: The water ice in the disk around HD 142527 contains a large reservoir of crystalline water ice. We determine the local abundance of water ice in the outer disk (i.e., beyond 130 AU). The re-reduced ISO spectrum differs significantly from that previously published, but matches the new Herschel spectrum at their common wavelength range. In particular, we do not detect any significant contribution from carbonates or hydrous silicates, in contrast to earlier claims. Conclusions: The amount of water ice detected in the outer disk requires ~80% of oxygen atoms. This is comparable to the water ice abundance in the outer solar system, comets, and dense interstellar clouds. The water ice is highly crystalline while the temperatures where we detect it are too low to crystallize the water on relevant timescales. We discuss the implications of this finding.

  8. Identification of transitional disks in Chamaeleon with Herschel

    CERN Document Server

    Ribas, Á; Bouy, H; de Oliveira, C Alves; Ardila, D R; Puga, E; Kóspál, Á; Spezzi, L; Cox, N L J; Prusti, T; Pilbratt, G L; André, Ph; Matrà, L; Vavrek, R

    2013-01-01

    Transitional disks are circumstellar disks with inner holes that in some cases are produced by planets and/or substellar companions in these systems. For this reason, these disks are extremely important for the study of planetary system formation. The Herschel Space Observatory provides an unique opportunity for studying the outer regions of protoplanetary disks. In this work we update previous knowledge on the transitional disks in the Chamaeleon I and II regions with data from the Herschel Gould Belt Survey. We propose a new method for transitional disk classification based on the WISE 12 micron-PACS 70 micron color, together with inspection of the Herschel images. We applied this method to the population of Class II sources in the Chamaeleon region and studied the spectral energy distributions of the transitional disks in the sample. We also built the median spectral energy distribution of Class II objects in these regions for comparison with transitional disks. The proposed method allows a clear separatio...

  9. Disk Truncation and Planet Formation in gamma Cephei

    CERN Document Server

    Jang-Condell, H; Schmidt, T

    2008-01-01

    The $\\gamma$ Cephei system is one of the most closely bound binary planet hosts known to date. The companion ($\\gamma$ Cep B) to the planet-hosting star ($\\gamma$ Cep A) should have truncated any protoplanetary disk around $\\gamma$ Cep A, possibly limiting planet formation in the disk. We explore this problem by calculating the truncation radii of protoplanetary disk models around $\\gamma$ Cep A to determine whether or not there is sufficient material remaining in the disk to form a planet. We vary the accretion rate and viscosity parameter of the disk models to cover a range of reasonable possibilities for the disks properties and determine that for accretion rates of $\\geq 10^{-7}$ M$_{\\sun}$/yr and low viscosity parameter, sufficient material in gas and solids exist for planet formation via core accretion to be possible. Disk instability is less favored, as this can only occur in the most massive disk model with an extremely high accretion rate.

  10. Burst-Disk Device Simulates Effect Of Pyrotechnic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James P.; Sexton, James H.

    1995-01-01

    Expendable disks substituted for costly pyrotechnic devices for testing actuators. Burst-disk device produces rush of pressurized gas similar to pyrotechnic device. Designed to reduce cost of testing pyrotechnically driven emergency actuators (parachute-deploying mechanisms in original application).

  11. Magnetic resonance tomography in diagnosing of lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative magnetic-resonance (MR) tomographic, myelographic and computerized tomographic studies are performed in 500 patients with pathological changes in the lumbar intervertebral disk. An assessment is done of the concrete MR-tomographic symptomatology by means of T-1 and T-2 characterization in cases of normal disk, disk protrusion, disk hernia, disk extrusion and disk sequestrum. Noninvasive MR-tomography unlike myelography and computerized tomography secures a direct imaging of disk herniation and its anatomical relationship to the disk proper, especially by T-2 characterization. The intervertebral foramen region is optimally examined by T-1 characterization. A reliable differentiation of postoperative epidural fibrous changes is attained by intravenous introduction of gadolinium contrast medium. 7 figs, 27 refs

  12. Capture of planetesimals by waning circumplanetary gas disks

    CERN Document Server

    Suetsugu, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    When gas giant protoplanets grow sufficiently massive, circumplanetary disks would form. While solid bodies captured by the circumplanetary disks likely contribute to the growth of the planets and regular satellites around them, some of captured bodies would remain in planet-centered orbits after the dispersal of the disk. We examine capture and subsequent orbital evolution of planetesimals in waning circumplanetary gas disks using three-body orbital integration. We find that some of captured planetesimals can survive in the circumplanetary disk for a long period of time under such weak gas drag. Captured planetesimals have semi-major axes smaller than about one third of the planet's Hill radius. Distributions of their eccentricities and inclinations after disk dispersal depend on the strength of gas drag and the timescale of disk dispersal, and initially strong gas drag and quick disk dispersal facilitates capture and survival of planetesimals. However, in such a case, final orbital eccentricities and inclin...

  13. THE GRAVITATIONAL FORCE AND POTENTIAL OF THE FINITE MESTEL DISK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Earl, E-mail: earlschulz@gmail.com [60 Mountain Road, North Granby, CT 06060 (United States)

    2012-03-10

    Mestel determined the surface mass distribution of the finite disk for which the circular velocity is constant in the disk and found the gravitational field for points in the z = 0 plane. Here we find the exact closed form solutions for the potential and the gravitational field of this disk in cylindrical coordinates over all the space. The finite Mestel disk (FMD) is characterized by a cuspy mass distribution in the inner disk region and by an exponential distribution in the outer region of the disk. The FMD is quite different from the better known exponential disk or the untruncated Mestel disk which, being infinite in extent, are not realistic models of real spiral galaxies. In particular, the FMD requires significantly less mass to explain a measured velocity curve.

  14. The gravitational force and potential of the finite Mestel disk

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Earl

    2011-01-01

    Mestel determined the surface mass distribution of the finite disk for which the circular velocity is constant in the disk and found the gravitational field for points in the $z=0$ plane. Here we find the exact closed form solutions for the potential and the gravitational field of this disk in cylindrical coordinates over all the space. The Finite Mestel Disk (FMD) is characterized by a cuspy mass distribution in the inner disk region and by an exponential distribution in the outer region of the disk. The FMD is quite different from the better known exponential disk or the untruncated Mestel disk which, being infinite in extent, are not realistic models of real spiral galaxies. In particular, the FMD requires significantly less mass to explain a measured velocity curve.

  15. Tidal Disruption Flares: The Accretion Disk Phase

    CERN Document Server

    Armijo, Matias Montesinos

    2011-01-01

    The evolution of an accretion disk, formed as a consequence of the disruption of a star by a black hole, is followed by solving numerically the hydrodynamic equations. The present investigation aims to study the dependence of resulting light curves on dynamical and physical properties of such a transient disk during its existence. One of main results derived from our simulations is that black body fits of X-ray data tend to overestimate the true mean disk temperature. The temperature derived from black body fits should be identified with the color X-ray temperature rather than the average value derived from the true temperature distribution along the disk. The time interval between the beginning of the circularization of the bound debris and the beginning of the accretion process by the black hole is determined by the viscous timescale, which fixes also the raising part of the resulting light curve. The luminosity peak coincides with the beginning of matter accretion by the black hole and the late evolution o...

  16. The geometry of the disk complex

    OpenAIRE

    Masur, Howard; Schleimer, Saul

    2010-01-01

    We give a distance estimate for the metric on the disk complex and show that it is Gromov hyperbolic. As another application of our techniques, we find an algorithm which computes the Hempel distance of a Heegaard splitting, up to an error depending only on the genus.

  17. Holographic Compact Disk Read-Only Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Compact disk read-only memories (CD-ROMs) of proposed type store digital data in volume holograms instead of in surface differentially reflective elements. Holographic CD-ROM consist largely of parts similar to those used in conventional CD-ROMs. However, achieves 10 or more times data-storage capacity and throughput by use of wavelength-multiplexing/volume-hologram scheme.

  18. Asymmetric transition disks: Vorticity or eccentricity?

    CERN Document Server

    Zsom, A; Ghanbari, J

    2013-01-01

    Context. Transition disks typically appear in resolved millimeter observations as giant dust rings surrounding their young host stars. More accurate observations with ALMA have shown several of these rings to be in fact asymmetric: they have lopsided shapes. It has been speculated that these rings act as dust traps, which would make them important laboratories for studying planet formation. It has been shown that an elongated giant vortex produced in a disk with a strong viscosity jump strikingly resembles the observed asymmetric rings. Aims. We aim to study a similar behavior for a disk in which a giant planet is embedded. However, a giant planet can induce two kinds of asymmetries: (1) a giant vortex, and (2) an eccentric disk. We studied under which conditions each of these can appear, and how one can observationally distinguish between them. This is important because only a vortex can trap particles both radially and azimuthally, while the eccentric ring can only trap particles in radial direction. Method...

  19. Herniated Disk in the Lower Back

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of patients with lumbar disk herniations require surgery. Spine surgery is typically recommended only a er a period ... be as good as if you had elected surgery earlier. The risk of surgical complications is exceptionally low. Possible complications include: • Infection • Nerve ...

  20. Processed and unprocessed ices in circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Pontoppidan, K; Thi, W F; Van Dishoeck, E F

    2004-01-01

    We present 3-5 micron VLT-ISAAC spectroscopy searching for evidence of methanol ices in edge-on disks of young embedded stars. Examples include the disks of L1489 IRS in Taurus and CRBR 2422.8-3423 in Ophiuchus, the last of which has the highest column density of solid CO known toward a YSO. We find no unambiguous evidence for abundant methanol in the observed disks, but give strict upper limits. Several additional low-mass sources in the Serpens and Chameleon molecular clouds exhibit abundant solid methanol, although it is not clear if the ice is associated with a disk or with the envelope. These are the first detections of solid methanol in the circumstellar environments of embedded young low-mass stars providing evidence that complex molecular species previously observed only in the solid state toward high-mass star forming regions are also present near solar-type young stars. The constraints on the formation mechanisms of methanol and the chemical evolution of ices as the material is incorporated into cir...

  1. The short circuit instability in protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubbard, A.; McNally, C.P.; Mac Low, M.M.;

    2013-01-01

    and lightning, as it concentrates the dissipation of magnetic energy by means of the enhanced release of free electrons. This instability can generate very high temperatures, making it an excellent candidate for thermally processing protoplanetary disk solids, from annealing silicates to melting...

  2. Local Magnetohydrodynamical Models of Layered Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Fleming, T; Fleming, Timothy; Stone, James M.

    2003-01-01

    Using numerical MHD simulations, we have studied the evolution of the magnetorotational instability in stratified accretion disks in which the ionization fraction (and therefore resistivity) varies substantially with height. This model is appropriate to dense, cold disks around protostars or dwarf nova systems which are ionized by external irradiation of cosmic rays or high-energy photons. We find the growth and saturation of the MRI occurs only in the upper layers of the disk where the magnetic Reynolds number exceeds a critical value; in the midplane the disk remains queiscent. The vertical Poynting flux into the "dead", central zone is small, however velocity fluctuations in the dead zone driven by the turbulence in the active layers generate a significant Reynolds stress in the midplane. When normalized by the thermal pressure, the Reynolds stress in the midplane never drops below about 10% of the value of the Maxwell stress in the active layers, even though the Maxwell stress in the dead zone may be orde...

  3. Computing Temperatures in Optically Thick Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuder, Lawrence F.. Jr.

    2011-01-01

    We worked with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer code to simulate the transfer of energy through protoplanetary disks, where planet formation occurs. The code tracks photons from the star into the disk, through scattering, absorption and re-emission, until they escape to infinity. High optical depths in the disk interior dominate the computation time because it takes the photon packet many interactions to get out of the region. High optical depths also receive few photons and therefore do not have well-estimated temperatures. We applied a modified random walk (MRW) approximation for treating high optical depths and to speed up the Monte Carlo calculations. The MRW is implemented by calculating the average number of interactions the photon packet will undergo in diffusing within a single cell of the spatial grid and then updating the packet position, packet frequencies, and local radiation absorption rate appropriately. The MRW approximation was then tested for accuracy and speed compared to the original code. We determined that MRW provides accurate answers to Monte Carlo Radiative transfer simulations. The speed gained from using MRW is shown to be proportional to the disk mass.

  4. Disk Acceleration Experiment Utilizing Minimal Material (DAXUMM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biss, Matthew; Lorenz, Thomas; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2015-06-01

    A venture between the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently underway in an effort to characterize novel energetic material performance properties using a single, high-precision, gram-range charge. A nearly all-inclusive characterization experiment is proposed by combing LLNL's disk acceleration experiment (DAX) with the ARL explosive evaluation utilizing minimal material (AXEUMM) experiment. Spherical-cap charges fitted with a flat circular metal disk are centrally initiated using an exploding bridgewire detonator while photonic doppler velocimetry is used to probe the metal disk surface velocity and measure its temporal history. The metal disk's jump-off-velocity measurement is combined with conservation equations, material Hugoniots, and select empirical relationships to determine performance properties of the detonation wave (i.e., velocity, pressure, particle velocity, and density). Using the temporal velocity history with the numerical hydrocode CTH, a determination of the energetic material's equation of state and material expansion energy is possible. Initial experimental and computational results for the plastic-bonded energetic formulation PBXN-5 are presented.

  5. Relativistic slim disks with vertical structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sądowski, A.; Bursa, Michal; Abramowicz, M. A.; Kluzniak, W.; Lasota, J.-P.; Rózanska, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 527, March (2011), A17/1-A17/14. ISSN 0004-6361 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : black hole physics * accretion * accretion disks Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.587, year: 2011

  6. DUST-DRIVEN WIND FROM DISK GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study gaseous outflows from disk galaxies driven by radiation pressure on dust grains. We include the effect of bulge and dark matter halo and show that the existence of such an outflow implies a maximum value of disk mass-to-light ratio. We show that the terminal wind speed is proportional to the disk rotation speed in the limit of a cold gaseous outflow, and that in general there is a contribution from the gas sound speed. Using the mean opacity of dust grains and the evolution of the luminosity of a simple stellar population, we then show that the ratio of the wind terminal speed (v∞) to the galaxy rotation speed (vc ) ranges between 2 and 3 for a period of ∼10 Myr after a burst of star formation, after which it rapidly decays. This result is independent of any free parameter and depends only on the luminosity of the stellar population and the relation between disk and dark matter halo parameters. We briefly discuss the possible implications of our results.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic Origin of Jets from Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovelace, R. V. E.; Romanova, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    A review is made of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory and simulation of outflows from disks for different distributions of magnetic field threading the disk. In one limit of a relatively weak, initially diverging magnetic field, both thermal and magnetic pressure gradients act to drive matter to an outflow, while a toroidal magnetic field develops which strongly collimates the outflow. The collimation greatly reduces the field divergence and the mass outflow rate decreases after an initial peak. In a second limit of a strong magnetic field, the initial field configuration was taken with the field strength on the disk decreasing outwards to small values so that collimation was reduced. As a result, a family of stationary solutions was discovered where matter is driven mainly by the strong magnetic pressure gradient force. The collimation in this case depends on the pressure of an external medium. These flows are qualitatively similar to the analytic solutions for magnetically driven outflows. The problem of the opening of a closed field line configuration linking a magnetized star and an accretion disk is also discussed.

  8. Complex organic molecules in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Catherine; Nomura, Hideko; Herbst, Eric; Weaver, Susanna L Widicus; Aikawa, Yuri; Laas, Jake C; Vasyunin, Anton I

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Protoplanetary disks are vital objects in star and planet formation, possessing all the material which may form a planetary system orbiting the new star. We investigate the synthesis of complex organic molecules (COMs) in disks to constrain the achievable chemical complexity and predict species and transitions which may be observable with ALMA. We have coupled a 2D model of a protoplanetary disk around a T Tauri star with a gas-grain chemical network including COMs. We compare compare synthesised line intensities and calculated column densities with observations and determine those COMs which may be observable in future. COMs are efficiently formed in the disk midplane via grain-surface chemical reactions, reaching peak grain-surface fractional abundances 1e-6 - 1e-4 that of the H nuclei number density. COMs formed on grain surfaces are returned to the gas phase via non-thermal desorption; however, gas-phase species reach lower fractional abundances than their grain-surface equivalents, 1e-12 - 1e-...

  9. QPOs and Resonance in Accretion Disks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kluzniak, W.; Abramowicz, M. A.; Bursa, Michal; Török, G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 27, Marzo 2007 (2007), s. 18-25. ISSN 1405-2059 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300030510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : quasi-periodic oscillations * accretion disks * general relativity Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics

  10. Studying Young Circumstellar Disks with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménard, F. C.

    2005-12-01

    Accretion disks are pivotal elements in the formation and early evolution of solar-like stars. On top of supplying the raw material for stellar build-up, their internal conditions also regulate the formation of planets. Their study therefore holds the key to solve the mystery of the formation of our Solar System. This article focuses on observational studies of circumstellar disks associated with pre-main sequence solar-like stars and presents a few selected problems where ALMA will contribute in finding answers. At optical and near-infrared wavelengths, the direct measurement of disk parameters poses an obvious challenge: at the distance of typical star forming regions (e.g. ˜140 pc for Taurus), a planetary system like ours (with a diameter of ≃ 50 AU out to Pluto, but excluding the Kuiper belt) subtends only 0.35 arcsec. Moreover, its surface brightness is low in comparison to the bright central star. Hence, high angular resolution and high contrast imaging techniques are required if one hopes to resolve and measure such protoplanetary disks. Fortunately, potent imaging instruments have been available for about 10 years now. They cover a large part of the electromagnetic spectrum, from the UV/optical with HST, the near-infrared with ground-based adaptive optics systems to the millimeter range with long-baseline radio interferometers. It is therefore not surprising that our knowledge of the structure of disks surrounding low-mass stars has made a gigantic leap forward in the last decade. However, the angular resolution of current millimeter interferometers will remain significantly poorer than the resolution that is available at shorter wavelengths (˜ 0.1 arcsec) until ALMA provides the necessary long baselines. At that time, astronomers will have access to data of comparable resolution over a very large wavelength range, with unprecedented sensitivity. As a direct consequence, our understanding of the disk structure and evolution should improve just as much

  11. Resolving the inner disk of UX Orionis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreplin, A.; Madlener, D.; Chen, L.; Weigelt, G.; Kraus, S.; Grinin, V.; Tambovtseva, L.; Kishimoto, M.

    2016-05-01

    Aims: The cause of the UX Ori variability in some Herbig Ae/Be stars is still a matter of debate. Detailed studies of the circumstellar environment of UX Ori objects (UXORs) are required to test the hypothesis that the observed drop in photometry might be related to obscuration events. Methods: Using near- and mid-infrared interferometric AMBER and MIDI observations, we resolved the inner circumstellar disk region around UX Ori. Results: We fitted the K-, H-, and N-band visibilities and the spectral energy distribution (SED) of UX Ori with geometric and parametric disk models. The best-fit K-band geometric model consists of an inclined ring and a halo component. We obtained a ring-fit radius of 0.45 ± 0.07 AU (at a distance of 460 pc), an inclination of 55.6 ± 2.4°, a position angle of the system axis of 127.5 ± 24.5°, and a flux contribution of the over-resolved halo component to the total near-infrared excess of 16.8 ± 4.1%. The best-fit N-band model consists of an elongated Gaussian with a HWHM ~ 5 AU of the semi-major axis and an axis ration of a/b ~ 3.4 (corresponding to an inclination of ~72°). With a parametric disk model, we fitted all near- and mid-infrared visibilities and the SED simultaneously. The model disk starts at an inner radius of 0.46 ± 0.06 AU with an inner rim temperature of 1498 ± 70 K. The disk is seen under an nearly edge-on inclination of 70 ± 5°. This supports any theories that require high-inclination angles to explain obscuration events in the line of sight to the observer, for example, in UX Ori objects where orbiting dust clouds in the disk or disk atmosphere can obscure the central star. Based on observations made with ESO telescopes at Paranal Observatory under program IDs: 090.C-0769, 074.C-0552.

  12. Disk Accretion and the Stellar Birthline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee; Cassen, Patrick; Kenyon, Scott J.

    1997-02-01

    We present a simplified analysis of some effects of disk accretion on the early evolution of fully convective, low-mass pre-main-sequence stars. Our analysis builds on the previous seminal work of Stahler, but it differs in that the accretion of material occurs over a small area of the stellar surface, such as through a disk or magnetospheric accretion column, so that most of the stellar photosphere is free to radiate to space. This boundary condition is similar to the limiting case considered by Palla & Stahler for intermediate-mass stars. We argue that for a wide variety of disk mass accretion rates, material will be added to the star with relatively small amounts of thermal energy. Protostellar evolution calculated assuming this ``low-temperature'' limit of accretion generally follows the results of Stahler because of the thermostatic nature of deuterium fusion, which prevents protostars from contracting below a ``birthline'' in the H-R diagram. Our calculated protostellar radii tend to fall below Stahler's at higher masses; the additional energy loss from the stellar photosphere in the case of disk accretion tends to make the protostar contract. The low-temperature disk accretion evolutionary tracks never fall below the deuterium-fusion birthline until the internal deuterium is depleted, but protostellar tracks can lie above the birthline in the H-R diagram if the initial radius of the protostellar core is large enough or if rapid disk accretion (such as might occur during FU Ori outbursts) adds significant amounts of thermal energy to the star. These possibilities cannot be ruled out by either theoretical arguments or observational constraints at present, so that individual protostars might evolve along a multiplicity of birthlines with a modest range of luminosity at a given mass. Our results indicate that there are large uncertainties in assigning ages for the youngest stars from H-R diagram positions, given the uncertainty in birthline positions. Our

  13. DISK BATTERIES IN THE ESOPHAGUS OF NIGERIAN CHILDREN: CASE SERIES

    OpenAIRE

    LUCKY OBUKOWHO ONOTAI; ADAOBI ELIZABETH OSUJI

    2015-01-01

    Foreign body (FB) ingestion is common in clinical practice especially in children. Its impaction in the esophagus constitutes an important cause of morbidity and mortality in our environment. Due to technological advancement and increase use of disk batteries to power children toys and remote control gadgets, ingestion of disk batteries is now commonplace. In our environment there is paucity of information on disk batteries hence we decided to present case series of disk batteries in the esop...

  14. Mode Dynamics and Thermal Lens Effects of Thin Disk Lasers

    OpenAIRE

    Mende, Jens; Spindler, Gerhard; Speiser, Jochen; Bohn, Willy L.; Giesen, Adolf

    2007-01-01

    In principle, the thin disk laser concept opens the possibility to demonstrate high power, high efficiency and good beam quality, simultaneously. For this purpose a very homogeneous pump power distribution on the disk is necessary as well as very low phase distortions of the disk itself. Spatial mode structure and thermal lensing effects in an Yb:YAG thin disk laser have been investigated as function of the pump power in linear and folded resonators. Whereas thermal lensing is shown to be...

  15. Modeling Dust Emission of HL Tau Disk Based on Planet-Disk Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Sheng; Isella, Andrea; Li, Hui; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-01-01

    We use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 $M_{Jup}$ at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  16. SOLIS: reconciling disk-integrated and disk-resolved spectra from the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Pevtsov, Alexei; Harker, Brian; Giampapa, Mark; Marble, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Unlike other stars, the surface of the Sun can be spatially resolved to a high degree of detail. But the Sun can also be observed as if it was a distant star. The availability of solar disk-resolved and disk-integrated spectra offers an opportunity to devise methods to derive information about the spatial distribution of solar features from Sun-as-a-star measurements. Here, we present an update on work done at the National Solar Observatory to reconcile disk-integrated and disk-resolved solar spectra from the Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigation of the Sun (SOLIS) station. The results of this work will lead to a new approach to infer the information about the spatial distribution of features on other stars, from the overall filling factor of active regions to, possibly, the latitude/longitude distribution of features.

  17. Modeling Dust Emission of HL Tau Disk Based on Planet-Disk Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sheng; Li, Shengtai; Isella, Andrea; Li, Hui; Ji, Jianghui

    2016-02-01

    We use extensive global two-dimensional hydrodynamic disk gas+dust simulations with embedded planets, coupled with three-dimensional radiative transfer calculations, to model the dust ring and gap structures in the HL Tau protoplanetary disk observed with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA). We include the self-gravity of disk gas and dust components and make reasonable choices of disk parameters, assuming an already settled dust distribution and no planet migration. We can obtain quite adequate fits to the observed dust emission using three planets with masses of 0.35, 0.17, and 0.26 MJup at 13.1, 33.0, and 68.6 AU, respectively. Implications for the planet formation as well as the limitations of this scenario are discussed.

  18. Substantial reservoirs of molecular hydrogen in the debris disks around young stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thi, W. F.; Blake, G. A.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; van Zadelhoff, G. J.; Horn, J. M.; Becklin, E. E.; Mannings, V.; Sargent, A. I.; van Den Ancker, M. E.; Natta, A.

    2001-01-01

    Circumstellar accretion disks transfer matter from molecular clouds to young stars and to the sites of planet formation. The disks observed around pre-main-sequence stars have properties consistent with those expected for the pre-solar nebula from which our own Solar System formed 4.5 Gyr ago. But the 'debris' disks that encircle more than 15% of nearby main-sequence stars appear to have very small amounts of gas, based on observations of the tracer molecule carbon monoxide: these observations have yielded gas/dust ratios much less than 0.1, whereas the interstellar value is about 100 (ref. 9). Here we report observations of the lowest rotational transitions of molecular hydrogen (H2) that reveal large quantities of gas in the debris disks around the stars beta Pictoris, 49 Ceti and HD135344. The gas masses calculated from the data are several hundreds to a thousand times greater than those estimated from the CO observations, and yield gas/dust ratios of the same order as the interstellar value.

  19. Updated Kinematic Constraints on a Dark Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Eric David; Randall, Lisa

    2016-06-01

    We update the method of the Holmberg & Flynn study, including an updated model of the Milky Way’s interstellar gas, radial velocities, an updated reddening map, and a careful statistical analysis, to bound the allowed surface density and scale height of a dark disk. We pay careful attention to the self-consistency of the model, including the gravitational influence of the dark disk on other disk components, and to the net velocity of the tracer stars. We find that the data set exhibits a non-zero bulk velocity in the vertical direction as well as a displacement from the expected location at the Galactic midplane. If not properly accounted for, these features would bias the bound toward low dark disk mass. We therefore perform our analysis two ways. In the first, using the traditional method, we subtract the mean velocity and displacement from the tracers’ phase space distributions. In the second method, we perform a non-equilibrium version of the HF method to derive a bound on the dark disk parameters for an oscillating tracer distribution. Despite updates in the mass model and reddening map, the traditional method results remain consistent with those of HF2000. The second, non-equilibrium technique, however, allows a surface density as large as 14 {M}ȯ {{{pc}}}-2 (and as small as 0 {M}ȯ {{{pc}}}-2), demonstrating much weaker constraints. For both techniques, the bound on surface density is weaker for larger scale height. In future analyses of Gaia data it will be important to verify whether the tracer populations are in equilibrium.

  20. In vitro activity and selection of disk content for disk diffusion susceptibility tests with trovafloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, P C; Barry, A L; Brown, S D; Sewell, D L

    1996-08-01

    The activity of the new fluoroquinolone trovafloxacin (CP-99,219) was compared with that of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin against 517 bacterial isolates representing 50 different species. Against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, all three drugs showed good in vitro activity. Against most anaerobic bacteria, Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Enterococcus species, trovafloxacin was four- to sixteenfold more active than ciprofloxacin. For disk diffusion testing, 10 micrograms trovafloxacin disks gave satisfactory results. Tentative criteria are proposed for use during clinical studies. PMID:8894580

  1. The DiskMass Survey : II. Error Budget

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bershady, Matthew A.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.; Martinsson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present a performance analysis of the DiskMass Survey. The survey uses collisionless tracers in the form of disk stars to measure the surface density of spiral disks, to provide an absolute calibration of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (Gamma(*)), and to yield robust estimates of the dark-matter

  2. POLAR DISK GALAXY FOUND IN WALL BETWEEN VOIDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanonik, K.; Platen, E.; Aragon-Calvo, M. A.; van Gorkom, J. H.; van de Weygaert, R.; van der Hulst, J. M.; Peebles, P. J. E.

    2009-01-01

    We have found an isolated polar disk galaxy in what appears to be a cosmological wall situated between two voids. This void galaxy is unique as its polar disk was discovered serendipitously in an Hi survey of SDSS void galaxies, with no optical counterpart to the Hi polar disk. Yet the Hi mass in th

  3. Ultrasonic testing of turbine rotors with hooped disks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsthom-Atlantique has developed ultrasonic testing methods for in-service inspection of the low-pressure rotors of 900 MW steam turbines; they allow to detect fatigue cracks which grow from the rotor shaft/disk interface, either within the shaft, or in the disks, without removing the disks

  4. On the Solar System-Debris Disk Connecction

    OpenAIRE

    Moro-Martin, Amaya

    2007-01-01

    This paper emphasizes the connection between solar and extra-solar debris disks: how models and observations of the Solar System are helping us understand the debris disk phenomenon, and vice versa, how debris disks are helping us place our Solar System into context.

  5. On the structure of the transition disk around TW Hydrae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Menu; R. van Boekel; T. Henning; C.J. Chandler; H. Linz; M. Benisty; S. Lacour; M. Min; C. Waelkens; S.M. Andrews; N. Calvet; J.M. Carpenter; S.A. Corder; A.T. Deller; J.S. Greaves; R. J. Harris; A. Isella; W. Kwon; J. Lazio; J.B. de Bouquin; F. Ménard; L.G. Mundy; L.M. Pérez; L. Ricci; A.I. Sargent; S. Storm; L. Testi; D.J. Wilner

    2014-01-01

    Context. For over a decade, the structure of the inner cavity in the transition disk of TW Hydrae has been a subject of debate. Modeling the disk with data obtained at different wavelengths has led to a variety of proposed disk structures. Rather than being inconsistent, the individual models might

  6. Turbulence driven diffusion in protoplanetary disks - chemical effects in the outer disk

    CERN Document Server

    Willacy, K; Langer, W D

    2006-01-01

    The dynamics and chemistry of protostellar disks are likely to be intricately linked, with dynamical processes altering the chemical composition, and chemistry, in turn, controlling the ionization structure and hence the ability of the magneto-rotational instability to drive the disk turbulence. Here we present the results from the first chemical models of the outer regions (R > 100 AU) of protoplanetary disks to consider the effects of turbulence driven diffusive mixing in the vertical direction. We show that vertical diffusion can greatly affect the column densities of many species, increasing them by factors of up to two orders of magnitude. Previous disk models have shown that disks can be divided into three chemically distinct layers, with the bulk of the observed molecular emission coming from a region between an atomic/ionic layer on the surface of the disk and the midplane regoin where the bulk of molecules are frozen onto grains. Diffusion retains this three layer structure, but increases the depth o...

  7. Chemistry in Disks X: The Molecular Content of Proto-planetary Disks in Taurus

    CERN Document Server

    Guilloteau, S; Dutrey, A; Chapillon, E; Wakelam, V; Piétu, V; Di Folco, E; Semenov, D; Henning, Th

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We used the IRAM 30-m to perform a sensitive wideband survey of 30 protoplanetary disks in the Taurus Auriga region. We simultaneously observed HCO$^+$(3-2), HCN(3-2), C$_2$H(3-2), CS(5-4), and two transitions of SO. We combine the results with a previous survey which observed $^{13}$CO (2-1), CN(2-1), two o-H$_2$CO lines and one of SO. We use available interferometric data to derive excitation temperatures of CN and C$_2$H in several sources. We determine characteristic sizes of the gas disks and column densities of all molecules using a parametric power-law disk model. Our study is mostly sensitive to molecules at 200-400 au from the stars. We compare the derived column densities to the predictions of an extensive gas-grain chemical disk model, under conditions representative of T Tauri disks. This survey provides 20 new detections of HCO$^+$ in disks, 18 in HCN, 11 in C$_2$H, 8 in CS and 4 in SO. HCO$^+$ is detected in almost all sources, and its J=3-2 line is essentially optically thick, provid...

  8. Brown dwarf disks with ALMA: evidence for truncated dust disks in Ophiuchus

    CERN Document Server

    Testi, L; Scholz, A; Tazzari, M; Ricci, L; Monsalvo, I de Gregorio

    2016-01-01

    The study of the properties of disks around young brown dwarfs can provide important clues on the formation of these very low mass objects and on the possibility of forming planetary systems around them. The presence of warm dusty disks around brown dwarfs is well known, based on near- and mid-infrared studies. High angular resolution observations of the cold outer disk are limited, we used ALMA to attempt a first survey of young brown dwarfs in the rho-Ophiuchi star forming region with ALMA. All 17 young brown dwarfs in our sample were observed at 890 um in the continuum at ~0.5" angular resolution. The sensitivity of our observations was chosen to detect ~0.5 MEarth of dust. We detect continuum emission in 11 disks (65% of the total), the estimated mass of dust in the detected disks ranges from ~0.5 to ~6 MEarth. These disk masses imply that planet formation around brown dwarfs may be relatively rare and that the supra-Jupiter mass companions found around some brown dwarfs are probably the result of a binar...

  9. Fomalhaut's Debris Disk and Planet: Constraining the Mass of Fomalhaut b From Disk Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Chiang, E; Kalas, P; Graham, J R; Clampin, M

    2008-01-01

    Following the optical imaging of the exoplanet candidate Fomalhaut b (Fom b), we present a numerical model of how Fomalhaut's debris disk is gravitationally shaped by a single interior planet. The model is simple, adaptable to other debris disks, and can be extended to accommodate multiple planets. We find that to not disrupt the belt, Fom b must have a mass < 3 Jupiter masses. Previous mass constraints based on disk morphology rely on several oversimplifications. We explain why our constraint is more reliable. It is based on a global model of the disk that is not restricted to the planet's chaotic zone boundary. Moreover, we screen disk parent bodies for dynamical stability over the system age of 100 Myr, and model them separately from their dust grain progeny; the latter's orbits are strongly affected by radiation pressure and their lifetimes are limited to 0.1 Myr by destructive grain-grain collisions. The single planet model predicts that planet and disk orbits be apsidally aligned. Preliminary analysi...

  10. Tatooine Nurseries: Structure and Evolution of Circumbinary Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartanyan, David; Garmilla, José A.; Rafikov, Roman R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent discoveries of circumbinary planets by the Kepler mission provide motivation for understanding their birthplaces—protoplanetary disks around stellar binaries with separations ≲ 1 {{AU}}. We explore properties and evolution of such circumbinary disks focusing on modification of their structure caused by tidal coupling to the binary. We develop a set of analytical scaling relations describing viscous evolution of the disk properties, which are verified and calibrated using 1D numerical calculations with realistic inputs. Injection of angular momentum by the central binary suppresses mass accretion onto the binary and causes radial distribution of the viscous angular momentum flux {F}J to be different from that in a standard accretion disk around a single star with no torque at the center. Disks with no mass accretion at the center develop an {F}J profile that is flat in radius. Radial profiles of temperature and surface density are also quite different from those in disks around single stars. Damping of the density waves driven by the binary and viscous dissipation dominates heating of the inner disk (within 1-2 AU), pushing the ice line beyond 3-5 AU, depending on disk mass and age. Irradiation by the binary governs disk thermodynamics beyond ˜10 AU. However, self-shadowing by the hot inner disk may render central illumination irrelevant out to ˜20 AU. Spectral energy distribution of a circumbinary disk exhibits a distinctive bump around 10 μm, which may facilitate identification of such disks around unresolved binaries. Efficient tidal coupling to the disk drives orbital inspiral of the binary and may cause low-mass and relatively compact binaries to merge into a single star within the disk lifetime. We generally find that circumbinary disks present favorable sites for planet formation (despite their wider zone of volatile depletion), in agreement with the statistics of Kepler circumbinary planets.

  11. THE NATURE OF TRANSITION CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS. II. SOUTHERN MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Gisela A.; Schreiber, Matthias R.; Rebassa-Mansergas, Alberto [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Cieza, Lucas A. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Merin, Bruno [Herschel Science Centre, ESAC (ESA), P.O. Box 78, 28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Smith Castelli, Analia V. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Buenos Aires (Argentina); Allen, Lori E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Morrell, Nidia [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile)

    2012-04-10

    Transition disk objects are pre-main-sequence stars with little or no near-IR excess and significant far-IR excess, implying inner opacity holes in their disks. Here we present a multifrequency study of transition disk candidates located in Lupus I, III, IV, V, VI, Corona Australis, and Scorpius. Complementing the information provided by Spitzer with adaptive optics (AO) imaging (NaCo, VLT), submillimeter photometry (APEX), and echelle spectroscopy (Magellan, Du Pont Telescopes), we estimate the multiplicity, disk mass, and accretion rate for each object in our sample in order to identify the mechanism potentially responsible for its inner hole. We find that our transition disks show a rich diversity in their spectral energy distribution morphology, have disk masses ranging from {approx}<1 to 10 M{sub JUP}, and accretion rates ranging from {approx}<10{sup -11} to 10{sup -7.7} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. Of the 17 bona fide transition disks in our sample, three, nine, three, and two objects are consistent with giant planet formation, grain growth, photoevaporation, and debris disks, respectively. Two disks could be circumbinary, which offers tidal truncation as an alternative origin of the inner hole. We find the same heterogeneity of the transition disk population in Lupus III, IV, and Corona Australis as in our previous analysis of transition disks in Ophiuchus while all transition disk candidates selected in Lupus V, VI turned out to be contaminating background asymptotic giant branch stars. All transition disks classified as photoevaporating disks have small disk masses, which indicates that photoevaporation must be less efficient than predicted by most recent models. The three systems that are excellent candidates for harboring giant planets potentially represent invaluable laboratories to study planet formation with the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array.

  12. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, P.; Min, M.; Pinte, C.; Thi, W.-F.; Kamp, I.; Rab, C.; Anthonioz, F.; Antonellini, S.; Baldovin-Saavedra, C.; Carmona, A.; Dominik, C.; Dionatos, O.; Greaves, J.; Güdel, M.; Ilee, J. D.; Liebhart, A.; Ménard, F.; Rigon, L.; Waters, L. B. F. M.; Aresu, G.; Meijerink, R.; Spaans, M.

    2016-02-01

    We propose a set of standard assumptions for the modelling of Class II and III protoplanetary disks, which includes detailed continuum radiative transfer, thermo-chemical modelling of gas and ice, and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In particular, we propose new standard dust opacities for disk models, we present a simplified treatment of PAHs in radiative equilibrium which is sufficient to reproduce the PAH emission features, and we suggest using a simple yet physically justified treatment of dust settling. We roughly adjust parameters to obtain a model that predicts continuum and line observations that resemble typical multi-wavelength continuum and line observations of Class II T Tauri stars. We systematically study the impact of each model parameter (disk mass, disk extension and shape, dust settling, dust size and opacity, gas/dust ratio, etc.) on all mainstream continuum and line observables, in particular on the SED, mm-slope, continuum visibilities, and emission lines including [OI] 63 μm, high-J CO lines, (sub-)mm CO isotopologue lines, and CO fundamental ro-vibrational lines. We find that evolved dust properties, i.e. large grains, often needed to fit the SED, have important consequences for disk chemistry and heating/cooling balance, leading to stronger near- to far-IR emission lines in general. Strong dust settling and missing disk flaring have similar effects on continuum observations, but opposite effects on far-IR gas emission lines. PAH molecules can efficiently shield the gas from stellar UV radiation because of their strong absorption and negligible scattering opacities in comparison to evolved dust. The observable millimetre-slope of the SED can become significantly more gentle in the case of cold disk midplanes, which we find regularly in our T Tauri models

  13. Energy response of CaSO4:Dy teflon TLD disk dosimeters to photons and electrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharada, K S

    1983-01-01

    The photon energy response of CaSO4:Dy teflon disk dosimeters used widely in radiation dosimetry is computed using the energy absorption coefficient values for calcium, sulfur, oxygen, and carbon taken from J. H. Hubbell's tables. For fluorine, the energy absorption coefficients were obtained from the values given by F. H. Attix for CaF2 and Ca. The energy response of the radiation-monitoring disk for the range of 10 keV to 10 MeV, relative to air, is computed and plotted. The response is maximum between 20 and 30 keV and then gradually falls to a constant at 200 keV to 10 MeV. This computed response for different energies is compared with the experimental TL response of the dosimeter. The electron energy response of these TLD disks is computed using the stopping-power values for the different component elements. The electron stopping power for sulfur and calcium from 10 keV to 10 MeV is computed using the Bethe-Bloch formula. Those for oxygen and carbon are taken from the tables given by M. J. Berger and S. M. Seltzer. For fluorine, the values are computed from those for Li and LiF given in the same tables. This calculated response is compared with the experimental beta response of the TL dosimeter. PMID:6823508

  14. Cosmological accretion disks via external radiation drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukue, Jun; Umemura, Masayuki

    1994-02-01

    Accretion disks as well as disk accretion driven by external radiation drag are presented under a steady approximation in the cases of the point-mass potential and of the dark-matter potential. We assume that the external drag force can be expressed as -beta V, where beta is a constant coefficient and V the velocity vector. When the gravitational potential is given by a central point-mass M, we find, in a cold regime where the pressure force is neglected, steady solutions such that the infalling velocity Vr is expressed as Vr = -beta r far from the center and as Vr = 2 beta r near the center, where r is the distance from the center, while the rotation velocity Vphi is constant far from the center and almost Keplerian (i.e., Vphi = square root of (GM/r)) near the center. In a warm regime, where the effect of the gas pressure is taken into account, a transonic solution is found, where the flow accretes supersonically far from the center, passes a sonic point, and eventually becomes subsonic, but rotating in a nearly Keplerian orbit. When the dark matter exerts a gravitational force, which is assumed to be -r((omegaDM)2) (omegaDM = const.), we find steady analytical solutions in the cold regime such that Vr = -(beta/2)r and Vphi = r(square root of (((omegaDM)2) - ((beta2)/4))). The effect of the gas pressure is also discussed. Such accretion disks, where the angular momentum is removed via an external radiative drag proportional to the velocity (beta disk), are possible in the post-recombination epoch during the early universe. Shortly after the cosmological recombination era, when the radiation density of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) was sufficiently high, the gas could lose its angular momentum efficiently through Compton drag with the CBR and, consequently, form cosmological accretion disks which evolve into primordial active galactic nuclei (proto-quasars). In a dark matter-dominated universe, the disk gas would initially accrete in the dark

  15. Evidence for dust grain growth in young circumstellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Throop, H B; Esposito, L W; McCaughrean, M J; Throop, Henry B.; Bally, John; Esposito, Larry W.; Caughrean, Mark J. Mc

    2001-01-01

    Hundreds of circumstellar disks in the Orion nebula are being rapidly destroyed by the intense ultraviolet radiation produced by nearby bright stars. These young, million-year-old disks may not survive long enough to form planetary systems. Nevertheless, the first stage of planet formation -- the growth of dust grains into larger particles -- may have begun in these systems. Observational evidence for these large particles in Orion's disks is presented. A model of grain evolution in externally irradiated protoplanetary disks is developed and predicts rapid particle size evolution and sharp outer disk boundaries. We discuss implications for the formation rates of planetary systems.

  16. Evolution of Pre-Main Sequence Accretion Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Lee W.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this project was to develop a comprehensive global picture of the physical conditions in, and evolutionary timescales of, premain sequence accretion disks. The results of this work will help constrain the initial conditions for planet formation. To this end we developed much larger samples of 3-10 Myr-old stars to provide better empirical constraints on protoplanetary disk evolution; measured disk accretion rates in these systems; and constructed detailed model disk structures consistent with observations to infer physical conditions such as grain growth in protoplanetary disks.

  17. Disk Destruction and (Re)-Creation in the Magellanic Clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Nidever, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most satellite galaxies in the Local Group that have long lost their gaseous disks, the Magellanic Clouds are gas-rich dwarf galaxies most-likely on their first pericentric passage allowing us to study disk evolution on the smallest scales. The Magellanic Clouds show both disk destruction and (re)-creation. The Large Magellanic Cloud has a very extended stellar disk reaching to at least 15 kpc (10 radial scalelengths) while its gaseous disk is truncated at ~5 kpc mainly due to its inte...

  18. Reading the Signatures of Extrasolar Planets in Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchner, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    An extrasolar planet sculpts the famous debris dish around Fomalhaut; probably ma ny other debris disks contain planets that we could locate if only we could better recognize their signatures in the dust that surrounds them. But the interaction between planets and debris disks involves both orbital resonances and collisions among grains and rocks in the disks --- difficult processes to model simultanemus]y. I will describe new 3-D models of debris disk dynamics that incorporate both collisions and resonant trapping of dust for the first time, allowing us to decode debris disk images and read the signatures of the planets they contain.

  19. Molecular dynamics simulations of the structures and mechanical properties of ZDOL polymer films on diamond-like carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2014-01-01

    One of the core technologies in the design and manufacture of the next-generation hard disk drives is the head-disk interface (HDI). The design of HDI must provide sufficient stability and durability for tens of thousands of hard drive start/stop cycles. However, the intermittent contacts between the head and disk are often unavoidable. To avoid and minimize disk damage, the surface of hard drive disks is often protected by a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating, which is in turn covered by a th...

  20. Towards a Global Evolutionary Model of Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Xue-Ning

    2016-01-01

    A global evolution picture of protoplanetary disks (PPDs) is key to understanding almost every aspect of planet formation, where standard alpha-disk models have been constantly employed for its simplicity. In the mean time, disk mass loss has been conventionally attributed to photoevaporation, which controls disk dispersal. However, a paradigm shift towards accretion driven by magnetized disk winds has been realized in the recent years, thanks to studies of non-ideal magneto-hydrodynamic effects in PPDs. I present a framework of global PPD evolution aiming to incorporate these advances, highlighting the role of wind-driven accretion and wind mass loss. Disk evolution is found to be largely dominated by wind-driven processes, and viscous spreading is suppressed. The timescale of disk evolution is controlled primarily by the amount of external magnetic flux threading the disks, and how rapidly the disk loses the flux. Rapid disk dispersal can be achieved if the disk is able to hold most of its magnetic flux dur...

  1. The cosmic origin of carbon and manganese

    CERN Document Server

    Bensby, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    [ABRIDGED] We have determined carbon abundances for 51 dwarf stars and manganese abundances for 95 dwarf stars in two distinct and well defined stellar populations - the Galactic thin and thick disks. As these two populations have different chemical histories we have been able to, through a differential abundance analysis using high-resolution spectra, constrain the formation sites for carbon and manganese in the Galactic disk(s). The analysis of carbon is based on the forbidden [C I] line at 872.7 nm which is an abundance indicator that is insensitive to errors in the stellar atmosphere parameters. Combining these data with our previously published oxygen abundances, based on the forbidden [O I] line at 630.0 nm, we can form very robust [C/O] ratios that we then used to investigate the origin of carbon and the chemical evolution of the Galactic thin and thick disks..... Our interpretation of our abundance trends is that the sources that are responsible for the carbon enrichment in the Galactic thin and thick...

  2. Stability of Magnetized Disks and Implications for Planet Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Lizano, Susana; Cai, Mike J; Adams, Fred C

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers gravitational perturbations in geometrically thin disks with rotation curves dominated by a central object, but with substantial contributions from magnetic pressure and tension. The treatment is general, but the application is to the circumstellar disks that arise during the gravitational collapse phase of star formation. We find the dispersion relation for spiral density waves in these generalized disks and derive the stability criterion for axisymmetric $(m=0)$ disturbances (the analog of the Toomre parameter $Q_T$) for any radial distribution of the mass-to-flux ratio $\\lambda$. The magnetic effects work in two opposing directions: on one hand, magnetic tension and pressure stabilize the disk against gravitational collapse and fragmentation; on the other hand, they also lower the rotation rate making the disk more unstable. For disks around young stars the first effect generally dominates, so that magnetic fields allow disks to be stable for higher surface densities and larger total m...

  3. Research overview on vibration damping of mistuned bladed disk assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bladed disk assemblies are very important parts in auto engine and gas turbine, and is widely used in practical engineering. The mistuning existing commonly in the bladed disk assemblies can destroy the vibration characteristics of the bladed disk assemblies, which is one of the reasons for the high cycle fatigue failure of bladed disk assemblies, so it is necessary to research how to reduce the vibration of the bladed disk assemblies. On the basis of the review of relevant research at home and abroad, the mistuning vibration mechanism of the bladed disk assemblies is introduced, and the main technical methods of the vibration damping of bladed disk assemblies are reviewed, such as artificially active mistuning, collision damping, friction damping and optimization of the blade position. Some future research directions are presented.

  4. Determining locus and periphery of optic disk in retinal images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi Fard, Mohammad; Salehi, Alireza; Shanbeh Zadeh, Jamshid

    2008-04-01

    Diabetes can be recognized by features of retina. Automatic retina feature extraction improves the speed of diabetes diagnosis. The first step in extracting the features is to localize the optic disk. Methods with low accuracy in localizing the optic disk include area with maximum lightness or the largest area containing pixels with maximum gray levels. A more accurate method is to find the physical position of blood vessel that passes through optic disk. This paper presents a fast and accurate algorithm for localizing the optic disk. The process of localization consists of finding the target area, Optic Disk center and Optic Disk boundaries. Optic Disk boundaries are recognized by our algorithm with %90 accuracy.

  5. Thermal instability of advection-dominated disks against local perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, S; Chen, X; Kato, Shoji; Abramowicz, Marek Artur; Chen, Xingming

    1995-01-01

    Thermal instability is examined for advection-dominated one-temperature accretion disks. We consider axisymmetric perturbations with short wavelength in the radial direction. The viscosity is assumed to be sufficiently small for the vertical hydrostatic balance to hold in perturbed states. The type of viscosity is given either by the \\alpha-viscosity or by a diffusion-type stress tensor. Optically thick disks are found to be in general more unstable than optically thin ones. When the thermal diffusion is present, the optically thin disks become stable, but the optically thick disks are still unstable. The instability of the advection-dominated disks is different from that of the geometrically thin disks without advection. In the case of no advection, the thermal mode behaves under no appreciable surface density change. In the case of advection-dominated disks, however, the thermal mode occurs with no appreciable pressure change (compared with the density change), when local perturbations are considered. The v...

  6. Inner polar gaseous disks: incidence, ages, possible origin

    CERN Document Server

    Sil'chenko, Olga K

    2014-01-01

    We review our current knowledge about a particular case of decoupled gas kinematics -- inner ionized-gas polar disks. Though more difficult to be noticed, they seem to be more numerous than their large-scale counterparts; our recent estimates imply about 10 per cent of early-type disk galaxies to be hosts of inner polar disks. Since in the most cases the kinematics of the inner polar gaseous disks is decoupled from the kinematics of the outer large-scale gaseous disks and since they nested around very old stellar nuclei, we speculate that the inner polar disks may be relics of very early events of external gas accretion several Gyr ago. Such view is in agreement with our new paradigm of the disk galaxies evolution.

  7. Conservative GRMHD Simulations of Moderately Thin, Tilted Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Teixeira, Danilo Morales; Zhuravlev, Viacheslav V; Ivanov, Pavel B

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents our latest numerical simulations of accretion disks that are misaligned with respect to the rotation axis of a Kerr black hole. In this work we use a new, fully conservative version of the Cosmos++ general relativistic magnetohydrodynamics (GRMHD) code, coupled with an ad hoc cooling function designed to control the thickness of the disk. Together these allow us to simulate the thinnest tilted accretion disks ever using a GRMHD code. In this way, we are able to probe the regime where the dimensionless stress and scale height of the disk become comparable. We present results for both prograde and retrograde cases. The simulated prograde tilted disk shows no sign of Bardeen-Petterson alignment even in the innermost parts of the disk. This result is consistent with our earlier work, although perhaps contrary to some common misconceptions. The simulated retrograde tilted disk, however, does show modest alignment. The implication of these results is that the parameter space associated with Bard...

  8. Dipper disks not inclined towards edge-on orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Ansdell, M; Williams, J P; Kennedy, G; Wyatt, M C; LaCourse, D M; Jacobs, T L; Mann, A W

    2016-01-01

    The so-called "dipper" stars host circumstellar disks and have optical and infrared light curves that exhibit quasi-periodic or aperiodic dimming events consistent with extinction by transiting dusty structures orbiting in the inner disk. Most of the proposed mechanisms explaining the dips---i.e., occulting disk warps, vortices, and forming planetesimals---assume nearly edge-on viewing geometries. However, our analysis of the three known dippers with publicly available resolved sub-mm data reveals disks with a range of inclinations, most notably the face-on transition disk J1604-2130 (EPIC 204638512). This suggests that nearly edge-on viewing geometries are not a defining characteristic of the dippers and that additional models should be explored. If confirmed by further observations of more dippers, this would point to inner disk processes that regularly produce dusty structures far above the outer disk midplane in regions relevant to planet formation.

  9. Metallicity Gradients in Disks: Do Galaxies Form Inside-Out?

    CERN Document Server

    Pilkington, K; Gibson, B K; Calura, F; Michel-Dansac, L; Thacker, R J; Molla, M; Matteucci, F; Rahimi, A; Kawata, D; Kobayashi, C; Brook, C B; Stinson, G S; Couchman, H M P; Bailin, J; Wadsley, J

    2012-01-01

    We examine radial and vertical metallicity gradients using a suite of disk galaxy simulations, supplemented with two classic chemical evolution approaches. We determine the rate of change of gradient and reconcile differences between extant models and observations within the `inside-out' disk growth paradigm. A sample of 25 disks is used, consisting of 19 from our RaDES (Ramses Disk Environment Study) sample, realised with the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. Four disks are selected from the MUGS (McMaster Unbiased Galaxy Simulations) sample, generated with the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) code GASOLINE, alongside disks from Rahimi et al. (GCD+) and Kobayashi & Nakasato (GRAPE-SPH). Two chemical evolution models of inside-out disk growth were employed to contrast the temporal evolution of their radial gradients with those of the simulations. We find that systematic differences exist between the predicted evolution of radial abundance gradients in the RaDES and chemical evolution models, comp...

  10. CT changes after conservative treatment for lumbar disk herniation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess changes occurring to lumbar disk herniations and bulges and to the disk spaces after conservative treatment, a follow-up CT was carried out of 106 pathologic disks in 92 patients at a mean interval of 14 months after the initial examination. There was a strong association between the evolution of the hernias and clinical results, with a decrease in size of the majority of hernias in successfully treated patients, whereas the others essentially remained unchanged (p<0.0001). A significantly higher proportion of large hernias diminished as compared to the smaller ones (P<0.0001). Diffuse disk bulges were associated with a poor outcome and never regressed. There was a lower incidence of diminution of the central hernias compared to other locations. Patients with normal disk space at the initial examination had a better outcome than those with disk space narrowing. Only occasionally was a reduction of the disk space observed at follow-up. (orig.)

  11. Dust dynamics in 2D gravito-turbulent disks

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ji-Ming; Stone, James M; Chiang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of solid bodies in protoplanetary disks are subject to the properties of any underlying gas turbulence. Turbulence driven by disk self-gravity shows features distinct from those driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI). We study the dynamics of solids in gravito-turbulent disks with two-dimensional (in the disk plane), hybrid (particle and gas) simulations. Gravito-turbulent disks can exhibit stronger gravitational stirring than MRI-active disks, resulting in greater radial diffusion and larger eccentricities and relative speeds for large particles (those with dimensionless stopping times $t_{stop} \\Omega > 1$, where $\\Omega$ is the orbital frequency). The agglomeration of large particles into planetesimals by pairwise collisions is therefore disfavored in gravito-turbulent disks. However, the relative speeds of intermediate-size particles $t_{stop} \\Omega \\sim 1$ are significantly reduced as such particles are collected by gas drag and gas gravity into coherent filament-like structures ...

  12. On Vertically Global, Horizontally Local Models for Astrophysical Disks

    CERN Document Server

    McNally, Colin P

    2014-01-01

    Barotropic fluids, for which the pressure is only a function of the density, rotate on cylinders in the presence of a gravitational potential, so that the angular frequency of such a disk is independent of height. Therefore the shearing box framework, representing a small disk volume with height-independent angular frequency, can consistently model barotropic disks. If the fluid in the disk is baroclinic, the angular frequency does in general de- pend on height and it is thus necessary to go beyond the standard shearing box approach. In this paper, we show that given a global disk model, it is possible to develop consistent models that are local in horizontal planes and global in height with shearing-periodic boundary conditions. These models can be non-axisymmetric for globally barotropic disks but should be axisymmetric for globally baroclinic disks. We provide explicit equations for this vertically global shearing box which can be implemented in standard magnetohydrodynamic codes by generalizing the sheari...

  13. Magnetic white dwarfs with debris disks

    CERN Document Server

    Külebi, Baybars; Lorén-Aguilar, Pablo; Isern, Jordi; García-Berro, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    It has long been accepted that a possible mechanism for explaining the existence of magnetic white dwarfs is the merger of a binary white dwarf system, as there are viable mechanisms for producing sustainable magnetism within the merger product. However, the lack of rapid rotators in the magnetic white dwarf population has been always considered a problematic issue of this scenario. In order to explain this discrepancy we build a model in which the interaction between the magnetosphere of the star and the disk induces angular momentum transfer. Our model predicts that the magnetospheric interaction of magnetic white dwarfs with their disks results in a significant spin down, and we show that the observed rotation period of REJ 0317-853, which is suggested to be a product of a double degenerate merger, can be reproduced.

  14. Eccentric Jupiters via Disk-Planet Interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Numerical hydrodynamics calculations are performed to determine conditions under which giant planet eccentricities can be excited by parent gas disks. Unlike in other studies, Jupiter-mass planets are found to have their eccentricities amplified --- provided their orbits start eccentric. We disentangle the web of co-rotation, co-orbital, and external resonances to show that this finite-amplitude instability is consistent with that predicted analytically. Ellipticities can grow until they reach of order the disk's aspect ratio, beyond which the external Lindblad resonances that excite eccentricity are weakened by the planet's increasingly supersonic epicyclic motion. Forcing the planet to still larger eccentricities causes catastrophic eccentricity damping as the planet collides into gap walls. If the eccentricity driving documented here survives in 3D, it may explain the low-to-moderate eccentricities $\\lesssim 0.1$ exhibited by many giant planets (including Jupiter and Saturn), especially those without plane...

  15. High-Temperature Ionization in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Desch, Steven J

    2015-01-01

    We calculate the abundances of electrons and ions in the hot (> 500 K), dusty parts of protoplanetary disks, treating for the first time the effects of thermionic and ion emission from the dust grains. High-temperature ionization modeling has involved simply assuming that alkali elements such as potassium occur as gas-phase atoms and are collisionally ionized following the Saha equation. We show that the Saha equation often does not hold, because free charges are produced by thermionic and ion emission and destroyed when they stick to grain surfaces. This means the ionization state depends not on the first ionization potential of the alkali atoms, but rather on the grains' work functions. The charged species' abundances typically rise abruptly above about 800 K, with little qualitative dependence on the work function, gas density, or dust-to-gas mass ratio. Applying our results, we find that protoplanetary disks' dead zone, where high diffusivities stifle magnetorotational turbulence, has its inner edge locat...

  16. Zodiac II: Debris Disk Imaging Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub Wesley; Bryden, Geoff; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Chen, Pin; Trauger, John

    2011-01-01

    Zodiac II is a proposed coronagraph on a balloon-borne platform, for the purpose of observing debris disks around nearby stars. Zodiac II will have a 1.2-m diameter telescope mounted in a balloon-borne gondola capable of arcsecond quality pointing, and with the capability to make long-duration (several week) flights. Zodiac II will have a coronagraph able to make images of debris disks, meaning that its scattered light speckles will be at or below an average contrast level of about 10(exp -7) in three narrow (7 percent) bands centered on the V band, and one broad (20%) one at I band. We will discuss the potential science to be done with Zodiac II.

  17. Accretion disk structure in SS Cygni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessman, F. V.

    1987-02-01

    High-resolution coude observations of nonaxisymmetric line emission from the dwarf nova SS Cygni are presented. By subtracting the constant line component, the asymmetric line emission responsible for the observed phase shift between the absorption and emission line radial velocity curves can be isolated. The extra emission is a large fraction of the total line emission and extends to large velocities (of about 1500 km/sec). The phase stability of the emission demands a large-scale structure which is fixed in the frame of the binary. A magnetic origin of the excitation cannot be ruled out but is implausible. A simple explanation is that the accretion stream from the companion star is able to spill over the edge of the disk, introducing emission at noncircular velocities and most likely disturbing the upper layers of the accretion disk.

  18. Dead Zone Accretion Flows in Protostellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Neal; Sano, T.

    2008-01-01

    Planets form inside protostellar disks in a dead zone where the electrical resistivity of the gas is too high for magnetic forces to drive turbulence. We show that much of the dead zone nevertheless is active and flows toward the star while smooth, large-scale magnetic fields transfer the orbital angular momentum radially outward. Stellar X-ray and radionuclide ionization sustain a weak coupling of the dead zone gas to the magnetic fields, despite the rapid recombination of free charges on dust grains. Net radial magnetic fields are generated in the magnetorotational turbulence in the electrically conducting top and bottom surface layers of the disk, and reach the midplane by ohmic diffusion. A toroidal component to the fields is produced near the midplane by the orbital shear. The process is similar to the magnetization of the solar tachocline. The result is a laminar, magnetically driven accretion flow in the region where the planets form.

  19. Exponential Galaxy Disks from Stellar Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Elmegreen, Bruce G

    2013-01-01

    Stellar scattering off of orbiting or transient clumps is shown to lead to the formation of exponential profiles in both surface density and velocity dispersion in a two-dimensional non-self gravitating stellar disk with a fixed halo potential. The exponential forms for both nearly-flat rotation curves and near-solid body rotation curves. The exponential does not depend on initial conditions, spiral arms, bars, viscosity, star formation, or strong shear. After a rapid initial development, the exponential saturates to an approximately fixed scale length. The inner exponential in a two-component profile has a break radius comparable to the initial disk radius; the outer exponential is primarily scattered stars.

  20. Shock Waves in Dense Hard Disk Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Barahona, Javier; Radulescu, Matei I

    2011-01-01

    Media composed of colliding hard disks (2D) or hard spheres (3D) serve as good approximations for the collective hydrodynamic description of gases, liquids and granular media. In the present study, the compressible hydrodynamics and shock dynamics are studied for a two-dimensional hard-disk medium at both the continuum and discrete particle level descriptions. For the continuum description, closed form analytical expressions for the inviscid hydrodynamic description, shock Hugoniot, isentropic exponent and shock jump conditions were obtained using the Helfand equation of state. The closed-form analytical solutions permitted us to gain physical insight on the role of the material's density on its compressibility, i.e. how the medium compresses under mechanical loadings and sustains wave motion. Furthermore, the predictions were found in excellent agreement with calculations using the Event Driven Molecular Dynamic method involving 30,000 particles over the entire range of compressibility spanning the dilute id...

  1. Accretion disks in luminous young stellar objects

    CERN Document Server

    Beltran, M T

    2015-01-01

    An observational review is provided of the properties of accretion disks around young stars. It concerns the primordial disks of intermediate- and high-mass young stellar objects in embedded and optically revealed phases. The properties were derived from spatially resolved observations and therefore predominantly obtained with interferometric means, either in the radio/(sub)millimeter or in the optical/infrared wavelength regions. We make summaries and comparisons of the physical properties, kinematics, and dynamics of these circumstellar structures and delineate trends where possible. Amongst others, we report on a quadratic trend of mass accretion rates with mass from T Tauri stars to the highest mass young stellar objects and on the systematic difference in mass infall and accretion rates.

  2. Dynamical evolution of planetesimals in protoplanetary disks

    CERN Document Server

    Rafikov, R R

    2003-01-01

    The current picture of terrestrial planet formation relies heavily on our understanding of the dynamical evolution of planetesimals -- asteroid-like bodies thought to be planetary building blocks. In this study we investigate the growth of eccentricities and inclinations of planetesimals in spatially homogeneous protoplanetary disks using methods of kinetic theory. We explore disks with a realistic mass spectrum of planetesimals evolving in time, similar to that obtained in self-consistent simulations of planetesimal coagulation. We calculate the behavior of planetesimal random velocities as a function of the planetesimal mass spectrum both analytically and numerically; results obtained by the two approaches agree quite well. Scaling of random velocity with mass can always be represented as a combination of power laws corresponding to different velocity regimes (shear- or dispersion-dominated) of planetesimal gravitational interactions. For different mass spectra we calculate analytically the exponents and ti...

  3. Capsule- and disk-filter procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrobialowski, Stanley C.

    2016-01-01

    Capsule and disk filters are disposable, self-contained units composed of a pleated or woven filter medium encased in a polypropylene or other plastic housing that can be connected inline to a sample-delivery system (such as a submersible or peristaltic pump) that generates sufficient pressure (positive or negative) to force water through the filter. Filter media are available in several pore sizes, but 0.45 µm is the pore size used routinely for most studies at this time. Capsule or disk filters (table 5.2.1.A.1) are required routinely for most studies when filtering samples for trace-element analyses and are recommended when filtering samples for major-ion or other inorganic-constituent analyses.

  4. Neutron fluence spectrometry using disk activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and robust detector for spectrometry of environmental neutrons has been developed. The technique is based on neutron activation of a series of different metal disks followed by low-level gamma-ray spectrometry of the activated disks and subsequent neutron spectrum unfolding. The technique is similar to foil activation but here the applied neutron fluence rates are much lower than usually in the case of foil activation. The detector has been tested in quasi mono-energetic neutron fields with fluence rates in the order of 1000-10000 cm-2 s-1, where the obtained spectra showed good agreement with spectra measured using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. The detector has also been tested using an AmBe source and at a neutron fluence rate of about 40 cm-2 s-1, again, a good agreement with the assumed spectrum was achieved

  5. Transient dynamics of perturbations in astrophysical disks

    CERN Document Server

    Razdoburdin, Dmitry N

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some aspects of one of the major unsolved problems in understanding astrophysical (in particular, accretion) disks: whether the disk interiors may be effectively viscous in spite of the absence of marnetorotational instability? In this case a rotational homogeneous inviscid flow with a Keplerian angular velocity profile is spectrally stable, making the transient growth of perturbations a candidate mechanism for energy transfer from the regular motion to perturbations. Transient perturbations differ qualitatively from perturbation modes and can grow substantially in shear flows due to the nonnormality of their dynamical evolution operator. Since the eigenvectors of this operator, alias perturbation modes, are mutually nonorthogonal, they can mutually interfere, resulting in the transient growth of their linear combinations. Physically, a growing transient perturbation is a leading spiral whose branches are shrunk as a result of the differential rotation of the flow. This paper discusses in d...

  6. Terabyte IDE RAID-5 Disk Arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Sanders et al.

    2003-09-30

    High energy physics experiments are currently recording large amounts of data and in a few years will be recording prodigious quantities of data. New methods must be developed to handle this data and make analysis at universities possible. We examine some techniques that exploit recent developments in commodity hardware. We report on tests of redundant arrays of integrated drive electronics (IDE) disk drives for use in offline high energy physics data analysis. IDE redundant array of inexpensive disks (RAID) prices now are less than the cost per terabyte of million-dollar tape robots! The arrays can be scaled to sizes affordable to institutions without robots and used when fast random access at low cost is important.

  7. Comment to "Thomson rings in a disk"

    CERN Document Server

    Amore, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    We have found that the minimum energy configuration of $N=395$ charges confined in a disk and interacting via the Coulomb potential, reported by Cerkaski et al. in Ref.~\\cite{Cerkaski15} is not a global minimum of the total electrostatic energy. We have identified a large number of configurations with lower energy, where defects are present close to the center of the disk; thus, the formation of a hexagonal core and valence circular rings for the centered configurations, predicted by the model of Ref.~\\cite{Cerkaski15}, is not supported by numerical evidence and the configurations obtained with this model cannot be used as a guide for the numerical calculations, as claimed by the authors.

  8. The DiskMass Survey. II. Error Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bershady, Matthew A.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Westfall, Kyle B.; Andersen, David R.; Swaters, Rob A.; Martinsson, Thomas

    2010-06-01

    We present a performance analysis of the DiskMass Survey. The survey uses collisionless tracers in the form of disk stars to measure the surface density of spiral disks, to provide an absolute calibration of the stellar mass-to-light ratio (Υ_{*}), and to yield robust estimates of the dark-matter halo density profile in the inner regions of galaxies. We find that a disk inclination range of 25°-35° is optimal for our measurements, consistent with our survey design to select nearly face-on galaxies. Uncertainties in disk scale heights are significant, but can be estimated from radial scale lengths to 25% now, and more precisely in the future. We detail the spectroscopic analysis used to derive line-of-sight velocity dispersions, precise at low surface-brightness, and accurate in the presence of composite stellar populations. Our methods take full advantage of large-grasp integral-field spectroscopy and an extensive library of observed stars. We show that the baryon-to-total mass fraction ({F}_bar) is not a well-defined observational quantity because it is coupled to the halo mass model. This remains true even when the disk mass is known and spatially extended rotation curves are available. In contrast, the fraction of the rotation speed supplied by the disk at 2.2 scale lengths (disk maximality) is a robust observational indicator of the baryonic disk contribution to the potential. We construct the error budget for the key quantities: dynamical disk mass surface density (Σdyn), disk stellar mass-to-light ratio (Υ^disk_{*}), and disk maximality ({F}_{*,max}^disk≡ V^disk_{*,max}/ V_c). Random and systematic errors in these quantities for individual galaxies will be ~25%, while survey precision for sample quartiles are reduced to 10%, largely devoid of systematic errors outside of distance uncertainties.

  9. THE LONG-LIVED DISKS IN THE η CHAMAELEONTIS CLUSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Infrared Spectrograph spectra and revised Multiband Imaging Photometer photometry for the 18 members of the η Chamaeleontis cluster. Aged 8 Myr, the η Cha cluster is one of the few nearby regions within the 5-10 Myr age range, during which the disk fraction decreases dramatically and giant planet formation must come to an end. For the 15 low-mass members, we measure a disk fraction ∼50%, high for their 8 Myr age, and four of the eight disks lack near-IR excesses, consistent with the empirical definition of 'transition' disks. Most of the disks are comparable to geometrically flat disks. The comparison with regions of different ages suggests that at least some of the 'transition' disks may represent the normal type of disk around low-mass stars. Therefore, their flattened structure and inner holes may be related to other factors (initial masses of the disk and the star, environment, binarity), rather than to pure time evolution. We analyze the silicate dust in the disk atmosphere, finding moderate crystalline fractions (∼10%-30%) and typical grain sizes ∼1-3 μm, without any characteristic trend in the composition. These results are common to other regions of different ages, suggesting that the initial grain processing occurs very early in the disk lifetime (<1 Myr). Large grain sizes in the disk atmosphere cannot be used as a proxy for age, but are likely related to higher disk turbulence. The dust mineralogy varies between the 8-12 μm and the 20-30 μm features, suggesting high temperature dust processing and little radial mixing. Finally, the analysis of IR and optical data on the B9 star η Cha reveals that it is probably surrounded by a young debris disk with a large inner hole, instead of being a classical Be star.

  10. Effective gluon interactions from superstring disk amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oprisa, D.

    2006-05-15

    In this thesis an efficient method for the calculation of the N-point tree-level string amplitudes is presented. Furthermore it is shown that the six-gluon open-superstring disk amplitude can be expressed by a basis of six triple hypergeometric functions, which encode the full {alpha}' dependence. In this connection material for obtaining the {alpha}' expansion of these functions is derived. Hereby many Euler-Zagier sums are calculated including multiple harmonic series. (HSI)

  11. Subleading soft factor for string disk amplitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Burkhard U. W.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the behavior of superstring disk scattering amplitudes in the presence of a soft external momentum at finite string tension. We prove that there are no α'-corrections to the field theory form of the subleading soft factor S (1). At the end of this work, we also comment on the possibility to find the corresponding subleading soft factors in closed string theory using our result and the KLT relations.

  12. Subleading Soft Factor for String Disk Amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Schwab, Burkhard U W

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the behavior of superstring disk scattering amplitudes in the presence of a soft external momentum at finite string tension. We prove that there are no $\\alpha'$-corrections to the field theory form of the subleading soft factor $S^{(1)}$. At the end of this work, we also comment on the possibility to find the corresponding subleading soft factors in closed string theory using our result and the KLT relations.

  13. Trawelling waves in circular disk with imperfections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk

    Lodž : Department of Automatics and Biomechanics, 2009 - (Awrejcewicz, J.; Kažmierczak, M.; Olejnik, P.; Mrozowski, J.), s. 345-352 ISBN 978-83-929120-4-0. [Dynamical Systems - Theory and Applications /10./. Lodž (PL), 07.12.2009-10.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : rotating disk * imperfection * response curves Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  14. Effective gluon interactions from superstring disk amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis an efficient method for the calculation of the N-point tree-level string amplitudes is presented. Furthermore it is shown that the six-gluon open-superstring disk amplitude can be expressed by a basis of six triple hypergeometric functions, which encode the full α' dependence. In this connection material for obtaining the α' expansion of these functions is derived. Hereby many Euler-Zagier sums are calculated including multiple harmonic series. (HSI)

  15. The orbital evolution of planets in disks

    OpenAIRE

    Kley, Wilhelm

    2000-01-01

    The orbital parameters of the observed extrasolar planets differ strongly from those of our own solar system. The differences include planets with high masses, small semi-major axis and large eccentricities. We performed numerical computations of embedded planets in disks and follow their mass growth and orbital evolution over several thousand periods. We find that planets do migrate inwards on timescales of about $10^5$ years on nearly circular orbits, during which they may grow up to about ...

  16. A journey across the M33 disk

    OpenAIRE

    Corbelli, Edvige; Magrini, Laura; Verley, Simon

    2007-01-01

    The Local Group member M33 is a pure disk galaxy bearing no prominent bulge or stellar halo. It constitutes a challenge for any hierarchical galaxy formation theory and an ideal laboratory for studying quiescent star formation. Using multiwavelength observations of the gas and stellar component in this nearby galaxy we are able to constrain the gas accretion and star formation history. In the centermost region we find kinematical evidence of a weak bar, which explains the central light excess...

  17. Fallback Disks, Magnetars and Other Neutron Stars

    OpenAIRE

    Alpar, M. Ali; Caliskan, S.; Ertan, U.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of matter with angular momentum, in the form of a fallback disk around a young isolated neutron star will determine its evolution. This leads to an understanding of many properties of different classes of young neutron stars, in particular a natural explanation for the period clustering of AXPs, SGRs and XDINs. The spindown or spinup properties of a neutron star are determined by the dipole component of the magnetic field. The natural possibility that magnetars and other neutron ...

  18. Fallback disks, magnetars and other neutron stars

    OpenAIRE

    Alpar, M. Ali; Çalışkan, Şirin; Caliskan, Sirin; Ertan, Ünal; Ertan, Unal

    2012-01-01

    The presence of matter with angular momentum, in the form of a fallback disk around a young isolated neutron star will determine its evolution. This leads to an understanding of many properties of different classes of young neutron stars, in particular a natural explanation for the period clustering of AXPs, SGRs and XDINs. The spindown or spinup properties of a neutron star are determined by the dipole component of the magnetic field. The natural possibility that magnetars and other neutr...

  19. A New Parameter In Accretion Disk Model

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Feng(Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA)

    2000-01-01

    Taking optically thin accretion flows as an example, we investigate the dynamics and the emergent spectra of accretion flows with different outer boundary conditions (OBCs) and find that OBC plays an important role in accretion disk model. This is because the accretion equations describing the behavior of accretion flows are a set of {\\em differential} equations, therefore, accretion is intrinsically an initial-value problem. We argue that optically thick accretion flow should also show OBC-d...

  20. Global Slim Accretion Disk Solutions Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Jiao, Cheng-Liang; Xue, Li; Gu, Wei-Min; Lu, Ju-Fu

    2008-01-01

    We show that there exists a maximal possible accretion rate, beyond which global slim disk solutions cannot be constructed because in the vertical direction the gravitational force would be unable to balance the pressure force to gather the accreted matter. The principle for this restriction is the same as that for the Eddington luminosity and the corresponding critical accretion rate, which were derived for spherical accretion by considering the same force balance in the radial direction. If...

  1. Hoyle-Lyttleton Accretion onto Accretion Disks

    OpenAIRE

    Fukue, Jun; Ioroi, Masayuki

    1999-01-01

    We investigate Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion for the case where the central source is a luminous accretion disk. %In classical Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto a ``spherical'' source, accretion takes place in an axially symmetric manner around a so-called accretion axis. The accretion rate of the classical Hoyle-Lyttleton accretion onto a non-luminous object and $\\Gamma$ the luminosity of the central object normalized by the Eddington luminosity. %If the central object is a compact star with a lumi...

  2. Radiative Transfer in Accretion-Disk Winds

    OpenAIRE

    Fukue, Jun

    2007-01-01

    Radiative transfer equation in an accretion disk wind is examined analytically and numerically under the plane-parallel approximation in the subrelativistic regime of $(v/c)^1$, where $v$ is the wind vertical velocity. Emergent intensity is analytically obtained for the case of a large optical depth, where the flow speed and the source function are almost constant. The usual limb-darkening effect, which depends on the direction cosine at the zero-optical depth surface, does not appear, since ...

  3. A Short Guide to Debris Disk Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Christine H.

    2009-01-01

    Multi-wavelength spectroscopy can be used to constrain the dust and gas properties in debris disks. Circumstellar dust absorbs and scatters incident stellar light. The scattered light is sometimes resolved spatially at visual and near-infrared wavelengths using high contrast imaging techniques that suppress light from the central star. The thermal emission is inferred from infrared through submillimeter excess emission that may be 1-2 orders of magnitude brighter than the stellar photosphere ...

  4. Molecular Gas Clumps from the Destruction of Icy Bodies in the $\\beta$ Pictoris Debris Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Dent, W R F; Roberge, A; Augereau, J -C; Casassus, S; Corder, S; Greaves, J S; de Gregorio-Monsalvo, I; Hales, A; Jackson, A P; Hughes, A Meredith; Lagrange, A -M; Matthews, B; Wilner, D

    2014-01-01

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets and dwarf planets. But is gas also released in such events? Observations at submm wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around $\\beta$ Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85AU from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, $\\beta$ Pic b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet, or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets.

  5. Molecular Gas Clumps from the Destruction of Icy Bodies in the beta Pictoris Debris Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, W. R. F.; Wyatt, M. C.; Roberge, A.; Augereau, J. -C.; Casassus, S.; Corder, S.; Greaves, J. S.; DeGregorio-Monsalvo, I.; Hales, A.; Jackson, A. P.; Hughes, A. Meredith; Lagrange, A. -M.; Matthews, B.; Wilner, D.

    2014-01-01

    Many stars are surrounded by disks of dusty debris formed in the collisions of asteroids, comets and dwarf planets. But is gas also released in such events? Observations at sub-mm wavelengths of the archetypal debris disk around ß Pictoris show that 0.3% of a Moon mass of carbon monoxide orbits in its debris belt. The gas distribution is highly asymmetric, with 30% found in a single clump 85 AU from the star, in a plane closely aligned with the orbit of the inner planet, beta Pic b. This gas clump delineates a region of enhanced collisions, either from a mean motion resonance with an unseen giant planet, or from the remnants of a collision of Mars-mass planets.

  6. The V0 detector is two disks of counters in both sides of the interaction point.

    CERN Multimedia

    Grossiord, Jean-Yves

    2006-01-01

    The V0 detector is two disks of counters in both sides of the interaction point. Here is the V0C disk to be fixed on the front face of the muon spectrometer absorber. It is made of 48 scintillating elements coupled to two wavelength fibre layers which emit and guide the light up to connrctors arounda case made of Carbon fibre plates. The light going out of connectors is collected by an optical fibre bundle and transmitted at 3 metres to photo-multipliers which convert light to electrical signal. The elements are set in the case following 2 small rings of 8 counters and 2 large rings of 16 counters grouped two by two. 32 channels of detection distributed around the LHC beam pipe constitute thus the detector

  7. The Outer Disks of Dwarf Irregular Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Hunter, Deidre A; Oh, Se-Heon; Anderson, Ed; Nordgren, Tyler E; Massey, Philip; Wilsey, Nick; Riabokin, Malanka

    2011-01-01

    To explore the properties of extreme outer stellar disks, we obtained ultra-deep V and GALEX UV images of 4 dwarf irregular galaxies and one Blue Compact Dwarf galaxy and ultra-deep B images of 3 of these. Our V-band surface photometry extends to 29.5 magnitudes arcsec^-2. We convert the FUV and V-band photometry, along with Halpha photometry, into radial star formation rate profiles that are sensitive to timescales from 10 Myrs to the lifetime of the galaxy. We also compare the stellar distributions, surface brightness profiles, and star formation rate profiles to HI-line emission maps, gas surface density profiles, and gas kinematics. Our data lead us to two general observations: First, the exponential disks in these irregular galaxies are extraordinarily regular. The stellar disks continue to decline exponentially as far as our measurements extend. In spite of lumpiness in the distribution of young stars and HI distributions and kinematics that have significant unordered motions, sporadic processes that ha...

  8. Radiative Flow in a Luminous Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Fukue, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiatively-driven flow in a luminous disk is examined in the subrelativistic regime of $(v/c)^1$, taking account of radiation transfer. The flow is assumed to be vertical, and the gravity and gas pressure are ignored. When internal heating is dropped, for a given optical depth and radiation pressure at the flow base (disk ``inside''), where the flow speed is zero, the flow is analytically solved under the appropriate boundary condition at the flow top (disk ``surface''), where the optical depth is zero. The loaded mass and terminal speed of the flow are both determined by the initial conditions; the mass-loss rate increases as the initial radiation pressure increases, while the flow terminal speed increases as the initial radiation pressure and the loaded mass decrease. In particular, when heating is ignored, the radiative flux $F$ is constant, and the radiation pressure $P_0$ at the flow base with optical depth $\\tau_0$ is bound in the range of $2/3 < cP_0/F < 2/3 + \\tau_0$. In this case, in the limit...

  9. Molecular emission from GG Car's circumbinary disk

    CERN Document Server

    Kraus, Michaela; Nickeler, Dieter; Muratore, Florencia; Fernandes, Marcelo Borges; Aret, Anna; Cidale, Lydia; de Wit, Willem-Jan

    2012-01-01

    The appearance of the B[e] phenomenon in evolved massive stars such as B[e] supergiants is still a mystery. While these stars are generally found to have disks that are cool and dense enough for efficient molecule and dust condensation, the origin of the disk material is still unclear. We aim at studying the kinematics and origin of the disk in the eccentric binary system GG Car, whose primary component is proposed to be a B[e] supergiant. Based on medium- and high-resolution near-infrared spectra we analyzed the CO-band emission detected from GG Car. The complete CO-band structure delivers information on the density and temperature of the emitting region, and the detectable 13CO bands allow us to constrain the evolutionary phase. In addition, the kinematics of the CO gas can be extracted from the shape of the first 12CO band head. We find that the CO gas is located in a ring surrounding the eccentric binary system, and its kinematics agrees with Keplerian rotation with a velocity, projected to the line of si...

  10. Observations, Modeling and Theory of Debris Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Matthews, Brenda C; Wyatt, Mark C; Bryden, Geoff; Eiroa, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Main sequence stars, like the Sun, are often found to be orbited by circumstellar material that can be categorized into two groups, planets and debris. The latter is made up of asteroids and comets, as well as the dust and gas derived from them, which makes debris disks observable in thermal emission or scattered light. These disks may persist over Gyrs through steady-state evolution and/or may also experience sporadic stirring and major collisional breakups, rendering them atypically bright for brief periods of time. Most interestingly, they provide direct evidence that the physical processes (whatever they may be) that act to build large oligarchs from micron-sized dust grains in protoplanetary disks have been successful in a given system, at least to the extent of building up a significant planetesimal population comparable to that seen in the Solar System's asteroid and Kuiper belts. Such systems are prime candidates to host even larger planetary bodies as well. The recent growth in interest in debris dis...

  11. The DiskMass Survey. I. Overview

    CERN Document Server

    Bershady, Matthew A; Swaters, Rob A; Andersen, David R; Westfall, Kyle B; Martinsson, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We present a survey of the mass surface-density of spiral disks, motivated by outstanding uncertainties in rotation-curve decompositions. Our method exploits integral-field spectroscopy to measure stellar and gas kinematics in nearly face-on galaxies sampled at 515, 660, and 860 nm, using the custom-built SparsePak and PPak instruments. A two-tiered sample, selected from the UGC, includes 146 nearly face-on galaxies, with B<14.7 and disk scale-lengths between 10 and 20 arcsec, for which we have obtained H-alpha velocity-fields; and a representative 46-galaxy subset for which we have obtained stellar velocities and velocity dispersions. Based on re-calibration of extant photometric and spectroscopic data, we show these galaxies span factors of 100 in L(K) (0.03 < L/L(K)* < 3), 8 in L(B)/L(K), 10 in R-band disk central surface-brightness, with distances between 15 and 200 Mpc. The survey is augmented by 4-70 micron Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, ground-based UBVRIJHK photometry, and HI aperture-synt...

  12. Information Leakage Prevention Using Virtual Disk Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek S. Sobh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The worst news for information technology people are computer has been stolen or lost. The actual problem is the loss of the data stored on the hard drive that can fall into the wrong hands. However, users of information system and laptops computers are facing real problems with due to intruders using attack techniques when they are connected to the network and lost or stolen computers. In order to protect your organization against information leakage you should encrypt this data by only allowing the user with access to the encryption key to view the data, authorized application usage, and control who gets access to specific types of data. This work focuses on confidentiality of secure information storage. In addition, it presents the model to create of a Virtual Disk Drive (VDD on MS Windows, that appear to the user (after the mounting process as hard disks, but that are really stored as ciphered files on a file system. The proposed VDD prevents dictionary attacks and brute force attacks by incorporating a CAPTCHA (Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart in the login mechanism. The authentication method for the VDD login is based upon a 3-D image CAPTCHA. All components of this work are integrated in one security VDD tool called "SecDisk".

  13. Hydrogen environment embrittlement of turbine disk alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differences in reported data on properties of turbine disk materials are examined. Results confirm previous results that Udimet 700 bar stock is severely embrittled when tested in gaseous hydrogen. This extreme sensitivity to embrittlement of Udimet 700 is presumably related to its microstructure. Results that Astroloy forgings exhibit a high degree of resistance to hydrogen environment embrittlement during short-term testing, and possibly long-term testing are also confirmed. Therefore, this alloy could be considered for use as the turbine disk alloy for advanced versions of the APU, thereby permitting an increased turbine inlet temperature and/or higher rotational speed than possible with V-57. V-57 is an iron-base superalloy (stable austenitic stainless steel) and is a member of a class of alloys generally quite resistant to hydrogen environment embrittlement. The results of investigation demonstrate the good resistance of V-57 alloy to embrittlement only during short-term tensile testing. Significant reductions in creep and rupture lives, as well as post-creep residual ductility, were determined. Despite these laboratory results, V-57 turbine disks successfully completed short-time performance testing in the experimental APU

  14. When did round disk galaxies form?

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Tomoe M; Yuma, Suraphong; Yabe, Kiyoto

    2015-01-01

    When and how galaxy morphology such as disk and bulge seen in the present-day universe emerged is still not clear. In the universe at $z\\gtrsim 2$, galaxies with various morphology are seen, and star-forming galaxies at $z\\sim2$ show an intrinsic shape of bar-like structure. Then, when did round disk structure form? Here we take a simple and straightforward approach to see the epoch when a round disk galaxy population emerged by constraining the intrinsic shape statistically based on apparent axial ratio distribution of galaxies. We derived the distributions of the apparent axial ratios in the rest-frame optical light ($\\sim 5000$ \\AA) of star-forming main sequence galaxies at $2.5>z>1.4$, $1.4>z>0.85$, and $0.85>z>0.5$, and found that the apparent axial ratios of them show peaky distributions at $z\\gtrsim0.85$, while a rather flat distribution at the lower redshift. By using a tri-axial model ($A>B>C$) for the intrinsic shape, we found the best-fit models give the peaks of the $B/A$ distribution of $0.81\\pm0...

  15. Lopsided dust rings in transition disks

    CERN Document Server

    Birnstiel, T; Pinilla, P

    2013-01-01

    Context. Particle trapping in local or global pressure maxima in protoplanetary disks is one of the new paradigms in the theory of the first stages of planet formation. However, finding observational evidence for this effect is not easy. Recent work suggests that the large ring-shaped outer disks observed in transition disk sources may in fact be lopsided and constitute large banana-shaped vortices. Aims. We wish to investigate how effective dust can accumulate along the azimuthal direction. We also want to find out if the size- sorting resulting from this can produce a detectable signatures at millimeter wavelengths. Methods. To keep the numerical cost under control we develop a 1+1D method in which the azimuthal variations are treated sepa- rately from the radial ones. The azimuthal structure is calculated analytically for a steady-state between mixing and azimuthal drift. We derive equilibration time scales and compare the analytical solutions to time-dependent numerical simulations. Results. We find that ...

  16. Evolution of Massive Protostars via Disk Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Hosokawa, Takashi; Omukai, Kazuyuki

    2010-01-01

    Mass accretion onto (proto-)stars at high accretion rates > 10^-4 M_sun/yr is expected in massive star formation. We study the evolution of massive protostars at such high rates by numerically solving the stellar structure equations. In this paper we examine the evolution via disk accretion. We consider a limiting case of "cold" disk accretion, whereby most of the stellar photosphere can radiate freely with negligible backwarming from the accretion flow, and the accreting material settles onto the star with the same specific entropy as the photosphere. We compare our results to the calculated evolution via spherically symmetric accretion, the opposite limit, whereby the material accreting onto the star contains the entropy produced in the accretion shock front. We examine how different accretion geometries affect the evolution of massive protostars. For cold disk accretion at 10^-3 M_sun/yr the radius of a protostar is initially small, about a few R_sun. After several solar masses have accreted, the protostar...

  17. HST observations of nuclear stellar disks

    CERN Document Server

    Krajnovic, D; Krajnovic, Davor; Jaffe, Walter

    2004-01-01

    We present observations of four nearby early-type galaxies with previously known nuclear stellar disks using two instruments on-board the Hubble Space Telescope. We observed NGC4128, NGC4612, and NGC5308 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and the same three galaxies, plus NGC4570, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We have detected a red nucleus in NGC4128, a blue nucleus in NGC4621, and a blue disk in NGC5308. Additionally, we have discovered a blue disk-like feature with position angle ~15 degrees from the major axis in NGC4621. In NGC5308 there is evidence for a blue region along the minor axis. We discovered a blue transient on the images of NGC4128 at position 0.14" west and 0.32" north from the nucleus. The extracted kinematic profiles belong to two groups: fast (NGC4570 and NGC5308) and kinematically disturbed rotators (NGC4128 and NGC4621). We report the discovery of a kinematically decoupled core in NGC4128. Galaxies have mostly old (10-14 Gyr) stellar populations with large spread i...

  18. Fallback Disks, Magnetars and Other Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Alpar, M Ali; Ertan, U

    2012-01-01

    The presence of matter with angular momentum, in the form of a fallback disk around a young isolated neutron star will determine its evolution. This leads to an understanding of many properties of different classes of young neutron stars, in particular a natural explanation for the period clustering of AXPs, SGRs and XDINs. The spindown or spinup properties of a neutron star are determined by the dipole component of the magnetic field. The natural possibility that magnetars and other neutron stars may have different strengths of the dipole and higher multipole components of the magnetic field is now actually required by observations on the spindown rates of some magnetars. This talk gives a broad overview and some applications of the fallback disk model to particular neutron stars. Salient points are: (i) A fallback disk has already been observed around the AXP 4U 0142+61 some years ago. (ii) The low observed spindown rate of the SGR 0418+5729 provides direct evidence that the dipole component of the field is...

  19. An interferometric view of hot star disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faes, Daniel Moser

    2015-08-01

    Optical long baseline interferometry was recently established as a technique capable of resolving stars and their circumstellar environments at the milliarcsecond (mas) resolution level. This high-resolution opens an entire new window to the study of astrophysical systems, providing information inaccessible by other techniques. Astrophysical disks are observed in a wide variety of systems, from galaxies up to planetary rings, commonly sharing similar physical processes. Two particular disk like systems are studied in the thesis: (i) B He-rich stars that exhibits magnetic fields in order of kG and that trap their winds in structures called magnetospheres; and (ii) Be stars, fast rotating stars that create circumstellar viscous disks. This study uses the interferometric technique to investigate both the photosphere proper and the circumstellar environment of these stars. The objective is to combine interferometry with other observational techniques (such as spectroscopy and polarimetry) to perform a complete and well-constrained physical description of these systems. This description is accompanied by radiative transfer models performed by the HDUST code.

  20. Disk-averaged synthetic spectra of Mars

    CERN Document Server

    Tinetti, G; Fong, W; Meadows, V S; Snively, H; Velusamy, T; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Meadows, Victoria S.; Snively, Heather; Tinetti, Giovanna; Velusamy, Thangasamy

    2004-01-01

    The principal goal of the NASA Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) and ESA Darwin mission concepts is to directly detect and characterize extrasolar terrestrial (Earth-sized) planets. This first generation of instruments is expected to provide disk-averaged spectra with modest spectral resolution and signal-to-noise. Here we use a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the planet Mars to study the detectability of a planet's surface and atmospheric properties from disk-averaged spectra as a function of spectral resolution and wavelength range, for both the proposed visible coronograph (TPF-C) and mid-infrared interferometer (TPF-I/Darwin) architectures. At the core of our model is a spectrum-resolving (line-by-line) atmospheric/surface radiative transfer model which uses observational data as input to generate a database of spatially-resolved synthetic spectra for a range of illumination conditions (phase angles) and viewing geometries. Results presented here include disk averaged synthetic spectra, light-cur...