WorldWideScience

Sample records for algal bloom detection

  1. Extreme Algal Bloom Detection with MERIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, R.; Gilerson, A.; Gould, R.; Arnone, R.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-05-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB's) are a major concern all over the world due to their negative impacts on the marine environment, human health, and the economy. Their detection from space still remains a challenge particularly in turbid coastal waters. In this study we propose a simple reflectance band difference approach for use with Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) data to detect intense plankton blooms. For convenience we label this approach as the Extreme Bloom Index (EBI) which is defined as EBI = Rrs (709) - Rrs (665). Our initial analysis shows that this band difference approach has some advantages over the band ratio approaches, particularly in reducing errors due to imperfect atmospheric corrections. We also do a comparison between the proposed EBI technique and the Maximum Chlorophyll Index (MCI) Gower technique. Our preliminary result shows that both the EBI and MCI indeces detect intense plankton blooms, however, MCI is more vulnerable in highly scattering waters, giving more positive false alarms than EBI.

  2. Detection of surface algal blooms using the newly developed algorithm surface algal bloom index (SABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alawadi, Fahad

    2010-10-01

    Quantifying ocean colour properties has evolved over the past two decades from being able to merely detect their biological activity to the ability to estimate chlorophyll concentration using optical satellite sensors like MODIS and MERIS. The production of chlorophyll spatial distribution maps is a good indicator of plankton biomass (primary production) and is useful for the tracing of oceanographic currents, jets and blooms, including harmful algal blooms (HABs). Depending on the type of HABs involved and the environmental conditions, if their concentration rises above a critical threshold, it can impact the flora and fauna of the aquatic habitat through the introduction of the so called "red tide" phenomenon. The estimation of chlorophyll concentration is derived from quantifying the spectral relationship between the blue and the green bands reflected from the water column. This spectral relationship is employed in the standard ocean colour chlorophyll-a (Chlor-a) product, but is incapable of detecting certain macro-algal species that float near to or at the water surface in the form of dense filaments or mats. The ability to accurately identify algal formations that sometimes appear as oil spill look-alikes in satellite imagery, contributes towards the reduction of false-positive incidents arising from oil spill monitoring operations. Such algal formations that occur in relatively high concentrations may experience, as in land vegetation, what is known as the "red-edge" effect. This phenomena occurs at the highest reflectance slope between the maximum absorption in the red due to the surrounding ocean water and the maximum reflectance in the infra-red due to the photosynthetic pigments present in the surface algae. A new algorithm termed the surface algal bloom index (SABI), has been proposed to delineate the spatial distributions of floating micro-algal species like for example cyanobacteria or exposed inter-tidal vegetation like seagrass. This algorithm was

  3. Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Eighth Annual National Conference on Health Communication, Marketing & Media August 19-21, 2014 Atlanta, GA Harmful Algal Blooms Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page What's the ...

  4. Algal Bloom: Boon or Bane?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    Algal blooms occur in response to nutrient deplete or replete conditions. Nitrogen fixing forms proliferate under oligotrophic conditions when nutrient levels are low. Replete conditions in response to upwelling creates the most biologically...

  5. An optical system for detecting and describing major algal blooms in coastal and oceanic waters around India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokul, Elamurugu Alias; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2016-06-01

    An optical system is developed with the aim to detect and monitor three major algal blooms (including harmful algal blooms "HABs") over ecologically relevant scales around India and to strengthen algal forecasting system. This system is designed to be capable of utilizing remote sensing, in situ, and radiative transfer techniques to provide species-specific data necessary for increasing capabilities of an algal forecasting system. With the ability to measure in-water optical properties by means of remote sensing and in situ observations, the optical system developed infers the desired phytoplankton signal from spectral distributions and utilize these data in a numerical classification technique to generate species-specific maps at given spatial and temporal scales. A simple radiative transfer model is adopted for this system to provide a means to optimally interpolate to regions with sparse in situ observation data and to provide a central component to generate in-water optical properties from remotely sensed data. For a given set of inherent optical properties along with surface and bottom boundary conditions, the optical system potentially provides researchers and managers coverage at different locations and depths for tracking algal blooms in the water column. Three major algal blooms focused here include Noctiluca scintillans/miliaris, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Cochlodinium polykrikoides, which are recurring events in coastal and oceanic waters around India. Because satellite sensors provide a synoptic view of the ocean, both spatially and temporally, our initial efforts tested this optical system using several MODIS-Aqua images and ancillary data. Validation of the results with coincident in situ data obtained from either surface samples or depth samples demonstrated the robustness and potential utility of this approach, with an accuracy of 80-90% for delineating the presence of all three blooms in a heterogeneous phytoplankton community. Despite its

  6. Beach-goer behavior during a retrospectively detected algal bloom at a Great Lakes beach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algal blooms occur among nutrient rich, warm surface waters and may adversely impact recreational beaches. During July – September 2003, a prospective study of beachgoers was conducted on weekends at a public beach on a Great Lake in the United States. We measured each beac...

  7. Algal blooms and public health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, P.R. (Cambridge Hospital, MA (United States). Harvard Medical School)

    1993-06-01

    Alterations in coastal ecology are expanding the geographic extent, frequency, magnitude, and species complexity'' of algal blooms throughout the world, increasing the threat of fish and shellfish poisonings, anoxia in marine nurseries, and of cholera. The World Health Organization and members of the medical profession have described the potential health effects of global climate change. They warn of the consequences of increased ultraviolet-B (UV-B) rays and of warming: the possible damage to agriculture and nutrition, and the impact on habitats which may alter the distribution of vector-borne and water-based infectious diseases. Algal growth due to increased nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) and warming are already affecting marine microflora and aquatic plants; and there is now clear evidence that marine organisms are a reservoir for enteric pathogens. The pattern of cholera in the Western Hemisphere suggests that environmental changes have already begun to influence the epidemiology of this infectious disease. 106 refs.

  8. Airborne Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms over Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokars, Roger; Lekki, John

    2013-01-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager mounted to an aircraft was used to develop a remote sensing capability to detect the pigment Phycocyanin, an indicator of Microcystis, in low concentration as an early indicator of harmful algal bloom prediction.

  9. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ecological Stewardship Institute at Northern Kentucky University and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating to optimize a harmful algal bloom detection algorithm that estimates the presence and count of cyanobacteria in freshwater systems by image analysis...

  10. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational pro

  11. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of the plant to avoid irreversible fouling...

  12. Development of Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Capability For the Early Detection and Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the Great Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John; Anderson, Robert; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Demers, James; Leshkevich, George; Flatico, Joseph; Kojima, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Hyperspectral imagers have significant capability for detecting and classifying waterborne constituents. One particularly appropriate application of such instruments in the Great Lakes is to detect and monitor the development of potentially Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). Two generations of small hyperspectral imagers have been built and tested for aircraft based monitoring of harmful algal blooms. In this paper a discussion of the two instruments as well as field studies conducted using these instruments will be presented. During the second field study, in situ reflectance data was obtained from the Research Vessel Lake Guardian in conjunction with reflectance data obtained with the hyperspectral imager from overflights of the same locations. A comparison of these two data sets shows that the airborne hyperspectral imager closely matches measurements obtained from instruments on the lake surface and thus positively supports its utilization for detecting and monitoring HABs.

  13. Harmful Algal Bloom Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jilan; Zhou Mingjiang

    2001-01-01

    Proliferations of harmful algae in coastal waters, i.e., harmful algal blooms (HABs), popularly known as "red tides," have attracted the concern of governments and scientists worldwide. In recent years, HABs have occurred in China with increasing frequency and scope. These outbreaks have seriously affected the economy along the coast through fish kills, heavy losses in aquaculture, threats to human health, and other effects detrimental to the marine ecosystem. Therefore, it is important to pay special attention to the ecology and oceanography studies related to the outbreak of HABs. Only through the combination of the advancement of such knowledge with the strengthening of the monitoring network can we develop a HAB warning system for the sustainable development of the coastal economy.

  14. Coastal engineering and Harmful Algal Blooms along Alexandria coast, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany A. Ismael

    2014-01-01

    The phytoplankton composition and its standing crop became totally different during the two periods. The most important bloom was caused by Micromonas pusilla forming a heavy green tide accompanied by a bloom of Peridinium quinquecorne. Although there were no fish or invertebrate mortality, this bloom caused economic losses to internal tourism. In the absence of any Environmental Assessment, the coastal engineering works increased the harmful algal blooms in Alexandria coastal waters, even after corrective steps were taken to mitigate the harmful effects.

  15. Algal Bloom in Aquatic Ecosystems-an Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghorbani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Algae play an important role in all aquatic ecosystems by providing all living organisms of water bodies with preliminary nutrients and energy required. However, abnormal and excessive algal growth so-called algal bloom would be detrimental as much. Given the importance of algae in aquatic environment as well as their sensitivity to environmental changes, algal measurements are of key components of water quality monitoring programs. The algal blooms could include a variety of adverse impacts on environmental, social, cultural and economic environments. The present study is an overview on the algal growth, its mechanisms and mitigating strategies in aquatic ecosystems whereas in spite of the growing knowledge of human being of ecological, physiological, and functional conditions of eutrophication, a systematic understanding of algal blooms is still lacking.

  16. Detecting algae blooms in European waters

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Y; K. Ruddick

    2007-01-01

    A near real-time algal bloom detection service has been developed for European waters. Daily chlorophyll a data from Envisat/MERIS and Aqua/MODIS are compared to a predefined threshold map to determine whether an algal bloom has occurred. The design of the threshold map takes account of two factors. Firstly, over European waters regional differences in typical and extreme levels of chlorophyll a span two orders of magnitude. A concentration, e.g. 2 µg/l, that would be considered as a bloom co...

  17. Evaluation of Harmful Algal Bloom Outreach Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weisman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available With an apparent increase of harmful algal blooms (HABs worldwide,healthcare providers, public health personnel and coastal managers are struggling toprovide scientifically-based appropriately-targeted HAB outreach and education. Since1998, the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami, with its 24 hour/365 day/year freeAquatic Toxins Hotline (1-888-232-8635 available in several languages, has received over 25,000 HAB-related calls. As part of HAB surveillance, all possible cases of HAB-relatedillness among callers are reported to the Florida Health Department. This pilot studyevaluated an automated call processing menu system that allows callers to access bilingualHAB information, and to speak directly with a trained Poison Information Specialist. Themajority (68% of callers reported satisfaction with the information, and many provided specific suggestions for improvement. This pilot study, the first known evaluation of use and satisfaction with HAB educational outreach materials, demonstrated that the automated system provided useful HAB-related information for the majority of callers, and decreased the routine informational call workload for the Poison Information Specialists, allowing them to focus on callers needing immediate assistance and their healthcare providers. These results will lead to improvement of this valuable HAB outreach, education and surveillance tool. Formal evaluation is recommended for future HAB outreach and educational materials.

  18. Physical Hydrography and Algal Bloom Transport in Hong Kong Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Cui-ping; LEE Joseph H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: I) In the wet season (May~August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November~April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.

  19. Algal blooms: an emerging threat to seawater reverse osmosis desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2014-08-04

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination technology has been rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity and global application over the last decade. An emerging threat to SWRO application is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in SWRO plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of various desalination plants to avoid irreversible fouling of downstream SWRO membranes. This article summarizes the current state of SWRO technology and the emerging threat of algal blooms to its application. It also highlights the importance of studying the algal bloom phenomena in the perspective of seawater desalination, so proper mitigation and preventive strategies can be developed in the near future. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  20. Algal blooms: a perspective from the coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSilva, M.S.; Anil, A.C.; Naik, R.K.; DeCosta, P.M.

    and mapping of algal blooms from satellite data in optically complex waters of the Arabian Sea (Shanmugam 2011). The algorithm is derived using Sea–viewing Wide Field–of–view Sensor (SeaWiFS) bands, and it is subsequently tuned to be applicable to Moderate..., Andamans. Curr Sci 81:203–206 Falkowski PG (1984) Physiological response of phytoplankton to natural light regimes. J Plankton Res 6:295– 307 16 GEOHAB (2001) Global Ecology and Oceanography of Harmful Algal Blooms, GEOHAB Science Plan. In: Patricia...

  1. Metatranscriptome profiling of a harmful algal bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Endymion D; Bentlage, Bastian; Gibbons, Theodore R; Bachvaroff, Tsvetan R; Delwiche, Charles F

    2014-07-01

    Metagenomic methods provide a powerful means to investigate complex ecological phenomena. Developed originally for study of Bacteria and Archaea, the application of these methods to eukaryotic microorganisms is yet to be fully realized. Most prior environmental molecular studies of eukaryotes have relied heavily on PCR amplification with eukaryote-specific primers. Here we apply high throughput short-read sequencing of poly-A selected RNA to capture the metatranscriptome of an estuarine dinoflagellate bloom. To validate the metatranscriptome assembly process we simulated metatranscriptomic datasets using short-read sequencing data from clonal cultures of four algae of varying phylogenetic distance. We find that the proportion of chimeric transcripts reconstructed from community transcriptome sequencing is low, suggesting that metatranscriptomic sequencing can be used to accurately reconstruct the transcripts expressed by bloom-forming communities of eukaryotes. To further validate the bloom metatransciptome assembly we compared it to a transcriptomic assembly from a cultured, clonal isolate of the dominant bloom-causing alga and found that the two assemblies are highly similar. Eukaryote-wide phylogenetic analyses reveal the taxonomic composition of the bloom community, which is comprised of several dinoflagellates, ciliates, animals, and fungi. The assembled metatranscriptome reveals the functional genomic composition of a metabolically active community. Highlighting the potential power of these methods, we found that relative transcript abundance patterns suggest that the dominant dinoflagellate might be expressing toxin biosynthesis related genes at a higher level in the presence of competitors, predators and prey compared to it growing in monoculture. PMID:25484636

  2. Algal bloom-associated disease outbreaks among users of freshwater lakes-United States, 2009 - 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algal blooms’ are local abundances of phytoplankton – microscopic photosynthesizing aquatic organisms found in surface waters worldwide; blooms are variable temporally and spatially and frequently produce a visible algal scum on the water. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are abundan...

  3. Seawater reverse osmosis desalination and (harmful) algal blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the occurrence of HABs in seawater, their effects on the operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants, the indicators for quantifying/predicting these effects, and the pretreatment strategies for mitigating operational issues during algal blooms. The potential issues in SWRO plants during HABs are particulate/organic fouling of pretreatment systems and biological fouling of RO membranes, mainly due to accumulation of algal organic matter (AOM). The presence of HAB toxins in desalinated water is also a potential concern but only at very low concentrations. Monitoring algal cell density, AOM concentrations and membrane fouling indices is a promising approach to assess the quality of SWRO feedwater and performance of the pretreatment system. When geological condition is favourable, subsurface intake can be a robust pretreatment for SWRO during HABs. Existing SWRO plants with open intake and are fitted with granular media filtration can improve performance in terms of capacity and product water quality, if preceded by dissolved air flotation or sedimentation. However, the application of advanced pretreatment using ultrafiltration membrane with in-line coagulation is often a better option as it is capable of maintaining stable operation and better RO feed water quality during algal bloom periods with significantly lower chemical consumption.

  4. Formation of harmful algal blooms cannot be explained by allelopathic interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jonsson, Per R.; Pavia, Henrik; Toth, Gunilla

    2009-01-01

    Many planktonic microalgae produce a range of toxins and may form harmful algal blooms. One hypothesis is that some toxins are allelopathic, suppressing the growth of competitors, and it has been suggested that allelopathy may be one important mechanism causing algal blooms. In a metaanalysis of recent experimental work, we looked for evidence that allelopathy may explain the initiation of algal blooms. With few exceptions, allelopathic effects were only significant at very high cell densitie...

  5. Harmful Algal Bloom in Iligan Bay, Southern Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Vicente

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the first occurrence of harmful algal bloom (HAB caused by a non-toxic dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium sp. in Philippine waters, particularly, in Kalangahan Pt.-Manticao Pt., Iligan Bay on March 13-18, 2002. Two patches of Cochlodinium sp. bloom, associated with fish kills in Kalangahan Pt.-Mantacao Pt., Iligan Bay, caused localized water discoloration from the usual ocean blue to rusty brown or reddish brown to blackish. The first patch, located near fish-aggregating device (FAD areas, spanned 2 km wide, while the second patch, located near a fish corral, spanned 500m wide. These patches occupied the water column from surface to 5 m depth, but a thick mat formed at 0.5 m to surface. Patches occupied the water column from surface to 5 m depth, but a thick mat formed at 0.5 m to surface. Patches decreased as the bloom began to decline. The observed dead demersal and pelagic fishes coincided with highest bloom density of 3.1 x 104 to 3.8 x 104 cells ml-1 of Cochlodinium. Dissected gills and stomach contents of fishes killed in HAB-affected areas did not reveal any indication of clogging of gills by Cochlodinium sp. Fishes covered by the “shading effect” of Cochlodinium bloom may have suffered anoxia or asphyxation due to oxygen depletion. No poisoning of people who consumed the dead fishes was reported. Laboratory analyses revealed lower DO values, 2.4 to 0.5 mg L-1from 2400 to 0600Hr; 14N:1P ratio; air-water temperature ranged from 28-29°C; pH 7.89-8.29; and salinity, 33-35°/oo. Favella sp., a tintinnid grazer of dinoflagellate was developing in the area at the termination of the Cochlodinium bloom on March 18.

  6. Parasitic chytrids sustain zooplankton growth during inedible algal bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasconi, Serena; Grami, Boutheina; Niquil, Nathalie; Jobard, Marlène; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2014-01-01

    This study assesses the quantitative impact of parasitic chytrids on the planktonic food web of two contrasting freshwater lakes during different algal bloom situations. Carbon-based food web models were used to investigate the effects of chytrids during the spring diatom bloom in Lake Pavin (oligo-mesotrophic) and the autumn cyanobacteria bloom in Lake Aydat (eutrophic). Linear inverse modeling was employed to estimate undetermined flows in both lakes. The Monte Carlo Markov chain linear inverse modeling procedure provided estimates of the ranges of model-derived fluxes. Model results confirm recent theories on the impact of parasites on food web function through grazers and recyclers. During blooms of "inedible" algae (unexploited by planktonic herbivores), the epidemic growth of chytrids channeled 19-20% of the primary production in both lakes through the production of grazer exploitable zoospores. The parasitic throughput represented 50% and 57% of the zooplankton diet, respectively, in the oligo-mesotrophic and in the eutrophic lakes. Parasites also affected ecological network properties such as longer carbon path lengths and loop strength, and contributed to increase the stability of the aquatic food web, notably in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Pavin. PMID:24904543

  7. Parasitic Chytrids sustain zooplankton growth during inedible algal bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SerenaRasconi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the quantitative impact of parasitic chytrids on the planktonic food web of two contrasting freshwater lakes during different algal bloom situations. Carbon-based food web models were used to investigate the effects of chytrids during the spring diatom bloom of Lake Pavin (oligo-mesotrophic and the autumn cyanobacteria bloom of Lake Aydat (eutrophic. Linear inverse modelling was employed to estimate undetermined flows in both lakes. The Monte Carlo Markov chain linear inverse modelling procedure provided estimates of the ranges of model-derived fluxes. Model results confirm recent theories on the probable impact of parasites on food web function as grazers and recyclers. During blooms of “inedible” algae (unexploited by planktonic herbivores, the epidemic growth of chytrids channelled 19-20% of the primary production in both lakes through the production of grazer-exploitable zoospores. The parasitic throughput represents 50 and 57% of the zooplankton diet respectively in the oligo-mesotrophic and in the eutrophic lakes. Parasites also affected ecological network properties as longer carbon path lengths and loop strength, and contributed to increase the stability of the aquatic food web, notably in the oligo-mesotrophic Lake Pavin.# The first two authors contributed equally to this work

  8. Marine harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berdalet, Elisa; Fleming, Lora E.; Gowen, Richard;

    2016-01-01

    cause harm to humans and other organisms. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) have direct impacts on human health and negative influences on human wellbeing, mainly through their consequences to coastal ecosystem services (fisheries, tourism and recreation) and other marine organisms and environments...... multidisciplinary research. At the beginning of the 21st century, with expanding human populations, particularly in coastal and developing countries, mitigating HABs impacts on human health and wellbeing is becoming a more pressing public health need. The available tools to address this global challenge include...... and human health and wellbeing....

  9. Physical Water Quality and Algal Density for Remediation of Algal Blooms in Tropical Shallow Eutrophic Reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    Gurminder Kaur Sardool Singh; Perumal Kuppan; Goto, Masafumi; Sugiura, Norio; Megat Johari Megat Mohd Noor; Zaini Ujang

    2013-01-01

    This study is on physical water quality data with regards to algal bloom occurrence in a shallow eutrophic reservoir in Malaysia. Some of the important physical parameters emphasized for future remedial studies for the Semberong Dam, a tropical reservoir, are dissolved oxygen, temperature and light intensity. The use of Planktothrix culture as a dominant algae or a mixed culture with a spike of this dominant algae is suggested for remedial study. Other influencing factors for consideration ar...

  10. Characterisation of algal organic matter produced by bloom-forming marine and freshwater algae

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2015-04-01

    Algal blooms can seriously affect the operation of water treatment processes including low pressure (micro- and ultra-filtration) and high pressure (nanofiltration and reverse osmosis) membranes mainly due to accumulation of algal-derived organic matter (AOM). In this study, the different components of AOM extracted from three common species of bloom-forming algae (Alexandrium tamarense, Chaetoceros affinis and Microcystis sp.) were characterised employing various analytical techniques, such as liquid chromatography - organic carbon detection, fluorescence spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, alcian blue staining and lectin staining coupled with laser scanning microscopy to indentify its composition and force measurement using atomic force microscopy to measure its stickiness. Batch culture monitoring of the three algal species illustrated varying characteristics in terms of growth pattern, cell concentration and AOM release. The AOM produced by the three algal species comprised mainly biopolymers (e.g., polysaccharides and proteins) but some refractory compounds (e.g., humic-like substances) and other low molecular weight acid and neutral compounds were also found. Biopolymers containing fucose and sulphated functional groups were found in all AOM samples while the presence of other functional groups varied between different species. A large majority (>80%) of the acidic polysaccharide components (in terms of transparent exopolymer particles) were found in the colloidal size range (<0.4μm). The relative stickiness of AOM substantially varied between algal species and that the cohesion between AOM-coated surfaces was much stronger than the adhesion of AOM on AOM-free surfaces. Overall, the composition as well as the physico-chemical characteristics (e.g., stickiness) of AOM will likely dictate the severity of fouling in membrane systems during algal blooms.

  11. A Geospatial Analysis of Harmful Algal Blooms along the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, C.; Rothwell, R.; Johnson, E.; Condamoor, M.; Patil, M.; Largier, J. L.; Schmidt, C.

    2012-12-01

    Algal blooms are natural phenomena consisting of the rapid growth of phytoplankton populations. Some blooms have negative ecological or public health effects due to toxin production and removal of oxygen from the water column. In recent years, such "harmful algal blooms" (HABs) have been linked to human illness, economic loss from decreased fishing, and ecological damage related to marine life mortality as well as eutrophication. A notable HAB event occurred along the coast of northern California in August 2011, resulting in economic and ecological impacts of approximately $82 million. This was one of several algal blooms that occurred in fall 2011, with similar northward propagating algal blooms occurring in autumn of other years. Although the scale of the bloom impact is well-known, the spatial and temporal extent of the bloom boundary is still unclear. This study tracked the space-time pattern of numerous blooms during August-October 2011 using multiple NASA Earth observing systems in an effort to quantify and understand the structure of these recurrent bloom events. Aqua MODIS images were used to quantify surface chlorophyll-α levels, and thus to map the extent and development of all autumn algal blooms. The relation between sea surface temperature, ocean surface topography, and algal blooms was further explored with AVHRR and Jason-2 satellite data. A Generalized Additive Model (GAM) was used to identify the environmental factors most statistically influential in algal blooms and specifically in HAB events. Results from this study will assist California's Departments of Public Health and Fish & Game in mitigating and managing the impact of future harmful algal blooms.

  12. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Lee, Jong-Kook; Kim, Si Wouk; Park, Yoonkyung

    2011-01-01

    Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB), also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal impact on marine

  13. Selective algicidal action of peptides against harmful algal bloom species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Park

    Full Text Available Recently, harmful algal bloom (HAB, also termed "red tide", has been recognized as a serious problem in marine environments according to climate changes worldwide. Many novel materials or methods to prevent HAB have not yet been employed except for clay dispersion, in which can the resulting sedimentation on the seafloor can also cause alteration in marine ecology or secondary environmental pollution. In the current study, we investigated that antimicrobial peptide have a potential in controlling HAB without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Here, antimicrobial peptides are proposed as new algicidal compounds in combating HAB cells. HPA3 and HPA3NT3 peptides which exert potent antimicrobial activity via pore forming action in plasma membrane showed that HPA3NT3 reduced the motility of algal cells, disrupted their plasma membrane, and induced the efflux of intracellular components. Against raphidoflagellate such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Chattonella sp., and C. marina, it displayed a rapid lysing action in cell membranes at 1~4 µM within 2 min. Comparatively, its lysing effects occurred at 8 µM within 1 h in dinoflagellate such as Cochlodium polykrikoides, Prorocentrum micans, and P. minimum. Moreover, its lysing action induced the lysis of chloroplasts and loss of chlorophyll a. In the contrary, this peptide was not effective against Skeletonema costatum, harmless algal cell, even at 256 µM, moreover, it killed only H. akashiwo or C. marina in co-cultivation with S. costatum, indicating to its selective algicidal activity between harmful and harmless algal cells. The peptide was non-hemolytic against red blood cells of Sebastes schlegeli, the black rockfish, at 120 µM. HAB cells were quickly and selectively lysed following treatment of antimicrobial peptides without cytotoxicity to harmless marine organisms. Thus, the antibiotic peptides examined in our study appear to have much potential in effectively controlling HAB with minimal

  14. Discussion about mechanism of harmful algal blooms breakout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Xianwei; XU Weiyi; ZHU Dedi; CHEN Gengxin

    2005-01-01

    HAB (harmful algal bloom) is a serious marine ecological disaster. Up to now there is no definite conclusion about its mechanism of occurrence.The observation results show that the HAB breakout in the Xiangshan Bay was mainly caused by physical convergence ca pacity,and the breakout process had no direct relation to eutrophication. As a new idea it is thought that the process of the HAB break out is mainly a physical convergence or accumulation process in some areas. A hypothesis about dynamic mechanism of the HAB ap pearing in the area off the Changjiang Estuary is put forward according to hydrology and topography and the past work, and a breakthrough is expected to be made for doing further research.

  15. Using Ocean Color Satellite Data to Estimate Economics Benefits Associated with Monitoring and Preventing Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation describes preliminary work that is underway that will illustrate the use of ocean land colour instrument data (Sentinel-3 & Landsat) to detect and monitor harmful algal blooms (HABS) in freshwater lakes for two types of economic analyses. This project is a j...

  16. Algicidal bacteria in the sea and their impact on algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayali, Xavier; Azam, Farooq

    2004-01-01

    Over the past two decades, many reports have revealed the existence of bacteria capable of killing phytoplankton. These algicidal bacteria sometimes increase in abundance concurrently with the decline of algal blooms, suggesting that they may affect algal bloom dynamics. Here, we synthesize the existing knowledge on algicidal bacteria interactions with marine eukaryotic microalgae. We discuss the effectiveness of the current methods to characterize the algicidal phenotype in an ecosystem context. We briefly consider the literature on the phylogenetic identification of algicidal bacteria, their interaction with their algal prey, the characterization of algicidal molecules, and the enumeration of algicidal bacteria during algal blooms. We conclude that, due to limitations of current methods, the evidence for algicidal bacteria causing algal bloom decline is circumstantial. New methods and an ecosystem approach are needed to test hypotheses on the impact of algicidal bacteria in algal bloom dynamics. This will require enlarging the scope of inquiry from its current focus on the potential utility of algicidal bacteria in the control of harmful algal blooms. We suggest conceptualizing bacterial algicidy within the general problem of bacterial regulation of algal community structure in the ocean. PMID:15134248

  17. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuwen, E-mail: qchen@rcees.ac.cn [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China); China Three Gorges University, Daxuelu 8, Yichang 443002 (China); CEER, Nanjing Hydraulics Research Institute, Guangzhoulu 223, Nanjing 210029 (China); Rui, Han; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yanhui [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004–2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial–temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial–temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties. - Highlights: • An innovative method is developed to analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. • The algal blooms in Taihu Lake showed obvious spatial and temporal patterns. • The lake is mainly characterized as moderate bloom but with high uncertainty. • Severe bloom with low uncertainty appeared occasionally in the northwest part. • The results provide important information to bloom monitoring and management.

  18. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004–2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial–temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial–temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties. - Highlights: • An innovative method is developed to analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. • The algal blooms in Taihu Lake showed obvious spatial and temporal patterns. • The lake is mainly characterized as moderate bloom but with high uncertainty. • Severe bloom with low uncertainty appeared occasionally in the northwest part. • The results provide important information to bloom monitoring and management

  19. Physical and biological data collected along the Texas, Mississippi, and Florida Gulf coasts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System from 19 Aug 1953 to 11 July 2014 (NODC Accession 0120767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HABSOS (Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System) is a data collection and distribution system for harmful algal bloom (HAB) information in the Gulf of Mexico. The...

  20. Recognizing harmful algal bloom based on remote sensing reflectance band ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Mariano; Giardino, Claudia; Bartoli, Marco; Tavernini, Silvia; Bolpagni, Rossano; Nizzoli, Daniele

    2011-01-01

    We present a band ratio algorithm based on remote sensing reflectance (RRS) data to detect an algal bloom composed of cyanobacteria (Planktothrix spp.) and chrysophytes in Lake Idro, a small meso-eutrophic lake situated in the subalpine region (northern Italy). The bloom started around the first week of September 2010 and persisted for about 1 month, with highest mean chlorophyll-a concentrations (17.5 +/- 1.6 mgm-3) and phytoplankton cellular density (7,250,000 cell.l-1) measured on September 14, 2010. RRS data obtained from in situ measurements were first investigated to select the diagnostic wavelengths (i.e., 560 and 620 nm) of both phycoerythrin (present in the Planktothrix spp.) and other pigments (e.g., fucoxanthin, common to several species of chrysophyte). Testing the algorithm on RRS data derived from atmospherically corrected image data showed the ability of the medium resolution imaging spectrometer (MERIS) to detect the bloom also. The results demonstrate that a combination of in situ and MERIS data is a valuable tool to monitor the extent and duration of phytoplankton blooms.

  1. Harmful algal blooms discovered during the Mote Monthly transect cruises, 1998 and 1999 (NODC Accession 0000532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Harmful algal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, have caused massive fish kills in the Gulf of Mexico since the 1500's, with most occurrences on...

  2. Enhancement of Chlorophyll Concentration and Growing Harmful Algal Bloom Along the California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceves, Joselyn; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    We have carried out detailed analysis of satellite and ground data at different locations, Cal Poly, Goleta, Newport, Santa Monica, and Scripps piers and Monterey, Stearns and Santa Cruz wharfs along the California coast for the period 2008-2015. The sea surface temperature and chlorophyll concentrations derived from satellite data are analyzed together with ground observations of nitrogen, phosphorus, domoic acids and harmful algal blooms. The frequency of harmful algal blooms are found to increase in recent years depending upon the enhancement of chlorophyll concentrations and the discharges along the coast and dynamics of the sea surface temperature. The frequency of harmful algal blooms is higher in the northern California compared to southern California. The anthropogenic activities along the coast have increased which are associated with the forest fires and long range transport of dusts from Asia. The aerosol optical depth derived from satellite data during summer months seems to play an important role in the frequency of harmful algal blooms.

  3. THE TRPV1 RECEPTOR: THE INTERAGENCY, INTERNATION SYMPOSIUM ON CYANOBACTERIAL HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background and Significance Evidence indicates that the frequency of occurrence of cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) is increasing in spatial and temporal extent in the US and worldwide. Cyanotoxins are among the most potent toxins known, causing death through ...

  4. Algal-bloom control by allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes——A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongying HU; Yu HONG

    2008-01-01

    Algal-bloom control is an important issue for water environment protection as it induces several nega-tive impacts on the lives of aquatic organisms, aquacul-ture, landscaping, and human health. The development of an environment-friendly, cost-effective, and convenient alternative for controlling algal bloom has gained much concern. Using the allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes as a novel and safe method for algal-bloom control is a promising alternative. This paper reviews the develop-ment and potential application about allelopathy of aquatic plants on algae, including the allelopathic research history, the potential research problems, the research methodology, and the reported aquatic macro-phytes and their inhibitory allelochemicals. Potential modes of inhibition action of allelochemicals on algae, possible ways for application, and future development directions of research on algal-bloom control by aquatic macrophytes were also presented.

  5. Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Sung Cheng

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-μg/L microcystin concentration. We analyzed water, air, and human blood samples for water quality, potential human pathogens, algal taxonomy, and microcystin concentrations. We interviewed study participants for demographic and current health symptom information. Water samples were assayed for potential respiratory viruses (adenoviruses and enteroviruses, but none were detected. We did find low concentrations of Escherichia coli, indicating fecal contamination. We found low levels of microcystins (2 μg/L to 5 μg/L in the water and (<0.1 ng/m3 in the aerosol samples. Blood levels of microcystins for all participants were below the limit of detection (0.147μg/L. Given this low exposure level, study participants reported no symptom increases following recreational exposure to microcystins. This is the first study to report that water-based recreational activities can expose people to very low concentrations of aerosol-borne microcystins; we recently conducted another field study to assess exposures to higher concentrations of these algal toxins.

  6. Is Occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Exclusive Economic Zone of India on the Rise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence, increase in frequency, intensity and spatial coverage of harmful algal blooms during the past decade in the EEZ of India are documented here. Eighty algal blooms were recorded during the period 1998–2010. Of the eighty algal blooms, 31 blooms were formed by dinoflagellates, 27 by cyanobacteria, and 18 by diatoms. Three raphidophyte and one haptophyte blooms were also observed. Potentially toxic microalgae recorded from the Indian waters were Alexandrium spp., Gymnodinium spp. Dinophysis spp., Coolia monotis, Prorocentrum lima, and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Examination of available data from the literature during the last hundred years and in situ observations during 1998–2010 indicates clear-cut increase in the occurrence of HABs in the Indian EEZ.

  7. Remote sensing of algal blooms using a turbidity-free function for near-infrared and red signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a method for real- time mapping of algal blooms in turbid coastal waters using the remote sensing reflectance of red band (Channel 1, 580-680 nm) and near-infrared band (Channel 2, 720-1100 nm) of the AVHRR sensor on the NOAA series satellites. A turbidity-free function for near-infrared and red signals, α0 = (bb(1)/bb(2))(a(2)/ a(1)) based on the first order bb/(a+bb) model deducing equation Rrs(2)-1 =α0 Rrs(1)-1+ g-1 (1-α0), were selected as a chlorophyll-a related index for detecting algal blooms, and the algal blooms with chlorophyll-a concentration of 64-256 mg/L could be defined by window of 1.6 <α0 < 5.2 and 0.01< Rrs(2)/g < 0.2. Such turbidity-free two-band method is supported by both sea-truth data and remote sensing experiment for an algal blooms event on the near-shore water off the Minjiang estuary of southeastern China during early June of 2003. Comparisons of this algorithm with other published algorithms, one-band method (i.e. method of bright water) or two-band methods (i.e. method of ratio, method of NDVI, and method of subtracting) have suggested that the turbidity-free function method could be regarded as a standard algorithm in capabilities of AVHRR imagery or other high resolution but wide near-infrared and red band imagery for detecting algal blooms events in coastal waters.

  8. Indian satellite IRS-P4 (OCEANSAT). Monitoring algal blooms in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Bhat, S.R.; Dwivedi, R.M.; Nayak, S.R.

    While there have been a number of reports on occurrences of algal blooms in the coastal waters of India, the observation on large scale Noctiluca bloom during FORV Sagar Sampada cruises (years 2003 and 2004), forms the first report from NE Arabian...

  9. Marine harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing: challenges and opportunities in the 21st century

    OpenAIRE

    Berdalet, Elisa; Fleming, Lora E.; GOWEN, RICHARD; Davidson, Keith; Hess, Philipp; Backer, Lorraine C; Moore, Stephanie K; Hoagland, Porter; ENEVOLDSEN, HENRIK

    2015-01-01

    Microalgal blooms are a natural part of the seasonal cycle of photosynthetic organisms in marine ecosystems. They are key components of the structure and dynamics of the oceans and thus sustain the benefits that humans obtain from these aquatic environments. However, some microalgal blooms can cause harm to humans and other organisms. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) have direct impacts on human health and negative influences on human wellbeing, mainly through their consequences to coastal e...

  10. Impacts of algal blooms removal by chitosan-modified soils on zooplankton community in Taihu Lake,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiajia Ni; Yuhe Yu; Weisong Feng; Qingyun Yan; Gang pan; Bo Yang; Xiang Zhang; Xuemei Li

    2010-01-01

    It is important to assess the effect on zooplankton when perform the environmental protection or restoration technology,especially removing algal blooms,because algae were the major primary producer in algal lakes.The influence on zooplankton community after half a year of algal blooms removed by chitosan-modified soils in Taihu Lake was assessed and the rationality of carrying out the process semiannually was evaluated in the present study.Morphological composition and genetic diversity of zooplankton community were investigated by microscope checkup and polymerase chain reaction-denatured gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE).A total of 44 zooplankton taxa (23 protozoa,17 rotifers,3 copepoda and 1 cladocera) were detected by microscope checkup,and a total of 91 bands (28 bands amplified by primers F1427-GC and R1616,63 bands amplified by primers Fung-G-C and NS1) were detected by PCR-DGGE.The results of cluster analysis or detrended correspondence analysis indicated that there was no considerable difference in morphological composition of zooplankton and DGGE profiles between experimental and control sites,and DGGE profiles could represent the biologic diversity.The study showed that zooplankton community could recover original condition after half year of algal blooms removed by chitosan-modified soils and it was acceptable to apply this process semiannually.In addition,the results revealed that PCR-DGGE could be applied to investigate the impacts of the environmental protection or restoration engineering on zooplankton community diversity.

  11. Remote Sensing Marine Ecology: Wind-driven algal blooms in the open oceans and their ecological impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g., Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actually the traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms. Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing, this study: 1), introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; 2), Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. 3), Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. 1), It proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combing "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. 2), A new interdisciplinary subject "Remote Sensing Marine Ecology"(RSME) has been

  12. Approaches to monitoring, control and management of harmful algal blooms (HABs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald M

    2009-07-01

    Virtually every coastal country in the world is affected by harmful algal blooms (HABs, commonly called "red tides"). These phenomena are caused by blooms of microscopic algae. Some of these algae are toxic, and can lead to illness and death in humans, fish, seabirds, marine mammals, and other oceanic life, typically as a result of the transfer of toxins through the food web. Sometimes the direct release of toxic compounds can be lethal to marine animals. Non-toxic HABs cause damage to ecosystems, fisheries resources, and recreational facilities, often due to the sheer biomass of the accumulated algae. The term "HAB" also applies to non-toxic blooms of macroalgae (seaweeds), which can cause major ecological impacts such as the displacement of indigenous species, habitat alteration and oxygen depletion in bottom waters.Globally, the nature of the HAB problem has changed considerably over the last several decades. The number of toxic blooms, the resulting economic losses, the types of resources affected, and the number of toxins and toxic species have all increased dramatically. Some of this expansion has been attributed to storms, currents and other natural phenomena, but human activities are also frequently implicated. Humans have contributed by transporting toxic species in ballast water, and by adding massive and increasing quantities of industrial, agricultural and sewage effluents to coastal waters. In many urbanized coastal regions, these inputs have altered the size and composition of the nutrient pool which has, in turn, created a more favorable nutrient environment for certain HAB species. The steady expansion in the use of fertilizers for agricultural production represents a large and worrisome source of nutrients in coastal waters that promote some HABs.The diversity in HAB species and their impacts presents a significant challenge to those responsible for the management of coastal resources. Furthermore, HABs are complex oceanographic phenomena that

  13. Potentially harmful microalgae and algal blooms in a eutrophic estuary in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TAS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of potentially harmful microalgae and algal blooms were investigated at monthly and weekly time scales between October 2009 and September 2010 in the Golden Horn, a eutrophic estuary in the Sea of Marmara (Turkey. Several physical and chemical parameters were analysed together with phytoplankton composition and abundance. A total number of 23 potentially harmful and/or bloom-forming microalgae (14 dinoflagellates, 4 diatoms and 5 phytoflagellates were identified throughout this study period, of which nine taxa have been confirmed to be toxic elsewhere in the world. Most harmful species and algal blooms were observed in late spring and summer particularly in the middle and upper estuaries, and nine taxa formed dense and successive algal blooms causing water discoloration. Nutrient concentrations increased significantly from the lower to the upper estuary. Additionally, high organic matter loads in the upper estuary could also have benefited by mixotrophic species. The increasing number of potentially harmful and bloom-forming species and algal blooms indicated that the GHE is a potential risk area for future HABs. 

  14. Fish sound production in the presence of harmful algal blooms in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie C Wall

    Full Text Available This paper presents the first known research to examine sound production by fishes during harmful algal blooms (HABs. Most fish sound production is species-specific and repetitive, enabling passive acoustic monitoring to identify the distribution and behavior of soniferous species. Autonomous gliders that collect passive acoustic data and environmental data concurrently can be used to establish the oceanographic conditions surrounding sound-producing organisms. Three passive acoustic glider missions were conducted off west-central Florida in October 2011, and September and October 2012. The deployment period for two missions was dictated by the presence of red tide events with the glider path specifically set to encounter toxic Karenia brevis blooms (a.k.a red tides. Oceanographic conditions measured by the glider were significantly correlated to the variation in sounds from six known or suspected species of fish across the three missions with depth consistently being the most significant factor. At the time and space scales of this study, there was no detectable effect of red tide on sound production. Sounds were still recorded within red tide-affected waters from species with overlapping depth ranges. These results suggest that the fishes studied here did not alter their sound production nor migrate out of red tide-affected areas. Although these results are preliminary because of the limited measurements, the data and methods presented here provide a proof of principle and could serve as protocol for future studies on the effects of algal blooms on the behavior of soniferous fishes. To fully capture the effects of episodic events, we suggest that stationary or vertically profiling acoustic recorders and environmental sampling be used as a complement to glider measurements.

  15. Integrative Indicator for Assessing the Alert Levels of Algal Bloom in Lakes: Lake Taihu as a Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qinqin; Hu, Weiping; Zhai, Shuhua

    2016-01-01

    Algal blooms have recently become one of the most serious environmental problems in eutrophic freshwater ecosystems worldwide. Although many observation and simulation approaches have been applied to predict algal blooms, few studies have addressed the alert levels of algal blooms using integrative indicators in a large lake with multiple service function and significant horizontal heterogeneity. This study developed an integrative indicator assessment system (IIAS) to rank the alert level of algal blooms. In the IIAS, algal biomass, area percentage, distance from drinking water intake points, distance from scenic zones and duration of algal bloom were used as indicators to calculate a comprehensive alert level, which was classified into five grades (Vigilance, Low, Moderate, High, and Severe). Lake Taihu was taken as a case study to assess the comprehensive alert level of algal blooms in 2007 and 2010. The comprehensive alert level showed obvious spatial-temporal patterns, with an acceptable accuracy in Lake Taihu. The comprehensive alert levels were relatively higher in typical phytoplankton subzones than typical hydrophytes subzones and are more sensitive to weight factor in the northern and western subzones where high biomass usually occurs. Case study showed a very good application of the proposed comprehensive alert level assessment methodology, which can be adjusted to predict the degree of hazard of algal blooms in multi-service function large lakes to help the government and decision makers to act to prevent the disaster from algal bloom spreading.

  16. Are interactive effects of harmful algal blooms and copper pollution a concern for water quality management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; Asselman, Jana; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-09-01

    Toxicity of mixtures of stressors is one of the major challenges in water quality management. Yet until now risk assessment focuses almost exclusively on the effect characterization of individual stressors. An important concern is the potential interactive effects of cyanobacteria, sometimes referred to as harmful algal blooms, with chemical stressors. Here, we evaluated the response of two clones of the freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna to the combined effects of five cyanobacteria and copper. The latter remains the most commonly applied chemical algaecide and is also often detected in eutrophic run-offs that promote harmful algal blooms. Because the different cyanobacteria studied here have known modes of action that are similar, as well as dissimilar compared to the known modes of actions of copper, we based our assessment on two widely used reference models, i.e. the Concentration Addition (CA) model for similarly acting stressors and the Independent Action (IA) model for dissimilarly acting stressors. We highlight four major findings. First, the conclusions drawn on the interaction type (non-interaction vs. synergism or antagonism) between either of the five cyanobacteria species and copper were the same for both D. magna clones. Second, the interaction type differed between the Microcystis + copper mixture (non-interaction according to CA and synergism according to IA) and the four other cyanobacteria + copper mixtures (antagonism according to CA and non-interaction according to IA). Third, both reference models provided reasonable predictions for all observed mixture toxicities. Fourth, we consistently obtained different results with the IA reference model compared to the CA model. More specifically, mixtures of Cu and Microcystis were synergistic with IA whereas non-interaction was observed with CA, while the remaining four cyanobacteria + copper combinations all displayed non-interaction with IA and antagonism with CA. Despite the IA reference

  17. Arctic spring awakening - Steering principles behind the phenology of vernal ice algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, E.; Mundy, C. J.; Assmy, P.; Campbell, K.; Gabrielsen, T. M.; Gosselin, M.; Juul-Pedersen, T.; Gradinger, R.

    2015-12-01

    Marine ecosystems at high latitudes are characterized by extreme seasonal changes in light conditions, as well as a limited period of high primary production during spring and early summer. As light returns at the end of winter to Arctic ice-covered seas, a first algal bloom takes place in the bottom layer of the sea ice. This bottom ice algae community develops through three distinct phases in the transition from winter to spring, starting with phase I, a predominantly net heterotroph community that has limited interaction with the pelagic or benthic realms. Phase II begins in the spring once light for photosynthesis becomes available at the ice bottom, although interaction with the water column and benthos remains limited. The transition to the final phase III is then mainly driven by a balance of atmospheric and oceanographic forcing that induce structural changes in the sea ice and ultimately the removal of algal biomass from the ice. Due to limited data availability an incomplete understanding exists of all the processes determining ice algal bloom phenology and the considerable geographic differences in sympagic algal standing stocks and primary production. We present here the first pan-Arctic compilation of available time-series data on vernal sea ice algal bloom development and identify the most important factors controlling its development and termination. Using data from the area surrounding Resolute Bay (Nunavut, Canada) as an example, we support previous investigations that snow cover on top of the ice influences sea ice algal phenology, with highest biomass development, but also earliest termination of blooms, under low snow cover. We also provide a pan-Arctic overview of sea ice algae standing stocks and primary production, and discuss the pertinent processes behind the geographic differences we observed. Finally, we assess potential future changes in vernal algal bloom phenology as a consequence of climate change, including their importance to

  18. Numerical Mesocosm Experimental Study on Harmful Algal Blooms of Two Algal Species in the East China Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangsheng Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available From the results of algal culture and mesocosm experiments, a numerical mesocosm experiment is designed that accounts for the effect of the marine environment (sea currents, nutrient levels, and temperature on the harmful algal bloom (HAB processes of Skeletonema costatum and Prorocentrum donghaiense, two of the most frequent HAB-associated species in the East China Sea. Physical and ecological environment of the waters is simulated numerically by applying a hydrodynamic-ecological-one-way-coupled marine culture box model, which is semienclosed. The algal growth rate is digitalized by a temperature-factor-optimization Droop equation. A 90-mode-day numerical mesocosm experiment for the above two species is conducted. The species were found to alternately trigger algal blooms in the experimental waters, replicating the population succession phenomenon observed in the field and confirming that the two HAB species compete for nutrients. Deductively, the numerical result shows that both the Taiwan Warm Current and the eutrophication in the adjacent water of the Yangtze River Estuary contribute to the northward movement of algal concentration centers during HAB and also suggests that the lack of nutritious supplements in the open sea limits HAB occurrences in coastal waters.

  19. Potentials for Indication of Potentially Harmful Toxic Algal Blooms Using PROBA1-CHRIS Hyperspectral Imagery- A Case Study in Burkina Faso

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiermann, Timo

    2010-12-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an issue affecting water quality and can cause harmful health impacts. The aim of the conducted case study is to assess such blooms by chlorophyll a and phycocyanin detection as indicators of the occurrence. Using demonstrated single reflectance ratio algorithms published as in [7] and processed with provided tools for hyperspectral Proba1-CHRIS imagery in a study site including Loumbila reservoir near Ouagadougou, capital of Burkina Faso to investigate potentials of this approach.

  20. Recreational Exposure to Low Concentrations of Microcystins During an Algal Bloom in a Small Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Yung-Sung Cheng; Kieszak, Stephanie M.; Hill, Vincent R.; Kate Nierenberg; Johnson, Trisha B.; Yue Zhou; Mitch Irvin; Christopher Williams; Barbara Kirkpatrick; Wayne Carmichael; Backer, Lorraine C.

    2008-01-01

    We measured microcystins in blood from people at risk for swallowing water or inhaling spray while swimming, water skiing, jet skiing, or boating during an algal bloom. We monitored water samples from a small lake as a Microcystis aeruginosa bloom developed. We recruited 97 people planning recreational activities in that lake and seven others who volunteered to recreate in a nearby bloom-free lake. We conducted our field study within a week of finding a 10-μg/L microcystin concentration. W...

  1. How to estimate costs from harmful algal blooms : economic impacts on wild fisheries, aquaculture and commercial tourism

    OpenAIRE

    Lorentzen, Torbjørn; Pettersson, Lasse H.

    2005-01-01

    The background for the analysis is the increased registration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in different sea areas world wide. The frequency of algae blooms in for example Skagerrak and along the coast of Norway is relatively high. There exist about 4000 algae species, and the micro organisms play normally an important role in the ecosystem. But under certain conditions the algal can bloom and be harmful for other species and inflict economic losses. The report is addressed to methodological...

  2. Free polyamine content during algal bloom succession in the East China Sea in spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Li, Caiyan; Miao, Hui

    2016-03-01

    We measured the concentrations and distribution of major polyamines (spermine, putrescine and spermidine) in seawater during successive spring algal blooms in an area of frequent harmful blooms in the East China Sea. Spermine, putrescine, and spermidine concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and ranged from 1-64, 7-81, and 0-19 nmol/L. Spermine was present at the highest concentrations, followed by putrescine and spermidine. In late April, when a diatom bloom dominated by Skeletonema costatum dispersed, polyamine concentrations increased, presumably as a result of diatom decomposition. In early May, when a dinoflagellate bloom dominated by Prorocentrum donghaiense occurred, the polyamine concentration decreased from the level seen in late April. The abundant polyamines that decomposed and were released during the diatom bloom in late April may have promoted the growth of P. donghaiense, resulting in its dominance.

  3. Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on Several Lake Erie Drinking Water Treatment Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent events in Ohio have demonstrated the challenge treatment facilities face in providing safe drinking water when encountering extreme harmful algal bloom (HAB) events. Over the last two years the impact of HAB-related microcystins on several drinking water treatment facilit...

  4. Detection of cylindrospermopsin toxin markers in cyanobacterial algal blooms using analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and thermally-assisted hydrolysis and methylation (TCh-GC/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, V; Prieto, Ana I; Cameán, Ana M; González-Vila, F J; de la Rosa, J M; Vasconcelos, Vitor; González-Pérez, J A

    2014-08-01

    The hepatotoxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN) is produced by freshwater cyanobacteria becoming an emerging threat for human health. Methods for the rapid determination of CYN in environmental samples are needed. Conventional analytical pyrolysis (Py-GC/MS) and thermally-assisted hydrolysis and methylation (TCh-GC/MS) were used to study a CYN standard, two Aphanizomenon ovalisporum cultures (CYN+) and one culture of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (CYN-). A micro-furnace pyrolyzer was used directly attached to a GC/MS system fitted with a 30 m × 250 μm × 0.25 μm film thickness column (14% cyanopropyl phenyl, 86% dimethyl polysiloxane pahase composition). Oven temperature was held at 50 °C for 1 min and increased to 100 °C at 30 °C min(-1), from 100 °C to 300 °C at 10 °C min(-1), and stabilized at 300 °C for 10 min using helium (1 mL min(-1)) as carrier gas. Pyrolysis at 500 °C yield over 70 compounds with 20 specific for CYN+ samples. Two peaks containing a diagnostic fragment (m/z 194) were found at 25.0 and 28.9 min only in CYN+ samples. Fewer peaks with limited diagnostic value were released after TCh-GC/MS, including breakdown products and TMAH adducts. A compound was detected that may correspond to the CYN molecule (MW 415 Da) thermoevaporation product after the loss of SO3 (MW 80 Da). This TCh-GC/MS peak (m/z 336) together with the fragments obtained by conventional Py-GC/MS (m/z 194) are diagnostic ions with potential use for the direct detection of CYN toxin in environmental samples at last with an estimated 5 ppm detection threshold. PMID:24530162

  5. Feasibility test to control algal bloom using electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts were made to assess the feasibility to control algal growth using electron beam irradiation. Fresh water algae (e.g. Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp., Microcystis sp., Anabaena sp., Oscillatoria sp.) and sea water red algae (e.g. Procentrium minimum, Lingulodinium polyedra, Cochlodinium polykrikoides, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Procentrium micans) were cultured in laboratory and irradiated at different dose of 1.0-10kGy by ELV-4 model electron beam accelerator. The results indicated that in spite of low dose, electron beam irradiation have a great effect on the algal photosynthetic activity; especially for sea water red algae, approximately 40% reduction in chlorophyll-a concentration was observed right after electron beam irradiation at 1.0kGy. Decrease in photosynthetic activity of sea water red algae was more pronounced than that of fresh water algae. With regard to fresh water algae, blue green algae(e.g. Microcystis sp., Oscillatoria sp.) was more vulnerable to electron beam exposure than green algae(e.g. Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus sp.). It is interesting to observe that complete bioflocculation marked by cell aggregation and rapid settling of fresh water algae occurred within 2 days after electron beam irradiation. Continuous mixing was one of the important factors to induce algal bioflocculation. Algal removal and settleable matter production were found to be proportional to irradiation dose and mixing intensity. It is likely that electron beam irradiation damages cell contents including chlorophyll-a, releasing extracellular biopolymer that can be used for inducing bioflocculation. (author)

  6. Novel Insights on the Dynamics and Consequence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the California Current System: From Parasites as Bloom Control Agents to Human Toxin Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Mazzillo, Fernanda da Frota Mattos

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation provided novel insights on the dynamics and consequences of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the California Current System (CCS). Parasitism is described as a biological control agent of harmful dinoflagellate blooms and referred to as a novel factor influencing HAB dynamics in coastal upwelling environments. Chapter 1 documented, for the first time, the presence of Amoebophrya, an endoparasitic dinoflagellate that infects and kills 7 bloom-forming dinoflagellate host species ...

  7. Nitrogen deposition fuels harmful algal blooms in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.; Kavanaugh, M.; Chien, C. T.; Chen, Y.; Glover, D. M.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chinese marginal seas support vast fisheries and vital economies, but their productivity is threatened by eutrophication and increasing harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here we provide direct experimental evidence that aerosol enrichment shifts seawater chemistry by increasing the ratio of N to phosphorus (N:P) and supports the growth of bloom-forming phytoplankton in the East China Sea. We use a combination of field-based aerosol addition incubation experiments, along with ocean color data on blooms dominated by different taxa to show that HAB forming dinoflagellates are particularly responsive to aerosol inputs. Moreover, we show that the effect of N deposition is strongest in offshore waters further from the Yangtze River outflow, consistent with the large anthropogenic flux of N from this source. This study shows the potential for aerosols to control N:P ratios in offshore waters and to shape the phytoplankton community, contributing to the success of bloom-forming organisms.

  8. The efficacy and mechanisms of fungal suppression of freshwater harmful algal bloom species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Yong; Han Guomin; Wang Congyan; Guo Peng; Jiang Wenxin; Li Xiaona [School of Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China); Tian Xingjun, E-mail: tianxj@nju.edu.cn [School of Life Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Microorganisms have attracted worldwide attention as possible agents for inhibiting water blooms. Algae are usually indirectly inhibited and degraded by secretion from microorganisms. In this study, algal cultures Microcystis aeruginosa (Ma) FACH-918, Microcystis flos-aquae (Mf) FACH-1028, Oocystis borgei (Ob) FACH-1108, and M. aeruginosa PCC 7806 were co-cultured with the fungus strain Trichaptum abietinum 1302BG. All algal cells were destroyed within 48 hours (h) of co-incubation. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope observation revealed that the fungal strain had preying ability on the algal cells. The mechanism may be that the algal cells were encased with a mucous membrane secreted by the fungal mycelia, and finally degraded by the fungus directly.

  9. Great Lakes Hyperspectral Water Quality Instrument Suite for Airborne Monitoring of Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekki, John; Leshkevich, George; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Flatico, Joseph; Prokop, Norman; Kojima, Jun; Anderson, Robert; Demers, James; Krasowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center and NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab are collaborating to utilize an airborne hyperspectral imaging sensor suite to monitor Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in the western basin of Lake Erie. The HABs are very dynamic events as they form, spread and then disappear within a 4 to 8 week time period in late summer. They are a concern for human health, fish and wildlife because they can contain blue green toxic algae. Because of this toxicity there is a need for the blooms to be continually monitored. This situation is well suited for aircraft based monitoring because the blooms are a very dynamic event and they can spread over a large area. High resolution satellite data is not suitable by itself because it will not give the temporal resolution due to the infrequent overpasses of the quickly changing blooms. A custom designed hyperspectral imager and a point spectrometer mounted on aT 34 aircraft have been used to obtain data on an algal bloom that formed in the western basin of Lake Erie during September 2006. The sensor suite and operations will be described and preliminary hyperspectral data of this event will be presented

  10. Approaches to monitoring, control and management of harmful algal blooms (HABs)

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Donald M.

    2009-01-01

    Virtually every coastal country in the world is affected by harmful algal blooms (HABs, commonly called “red tides”). These phenomena are caused by blooms of microscopic algae. Some of these algae are toxic, and can lead to illness and death in humans, fish, seabirds, marine mammals, and other oceanic life, typically as a result of the transfer of toxins through the food web. Sometimes the direct release of toxic compounds can be lethal to marine animals. Non-toxic HABs cause damage to ecosys...

  11. Evidence for a novel marine harmful algal bloom: cyanotoxin (microcystin transfer from land to sea otters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A Miller

    Full Text Available "Super-blooms" of cyanobacteria that produce potent and environmentally persistent biotoxins (microcystins are an emerging global health issue in freshwater habitats. Monitoring of the marine environment for secondary impacts has been minimal, although microcystin-contaminated freshwater is known to be entering marine ecosystems. Here we confirm deaths of marine mammals from microcystin intoxication and provide evidence implicating land-sea flow with trophic transfer through marine invertebrates as the most likely route of exposure. This hypothesis was evaluated through environmental detection of potential freshwater and marine microcystin sources, sea otter necropsy with biochemical analysis of tissues and evaluation of bioaccumulation of freshwater microcystins by marine invertebrates. Ocean discharge of freshwater microcystins was confirmed for three nutrient-impaired rivers flowing into the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, and microcystin concentrations up to 2,900 ppm (2.9 million ppb were detected in a freshwater lake and downstream tributaries to within 1 km of the ocean. Deaths of 21 southern sea otters, a federally listed threatened species, were linked to microcystin intoxication. Finally, farmed and free-living marine clams, mussels and oysters of species that are often consumed by sea otters and humans exhibited significant biomagnification (to 107 times ambient water levels and slow depuration of freshwater cyanotoxins, suggesting a potentially serious environmental and public health threat that extends from the lowest trophic levels of nutrient-impaired freshwater habitat to apex marine predators. Microcystin-poisoned sea otters were commonly recovered near river mouths and harbors and contaminated marine bivalves were implicated as the most likely source of this potent hepatotoxin for wild otters. This is the first report of deaths of marine mammals due to cyanotoxins and confirms the existence of a novel class of marine

  12. Cephalopods as Vectors of Harmful Algal Bloom Toxins in Marine Food Webs

    OpenAIRE

    Rui Rosa; Pedro Costa; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Ana Rita Lopes

    2013-01-01

    Here we summarize the current knowledge on the transfer and accumulation of harmful algal bloom (HAB)-related toxins in cephalopods (octopods, cuttlefishes and squids). These mollusks have been reported to accumulate several HAB-toxins, namely domoic acid (DA, and its isomers), saxitoxin (and its derivatives) and palytoxin (and palytoxin-like compounds) and, therefore, act as HAB-toxin vectors in marine food webs. Coastal octopods and cuttlefishes store considerably high levels of DA (amnesic...

  13. Monitoring of the 2011 Super Algal Bloom in Indian River Lagoon, FL, USA, Using MERIS

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Kamerosky; Hyun Jung Cho; Lori Morris

    2015-01-01

    During the spring of 2011 an unprecedented “Super” algal bloom formed in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL), with Chlorophyll a (Chl a) concentrations over eight times the historical mean in some areas and lasted for seven months across the IRL. The European Space Agency’s MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) platform provided multispectral data at 665 and 708 nm, which was used to quantify the phytoplankton Chl a by fluorescence while minimizing the effects of other water column constit...

  14. Fish Sound Production in the Presence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Carrie C Wall; Chad Lembke; Chuanmin Hu; Mann, David A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first known research to examine sound production by fishes during harmful algal blooms (HABs). Most fish sound production is species-specific and repetitive, enabling passive acoustic monitoring to identify the distribution and behavior of soniferous species. Autonomous gliders that collect passive acoustic data and environmental data concurrently can be used to establish the oceanographic conditions surrounding sound-producing organisms. Three passive acoustic glider ...

  15. Tracing the early development of harmful algal blooms with the aid of Lagrangian coherent structures

    CERN Document Server

    Olascoaga, M J; Brand, L E; Koçak, H

    2007-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed to explain the development of harmful algal blooms (HABs) produced by the toxic dinoflagellate \\emph{Karenia brevis} on the West Florida Shelf. However, because the early stages of HAB development are usually not detected, these theories have been so far very difficult to verify. In this paper we employ simulated \\emph{Lagrangian coherent structures} (LCSs) to trace the early location of a HAB in late 2004 before it was transported to an area where it could be detected by satellite imagery, and then we make use of a population dynamics model to infer the factors that may have led to its development. The LCSs, which are computed based on a surface flow description provided by an ocean circulation model, delineate past and future histories of boundaries of passively advected fluid domains. The population dynamics model determines nitrogen in two components, nutrients and phytoplankton, which are assumed to be passively advected by the simulated surface currents. Two nearshore...

  16. Satellite Remote Sensing of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs and a Potential Synthesized Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulin Guo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs are severe ecological disasters threatening aquatic systems throughout the World, which necessitate scientific efforts in detecting and monitoring them. Compared with traditional in situ point observations, satellite remote sensing is considered as a promising technique for studying HABs due to its advantages of large-scale, real-time, and long-term monitoring. The present review summarizes the suitability of current satellite data sources and different algorithms for detecting HABs. It also discusses the spatial scale issue of HABs. Based on the major problems identified from previous literature, including the unsystematic understanding of HABs, the insufficient incorporation of satellite remote sensing, and a lack of multiple oceanographic explanations of the mechanisms causing HABs, this review also attempts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the complicated mechanism of HABs impacted by multiple oceanographic factors. A potential synthesized framework can be established by combining multiple accessible satellite remote sensing approaches including visual interpretation, spectra analysis, parameters retrieval and spatial-temporal pattern analysis. This framework aims to lead to a systematic and comprehensive monitoring of HABs based on satellite remote sensing from multiple oceanographic perspectives.

  17. Satellite remote sensing of harmful algal blooms (HABs) and a potential synthesized framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Li; Xu, Huiping; Guo, Xulin

    2012-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are severe ecological disasters threatening aquatic systems throughout the World, which necessitate scientific efforts in detecting and monitoring them. Compared with traditional in situ point observations, satellite remote sensing is considered as a promising technique for studying HABs due to its advantages of large-scale, real-time, and long-term monitoring. The present review summarizes the suitability of current satellite data sources and different algorithms for detecting HABs. It also discusses the spatial scale issue of HABs. Based on the major problems identified from previous literature, including the unsystematic understanding of HABs, the insufficient incorporation of satellite remote sensing, and a lack of multiple oceanographic explanations of the mechanisms causing HABs, this review also attempts to provide a comprehensive understanding of the complicated mechanism of HABs impacted by multiple oceanographic factors. A potential synthesized framework can be established by combining multiple accessible satellite remote sensing approaches including visual interpretation, spectra analysis, parameters retrieval and spatial-temporal pattern analysis. This framework aims to lead to a systematic and comprehensive monitoring of HABs based on satellite remote sensing from multiple oceanographic perspectives. PMID:22969372

  18. Characterisation of transparent exopolymer particles (TEP) produced during algal bloom: A membrane treatment perspective

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2013-01-01

    Algal blooms are currently a major concern of the membrane industry as it generates massive concentrations of organic matter (e.g. transparent exopolymer particles [TEP]), which can adversely affect the operation of membrane filtration systems. The goal of this study is to understand the production, composition and membrane rejection of these organic materials using different characterisation techniques. Two common species of bloom-forming freshwater and marine algae were cultivated in batch cultures for 30days and the productions of TEP and other organic matter were monitored at different growth phases. TEP production of the marine diatom, Chaetoceros affinis, produced 6-9 times more TEP than the freshwater blue-green algae, Microcystis. The organic substances produced by both algal species were dominated by biopolymeric substances such as polysaccharides (45-64%) and proteins (2-17%) while the remaining fraction comprises of low molecular weight refractory (humic-like) and/ or biogenic organic substances. MF/UF membranes mainly rejected the biopolymers but not the low molecular weight organic materials. MF membranes (0.1-0.4 lm) rejected 42-56% of biopolymers, while UF membranes (10-100 kDa) rejected 65-95% of these materials. Further analysis of rejected organic materials on the surface of the membranes revealed that polysac-charides and proteins are likely responsible for the fouling of MF/UF systems during an algal bloom situation. © 2013 Desalination Publications.

  19. A Harmful Algal Bloom of Karenia brevis in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico as Revealed by MODIS and VIIRS: A Comparison

    OpenAIRE

    Chuanmin Hu; Barnes, Brian B.; Lin Qi; Corcoran, Alina A.

    2015-01-01

    The most recent Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) is not equipped with a spectral band to detect solar-stimulated phytoplankton fluorescence. The lack of such a band may affect the ability of VIIRS to detect and quantify harmful algal blooms (HABs) in coastal waters rich in colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) because of the overlap of CDOM and chlorophyll absorption within the blue-green spectrum. A recent HAB dominated by the toxin-producing dinoflagellate Karenia brevis i...

  20. Monitoring of the 2011 Super Algal Bloom in Indian River Lagoon, FL, USA, Using MERIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Kamerosky

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available During the spring of 2011 an unprecedented “Super” algal bloom formed in the Indian River Lagoon (IRL, with Chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations over eight times the historical mean in some areas and lasted for seven months across the IRL. The European Space Agency’s MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS platform provided multispectral data at 665 and 708 nm, which was used to quantify the phytoplankton Chl a by fluorescence while minimizing the effects of other water column constituents. The three objectives were to: (1 calibrate and validate two Chl a algorithms using all available MERIS data of the IRL from 2002 to 2012; (2 determine the accuracy of the algorithms estimation of Chl a before, during, and after the 2011 super bloom; and (3 map the 2011 algal bloom using the Chl a algorithm that was proven to be effective in other similar estuaries. The chosen algorithm, Normalized Difference Chlorophyll Index (NDCI, was positively correlated with the in-situ measurements, with an R2 value of 0.798. While there was a significant (62.9 ± 25% underestimation of Chl a using MERIS NDCI, the underestimation appears to be consistent across the data and mostly in the estimations of lower concentrations, suggesting that a qualitative or ratio analysis is still valid. Analysis of the application of the NDCI processed MERIS data provided additional insights that the in-situ measurements were unable to record. The time series MERIS Chl a maps along with in-situ water quality monitoring data depicted that the 2011 IRL bloom started after a heavy rainfall in March 2011 and peaked in October 2011 after a decrease in temperature. The bloom collapse also coincided with heavy rainfall and rapidly decreasing temperatures and salinity through October to November 2011.

  1. Field and laboratory guide to freshwater cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms for Native American and Alaska Native communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Barry H.; Ann St. Amand

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria can produce toxins and form harmful algal blooms. The Native American and Alaska Native communities that are dependent on subsistence fishing have an increased risk of exposure to these cyanotoxins. It is important to recognize the presence of an algal bloom in a waterbody and to distinguish a potentially toxic harmful algal bloom from a non-toxic bloom. This guide provides field images that show cyanobacteria blooms, some of which can be toxin producers, as well as other non-toxic algae blooms and floating plants that might be confused with algae. After recognition of a potential toxin-producing cyanobacterial bloom in the field, the type(s) of cyanobacteria present needs to be identified. Species identification, which requires microscopic examination, may help distinguish a toxin-producer from a non-toxin producer. This guide also provides microscopic images of the common cyanobacteria that are known to produce toxins, as well as images of algae that form blooms but do not produce toxins.

  2. Quantifying Phycocyanin Concentration in Cyanobacterial Algal Blooms from Remote Sensing Reflectance-A Quasi Analytical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S.; Mishra, D. R.; Tucker, C.

    2011-12-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHAB) are notorious for depleting dissolved oxygen level, producing various toxins, causing threats to aquatic life, altering the food-web dynamics and the overall ecosystem functioning in inland lakes, estuaries, and coastal waters. Most of these algal blooms produce various toxins that can damage cells, tissues and even cause mortality of living organisms. Frequent monitoring of water quality in a synoptic scale has been possible by the virtue of remote sensing techniques. In this research, we present a novel technique to monitor CHAB using remote sensing reflectance products. We have modified a multi-band quasi analytical algorithm that determines phytoplankton absorption coefficients from above surface remote sensing reflectance measurements using an inversion method. In situ hyperspectral remote sensing reflectance data were collected from several highly turbid and productive aquaculture ponds. A novel technique was developed to further decompose the phytoplankton absorption coefficients at 620 nm and obtain phycocyanin absorption coefficient at the same wavelength. An empirical relationship was established between phycocyanin absorption coefficients at 620 nm and measured phycocyanin concentrations. Model calibration showed strong relationship between phycocyanin absorption coefficients and phycocyanin pigment concentration (r2=0.94). Validation of the model in a separate dataset produced a root mean squared error of 167 mg m-3 (phycocyanin range: 26-1012 mg m-3). Results demonstrate that the new approach will be suitable for quantifying phycocyanin concentration in cyanobacteria dominated turbid productive waters. Band architecture of the model matches with the band configuration of the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and assures that MERIS reflectance products can be used to quantify phycocyanin in cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms in optically complex waters.

  3. Remote Sensing as a Tool to Track Algal Blooms in the Great Salt Lake, Utah, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, S. R.; Wurtsbaugh, W. A.; Naftz, D.; Moore, T.; Haney, J.

    2006-12-01

    The Great Salt Lake is a large hypersaline, terminal water body in northern Utah, USA. The lake has both a significant economic importance to the local community as a source of brine shrimp and mineral resources, as well as, an ecological importance to large numbers of migratory waterfowl. Due to nutrient input from sewage treatment plants, sections of the Great Salt Lake are subjected to highly eutrophic conditions. One of the main tributaries, Farmington Bay, experiences massive blooms of cyanobacteria which can reach concentrations in excess of 300 mg l-1 in the bay. Effects of these blooms can be observed stretching into the rest of the lake. The detrimental outcomes of the blooms include unsightly scums, foul odor and the danger of cyanobacterial toxins. While the blooms have an obvious effect on Farmington Bay, it is quite possible that the cyanobacteria impact a much wider area of the lake as currents move eutrophic water masses. Of particular interest is the reaction of brine shrimp to the plumes of cyanobacteria-rich water leaving Farmington Bay. We are employing remote sensing as a tool to map the distribution of algae throughout the lake and produce lake-wide maps of water quality on a regular basis. On-lake reflectance measurements have been coupled with MODIS satellite imagery to produce a time series of maps illustrating changes in algal distribution. The successes and shortcomings of our remote sensing technique will be a central topic of this presentation.

  4. Limnology of Oneida Lake with emphasis on factors contributing to algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeson, Phillip E.

    1971-01-01

    Oneida Lake is a naturally eutrophic lake that has existed for about 10,500 years. It has been in a eutrophic state for at least 350 years, and the geochemically derived dissolved materials entering the lake from the drainage basin are of sufficient quantity (449,700 tones per year) to support annual algal blooms. The greatest amount of the dissolved materials (72 percent) comes from the southern tributaries to the lake, of which Chittenango Creek carries the largest load of almost all major chemical substances. The stream contributes 37 percent of all dissolved solids entering the lake. Ground water is negligible in both the water and the nutrient budgets.

  5. Harmful algal blooms in the PICES region of the North Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Foreword Background and objectives [pdf, 0.84 MB] Country reviews and status reports Section I. Western North Pacific Japan Yasuwo Fukuyo, Ichiro Imai, Masaaki Kodama and Kyoichi Tamai Red tides and harmful algal blooms in Japan [pdf, 0.7 MB] People's Republic of China Tian Yan, Ming-Jiang Zhou and Jing-Zhong Zou A national report of HABs in China [pdf, 0.24 MB] Republic of Korea Sam Geun Lee, Hak Gyoon Kim, Eon Seob Cho and Chang Kyu Lee Harmful ...

  6. Applications of MODIS Fluorescent Line Height Measurements to Monitor Water Quality Trends and Algal Bloom Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Andrew; Moreno-Mardinan, Max; Ryan, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in satellite and airborne remote sensing, such as improvements in sensor and algorithm calibrations, processing techniques and atmospheric correction procedures have provided for increased coverage of remote-sensing, ocean-color products for coastal regions. In particular, for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor calibration updates, improved aerosol retrievals and new aerosol models has led to improved atmospheric correction algorithms for turbid waters and have improved the retrieval of ocean color in coastal waters. This has opened the way for studying ocean phenomena and processes at finer spatial scales, such as the interactions at the land-sea interface, trends in coastal water quality and algal blooms. Human population growth and changes in coastal management practices have brought about significant changes in the concentrations of organic and inorganic, particulate and dissolved substances entering the coastal ocean. There is increasing concern that these inputs have led to declines in water quality and have increase local concentrations of phytoplankton, which cause harmful algal blooms. In two case studies we present MODIS observations of fluorescence line height (FLH) to 1) assess trends in water quality for Tampa Bay, Florida and 2) illustrate seasonal and annual variability of algal bloom activity in Monterey Bay, California as well as document estuarine/riverine plume induced red tide events. In a comprehensive analysis of long term (2003-2011) in situ monitoring data and satellite imagery from Tampa Bay we assess the validity of the MODIS FLH product against chlorophyll-a and a suite of water quality parameters taken in a variety of conditions throughout a large optically complex estuarine system. A systematic analysis of sampling sites throughout the bay is undertaken to understand how the relationship between FLH and in situ chlorophyll-a responds to varying conditions and to develop a near decadal trend in

  7. Future Climate Impacts on Harmful Algal Blooms in an Agriculturally Dominated Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloysius, N. R.; Martin, J.; Ludsin, S.; Stumpf, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Cyanobacteria blooms have become a major problem worldwide in aquatic ecosystems that receive excessive runoff of limiting nutrients from terrestrial drainage. Such blooms often are considered harmful because they degrade ecosystem services, threaten public health, and burden local economies. Owing to changing agricultural land-use practices, Lake Erie, the most biologically productive of the North American Great Lakes, has begun to undergo a re-eutrophication in which the frequency and extent of harmful algal blooms (HABs) has increased. Continued climate change has been hypothesized to magnify the HAB problem in Lake Erie in the absence of new agricultural management practices, although this hypothesis has yet to be formally tested empirically. Herein, we tested this hypothesis by predicting how the frequency and extent of potentially harmful cyanobacteria blooms will change in Lake Erie during the 21st century under the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Fifth Assessment climate projections in the region. To do so, we used 80 ensembles of climate projections from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) and two greenhouse gas emission scenarios (moderate reduction, RCP4.5; business-as-usual, RCP8.5) to drive a spatiotemporally explicit watershed-hydrology model that was linked to several statistical predictive models of annual cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Erie. Owing to anticipated increases in precipitation during spring and warmer temperatures during summer, our ensemble of predictions revealed that, if current land-management practices continue, the frequency of severe HABs in Lake Erie will increase during the 21st century. These findings identify a real need to consider future climate projections when developing nutrient reduction strategies in the short term, with adaptation also needing to be encouraged under both greenhouse gas emissions scenarios in the absence of effective nutrient mitigation strategies.

  8. MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF ALGAL BLOOMS IN ARAS DAM BY ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAHANGIRI-RAD MAHSA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Man made practices have contributed to large-scale algal blooms that have caused serious ecological, aesthetic, water purification and water distribution problems. Aras Dam, which provides Arasful city with drinking water, has chronic algal blooms since 1990. This study addresses the use of artificial neural network (ANN model to anticipate the chlorophyll-a concentration in water of dam reservoir. Operation tests carried out by collecting water samples from 5 stations and examined for physical quality parameters namely: water temperature, total suspended solids (TSS, biochemical oxygen demands (BOD, ortophosphate, total phosphorous and nitrate concentrations using standard methods. Chlorophyll-a was also checked separately in order to investigate the accuracy of the predicted results by ANN. The results showed that a network was highly accurate in predicting the Chl-a concentration. A good agreement between actual data and the ANN outputs for training was observed, indicating the validation of testing data sets. The initial results of the research indicate that the dam is enriched with nutrients (phosphorus and nitrogen. The Chl-a concentration that were predicted by the model were beyond the standard levels; indicating the possibility of eutrophication especially during fall season.

  9. Receptor binding assay technique for harmful algal bloom toxins quantification: reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of reference manual of procedures for distribution to laboratories engaged in shellfish toxicity research and monitoring activities and this manual is a contribution to the regional project which was funded by the Philippine Department of Science and Technology and produced by the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. The main objectives of the project are the transfer of the receptor assay technology to interested Member States and the establishment of the receptor assay method in these laboratories and these objectives address the need for a rapid and sensitive assay to complement and replace the current live mouse bioassay in order to enhance shellfish toxicity monitoring program and improve the management of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Towards these objectives, a Regional (RCA) Training Workshop on Receptor Binding Assay Techniques for Harmful Algal Bloom Toxins Quantification was conducted at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) from 29 Nov - 04 Dec 1999 and it aimed to train the RCA Member States representatives in neuroreceptor binding assays for paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins as an alternative method to mouse bioassay

  10. Eutrophication and algal blooms in channel type reservoirs: A novel enclosure experiment by changing light intensity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengjin Cao; Binghui Zheng; Zhenlou Chen; Minsheng Huang; Jialei Zhang

    2011-01-01

    To explore eutrophication and algal bloom mechanisms in channel type reservoirs,a novel enclosure experiment was conducted by changing light intensity (LI) in the Daning River of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR).Square enclosures (side 5.0 m) were covered on the surface with shading materials of different thickness,and with their bases open to the river.Changes and characteristics of the main eutrophication factors under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions but different LI were evaluated.All experimental water samples were neutral and alkalescent,with high nitrogen and phosphate concentrations,low potassium permanganate index,stable water quality,and different LI.At the same water depth,LI decreased with increasing shade material,while dissolved oxygen and water temperature were both stable.The growth peak of phytoplankton was with light of 345-4390 lux underwater or 558-7450lux above the water surface,and water temperature of 25.6-26.5℃.Algae were observed in all water samples,accounting for 6 phylum and 57 species,with algal density changing frequently.The results showed that significantly strong or weak light was unfavorable for phytoplankton growth and the function together with suitable temperature and LI and ample sunshine encouraged algal blooms under the same water quality and hydrodynamic conditions.Correlation analysis indicated that algae reduced gradually lengthwise along water depth in the same enclosure while pH became high.The power exponent relationship between chlorophyll a (Chl-a) and LI was found by curve fitting,that is Chi-a =K(LI)n.

  11. Meteorological and hydrological conditions driving the formation and disappearance of black blooms, an ecological disaster phenomena of eutrophication and algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Liu, Junjie; Deng, Jianming; Qin, Boqiang; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2016-11-01

    Potentially toxic black blooms can disrupt drinking water treatment plants and have fatal effects on aquatic ecosystems; therefore, lake management is required to determine whether conditions are favorable for the formation and disappearance of black blooms in water supply sources. Long-term climate background, short-term thresholds of meteorological and hydrological conditions, and the duration of harmful algal blooms (HABs) were investigated as factors affecting the formation and disappearance of black blooms in hyper-eutrophic Lake Taihu. Long-term climate warming (0.31°C/decade), decreases in wind speed (0.26m/s per decade) and air pressure (0.16hPa/decade), and the increase in the meteorological index of black blooms (3.6days/decade) in Lake Taihu over the past 51years provided climate conditions conducive to the formation and occurrence of black blooms. A total of 16 black bloom events with an area larger than 0.1km(2) were observed from 2007 to 2014. Several critical thresholds for short-term meteorological and hydrological conditions were determined for the formation of black blooms, including a five-day average air temperature above 25°C, a five-day average wind speed 5days. Heavy precipitation events, sudden cooling, and large wind disturbances were the driving factors of black blooms' disappearance. The use of a coupling model that combines the remote sensing of HABs with environmental, meteorological, and hydrological observations could permit an adequate and timely response to black blooms in drinking water sources. PMID:27396313

  12. Cyanobacteria Toxin and Cell Propagation through Seven Lake Erie Treatment Plants during the 2013 Algal Bloom Season - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over the past five years, Lake Erie has been experiencing harmful algal blooms (HABs) of progressively increasing severity. Cognizant of the potential health and economic impacts, the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (USEPA’s) Water Supply and Water Resources Divis...

  13. Interactions between algal-bacterial populations and trace metals in fjord surface waters during a nutrient stimulated summer bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, F.; Larsen, A.; Stedmon, C.; Søndergaard, M.

    2005-01-01

    We examined how variations in algal-bacterial community structure relate to Cu, Zn, and Mn speciation during a diatom-rich bloom that was induced by daily additions of inorganic macronutrients to fjord waters in August 2002. The experiments were carried out in 11-m3 floating mesocosm bags deployed...

  14. Evaluating Chlorophyll-a Changes During Algal Bloom in Three Gorges Reservoir Using an Extended WASP Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Algal bloom in Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR and one of its tributaries, Xiangxi River (XR, have become major concerns and the dynamic changes of such events were investigated using the hydrodynamic model SELFE and the extended Water Quality Analysis Simulation Program (WASP model to address nutrient and biomass dynamics. The model has taken into consideration the surface wind, heat fluxes, oxygen exchanges, solar radiations and boundary conditions from main river channel and tributaries. As an extension to our previous work, this study aimed to report in more detailed the result of chlorophyll-a simulations, where the field observed data of algal blooms in TGR in 2007 was used for calibration and the horizontal and vertical distributions of phytoplankton biomass (based on chlorophyll-a were presented. It was found that the chlorophyll-a concentration characterized as algal biomass was influenced by many complex factors. Further study results are yet to be reported.

  15. Progress in Understanding Harmful Algal Blooms: Paradigm Shifts and New Technologies for Research, Monitoring, and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Donald M.; Cembella, Allan D.; Hallegraeff, Gustaaf M.

    2012-01-01

    The public health, tourism, fisheries, and ecosystem impacts from harmful algal blooms (HABs) have all increased over the past few decades. This has led to heightened scientific and regulatory attention, and the development of many new technologies and approaches for research and management. This, in turn, is leading to significant paradigm shifts with regard to, e.g., our interpretation of the phytoplankton species concept (strain variation), the dogma of their apparent cosmopolitanism, the role of bacteria and zooplankton grazing in HABs, and our approaches to investigating the ecological and genetic basis for the production of toxins and allelochemicals. Increasingly, eutrophication and climate change are viewed and managed as multifactorial environmental stressors that will further challenge managers of coastal resources and those responsible for protecting human health. Here we review HAB science with an eye toward new concepts and approaches, emphasizing, where possible, the unexpected yet promising new directions that research has taken in this diverse field.

  16. A Multiscale Mapping Assessment of Lake Champlain Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Torbick

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lake Champlain has bays undergoing chronic cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms that pose a public health threat. Monitoring and assessment tools need to be developed to support risk decision making and to gain a thorough understanding of bloom scales and intensities. In this research application, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI, Rapid Eye, and Proba Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS images were obtained while a corresponding field campaign collected in situ measurements of water quality. Models including empirical band ratio regressions were applied to map chlorophylla and phycocyanin concentrations; all sensors performed well with R2 and root-mean-square error (RMSE ranging from 0.76 to 0.88 and 0.42 to 1.51, respectively. The outcomes showed spatial patterns across the lake with problematic bays having phycocyanin concentrations >25 μg/L. An alert status metric tuned to the current monitoring protocol was generated using modeled water quality to illustrate how the remote sensing tools can inform a public health monitoring system. Among the sensors utilized in this study, Landsat 8 OLI holds the most promise for providing exposure information across a wide area given the resolutions, systematic observation strategy and free cost.

  17. A Multiscale Mapping Assessment of Lake Champlain Cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torbick, Nathan; Corbiere, Megan

    2015-09-01

    Lake Champlain has bays undergoing chronic cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms that pose a public health threat. Monitoring and assessment tools need to be developed to support risk decision making and to gain a thorough understanding of bloom scales and intensities. In this research application, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI), Rapid Eye, and Proba Compact High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) images were obtained while a corresponding field campaign collected in situ measurements of water quality. Models including empirical band ratio regressions were applied to map chlorophylla and phycocyanin concentrations; all sensors performed well with R² and root-mean-square error (RMSE) ranging from 0.76 to 0.88 and 0.42 to 1.51, respectively. The outcomes showed spatial patterns across the lake with problematic bays having phycocyanin concentrations >25 μg/L. An alert status metric tuned to the current monitoring protocol was generated using modeled water quality to illustrate how the remote sensing tools can inform a public health monitoring system. Among the sensors utilized in this study, Landsat 8 OLI holds the most promise for providing exposure information across a wide area given the resolutions, systematic observation strategy and free cost. PMID:26389930

  18. Genomewide investigation of adaptation to harmful algal blooms in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammen, Kristina M; Schultz, Thomas F; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2015-09-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs), which can be lethal in marine species and cause illness in humans, are increasing worldwide. In the Gulf of Mexico, HABs of Karenia brevis produce neurotoxic brevetoxins that cause large-scale marine mortality events. The long history of such blooms, combined with the potentially severe effects of exposure, may have produced a strong selective pressure for evolved resistance. Advances in next-generation sequencing, in particular genotyping-by-sequencing, greatly enable the genomic study of such adaptation in natural populations. We used restriction site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to investigate brevetoxicosis resistance in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). To improve our understanding of the epidemiology and aetiology of brevetoxicosis and the potential for evolved resistance in an upper trophic level predator, we sequenced pools of genomic DNA from dolphins sampled from both coastal and estuarine populations in Florida and during multiple HAB-associated mortality events. We sequenced 129 594 RAD loci and analysed 7431 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The allele frequencies of many of these polymorphic loci differed significantly between live and dead dolphins. Some loci associated with survival showed patterns suggesting a common genetic-based mechanism of resistance to brevetoxins in bottlenose dolphins along the Gulf coast of Florida, but others suggested regionally specific mechanisms of resistance or reflected differences among HABs. We identified candidate genes that may be the evolutionary target for brevetoxin resistance by searching the dolphin genome for genes adjacent to survival-associated SNPs. PMID:26290192

  19. Molecular Characterization of cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traditionally, the detection and identification of cyanobacteria implicated in harmful algal blooms has been conducted using microscopical techniques. Such conventional methods are time consuming and cumbersome, cannot discriminate between closely related taxa, and cannot discrim...

  20. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Todd A. Egerton; Ryan E. Morse; Marshall, Harold G; Mulholland, Margaret R.

    2014-01-01

    Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days). Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s...

  1. The Haber Bosch–harmful algal bloom (HB–HAB) link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large-scale commercialization of the Haber–Bosch (HB) process is resulting in intensification of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use worldwide. Globally N fertilizer use is far outpacing that of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Much of the increase in N fertilizers is also now in the form of urea, a reduced form of N. Incorporation of these fertilizers into agricultural products is inefficient leading to significant environmental pollution and aquatic eutrophication. Of particular concern is the increased occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in waters receiving nutrient enriched runoff. Many phytoplankton causing HABs have physiological adaptive strategies that make them favored under conditions of elevated N : P conditions and supply of chemically reduced N (ammonium, urea). We propose that the HB-HAB link is a function of (1) the inefficiency of incorporation of N fertilizers in the food supply chain, the leakiness of the N cycle from crop to table, and the fate of lost N relative to P to the environment; and (2) adaptive physiology of many HABs to thrive in environments in which there is excess N relative to classic nutrient stoichiometric proportions and where chemically reduced forms of N dominate. The rate of HAB expansion is particularly pronounced in China where N fertilizer use has escalated very rapidly, where soil retention is declining, and where blooms have had large economic and ecological impacts. There, in addition to increased use of urea and high N : P based fertilizers overall, escalating aquaculture production adds to the availability of reduced forms of N, as does atmospheric deposition of ammonia. HABs in both freshwaters and marginal seas in China are highly related to these overall changing N loads and ratios. Without more aggressive N control the future outlook in terms of HABs is likely to include more events, more often, and they may also be more toxic. (paper)

  2. The Haber Bosch-harmful algal bloom (HB-HAB) link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glibert, Patricia M.; Maranger, Roxane; Sobota, Daniel J.; Bouwman, Lex

    2014-10-01

    Large-scale commercialization of the Haber-Bosch (HB) process is resulting in intensification of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use worldwide. Globally N fertilizer use is far outpacing that of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Much of the increase in N fertilizers is also now in the form of urea, a reduced form of N. Incorporation of these fertilizers into agricultural products is inefficient leading to significant environmental pollution and aquatic eutrophication. Of particular concern is the increased occurrence of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in waters receiving nutrient enriched runoff. Many phytoplankton causing HABs have physiological adaptive strategies that make them favored under conditions of elevated N : P conditions and supply of chemically reduced N (ammonium, urea). We propose that the HB-HAB link is a function of (1) the inefficiency of incorporation of N fertilizers in the food supply chain, the leakiness of the N cycle from crop to table, and the fate of lost N relative to P to the environment; and (2) adaptive physiology of many HABs to thrive in environments in which there is excess N relative to classic nutrient stoichiometric proportions and where chemically reduced forms of N dominate. The rate of HAB expansion is particularly pronounced in China where N fertilizer use has escalated very rapidly, where soil retention is declining, and where blooms have had large economic and ecological impacts. There, in addition to increased use of urea and high N : P based fertilizers overall, escalating aquaculture production adds to the availability of reduced forms of N, as does atmospheric deposition of ammonia. HABs in both freshwaters and marginal seas in China are highly related to these overall changing N loads and ratios. Without more aggressive N control the future outlook in terms of HABs is likely to include more events, more often, and they may also be more toxic.

  3. Technological adaptation to harmful algal blooms : socioeconomic consequences for the shellfish farming sector in Bourgneuf Bay (France)

    OpenAIRE

    Perez Agundez, José A.; Raux, Pascal,; Girard, Sophie; Mongruel, Remi

    2013-01-01

    The economic impacts of harmful algal blooms (HABs) on the shellfish farming sector depend on their frequency, duration and intensity. Safeguarding storage and accelerated detoxification are technical solutions that could mitigate the effects of these events. This article first analyzes the economic feasibility of the technological changes that can be adopted by the shellfish farming sector in France. It then examines their associated social impacts. Finally, an application is carried out on ...

  4. Reservoir Operation Rules for Controlling Algal Blooms in a Tributary to the Impoundment of Three Gorges Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jijian Lian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first impoundment of Three Gorges Dam in 2003, algal blooms occur frequently in the near-dam tributaries. It is widely recognized that the impoundment-induced change in hydrodynamic condition with the lower current velocity will make the eutrophication problem even more severe when an excessive amount of nutrients is already loaded into a reservoir and/or its tributaries. Operation tests carried out by Three Gorges Corporation in 2010 point to some feasible reservoir operation schemes that may have positive impacts on reducing the algal bloom level. In our study, an attempt is made to obtain, through a numerical hydrodynamic and water quality modeling and analysis, the reservoir operation rules that would reduce the level of algal blooms in the Xiangxi River (XXR, a near-dam tributary. Water movements and algal blooms in XXR are simulated and analyzed under different scenarios of one-day water discharge fluctuation or two-week water level variation. The model results demonstrate that the reservoir operations can further increase the water exchange between the mainstream of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR and the XXR tributary and thus move a larger amount of algae into the deep water where it will die. Analysis of the model results indicate that the water discharge fluctuation constituted of a lower valley-load flow and a larger flow difference for the short-term operation (within a day, the rise in water level for the medium-term operation (e.g., over weeks, and the combination of the above two for the long-term operation (e.g., over months can be the feasible reservoir operation rules in the non-flood season for TGR.

  5. An Overview on the Occurrences of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and Mitigation Strategies in Korean Coastal Waters

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, HakGyoon

    2010-01-01

    Recent wide spread and persistent harmful algal blooms (HABs) give severe impacts on public health and fisheries economics along all coasts of Korea. As the HABs have become more widespread and caused increasing fisheries damage, Korea established an integrated monitoring system included oceanographic, environmental, and red tides observations. Both oceanographic and environmental data and remotely sensed information are available for HABs prediction. Hierarchical HABs monitoring whose observ...

  6. Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia: an insidious and escalating water pollution phenomenon with effects on ecological and human health

    OpenAIRE

    Glibert, Patricia M.

    2014-01-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), those proliferations of algae that causeenvironmental, economic, or human health problems, are increasing in frequency,duration, and geographic extent due to nutrient pollution. The scale of the HABproblem in Asia has escalated in recent decades in parallel with the increase in useof agricultural fertilizer, the development of aquaculture, and a growing population.Three examples, all from China but illustrative of the diversity of events and theirecological, econo...

  7. Temporal and spatial characteristics of harmful algal blooms in Qingdao Waters, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongquan; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua

    2016-05-01

    Qingdao waters, including both the semi-enclosed Jiaozhou Bay (JB) and the adjacent water out of JB (OJB), have been the areas that are most frequently aff ected by harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the western Yellow Sea (west of 124°E). In this research, HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters from 1990 to 2009 were investigated using spatial tools in geographic information system (GIS) and are discussed in terms of their connection to temporal variation. Additionally, the eff ects of each HAB occurrence were further evaluated using a simple model. The calculated results were then visualized using a GIS software to indicate the eff ects of HABs in Qingdao waters during the entire period. As a result, the OJB was proven to be responsible for the frequent HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters after 2000, although JB was traditionally believed to be the principle source of HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters. In addition, increasing nitrogen and N/P structure imbalance were essential for increasing HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters throughout the entire period, especially for the recent HAB occurrences in the OJB. The results of this research would improve the current understanding on HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters, which would benefit HAB monitoring and the implementation of a control strategy in China as well.

  8. Long term phytoplankton monitoring, including harmful algal blooms, in the Bay of Fundy, eastern Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. L.; Hanke, A. R.; LeGresley, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    A monitoring program was initiated in May 1987 to study phytoplankton populations in the Bay of Fundy, southwest New Brunswick, eastern Canada. Samples are collected for phytoplankton distribution and abundance at five locations in the Bay of Fundy. Other parameters measured include plant nutrients (ammonia, nitrite, nitrate, phosphate and silicate), Secchi depth, and depth profiles for fluorescence, oxygen, temperature and salinity. Alexandrium fundyense abundance from the 5 sites and between years is compared to physical and chemical properties of seawater using principle component analyses (PCA) to identify factors showing the greatest amount of variance in temporal and spatial distribution patterns. Analysis of A. fundyense abundance over the 19-year period 1987-2005 indicates that cell abundance from one year does not reflect the following year's phytoplankton concentration, and nitrate values and cell densities appear to have a negative relationship. A further comparison between the 2 years 2004 and 2005 (years with very different intensities of A. fundyense maximum cell concentrations) further supported these findings. Preliminary analyses indicate that many species abundances and intensities appear to be more climate or weather related than nutrient flux related. Examination of relationships between harmful algal bloom (HAB) cell density, nutrients and environmental variables indicates that there is no evidence that HABs are linked to eutrophication processes at the temporal and spatial scales of the study.

  9. Temporal and spatial characteristics of harmful algal blooms in the Bohai Sea during 1952-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan-qi; Wang, Nuo; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Jian-ru

    2016-07-01

    Evidence was collected from harmful algal bloom (HAB) outbreaks in the Bohai Sea during 1952-2014. The geographic information system (GIS) was used to analyse the temporal and spatial distributions of these HAB events and, subsequently, to map the distribution of these events. The results reveal the following: (1) four areas had a high frequency of HABs: Bohai Bay, the coastal waters of the cities of Qinhuangdao and Yingkou, and the Yellow River estuary. In these areas, HABs occurred a total of 142 times, 18 of which exceeded 1000 km2 in area. After 2000, the frequency of HAB outbreaks increased significantly. (2) The HAB occurrences exhibited significant seasonality (occurring during June to August). (3) Outbreaks of the dominant HAB plankton species, Noctiluca scientillans, Prorocentrum dentatum, Phaeocystis globosa, and Skeletonema costatum, occurred 57, 11, 9, and 8 times, respectively. (4) Bohai Bay, the coastal waters of Qinhuangdao, and the Yellow River estuary suffered great harm caused by these HABs. This study utilized a visual approach to more fully identify the scope, distribution, and characteristics of HABs in the Bohai Sea over the past 63 years, thus providing useful information to support the monitoring and management program for HABs.

  10. Common European harmful algal blooms affect the viability and innate immune responses of Mytilus edulis larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rijcke, M; Vandegehuchte, M B; Vanden Bussche, J; Nevejan, N; Vanhaecke, L; De Schamphelaere, K A C; Janssen, C R

    2015-11-01

    Like marine diseases, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are globally increasing in frequency, severity and geographical scale. As a result, bivalves will have to face the combined threat of toxic algae and marine pathogens more frequently in the (near) future. These stressors combined may further affect the recruitment of ecologically and economically important bivalve species as HABs can affect the growth, viability and development of their larvae. To date, little is known on the specific effects of HABs on the innate immune system of bivalve larvae. This study therefore investigates whether two common harmful algae can influence the larval viability, development and immunological resilience of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. Embryos of this model organism were exposed (48 h) to five densities of Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries or Prorocentrum lima cells. In addition, the effect of six concentrations of their respective toxins: domoic acid (DA) and okadaic acid (OA) were assessed. OA was found to significantly reduce larval protein phosphatase activity (p < 0.001) and larval viability (p < 0.01) at concentrations as low as 37.8 μg l(-1). P. multiseries (1400 cells ml(-1)), P. lima (150 cells ml(-1)) and DA (dosed five times higher than typical environmental conditions i.e. 623.2 μg l(-1)) increased the phenoloxidase (PO) innate immune activity of the mussel larvae. These results suggest that the innate immune response of even the earliest life stages of bivalves is susceptible to the presence of HABs. PMID:26348409

  11. A novel remote sensing algorithm to quantify phycocyanin in cyanobacterial algal blooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel three-band algorithm (PC3) to retrieve phycocyanin (PC) pigment concentration in cyanobacteria laden inland waters. The water sample and remote sensing reflectance data used for PC3 calibration and validation were acquired from highly turbid productive catfish aquaculture ponds. Since the characteristic PC absorption feature at 620 nm is contaminated with residual chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) absorption, we propose a coefficient (ψ) for isolating the PC absorption component at 620 nm. Results show that inclusion of the model coefficient relating Chl-a absorption at 620 nm–665 nm enables PC3 to compensate for the confounding effect of Chl-a at the PC absorption band and considerably increases the accuracy of the PC prediction algorithm. In the current dataset, PC3 produced the lowest mean relative error of prediction among all PC algorithms considered in this research. Moreover, PC3 eliminates the nonlinear sensitivity issue of PC algorithms particularly at high PC range (>100 μg L−1). Therefore, introduction of PC3 will have an immediate positive impact on studies monitoring inland and coastal cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms. (letter)

  12. A novel remote sensing algorithm to quantify phycocyanin in cyanobacterial algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, S.; Mishra, D. R.

    2014-11-01

    We present a novel three-band algorithm (PC3) to retrieve phycocyanin (PC) pigment concentration in cyanobacteria laden inland waters. The water sample and remote sensing reflectance data used for PC3 calibration and validation were acquired from highly turbid productive catfish aquaculture ponds. Since the characteristic PC absorption feature at 620 nm is contaminated with residual chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) absorption, we propose a coefficient (ψ) for isolating the PC absorption component at 620 nm. Results show that inclusion of the model coefficient relating Chl-a absorption at 620 nm-665 nm enables PC3 to compensate for the confounding effect of Chl-a at the PC absorption band and considerably increases the accuracy of the PC prediction algorithm. In the current dataset, PC3 produced the lowest mean relative error of prediction among all PC algorithms considered in this research. Moreover, PC3 eliminates the nonlinear sensitivity issue of PC algorithms particularly at high PC range (>100 μg L-1). Therefore, introduction of PC3 will have an immediate positive impact on studies monitoring inland and coastal cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms.

  13. Sea Surface Warming and its Implications for Harmful Algal Blooms off Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.V.B. Sarma

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the sea surface temperature (SST data for the period from 1961 to 2010, showed the SST regime changes off Oman on different temporal scales. A rapid warming phase is conspicuous in the SST off Muscat and off Masirah along Oman after 1984. The shifts in the SST occurred several times on shorter time scales prior to 1984 but a notable shift in the SST occurred after 1984 when the mean annual SST increased by 0.53℃ off Masirah and by 0.32℃ off Muscat. The amplitude and period of heating/cooling are smaller and shorter off Muscat compared to Masirah with increasing summer warming and decreasing winter cooling. The multivariate ENSO index (MEI and the annual mean SST at the study locations showed better correlation (R2=0.3 with April-May MEI compared to the other months. The highs and lows of SST at both the locations responded with stronger El Nino and La Nina events respectively. The frequency of harmful algal bloom (HAB events off Oman closely followed the warming and cooling patterns of the sea surface. The frequency of HAB events increased with increasing SST during present decade (2001~2010. The increase in toxic or potentially harmful HAB events may be the consequence of upper ocean stratification forced by increasing SST.

  14. MF/UF rejection and fouling potential of algal organic matter from bloom-forming marine and freshwater algae

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2015-07-01

    Pretreatment with microfiltration (MF) or ultrafiltration (UF) membranes has been proposed for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants to address operational issues associated with algal blooms. Here, we investigated the MF/UF rejection and fouling potential of algal organic matter (AOM) released by common species of bloom-forming marine (Alexandrium tamarense and Chaetoceros affinis) and freshwater (Microcystis sp.) algae. Batch culture monitoring of the three algal species illustrated varying growth pattern, cell concentration, AOM released and membrane fouling potential. The high membrane fouling potential of the cultures can be directly associated (R2>0.85) with AOM such as transparent exopolymer particle (TEP) while no apparent relationship with algal cell concentration was observed. The AOM comprised mainly biopolymers (e.g., polysaccharides and proteins) and low molecular weight organic compounds (e.g., humic-like substances). The former were largely rejected by MF/UF membranes while the latter were poorly rejected. MF (0.4μm and 0.1μm pore size) rejected 14%-56% of biopolymers while conventional UF (100kDa) and tight UF (10kDa) rejected up to 83% and 97%, respectively. The retention of AOM resulted in a rapid increase in trans-membrane pressure (δP) over time, characterised by pore blocking followed by cake filtration with enhanced compression as illustrated by an exponential progression of δP. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Investigating the presence of predatory bacteria on algal bloom samples using a T6SS gene marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, J.; Sison-Mangus, M.; Mehic, S.; McMahon, E.

    2015-12-01

    Predation is considered to be a major driving force in evolution and ecology, which has been observed affecting individual organisms, communities, and entire ecosystems. The type VI secretion system (T6SS) is an intermembranal protein complex identified in certain bacteria, which appears to have evolved strictly as a mechanism of predation. The effects of bacteria on phytoplankton physiology are still understudied, however, studies have shown that the interactions between bacteria that inhabit the phycosphere of phytoplankton can possibly result in coevolution of native host and microbiota. It is unclear if bacteria can prey upon other bacteria to gain advantages during periods of high phytoplankton density. Here, we investigate the predatory interactions between bacteria and analyze environmental samples for the presence of predatory bacterial genes in an effort to understand bacteria-bacteria and phytoplankton interactions during algal blooms. DNA were extracted from bacterial samples collected weekly from size-fractionated samples using 3.0 um and 0.2 um membrane filters at the Santa Cruz wharf. PCR amplification and gel visualization for the presence of T6SS gene was carried out on bloom and non-bloom samples. Moreover, we carried out a lab- based experiment to observe bacteria-bacteria interaction that may hint for the presence of predatory behavior between bacterial taxa. We observed what appeared to be a predatory biofilm formation between certain bacterial species. These bacteria, however, did not contain the T6SS genes. On the contrary the T6SS gene was discovered in some of the bloom samples gathered from the Santa Cruz wharf. It is still unclear if the predatory mechanisms facilitate the abundance of certain groups of bacteria that contain the T6SS genes during algal blooms, but our evidence suggest that bacterial predation through T6SS mechanism is present during bloom events.

  16. Phytoplankton dynamics with a special emphasis on harmful algal blooms in the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Ionian Sea, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caroppo, Carmela; Cerino, Federica; Auriemma, Rocco; Cibic, Tamara

    2016-07-01

    The response of phytoplankton assemblages to the closure of urban sewage outfalls (USOs) was examined for the Mar Piccolo of Taranto (Mediterranean Sea), a productive semi-enclosed coastal marine ecosystem devoted to shellfish farming. Phytoplankton dynamics were investigated in relation to environmental variables, with a particular emphasis on harmful algal blooms (HABs). Recent analyses evidenced a general reduction of the inorganic nutrient loads, except for nitrates and silicates. Also phytoplankton biomass (chlorophyll a) and abundances were characterized by a decrease of the values, except for the inner area of the basin (second inlet). The phytoplankton composition changed, with nano-sized species, indicators of oligotrophic conditions, becoming dominant over micro-sized species. If the closure of the USOs affected phytoplankton dynamics, however, it did not preserve the Mar Piccolo from HABs and anoxia crises. About 25 harmful species have been detected throughout the years, such as the potentially domoic acid producers Pseudo-nitzschia cf. galaxiae and P seudo-nitzschia cf. multistriata, identified for the first time in these waters. The presence of HABs represents a threat for human health and aquaculture. Urgent initiatives are needed to improve the communication with authorities responsible for environmental protection, economic development, and public health for a sustainable mussel culture in the Mar Piccolo. PMID:26206123

  17. Emergence of Algal Blooms: The Effects of Short-Term Variability in Water Quality on Phytoplankton Abundance, Diversity, and Community Composition in a Tidal Estuary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd A. Egerton

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms are dynamic phenomena, often attributed to environmental parameters that vary on short timescales (e.g., hours to days. Phytoplankton monitoring programs are largely designed to examine long-term trends and interannual variability. In order to better understand and evaluate the relationships between water quality variables and the genesis of algal blooms, daily samples were collected over a 34 day period in the eutrophic Lafayette River, a tidal tributary within Chesapeake Bay’s estuarine complex, during spring 2006. During this period two distinct algal blooms occurred; the first was a cryptomonad bloom and this was followed by a bloom of the mixotrophic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium instriatum. Chlorophyll a, nutrient concentrations, and physical and chemical parameters were measured daily along with phytoplankton abundance and community composition. While 65 phytoplankton species from eight major taxonomic groups were identified in samples and total micro- and nano-phytoplankton cell densities ranged from 5.8 × 106 to 7.8 × 107 cells L−1, during blooms, cryptomonads and G. instriatum were 91.6% and 99.0%, respectively, of the total phytoplankton biomass during blooms. The cryptomonad bloom developed following a period of rainfall and concomitant increases in inorganic nitrogen concentrations. Nitrate, nitrite and ammonium concentrations 0 to 5 days prior were positively lag-correlated with cryptomonad abundance. In contrast, the G. insriatum bloom developed during periods of low dissolved nitrogen concentrations and their abundance was negatively correlated with inorganic nitrogen concentrations.

  18. Monitoring of ocean surface algal blooms in coastal and oceanic waters around India.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tholkapiyan, M.; Shanmugam, P.; Suresh, T.

    .R., & Fasullo, J.T. (2005). Warming of the Eurasian landmass Is making the Arabian Sea more productive. Science, 308, 545-47. Hu, C. (2009). A novel ocean color index to detect floating algae in the global oceans. Remote Sensing of Environment, 113, 2118...: thresholds of hypoxia and pathways to recovery. Environ. Res. Lett., 6, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/6/2/025003. Takeuchi, N. (2013). Seasonal and altitudinal variations in snow algal communities on an Alaskan glacier (Gulkana glacier in the Alaska range...

  19. Optical detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms based on multispectral reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Bangyi; PAN Delu; MAO Zhihua; SHEN Yuzhang; ZHU Qiankun; CHEN Jianyu

    2013-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is one of the most common red tide causative dinoflagellates in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River Estuary and the adjacent area of the East China Sea. It causes large-scale blooms in late spring and early summer that lead to widespread ecologic and economic damage. A means for distinguish-ing dinoflagellate blooms from diatom (Skeletonema costatum) blooms is desired. On the basis of measure-ments of remote sensing reflectance [Rrs(λ)] and inherent optical parameters, the potential of using a mul-tispectral approach is assessed for discriminating the algal blooms due to P. donghaiense from those due to S. costatum. The behavior of two reflectance ratios [R1 =Rrs(560)/Rrs(532) and R2 =Rrs(708)/Rrs(665)], suggests that differentiation of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom bloom types is possible from the current band setup of ocean color sensors. It is found that there are two reflectance ratio regimes that indicate a bloom is dominated by P. donghaiense: (1) R1 >1.55 and R2 1.75 and R2 ?1.0. Various sensitivity analyses are conducted to investigate the effects of the variation in varying levels of chlorophyll concentration and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as changes in the backscattering ratio (bbp/bp) on the efficacy of this multispectral approach. Results indicate that the intensity and inherent op-tical properties of the algal species explain much of the behavior of the two ratios. Although backscattering influences the amplitude of Rrs(λ), especially in the 530 and 560 nm bands, the discrimination between P. donghaiense and diatoms is not significantly affected by the variation of bbp/bp. Since a CDOM(440) in coastal areas of the ECS is typically lower than 1.0 m−1 in most situations, the presence of CDOM does not interfere with this discrimination, even as SCDOM varies from 0.01 to 0.026 nm−1. Despite all of these effects, the dis-crimination of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom blooms based on multispectral

  20. Cephalopods as vectors of harmful algal bloom toxins in marine food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vanessa M; Lopes, Ana Rita; Costa, Pedro; Rosa, Rui

    2013-09-01

    Here we summarize the current knowledge on the transfer and accumulation of harmful algal bloom (HAB)-related toxins in cephalopods (octopods, cuttlefishes and squids). These mollusks have been reported to accumulate several HAB-toxins, namely domoic acid (DA, and its isomers), saxitoxin (and its derivatives) and palytoxin (and palytoxin-like compounds) and, therefore, act as HAB-toxin vectors in marine food webs. Coastal octopods and cuttlefishes store considerably high levels of DA (amnesic shellfish toxin) in several tissues, but mainly in the digestive gland (DG)--the primary site of digestive absorption and intracellular digestion. Studies on the sub-cellular partitioning of DA in the soluble and insoluble fractions showed that nearly all DA (92.6%) is found in the cytosol. This favors the trophic transfer of the toxins since cytosolic substances can be absorbed by predators with greater efficiency. The available information on the accumulation and tissue distribution of DA in squids (e.g., in stranded Humboldt squids, Dosidicus gigas) is scarcer than in other cephalopod groups. Regarding paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs), these organisms accumulate them at the greatest extent in DG > kidneys > stomach > branchial hearts > posterior salivary glands > gills. Palytoxins are among the most toxic molecules identified and stranded octopods revealed high contamination levels, with ovatoxin (a palytoxin analogue) reaching 971 μg kg⁻¹ and palytoxin reaching 115 μg kg⁻¹ (the regulatory limit for PlTXs is 30 μg kg⁻¹ in shellfish). Although the impacts of HAB-toxins in cephalopod physiology are not as well understood as in fish species, similar effects are expected since they possess a complex nervous system and highly developed brain comparable to that of the vertebrates. Compared to bivalves, cephalopods represent a lower risk of shellfish poisoning in humans, since they are usually consumed eviscerated, with exception of traditional dishes from the

  1. Cephalopods as Vectors of Harmful Algal Bloom Toxins in Marine Food Webs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Rosa

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we summarize the current knowledge on the transfer and accumulation of harmful algal bloom (HAB-related toxins in cephalopods (octopods, cuttlefishes and squids. These mollusks have been reported to accumulate several HAB-toxins, namely domoic acid (DA, and its isomers, saxitoxin (and its derivatives and palytoxin (and palytoxin-like compounds and, therefore, act as HAB-toxin vectors in marine food webs. Coastal octopods and cuttlefishes store considerably high levels of DA (amnesic shellfish toxin in several tissues, but mainly in the digestive gland (DG—the primary site of digestive absorption and intracellular digestion. Studies on the sub-cellular partitioning of DA in the soluble and insoluble fractions showed that nearly all DA (92.6% is found in the cytosol. This favors the trophic transfer of the toxins since cytosolic substances can be absorbed by predators with greater efficiency. The available information on the accumulation and tissue distribution of DA in squids (e.g., in stranded Humboldt squids, Dosidicus gigas is scarcer than in other cephalopod groups. Regarding paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs, these organisms accumulate them at the greatest extent in DG >> kidneys > stomach > branchial hearts > posterior salivary glands > gills. Palytoxins are among the most toxic molecules identified and stranded octopods revealed high contamination levels, with ovatoxin (a palytoxin analogue reaching 971 μg kg−1 and palytoxin reaching 115 μg kg−1 (the regulatory limit for PlTXs is 30 μg kg−1 in shellfish. Although the impacts of HAB-toxins in cephalopod physiology are not as well understood as in fish species, similar effects are expected since they possess a complex nervous system and highly developed brain comparable to that of the vertebrates. Compared to bivalves, cephalopods represent a lower risk of shellfish poisoning in humans, since they are usually consumed eviscerated, with exception of traditional dishes from the

  2. Significance of different carbon forms and carbonic anhydrase activity in monitoring and prediction of algal blooms in the urban section of Jialing River, Chongqing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Yudong; Zhang, Zhi; Shen, Qian; Gao, Wenjin; Li, Yingfan

    2016-05-18

    The Three Gorges Dam is one of the largest hydroelectric power plants worldwide; its reservoir was preliminarily impounded in 2003 and finally impounded to 175 m in 2012. The impoundment caused some environmental problems, such as algal blooms. Carbonic anhydrase (CA) is an important biocatalyst in the carbon utilization by algae and plays an important role in algal blooms. CA has received considerable attention for its role in red tides in oceans, but less investigation has been focused on its role in algal blooms in fresh water. In this study, the seasonal variation of water quality parameters, different carbon forms, carbonic anhydrase activity (CAA), and the algal cell density of four sampling sites in the urban section of the Jialing River were investigated from November 1, 2013 to October 31, 2014. Results indicated that CAA exhibited a positive correlation with dissoluble organic carbon (DOC), pH, and temperature, but a negative correlation with CO2 and dissoluble inorganic carbon (DIC). Algal cell density exhibited a positive correlation with flow velocity (V), pH, particulate organic carbon (POC), and CAA, a negative correlation with CO2, and a negative partial correlation with DIC. The relationship between CAA and algal cell density for the entire year can be described as cells = 23.278CAA - 42.666POC + 139.547pH - 1057.106. The algal bloom prediction model for the key control period can be described as cells = -45.895CAA + 776.103V- 29.523DOC + 14.219PIC + 35.060POC + 19.181 (2 weeks in advance) and cells = 69.200CAA + 203.213V + 4.184CO2 + 38.911DOC + 40.770POC - 189.567 (4 weeks in advance). The findings in this study demonstrate that the carbon utilization by algae is conducted by CA and provide a new method of monitoring algal cell density and predicting algal blooms. PMID:27142237

  3. Controls on Algal Bloom Propagation in the Kuwait Bay Utilizing: An Integrated Remote Sensing and Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manche, C. J.; Sultan, M.; Elkadiri, R.; Uddin, S.; Al-Dousari, A.; Chouinard, K.

    2014-12-01

    Algal blooms have become a major concern over the last decade in Kuwait's coastal waters where these blooms caused massive fish kill in a number of incidences. The purpose of this study is to accomplish the following: 1) identify the factors controlling algal bloom the development and propagation using Aqua-MODIS satellite data products (from 07/2002 to 07/2012), (2) identify the spatial and temporal variations in Chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) production in relation to the controlling factors; and 3) develop conceptual and predictive models (using in-situ and satellite-based datasets) that account for reported historical blooms and can successfully predict algal bloom proliferation in space and time. To achieve these goals, the following tasks were accomplished: 1) in-situ Chl-a data was correlated with satellite-based (MODIS and MERIS) Chl-a data products (OC3M, GIOP, GSM, and OC4E); 2) Chl-a concentration (from OC3M) were correlated spatially and temporally with potential controlling factors (SST, Turbidity, Euphotic Depth, Precipitation, Photosynthetically Available Radiation, Wind Vectors etc.); 3) the stepwise regression method was applied to identify the most significant controlling factors and to determine their order of importance; and 4) a back-propagation artificial neural network (ANN) was constructed to predict the bloom occurrences in time (first layer process) and space (second layer process). Findings include: 1) the Aqua-MODIS OC3M Chlorophyll-a algorithm correlated best with in-situ measurements (RMSE: 2.42, Mean Bias: 32.2%); (2) maximum OC3M Chl-a concentration was observed throughout the months of August through October (Temp. range: 18.4° to 22.3 °C); 3) the stepwise regression identified SST, secchi disk depth, wind direction, OC3M and wind speed as the most indicative temporal factors (SST: most significant R2: 80.1%) and the OC3M, distance to shore, GSM, SST and GIOP as the most indicative spatial variables; 4) the ANN model showed an excellent

  4. Cyanobacteria and Algae Blooms: Review of Health and Environmental Data from the Harmful Algal Bloom-Related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS 2007–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorraine C. Backer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Algae and cyanobacteria are present in all aquatic environments. We do not have a good sense of the extent of human and animal exposures to cyanobacteria or their toxins, nor do we understand the public health impacts from acute exposures associated with recreational activities or chronic exposures associated with drinking water. We describe the Harmful Algal Bloom-related Illness Surveillance System (HABISS and summarize the collected reports describing bloom events and associated adverse human and animal health events. For the period of 2007–2011, Departments of Health and/or Environment from 11 states funded by the National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention contributed reports for 4534 events. For 2007, states contributed 173 reports from historical data. The states participating in the HABISS program built response capacity through targeted public outreach and prevention activities, including supporting routine cyanobacteria monitoring for public recreation waters. During 2007–2010, states used monitoring data to support196 public health advisories or beach closures. The information recorded in HABISS and the application of these data to develop a wide range of public health prevention and response activities indicate that cyanobacteria and algae blooms are an environmental public health issue that needs continuing attention.

  5. Are harmful algal blooms becoming the greatest inland water quality threat to public health and aquatic ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Bryan W; Lazorchak, James M; Howard, Meredith D A; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V; Morton, Steve L; Perkins, Dawn A K; Reavie, Euan D; Scott, Geoffrey I; Smith, Stephanie A; Steevens, Jeffery A

    2016-01-01

    In this Focus article, the authors ask a seemingly simple question: Are harmful algal blooms (HABs) becoming the greatest inland water quality threat to public health and aquatic ecosystems? When HAB events require restrictions on fisheries, recreation, and drinking water uses of inland water bodies significant economic consequences result. Unfortunately, the magnitude, frequency, and duration of HABs in inland waters are poorly understood across spatiotemporal scales and differentially engaged among states, tribes, and territories. Harmful algal bloom impacts are not as predictable as those from conventional chemical contaminants, for which water quality assessment and management programs were primarily developed, because interactions among multiple natural and anthropogenic factors determine the likelihood and severity to which a HAB will occur in a specific water body. These forcing factors can also affect toxin production. Beyond site-specific water quality degradation caused directly by HABs, the presence of HAB toxins can negatively influence routine surface water quality monitoring, assessment, and management practices. Harmful algal blooms present significant challenges for achieving water quality protection and restoration goals when these toxins confound interpretation of monitoring results and environmental quality standards implementation efforts for other chemicals and stressors. Whether HABs presently represent the greatest threat to inland water quality is debatable, though in inland waters of developed countries they typically cause more severe acute impacts to environmental quality than conventional chemical contamination events. The authors identify several timely research needs. Environmental toxicology, environmental chemistry, and risk-assessment expertise must interface with ecologists, engineers, and public health practitioners to engage the complexities of HAB assessment and management, to address the forcing factors for HAB formation, and

  6. The laboratory mouse in routine food safety testing for marine algal biotoxins and harmful algal bloom toxin research: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ian; McLeod, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Mouse bioassays have been a mainstay for detecting harmful concentrations of marine algal toxins in shellfish for over 70 years. Routine monitoring involves intraperitoneal injection of shellfish extracts into mice; shellfish contaminated with algal toxins are thus identified by mortality in exposed mice. With the advent of alternative test methods to detect and quantify specific algal toxins has come increasing criticism of enduring use of mouse bioassays for shellfish safety testing. However, the complete replacement of shellfish safety mouse bioassays by chemical, antibody-based, and functional assays has been and will continue to be a gradual process for various reasons, including skills availability and instrument costs for chromatography-based toxin monitoring. Mouse bioassays for shellfish safety testing do not comply with modern standards for laboratory animal welfare, specifically the requirement in published official methods for death as a test outcome. Mouse bioassays for algal biotoxins in shellfish, as well as fundamental algal toxin research endeavors using in vivo models, are amenable to revision and refinement from a humane endpoints perspective. Regulated hypothermia may be a useful and easily acquired nonlethal toxicological endpoint; objective determination of neuromuscular blockade may allow algal neurotoxin testing and research to enter the domain of humane endpoints evaluation. Relinquishing reliance on subjective test endpoints, including death, will likely also deliver collateral improvements in assay variability and sensitivity. PMID:24830147

  7. Sampling of Ostreopsis cf. ovata using artificial substrates: Optimization of methods for the monitoring of benthic harmful algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauzein, Cécile; Fricke, Anna; Mangialajo, Luisa; Lemée, Rodolphe

    2016-06-15

    In the framework of monitoring of benthic harmful algal blooms (BHABs), the most commonly reported sampling strategy is based on the collection of macrophytes. However, this methodology has some inherent problems. A potential alternative method uses artificial substrates that collect resuspended benthic cells. The current study defines main improvements in this technique, through the use of fiberglass screens during a bloom of Ostreopsis cf. ovata. A novel set-up for the deployment of artificial substrates in the field was tested, using an easy clip-in system that helped restrain substrates perpendicular to the water flow. An experiment was run in order to compare the cell collection efficiency of different mesh sizes of fiberglass screens and results suggested an optimal porosity of 1-3mm. The present study goes further on showing artificial substrates, such as fiberglass screens, as efficient tools for the monitoring and mitigation of BHABs. PMID:27048690

  8. An investigation of submarine groundwater-borne nutrient fluxes to the west Florida shelf and recurrent harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christopher G.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2012-01-01

    A cross-shelf, water-column mass balance of radon-222 (222Rn) provided estimates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD), which were then used to quantify benthic nutrient fluxes. Surface water and groundwater were collected along a shore-normal transect that extended from Tampa Bay, Florida, across the Pinellas County peninsula, to the 10-m isobath in the Gulf of Mexico. Samples were analyzed for 222Rn and radium-223,224,226 (223,224,226Ra) activities as well as inorganic and organic nutrients. Cross-shore gradients of 222Rn and 223,224,226Ra activities indicate a nearshore source for these isotopes, which mixes with water characterized by low activities offshore. Radon-based SGD rates vary between 2.5 and 15 cm d-1 proximal to the shoreline and decrease offshore. The source of SGD is largely shallow exchange between surface and pore waters, although deeper groundwater cycling may also be important. Enrichment of total dissolved nitrogen and soluble reactive phosphorus in pore water combined with SGD rates results in specific nutrient fluxes comparable to or greater than estuarine fluxes from Tampa Bay. The significance of these fluxes to nearshore blooms of Karenia brevis is highlighted by comparison with prescribed nutrient demands for bloom maintenance and growth. Whereas our flux estimates do not indicate SGD and benthic fluxes as the dominant nutrient source to the harmful algal blooms, SGD-derived loads do narrow the deficit between documented nutrient supplies and bloom demands.

  9. Shifts in Cyanobacterial Strain Dominance during the Onset of Harmful Algal Blooms in Florida Bay, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Dianna L; Goleski, Jennifer A; Koch, Florian; Wall, Charles C; Peterson, Bradley J; Anderson, O Roger; Gobler, Christopher J

    2015-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are fundamental components of aquatic phytoplankton communities and some taxa can cause harmful blooms in coastal ecosystems. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms are typically comprised of multiple strains of a single genus or species that cannot be resolved microscopically. Florida Bay, USA, has experienced harmful cyanobacterial blooms that have been associated with the loss of eelgrass, spiny lobsters, and general food web disruption for more than two decades. To identify the strain or strains of cyanobacteria forming blooms in Florida Bay, samples were collected across the system over an annual cycle and analyzed via DNA sequencing using cyanobacterial-specific 16S rRNA gene primers, flow cytometry, and scanning electron microscopy. Analyses demonstrated that the onset of blooms in Florida Bay was coincident with a transformation of the cyanobacterial populations. When blooms were absent, the cyanobacterial population in Florida Bay was dominated by phycoerythrin-containing Synechococcus cells that were most similar to strains within Clade III. As blooms developed, the cyanobacterial community transitioned to dominance by phycocyanin-containing Synechococcus cells that were coated with mucilage, chain-forming, and genetically most similar to the coastal strains within Clade VIII. Clade VIII strains of Synechococcus are known to grow rapidly, utilize organic nutrients, and resist top-down control by protozoan grazers and viruses, all characteristics consistent with observations of cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay. Further, the strains of Synechococcus blooming in this system are genetically distinct from the species previously thought to cause blooms in Florida Bay, Synechococcus elongatus. Collectively, this study identified the causative organism of harmful cyanobacterial blooms in Florida Bay, demonstrates the dynamic nature of cyanobacterial stains within genera in an estuary, and affirms factors promoting Synechococcus blooms. PMID:25661475

  10. Simulation of algal bloom dynamics in a river with the ensemble Kalman filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghyun; Park, Minji; Min, Joong-Hyuk; Ryu, Ingu; Kang, Mi-Ri; Park, Lan Joo

    2014-11-01

    A simulation framework of algal bloom in a river channel with data assimilation (DA) was developed by employing two numerical models coupled to simulate a watershed and the embedded river channel. The Hydrological Simulation Program-Fortran (HSPF) model simulates flow discharge and water quality from the subwatersheds and the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) model takes the subwatershed model outputs at the watershed-river confluence points as boundary forcing to simulate river hydrodynamics and water quality. The ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) was used for assimilation of water quality variables in the framework, linking uncertainty of model simulation and observation. The simulation uncertainty of the HSPF was quantified at the confluence points as simple stochastic error models developed by comparing the model simulation and the observation. The error models reflect uncertainty of both hydrologic and water quality simulation, including uncertainty associated with point and non-point pollution sources in the watershed. The outputs of the HSPF at the confluence points were perturbed with the error models before used in the following ensemble simulation of the EFDC for the main river. DA was conducted with weekly chlorophyll-a data observed along the river to update chlorophyll-a concentrations of the EFDC model grids. The results showed that the model performance was improved by the assimilation: the root mean square error (RMSE) and the mean continuous probability rank score (CPRS) significantly decreased compared to the open-loop simulation. The updated spatial distribution of chlorophyll-a concentration along the river channel was in reasonable agreement with the observation. Although only chlorophyll-a data was involved in the assimilation, phosphate was selected among other water quality variables for update in order to evaluate the effect of chlorophyll-a assimilation on those variables. It turned out that the phosphate simulation was not much

  11. Hexavalent chromium removal from aqueous solution by algal bloom residue derived activated carbon: Equilibrium and kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Hong; Tang Yi; Cai Dongqing; Liu Xianan; Wang Xiangqin [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Huang Qing, E-mail: huangq@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Yu Zengliang, E-mail: zlyu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China)

    2010-09-15

    A novel approach to prepare activated carbon from blue-green algal bloom residue has been tried for first time and its adsorption capability to remove hexavalent chromium Cr(VI) from aqueous solution has been examined. For this algal bloom residue derived activated carbon, the physical characters regarding adsorption capability were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope (EDS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Batch studies showed that initial pH, absorbent dosage, and initial concentration of Cr(VI) were important parameters for Cr(VI) absorption. It was found that initial pH of 1.0 was most favorable for Cr(VI) removal. The adsorption process followed the pseudo-second-order equation and Freundlich isotherm. The maximum adsorption capacity for Cr(VI) was 155.52 mg g{sup -1} in an acidic medium, which is comparable to best result from activated carbons derived from biomass. Therefore, this work put forward a nearly perfect solution which on one hand gets rid of environment-unfriendly algae residue while on the other hand produces high-quality activated carbon that is in return advantageous to environment protection.

  12. Formation of a Volunteer Harmful Algal Bloom Network in British Columbia, Canada, Following an Outbreak of Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Haigh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Evidence for shellfish toxin illness in British Columbia (BC on the west coast of Canada can be traced back to 1793. For over two hundred years, domestically acquired bivalve shellfish toxin illnesses in BC were solely ascribed to paralytic shellfish poisonings caused by algal blooms of Alexandrium. This changed in 2011, when BC experienced its first outbreak of diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP. As a result of this outbreak, Canada’s first DSP symposium was held in November, 2012, in North Vancouver, BC. Three of the objectives of the symposium were to provide a forum to educate key stakeholders on this emerging issue, to identify research and surveillance priorities and to create a DSP network. The purpose of this paper is to review what is known about shellfish poisoning in BC and to describe a novel volunteer network that arose following the symposium. The newly formed network was designed for industry shellfish growers to identify harmful algae bloom events, so that they may take actions to mitigate the effects of harmful blooms on shellfish morbidity. The network will also inform public health and regulatory stakeholders of potentially emerging issues in shellfish growing areas.

  13. The death mechanism of the harmful algal bloom species Alexandrium tamarense induced by algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eLi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Harmful algal blooms (HABs cause a variety of deleterious effects on aquatic ecosystems, especially the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense, which poses a serious threat to marine economic and human health based on releasing paralytic shellfish poison into the environment. The algicidal bacterium Deinococcus sp. Y35 which can induce growth inhibition on A. tamarense was used to investigate the functional mechanism. The growth status, reactive oxygen species (ROS content, photosynthetic system and the nuclear system of algal cells were determined under algicidal activity. A culture of strain Y35 not only induced overproduction of ROS in algal cells within only 0.5 h of treatment, also decrease the total protein content as well as the response of the antioxidant enzyme. Meanwhile, lipid peroxidation was induced and cell membrane integrity was lost. Photosynthetic pigments including chlorophyll a and carotenoid decreased along with the photosynthetic efficiency being significantly inhibited. At the same time, photosynthesis-related gene expression showed down-regulation. More than, the destruction of cell nuclear structure and inhibition of proliferating cell nuclear antigen related gene expression were confirmed. The potential functional mechanism of the algicidal bacterium on A. tamarense was investigated and provided a novel viewpoint which could be used in HABs control.

  14. MULTI-COMPONENT EVALUATION TO MINIMIZE THE SPREAD OF AQUATIC INVASIVE SEAWEEDS AND HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOM MICROALGAE VIA LIVE BAIT VECTORS IN LONG ISLAND SOUND

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to quantify the importance of bait products and associated packing materials as vectors for the introduction of non-indigenous species and harmful algal bloom (HAB)-forming microalgae to Long Island Sound. Non-native, invasive seaweeds and HAB-forming...

  15. Characterization of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman using MERIS fluorescence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Temimi, Marouane; Ghedira, Hosni

    2015-03-01

    In this study, MERIS fluorescence data were utilized to monitor a toxin-producing dinoflagellate Cochlodinium bloom in 2008 in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman. The bloom was characterized using modified fluorescence line height (MFLH), enhanced Red-Green-Blue (ERGB) and true color composites, and the ratio of particulate backscattering (bbp) to MFLH (bbp/MFLH). In addition to high MFLH values and dark colors in ERGB images which are generally observed when blooms happen, it was found that the Cochlodinium bloom indicated species-specific signatures which consisted of reddish brown colors in true color composites and bbp/MFLH values below 0.2 mW-1 cm2 μm m-1 sr. Based on these findings, Cochlodinium blooms were successfully distinguished from blooms dominated by other species that were found in the study area, like diatom, Noctiluca, and Trichodesmium. Qualitative analysis showed that the fluorescence-based approach presented better performance than the chlorophyll-a anomaly approach for HAB detection, despite the sensitivity to atmospheric perturbations, benthic vegetation in coastal shallow waters, and variations in environmental conditions. The applicability of the HAB characterization approach tested for the first time over the study area using MERIS data was discussed and can be anticipated with sufficient knowledge of local bloom history. Combing different ocean color products is strongly recommended to improve our understanding of HAB dynamics and enhance our ability to characterize them. This is of great importance for marine environment protection and management and can lead to valuable information for contingency planning.

  16. DMS gas transfer coefficients from algal blooms in the Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. G. Bell

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Air/sea dimethylsulfide (DMS fluxes and bulk air/sea gradients were measured over the Southern Ocean in February/March 2012 during the Surface Ocean Aerosol Production (SOAP study. The cruise encountered three distinct phytoplankton bloom regions, consisting of two blooms with moderate DMS levels, and a high biomass, dinoflagellate-dominated bloom with high seawater DMS levels (>15 nM. Gas transfer coefficients were considerably scattered at wind speeds above 5 m s−1. Bin averaging the data resulted in a linear relationship between wind speed and mean gas transfer velocity consistent with that previously observed. However, the wind speed-binned gas transfer data distribution at all wind speeds is positively skewed. The flux and seawater DMS distributions were also positively skewed, which suggests that eddy covariance-derived gas transfer velocities are consistently influenced by additional, log-normal noise. A~flux footprint analysis was conducted during a transect into the prevailing wind and through elevated DMS levels in the dinoflagellate bloom. Accounting for the temporal/spatial separation between flux and seawater concentration significantly reduces the scatter in computed transfer velocity. The SOAP gas transfer velocity data shows no obvious modification of the gas transfer-wind speed relationship by biological activity or waves. This study highlights the challenges associated with eddy covariance gas transfer measurements in biologically active and heterogeneous bloom environments.

  17. Harmful Algal Blooms in Asia: an insidious and escalating water pollution phenomenon with effects on ecological and human health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs, those proliferations of algae that causeenvironmental, economic, or human health problems, are increasing in frequency,duration, and geographic extent due to nutrient pollution. The scale of the HABproblem in Asia has escalated in recent decades in parallel with the increase in useof agricultural fertilizer, the development of aquaculture, and a growing population.Three examples, all from China but illustrative of the diversity of events and theirecological, economic, and human health effects throughout Asia, are highlightedhere. These examples include inland (Lake Tai or Taihu as well as offshore (EastChina Sea and Yellow Sea waters. The future outlook for controlling these bloomsis bleak. The effects of advancing industrialized agriculture and a continually growingpopulation will continue to result in more nutrient pollution and more HABs—-and more effects - in the foreseeable future.

  18. Environmental controls, oceanography and population dynamics of pathogens and harmful algal blooms: connecting sources to human exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minnett Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Coupled physical-biological models are capable of linking the complex interactions between environmental factors and physical hydrodynamics to simulate the growth, toxicity and transport of infectious pathogens and harmful algal blooms (HABs. Such simulations can be used to assess and predict the impact of pathogens and HABs on human health. Given the widespread and increasing reliance of coastal communities on aquatic systems for drinking water, seafood and recreation, such predictions are critical for making informed resource management decisions. Here we identify three challenges to making this connection between pathogens/HABs and human health: predicting concentrations and toxicity; identifying the spatial and temporal scales of population and ecosystem interactions; and applying the understanding of population dynamics of pathogens/HABs to management strategies. We elaborate on the need to meet each of these challenges, describe how modeling approaches can be used and discuss strategies for moving forward in addressing these challenges.

  19. Concentrations of heavy metals in sediment and organisms during a harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Kun Kaak Bay, Sonora, Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early April 2003, fishermen from Kino Bay Sonora alerted us about a massive die-off of fish and mollusks occurring at Kun Kaak Bay. Phytoplankton samples taken on 17 May 2003 reported the presence of a harmful algal bloom composed of Chatonella marina, Chatonella cf. ovata, Gymnodinium catenatum and Gymnodinium sanguineum. On 22 of May, we collected samples of water, sediment and organisms at the affected area. Physicochemical parameters and nutrients were measured in water samples from different depths. Sediment and benthic organisms were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg. We found concentrations of heavy metals higher than background levels for this area. Cadmium and Lead concentrations in sediment from the HAB area were up to 6x greater than background levels and Cd in mollusks was 8x greater than regulations allow. A relationship between elevated Cd and Pb concentrations in sediment and the survival of toxic dinoflagellates is suspected

  20. Concentrations of heavy metals in sediment and organisms during a harmful algal bloom (HAB) at Kun Kaak Bay, Sonora, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD) Guaymas Unit, Carretera al Varadero Nal. Km 6.6, Apdo. Postal 284, CP 85480 Guaymas, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: jaqueline@cascabel.ciad.mx; Garcia-Rico, Leticia [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD), Carretera a la Victoria Km 0.6, Apdo. Postal 1735, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: lgarciar@cascabel.ciad.mx; Jara-Marini, Martin E. [Centro de investigacion en Alimentacion y Desarrollo AC (CIAD), Carretera a la Victoria Km 0.6, Apdo. Postal 1735, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: mjara@cascabel.ciad.mx; Barraza-Guardado, Ramon [Departamento de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnologicas de la Universidad de Sonora (DICTUS), Rosales y Ninos Heroes s/n Col. Centro, CP 83000 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: rbarraza@rtn.uson.mx; Hudson Weaver, Amy [Comunidad y Biodiversidad AC - COBI, Terminacion Bahia de Bacochibampo s/m, Fraccionamiento Lomas de Cortes, CP 85450 Guaymas, Sonora (Mexico)]. E-mail: ahw@cobi.org.mx

    2005-07-01

    In early April 2003, fishermen from Kino Bay Sonora alerted us about a massive die-off of fish and mollusks occurring at Kun Kaak Bay. Phytoplankton samples taken on 17 May 2003 reported the presence of a harmful algal bloom composed of Chatonella marina, Chatonella cf. ovata, Gymnodinium catenatum and Gymnodinium sanguineum. On 22 of May, we collected samples of water, sediment and organisms at the affected area. Physicochemical parameters and nutrients were measured in water samples from different depths. Sediment and benthic organisms were analyzed for Cd, Cu, Zn, Pb and Hg. We found concentrations of heavy metals higher than background levels for this area. Cadmium and Lead concentrations in sediment from the HAB area were up to 6x greater than background levels and Cd in mollusks was 8x greater than regulations allow. A relationship between elevated Cd and Pb concentrations in sediment and the survival of toxic dinoflagellates is suspected.

  1. Impact of several harmful algal bloom (HAB) causing species, on life history characteristics of rotifer Brachionus plicatilis Müller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianing; Yan, Tian; Zhang, Qingchun; Zhou, Mingjiang

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, harmful algal blooms (HABs) have occurred frequently along the coast of China, and have been exhibiting succession from diatom- to dinoflagellate-dominated blooms. To examine the effects of different diatom and dinoflagellate HABs, the life history parameters of rotifers ( Brachionus plicatilis Müller) were measured after exposure to different concentrations of HAB species. The HAB species examined included a diatom ( Skeletonema costatum) and four dinoflagellates ( Prorocentrum donghaiense, Alexandrium catenella, Prorocentrum lima and Karlodinium veneficum). Compared with the control treatment (CT), the diatom S. costatum showed no adverse impacts on rotifers. Exposure to dinoflagellates at densities equivalent to those measured in the field resulted in a reduction in all the life history parameters measured. This included a reduction in: lifetime egg production (CT: 20.34 eggs/ind.) reduced to 10.11, 3.22, 4.17, 7.16 eggs/ind., life span (CT: 394.53 h) reduced to 261.11, 162.90, 203.67, 196 h, net reproductive rate (CT: 19.51/ind.) reduced to 3.01, 1.26, 3.53, 5.96/ind., finite rate of increase (CT: 1.47/d) reduced to 1.16, 1.03, 1.33, 1.38/d, and intrinsic rate of population increase (CT: 0.39/d) reduced to 0.15, 0.03, 0.28, 0.32/d, for the dinoflagellates P. donghaiense, A. catenella, P. lima and K. veneficum, respectively. The results showed that the diatom S. costatum had no detrimental consequences on the reproduction and growth of B. plicatilis, however, the four dinoflagellates tested did show adverse effects. This suggests that dinoflagellate HABs may suppress microzooplankton, resulting in an increase in algal numbers.

  2. Algal blooms in the seas around India - Networking for research and outreach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    the 70s, when blooms were phenomena mostly restricted to the temperate waters, the 90s have been witnessing their spread to tropical and sub-tropical regions as well. The Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries Abstracts world database of FAO, Rome to which...

  3. The effect of zooplankton on the dynamics and molecular composition ofcarbohydrates during an experimental algal bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, J. T.; Søndergaard, M.; Borch, N. H.

    2006-01-01

    The accumulation and degradation of carbohydrates (aldoses) were investigated during diatom blooms in two mesocosms. The effects of macrozooplankton were explored by addition of zooplankton to one mesocosm (+Z). Aldoses accumulated at a steady rate of 4.9 µM C d-1 from day 9 in the mesocosm without...

  4. Lack of variation in voltage-gated sodium channels of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) exposed to neurotoxic algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammen, Kristina M; Rosel, Patricia E; Wells, Randall S; Read, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    In coastal marine ecosystems, neurotoxins produced by harmful algal blooms (HABs) often result in large-scale mortality events of many marine species. Historical and frequent exposure to HABs therefore may provide a strong selective pressure for adaptations that result in toxin resistance. Neurotoxin resistance has independently evolved in a variety of terrestrial and marine species via mutations in genes encoding the toxin binding sites within the voltage-gated sodium channel gene complex. Accordingly, we tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in the putative binding site of brevetoxins in common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) explains differences among individuals or populations in resistance to harmful Karenia brevis blooms in the Gulf of Mexico. We found very little variation in the sodium channel exons encoding the putative brevetoxin binding site among bottlenose dolphins from central-west Florida and the Florida Panhandle. Our study included samples from several bottlenose dolphin mortality events associated with HABs, but we found no association between genetic variation and survival. We observed a significant effect of geographic region on genetic variation for some sodium channel isoforms, but this can be primarily explained by rare private alleles and is more likely a reflection of regional genetic differentiation than the cause of different levels of HAB resistance between regions. In contrast to many other previously studied neurotoxin-resistant species, we conclude that bottlenose dolphins have not evolved resistance to HABs via mutations in genes encoding the brevetoxin binding site on the voltage-gated sodium channels. PMID:25456229

  5. Subsurface seeding of surface harmful algal blooms observed through the integration of autonomous gliders, moored environmental sample processors, and satellite remote sensing in southern California

    KAUST Repository

    Seegers, Bridget N.

    2015-04-01

    An observational study was performed in the central Southern California Bight in Spring 2010 to understand the relationship between seasonal spring phytoplankton blooms and coastal processes that included nutrient input from upwelling, wastewater effluent plumes, and other processes. Multi-month Webb Slocum glider deployments combined with MBARI environmental sample processors (ESPs), weekly pier sampling, and ocean color data provided a multidimensional characterization of the development and evolution of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Results from the glider and ESP observations demonstrated that blooms of toxic Pseudo-nitzschia sp. can develop offshore and subsurface prior to their manifestation in the surface layer and/or near the coast. A significant outbreak and surface manifestation of the blooms coincided with periods of upwelling, or other processes that caused shallowing of the pycnocline and subsurface chlorophyll maximum. Our results indicate that subsurface populations can be an important source for “seeding” surface Pseudo-nitzschia HAB events in southern California.

  6. Distribution and development of algal photosynthesis in sea ice during a spring bloom: A novel application of Imaging-PAM fluorometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hawes, Ian; Lund-Hansen, Lars Chresten; Sorrell, Brian Keith; Nielsen, Morten Holtegaard; Buss, Inge; Borzak, Reká

    were able to migrate with ice growth. Furthermore, increases in maximum fluorescence (Fm) and photosynthesis yield (Y) allowed us to document the progression of a spring bloom in algal biomass and activity. Maximum light intensities in the ice algal communities were ca. 40 µmol PPFD m-2 s-1 and light......-phase measurements on thawed ice, which is artificial and unlikely to be representative of conditions experienced by ice algae in situ. We report here the first ever application of Imaging-PAM fluorometry as a method to estimate algal biomass and photosynthetic parameters in intact sea ice. We collected sea ice...... cores from the Kangerlussuaq Fjord, Greenland, over two weeks in March 2011, and used Imaging-PAM to explore the spatial distribution of algal biomass (predominantly pennate diatoms), fluorescence yield, and light response curves. Algae were largely confined to the lowest 1 cm of the ice column, where...

  7. Eutrophic waters, algal bloom and fish kill in fish farming areas in Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coastal waters of Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines experienced environmental changes over a 10-year period (1995-2005), the most significant effect of which was the major fish kill event in 2002 that coincided with the first reported Philippine bloom of a dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum. Days before the bloom, dissolved oxygen was <2.0 mg/l in the waters that were stratified. These conditions may be linked to the uncontrolled proliferation of fish pens and cages to more than double the allowable limit of 544 units for Bolinao waters. Mariculture activities release organic matter from unconsumed feed and fecal material that accumulate in the water and sediments. In over 10 years, water quality conditions have become eutrophic with ammonia increasing by 56%, nitrite by 35%, nitrate by 90%, and phosphate by 67%. The addition of more fish pens and cages placed additional stress to this poorly flushed, shallow area that affected water quality due to changes in the water residence time

  8. Eutrophic waters, algal bloom and fish kill in fish farming areas in Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    San Diego-McGlone, Maria Lourdes [Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)], E-mail: mcglonem@upmsi.ph; Azanza, Rhodora V.; Villanoy, Cesar L.; Jacinto, Gil S. [Marine Science Institute, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City 1101 (Philippines)

    2008-07-01

    The coastal waters of Bolinao, Pangasinan, Philippines experienced environmental changes over a 10-year period (1995-2005), the most significant effect of which was the major fish kill event in 2002 that coincided with the first reported Philippine bloom of a dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum. Days before the bloom, dissolved oxygen was <2.0 mg/l in the waters that were stratified. These conditions may be linked to the uncontrolled proliferation of fish pens and cages to more than double the allowable limit of 544 units for Bolinao waters. Mariculture activities release organic matter from unconsumed feed and fecal material that accumulate in the water and sediments. In over 10 years, water quality conditions have become eutrophic with ammonia increasing by 56%, nitrite by 35%, nitrate by 90%, and phosphate by 67%. The addition of more fish pens and cages placed additional stress to this poorly flushed, shallow area that affected water quality due to changes in the water residence time.

  9. Evidence for a Novel Marine Harmful Algal Bloom: Cyanotoxin (Microcystin) Transfer from Land to Sea Otters

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Melissa A.; Kudela, Raphael M.; Abdu Mekebri; Dave Crane; Oates, Stori C.; M Timothy Tinker; Michelle Staedler; Miller, Woutrina A.; Sharon Toy-Choutka; Clare Dominik; Dane Hardin; Gregg Langlois; Michael Murray; Kim Ward; Jessup, David A.

    2010-01-01

    "Super-blooms" of cyanobacteria that produce potent and environmentally persistent biotoxins (microcystins) are an emerging global health issue in freshwater habitats. Monitoring of the marine environment for secondary impacts has been minimal, although microcystin-contaminated freshwater is known to be entering marine ecosystems. Here we confirm deaths of marine mammals from microcystin intoxication and provide evidence implicating land-sea flow with trophic transfer through marine invertebr...

  10. In situ algal bloom control by the integration of ultrasonic radiation and jet circulation to flushing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, K; Lee, T J; Matsumura, M

    2001-12-15

    A novel strategy for in situ water bloom control was applied and evaluated in Lake Senba. The proposed strategy was to integrate ultrasonic radiation and water jet circulation to an existing flushing process for reducing the growth rate of cyanobacteria and to support the flushing process by providing efficient mixing. Ten units of the system, each consisting of an ultrasonication module and a water jet circulator module, were strategically situated on the lake, and the performance was monitored for 2 years. Water bloom occurrence reflected as chlorophyll a, SS, and transparency were controlled to lower levels when the integrated system was coupled with sufficient inflow water supply to achieve the target flushing rate. Also, an improvement in the water quality such as COD and phosphorus were observed. Based on linear regression analysis, relationships between water quality parameters and inflow water volume were discussed to evaluate the proposed strategy. Of the three major water quality parameters associated with water bloom, the integrated system contributed mainly to the reduction in SS and transparency compared to chlorophyll a reduction. Improved chlorophyll a reduction may be achieved by strategies that augment effective washout of cyanobacteria during flushing. PMID:11775176

  11. Exploration of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system of a marine algicidal Bacillus and its effect on four harmful algal bloom species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shaoling; Shu, Wanjiao; Tan, Shuo; Zhao, Ling; Yin, Pinghe

    2016-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium, strain B1, initially showed 96.4% algicidal activity against Phaeocystis globosa. Under this situation, 3 other harmful algal species (Skeletonema costatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, and Prorocentrum donghaiense) were chosen to study the algicidal effects of strain B1, and the algicidal activities were 91.4%, 90.7%, and 90.6%, respectively. To explore the algicidal mechanism of strain B1 on these 4 harmful algal species, the characteristics of the antioxidant system and photosynthetic system were studied. Sensitivity to strain B1 supernatant, enzyme activity, and gene expression varied with algal species, while the algicidal patterns were similar. Strain B1 supernatant increased malondialdehyde contents; decreased chlorophyll a contents; changed total antioxidant and superoxide dismutase activity; and restrained psbA, psbD, and rbcL genes expression, which eventually resulted in the algal cells death. The algicidal procedure was observed using field emission scanning electron microscopy, which indicated that algal cells were lysed and cellular substances were released. These findings suggested that the antioxidant and photosynthetic system of these 4 algal species was destroyed under strain B1 supernatant stress. This is the first report to explore and compare the mechanism of a marine Bacillus against harmful algal bloom species of covered 4 phyla. PMID:26634608

  12. 生物制剂法治理藻类水华%Control of algal bloom with immobilized biological catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周晓云; 黄瑞敏; 刘欣; 文淦斌

    2013-01-01

    In situ experiment was conducted in one lake in Guangzhou for controlling the algal bloom using immobilized biological catalyst (IBC). The results show that IBC could quickly reduce algal biomass by the function of bacteria directly or indirectly killing algae, the removal rates of chlorophyll a was up to be 81. 5% . Removal rates of total nitrogen, ammonia-nitrogen and COD were up to 81. 9% , 80. 3% and 65. 3% , respectively from the water which was attributed to the function of microorganism and enzymes of IBC rapid degradation of organic pollutants. As a result, it could inhibit the formation of algae effectively and improve the water quality.%在广州市黄埔区某公园池塘进行现场围隔对比实验,通过投加固定化生物催化剂(IBC)治理藻类水华.结果表明,在IBC中细菌的直接或间接杀藻的作用下,水体中的藻类生物量迅速降低,叶绿素a去除率达到81.5%;微生物的快速生长及酶和酶活因子的协同作用下,水中污染物被快速降解,使水体中的总氮、氨氮和COD的浓度快速下降,去除率分别达到81.9%、80.3%和65.3%,并维持在低水平,进一步抑制了藻类水华的形成和发展,加快水体的净化.

  13. Nutrients and toxin producing phytoplankton control algal blooms – a spatio-temporal study in a noisy environment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ram Rup Sarkar; Horst Malchow

    2005-12-01

    A phytoplankton-zooplankton prey-predator model has been investigated for temporal, spatial and spatio-temporal dissipative pattern formation in a deterministic and noisy environment, respectively. The overall carrying capacity for the phytoplankton population depends on the nutrient level. The role of nutrient concentrations and toxin producing phytoplankton for controlling the algal blooms has been discussed. The local analysis yields a number of stationary and/or oscillatory regimes and their combinations. Correspondingly interesting is the spatio-temporal behaviour, modelled by stochastic reaction-diffusion equations. The present study also reveals the fact that the rate of toxin production by toxin producing phytoplankton (TPP) plays an important role for controlling oscillations in the plankton system. We also observe that different mortality functions of zooplankton due to TPP have significant influence in controlling oscillations, coexistence, survival or extinction of the zooplankton population. External noise can enhance the survival and spread of zooplankton that would go extinct in the deterministic system due to a high rate of toxin production.

  14. Impact of Interdecadal Sea Level and Sea Surface Temperature Variability on Primary Productivity and Harmful Algal Blooms in Southern California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, K. L.

    2014-12-01

    Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are increasing in frequency and intensity on global, regional and local scales. Although climate change has been suggested as one of the key factors, very few interdecadal studies comparing HABs to low frequency physical forcing have been performed. Interannual to interdecadal variability in sea level and sea surface temperature along the Southern California Coast have been shown to have high correlation with the El Nino-La Nina signal. This is important in the study of phytoplankton, because abnormally low sea level corresponds to increased sea surface nutrient concentrations in this region. The California current is stronger during these times, and the higher nutrient water found to the north is advected southward. We have determined that primary productivity is most highly correlated with interdecadal sea level variability derived from tide gage data at a lag of approximately 2 months. This is consistent with previous zooplankton studies. In preparation for a potential El Nino event, we have expanded our analysis to include parameters such as sea surface temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations from spaceborne and in situ instruments. We have also expanded our research to allow for analysis of several of the most prevalent HAB species. This work is the first step in our effort to create a model to predict and locate Southern California HAB events in the future.

  15. Harmful Algal Bloom Characterization at Ultra-High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Using Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deon Van der Merwe

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs degrade water quality and produce toxins. The spatial distribution of HAbs may change rapidly due to variations wind, water currents, and population dynamics. Risk assessments, based on traditional sampling methods, are hampered by the sparseness of water sample data points, and delays between sampling and the availability of results. There is a need for local risk assessment and risk management at the spatial and temporal resolution relevant to local human and animal interactions at specific sites and times. Small, unmanned aircraft systems can gather color-infrared reflectance data at appropriate spatial and temporal resolutions, with full control over data collection timing, and short intervals between data gathering and result availability. Data can be interpreted qualitatively, or by generating a blue normalized difference vegetation index (BNDVI that is correlated with cyanobacterial biomass densities at the water surface, as estimated using a buoyant packed cell volume (BPCV. Correlations between BNDVI and BPCV follow a logarithmic model, with r2-values under field conditions from 0.77 to 0.87. These methods provide valuable information that is complimentary to risk assessment data derived from traditional risk assessment methods, and could help to improve risk management at the local level.

  16. Learning-Based Algal Bloom Event Recognition for Oceanographic Decision Support System Using Remote Sensing Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilong Song

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of machine learning methods to build a decision support system for predicting the distribution of coastal ocean algal blooms based on remote sensing data in Monterey Bay. This system can help scientists obtain prior information in a large ocean region and formulate strategies for deploying robots in the coastal ocean for more detailed in situ exploration. The difficulty is that there are insufficient in situ data to create a direct statistical machine learning model with satellite data inputs. To solve this problem, we built a Random Forest model using MODIS and MERIS satellite data and applied a threshold filter to balance the training inputs and labels. To build this model, several features of remote sensing satellites were tested to obtain the most suitable features for the system. After building the model, we compared our random forest model with previous trials based on a Support Vector Machine (SVM using satellite data from 221 days, and our approach performed significantly better. Finally, we used the latest in situ data from a September 2014 field experiment to validate our model.

  17. A multi-temporal analysis for change assessment and estimation of algal bloom in Sambhar Lake, Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Pinto, Shannon M; Kushwaha, Vikash K; Pal, Sukdeb; Nandy, Tapas

    2016-09-01

    Sambhar Lake in Rajasthan, India is the major inland salt water lake producing salt for centuries. The present study addresses the monitoring changes in and around the lake and its consequent effect on the lake water ecology. For this, satellite images of the years 1976, 1981, 1997, and 2013 are analyzed for land use land cover classes. Significant reduction in the water body is observed in contrast with the increase in salt pan around the periphery of lake and wetland classes. Further, the extent of water body and algae in the lake are delineated as per normalized difference water index and normalized difference vegetation index. Rainfall data do not indicate any major change in the pattern, but drastic decrease in the extent of water body and significant increase in algal bloom are serious concerns for the lake's existence. This may be due to surrounding anthropogenic activities and construction of check dams and anicuts in the lake catchment which curtail the runoff into the lake and provide favorable growth of algae. Sambhar Lake, being declared as a wetland according to the Ramsar Convention, is necessary to protect and conserve the ecological importance of the lake through sustainable planning and management. PMID:27502521

  18. The application of isotope and geochemical techniques to reveal contributions of submarine groundwater and septic systems discharges to algal bloom in Boracay Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study shows that critical areas in Boracay island are contaminated by coliform bacteria and blue green algae (cyanobacteria). The distribution of tritium, 18O, 15N, and 13C in seawater, biota and sediments in the intertidal zone, helped to identify sites with specific sewage outflows and submarine groundwater discharge, SGD, Nitrates (from, 0.0 to 2.3 parts per million, ppm) and nutrients were discovered in seawater, particularly in four identified sites in the bathing zone. Point sources of infiltrating plumes were exposed by anomalies in tritium and 18O in sea water. Septic and canal outflows as well as land based run-offs and submarine groundwater discharge were the identified causes of nutrient enrichments in sites with eminent algal bloom. The isotope composition implied that algae acquire nutrients from septic contamination, while a number of corals assimilate inorganic fertilizer nutrients from land-based plumes and SGD. The elements identified in sediments and corals were related to the natural mineral matrix of calcareous beach zone materials; however, sporadic spikes of lead, chromium and zinc were detected in particular sites at certain depths. These element spikes proxy processes linked to anthropogenic pollution and or organic matter decomposition in the sediment-water interfaces. The practicality of applying isotope-based techniques in conjunction with other chemical methods for the tracking down of the sources of nutrient contamination in polluted systems is demonstrated by the study.

  19. Isotopes of carbon, nitrogen and oxygen reveal contributions of submarine groundwater and septic systems discharges to algal bloom in Boracay Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study showed that critical areas in Boracay island were contaminated by coliform bacteria and blue green algae (cyanobacteria). The distribution of tritium, 18O,15N and 13C in seawater, biota and sediments in the inter tidal zone, helped to identify sites with septic sewage outflows and submarine groundwater discharge, SGD. Nitrates (from 0.0 to 2.3 parts per million, ppm) and nutrients were discovered in seawater, particularly in four identified sites in the bathing zone. Point sources of infiltrating plumes were exposed by anomalies in tritium and 18O in sea water. Septic and canal outflows as well as land based run-offs and submarine groundwater discharge were the identified causes of nutrient enrichments in sites with eminent algal bloom. The isotope composition implied that algae acquire nutrients from septic contamination, while a number of corals assimilate inorganic fertilizer nutrients from land-based plumes and SGD. The elements identified in sediments and corals were related to the natural mineral matrix of calcareous beach zone materials, however, sporadic spikes of lead, chromium and zinc were detected in particular sites at certain depths. These element spikes proxy processes linked to anthropogenic pollution and or organic matter decomposition in the sediment-water interfaces. The practicality of applying isotope-based techniques in conjunction with other chemical methods for the tracking down of the sources of nutrient contamination in polluted systems in demonstrated by the study.(author)

  20. The use of pigment "fingerprints" in the study of harmful algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustillos-Guzmán, J; Gárate-Lizárraga, I; López-Cortés, D; Hernández-Sandoval, F

    2004-09-01

    Along the Mexican coast, harmful algae blooms (HAB) have become more frequent, and therefore, there is an urgent need to establish monitoring programs to avoid the undesired consequences of HAB in human and natural ecosystems. In this work, we analyzed the pigment signatures and the species composition from phytoplankton samples to evaluate the utility of the specific pigment "fingerprints" in HAB monitoring programs. Vertical profiles from a coastal lagoon and temporal samples of a red tide occurring in a shrimp-culture pond and in a coastal zone were taken into consideration. Between 76% and 84% of dinoflagellate and diatom cell density was explained by their specific signature variation, in both vertical and temporal samples. Only the variation of zeaxanthin and the cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. showed a poor relationship, probably from difficulties in counting other cyanobacteria present in the samples examined with the microscopic method. These results suggest that inclusion of pigment analysis in the study and monitoring programs dealing with harmful algae would be very useful. PMID:17465114

  1. [Impacts of algal blooms accumulation on physiological ecology of water hyacinth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting-ting; Liu, Guo-feng; Han, Shi-qun; Zhou, Qing; Tang, Wan-ying

    2015-01-01

    Blue-green algae bloom will consume plenty of dissolved oxygen in water, which affects the growth of aquatic plants. The effects of water hyacinth growth and physiological response changes under 25 degrees C, 5 different concentrations of cyanobacteria gathered were studied and which would provide a theoretical basis to mitigate adverse impacts and improve water purification effect. The results showed that water quality indexes including dissolved oxygen (DO), pH dropped in algae density below 60 g x L(-1), with the increase of algae density. And the level of oxidation-reduction potential dropped to about 100 mV. The removal rates of TN, TP and COD were 58%-78%, 43%-68% and 59%-73%, leaf soluble protein, soluble sugar, MDA contents increased, respectively; and the MDA content became higher with the increase of algae density. It indicated that the water hyacinth could adapt to the adversity condition as algae density less than 60 g x L(-1). While algae density above 60 g x L(-1), water quality indexes significantly decreased, respectively and the water was in hypoxia or anoxia conditions. Plant leaves soluble sugar contents had a change trend of low-high-low. It indicated that the removal rates of TN, TP decreased with the increase of algae density and water hyacinth had irreversible stress. Plant root length, total length, fresh weight in different treatments, increased compared with the beginning of the experiment, the increase of root length, total length and fresh weight were 0.29-2.44 times, 0.41-0.76 times and 0.9-1.43 times. The increase of root length, total length decreased with the increase of algae density. According to the results, the cyanobacteria should avoid of excessive accumulation as using the floating plant to purify the water. PMID:25898654

  2. Satellite Retrievals of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms in the West Florida Shelf Using Neural Networks and Comparisons with Other Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-habashi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the application of a Neural Network (NN previously developed by us, to the detection and tracking, of Karenia brevis Harmful Algal Blooms (KB HABs that plague the coasts of the West Florida Shelf (WFS using Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS satellite observations. Previous approaches for the detection of KB HABs in the WFS primarily used observations from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Aqua (MODIS-A satellite. They depended on the remote sensing reflectance signal at the 678 nm chlorophyll fluorescence band (Rrs678 needed for both the normalized fluorescence height (nFLH and Red Band Difference algorithms (RBD currently used. VIIRS which has replaced MODIS-A, unfortunately does not have a 678 nm fluorescence channel so we customized the NN approach to retrieve phytoplankton absorption at 443 nm (aph443 using only Rrs measurements from existing VIIRS channels at 486, 551 and 671 nm. The aph443 values in these retrieved VIIRS images, can in turn be correlated to chlorophyll-a concentrations [Chla] and KB cell counts. To retrieve KB values, the VIIRS NN retrieved aph443 images are filtered by applying limiting constraints, defined by (i low backscatter at Rrs 551 nm and (ii a minimum aph443 value known to be associated with KB HABs in the WFS. The resulting filtered residual images, are then used to delineate and quantify the existing KB HABs. Comparisons with KB HABs satellite retrievals obtained using other techniques, including nFLH, as well as with in situ measurements reported over a four year period, confirm the viability of the NN technique, when combined with the filtering constraints devised, for effective detection of KB HABs.

  3. Application of 210Pb-derived sedimentation rates and dinoflagellate cyst analyses in understanding Pyrodinium bahamense harmful algal blooms in Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of areas affected by toxic harmful algal bloom (HAB) in the Philippines has been increasing since its first recorded occurrence in 1983. Thus far, HAB has been reported in about 20 areas in the Philippines including major fishery production areas. The HAB-causing organism (Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum) produces a cyst during its life cycle. Pyrodinium cysts which are deposited in the sediment column may play a role in initiating a toxic bloom. 210Pb-derived sedimentation rate studies in the two important fishing grounds of Manila Bay and Malampaya Sound, Palawan have shown that Pyrodinium cysts may have been present in the sediment even before the first recorded toxic algal bloom in these areas. High sedimentation rates (approximately 1 cm/year) have been observed in the Northern and Western parts of Manila Bay. The results indicate that the sedimentation processes occurring in these bays would require subsurface cyst concentration analysis in evaluating the potential of an area to act as sea bed

  4. Research Advance in Early Warning Model and Monitoring of Algal Bloom%水华预警模型及监测技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    包慧; 刘颖; 尹静

    2012-01-01

    近年来,日趋严重的水体富营养化和频繁发生的藻华严重影响着人类的生存环境,因此对水华的发生做出及时准确的监测预警具有重要意义.该文从经典的指标因子临界值预警、基于水文水质参数的数学统计模型及遥感监测技术三个方面介绍了国内外水华监测预警技术的研究进展,分析了现有预警模型和监测手段存在的问题,提出了利用生物群落多样性及基因芯片等技术在分子水平上对水华发生进行监测预警的可行性.%In recent years,the increasing water eutrophication and the frequent occurrence of water bloom has seriously affected human living environment,thus,it is of great significance making timely and accurately monitoring and warning for water bloom.The evolvement of the early-warning and prediction technologies of algal bloom at home and abroad were reviewed in this paper,including specific factors critical value prediction,math model based on hydrology and water quality parameters,and remote sensing (RS) technology,and the advantages and disadvantages of these three technologies were analyzed separately.Some new ideas of prediction on algal bloom which based on community diversity and microarray were brought forward after the comparative analyses of the three technologies mentioned above.

  5. A marine algicidal Thalassospira and its active substance against the harmful algal bloom species Karenia mikimotoi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiuhua; Zhou, Bin; Xu, Lili; Liu, Lin; Wang, Gangyuan; Liu, Xiaodong; Tang, Xuexi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to obtain a marine bacterium active against Karenia mikimotoi from the East China Sea and to characterize its extracellular algicidal substances. Using preparative high-performance liquid chromatography (prep-HPLC) and electrospray ionization/quadrupole-time of flight mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography (LC/MS-Q-TOF) system, we purified the alga-lysing substance produced by strain ZR-2 and determined its molecular structure. Based on morphology and l6S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequence analysis, the ZR-2 strain was highly homologous to Thalassospira species. Algicidal activity against K. mikimotoi was detected in the cell-free filtrate but not in bacterial cells. The alga-lysing substance produced by ZR-2 was ethanol-soluble and thermostable, with a retention time of 6.3 min and a measured elemental composition of C7H5O2 ([M-H](-) ion at m/z 121.0295). The alga-lysing substance produced by ZR-2 was determined to be benzoic acid. Compared with the negative control, both purified ZR-2 bacteria-free filtrate and standard benzoic acid promoted K. mikimotoi cell disruption and induced K. mikimotoi cell content leakage. Our study is the first to report benzoic acid activity against K. mikimotoi as well as production of benzoic acid by a Thalassospira species. PMID:26846742

  6. Harmful algal blooms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.; PrabhaDevi; DeSouza, L.; Verlecar, X.N.; Naik, C.G.

    between Coodapur and Mangalore. The waters here appeared more productive as evidenced by the frequent shoals of sardines and squids. Similar was the case with the Karwar waters (Figure 2). The 1980s started witnessing the cases of PSPs, largely from...

  7. Classification methods of different remote sense in the East China Sea during an algal bloom%赤潮期东海水体不同遥感分类算法应用分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    申力; 许惠平; 吴萍

    2012-01-01

    This paper focused on extracting water classification of the Yangtze River Estuary and the adjacent East China Sea during an algal bloom using three remote sensing approaches. Firstly,both Supervised Maximum likelihood and Unsupervised ISODATA methods were applied into the classification extraction. Then, based on the spectral characteristics of different waters a new method named Band-ratio Threshold Method consisting of Model 1 and Model 2 was developed, Cl= Lrs (645 ) /Lrs (469) and C2 = Lre (555) /Lrs ( 469). The results derived from three methods showed the spatial distribution of waters in our study area from the coastal area to open ocean. They were the suspended sediment water,eutrophication water,and algal bloom water,boundary water of algal bloom and open ocean water. The maximum likelihood supervised method was more specific to classes of comparatively homogenous pixel values such as suspended sediment water and eutrophication water,while ISODATA unsupervised method could serve as a reference proof due to its severe misjudgments. Compared with the aforementioned two methods,the method put forward in this paper had a higher accuracy. The results of Model 1 was superior in identifying suspended sediment water with an overall accuracy of 91.34% and the Kappa coefficient of 0.88; Model 2 could better detect the spatial range of the algal bloom water with an overall accuracy of 94.14% and Kappa coefficient of 0.92.%对赤潮期长江口及邻近东海海域水体进行了三种不同遥感分类方法的水体类别提取.首先进行了最大似然监督法和ISODATA非监督法两种代表性的水体遥感分类,之后提出了两种基于水体光谱曲线特征的波段比值阈值分割模型,即C1=Lrs(645)/Lrs(469)和C2= Lrs(555)/Lrs(469).对比发现,三种方法分类结果均揭示出了长江口及邻近东海海域近岸到远洋的水体空间变化规律,依次为悬浮泥沙水体、富营养化水体、赤潮水体、赤潮边界水

  8. Subtle reproductive impairment through nitric oxide-mediated mechanisms in sea urchins from an area affected by harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliaccio, Oriana; Castellano, Immacolata; di Cioccio, Davide; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Negri, Armando; Cirino, Paola; Romano, Giovanna; Zingone, Adriana; Palumbo, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The health of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus, a key species in the Mediterranean Sea, is menaced by several pressures in coastal environments. Here, we aimed at assessing the reproductive ability of apparently healthy P. lividus population in a marine protected area affected by toxic blooms of Ostreospsis cf. ovata. Wide-ranging analyses were performed in animals collected prior to and during the bloom, as well as at several times thereafter, during the reproductive season. Adults showed a low fertilization rate, along with high nitric oxide (NO) levels in the gonads and the nitration of the major yolk protein toposome, which is an important player in sea urchin development. Serious developmental anomalies were observed in the progeny, which persist several months after the bloom. NO levels were high in the different developmental stages, which also showed variations in the transcription of several genes that were found to be directly or indirectly modulated by NO. These results highlight subtle but important reproductive flaws transmitted from the female gonads to the offspring with the NO involvement. Despite a recovery along time after the bloom, insidious damages can be envisaged in the local sea urchin population, with possible reverberation on the whole benthic system.

  9. Discovery of an algicidal compound from Brevibacterium sp. BS01 and its effect on a harmful algal bloom-causing species, Alexandrium tamarense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli eAn

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense have become worldwide phenomena and have detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. In this study, a culture supernatant of the marine actinomycete BS01 exerted a strong algicidal effect on A. tamarense (ATGD98-006. The target algicide from BS01 was separated by adsorption chromatography and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and NMR analysis. The results suggested that the purified algicidal component corresponded to a hydrophobic compound (2-isobutoxyphenylamine (C10H15NO with a molecular weight of 165 Da, which exhibited a significant algicidal effect (64.5% on A. tamarense. After incubation in 5 μg/mL of (2-isobutoxyphenylamine for 24 h, the algae lost mobility and sank to the bottom of the flasks, and 56.5% of the algae cells lost vitality at a concentration of 20 μg/mL (p < 0.01 despite having intact cell profiles. Morphological analysis revealed that the cell structure of A. tamarense was altered by (2-isobutoxyphenylamine resulting in cytoplasm degradation and the loss of organelle integrity. The images following propidium iodide staining suggested that the algal nucleus was also severely damaged and eventually degraded due to exposure to the algicidal compound. All of the results indicate that (2-isobutoxyphenylamine from the actinomycete might be a candidate for the control of bloom-forming A. tamarense.

  10. Discovery of an algicidal compound from Brevibacterium sp. BS01 and its effect on a harmful algal bloom-causing species, Alexandrium tamarense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Zhiming; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Blooms of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense have become worldwide phenomena and have detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. In this study, a culture supernatant of the marine actinomycete BS01 exerted a strong algicidal effect on A. tamarense (ATGD98-006). The target algicide from BS01 was separated by adsorption chromatography and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and NMR analysis. The results suggested that the purified algicidal component corresponded to a hydrophobic compound (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine (C10H15NO) with a molecular weight of 165 Da, which exhibited a significant algicidal effect (64.5%) on A. tamarense. After incubation in 5 μg/mL of (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine for 24 h, the algae lost mobility and sank to the bottom of the flasks, and 56.5% of the algae cells lost vitality at a concentration of 20 μg/mL (p < 0.01) despite having intact cell profiles. Morphological analysis revealed that the cell structure of A. tamarense was altered by (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine resulting in cytoplasm degradation and the loss of organelle integrity. The images following propidium iodide staining suggested that the algal nucleus was also severely damaged and eventually degraded due to exposure to the algicidal compound. All of the results indicate that (2-isobutoxyphenyl)amine from the actinomycete might be a candidate for the control of bloom-forming A. tamarense. PMID:26594205

  11. 植物化感作用在控制水华藻类中的应用%Application of Plant Allelopathy in Controlling of Algal Bloom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹华; 邓继选; 朱银

    2012-01-01

    伴随着水环境污染,水体中藻类疯长形成的“水华”、“赤潮”现象日益严重.各种化学、物理、生物方法被用于抑制藻类的生长,但这些方法都存在不易控制、成本高、易破坏生态等问题.利用植物化感作用抑制藻类生长具有生态安全和灵敏高效等优点,对湖泊富营养化的生态控制具有非常重要的意义.作者介绍了植物化感抑藻的研究进展,归纳了化感作用的种类和化感物质的化学成分,并讨论了植物化感抑藻的作用机制、抑藻机理,最后对植物化感作用在抑藻方面的研究前景进行了展望.%With the serious water pollution, the "algal bloom", "red tide" formed by the overpopulation of algal is getting worse. At present, different methods including chemical, physical, biological were used to inhibit the growth of algae in polluted water. However, the characteristics of these methods are difficult controlling, high cost, and damaging the ecology. In order to develop a low cost and ecologically safe method to inhibit the growth of algae, plant allelopathy is introduced. In this review, the research progress of algal -inhibition with plant allelopathy was introduced, the types of plant allelopathy and the chemical composition of allelo-chemicals were summarized , the mechanisms and perspective of plant allelopathy were discussed.

  12. Neural network algorithms for retrieval of harmful algal blooms in the west Florida shelf from VIIRS satellite observations and comparisons with other techniques, without the need for a fluorescence channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-habashi, A.; Ahmed, S.

    2015-10-01

    New approaches are described that use of the Ocean Color Remote Sensing Reflectance readings (OC Rrs) available from the existing Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) bands to detect and retrieve Karenia brevis (KB) Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) that frequently plague the coasts of the West Florida Shelf (WFS). Unfortunately, VIIRS, unlike MODIS, does not have a 678 nm channel to detect Chlorophyll fluorescence, which is used with MODIS in the normalized fluorescence height (nFLH) algorithm which has been shown to help in effectively detecting and tracking KB HABs. We present here the use of neural network (NN) algorithms for KB HABS retrievals in the WFS. These NNs, previously reported by us, were trained, using a wide range of suitably parametrized synthetic data typical of coastal waters, to form a multiband inversion algorithm which models the relationship between Rrs values at the 486, 551 and 671nm VIIRS bands against the values of phytoplankton absorption (aph), CDOM absorption (ag), non-algal particles (NAP) absorption (aNAP) and the particulate backscattering bbp coefficients, all at 443nm, and permits retrievals of these parameters. We use the NN to retrieve aph443 in the WFS. The retrieved aph443 values are then filtered by applying known limiting conditions on minimum Chlorophyll concentration [Chla] and low backscatter properties associated with KB HABS in the WFS, thereby identifying, delineating and quantifying the aph443 values, and hence [Chl] concentrations representing KB HABS. Comparisons with in-situ measurements and other techniques including MODIS nFLH confirm the viability of both the NN retrievals and the filtering approaches devised.

  13. Use of fuzzy logic models for prediction of taste and odor compounds in algal bloom-affected inland water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruder, Slawa; Babbar-Sebens, Meghna; Tedesco, Lenore; Soyeux, Emmanuel

    2014-03-01

    Mechanistic modeling of how algal species produce metabolites (e.g., taste and odor compounds geosmin and 2-methyl isoborneol (2-MIB)) as a biological response is currently not well understood. However, water managers and water utilities using these reservoirs often need methods for predicting metabolite production, so that appropriate water treatment procedures can be implemented. In this research, a heuristic approach using Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) was developed to determine the underlying nonlinear and uncertain quantitative relationship between observed cyanobacterial metabolites (2-MIB and geosmin), various algal species, and physical and chemical variables. The model is proposed to be used in conjunction with numerical water quality models that can predict spatial-temporal distribution of flows, velocities, water quality parameters, and algal functional groups. The coupling of the proposed metabolite model with the numerical water quality models would assist various utilities which use mechanistic water quality models to also be able to predict distribution of taste and odor metabolites, especially when monitoring of metabolites is limited. The proposed metabolite model was developed and tested for the Eagle Creek Reservoir in Indiana (USA) using observations over a 3-year period (2008-2010). Results show that the developed models performed well for geosmin (R (2) = 0.83 for all training data and R (2) = 0.78 for validation of all 10 data points in the validation dataset) and reasonably well for the 2-MIB (R (2) = 0.82 for all training data and R (2) = 0.70 for 7 out of 10 data points in the validation dataset). PMID:24242080

  14. A Recent Survey on Bloom Filters in Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.Saravanan,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Computer networks are prone to hacking, viruses and other malware; a Network Intrusion Detection System (NIDS is needed to protect the end-user machines from threats. An effective NIDS is therefore anetwork security system capable of protecting the end user machines well before a threat or intruder affects. NIDS requires a space efficient data base for detection of threats in high speed conditions. A bloom filter is a space efficient randomized data structure for representing a set in order to support membership queries. These Bloom filters allow false positive results (FPR but the space saving capability often outweigh this drawback provided the probability of FPR is controlled. Research is being done to reduce FPR by modifying the structure of bloom filters and enabling it to operate in the increasing network speeds, thus variant bloom filters are being introduced. The aim of this paper is to survey the ways in which Bloom filters have been used and modified to be used in high speed Network Intrusion Detection Systems with their merits and demerits.

  15. Algal blooms and "Marine snow": Mechanisms that enhance preservation of organic carbon in ancient fine-grained sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macquaker, J.H.S.; Keller, M.A.; Davies, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    Combined petographic and geochemical methods are used to investigate the microfabrics present in thin sections prepared from representative organic carbon-rich mudstones collected from three successions (the Kimmeridge Clay Formation, the Jet Rock Member of the Whitby Mudstone Formation, and the pebble shale and Hue Shale). This study was initiated to determine how organic carbon-rich materials were being delivered to the sediment-water interface, and what happened to them after deposition, prior to deep burial. Analyses of the fabrics present shows that they exhibit many common attributes. In particular they are all: (1) highly heterogeneous on the scale of a thin section, (2) organized into thin beds (carbonate materials, and (3) contain significant concentrations of organic carbon, much of which is organized into laminasets that contain abundant organomineralic aggregates and pellets. In addition, framboidal pyrite (range of sizes from organisms using either aerobic or dysaerobic metabolic pathways. These textures suggest that the constituents of these mudstones were delivered neither as a continuous rain of sediment nor were the bottom waters persistently anoxic. In addition, the presence of thin lags and sharp-based beds suggests that the seafloor was being episodically reworked during deposition. These fabrics indicate that conditions in the water columns and at the seafloors while these rocks were being deposited were very dynamic, and episodic fluxes of high concentrations of organic carbon to the seafloor, during phytoplankton blooms, likely enhanced preservation of organic carbon. Copyright ?? 2010, SEPM (Society for Sedimentary Geology).

  16. The effect of zooplankton on the dynamics and molecular composition of carbohydrates during an experimental algal bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels H. BORCH

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation and degradation of carbohydrates (aldoses were investigated during diatom blooms in two mesocosms. The effects of macrozooplankton were explored by addition of zooplankton to one mesocosm (+Z. Aldoses accumulated at a steady rate of 4.9 μM C d-1 from day 9 in the mesocosm without zooplankton (-Z, while zooplankton induced an increased rate to 10.3 μM C d-1. The surplus of 14 μM dissolved combined carbohydrates (DCCHO in the +Z mesocosm after 22 days was caused by higher concentrations of arabinose, galactose and rhamnose. The increase was 50, 25 and 25% respectively in the +Z mesocosm, compared with the -Z mesocosm. The introduction of zooplankton had a significant effect on the rate of biodegradation and the fraction of refractory aldoses. The accumulated aldoses became less labile and a larger fraction was refractory with the presence of zooplankton. During degradation the fraction of dissolved organic carbon (DOC explained by aldoses decreased in the –Z mesocosm while it increased with the presence of grazers. In the +Z mesocosm, two new peaks appeared on the chromatograms and contributed about 4% to the total area of aldoses. It is hypothesised that these two peaks are an indicator of the presence of grazers.

  17. Detection of microcystins in Pamvotis lake water and assessment of cyanobacterial bloom toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Theodoti; Armeni, Euthimia; Stalikas, Constantine D; Kagalou, Ifigeneia; Leonardos, Ioannis D

    2012-05-01

    Lake Pamvotis is a shallow, eutrophic Mediterranean lake with ecological significance. This paper deals with the evaluation of cyanobacterial toxicity in Lake Pamvotis. ELISA and HPLC revealed the presence of significant amounts of MCYST-LR. Danio rerio bioassay confirmed the toxic nature of the bloom. Cyanobacterial extracts had adverse toxic effects on development of D. rerio. Also, it was shown that cyanobacterial extracts containing environmentally detected concentrations of MCYST can cause reduced survival rate of fish species. The results clearly indicate that cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Pamvotis may be regarded as human and fish health hazard. Continuous monitoring of the lake is suggested, in order to prevent future possible intoxications. PMID:21713485

  18. Effects of temperature, salinity, and irradiance on the growth of harmful algal bloom species Phaeocystis globosa Scherffel (Prymnesiophyceae) isolated from the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Huang, Bozhu; Hu, Zhangxi; Tang, Yingzhong; Duan, Shunshan; Zhang, Chengwu

    2016-06-01

    Blooms of Phaeocystis globosa have been frequently reported in Chinese coastal waters, causing serious damage to marine ecosystems. To better understand the ecological characteristics of P. globosa in Chinese coastal waters that facilitate its rapid expansion, the effects of temperature, salinity and irradiance on the growth of P. globosa from the South China Sea were examined in the laboratory. The saturating irradiance for the growth of P. globosa (I s) was 60 μmol/(m2•s), which was lower than those of other harmful algal species (70-114 μmol/(m2•s)). A moderate growth rate of 0.22/d was observed at 2 μmol/(m2•s) (the minimum irradiance in the experiment), and photo-inhibition did not occur at 230 μmol/(m2•s) (the maximum irradiance in the experiment). Exposed to 42 different combinations of temperatures (10-31°C) and salinities (10-40) under saturating irradiance, P. globosa exhibited its maximum specific growth rate of 0.80/d at the combinations of 24°C and 35, and 27°C and 40. The optimum growth rates (>0.80/d) were observed at temperatures ranging from 24 to 27°C and salinities from 35 to 40. While P. globosa was able to grow well at temperatures from 20°C to 31°C and salinities from 20 to 40, it could not grow at temperatures lower than 15°C or salinities lower than 15. Factorial analysis revealed that temperature and salinity has similar influences on the growth of this species. This strain of P. globosa not only prefers higher temperatures and higher salinity, but also possesses a flexible nutrient competing strategy, adapted to lower irradiance. Therefore, the P. globosa population from South China Sea should belong to a new ecotype. There is also a potentially high risk of blooms developing in this area throughout the year.

  19. Progress in Understanding Algal Bloom-Mediated Fish Kills: The Role of Superoxide Radicals, Phycotoxins and Fatty Acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Dorantes-Aranda

    Full Text Available Quantification of the role of reactive oxygen species, phycotoxins and fatty acids in fish toxicity by harmful marine microalgae remains inconclusive. An in vitro fish gill (from rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss assay was used to simultaneously assess the effect in superoxide dismutase, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities caused by seven species of ichthyotoxic microalgae (Chattonella marina, Fibrocapsa japonica, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Alexandrium catenella, Karlodinium veneficum, Prymnesium parvum. Quantification of superoxide production by these algae was also performed. The effect of purified phycotoxins and crude extracts was compared, and the effect of fatty acids is discussed. The raphidophyte Chattonella was the most ichthyotoxic (gill cell viability down to 35% and also the major producer of superoxide radicals (14 pmol cell-1 hr-1 especially after cell lysis. The raphidophyte Heterosigma and dinoflagellate Alexandrium were the least toxic and had low superoxide production, except when A. catenella was lysed (5.6 pmol cell-1 hr-1. Catalase showed no changes in activity in all the treatments. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and lactate dehydrogenase exhibited significant activity increases of ≤23% and 51.2% TCC (total cellular content, respectively, after exposure to C. marina, but SOD showed insignificant changes with remaining algal species. A strong relationship between gill cell viability and superoxide production or superoxide dismutase was not observed. Purified brevetoxins PbTx-2 and -3 (from Karenia brevis, LC50 of 22.1 versus 35.2 μg mL-1 and karlotoxin KmTx-2 (from Karlodinium; LC50 = 380 ng mL-1 could almost entirely account for the fish killing activity by those two dinoflagellates. However, the paralytic shellfish toxins (PST GTX1&4, C1&C2, and STX did not account for Alexandrium ichthyotoxicity. Only aqueous extracts of Alexandrium were cytotoxic (≤65% decrease of viability, whereas

  20. Recurring patterns in bacterioplankton dynamics during coastal spring algae blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teeling, Hanno; Fuchs, Bernhard M; Bennke, Christin M; Krüger, Karen; Chafee, Meghan; Kappelmann, Lennart; Reintjes, Greta; Waldmann, Jost; Quast, Christian; Glöckner, Frank Oliver; Lucas, Judith; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Wiltshire, Karen H; Amann, Rudolf I

    2016-01-01

    A process of global importance in carbon cycling is the remineralization of algae biomass by heterotrophic bacteria, most notably during massive marine algae blooms. Such blooms can trigger secondary blooms of planktonic bacteria that consist of swift successions of distinct bacterial clades, most prominently members of the Flavobacteriia, Gammaproteobacteria and the alphaproteobacterial Roseobacter clade. We investigated such successions during spring phytoplankton blooms in the southern North Sea (German Bight) for four consecutive years. Dense sampling and high-resolution taxonomic analyses allowed the detection of recurring patterns down to the genus level. Metagenome analyses also revealed recurrent patterns at the functional level, in particular with respect to algal polysaccharide degradation genes. We, therefore, hypothesize that even though there is substantial inter-annual variation between spring phytoplankton blooms, the accompanying succession of bacterial clades is largely governed by deterministic principles such as substrate-induced forcing. PMID:27054497

  1. The quantitative real-time PCR applications in the monitoring of marine harmful algal bloom (HAB) species

    OpenAIRE

    Antonella, Penna; Luca, Galluzzi

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, various molecular methods (e.g., fluorescent hybridization assay, sandwich hybridization assay, automatized biosensor detection, real-time PCR assay) have been developed and implemented for accurate and specific identification and estimation of marine toxic microalgal species. This review focuses on the recent quantitative real-time PCR (qrt-PCR) technology developed for the control and monitoring of the most important taxonomic phytoplankton groups producing biotoxins wit...

  2. Detection of Harmful Algal Toxins Using the Radioligand Receptor Binding Assay. A Manual of Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine ecosystems and their resources play major roles in sustaining human population and economic growth in coastal developing countries. These ecosystems are subjected to various natural and human-made threats. Among these are harmful algal blooms (HABs), which are natural phenomena that are increasingly being reported around the globe and responsible for human poisoning through the accumulation of potent toxins in marine food products. The impact of HABs may be aggravated by a limited knowledge of the microalgal species that cause toxic outbreaks, their biology, their diversity, their life cycles, and by poor capabilities for predicting the outbreaks and assessing the degree of HAB toxicity. Other negative factors are the lack of recognition of the disease, the lack of epidemiological data, the lack of adequate and specific treatment and low public awareness. Owing to the profound public health and socioeconomic impact of HABs, many countries have developed and implemented HAB related monitoring programmes and regulatory frameworks. Following a request made by the Philippines during the IAEA General Conference in 1997 to identify possible meaures to address the impacts of HABs, the IAEA initiated related Technical Cooperation projects to assist Member States in strengthening their capacities for prevention, management and mitigation of health and socioeconomic impacts of HABs. Since 1998, the IAEA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have undertaken concerted actions to develop and to validate a radioligand based method, the receptor binding assay (RBA). The RBA is now recognized by the AOAC International as an official method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins. Within the IAEA Technical Cooperation programme, the RBA methodology was transferred to over 23 Member States in Africa, Asia, the Pacific region and Latin America. Transfer of knowledge and relevant equipment has enabled the development and strengthening

  3. Aquatic plant allelopathy emergency disposal of red tide and freshwater algal blooms%水生植物化感作用应急处置海洋赤潮和淡水水华

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    边归国

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, Allelopathy is becoming the new technology to control algae outbreaks. According to the research results at home and abroad, focus on the aquatic plant allelopathy, allelopathic algal material, algae emergency response methods, the red tide and algal blooms in freshwater emergency response and mechanism are reviewed, and the future development are to be Looking.%近年来,植物化感作用逐渐成为控制藻类暴发的一种新技术。根据国内外的研究成果,着重从水生植物化感作用、化感抑藻物质、应急处置藻类方法、海洋赤潮和淡水水华的应急处置及机理进行评述,并对该技术今后的发展予以展望。

  4. Development and evaluation of a DNA microarray assay for the simultaneous detection of nine harmful algal species in ship ballast and seaport waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xianfeng; Zhou, Qianjin; Duan, Weijun; Zhou, Chengxu; Duan, Lijun; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Aili; Yan, Xiaojun; Chen, Jiong

    2016-01-01

    Rapid, high-throughput and reliable methods are urgently required to accurately detect and monitor harmful algae, which are responsible for algal blooms, such as red and green tides. In this study, we successfully developed a multiplex PCR-based DNA microarray method capable of detecting nine harmful algal species simultaneously, namely Alexandrium tamarense, Gyrodinium instriatum, Heterosigma akashiwo, Karenia mikimotoi, Prorocentrum donghaiense, Prorocentrum minimum, Ulva compressa, Ulva ohnoi and Ulva prolifera. This method achieved a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.5 ng of genomic DNA (orders of magnitude of the deci-nanogram range) in the tested algae cultures. Altogether, 230 field samples from ship ballast waters and seaport waters were used to evaluate the DNA microarray. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the DNA microarray assay in detecting field samples were 96.4% and 90.9%, respectively, relative to conventional morphological methods. This indicated that this high-throughput, automatic, and specific method is well suited for the detection of algae in water samples.

  5. Algal bloom detection, monitoring and prediction. 3. Workshop on public health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, G.; Funari, E. [eds.] [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Rome (Italy). Lab. di Igiene Ambientale

    1999-07-01

    The report presents articles discussed in the 3. Workshop on Public Health (Rome, Italy) focused on the problem of the harmful algae in the Mediterranean basin with the aim of verifying the possibilities of using remote sensing techniques together with conventional ones. These proceedings report the aim aspects of the problem, as the ecological one, the conventional monitoring techniques, the activities of international organizations and finally some of the current research activities in Italy aimed at using remote sensing techniques. [Italian] Il workshop sulla salute pubblica e' incentrato sul problema delle alghe tossiche marine all'interno del bacino del Mediterraneo con lo scopo di verificare le possibilita' di utilizzare delle tecniche di telerilevamento in modo complementare rispetto a quelle convenzionali. Si affrontano alcuni degli aspetti principali di questa problematica quali l'ecologia, le tecniche convenzionali di monitoraggio, le attivita' di organismi internazionali e infine le attivita' in corso in Italia finalizzate all'utilizzazione delle tecniche di telerilevamento.

  6. Formation of algal bloom in the northern Arabian Sea deep waters during January-March: A study using pooled in situ and satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dwivedi, R.M.; Raman, M.; Babu, K.N.; Singh, S.K.; Vyas, N.K.; Matondkar, S.G.P.

    The formation of winter bloom (January-March) was studied in deep waters of the northeastern Arabian Sea (NAS) during 2003 and 2004. Six ship cruises were undertaken at different phases of the bloom to examine its formation. Along with physical...

  7. Algal grazing by the planktonic copepods Centropages hamatus and Pseudocalanus sp.: Diurnal and seasonal variation during the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Øresund Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolajsen, Hanne; Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Seasonal and diel variation in rate of algal grazing were estimated from measurements of gut content (plant pigments) and gut turnover in the copepods C. hamatus and Pseudocalanus sp. during spring (Jan.-May) in the Oresund. Both species exhibited significant diel variation in gut content and...... activity rather than continuous feeding at varying food concentrations. A positive correlation was found between ambient algal concentration and algal ingestion rate and gut content for both species in weekly morning samples. Satiation of the ingestion rates at high algal concentrations was indicated....... Maximum algal ingestion rates measured in the field were similar to maximum ingestion rates measured in the laboratory in C. hamatus at the same temperatures. Due to the circadian feeding rhythm, the daily rations estimated in the field were considerably less than corresponding maximum daily laboratory...

  8. Cyanobacterial bloom management through integrated monitoring and forecasting in large shallow eutrophic Lake Taihu (China).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Boqiang; Li, Wei; Zhu, Guangwei; Zhang, Yunlin; Wu, Tingfeng; Gao, Guang

    2015-04-28

    The large shallow eutrophic Lake Taihu in China has long suffered from eutrophication and toxic cyanobacterial blooms. Despite considerable efforts to divert effluents from the watershed, the cyanobacterial blooms still reoccur and persist throughout summer. To mitigate cyanobacterial bloom pollution risk, a large scale integrated monitoring and forecasting system was developed, and a series of emergency response measures were instigated based on early warning. This system has been in place for 2009-2012. With this integrated monitoring system, it was found that the detectable maximum and average cyanobacterial bloom area were similar to that before drinking water crisis, indicating that poor eutrophic status and cyanobacterial bloom had persisted without significant alleviation. It also revealed that cyanobacterial bloom would occur after the intense storm, which may be associated with the increase in buoyance of cyanobacterial colonies. Although the cyanobacterial blooms had persisted during the monitoring period, there had been a reduction in frequency and intensity of the cyanobacterial bloom induced black water agglomerates (a phenomenon of algal bloom death decay to release a large amount black dissolved organic matter), and there have been no further drinking water crises. This monitoring and response strategy can reduce the cyanobacterial bloom pollution risk, but cannot reduce eutrophication and cyanobacterial blooms, problems which will take decades to resolve. PMID:25679801

  9. Detection of Coccolithophore Blooms in Ocean Color Satellite Imagery: a Generalized Approach for Use with Multiple Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Timothy; Dowell, Mark; Franz, Bryan A.

    2012-01-01

    A generalized coccolithophore bloom classifier has been developed for use with ocean color imagery. The bloom classifier was developed using extracted satellite reflectance data from SeaWiFS images screened by the default bloom detection mask. In the current application, we extend the optical water type (OWT) classification scheme by adding a new coccolithophore bloom class formed from these extracted reflectances. Based on an in situ coccolithophore data set from the North Atlantic, the detection levels with the new scheme were between 1,500 and 1,800 coccolithophore cellsmL and 43,000 and 78,000 lithsmL. The detected bloom area using the OWT method was an average of 1.75 times greater than the default bloom detector based on a collection of SeaWiFS 1 km imagery. The versatility of the scheme is shown with SeaWiFS, MODIS Aqua, CZCS and MERIS imagery at the 1 km scale. The OWT scheme was applied to the daily global SeaWiFS imagery mission data set (years 19972010). Based on our results, average annual coccolithophore bloom area was more than two times greater in the southern hemisphere compared to the northern hemi- sphere with values of 2.00 106 km2 and 0.75 106 km2, respectively. The new algorithm detects larger bloom areas in the Southern Ocean compared to the default algorithm, and our revised global annual average of 2.75106 km2 is dominated by contributions from the Southern Ocean.

  10. Wind-driven marine phytoplank blooms: Satellite observation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom is defined as a rapid increase or accumulation in biomass in an aquatic system. It not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g.,Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actuallythe traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms.Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing , this study introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; (2)Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. (3)Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. The proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combined "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. These

  11. An algorithm for detecting Trichodesmium surface blooms in the South Western Tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dandonneau

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Trichodesmium, a major colonial cyanobacterial nitrogen fixer, forms large blooms in NO3-depleted tropical oceans and enhances CO2 sequestration by the ocean due to its ability to fix dissolved dinitrogen. Thus, its importance in C and N cycles requires better estimates of its distribution at basin to global scales. However, existing algorithms to detect them from satellite have not yet been successful in the South Western Tropical Pacific (SWTP. Here, a novel approach based on radiance anomaly spectra (RAS observed in SeaWiFS imagery is used to detect Trichodesmium during the austral summertime in the SWTP. Selected pixels are characterized by a restricted range of parameters quantifying RAS spectra quantitative parameters (e.g. slope, intercept, curvature. The fraction of valid pixels identified as Trichodesmium surface blooms in the region 5° S–25° S 160° E–190° E is low (between 0.01 and 0.2 %, but is about 100 times higher than suggested by previous algorithms. This represents a total surface area which varies from 1500 to 20 000 km2. A monthly distribution of Trichodesmium surface accumulations in the SWTP is presented which demonstrates that the number of selected pixels peaks in November–February each year, consistent with field observations. This approach was validated with in situ observations of Trichodesmium surface accumulations for the period 1998–2010.

  12. An algorithm for detecting Trichodesmium surface blooms in the South Western Tropical Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Dandonneau

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Trichodesmium, a major colonial cyanobacterial nitrogen fixer, forms large blooms in NO3-depleted tropical oceans and enhances CO2 sequestration by the ocean due to its ability to fix dissolved dinitrogen. Thus, its importance in C and N cycles requires better estimates of its distribution at basin to global scales. However, existing algorithms to detect them from satellite have not yet been successful in the South Western Tropical Pacific (SP. Here, a novel algorithm (TRICHOdesmium SATellite based on radiance anomaly spectra (RAS observed in SeaWiFS imagery, is used to detect Trichodesmium during the austral summertime in the SP (5° S–25° S 160° E–170° W. Selected pixels are characterized by a restricted range of parameters quantifying RAS spectra (e.g. slope, intercept, curvature. The fraction of valid (non-cloudy pixels identified as Trichodesmium surface blooms in the region is low (between 0.01 and 0.2 %, but is about 100 times higher than deduced from previous algorithms. At daily scales in the SP, this fraction represents a total ocean surface area varying from 16 to 48 km2 in Winter and from 200 to 1000 km2 in Summer (and at monthly scale, from 500 to 1000 km2 in Winter and from 3100 to 10 890 km2 in Summer with a maximum of 26 432 km2 in January 1999. The daily distribution of Trichodesmium surface accumulations in the SP detected by TRICHOSAT is presented for the period 1998–2010 which demonstrates that the number of selected pixels peaks in November–February each year, consistent with field observations. This approach was validated with in situ observations of Trichodesmium surface accumulations in the Melanesian archipelago around New Caledonia, Vanuatu and Fiji Islands for the same period.

  13. Discovery of an algicidal compound from Brevibacterium sp. BS01 and its effect on a harmful algal bloom-causing species, Alexandrium tamarense

    OpenAIRE

    An, Xinli; Zhang, Bangzhou; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Zhiming; Fu, Lijun; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-01-01

    Blooms of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense have become worldwide phenomena and have detrimental impacts on aquatic ecosystems and human health. In this study, a culture supernatant of the marine actinomycete BS01 exerted a strong algicidal effect on A. tamarense (ATGD98-006). The target algicide from BS01 was separated by adsorption chromatography and identified by MALDI-TOF-MS and NMR analysis. The results suggested that the purified algicidal component corresponded to a hydrophobic ...

  14. 水华生消过程对巢湖沉积物微生物群落结构的影响%Effects of Outbreak and Extinction of Algal Blooms on the Microbial Community Structure in Sediments of Chaohu Lake

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刁晓君; 李一葳; 王曙光

    2015-01-01

    Although impacts of algal bloom on the physicochemical and biological properties of water and sediment in many lakes have been largely studied, less attention is paid to the impact of outbreak and extinction of algal blooms on the microbial community structure in sediment. In this study, outbreak and extinction of algal blooms and their effects on the microbial community structure in sediment of Chaohu Lake were studied by PCR-DGGE method. The results showed that algal blooms formed between May 15 and June 20, sustained from June 20 to September 5, and then went into extinction. In the region without algal blooms, PCR-DGGE analysis showed that microbial species, Shannon-Wiener diversity index and Simpson dominance index changed slightly over time; moreover, the microbial community structure had high similarity during the whole study. Temperature may be the main factor affecting the fluctuation of the microbial community structure in this region. In the region with algal blooms, however, microbial species and Shannon-Wiener diversity index were higher during the formation and extinction of algal blooms and lower in the sustaining blooms stage than those in the region without algal blooms. But the Simpson dominance index showed the opposite trend over time. In addition, the microbial community structure had low similarity during the whole study. The results suggested that outbreak and extinction of algal blooms produced different effects on the microbial community structure and the dominant microbial species, which may be related to the variation of water properties caused by temperature and algal blooms. This study showed that outbreak and extinction of algal blooms caused different effects on microbes in lake sediment, and this is significantly important to deeply evaluate the effects of algal bloom on the aquatic ecosystem of the lake and effectively control algal blooms using sediment microbes.%水华对湖泊水体和沉积物理化和生物学性质的影响

  15. Summer heatwaves promote blooms of harmful cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joehnk, K.D; Huisman, J.; Sharples, J.; Sommeijer, B.P.; Visser, P.M.; Stroom, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dense surface blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes may lead to mass mortalities of fish and birds, and provide a serious health threat for cattle, pets, and humans. It has been argued that global warming may increase the incidence of harmful algal blooms. Here, we report on a lake experi

  16. Analysis of harmful algal bloom species using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE)%常见赤潮藻类的变性梯度凝胶电泳分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵娟; 王朝晖; 林朗聪; 张珂

    2011-01-01

    为了解我国典型有毒有害赤潮藻类的变性梯度凝胶电泳( DGGE)指纹图谱以及DGGE技术在赤潮藻类分析鉴定中的作用,本课题组运用DGGE技术,研究了我国沿海7种重要赤潮藻类的单一种类以及混合种类样品的18S rDNA V3区的DGGE指纹图谱,并且对2009年10月底在广东省珠海海域发生的双胞旋沟藻(Cochlodinium gemtnatum)赤潮样品进行了DGGE分析.结果表明,DGGE技术能够对环节环沟藻、海洋原甲藻、血红哈卡藻、锥状斯氏藻、中肋骨条藻、塔玛亚历山大藻、双胞旋沟藻7种常见的海洋赤潮藻类具有较好的区分效果,同时监测出赤潮样品中双胞旋沟藻、血红哈卡藻、环节环沟藻和海洋原甲藻4种优势种,种类组成与显微镜观察结果具有较好的一致性.结果说明DGGE技术可作为一种辅助方法对赤潮藻类进行分类鉴定.%Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) fingerprints of 18S rDNA V3 region of single species and multi-species of seven harmful algal bloom ( HAB) taxa were studied in this study. The purpose is to understand DGGE fingerprints of typical HAB species from Chinese sea areas and the use of DGGE in the identification of HAB specie. A nature sample from the Cochlodinium geminatum bloom in Zhuhai coasts in October 2009 was analyzed. Results showed that distinguish lanes appeared in DGGE fingerprints by the seven HAB species including Gyrodinium instriatum, Prorocentrum micans, Akashiwo sanguined, Scrippsiella trochoidea, Skeletonema costatum, Alexandrium tamarense and Cochlodinium geminatum. Meanwhile four dominant species ( Cochlodinium geminatum, Akashiwo sanguined, Gyrodinium instriatum and Prorocentrum micans ) were observed in fingerprint of the bloom sample, which were consistent with the microscopical observation. The results suggested that DGGE technique could be applied as an auxiliary method for HAB species identification and analyzing.

  17. Characterization of marine bacteria and the activity of their enzyme systems involved in degradation of the algal storage glucan laminarin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alderkamp, A-C.; van Rijssel, M.; Bolhuis, H.

    2007-01-01

    The algal storage glucan laminarin is one of the most abundant carbon sources for marine prokaryotes. Its degradation was investigated in bacteria isolated during and after a spring phytoplankton bloom in the coastal North Sea. On average, 13% of prokaryotes detected by epifluorescence counts were a

  18. Molecular characterization of harmful algal species

    OpenAIRE

    Stacca, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the research activities carried out in this thesis was to give contributions to ecological studies on potentially harmful algal species (HAS) present in Sardinia’s aquatic environments through the application of biomolecular techniques. In Sardinia, as well as globally in the world, the reports of blooms caused by HAS (Harmful Algal Blooms, HABs) have increased in recent decades, requiring specific studies and investigations. The identification of the species invo...

  19. Overview the Factors Affecting Algal Bloom of Landscape Water%景观水体藻类水华影响因素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛峰; 黄勇; 李学艳

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing living standards, People have a increasing demands on the surrounding environment. Nowadays, the phenomenon of massive growth of algae blooms are becoming more and more frequently, and also becoming more serious harm, even some landscape urban river water bodies are also frequently occur, bring larger problems to People's daily lives and well-being. How it exactly happened, what factors affect it largely and how do it affect, the paper will explain it to you. The paper from the physical factors (temperature, light, pH, hydrology), chemical factors (nutrients) and other factors (trace elements, biological factors) of three possible factors that lead to algae blooms were reviewed, detailed the action principle of various factors on the growth of algae, at the same time parts of the optimum growth conditions for algae were summarized, and some of the research directions in the future should focus on were discussed and prospects.%随着人民生活水平的日益提高,人们对周围环境的要求也越来越高,而目前由于藻类大量生长引发的水华现象越来越频繁,危害也越趋严重,甚至连一些景观城市河道水体也频有发生,给周围的人民群众的日常生活和身心健康带来了较大的困扰。水华究竟是怎么发生的,哪些因素对它影响比较大,又是如何影响的,是文章所要讲诉的内容。文章分别从物理因素(温度、光照、pH、水文)、化学因素(营养盐)和其它因素(微量元素、生物因素)3个方面系统的对水华的影响因素进行了总结,详细的阐述了每种因素的作用机理以及部分适合藻类生长的最佳条件,同时对一些未来要重点进一步研究的方向进行了探讨与展望。

  20. Investigating the impact of land use and the potential for harmful algal blooms in a tropical lagoon of the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limoges, Audrey; de Vernal, Anne; Ruiz-Fernández, Ana-Carolina

    2015-12-01

    Palynological and geochemical analyses were carried out on a sediment core collected in the shallow Alvarado lagoon (Veracruz, Southwestern Gulf of Mexico) in order to evaluate the impact of the significant decline in the surrounding native coastal vegetation on phytoplankton assemblages. The sedimentary sequence encompasses the last millennium and provides information on pre-industrial phytoplankton assemblages. Results highlight a recent increase of freshwater-sourced organic matter relative to marine organic matter in line with reduced total concentrations of cyst-producing dinoflagellates. These changes appear to be synchronous to the extensive conversion of wetlands into agricultural areas, with consequences on the stability and water retention capacity of the soils bordering the lagoon system. The data also show that Polysphaeridium zoharyi, a cyst produced by the potentially toxic dinoflagellate Pyrodinium bahamense, is present in high abundance in the dinoflagellate population of the lagoon. Consequently, the modern cyst bank of P. bahamense in sediment has the potential to initiate harmful blooms since surface sediments are prone to resuspension events related to strong seasonal winds and human activities.

  1. Detection of Toxin-producing Algae by Low-altitude Remote Sensing Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods for detection of freshwater harmful algal blooms have progressed more slowly than those used in marine systems. Techniques for assessment of phytoplankton were applied to catfish aquaculture production ponds. Species capable of producing the algal toxin microcystin were monitored by low-al...

  2. Algicidal activity against Skeletonema costatum by marine bacteria isolated from a high frequency harmful algal blooms area in southern Chinese coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Rongjun; Huang, Honghui; Qi, Zhanhui; Hu, Weian; Tian, Ziyang; Dai, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Four marine bacterial strains P1, P5, N5 and N21 were isolated from the surface water and sediment of Mirs Bay in southern Chinese coast using the liquid infection method with 48-well plates. These bacteria were all shown to have algicidal activities against Skeletonema costatum. Based on morphological observations, biochemical tests and homology comparisons by 16S rDNA sequences, the isolated strains P1, P5, N5 and N21 were identified as Halobacillus sp., Muricauda sp., Kangiella sp. and Roseivirga sp., respectively. Our results showed that bacterial strain P1 killed S. costatum by release of heat labile algicide, while strains P5, N5 and N21 killed them directly. The algicidal processes of four bacterial strains were different. Strains P1, N5 and N21 disrupted the chain structure and S. costatum appeared as single cells, in which the cellular components were aggregated and the individual cells were inflated and finally lysed, while strain P5 decomposed the algal chains directly. We also showed that the algicidal activities of the bacterial strains were concentration-dependent. More specifically, 10 % (v/v) of bacteria in algae showed the strongest algicidal activities, as all S. costatum cells were killed by strains N5 and N21 within 72 h and by strains P1 and P5 within 96 h. 5 % of bacteria in algae also showed significant algicidal activities, as all S. costatum were killed by strains N5, P5 and N21 within 72, 96 and 120 h, respectively, whereas at this concentration, only 73.4 % of S. costatum cells exposed to strain P1 were killed within 120 h. At the concentration of 1 % bacteria in algae, the number of S. costatum cells continued to increase and the growth rate of algae upon exposure to strain N5 was significantly inhibited. PMID:23054696

  3. Study on the Possible Cause of Water Blooming and the Bloom-PreventionTechnology in Lake Qiandaohu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUQi-gen; CHENMa-kang; TONGHe-yi; HEGuang-xi; HONGRong-hua; CHENLai-sheng; CHENLi-qiao

    2004-01-01

    A hypothesis was formulated to explain the possible cause of water bloom occurring in Lake Qiandaohu in 1998 and 1999. We tested this hypothesis with a 3-year in situ field study. The results showed that the reconstruction of the silver carp and bighead carp populations, without other measures of nutrient control, could prevent the recurrence of algal bloom in the lake successfully. This result could serve as an evidence to the suggested hypothesis for water blooming: The drastic decline of the filter feeding silver carp and bighead carp in the lake, rather than the nutrients overloading, was mainly responsible for the algal bloom. According to this study, we suggest a general hypothesis to the ecological mechanism of algal blooming: The insufficient grazing from the phytoplanktivores (top-down control) to the algal reproduction from nutrients available (bottom-up effect) is the radical cause of water blooming, while conventionally,it is primarily attributed to the enrichment of nutrients. Besides, this study showed that stocking silver carp and bighead carp in lakes could improve water quality, which is also contrary to the conventional opinion. Finally, this study provided a costeffective and practicable approach to control water bloom for the large-sized reservoirs,especially when water blooming occurred locally. A net-enclosed aquaculture zone (NEAZ) can be established in the nutrients-exposure area of the waters and stocked with the two carps, water bloom could be controlled and prevented.

  4. Black silicon SERS substrate: effect of surface morphology on SERS detection and application of single algal cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yu-Luen; Juang, Yi-Je

    2014-03-15

    In this study, we have investigated the effect of the surface morphology of the black silicon substrate on surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and explored its application of single algal cell detection. By adjusting the O2 and SF6 flow rates in the cryogenic plasma etching process, different surface morphologies of the black silicon substrate was produced without performing the lithographic process. It was found the Raman signals were better enhanced as the tip density of the black silicon substrate increased. In addition, as the thickness of the deposited gold layer increased, the SERS effect increased as well, which could be owing to the generation of more hot spots by bridging individual silicon tips through deposition of gold layer. For the black silicon substrate with tip density of 30 tips/μm(2) and covered by 400 nm deposited gold layer, the detection limit of 10 fM R6G solution concentration with uniform SERS effect across the substrate was achieved. Furthermore, detection of individual algal cell (Chlorella vulgaris) was performed at the SERS substrate as fabricated and the Raman signals of carotenoid and lipid were substantially enhanced. PMID:24121206

  5. Fueling Future with Algal Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-07-05

    Algae constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity, play profound roles in the carbon cycle, and are prominent candidates for biofuel production. The US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) is leading the world in algal genome sequencing (http://jgi.doe.gov/Algae) and contributes of the algal genome projects worldwide (GOLD database, 2012). The sequenced algal genomes offer catalogs of genes, networks, and pathways. The sequenced first of its kind genomes of a haptophyte E.huxleyii, chlorarachniophyte B.natans, and cryptophyte G.theta fill the gaps in the eukaryotic tree of life and carry unique genes and pathways as well as molecular fossils of secondary endosymbiosis. Natural adaptation to conditions critical for industrial production is encoded in algal genomes, for example, growth of A.anophagefferens at very high cell densities during the harmful algae blooms or a global distribution across diverse environments of E.huxleyii, able to live on sparse nutrients due to its expanded pan-genome. Communications and signaling pathways can be derived from simple symbiotic systems like lichens or complex marine algae metagenomes. Collectively these datasets derived from algal genomics contribute to building a comprehensive parts list essential for algal biofuel development.

  6. Phytochip: Development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species

    OpenAIRE

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Veronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of to the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip...

  7. Marine viral populations detected during a nutrient induced phytoplankton bloom at elevated pCO2 levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.-A. Sandaa

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available During the PEeCE III mesocosm experiment in 2005 we investigated how the virioplankton community responded to increased levels of nutrients (N and P and CO2. We applied a combination of flow cytometry, Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis and degenerated PCR primers to categorize and quantify individual viral populations, and to investigate their temporal dynamics. Species specific and degenerated primers enabled us to identify two specific large dsDNA viruses, EhV and CeV, infecting the haptophytes Emiliania huxleyi and Crysochromulina ericina, respectively. Some of the viral populations detected and enumerated by flow cytometry did not respond to altered CO2-levels, but the abundance of EhV and an unidentified dsDNA virus decreased with increasing CO2 levels. Our results thus indicate that CO2 conditions may affect the marine pelagic food web at the viral level. Our results also demonstrate that in order to unravel ecological problems as how CO2 and nutrient levels affect the relationship between marine algal viruses and their hosts, we need to continue the effort to develop molecular markers used to identify both hosts and viruses.

  8. One step immunochromatographic assay for the rapid detection of Alexandrium minutum

    OpenAIRE

    Gas, Fabienne; Baus, Beatrice; Pinto, Laetitia; Compere, Chantal; Tanchou, Valerie; Quemeneur, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms represent a major threat to marine production, and particularly to shellfish farming. Current methods for analyzing environmental samples are tedious and time consuming because they require taxonomists and animal experiments. New rapid detection methods, such as immunoassays, are sought for alerting purposes and for the study of algal ecodynamics in their natural environment. Alexandrium minutum, which causes paralytic shellfish poisoning, occurs with increasing frequency...

  9. Support Vector Machine-based method for predicting Pseudo-nitzschia spp. blooms in coastal waters (Galician rias, NW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Vilas, Luis; Spyrakos, Evangelos; Torres Palenzuela, Jesus M.; Pazos, Yolanda

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplanktonic blooms in the coastal embayments (rias) at the NW part of Spain were mentioned for the first time in 1918 and since then they have been associated numerous times with negatives impacts to a very important economic activity in the area, mussel production. In this study, eight years of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. abundance and associated meteorological and oceanographic data were used to develop and validate support vector machine (SVM) models for the prediction of these diatoms. SVM were used to identify presence/below low detection limit, bloom/no bloom conditions of Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and finally to predict blooms due to these diatoms in the coastal systems of the Galician rias. The best SVM models were selected on the basis of C and γ parameters and their performance was evaluated in terms of accuracy and kappa statistics (κ). Regarding the presence/below low detection limit, bloom/no bloom models the best results in the validation dataset were achieved using all the variables: ria code, day of the year, temperature, salinity, upwelling indices and bloom occurrence in previous weeks. The best performing models were also tested in an independent dataset from the study area, where they showed high overall accuracy (78.53-82.18%), κ values (0.77-0.81) and true positive rates (62.60-78.18). In these models the bloom occurrence in previous weeks was identified as a key parameter to the prediction performance. In this paper, toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms could not be predicted due to limited information on toxin concentration and species composition. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that the approach followed here is capable for high predictive performance which could be of great aid in the monitoring of algal blooms and offer valuable information to the local shellfish industry. The reliable prediction of categorical Pseudo-nitzschia abundances using variables that are operationally determined or short-term predicted could provide early warning of

  10. Amperometric screen-printed algal biosensor with flow injection analysis system for detection of environmental toxic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shitanda, Isao [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: shitanda@rs.noda.tus.ac.jp; Takamatsu, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kunihiro; Itagaki, Masayuki [Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2009-08-30

    A screen-printed algal biosensor was fabricated for evaluation of toxicity of chemicals. An algal ink was prepared by mixing unicellular microalga Chlorella vulgaris cells, carbon nanotubes and sodium alginate solution. The algal ink was immobilized directly on a screen-printed carbon electrode surface using screen-printing technique. Photosynthetically generated oxygen of the immobilized algae was monitored amperometically. Responses of the algal biosensor to four toxic compounds, 6-chloro-N-ethyl-N-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine (atrazine) and 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-diethylurea (DCMU) were evaluated as inhibition ratios of the reduction current. The concentrations that gave 50% inhibition of the oxygen reduction current (IC{sup '}{sub 50}) for atrazine and DCMU were 12 and 1 {mu}mol dm{sup -3}, respectively. In comparison with the conventional algal biosensors, in which the algal cells were entrapped in an alginate gel and immobilized on the surface of a transparent indium tin oxide electrode, the present sensor is much smaller and less expensive, with the shorter assay time.

  11. Characteristics of Phytoplankton Community Structure During and After a Bloom of the Dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea by HPLC Pigment Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WONG Chun-kwan; WONG Chong-kim

    2009-01-01

    A bloom of the dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea was detected for the first time in inner Tolo Harbor, Hong Kong in 2000. Water samples were collected at eight stations along a transect passing through a red tide patch for microscopic analysis of phytoplankton composition and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of phytoplankton pigments. During the bloom, the density of dinoflagellates was 1.1×106 cells L-1 within the patch and 8.6×105 cells L-1 outside the patch where the phyto-plankton community was dominated by diatoms. After the bloom the S. trochoidea began to decrease in density and was replaced by diatoms as the dominating bloom-causing organisms at all stations, and the density of dinoflagellates at most stations was less than 1.0×106 cells L-1. The status of S. trochoidea as the causative species of the bloom was indicated by the presence of peridinin, the marker pigment for dinoflagellates. The shift from dinoflagellates to diatoms was marked by the decline of peridinin and the preva-lence of fucoxanthin. Phytoplankton pigment markers also revealed the presence of other minor phytoplankton assemblages such as cryptomonads and blue-green algal.

  12. A neurophysiological method of rapid detection and analysis of marine algal toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerr, DS; Bødtkjer, Donna Briggs; Saba, HI

    1999-01-01

    effect on either antidromic or fibre spikes. Fifty nanomolar saxitoxin (PSP) abolished all responses in all slices. Only antidromic spikes showed any recovery during wash-out. Field EPSP and fiber spike analysis further demonstrated that the preparation is capable of reliably detecting saxitoxin in a...... linearly responsive fashion at toxin concentrations of 25-200 nM, and tests of naturally contaminated shellfish confirmed the utility of this assay as a screening method for PSP. Our findings suggest that the in vitro hippocampal slice preparation has potential in the detection and analysis of three marine...

  13. Optimal dosing time of acid algaecide for restraining algal growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-chao PANG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Restraining algal growth by algaecide has been studied by many researchers, but the dosing time has not yet been studied. In this study, we examined the appropriate dosing time of algaecide through a series of experiments. In the experiments, the pH value of water is significantly affected by Microcystis aeruginosa, and the variation of the pH value is in favor of the growth of the alga. Therefore, using acid algaecide in the period with maximum pH values, i.e., the stable phase, would change the acidity-alkalinity of the water significantly, and would negatively affect algal growth. Acid algaecide does not eliminate the alga effectively if the acid algaecide is dosed in the logarithmic growth phase. Using acid algaecide in the decline phase after algal bloom not only is unfavorable for eliminating the alga, but also prolongs the decline phase, and even brings about next larger algal bloom.

  14. Seasonal phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic linked to the overwintering strategies of copepods

    OpenAIRE

    Friedland, Kevin D.; Record, Nicholas R.; Asch, Rebecca G.; Trond Kristiansen; Saba, Vincent S; Drinkwater, Kenneth F.; Stephanie Henson; Leaf, Robert T.; Ryan E. Morse; Johns, David G.; Large, Scott I.; Hjøllo, Solfrid S.; Nye, Janet A.; Mike A. Alexander; Rubao Ji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The North Atlantic Ocean contains diverse patterns of seasonal phytoplankton blooms with distinct internal dynamics. We analyzed blooms using remotely-sensed chlorophyll a concentration data and change point statistics. The first bloom of the year began during spring at low latitudes and later in summer at higher latitudes. In regions where spring blooms occurred at high frequency (i.e., proportion of years that a bloom was detected), there was a negative correlation between bloom ti...

  15. Harmful algal research and response: A human dimensions strategy

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Harmful Algal Research and Response: A Human Dimensions Strategy (HARR-HD) justifies and guides a coordinated national commitment to human dimensions research critical to prevent and respond to impacts of harmful algal blooms (HABs). Beyond HABs, it serves as a framework for developing hu-man dimensions research as a cross-cutting priority of ecosystem science supporting coastal and ocean management, including hazard research and mitigation planning. Measuring and promoting commu-nity resilie...

  16. Ceramic Ultrafiltration of Marine Algal Solutions: A Comprehensive Study

    KAUST Repository

    Dramas, Laure

    2014-09-01

    Algal bloom can significantly impact reverse osmosis desalination process and reduce the drinking water production. In 2008, a major bloom event forced several UAE reverse osmosis plants to stop their production, and in this context, a better understanding of UF membrane fouling caused by algal organic matter (AOM) is needed, in order to adjust the filtration conditions during algal bloom events. Polymeric MF/UF membranes are already widely used for RO pretreatment, but ceramic UF membranes can also be an alternative for the filtration of marine algal solutions. The fouling potential of the Red Sea and the Arabian Sea, sampled at different seasons, along with four algal monocultures grown in laboratory, and one mesocosm experiment in the Red Sea was investigated. Algal solutions induce a stronger and more irreversible fouling than terrestrial humic solution, toward ceramic membrane. During algal bloom events, this fouling is enhanced and becomes even more problematic at the decline phase of the bloom, for a similar initial DOC. Three main mechanisms are involved: the formation of a cake layer at the membrane surface; the penetration of the algal organic matter (AOM) in the pore network of the membrane; the strong adhesion of AOM with the membrane surface. The last mechanism is species-specific and metal-oxide specific. In order to understand the stronger ceramic UF fouling at the decline phase, AOM quality was analyzed every two days. During growth, AOM is getting enriched in High Molecular Weight (HMW) structures (> 200 kDa), which are mainly composed by proteins and polysaccharides, and these compounds seem to be responsible for the stronger fouling at decline phase. In order to prevent the fouling of ceramic membrane, coagulation-flocculation (CF) using ferric chloride was implemented prior to filtration. It permits a high removal of HMW compounds and greatly reduces the fouling potential of the algal solution. During brief algal bloom events, CF should be

  17. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Harmful Algal Flora in the Tropical Estuarine Complex of Goa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraksha M. Pednekar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising of monsoon (June–November and nonmonsoon (December–May. In Mandovi, total 54 HAB species with 49 in monsoon and 36 during nonmonsoon period were reported. In Zuari, total 46 HAB species with 38 in monsoon and 41 were reported during nonmonsoon period. Bray-Curtis cluster analysis based on log-transformed phytoplankton density detected seven well-defined groups revealing spatiotemporal variability. The density of the dominant harmful algal species was significantly positively correlated with nutrients, but negatively correlated with salinity. The results of the study indicate that monsoon plays an important role in occurrence and distribution of harmful algal species having direct correlation with salinity variations and nutrient loading.

  18. Spatiotemporal distribution of harmful algal flora in the tropical estuarine complex of Goa, India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pednekar, S.M.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Kerkar, V.

    for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, comprising...

  19. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhaskar, P.V.; Roy, R.; Gauns, M.; Shenoy, D.M.; Rao, V.D.; Mochemadkar, S.

    An unusual phytoplankton bloom dominated by unidentified green coloured spherical algal cells (approx 5 mu m diameter) and dinoflagellates (Heterocapsa, Scripsiella and Gymnodinium) was encountered along the coast of Goa, India during 27 and 29...

  20. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, P. V.; Roy, Rajdeep; Gauns, Mangesh; Shenoy, D. M.; Rao, V. D.; Mochemadkar, S.

    2011-12-01

    An unusual phytoplankton bloom dominated by unidentified green coloured spherical algal cells (˜5μm diameter) and dinoflagellates ( Heterocapsa, Scripsiella and Gymnodinium) was encountered along the coast of Goa, India during 27 and 29 January, 2005. Pigment analysis was carried out using both fluorometric and HPLC methods. Seawater samples collected from various depths within the intense bloom area showed high concentrations of Chl a (up to 106 mg m - 3) associated with low bacterial production (0.31 to 0.52 mg C m - 3 h - 1) and mesozooplankton biomass (0.03 ml m - 3). Pigment analyses of the seawater samples were done using HPLC detected marker pigments corresponding to prasinophytes, dinoflagellates and diatoms. Chlorophyll b (36-56%) followed by peridinin (15-30%), prasinoxanthin (11-17%) and fucoxanthin (7-15%) were the major diagnostic pigments while pigments of cryptophytes and cyanobacteria including alloxanthin and zeaxanthin formed <10%. Although microscopic analysis indicated a decline in the bloom, pheaophytin concentrations in the water column measured by both techniques were very low, presumably due to fast recycling and/or settling rate. The unique composition of the bloom and its probable causes are discussed in this paper.

  1. Identification of non-indigenous phytoplankton species dominated bloom off Goa using inverted microscopy and pigment (HPLC) analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Bhaskar; Rajdeep Roy; Mangesh Gauns; D M Shenoy; V D Rao; S Mochemadkar

    2011-12-01

    An unusual phytoplankton bloom dominated by unidentified green coloured spherical algal cells (∼5 m diameter) and dinoflagellates (Heterocapsa, Scripsiella and Gymnodinium) was encountered along the coast of Goa, India during 27 and 29 January, 2005. Pigment analysis was carried out using both fluorometric and HPLC methods. Seawater samples collected from various depths within the intense bloom area showed high concentrations of Chl (up to 106 mg m−3) associated with low bacterial production (0.31 to 0.52 mg C m−3 h−1) and mesozooplankton biomass (0.03 ml m−3). Pigment analyses of the seawater samples were done using HPLC detected marker pigments corresponding to prasinophytes, dinoflagellates and diatoms. Chlorophyll (36–56%) followed by peridinin (15–30%), prasinoxanthin (11–17%) and fucoxanthin (7–15%) were the major diagnostic pigments while pigments of cryptophytes and cyanobacteria including alloxanthin and zeaxanthin formed > 10%. Although microscopic analysis indicated a decline in the bloom, pheaophytin concentrations in the water column measured by both techniques were very low, presumably due to fast recycling and/or settling rate. The unique composition of the bloom and its probable causes are discussed in this paper.

  2. Formation of emerging DBPs from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida

    2014-05-01

    Limited studies focused on reactions occurring during disinfection and oxidation processes of seawater. The aim of this work was to investigate disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds. Simulated algal blooms directly growing in Red Sea, red tide samples collected during an algal bloom event and Hymenomonas sp. monoculture were studied as algal organic matter sources. Experiments were conducted in synthetic seawater containing bromide ion. A variety of DBPs was formed from the chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter. Brominated DBPs (bromoform, DBAA, DBAN and DBAcAm) were the dominant species. Iodinated DBPs (CIAcAm and iodinated THMs) were detected, which are known to be highly toxic compared to their chlorinated or brominated analogues. Algal organic matter was found to incorporate important precursors of nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), which have been reported to be more toxic than regulated THMs and HAAs. Isotopically-labeled monochloramine (15N- NH2Cl) was used in order to investigate the nitrogen source in N-DBPs. High formation of N-DBPs was found from Hymenomonas sp. sample in exponential growth phase, which was enriched in nitrogen-containing organic compounds. High inorganic nitrogen incorporation was found from the algal samples enriched in humic-like compounds. HAcAms formation was studied from chlorination and chloramination of amino acids. Asparagine, aspartic acid and other amino acids with an aromatic structure were found to be important precursors of HAcAms and DCAN. Factors affecting HAcAms formation (Cl2/ amino acid molar ratio and pH) were evaluated. Studies on the formation kinetics of DCAcAm and DCAN from asparagine suggested a rapid formation of DCAcAm from organic nitrogen (amide group) and a slower incorporation of inorganic nitrogen coming from monochloramine to form DCAN. High amounts of DCAN and DCAcAm were detected from the

  3. Algal toxins and reverse osmosis desalination operations: Laboratory bench testing and field monitoring of domoic acid, saxitoxin, brevetoxin and okadaic acid

    KAUST Repository

    Seubert, Erica L.

    2012-12-01

    The occurrence and intensity of harmful algal blooms (HABs) have been increasing globally during the past few decades. The impact of these events on seawater desalination facilities has become an important topic in recent years due to enhanced societal interest and reliance on this technology for augmenting world water supplies. A variety of harmful bloom-forming species of microalgae occur in southern California, as well as many other locations throughout the world, and several of these species are known to produce potent neurotoxins. These algal toxins can cause a myriad of human health issues, including death, when ingested via contaminated seafood. This study was designed to investigate the impact that algal toxin presence may have on both the intake and reverse osmosis (RO) desalination process; most importantly, whether or not the naturally occurring algal toxins can pass through the RO membrane and into the desalination product. Bench-scale RO experiments were conducted to explore the potential of extracellular algal toxins contaminating the RO product. Concentrations exceeding maximal values previously reported during natural blooms were used in the laboratory experiments, with treatments comprised of 50 μg/L of domoic acid (DA), 2 μg/L of saxitoxin (STX) and 20 μg/L of brevetoxin (PbTx). None of the algal toxins used in the bench-scale experiments were detectable in the desalinated product water. Monitoring for intracellular and extracellular concentrations of DA, STX, PbTx and okadaic acid (OA) within the intake and desalinated water from a pilot RO desalination plant in El Segundo, CA, was conducted from 2005 to 2009. During the five-year monitoring period, DA and STX were detected sporadically in the intake waters but never in the desalinated water. PbTx and OA were not detected in either the intake or desalinated water. The results of this study demonstrate the potential for HAB toxins to be inducted into coastal RO intake facilities, and the

  4. Seasonal phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic linked to the overwintering strategies of copepods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Friedland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The North Atlantic Ocean contains diverse patterns of seasonal phytoplankton blooms with distinct internal dynamics. We analyzed blooms using remotely-sensed chlorophyll a concentration data and change point statistics. The first bloom of the year began during spring at low latitudes and later in summer at higher latitudes. In regions where spring blooms occurred at high frequency (i.e., proportion of years that a bloom was detected, there was a negative correlation between bloom timing and duration, indicating that early blooms last longer. In much of the Northeast Atlantic, bloom development extended over multiple seasons resulting in peak chlorophyll concentrations in summer. Spring bloom start day was found to be positively correlated with a spring phenology index and showed both positive and negative correlations to sea surface temperature and the North Atlantic Oscillation in different regions. Based on the characteristics of spring and summer blooms, the North Atlantic can be classified into two regions: a seasonal bloom region, with a well-defined bloom limited to a single season; and a multi-seasonal bloom region, with blooms extending over multiple seasons. These regions differed in the correlation between bloom start and duration with only the seasonal bloom region showing a significant, negative correlation. We tested the hypothesis that the near-surface springtime distribution of copepods that undergo diapause (Calanus finmarchicus, C. helgolandicus, C. glacialis, and C. hyperboreus may contribute to the contrast in bloom development between the two regions. Peak near-surface spring abundance of the late stages of these Calanoid copepods was generally associated with areas having a well-defined seasonal bloom, implying a link between bloom shape and their abundance. We suggest that either grazing is a factor in shaping the seasonal bloom or bloom shape determines whether a habitat is conducive to diapause, while recognizing

  5. Integrating phylogeny, geographic niche partitioning, and secondary metabolite synthesis in bloom-forming Planktothrix

    OpenAIRE

    Kurmayer, Rainer; Blom, Judith F.; Deng, Li; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Toxic freshwater cyanobacteria form harmful algal blooms that can cause acute toxicity to humans and livestock. Globally distributed, bloom-forming cyanobacteria Planktothrix either retain or lose the mcy gene cluster (encoding the synthesis of the secondary metabolite hepatotoxin microcystin or MC), resulting in a variable spatial/temporal distribution of (non)toxic genotypes. Despite their importance to human well-being, such genotype diversity is not being mapped at scales relevant to natu...

  6. Note on the real-time time detection of a Karenia mikimotoi bloom from space in the Western English Channel in July 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Gohin, Francis; Le Bec, Claude; Cutting, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Karenia mikimotoi is a dinoflagellate common in the Eastern North Atlantic Ocean, particularly in summer. Recent K. mikimotoi blooms in Western Ireland (Silke et al., 2005), Scottish waters (Davidson et al., 2006), and the English Channel (Vanhoutte-Brunier et al., 2008) have been reported and described. This dinoflagellate is feared as it may impact the marine animal population directly, through its haemolitic cytotoxin, or indirectly through hypoxia during the degradation of the bloom when ...

  7. HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS AS INDICATORS OF ECOSYSTEM CONDITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are approximately 40 species of microalgae inhabiting coastal waters in the Gulf of Mexico that produce or potentially can produce biotoxins that negatively impact aquatic ecosystems, human health, and local economics. While nutrient enrichment and reduced water quality may...

  8. The Correlation between Prorocentrum donghaiense Blooms and the Taiwan Warm Current in the East China Sea - Evidence for the “Pelagic Seed Bank” Hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Xinfeng Dai; Douding Lu; Weibing Guan; Ping Xia; Hongxia Wang; Piaoxia He; Dongsheng Zhang

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, large-scale high biomass algal blooms of the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu have occurred frequently in the East China Sea (ECS). The role of increasing nutrient concentrations in driving those blooms is well-established, but the source population that initiates them is poorly understood. We hypothesized that the front of Taiwan Warm Current (TWC) may serve as a 'seed bank' that initiates P. donghaiense blooms in the ECS, as the physiochemical conditio...

  9. Spatiotemporal Distribution of Harmful Algal Flora in the Tropical Estuarine Complex of Goa, India

    OpenAIRE

    Pednekar, Suraksha M.; Prabhu Matondkar, S. G.; Vijaya Kerkar

    2012-01-01

    Mandovi and Zuari estuarine complex is monsoon-influenced estuaries located along the central west coast of India. During the past few years, there has been an increase in nutrient loading specially during monsoonal runoff which is responsible for the growth of harmful algal flora. To understand occurrence and distribution of harmful algal blooms species, daily/alternate day samplings were carried out in Mandovi and Zuari estuaries during 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 periods, respectively, compris...

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF A FIBER OPTIC ARRAY SYSTEM FOR DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF POTENTIALLY TOXIC CYANOBACTERIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have become a serious threat to freshwater and marine waters worldwide, impacting humans, animals, and aquatic ecosystems. In freshwater, many cyanobacterial blooms (cyanoHABs) produce neurotoxic, hepatotoxic, dermatotoxic, or other bioactive compo...

  11. Identifying Historical Occurrences of HABs Using Sedimentary Algal Pigments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoak, J. M.; Waters, M. N.

    2008-12-01

    Algal blooms are a common feature of many coastal areas. Under some environmental conditions, these develop into Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) and present an environmental hazard and a health risk for humans and wildlife due to toxin production. While monitoring programs track the development of contemporary HABs, data are lacking for historical blooms. We use sedimentary algal pigments to identify the occurrence of Karenia Brevis (Florida Red Tide) in sediment cores collected from mangrove environments along the west coast of Florida. Karenia Brevis has a unique pigment, gyroxanthin-diester, that is routinely used to identify red tide in the water column. Gyroxanthin-diester and other carotenoid pigments associated with red tide taxa are analyzed using HPLC techniques. Identification of gyroxanthan-diester is based on comparison with HPLC analysis of gyroxanthin standard, a monoculture sample of K. Brevis and with published spectra of Gyroxanthin-diester in water samples. We track the timing of the K. Brevis using Pb-210 dating models which allows an examination over the last 100 years.

  12. Assessment of direct economic loss of inshore fishing and tourism caused by harmful algal blooms%有害赤潮对近岸捕捞及观光旅游业直接灾害经济损失评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江天久; 李支薇; 江涛; 吴锋; 佟蒙蒙

    2011-01-01

    以广东省珠海市2009年10-11月双胞旋沟藻赤潮期的现场调查数据为基础,研究了赤潮灾害发生期近岸捕捞及旅游观光业直接经济损失的构成,并依据在该海域从事生产活动船只吨位的大小及经营的方式,分别构建了赤潮灾害对近岸捕捞及观光旅游业直接经济损失的评估模式.评估结果显示,这次赤潮造成以近岸捕捞为主的小型船只直接经济损失约为54万元,以旅游观光兼捕捞的中型船只直接经济损失约101万元,以捕捞为主的大型船只直接经济损失约61万元,上述经济损失合计约216万元.本文建立的评估方法填补了我国在有害赤潮对近岸捕捞及观光旅游业直接灾害经济损失精确评估的空白,对近海其它海洋灾害经济损失的评估也具有参考意义.%The economic impacts of the harmful algal blooms ( HABs) primarily include the impacts to inshore agriculture and fishing, tourism, ecosystem and human health. An accurate assessment system of direct economic loss of inshore fishing and tourism caused by HABs was established for the Chinese coastal areas. Based on the field investigation of Cochlodinium geminatum HABs that occurred in Zhuhai coast of Guangdong Province during October and November 2009, the present study focused on the direct economic loss structure of inshore fishing and tourism. According to the size of local boat and their management, new evaluation systems were established for inshore fishing loss and tourism loss,respectively. The results showed that direct economic loss of small size boat, which mostly was engaged in inshore fishing, reached ¥540 000. The loss of middle size boat,which was mainly used by inshore fishing and tourism,reached ¥ 1 010 000,whereas big size boat,working on inshore fishing,reached about ¥610 000. Total direct economic loss caused by the above red tide was about ¥2. 16 million. The economic loss assessment system can be used as the theoretic

  13. Using δ15N values in algal tissue to map locations and potential sources of anthropogenic nutrient inputs on the island of Maui, Hawaii, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroalgal blooms of Hypnea musciformis and Ulvafasciata in coastal waters of Maui only occur in areas of substantial anthropogenic nutrient input, sources of which include wastewater effluent via injection wells, leaking cesspools and agricultural fertilizers. Algal δ15N signatures were used to map anthropogenic nitrogen through coastal surveys (island-wide and fine-scale) and algal deployments along nearshore and offshore gradients. Algal δ15N values of 9.8 per mille and 2.0-3.5 per mille in Waiehu and across the north-central coast, respectively, suggest that cesspool and agricultural nitrogen reached the respective adjacent coastlines. Effluent was detected in areas proximal to the Wastewater Reclamation Facilities (WWRF) operating Class V injection wells in Lahaina, Kihei and Kahului through elevated algal δ15N values (17.8-50.1 per mille ). From 1997 to 2008, the three WWRFs injected an estimated total volume of 193 million cubic meters (51 billion gallons) of effluent with a nitrogen mass of 1.74 million kilograms (3.84 million pounds).

  14. Seasonal change of ice algal and phytoplankton assemblages in the Nella Fjord near Zhongshan Station, East Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The ice algal and phytoplankton assemblages were studied from Nella Fjord near Zhongshan Station, East Antarctica from April 12 to December 30, 1992. Algal blooms occurred about 3 cm thick on the bottom of sea ice in late April and mid November to early December respectively, and a phytoplankton bloom appeared in the underlying surface water in mid December following the spring ice algal bloom. The biomass in ice bottom was 1 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that of surface water. Amphiprora kjellmanii, Berkeleya sp., Navicula glaciei, Nitzschia barkelyi, N. cylindrus /N. curta, N. lecointei and Nitzschia sp. were common in the sea ice temporarily or throughout the study period. The biomass in a certain ice segment was decreased gradually and the dominant species were usually succeeded as the season went on. Nitzschia sublineata and Dactyliosolen antarctica were two seasonal dominant species only observed in underlying water column. The assemblages between bottom of ice and underlying surface water were different except when spring ice algae bloomed. The evidence shows that the ice algal blooms occurred mainly by in situ growth of ice algae, and the phytoplankton bloom was mostly caused by the release of ice algae.

  15. A cold phase of the East Pacific triggers new phytoplankton blooms in San Francisco Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloern, J.E.; Jassby, A.D.; Thompson, J.K.; Hieb, K.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ecological observations sustained over decades often reveal abrupt changes in biological communities that signal altered ecosystem states. We report a large shift in the biological communities of San Francisco Bay, first detected as increasing phytoplankton biomass and occurrences of new seasonal blooms that began in 1999. This phytoplankton increase is paradoxical because it occurred in an era of decreasing wastewater nutrient inputs and reduced nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, contrary to the guiding paradigm that algal biomass in estuaries increases in proportion to nutrient inputs from their watersheds. Coincidental changes included sharp declines in the abundance of bivalve mollusks, the key phytoplankton consumers in this estuary, and record high abundances of several bivalve predators: Bay shrimp, English sole, and Dungeness crab. The phytoplankton increase is consistent with a trophic cascade resulting from heightened predation on bivalves and suppression of their filtration control on phytoplankton growth. These community changes in San Francisco Bay across three trophic levels followed a state change in the California Current System characterized by increased upwelling intensity, amplified primary production, and strengthened southerly flows. These diagnostic features of the East Pacific "cold phase" lead to strong recruitment and immigration of juvenile flatfish and crustaceans into estuaries where they feed and develop. This study, built from three decades of observation, reveals a previously unrecognized mechanism of ocean-estuary connectivity. Interdecadal oceanic regime changes can propagate into estuaries, altering their community structure and efficiency of transforming land-derived nutrients into algal biomass. ?? 2007 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  16. Two-Dimensional Algal Collection and Assembly by Combining AC-Dielectrophoresis with Fluorescence Detection for Contaminant-Induced Oxidative Stress Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebman, Coralie; Velev, Orlin D; Slaveykova, Vera I

    2015-06-01

    An alternative current (AC) dielectrophoretic lab-on-chip setup was evaluated as a rapid tool of capture and assembly of microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in two-dimensional (2D) close-packed arrays. An electric field of 100 V·cm⁻¹, 100 Hz applied for 30 min was found optimal to collect and assemble the algae into single-layer structures of closely packed cells without inducing cellular oxidative stress. Combined with oxidative stress specific staining and fluorescence microscopy detection, the capability of using the 2D whole-cell assembly on-chip to follow the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and oxidative stress during short-term exposure to several environmental contaminants, including mercury, methylmercury, copper, copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs), and diuron was explored. The results showed significant increase of the cellular ROS when C. reinhardtii was exposed to high concentrations of methylmercury, CuO-NPs, and 10⁻⁵ M Cu. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of combining AC-dielectrophoretically assembled two-dimensional algal structures with cell metabolic analysis using fluorescence staining, as a rapid analytical tool for probing the effect of contaminants in highly impacted environment. PMID:26083806

  17. Two-Dimensional Algal Collection and Assembly by Combining AC-Dielectrophoresis with Fluorescence Detection for Contaminant-Induced Oxidative Stress Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coralie Siebman

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative current (AC dielectrophoretic lab-on-chip setup was evaluated as a rapid tool of capture and assembly of microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in two-dimensional (2D close-packed arrays. An electric field of 100 V·cm−1, 100 Hz applied for 30 min was found optimal to collect and assemble the algae into single-layer structures of closely packed cells without inducing cellular oxidative stress. Combined with oxidative stress specific staining and fluorescence microscopy detection, the capability of using the 2D whole-cell assembly on-chip to follow the reactive oxygen species (ROS production and oxidative stress during short-term exposure to several environmental contaminants, including mercury, methylmercury, copper, copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs, and diuron was explored. The results showed significant increase of the cellular ROS when C. reinhardtii was exposed to high concentrations of methylmercury, CuO-NPs, and 10−5 M Cu. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of combining AC-dielectrophoretically assembled two-dimensional algal structures with cell metabolic analysis using fluorescence staining, as a rapid analytical tool for probing the effect of contaminants in highly impacted environment.

  18. Allan Bloom's Quarrel with History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind." Concludes that despite cranky comments about bourgeois culture, the focus of Bloom's attack is on historicism, which undercuts his nostalgic vision of a prosperous and just America. Condemns Bloom's exclusion of Blacks, Hispanics, and women from America's cultural heritage. (DMM)

  19. Localization and Tracking of Submerged Phytoplankton Bloom Patches by an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, M. A.; Ryan, J. P.; Zhang, Y.; Bellingham, J. G.

    2012-12-01

    Observing plankton in their drifting frame of reference permits effective studies of marine ecology from the perspective of microscopic life itself. By minimizing variation caused simply by advection, observations in a plankton-tracking frame of reference focus measurement capabilities on the processes that influence the life history of populations. Further, the patchy nature of plankton populations motivates use of sensor data in real-time to resolve patch boundaries and adapt observing resources accordingly. We have developed capabilities for population-centric plankton observation and sampling by autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs). Our focus has been on phytoplankton populations, both because of their ecological significance - as the core of the oceanic food web and yet potentially harmful under certain bloom conditions, as well as the accessibility of their signal to simple optical sensing. During the first field deployment of these capabilities in 2010, we tracked a phytoplankton patch containing toxigenic diatoms and found that their toxicity correlated with exposure to resuspended sediments. However, this first deployment was labor intensive as the AUV drove in a pre-programmed pattern centered around a patch-marking drifter; it required a boat deployment of the patch-marking drifter and required full-time operators to periodically estimate of the position of the patch with respect to the drifter and adjust the AUV path accordingly. In subsequent field experiments during 2011 and 2012, the Tethys-class long-range AUVs ran fully autonomous patch tracking algorithms which detected phytoplankton patches and continually updated estimates of each patch center by driving adaptive patterns through the patch. Iterations of the algorithm were generated to overcome the challenges of tracking advecting and evolving patches while minimizing human involvement in vehicle control. Such fully autonomous monitoring will be necessary to perform long-term in

  20. Interactions between macro-algal mats and invertebrates in the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaelli, D.

    2000-07-01

    Blooms of opportunistic green macro-algae are a common feature of coastal areas and their effects on mudflat invertebrates can be dramatic. On the Ythan estuary, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, we have carried out a number of manipulative field experiments designed to evaluate the effects on invertebrates of different species of macro-algae with contrasting ecologies, and the effects of invertebrates on the development of the blooms. Macro-algal mats were found to have dramatic nega- tive effects on the density of the amphipod Corophium volutator, with higher algal biomasses having greater impact. The mechanism for this interaction seems to be interference by the algal filaments with the feeding behaviour of the amphipod. In contrast, the polychaete Capitella spp. increases in abundance under macro-algal mats due to enrichment of the sediment with organic material. These two interactions are seen at all scales, in areas of less than 1 m2 to the scale of the entire estuary, irrespective of the species composition of the macro- algal mats. Bioturbation by Corophium and grazing by the snail Hydrobia ulvae had little effect on macro-algal biomass, but there were less algae when the polychaete Nereis diversicolor was present. The most significant interaction in this system is the pronounced negative impact of algal mats on the abundance of Corophium, probably the most important invertebrate species in the diets of the estuary's shorebirds, fish and epibenthic crustaceans.

  1. Investigating vertical migration and bloom dynamics of a red tide dinoflagellate: Laboratory observations and a novel sensing approach. (AQU 2)

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Moorthi; Beth Stauffer; Carl Oberg; Gaurav Sukhatme; David Caron

    2006-01-01

    Lingulodinium polyedrum is a marine, bioluminescent dinoflagellate that is a common red tide species and potential toxin producer (yessotoxin) along a large expanse of the coast of Southern California. Little is known about the factors leading to bloom formation, or its impact on planktonic food webs. Bloom abundances can reach over 1000 cells/ml, events in which the interplay of physical forces (wind and surface currents) and of algal behavior (vertical migration) presumably play an importan...

  2. AQU 2: Investigating Vertical Migration and Bloom Dynamics of a Red Tide Dinoflagellate: Laboratory Observations and a Novel Sensing Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanie Moorthi; Beth Stauffer; Carl Oberg; Gaurav Sukhatme; David Caron

    2006-01-01

    Lingulodinium polyedrum is a marine, bioluminescent dinoflagellate that is a common red tide species and potential toxin producer (yessotoxin) along a large expanse of the coast of Southern California. Little is known about the factors leading to bloom formation, or its impact on planktonic food webs. Bloom abundances can reach over 1000 cells/ml, events in which the interplay of physical forces (wind and surface currents) and of algal behavior (vertical migration) presumably play an importan...

  3. Optical researches for cyanobacteria bloom monitoring in Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Budylin, Gleb B.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Voloshina, Olga V.; Karabashev, Genrik S.; Evdoshenko, Marina A.; Fadeev, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria bloom is a great ecological problem of Curonian Lagoon and Baltic Sea. The development of novel methods for the on-line control of cyanobacteria concentration and, moreover, for prediction of bloom spreading is of interest for monitoring the state of ecosystem. Here, we report the results of the joint application of hyperspectral measurements and remote sensing of Curonian Lagoon in July 2015 aimed at the assessment of cyanobacteria communities. We show that hyperspectral data allow on-line detection and qualitative estimation of cyanobacteria concentration, while the remote sensing data indicate the possibility of cyanobacteria bloom detection using the spectral features of upwelling irradiation.

  4. The decline process and major pathways of Microcystis bloom in Taihu Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhicong; LI Guowen; LIGenbao; LI Dunhai

    2012-01-01

    Eutrophication has become a serious concern in many lakes,resulting in cyanobacterial blooms.However,the mechanism and pathways of cyanobacteria decline are less understood.To identify and define the growth and decline of Microcystis blooms in Taihu Lake of China,and to illuminate the destination of surface floating blooms,we investigated the biomass distribution and variations in colony size,morphology,and floating velocity from October 2008 to September 2009.The results showed that the Microcystis bloom declined in response to biomass decrease,colony disaggregation,buoyancy reduction,and increased phytoplankton biodiversity,and these indicative parameters could be applied for recognition of the development phases of the bloom.Three major decline pathways were proposed to describe the bloom decline process,colony disaggregation (Pathway Ⅰ),colony settlement (Pathway Ⅱ),and cell lysis in colonies (Pathway Ⅲ).We proposed a strategy to define the occurrence and decline of Microcystis blooms,to evaluate the survival state under different stress conditions,and to indicate the efficiency of controlling countermeasures against algal blooms.

  5. Estimation of the algal-available phosphorus pool in sediments of a large, shallow eutrophic lake (Taihu, China) using profiled SMT fractional analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because large, shallow lakes are heavily influenced by wind–wave disturbance, it is difficult to estimate internal phosphorus load using traditional methods. To estimate the potential contribution of phosphorus from sediment to overlying water in eutrophic Lake Taihu, phosphorus fractions of surface and deep layer sediments were quantified and analyzed for algal bloom potential using a Standard Measurements and Testing (SMT) sequential extraction method and incubation experiments. Phosphorus bound to Fe, Al and Mn oxides and hydroxides (Fe–P) and organic phosphorus (OP) were to be found bioactive. The difference in Fe–P and OP contents between surface and deep layers equates to the sediment pool of potentially algal-available phosphorus. This pool was estimated at 5168 tons for the entire lake and was closely related to pollution input and algal blooms. Profiled SMT fractionation analysis is thus a potentially useful tool for estimating internal phosphorus loading in large, shallow lakes. - Highlights: ► We used profiled sediment P activity by SMT fractionation to evaluate the P release potential in large and shallow lakes. ► We built the relationship between sediment SMT fractionations of P and the P release by algal bloom degradation process. ► We discussed the supporting mechanism of sediment P release to Microcystis algal bloom in a large and shallow lake. ► We discussed the nutrient control strategy of algal bloom in shallow lakes in highly human activities disturbance catchment. - Profiled SMT fractional analysis of internal phosphorus pool in large, shallow lake.

  6. Algal-mediated ecosystem exchanges in the Eel River drainage network: towards photogrammetric mapping of color to function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, M. E.; Welter, J.; Furey, P.; Lowe, R.; Finlay, J. C.; Hondzo, M.; Limm, M.; Bode, C.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    Seasonal algal proliferations in river networks are typically short-lived (weeks-months) but spatially extensive. They mediate important ecological and biogeochemical exchanges within and between ecosystems. We are investigating correspondence of assemblage color with ecosystem function in the nitrogen-limited Eel River of northern California. During summer base flow following winter floods, Eel algal assemblages are dominated by the green macroalga Cladophora glomerata. New growths are green, but blooms turn yellow as Cladophora filaments are colonized by epiphytic diatoms (Cocconeis spp.). Later, proliferations turn rust colored as epiphytic assemblages became dominated by Epithemia spp., diatoms that contain nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterial endosymbionts. Epithemia-encrusted Cladophora occurs at and downstream of reaches draining > 100 km2 (where summer inundated average channel widths > 25 m), coinciding with a threshold increase in concentration of total dissolved nitrogen. Areal nitrogen fixation rates are 14x higher in rusty algal proliferations than in green, and 3-4x higher than in yellow Cladophora mats. Corresponding increases in insect emergence suggest that nitrogen fixed by cyanobacterial endosymbionts is highly edible. Rates of biomass emergence from rusty Cladophora mats are 12-17 times greater than from green mats, and 8-10 times greater from rusty than from yellow Cladophora mats, because larger taxa emerge from rusty mats (Chironominae versus Ceratopogonidae in yellow mats). Photogrammetric detection of spatial coverage and color changes in algal proliferations may help us track nitrogen fluxes they mediate (riverine loading from the atmosphere via fixation, river to the watershed return via insect emergence) that link riverine to aerial, watershed, and potentially nearshore marine ecosystems at reach to basin scales.

  7. Spring bloom onset in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Alexandre; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mork, Kjell Arne

    2016-06-01

    The North Atlantic spring bloom is a massive annual growth event of marine phytoplankton, tiny free-floating algae that form the base of the ocean's food web and generates a large fraction of the global primary production of organic matter. The conditions that trigger the onset of the spring bloom in the Nordic Seas, at the northern edge of the North Atlantic, are studied using in situ data from six bio-optical floats released north of the Arctic Circle. It is often assumed that spring blooms start as soon as phytoplankton cells daily irradiance is sufficiently abundant that division rates exceed losses. The bio-optical float data instead suggest the tantalizing hypothesis that Nordic Seas blooms start when the photoperiod, the number of daily light hours experienced by phytoplankton, exceeds a critical value, independently of division rates. The photoperiod trigger may have developed at high latitudes where photosynthesis is impossible during polar nights and phytoplankton enters into a dormant stage in winter. While the first accumulation of biomass recorded by the bio-optical floats is consistent with the photoperiod hypothesis, it is possible that some biomass accumulation started before the critical photoperiod but at levels too low to be detected by the fluorometers. More precise observations are needed to test the photoperiod hypothesis.

  8. Late Blooming or Language Problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Careers Certification Publications Events Advocacy Continuing Education Practice Management Research Home / Information for the Public / Speech, Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Late Blooming or ...

  9. Impact of multispecies diatom bloom on plankton community structure in Sundarban mangrove wetland, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A multispecies algal bloom was studied in coastal regions of Sundarban wetland. • Sharp changes in plankton community structure and hydrological parameters observed. • Chlorophyll a showed highest cell density (11.4 × 105 cells l−1) during bloom phase. • MODIS Aqua derived chlorophyll maps have been interpreted. - Abstract: A multispecies bloom caused by the centric diatoms, viz. Coscinodiscus radiatus, Chaetoceros lorenzianus and the pennate diatom Thalassiothrix frauenfeldii was investigated in the context of its impact on phytoplankton and microzooplankton (the loricate ciliate tintinnids) in the coastal regions of Sagar Island, the western part of Sundarban mangrove wetland, India. Both number (15–18 species) and cell densities (12.3 × 103 cells l−1 to 11.4 × 105 cells l−1) of phytoplankton species increased during peak bloom phase, exhibiting moderately high species diversity (H′ = 2.86), richness (R′ = 6.38) and evenness (E′ = 0.80). The diatom bloom, which existed for a week, had a negative impact on the tintinnid community in terms of drastic changes in species diversity index (1.09–0.004) and population density (582.5 × 103 to 50 × 103 ind m−3). The bloom is suggested to have been driven by the aquaculture activities and river effluents resulting high nutrient concentrations in this region. An attempt has been made to correlate the satellite remote sensing-derived information to the bloom conditions. MODIS-Aqua derived chlorophyll maps have been interpreted

  10. Enhancement of dissolved phosphorus release from sediment to lake water by Microcystis blooms--an enclosure experiment in a hyper-eutrophic, subtropical Chinese lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microcystis blooms induce release of dissolved phosphorus from lake sediments. - To clarify the possible influence of Microcystis blooms on the exchange of phosphorus (P) between sediment and lake water, an enclosure experiment was conducted in the hypereutrophic subtropical Lake Donghu during July-September 2000. Eight enclosures were used: six received sediment while two were sediment-free. In mid-August, Microcystis blooms developed in all the enclosures. There was a persistent coincidence between the occurrence of Microcystis blooms and the increase of both total P (TP) and soluble reactive P (SRP) concentrations in the water of the enclosures with sediments. In sediment-free enclosures, TP and SRP concentrations remained rather stable throughout the experiment, in spite of the appearance of Microcystis blooms. The results indicate that Microcystis blooms induced massive release of P from the sediment, perhaps mediated by high pH caused by intense algal photosynthesis, and/or depressed concentrations of nitrate nitrogen (NO3-N)

  11. Time to Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tikoo Shweta

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Bloom Syndrome (BS is an autosomal recessive disorder due to mutation in Bloom helicase (referred in literature either as BLM helicase or BLM. Patients with BS are predisposed to almost all forms of cancer. BS patients are even today diagnosed in the clinics by hyper-recombination phenotype that is manifested by high rates of Sister Chromatid Exchange. The function of BLM as a helicase and its role during the regulation of homologous recombination (HR is well characterized. However in the last few years the role of BLM as a DNA damage sensor has been revealed. For example, it has been demonstrated that BLM can stimulate the ATPase and chromatin remodeling activities of RAD54 in vitro. This indicates that BLM may increase the accessibility of the sensor proteins that recognize the lesion. Over the years evidence has accumulated that BLM is one of the earliest proteins that accumulates at the site of the lesion. Finally BLM also acts like a "molecular node" by integrating the upstream signals and acting as a bridge between the transducer and effector proteins (which again includes BLM itself, which in turn repair the DNA damage. Hence BLM seems to be a protein involved in multiple functions - all of which may together contribute to its reported role as a "caretaker tumor suppressor". In this review the recent literature documenting the upstream BLM functions has been elucidated and future directions indicated.

  12. A New Bloom: Transforming Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David; Conklin, Jack

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new design for the classic Bloom's Taxonomy developed by Anderson, L. W. & Krathwohl, D. (2001), which can be used to evaluate learners' technology-enhanced experience in more powerful and critical ways. The New Bloom's Taxonomy incorporates contemporary research on learning and human cognition into its model. The original…

  13. Algal δ15N values detect a wastewater effluent plume in nearshore and offshore surface waters and three-dimensionally model the plume across a coral reef on Maui, Hawai‘i, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The Lahaina WWRF effluent plume affects most of the shallow region at Kahekili. ► The Lahaina WWRF effluent plume rises to the surface waters in the Kahekili area. ► The Lahaina WWRF effluent plume flows south with the most predominant current. - Abstract: The coral reef at Kahekili, Maui is located ∼300 m south of the Lahaina Wastewater Reclamation Facility which uses four Class V injection wells to dispose of 3–5 million gallons of wastewater effluent daily. Prior research documented that the wastewater effluent percolates into the nearshore region of Kahekili. To determine if the wastewater effluent was detectable in the surface waters offshore, we used algal bioassays from the nearshore region to 100 m offshore and throughout the water column from the surface to the benthos. These algal bioassays documented that significantly more wastewater effluent was detected in the surface rather than the benthic waters and allowed us to generate a three-dimensional model of the wastewater plume in the Kahekili coastal region. Samples located over freshwater seeps had the highest δ15N values (∼30–35‰) and the effluent was detected in surface samples 500 m south and 100 m offshore of the freshwater seeps (∼8–11‰).

  14. A niche model to predict Microcystis bloom decline in Chaohu Lake, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhicong; LI Zhongjie; LI Dunhai

    2012-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms occur frequently in lakes due to eutrophication.Although a number of models have been proposed to forecast algal blooms,a good and applicable method is still lacking.This study explored a simple and effective mathematical-ecological model to evaluate the growth status and predict the population dynamics of Microcystis blooms.In this study,phytoplankton were collected and identified from 8 sampling sites in Chaohu Lake every month from July to October,2010.The niche breadth and niche overlap of common species were calculated using standard equations,and the potential relative growth rates of Microcystis were calculated as a weighted-value of niche overlap.In July,the potential relative growth rate was 2.79 (a.u.,arbitrary units) but then rapidly declined in the following months to -3.99 a.u.in September.A significant correlation (R=0.998,P<0.01) was found in the model between the net-increase in biomass of Microcystis in the field and the predicted values calculated by the niche model,we concluded that the niche model is suitable for forecasting the dynamics of Microcystis blooms.Redundancy analysis indicated that decreases in water temperature,dissolved oxygen and total dissolved phosphorus might be major factors underlying bloom decline.Based on the theory of community succession being caused by resource competition,the growth and decline of blooms can be predicted from a community structure.This may provide a basis for early warning and control of algal blooms.

  15. A Taste of Algal Genomes from the Joint Genome Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-06-17

    Algae play profound roles in aquatic food chains and the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, provide models for the study of symbiosis, photosynthesis, and eukaryotic evolution, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE's Joint Genome Institute (JGI). To date JGI has sequenced, assembled, annotated, and released to the public the genomes of 18 species and strains of algae, sampling almost all of the major clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. With more algal genomes currently undergoing analysis, JGI continues its commitment to driving forward basic and applied algal science. Among these ongoing projects are the pan-genome of the dominant coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the interrelationships between the 4 genomes in the nucleomorph-containing Bigelowiella natans and Guillardia theta, and the search for symbiosis genes of lichens.

  16. A Collection of Algal Genomes from the JGI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-19

    Algae, defined as photosynthetic eukaryotes other than plants, constitute a major component of fundamental eukaryotic diversity. Acquisition of the ability to conduct oxygenic photosynthesis through endosymbiotic events has been a principal driver of eukaryotic evolution, and today algae continue to underpin aquatic food chains as primary producers. Algae play profound roles in the carbon cycle, can impose health and economic costs through toxic blooms, and are candidate sources for bio-fuels; all of these research areas are part of the mission of DOE?s Joint Genome Institute (JGI). A collection of algal projects ongoing at JGI contributes to each of these areas and illustrates analyses employed in their genome exploration.

  17. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-07-12

    Abstract BACKGROUND: Progress in genome sequencing is proceeding at an exponential pace, and several new algal genomes are becoming available every year. One of the challenges facing the community is the association of protein sequences encoded in the genomes with biological function. While most genome assembly projects generate annotations for predicted protein sequences, they are usually limited and integrate functional terms from a limited number of databases. Another challenge is the use of annotations to interpret large lists of 'interesting' genes generated by genome-scale datasets. Previously, these gene lists had to be analyzed across several independent biological databases, often on a gene-by-gene basis. In contrast, several annotation databases, such as DAVID, integrate data from multiple functional databases and reveal underlying biological themes of large gene lists. While several such databases have been constructed for animals, none is currently available for the study of algae. Due to renewed interest in algae as potential sources of biofuels and the emergence of multiple algal genome sequences, a significant need has arisen for such a database to process the growing compendiums of algal genomic data. DESCRIPTION: The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes

  18. Heterosigma bloom and associated fish kill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, P.K.; Rensel, J.E.; Postel, J.R.; Taub, F.B.

    1997-01-01

    A bloom of the harmful marine phytoplankton, Heterosigma carterae occurred in upper Case Inlet, south Puget Sound, Washington in late September, 1994, correlating with the presence of at least 35 dead salmon. This marks the first time that this alga has been closely correlated with a wild fish kill; in the past it was thought to be associated with kills of penned fish at fish farms only. We were informed of the presence of a possible harmful algal bloom and dead salinois Ilear the town of Allyn on 27 September and a team was formed to investigate. We arrived at the Allyn waterfront at 17:30 hours the same day. Prior to our arrival, state agency personnel walked approximatcly two miles of shoreline from the powerlines north of the dock, to the mouth of Sherwood Creek and conducted the only official count of dead fish present along the shore consisting of 12 coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), 11 chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta), 12 chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tschawytscha), one flat fish, and one sculpin on the morning of 9/27. Since previous harmful blooms of Heterosigma have resultedin the majority of net penreared salmon sinking to the bottom of pens, and only approximately two miles of shoreline were sampled, it is suspected that many more exposed fish may have succumbed than were counted. Witnesses who explored the east side of the bay reported seeing many dead salmon there as well, but no counts were made. State agency personnel who observed the fish kill reported seeing “dying fish coming to the beach, gulping at the surface, trying to get out of the water” Scavengers were seen consuming the salmon carcasses; these included two harbor seals, a house cat, and Hymenopteran insects. None suffered any noticeable acute ill effects. Although precise cause of death has not been ascertained, visual inspection of the reproductive organs from a deceased male chum salmon found on the shore at Allyn confirmed that the fish was not yet reproductively mature and

  19. Effects of electron acceptors on soluble reactive phosphorus in the overlying water during algal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinzhi; Jiang, Xia; Zheng, Binghui; Niu, Yuan; Wang, Kun; Wang, Wenwen; Kardol, Paul

    2015-12-01

    Endogenous phosphorus (P) release from sediments is an important factor to cause eutrophication and, hence, algal bloom in lakes in China. Algal decomposition depletes dissolved oxygen (DO) and causes anaerobic conditions and therefore increases P release from sediments. As sediment P release is dependent on the iron (Fe) cycle, electron acceptors (e.g., NO3 (-), SO4 (2-), and Mn(4+)) can be utilized to suppress the reduction of Fe(3+) under anaerobic conditions and, as such, have the potential to impair the release of sediment P. Here, we used a laboratory experiment to test the effects of FeCl3, MnO2, and KNO3 on soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration and related chemical variables in the overlying water column during algal decomposition at different algal densities. Results showed that algal decomposition significantly depleted DO and thereby increased sediment Fe-bound P release. Compared with the control, addition of FeCl3 significantly decreased water SRP concentration through inhibiting sediment P release. Compared with FeCl3, addition of MnO2 has less potential to suppress sediment P release during algal decomposition. Algal decomposition has the potential for NO3 (-) removal from aquatic ecosystem through denitrification and by that alleviates the suppressing role of NO3 (-) on sediment P release. Our results indicated that FeCl3 and MnO2 could be efficient in reducing sediment P release during algal decomposition, with the strongest effect found for FeCl3; large amounts of NO3 (-) were removed from the aquatic ecosystem through denitrification during algal decomposition. Moreover, the amounts of NO3 (-) removal increased with increasing algal density. PMID:26263882

  20. Quantification of phytoplankton bloom dynamics by citizen scientists in urban and peri-urban environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilla, Eva Pintado; Cunha, Davi Gasparini Fernandes; Lee, Fred Wang Fat; Loiselle, Steven; Ho, Kin Chung; Hall, Charlotte

    2015-11-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are severely threatened by urban development and agricultural intensification. Increased occurrence of algal blooms is a main issue, and the identification of local dynamics and drivers is hampered by a lack of field data. In this study, data from 13 cities (250 water bodies) were used to examine the capacity of trained community members to assess elevated phytoplankton densities in urban and peri-urban freshwater ecosystems. Coincident nutrient concentrations and land use observations were used to examine possible drivers of algal blooms. Measurements made by participants showed a good relationship to standard laboratory measurements of phytoplankton density, in particular in pond and lake ecosystems. Links between high phytoplankton density and nutrients (mainly phosphate) were observed. Microscale observations of pollution sources and catchment scale estimates of land cover both influenced the occurrence of algal blooms. The acquisition of environmental data by committed and trained community members represents a major opportunity to support agency monitoring programmes and to complement field campaigns in the study of catchment dynamics. PMID:26471276

  1. The link between shrimp farm runoff and blooms of toxic Heterosigma akashiwo in Red Sea coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakaria A. Mohamed

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In May 2010 a copious bloom of the raphidophyte Heterosigma akashiwo was observed for the first time in Red Sea waters off the coasts of Saudi Arabia.This bloom was confined to an area where water and phytoplankton flow freely between the sea and a shrimp farm. The phytoplankton density and physico-chemical characteristics of the sea water were therefore investigated weekly at bloom and non-bloom sites in order to gain insightinto the environmental factors prevailing at the bloom site and their link with the shrimp farm runoff. The bloom site showed higher nutrient concentrations than the non-bloom site, indicating the possible role of the shrimp farm in flushing nutrients into this site. The bloom appeared on 27 May, coinciding with a decrease in salinity (19°C. The results of toxicological assays showed that both bloom samples and batch cultures of H. akashiwo were toxic toArtemia salina and exhibited haemolytic activity with respectto rabbit erythrocytes.Bloom samples showed a higher toxicity (LC50=8.9 ×10^4 cells ml-1 and haemolytic activity (EC50=3.64 × 104cells ml-1 than the batch cultures (LC50=11.6 × 104 cells ml-1, EC50=5.1 imes 104 cells ml-1. In the light ofthe results of this study, the link between H. akashiwoblooms and shrimp farm runoff should be considered during the monitoring of Red Sea coastal waters for the presence of harmful algal blooms.

  2. OSU MODIS FLH Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two bloom products were developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) and fluorescence line-height...

  3. Population dynamics of phytoplankton, heterotrophic bacteria, and viruses during the spring bloom in the western subarctic Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koji; Kuwata, Akira; Yoshie, Naoki; Shibata, Akira; Kawanobe, Kyoko; Saito, Hiroaki

    2011-05-01

    We characterized the community composition of phytoplankton in the western subarctic Pacific from the pre-bloom to the decline phase of the spring bloom with special reference to decreases in the silicic acid concentration in surface waters as an index for diatom bloom development. Furthermore, responses of heterotrophic bacteria and viruses to the spring bloom were also concomitantly investigated. Under pre-bloom conditions when nutrients were abundant but the surface mixed layer depth was relatively deep, chlorophyll (Chl) a concentrations were consistently low and green algae (chlorophytes and prasinophytes), cryptophytes, and diatoms were predominant in the phytoplankton assemblages as estimated by algal pigment signatures. Together with the shallowing of the mixed layer depth and the decrease in silicic acid concentration, diatoms bloomed remarkably in the Oyashio region, though the magnitude of the bloom in the Kuroshio-Oyashio transition (hereafter Transition) region was relatively small. A total of 77 diatom species were identified, with the bloom-forming diatoms mainly consisting of Thalassiosira, Chaetoceros, and Fragilariopsis species. It has become evident that the carotenoid fucoxanthin can serve as a strong indicator of the diatom carbon biomass during the spring diatom bloom. Differences in the species richness of diatoms among stations generally enabled us to separate the Oyashio bloom stations from the Transition and the Oyashio pre-bloom stations. Relatively high values of the Shannon-Wiener index for the diatom species were also maintained during the Oyashio bloom, indicating that a wide variety of species then shared dominance. In the decline phase of the Oyashio bloom when surface nutrient concentrations decreased, senescent diatom cells increased, as inferred from the levels of chlorophyllide a. Although the cell density of heterotrophic bacteria changed little with the development of the diatom bloom, viral abundance increased toward the end

  4. HAB detection based on absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hui; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The coastal area of East China Sea (ECS) suffers from the harmful algal blooms (HAB) frequently every year in the warm season. The most common causative phytoplankton algal species of HAB in the ECS in recent years are Prorocentrum donghaiense (dinoflagellates), Karenia mikimotoi (dinoflagellates which could produce hemolytic and ichthyotoxins) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). The discrimination between the dinoflagellates and diatom HAB through ocean color remote sensing approach can add the knowledge of HAB events in ECS and help to the precaution. A series of in-situ measurement consisted of absorption coefficient, total scattering and particulate backscattering coefficient was conducted in the southern coast of Zhejiang Province in May 2009, and the estuary of Changjiang River in August 2009 and December 2010, which encountered two HAB events and a moderate bloom. The Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) of the bloom waters have significant difference between phytoplankton species in absorption and backscattering properties. The chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient (a*phy(λ)) for the bloom patches (chlorophyll a concentration >6mg m-3) differ greatly from the adjacent normal seawater, with the a*phy(λ) of bloom water lower than 0.03 m2 mg-1 while the a*phy(λ) of the adjacent normal seawater is much higher (even up to 0.06 m2 mg-1). Meanwhile, the backscattering coefficients at 6 wavebands (420, 442, 470, 510, 590 and 700nm) are also remarkably lower for bloom waters ( 0.02 m-1). The backscattering coefficient ratio (Rbp(λ)) is much lower for diatom bloom waters than for dinoflagellates types (0.01079 vs. 0.01227). A discrimination model based on IOPs is established, and several typical dinoflagellates and diatom bloom events including Prorocentrum donghaiense, Karenia mikimotoi and Skeletonema costatum in the ECS are picked out for testing with the MODIS-L2 and L3 ocean color remote sensing products from NASA website. The result proves that the

  5. National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, John [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States); Sarisky-Reed, Valerie [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The framework for National Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap was constructed at the Algal Biofuels Technology Roadmap Workshop, held December 9-10, 2008, at the University of Maryland-College Park. The Workshop was organized by the Biomass Program to discuss and identify the critical challenges currently hindering the development of a domestic, commercial-scale algal biofuels industry. This Roadmap presents information from a scientific, economic, and policy perspectives that can support and guide RD&D investment in algal biofuels. While addressing the potential economic and environmental benefits of using algal biomass for the production of liquid transportation fuels, the Roadmap describes the current status of algae RD&D. In doing so, it lays the groundwork for identifying challenges that likely need to be overcome for algal biomass to be used in the production of economically viable biofuels.

  6. Effectiveness of an anti-algal compound in eliminating an aquatic unicellular harmful algal Phaeocystis globosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajun eZhang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Phaeocystis globosa blooms can have negative effects on higher trophic levels in the marine ecosystem and consequently influence human activities. Strain KA22, identified as the bacterium Hahella, was isolated from coastal surface water and used to control P. globosa growth. A methanol extract from the bacteral cells showed strong algicidal activity. After purification, the compound showed a similar structure to prodigiosin when identified with Q-Exactive Orbitrap MS and nuclear magnetic resonance spectra. The compound showed algicidal activity against P. globosa with a 50% Lethal Dose (LD50 of 2.24 μg/mL. The prodigiosin was stable under heat and acid environment, and it could be degraded under alkaline environment and natural light condition. The growth rates of strain KA22 was fast in 2216E medium and the content of prodigiosin in this medium was more than 70 μg/mL after 16 h incubation. The compound showed particularly strong algicidal activity against Prorocentrum donghaiense, P. globosa and Heterosigma akashiwo, but having little effect on three other phytoplankton species tested. The results of our research could increase our knowledge on harmful algal bloom control compound and lead to further study on the mechanisms of the lysis effect on harmful algae.

  7. Advanced Algal Systems Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Research and development (R&D) on advanced algal biofuels and bioproducts presents an opportunity to sustainably expand biomass resource potential in the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) Advanced Algal Systems Program is carrying out a long-term, applied R&D strategy to lower the costs of algal biofuel production by working with partners to develop revolutionary technologies and conduct crosscutting analyses to better understand the potential

  8. Doom and Boom on a Resilient Reef: Climate Change, Algal Overgrowth and Coral Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; McCook, Laurence J.; Dove, Sophie; Berkelmans, Ray; Roff, George; Kline, David I.; Weeks, Scarla; Richard D. Evans; Williamson, David H.; Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove

    2009-01-01

    Background Coral reefs around the world are experiencing large-scale degradation, largely due to global climate change, overfishing, diseases and eutrophication. Climate change models suggest increasing frequency and severity of warming-induced coral bleaching events, with consequent increases in coral mortality and algal overgrowth. Critically, the recovery of damaged reefs will depend on the reversibility of seaweed blooms, generally considered to depend on grazing of the seaweed, and reple...

  9. Development of Phaeocystis globosa blooms in the upwelling waters of the South Central coast of Viet Nam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Doan-Nhu; Lam, Nguyen-Ngoc; Dippner, Joachim W.

    2010-11-01

    Blooms of haptophyte algae in the south central coastal waters of Viet Nam often occur in association with upwelling phenomenon during the southwest (SW) monsoon. Depending on the magnitude of the blooms, damage to aquaculture farms may occur. Based on two years of data on biology, oceanography, and marine chemistry, the present study suggests a conceptual model of the growth of the haptophyte Phaeocystis globosa. At the beginning of the bloom, low temperature and abundant nutrient supply, especially nitrate from rain and upwelling, favour bloom development. Diatoms utilize available nitrate and phosphate; subsequently, higher ammonium concentration allows P. globosa to grow faster than the diatoms. At the end of the Phaeocystis bloom, free cells may become available as food for a heterotrophic dinoflagellate species, Noctiluca scintillans. During and after the phytoplankton bloom, remineralization by bacteria reduces dissolved oxygen to a very low concentration at depth, and favors growth of nitrate-reducing bacteria.A Lagrangian Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB) model, driven by a circulation model of the area, realistically simulates the transport of microalgae in surface waters during strong and weak SW monsoon periods, suggesting that it may be a good tool for early warning of HABs in Vietnamese coastal waters.

  10. Coastal upwelling linked to toxic Pseudo-nitzschia australis blooms in Los Angeles coastal waters, 2005-2007

    KAUST Repository

    Schnetzer, Astrid

    2013-06-10

    Harmful algal blooms dominated by the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have become a perennial but variable event within surface waters near the greater Los Angeles area. Toxic blooms during spring seasons from 2005 to 2007 varied strongly in their overall toxicity and duration. Differences in bloom dynamics were linked to differences in storm-induced river discharge following episodic rain events and coastal upwelling, both major coastal processes that led to the injection of nutrients into coastal surface waters. Heavy river runoff during early 2005, a record-rainfall year, favored a phytoplankton community mainly comprised of algal taxa other than Pseudo-nitzschia. The spring bloom during 2005 was associated with low domoic acid surface concentrations and minor contributions of (mainly) P. delicatissima to the diatom assemblage. In contrast, highly toxic P. australis-dominated blooms during spring seasons of 2006 and 2007 were linked to strong upwelling events. River discharge quotas in 2006 and 2007, in contrast to 2005, fell well below annual averages for the region. Surface toxin levels were linked to colder, more saline (i.e. upwelled) water over the 3-year study, but no such consistent relationship between domoic acid levels and other physiochemical parameters, such as macronutrient concentrations or nutrient ratios, was observed. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  11. Abundance, biomass and composition of spring ice algal and phytoplankton communities of the Laptev Sea (Arctic)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Abundance, biomass and composition of the ice algal and phytoplankton communities were investigated in the southeastern Laptev Sea in spring 1999.Diatoms dominated the algal communities and pennate diatoms dominated the diatom population. 12 dominant algal species occurred within sea ice and underlying water column, including Fragilariopsis oceanica, F. cylindrus, Nitzschia frigida , N. promare, Achnanthes taeniata , Nitzschia neofrigida , Navicula pelagica , N. vanhoef fenii, N. septentrionalis, Melosira arctica , Clindrotheca closterium and Pyramimonas sp. The algal abundance of bottom 10 cm sea ice varied between 14.6 and 1562.2 × 104 cells l-1 with an average of 639.0 × 104cells l-1 , and the algal biomass ranged from 7.89 to 2093.5 μg C l-1 with an average of 886.9 μg C l-1 , which were generally one order of magnitude higher than those of sub-bottom ice and two orders of magnitude higher than those of underlying surface water. The integrated algal abundance and biomass of lowermost 20 cm ice column were averagely 7.7 and 12.2 times as those of upper 20 m water column, respectively, suggesting that the ice algae might play an important role in maintaining the coastal marine ecosystem before the thawing of sea ice. Ice algae influenced the phytoplankton community of the underlying water column.However, the "seeding" of ice algae for phytoplankton bloom was negligible because of the low phytoplankton biomass within the underlying water column.

  12. MODIS-Aqua detects Noctiluca scintillans and hotspots in the central Arabian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, R; Priyaja, P; Rafeeq, M; Sudhakar, M

    2016-01-01

    Northern Arabian Sea is considered as an ecologically sensitive area as it experiences a massive upwelling and long-lasting algal bloom, Noctiluca scintillans (green tide) during summer and spring-winter, respectively. Diatom bloom is also found to be co-located with N. scintillans and both have an impact on ecology of the basin. In-house technique of detecting species of these blooms from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data was used to generate a time-series of images revealing their spatial distribution. A study of spatial-temporal variability of these blooms using satellite data expressed a cyclic pattern of their spread over a period of 13 years. An average distribution of the blooms for January-March period revealed a peak in 2015 and minimum in 2013. Subsequently, a time-series of phytoplankton species images were generated for these 2 years to study their inter-annual variability and the associated factors. Species images during active phase of the bloom (February) in 2015 indicated development of N. scintillans and diatom in the central Arabian Sea also, up to 12° N. This observation was substantiated with relevant oceanic parameters measured from the ship as well as satellite data and the same is highlight of the paper. While oxygen depletion and release of ammonia associated with N. scintillans are detrimental for waters on the western side; it is relatively less extreme and supports the entire food chain on the eastern side. In view of these contrasting eco-sensitive events, it is a matter of concern to identify biologically active persistent areas, hot spots, in order to study their ecology in detail. An ecological index, persistence of the bloom, was derived from the time-series of species images and it is another highlight of our study. PMID:26690080

  13. Algal functional annotation tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, D. [UCLA; Casero, D. [UCLA; Cokus, S. J. [UCLA; Merchant, S. S. [UCLA; Pellegrini, M. [UCLA

    2012-07-01

    The Algal Functional Annotation Tool is a web-based comprehensive analysis suite integrating annotation data from several pathway, ontology, and protein family databases. The current version provides annotation for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, and in the future will include additional genomes. The site allows users to interpret large gene lists by identifying associated functional terms, and their enrichment. Additionally, expression data for several experimental conditions were compiled and analyzed to provide an expression-based enrichment search. A tool to search for functionally-related genes based on gene expression across these conditions is also provided. Other features include dynamic visualization of genes on KEGG pathway maps and batch gene identifier conversion.

  14. Massive fish mortality and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii bloom in Aleksandrovac Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirčev, Zorica; Obradović, Vesna; Codd, Geoffrey A; Marjanović, Prvoslav; Spoof, Lisa; Drobac, Damjana; Tokodi, Nada; Petković, Anđelka; Nenin, Tanja; Simeunović, Jelica; Važić, Tamara; Meriluoto, Jussi

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a case study of a massive fish mortality during a Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii bloom in Aleksandrovac Lake, Serbia in mid-December 2012. According to a preliminary investigation of the samples taken on November 6 before the fish mortalities and to extended analyses of samples taken on November 15, no values of significant physicochemical parameters emerged to explain the cause(s) of the fish mortality. No industrial pollutants were apparent at this location, and results excluded the likelihood of bacterial infections. Even after freezing, the dissolved oxygen concentration in the water was sufficient for fish survival. High concentrations of chlorophyll a and phaeophytin occurred in the lake, and phytoplankton bloom samples were lethal in Artemia salina bioassays. A bloom of the cyanobacterium C. raciborskii was recorded during November. Although the A. salina bioassays indicated the presence of toxic compounds in the cyanobacterial cells, the cyanotoxins, microcystins, cylindrospermopsin and saxitoxin were not detected. PMID:27352231

  15. Concentration and dispersal of a Pseudo-nitzschia bloom in Penn Cove, Washington, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, V L; Adams, N G; Bill, B D; Anulacion, B F; Wekell, J C

    1998-01-01

    A bloom of the pennate diatom Pseudo-nitzschia, several species of which are associated with the production of the potent excitotoxin domoic acid, was observed in a Puget Sound, Washington embayment in July and August of 1997. Penn Cove, which receives nutrients from the nearby Skagit River and abundant sunshine during summer months due to its location in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains, is the home of a commercial mussel farm which supplies shellfish to many coastal areas of the USA. Levels of domoic acid in mussels increased to 3 ppm on 6 and 10 July, corresponding to the observation of a brown algal bloom in Penn Cove. Four species of Pseudo-nitzschia (P. pungens, P. multiseries, P. australis, and P. pseudodelicatissima) were present in our samples from the cove, corresponding to levels of domoic acid in seawater ranging from 0.1-0.8 mirog l(-1) as measured by a receptor binding assay. The highest Pseudo-nitzschia concentration during the time of our sampling was 13 million cells per liter on 28 July. The bloom of Pseudo-nitzschia occurred after a period of strong discharge from the Skagit River and rain accompanied by elevated south and southeasterly winds. Stratification of the cove, providing optimal bloom conditions, was facilitated by weak winds, sunshine, and a freshwater lens at the mouth of the cove. The position of the Pseudo-nitzschia bloom was influenced by buoyancy fronts caused by exchange of water within the cove with that of Saratoga Passage. The decay of this bloom in Penn Cove was accompanied by decreasing nitrate levels at all measured depths. These and future observations aid in the development of a model for prediction of toxic bloom events in the shallow embayments of Puget Sound. PMID:10223627

  16. Algal Biofuels; Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  17. Plankton community respiration during a coccolithophore bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Carol; Widdicombe, Claire E.; Zubkov, Mikhail V.; Tarran, Glen A.; Miller, Axel E. J.; Rees, Andrew P.

    Plankton dark community respiration (DCR), gross production (GP), bacterial production, protozoan herbivory, and phytoplankton, microzooplankton and heterotrophic bacterial abundance were measured during a bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. The study, which was conducted in the northern North Sea during June 1999, included a spatial survey and a 6-day Lagrangian time series informed by a sulphur hexafluoride (SF 6) tracer-release experiment. E. huxleyi abundance in surface waters ranged from 380 to 3000 cells ml -1, while DCR varied between 2 and 4 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1 and GP between 2 and 5 mmol O 2 m -3 d -1. Euphotic zone integrated DCR and GP were in approximate balance, with a mean (±SD) P:R ratio of 0.9±0.4 ( n=9). However, highest GP occurred at the surface alongside maxima of E. huxleyi, whereas highest rates of DCR occurred at depths of 25-30 m associated with maxima in chlorophyll a and bacterial biomass. DCR was positively correlated with bacterial biomass, microzooplankton biomass, attenuance, particulate organic carbon, and chlorophyll a concentration; and negatively correlated with apparent oxygen utilisation. DCR was not correlated with in situ temperature, dissolved organic carbon concentration or E. huxleyi abundance. A˜100 h incubation of 0.8 μm filtered seawater enabled the estimation of a bacterial respiratory quotient (RQ) and growth efficiency (BGE) from the slopes of the linear regressions of the decrease in dissolved oxygen and increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and bacterial carbon with time. During this experiment the bacterial RQ was 0.69 and the growth efficiency was 18%. This measured BGE was used in comparison with literature values to apportion DCR to that associated with bacterial (13-71%), microzooplankton (10-50%), and algal (11-28%) activity. This accounting exercise compared well with measured DCR (to within ±50%), the exact calculation being highly dependent on the BGE used.

  18. Reflections on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Aly

    2006-01-01

    In the application of the "Original" Bloom's taxonomy since its publication in 1956, several weaknesses and practical limitations have been revealed. Besides, psychological and educational research has witnessed the introduction of several theories and approaches to learning which make students more knowledgeable of and responsible for their own…

  19. Service discovery using Bloom filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goering, Patrick; Heijenk, Geert; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Haverkort, B.R.H.M.; Laat, de C.T.A.M.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.

    2006-01-01

    A protocol to perform service discovery in adhoc networks is introduced in this paper. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to distribute services to nodes in the neighborhood and thus enable local service discovery. The protocol has been implemented in a discrete event simulator to investigate the beh

  20. Determination of the cyanobacterial toxin cylindrospermopsin in algal food supplements

    OpenAIRE

    H. Liu; Scott, P. M.

    2011-01-01

    For the analysis of blue–green algal food supplements for cylindrospermopsin (CYN), a C18 solid-phase extraction column and a polygraphitized carbon solid-phase extraction column in series was an effective procedure for the clean-up of extracts. Determination of CYN was by liquid chromatography with ultraviolet light detection. At extract spiking levels of CYN equivalent to 25–500 μg g−1, blue–green algal supplement recoveries were in the range 70–90%. CYN was not detected in ten samples of f...

  1. Evaluation of cyanobacteria cell count detection derived from MERIS imagery across the eastern USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inland waters across the United States (US) are at potential risk for increased outbreaks of toxic cyanobacteria (Cyano) harmful algal bloom (HAB) events resulting from elevated water temperatures and extreme hydrologic events attributable to climate change and increased nutrient...

  2. Blooming Seas West of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For several weeks in May and early June, daily satellite images of the North Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland have captured partial glimpses of luxuriant blooms of microscopic marine plants between patches of clouds. On June 4, 2007, the skies over the ocean cleared, displaying the sea's spring bloom in brilliant color. A bright blue bloom stretches north from the Mouth of the River Shannon and tapers off like a plume of blue smoke north of Clare Island. (In the large image, a second bloom is visible to the north, wrapping around County Donegal, on the island's northwestern tip.) The image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite. Cold, nutrient-stocked water often wells up to the surface from the deeper ocean along coastal shelves and at the edges of ocean currents. When it does, it delivers a boost of nutrients that fuel large blooms of single-celled plants collectively known as phytoplankton. The plants are the foundation of the marine food web, and their proliferation in this area of the North Atlantic explains why the waters of western Ireland support myriad fisheries and populations of large mammals like seals, whales, and dolphins. Like plants on land, phytoplankton make their food through photosynthesis, harnessing sunlight for energy using chlorophyll and other light-capturing pigments. The pigments change the way light reflects off the surface water, appearing as colorful swirls of turquoise and green against the darker blue of the ocean. Though individually tiny, collectively these plants play a big role in Earth's carbon and climate cycles; worldwide, they remove about as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis as land plants do. Satellites are the only way to map the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms across the global oceans on a regular basis. That kind of information is important not only to scientists who model carbon and climate, but also to biologists and fisheries

  3. Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring Data for Puget Sound - SoundToxins: Partnership for Enhanced Monitoring and Emergency Response to Harmful Algal Blooms in Puget Sound

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Toxic outbreaks of species of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium have become pervasive in the Puget Sound region over the last two decades, escalating the threats to...

  4. Algal massive growth in relation to water quality and salinity at Damietta, north of Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Ibraheem Deyab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To relate the proliferation and dominance of certain algal species at the Damietta and its relation to water quality. Methods: Water and algal biomass were bimonthly sampled from five selected sites at Damietta Province, Egypt during 2012. Algae were identified and quantified. Waters, algae and sediment were analyzed. Results: The physicochemical properties of water showed limited seasonal but substantial local variation. The high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus and turbidity of water pointed to marked eutrophication, which could enhance massive algal growth. The temporal fluctuation in temperature, exposure to industrial and domestic sewage and salinity results in succession between blooming algal species. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris alternated in a moderately saline water and Oscillatoria agardhii and Mougeotia scalaris in a fresh water body during summer and winter respectively. Likewise, Microcystis aureginosa and Ulva lactuca alternated in a moderately saline site during autumn and summer respectively. Cladophora albida dominated a fish pond of brackish water and Dunaliella salina dominated the most saline water over the whole period of study. Conclusions: Growth of the predominant algal species is correlated to water quality. These species are of considerable nutritive value, with moderate contents of protein, carbohydrate, macronutrients and micronutrients, which evaluates them for usage as food (green and macroalgae, fodder or bio-fertilizer (cyanophytes.

  5. Algal massive growth in relation to water quality and salinity at Damietta, north of Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ali Ibraheem Deyab; Taha Mohamed El-Katony

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To relate the proliferation and dominance of certain algal species at the Damietta and its relation to water quality. Methods: Water and algal biomass were bimonthly sampled from five selected sites at Damietta Province, Egypt during 2012. Algae were identified and quantified. Waters, algae and sediment were analyzed. Results:The physicochemical properties of water showed limited seasonal but substantial local variation. The high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus and turbidity of water pointed to marked eutrophication, which could enhance massive algal growth. The temporal fluctuation in temperature, exposure to industrial and domestic sewage and salinity results in succession between blooming algal species. Spirulina platensis and Chlorella vulgaris alternated in a moderately saline water and Oscillatoria agardhii and Mougeotia scalaris in a fresh water body during summer and winter respectively. Likewise, Microcystis aureginosa and Ulva lactuca alternated in a moderately saline site during autumn and summer respectively. Cladophora albida dominated a fish pond of brackish water and Dunaliella salina dominated the most saline water over the whole period of study. Conclusions:Growth of the predominant algal species is correlated to water quality. These species are of considerable nutritive value, with moderate contents of protein, carbohydrate, macronutrients and micronutrients, which evaluates them for usage as food (green and macroalgae), fodder or bio-fertilizer (cyanophytes).

  6. Immunoassays and Biosensors for the Detection of Cyanobacterial Toxins in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Weller

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms are a frequent phenomenon in nearly all kinds of fresh water. Global warming and eutrophication by waste water, air pollution and fertilizers seem to lead to an increased frequency of occurrence. Many cyanobacteria produce hazardous and quite persistent toxins, which can contaminate the respective water bodies. This may limit the use of the raw water for many purposes. The purification of the contaminated water might be quite costly, which makes a continuous and large scale treatment economically unfeasible in many cases. Due to the obvious risks of algal toxins, an online or mobile detection method would be highly desirable. Several biosensor systems have been presented in the literature for this purpose. In this review, their mode of operation, performance and general suitability for the intended purpose will be described and critically discussed. Finally, an outlook on current developments and future prospects will be given.

  7. Integrated analytical approaches towards toxic algal natural products discovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Rasmussen, Silas Anselm; Gedsted Andersen, Mikael;

    Microalgae are known to produce toxins which affect the marine ecosystems. This include compounds active against competitors, grazers and in many cases also fish (1,2). Many strategies can be followed for discovery of novel bioactive secondary metabolites from marine sources. We have previously...... demonstrated that phenotypic based chemotaxonomy can be successfully used as the intial step in selection of talented strains for testing in various bioassays, using multivariate methods for clustering of whole profiles of metabolites. The second and very important step in the discovery process is...... present some of the initial results that we have gained looking into the chemistry of Alexandrium and Prymnesium in the new larger Danish strategic project: “Harmful algal blooms and fish kills”(5)....

  8. Toxic Microalgal Blooms: What Can Nuclear Techniques Provide for Their Management?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some harmful algal blooms (HABs) produce potent toxins that accumulate in shellfish and fish and represent a major threat to human health, international trade and sustainable coastal fisheries development. In the context of climate change and displacement of endemic toxigenic species (via ship ballast waters and other vectors) to new coastal areas, HABs appear to be more frequent and widespread. The IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory and its partners have been developing and transferring isotopic based analytical methods and instrumentation for monitoring HAB species, their biotoxins, and radiometric dating of sediment cores. The extremely sensitive and robust Receptor Binding Assay (RBA) for toxins associated with Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) and Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP) provides an alternative method to the standard mouse bioassay, and radiometric sediment core dating combined with fossil cyst abundance allows reconstruction of the prior history of blooms and their relationship to climate. (author)

  9. Algal culture studies for CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Arnett, K.; Gladue, R.; Cox, J.; Lieberman, D.

    1987-01-01

    Microalgae are well-suited as a component of a Closed Environmental Life Support System (CELSS), since they can couple the closely related functions of food production and atmospheric regeneration. The objective was to provide a basis for predicting the response of CELSS algal cultures, and thus the food supply and air regeneration system, to changes in the culture parameters. Scenedesmus growth was measured as a function of light intensity, and the spectral dependence of light absorption by the algae as well as algal respiration in the light were determined as a function of cell concentration. These results were used to test and confirm a mathematical model that describes the productivity of an algal culture in terms of the competing processes of photosynthesis and respiration. The relationship of algal productivity to cell concentration was determined at different carbon dioxide concentrations, temperatures, and light intensities. The maximum productivity achieved by an air-grown culture was found to be within 10% of the computed maximum productivity, indicating that CO2 was very efficiently removed from the gas stream by the algal culture. Measurements of biomass productivity as a function of cell concentration at different light intensities indicated that both the productivity and efficiency of light utilization were greater at higher light intensities.

  10. Effects of temperature and nutrients on phytoplankton biomass during bloom seasons in Taihu Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-lin CAI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term variations of phytoplankton chlorophyll-a (Chl-a, nutrients, and suspended solids (SS in Taihu Lake, a large shallow freshwater lake in China, during algal bloom seasons from May to August were analyzed using the monthly investigated data from 1999 to 2007. The effective accumulated water temperature (EAWT in months from March to June was calculated with daily monitoring data from the Taihu Laboratory for Lake Ecosystem Research (TLLER. The concentrations of Chl-a and nutrients significantly decreased from Meiliang Bay to Central Lake. Annual averages of the total nitrogen (TN, total phosphorus (TP, and Chl-a concentrations, and EAWT generally increased in the nine years. In Meiliang Bay, the concentration of Chl-a was significantly correlated with EAWT, ammonia nitrogen ( , TN, the soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, TP, and SS. In Central Lake, however, the concentration of Chl-a was only correlated with EAWT, TP, and SS. Multiple stepwise linear regression revealed that EAWT, dissolved total phosphorus (DTP, and TP explained 99.2% of the variation of Chl-a in Meiliang Bay, and that EAWT, , and TP explained 98.7% of the variation of Chl-a in Central Lake. Thus EAWT is an important factor influencing the annual change of phytoplankton biomass. Extreme climate change, such as extremely hot springs or cold springs, could cause very different bloom intensities in different years. It is also suggested that both nutrients and EAWT played important roles in the growth of phytoplankton in Taihu Lake. The climate factors and nutrients dually controlled the risk of harmful algal blooms in Taihu Lake. Cutting down phosphorus and nitrogen loadings from catchments should be a fundamental strategy to reduce the risk of blooms in Taihu Lake.

  11. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-01-01

    This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys think...

  12. Algal stabilisation of estuarine sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of benthic microalgae can increase the stability of intertidal sediments and influence sediment fluxes within an estuarine environment. Therefore the relative importance of algal stabilisation needs to be understood to help predict the effects of a tidal barrage. The biogenic stabilisation of intertidal estuarine sediments by epipelic diatom films and the macrophyte Vaucheria was studied at three sites on the Severn Estuary. The cohesive strength meter (CSM) was developed to measure surface critical shear stress with varied algal density. A number of techniques have been used to determine the general in situ erodibility of cohesive estuarine sediments. The measurements of sediment shear strength and critical erosion velocity were investigated. Field experiments were undertaken to investigate the effect of algae on binding sediments, and a predictive method for the assessment of sediment stabilisation by algal binding was developed. (author)

  13. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    OpenAIRE

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface...

  14. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  15. A novel approach to improve specificity of algal biosensors using wild-type and resistant mutants: an application to detect TNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, María; García-Villada, Libertad; Agrelo, Mar; Sánchez-Martín, Laura; Martín-Otero, Luis; Flores-Moya, Antonio; Rico, Marcos; López-Rodas, Victoria; Costas, Eduardo

    2004-05-15

    A new genetic approach was developed for increasing specificity of microalgal biosensors. This method is based on the use of two different genotypes jointly to detect a given pollutant: (i) a sensitive genotype to obtain sensitivity; and (ii) a resistant mutant to obtain specificity. The method was tested by the development of a microalgal biosensor for the detection of the explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) using a wild-type strain (DcG1wt) of Dictyosphaerium chlorelloides (Chlorophyceae) as the sensitive organism, and a TNT-resistant mutant, obtained from DcG1wt strain by a modified Luria-Delbrück fluctuation analysis. The inhibition of chlorophyll a fluorescence of PSII by TNT was used as the biological signal. Significant differences in maximal fluorescence of light-adapted algae (F'(m)) between wild-type DcG1wt cells and TNT-resistant mutants, were observed in all the TNT concentrations tested (from 0.5 to 31.3 mg l(-1)) after only 3 min of exposure. Resistant mutants always exhibited significant higher F'(m) values in the presence of TNT than wild-type cells. These results suggest that the use of two different genotypes (sensitive and resistant to a given pollutant) jointly is a useful method to improve microalgal biosensors specificity. PMID:15046765

  16. Effect of algal flocculation on dissolved organic matters using cationic starch modified soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wenqing; Bi, Lei; Pan, Gang

    2016-07-01

    Modified soils (MSs) are being increasingly used as geo-engineering materials for the sedimentation removal of cyanobacterial blooms. Cationic starch (CS) has been tested as an effective soil modifier, but little is known about its potential impacts on the treated water. This study investigated dissolved organic matters in the bloom water after algal removal using cationic starch modified soils (CS-MSs). Results showed that the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) could be decreased by CS-MS flocculation and the use of higher charge density CS yielded a greater DOC reduction. When CS with the charge density of 0.052, 0.102 and 0.293meq/g were used, DOC was decreased from 3.4 to 3.0, 2.3 and 1.7mg/L, respectively. The excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy and UV254 analysis indicated that CS-MS exhibits an ability to remove some soluble organics, which contributed to the DOC reduction. However, the use of low charge density CS posed a potential risk of DOC increase due to the high CS loading for effective algal removal. When CS with the charge density of 0.044meq/g was used, DOC was increased from 3.4 to 3.9mg/L. This study suggested, when CS-MS is used for cyanobacterial bloom removal, the content of dissolved organic matters in the treated water can be controlled by optimizing the charge density of CS. For the settled organic matters, other measures (e.g., capping treatments using oxygen loaded materials) should be jointly applied after algal flocculation. PMID:27372131

  17. Seasonal and annual dynamics of harmful algae and algal toxins revealed through weekly monitoring at two coastal ocean sites off southern California, USA

    KAUST Repository

    Seubert, Erica L.

    2013-01-04

    Reports of toxic harmful algal blooms (HABs) attributed to the diatom Pseudo-nitzschia spp. have been increasing in California during the last several decades. Whether this increase can be attributed to enhanced awareness and monitoring or to a dramatic upswing in the development of HAB events remains unresolved. Given these uncertainties, the ability to accurately and rapidly identify an emerging HAB event is of high importance. Monitoring of HAB species and other pertinent chemical/physical parameters at two piers in southern California, Newport and Redondo Beach, was used to investigate the development of a site-specific bloom definition for identifying emerging domoic acid (DA) events. Emphasis was given to abundances of the Pseudo-nitzschia seriata size category of Pseudo-nitzschia due to the prevalence of this size class in the region. P. seriata bloom thresholds were established for each location based on deviations from their respective long-term mean abundances, allowing the identification of major and minor blooms. Sixty-five percent of blooms identified at Newport Beach coincided with measurable DA concentrations, while 36 % of blooms at Redondo Beach coincided with measurable DA. Bloom definitions allowed for increased specificity in multiple regression analysis of environmental forcing factors significant to the presence of DA and P. seriata. The strongest relationship identified was between P. seriata abundances 2 weeks following upwelling events at Newport Beach. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  18. Invasive algal mats degrade coral reef physical habitat quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jonathan A.; Smith, Celia M.; Richmond, Robert H.

    2012-03-01

    Invasive species alter the ecology of marine ecosystems through a variety of mechanisms or combination of mechanisms. This study documented critical physical parameters altered by the invasive red macroalga Gracilaria salicornia in situ, including: reduced irradiance, increased sedimentation, and marked variation in diurnal dissolved oxygen and pH cycles in Kāne'ohe Bay, O'ahu, Hawai'i. Paired studies showed that algal mats reduced irradiance by 99% and doubled sediment accumulation. Several mats developed hypoxia and hyperoxia in the extreme minima and maxima, though there was no statistical difference detected in the mean or the variability of dissolved oxygen between different 30 min time points of 24 h cycles between algal mat-open reef pairs. The algal mat significantly acidified the water under the algal mat by decreasing pH by 0.10-0.13 pH units below open reef pH. A minimum of pH 7.47 occurred between 14 and 19 h after sunrise. Our combined results suggest that mats of G. salicornia can alter various physical parameters on a fine scale and time course not commonly detected. These changes in parameters give insight into the underlying basis for negative impact, and suggest new ways in which the presence of invasive species leads to decline of coral reef ecosystems.

  19. A mathematical modelling of bloom of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi in a mesocosm experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suykens

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic model has been developed to represent biogeochemical variables and processes observed during a bloom of Emiliania huxleyi coccolithophore. This bloom was induced in a mesocosm experiment during which the ecosystem development was followed over a period of 23-days through changes in various biogeochemical parameters such as inorganic nutrients (nitrate, ammonium and phosphate, total alkalinity (TA, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2, dissolved oxygen (O2, photosynthetic pigments, particulate organic carbon (POC, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, Transparent Exopolymer Particles (TEP, primary production, and calcification. This dynamic model is based on unbalanced algal growth and balanced bacterial growth. In order to adequately reproduce the observations, the model includes an explicit description of phosphorus cycling, calcification, TEP production and an enhanced mortality due to viral lysis. The model represented carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus fluxes observed in the mesocosms. Modelled profiles of algal biomass and final concentrations of DIC and nutrients are in agreement with the experimental observations.

  20. Effect of Alexandrium tamarense on three bloom-forming algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Juan; Xie, Jin; Yang, Weidong; Li, Hongye; Liu, Jiesheng

    2010-07-01

    We investigated the allelopathic properties of Alexandrium tamarense (Laboar) Balech on the growth of Prorocentrum donghaiense Lu, Chattonella marina (Subrahmanyan) Hara et Chihara and Heterosigma akashiwo (Hada) Hada in a laboratory experiment. We examined the growth of A. tamarense, C. marina, P. donghaiense and H. Akashiwo in co-cultures and the effect of filtrates from A. tamarense cultures in various growth phases, on the three harmful algal bloom (HAB)-forming algae. In co-cultures with A. tamarense, both C. marina and H. akashiwo were dramatically suppressed at high cell densities; in contrast, the growth of P. donghaiense varied in different inoculative ratios of A. tamarense and P. donghaiense. When the ratio was 1:1 ( P. donghaiense: A. tamarense), growth of P. donghaiense was inhibited considerably, while the growth of P. donghaiense was almost the same as that of the control when the ratio was 9:1. The growth difference of P. donghaiense, C. marina and H. akashiwo when co-cultured with A. tamarense indicated that the allelopathic effect may be one of the important factors in algal competition and phytoplankton succession involving A. tamarense. In addition, the filtrate from A. tamarense culture had negative impacts on these three HAB algae, and such inhibition varied with different growth phases of A. tamarense in parallel with reported values of PSP toxin content in Alexandrium cells. This implied that PSP toxin was possibly involved in allelopathy of A. tamarense. However, the rapid decomposition and inactivation of PSP toxin above pH 7 weakened this possibility. Further studies on the allelochemicals responsible for the allelopathy of A. tamarense need to be carried out in future.

  1. OPTICAL MONITORING AND FORECASTING SYSTEMS FOR HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS: POSSIBILITY OR PIPE DREAM? (R825243)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. OPTICAL MONITORING AND FORECASTING SYSTEMS FOR HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS: POSSIBILITY OR PIPE DREAM? (R827085)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Integrating human and ecological risk assessment: application to the cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orme-Zavaleta, Jennifer; Munns, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Environmental and public health policy continues to evolve in response to new and complex social, economic and environmental drivers. Globalization and centralization of commerce, evolving patterns of land use (e.g., urbanization, deforestation), and technological advances in such areas as manufacturing and development of genetically modified foods have created new and complex classes of stressors and risks (e.g., climate change, emergent and opportunist disease, sprawl, genomic change). In recognition of these changes, environmental risk assessment and its use are changing from stressor-endpoint specific assessments used in command and control types of decisions to an integrated approach for application in community-based decisions. As a result, the process of risk assessment and supporting risk analyses are evolving to characterize the human-environment relationship. Integrating risk paradigms combine the process of risk estimation for humans, biota, and natural resources into one assessment to improve the information used in environmental decisions (Suter et al. 2003b). A benefit to this approach includes a broader, system-wide evaluation that considers the interacting effects of stressors on humans and the environment, as well the interactions between these entities. To improve our understanding of the linkages within complex systems, risk assessors will need to rely on a suite of techniques for conducting rigorous analyses characterizing the exposure and effects relationships between stressors and biological receptors. Many of the analytical techniques routinely employed are narrowly focused and unable to address the complexities of an integrated assessment. In this paper, we describe an approach to integrated risk assessment, and discuss qualitative community modeling and Probabilistic Relational Modeling techniques that address these limitations and evaluate their potential for use in an integrated risk assessment of cyanobacteria. PMID:18461794

  4. Environmental Settings and Harmful Algal Blooms in the Sea Area Adjacent to the Changjiang River Estuary

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Mingjiang

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of the environmental settings of the sea area adjacent to the Changjiang River estuary include complex currents and water masses, the diluted water plume and its redirection, upwelling, front, and nutrients and their sources. The Changjiang River estuary characteristics also include the phytoplankton community, which can affect the growth, migration, assembling, resting and competition of algae to form red tides in this area.. The features of red tide events recorded in th...

  5. The Haber Bosch-harmful algal bloom (HB-HAB) link

    OpenAIRE

    Glibert, P.M.; Maranger, R.; Sobota, D.J.; Bouwman, Lex

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale commercialization of the Haber–Bosch (HB) process is resulting in intensification of nitrogen (N) fertilizer use worldwide. Globally N fertilizer use is far outpacing that of phosphorus (P) fertilizer. Much of the increase in N fertilizers is also now in the form of urea, a reduced form of N. Incorporation of these fertilizers into agricultural products is inefficient leading to significant environmental pollution and aquatic eutrophication. Of particular concern is the increased ...

  6. Modelling the production and cycling of dimethylsulphide during the vernal bloom in the Barents Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabric, A.J. [Griffith Univ., Nathan, QLD (Australia). School of Australian Environmental Studies; Matrai, P.A. [Northeastern Research Foundation, Inc., West Boothbay Harbor, ME (United States). Bigelow Lab. for Ocean Studies; Vernet, M. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States). Div. of Marine Research

    1999-11-01

    Recent field work suggests an important role for the Arctic Ocean in the global budget of dimethylsulphide (DMS), a climatically active volatile sulphur compound. Here, we have used an existing DMS production model and local field data to examine the temporal dynamics of the DMS cycle during the spring bloom in the Arctic shelf of the Barents Sea. The timing and duration of the spring phytoplankton bloom has been shown to be a key determinant of the flux of DMS to the atmosphere. Particular oceanic conditions due to the retreating ice-edge (e.g., a shallow mixed layer) can have an important effect on the timing of the phytoplankton bloom and thus the efflux of DMS in this region. Model simulations support the view that algal taxonomy is not the most important factor determining DMS production in these waters. The mean vernal DMS flux is predicted to be 0.063 mg S m{sup -2} d{sup -1} which is in general agreement with previous summer season averages in the Arctic.

  7. Influence of alum on cyanobacterial blooms and water quality of earthen fish ponds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawah, Aida; Soliman, Ashraf; Abomohra, Abd El-Fatah; Battah, Mohamed; Anees, Doaa

    2015-11-01

    Eruption of blue-green algal blooms occurs frequently in eutrophic lakes and fish ponds, with associated unpleasant odor and horrid scums. In the present study, we conducted a pre-test experiment in 3 m(3) outdoor concrete ponds to determine the optimum concentration of aluminum sulfate (alum) required for reduction of the cyanobacterial blooms without negative effect on fish growth. As a consequence, 10 mg L(-1) alum was named as the optimum concentration that was applied in 1000 m(3) earthen fish ponds. Obtained results showed that Secchi disc values significantly increased from 10 to 24 cm after 14 days of alum application. Alum-treated ponds showed a reduction in total phytoplankton counts by 94 and 96% compared to the corresponding controls after 10 and 14 days, respectively. Abundance of blue-green algae in the treated ponds was decreased by 98% compared to the corresponding control after 14 days of alum application. Consequently, dissolved oxygen, pH, total phosphorus, orthophosphate, and chlorophyll "a" content declined significantly. Our study revealed that using 10 mg L(-1) of alum is an effective way to control cyanobacterial blooms in eutrophic waters, especially in fish ponds, without negative effect in water quality. PMID:26054461

  8. Space station image captures a red tide ciliate bloom at high spectral and spatial resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierssen, Heidi; McManus, George B; Chlus, Adam; Qiu, Dajun; Gao, Bo-Cai; Lin, Senjie

    2015-12-01

    Mesodinium rubrum is a globally distributed nontoxic ciliate that is known to produce intense red-colored blooms using enslaved chloroplasts from its algal prey. Although frequent enough to have been observed by Darwin, blooms of M. rubrum are notoriously difficult to quantify because M. rubrum can aggregate into massive clouds of rusty-red water in a very short time due to its high growth rates and rapid swimming behavior and can disaggregate just as quickly by vertical or horizontal dispersion. A September 2012 hyperspectral image from the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean sensor aboard the International Space Station captured a dense red tide of M. rubrum (10(6) cells per liter) in surface waters of western Long Island Sound. Genetic data confirmed the identity of the chloroplast as a cryptophyte that was actively photosynthesizing. Microscopy indicated extremely high abundance of its yellow fluorescing signature pigment phycoerythrin. Spectral absorption and fluorescence features were related to ancillary photosynthetic pigments unique to this organism that cannot be observed with traditional satellites. Cell abundance was estimated at a resolution of 100 m using an algorithm based on the distinctive yellow fluorescence of phycoerythrin. Future development of hyperspectral satellites will allow for better enumeration of bloom-forming coastal plankton, the associated physical mechanisms, and contributions to marine productivity. PMID:26627232

  9. Automatic identification of algal community from microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Natchimuthu; Pradeepa, Chinnaraj; Subashini, Parthasarathy; Kalaiselvi, Senthil

    2013-01-01

    A good understanding of the population dynamics of algal communities is crucial in several ecological and pollution studies of freshwater and oceanic systems. This paper reviews the subsequent introduction to the automatic identification of the algal communities using image processing techniques from microscope images. The diverse techniques of image preprocessing, segmentation, feature extraction and recognition are considered one by one and their parameters are summarized. Automatic identification and classification of algal community are very difficult due to various factors such as change in size and shape with climatic changes, various growth periods, and the presence of other microbes. Therefore, the significance, uniqueness, and various approaches are discussed and the analyses in image processing methods are evaluated. Algal identification and associated problems in water organisms have been projected as challenges in image processing application. Various image processing approaches based on textures, shapes, and an object boundary, as well as some segmentation methods like, edge detection and color segmentations, are highlighted. Finally, artificial neural networks and some machine learning algorithms were used to classify and identifying the algae. Further, some of the benefits and drawbacks of schemes are examined. PMID:24151424

  10. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  11. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  12. Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159082.html Asthma Symptoms Can Bloom in Springtime Follow your care ... 27, 2016 FRIDAY, May 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma symptoms increase in spring, making it especially important ...

  13. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y-C; Oey, L-Y

    2016-01-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm. PMID:27545899

  14. Algal Diet of Small-Bodied Crustacean Zooplankton in a Cyanobacteria-Dominated Eutrophic Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tõnno, Ilmar; Agasild, Helen; Kõiv, Toomas; Freiberg, Rene; Nõges, Peeter; Nõges, Tiina

    2016-01-01

    Small-bodied cladocerans and cyclopoid copepods are becoming increasingly dominant over large crustacean zooplankton in eutrophic waters where they often coexist with cyanobacterial blooms. However, relatively little is known about their algal diet preferences. We studied grazing selectivity of small crustaceans (the cyclopoid copepods Mesocyclops leuckarti, Thermocyclops oithonoides, Cyclops kolensis, and the cladocerans Daphnia cucullata, Chydorus sphaericus, Bosmina spp.) by liquid chromatographic analyses of phytoplankton marker pigments in the shallow, highly eutrophic Lake Võrtsjärv (Estonia) during a seasonal cycle. Copepods (mainly C. kolensis) preferably consumed cryptophytes (identified by the marker pigment alloxanthin in gut contents) during colder periods, while they preferred small non-filamentous diatoms and green algae (identified mainly by diatoxanthin and lutein, respectively) from May to September. All studied cladoceran species showed highest selectivity towards colonial cyanobacteria (identified by canthaxanthin). For small C. sphaericus, commonly occuring in the pelagic zone of eutrophic lakes, colonial cyanobacteria can be their major food source, supporting their coexistence with cyanobacterial blooms. Pigments characteristic of filamentous cyanobacteria and diatoms (zeaxanthin and fucoxanthin, respectively), algae dominating in Võrtsjärv, were also found in the grazers’ diet but were generally avoided by the crustaceans commonly dominating the zooplankton assemblage. Together these results suggest that the co-occurring small-bodied cyclopoid and cladoceran species have markedly different algal diets and that the cladocera represent the main trophic link transferring cyanobacterial carbon to the food web in a highly eutrophic lake. PMID:27124652

  15. Behavioral and physiological changes during benthic-pelagic transition in the harmful alga, Heterosigma akashiwo: potential for rapid bloom formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth D Tobin

    Full Text Available Many species of harmful algae transition between a motile, vegetative stage in the water column and a non-motile, resting stage in the sediments. Physiological and behavioral traits expressed during benthic-pelagic transition potentially regulate the timing, location and persistence of blooms. The roles of key physiological and behavioral traits involved in resting cell emergence and bloom formation were examined in two geographically distinct strains of the harmful alga, Heterosigma akashiwo. Physiological measures of cell viability, division and population growth, and cell fatty acid content were made using flow cytometry and gas chromatography - mass spectrometry techniques as cells transitioned between the benthic resting stage and the vegetative pelagic stage. Video-based tracking was used to quantify cell-level swimming behaviors. Data show increased temperature and light triggered rapid emergence from the resting stage and initiated cell swimming. Algal strains varied in important physiological and behavioral traits, including survivorship during life-stage transitions, population growth rates and swimming velocities. Collectively, these traits function as "population growth strategies" that can influence bloom formation. Many resting cells regained the up-swimming capacity necessary to cross an environmentally relevant halocline and the ability to aggregate in near-surface waters within hours after vegetative growth supporting conditions were restored. Using a heuristic model, we illustrate how strain-specific population growth strategies can govern the timescales over which H. akashiwo blooms form. Our findings highlight the need for identification and quantification of strain-specific physiological and behavioral traits to improve mechanistic understanding of bloom formation and successful bloom prediction.

  16. Sinking rates of phytoplankton in the Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary: A comparative study between Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shujin; Sun, Jun; Zhao, Qibiao; Feng, Yuanyuan; Huang, Daji; Liu, Sumei

    2016-02-01

    Sinking rates of phytoplankton community with variable taxonomic composition in the offshore Changjiang (Yangtze River) estuary were measured during two cruises in spring and summer, 2011. A homogenous-sample method SETCOL was used to determine the sinking rates. Phytoplankton community was dominated by dinoflagellates in spring and diatoms in summer, and two species Prorocentrum dentatum and Skeletonema dorhnii formed algal blooms in the survey area during the two cruises, respectively. Phytoplankton sinking rates ranged from 0.13 to 1.04 m day- 1 (average = 0.61 ± 0.24 m day- 1) in spring and 0.28 to 1.71 m day- 1 (average = 0.80 ± 0.34 m day- 1) in summer. In the surface layer, phytoplankton sinking rates at the P. dentatum bloom stations in spring were lower than that at the S. dorhnii bloom stations in summer. No significant correlation was found between phytoplankton sinking rates and most of the environmental parameters during the two cruises, except for temperature and nitrite concentration in summer. A significant correlation was observed between phytoplankton sinking rates and phytoplankton community structure in the surface layers: the higher dominance of diatom in the phytoplankton community corresponded to higher phytoplankton sinking rate. Therefore, the phytoplankton community structure other than the environmental parameters, is the important factor to affect the sinking rates greatly. The consequent carbon flux caused by phytoplankton sinking was estimated, and results suggested that the carbon flux to bottom water during the S. dorhnii bloom (average = 63.13 ± 48.16 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in summer was about 2.4 fold of that during the P. dentatum bloom (average = 26.10 ± 26.25 mg C m- 2 day- 1) in spring. These findings provide us some insight in understanding the carbon export contributed by marine phytoplankton in the coastal sea, where frequent phytoplankton blooms and high following carbon export occur.

  17. First report on Noctiluca scintillans blooms in the Red Sea off the coasts of Saudi Arabia: consequences of eutrophication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Mesaad

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of Noctiluca scintillans are reported for the first time in the Red Sea offthe south-western coasts of Saudi Arabia. During the present study, surface water samples werecollected weekly on the coasts of the Al Shuqayq region from February to April 2004-2006. The abundance of N. scintillans correlated negatively with most nutrients,as well as the cell densities of diatoms and dinoflagellate species. Microscopic examination of live cells from Noctiluca blooms showed the presence of some species of diatoms and dinoflagellates within the Noctiluca body - confirmation of its grazing on these microalgae algae. Thepresence of a Noctiluca bloom in the coastal waters off south-western Saudi Arabia could be linked indirectly to water eutrophication by an increase in prey abundance.The physico-chemical properties of Red Sea coastal waters should therefore be monitored regularly in order to minimize the formation of harmful algal blooms, which may affect all food web levels, including the human level.

  18. 基于物联网技术的太湖蓝藻水华预警平台%Blue-green algae bloom forecast platform with Internet of things

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨宏伟; 吴挺峰; 张唯易; 李未

    2011-01-01

    To overcome the shortcomings of conventional algal bloom forecast system in acquiring data, this study applied the Internet of Things (IoT) technology to establish a data transmission network with three-layer structure, and thus secured data continuity. With improved retrieval approach of water quality parameters, technology of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) and forecast model of algal bloom, the blue-green algal bloom forecast platform was developed. The evaluation demonstrates that the platform achieves an overall accuracy of 80% in forecasting blue-green blooms in Taihu Lake in next three days.%针对以往藻类水华预测系统在数据源方面存在的不足,采用物联网技术,实现基于三层网络传输结构的监测体系,保证了数据的时间连续性;并对遥感水质参数定量反演方法、中程无线传感网络技术和藻类水华预测预警模型方面进行了改进.在此基础上,开发了太湖蓝藻预测预警平台,运行结果表明蓝藻水华未来3天的平均预测精度达到了80%以上.

  19. Comparative molecular microbial ecology of the spring haptophyte bloom in a Greenland arctic oligosaline lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SusannaTheroux

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic is highly sensitive to increasing global temperatures and is projected to experience dramatic ecological shifts in the next few decades. Oligosaline lakes are common in arctic regions where evaporation surpasses precipitation, however these extreme microbial communities are poorly characterized. Many oligosaline lakes, in contrast to freshwater ones, experience annual blooms of haptophyte algae that generate valuable alkenone biomarker records that can be used for paleoclimate reconstruction. These haptophyte algae are globally important, and globally distributed, aquatic phototrophs yet their presence in microbial molecular surveys is scarce. To target haptophytes in a molecular survey, we compared microbial community structure during two haptophyte bloom events in an arctic oligosaline lake, Lake BrayaSø in southwestern Greenland, using high-throughput pyrotag sequencing. Our comparison of two annual bloom events yielded surprisingly low taxon overlap, only 13% for bacterial and 26% for eukaryotic communities, which indicates significant annual variation in the underlying microbial populations. Both the bacterial and eukaryotic communities strongly resembled high-altitude and high-latitude freshwater environments. In spite of high alkenone concentrations in the water column, and corresponding high haptophyte rRNA gene copy numbers, haptophyte pyrotag sequences were not the most abundant eukaryotic tag, suggesting that sequencing biases obscured relative abundance data. With over 170 haptophyte tag sequences, we observed only one haptophyte algal Operational Taxonomic Unit, a prerequisite for accurate paleoclimate reconstruction from the lake sediments. Our study is the first to examine microbial diversity in a Greenland lake using next generation sequencing and the first to target an extreme haptophyte bloom event. Our results provide a context for future explorations of aquatic ecology in the warming arctic.

  20. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and…

  1. Importance of climate change-physical forcing on the increase of cyanobacterial blooms in a small, stratified lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Planas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The community structure of planktonic cyanobacteria was studied in a dimictic lake in which recurrent summer surface algal blooms have frequently occurred since the beginning of this millennium. In eutrophic-hypereutrophic lakes, epilimnetic cyanobacterial blooms are promoted by increased ambient temperatures and water column thermal stability, which favour the vertical migration of buoyancy-regulating cyanobacteria. Here we propose that intensified external energy (wind that alters thermocline stability could explain the occurence of heavy blooms in the surface of lakes with low external nutrient loading. Specifically, we hypothesized that: i in small stratified lakes with low external nutrient sources, cyanobacterial growth primarily occurs near the lake bottom, where phosphorus is more abundant and light is available; ii we additionally hypothesized that turbulence induced by strong winds increases the amplitude and energy of metalimnetic internal waves and entrains meta- and hypolimnetic water,  rich in nutrients and cyanobacteria, into the epilimnion. The study was done in a small lake (45 Ha, maximum and mean depth 7.2 m and 4.3 m, respectively with mean epilimnetic dissolved phosphorus concentrations ≈ 4 μg L-1 and chlorophyll α ≈ 8 μg L-1.  Vertical temperature profiles during the open season were continuously registered using thermistors.  Weekly vertical profiles of light transmission, phytoplankton distribution and water chemistry were also taken. On one occasion, these variables were measured throughout a continuous 24 h cycle. Results demonstrated that summer cyanobacterial blooms were dominated by Plankthotrix spp., which began their cycle in late spring at the bottom of the lake, and grew to form dense metalimnetic biomass peaks. Time series analysis of isotherms and the Lake number indicated that internal metalimnetic waves (seiches were present through the summer. During the diel sampling cycle, we found that medium to

  2. Macromolecular synthesis in algal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is a review of our experimental results obtained previously on the macromolecular biosyntheses in the cells of blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans as a representative species of prokaryote, and also in those of three species of eukaryotic algae, i.e. Euglena gracilis strain Z, Chlamydomonas reinhardi, and Cyanidium caldarium. In these algal cells, the combined methods consisting of pulse-labelling using 32P, 3H- and 14C-labelled precursors for macromolecules, of their chasing and of the use of inhibitors which block specifically the syntheses of macromolecules such as proteins, RNA and DNA in living cells were very effectively applied for the analyses of the regulatory mechanism in biosyntheses of macromolecules and of the mode of their assembly into the cell structure, especially organelle constituents. Rased on the results obtained thus, the following conclusions are reached: (1) the metabolic pool for syntheses of macromolecules in the cells of prokaryotic blue-green alga is limited to the small extent and such activities couple largely with the photosynthetic mechanism; (2) 70 S ribosomes in the blue-green algal cells are assembled on the surface of thylakoid membranes widely distributed in their cytoplasm; and (3) the cells of eukaryotic unicellular algae used here have biochemical characters specific for already differentiated enzyme system involving in transcription and translation machineries as the same as in higher organisms, but the control mechanism concerning with such macromolecule syntheses are different among each species. (author)

  3. Seasonal dynamics in dissolved organic matter, hydrogen peroxide, and cyanobacterial blooms in Lake Erie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose M. Cory

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 has been suggested to influence cyanobacterial community structure and toxicity. However, no study has investigated H2O2 concentrations in freshwaters relative to cyanobacterial blooms when sources and sinks of H2O2 may be highly variable. For example, photochemical production of H2O2 from chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM may vary over the course of the bloom with changing CDOM and UV light in the water column, while microbial sources and sinks of H2O2 may change with community biomass and composition. To assess relationships between H2O2 and harmful algal blooms dominated by toxic cyanobacteria in the western basin of Lake Erie, we measured H2O2 weekly at six stations from June – November, 2014 and 2015, with supporting physical, chemical, and biological water quality data. Nine additional stations across the western, eastern, and central basins of Lake Erie were sampled during August and October, 2015. CDOM sources were quantified from the fluorescence fraction of CDOM using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. CDOM concentration and source were significantly correlated with specific conductivity, demonstrating that discharge of terrestrially-derived CDOM from rivers can be tracked in the lake. Autochthonous sources of CDOM in the lake increased over the course of the blooms. Concentrations of H2O2 in Lake Erie ranged from 47 ± 16 nM to 1570 ± 16 nM (average of 371 ± 17 nM; n = 225, and were not correlated to CDOM concentration or source, UV light, or estimates of photochemical production of H2O2 by CDOM. Temporal patterns in H2O2 were more closely aligned with bloom dynamics in the lake. In 2014 and 2015, maximum concentrations of H2O2 were observed prior to peak water column respiration and chlorophyll a, coinciding with the onset of the widespread Microcystis blooms in late July. The spatial and temporal patterns in H2O2 concentrations suggested that production and decay of H2O2 from aquatic

  4. Investigation of severe UF membrane fouling induced by three marine algal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Tony; Dramas, Laure; Gutierrez, Leonardo; Garcia-Molina, Veronica; Croué, Jean-Philippe

    2016-04-15

    Reducing membrane fouling caused by seawater algal bloom is a challenge for regions of the world where most of their freshwater is produced by seawater desalination. This study aims to compare ultrafiltration (UF) fouling potential of three ubiquitous marine algal species cultures (i.e., Skeletonema costatum-SKC, Tetraselmis sp.-TET, and Hymenomonas sp.-HYM) sampled at different phases of growth. Results showed that flux reduction and irreversible fouling were more severe during the decline phase as compared to the exponential phase, for all species. SKC and TET were responsible for substantial irreversible fouling but their impact was significantly lower than HYM. The development of a transparent gel layer surrounding the cell during the HYM growth and accumulating in water is certainly responsible for the more severe observed fouling. Chemical backwash with a standard chlorine solution did not recover any membrane permeability. For TET and HYM, the Hydraulically Irreversible Fouling Index (HIFI) was correlated to their biopolymer content but this correlation is specific for each species. Solution pre-filtration through a 1.2 μm membrane proved that cells and particulate algal organic matter (p-AOM) considerably contribute to fouling, especially for HYM for which the HIFI was reduced by a factor of 82.3. PMID:26874470

  5. Investigation of severe UF membrane fouling induced by three marine algal species

    KAUST Repository

    Merle, Tony

    2016-02-06

    Reducing membrane fouling caused by seawater algal bloom is a challenge for regions of the world where most of their freshwater is produced by seawater desalination. This study aims to compare ultrafiltration (UF) fouling potential of three ubiquitous marine algal species cultures (i.e., Skeletonena costatum-SKC, Tetraselmis sp.-TET, and Hymenomonas sp.-HYM) sampled at different phases of growth. Results showed that flux reduction and irreversible fouling were more severe during the decline phase as compared to the exponential phase, for all species. SKC and TET were responsible for substantial irreversible fouling but their impact was significantly lower than HYM. The development of a transparent gel layer surrounding the cell during the HYM growth and accumulating in water is certainly responsible for the more severe observed fouling. Chemical backwash with a standard chlorine solution did not recover any membrane permeability. For TET and HYM, the Hydraulically Irreversible Fouling Index (HIFI) was correlated to their biopolymer content but this correlation is specific for each species. Solution pre-filtration through a 1.2 μm membrane proved that cells and particulate algal organic matter (p-AOM) considerably contribute to fouling, especially for HYM for which the HIFI was reduced by a factor of 82.3.

  6. Detection of bioavailable phosphorus forms for the alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata

    OpenAIRE

    Van Moorleghem, Christoff

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is generally the limiting nutrient for primary production in freshwater systems. Elevated P concentrations can cause eutrophication, potentially resulting in adverse effects on the quality of water systems due to excessive algal blooms. Algal growth is not only related to the total P concentration in water but also to the P speciation i.e. the chemical form of P such as ionic orthophosphate (Pi), organic P forms (mainly phosphate esters) and inorganic colloidal P forms such as ...

  7. Radar manifestations of ship wakes in algae bloom zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityagina, Marina I.; Lavrova, Olga Yu.

    2014-10-01

    Radar manifestations of ship wakes in zones of phytoplankton bloom are discussed. It is shown that these signatures can be regarded as indicators of biogenic activity. The main data are satellite radar images. Satellite visible (VIS) and infrared (IR) satellite data are also analyzed. The large amount of the available data allowed us to make some generalizations and obtain statistically reliable results concerning spatial and temporal variability of certain type of ship wake manifestations in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images of the sea surface. Traditional classification of surface ship wakes manifestations in satellite SAR images specifies distinct features such as a dark trailing centreline region (turbulent wake), narrow V-wakes aligned at some angle to the ship's path (the Kelvin wake), and, sometimes, internal wave wakes generated under conditions of shallow stratification. Their characteristic lengths are reported to be up to tens of kilometers and they can last from tens of minutes up to one hour. Instances of radar signatures of the ship wakes dissimilar to the previously described were detected in radar images obtained in the course of a satellite monitoring campaign of the central and south-eastern Baltic. These ship wakes can be seen in satellite radar images as long bright strips of enhanced backscatter with characteristic length of up to several hundred kilometres lasting more than 5 hours. A hypothesis is put forward of the coherence of this type of ship wakes detected in sea surface radar imagery and areas of intensive biogenic activity under conditions of low near-surface winds. Statistics on their seasonal, spatial and year-to-year distribution are drawn. These results are compared with temporal and spatial variations in chlorophyll a concentration and intensity of phytoplankton bloom in the area of interest. Chlorophyll a concentration maps derived from satellite data are used, as well as those based on in situ measurements. The relation

  8. AN OVERVIEW ON BLOOM'S REVISED TAKSONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    TUTKUN, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the main purpose is to present the main frame of revised version in 2001 of Bloom's taxonomy that has been accepted extensively in our country since 1956 as well as around the world. In accordance with this purpose, in the study, answers have been searched to these questions: 1- The rise of the original Bloom's taxonomy and what are the key features of? 2- What are the reasons for renewal of original taxonomy? 3- What kind of arrangements has been made in revised taxonomy? 4- W...

  9. Exploring the Utilization of Complex Algal Communities to Address Algal Pond Crash and Increase Annual Biomass Production for Algal Biofuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Cyd E. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States).

    2014-03-25

    This white paper briefly reviews the research literature exploring complex algal communities as a means of increasing algal biomass production via increased tolerance, resilience, and resistance to a variety of abiotic and biotic perturbations occurring within harvesting timescales. This paper identifies what data are available and whether more research utilizing complex communities is needed to explore the potential of complex algal community stability (CACS) approach as a plausible means to increase biomass yields regardless of ecological context and resulting in decreased algal-based fuel prices by reducing operations costs. By reviewing the literature for what we do and do not know, in terms of CACS methodologies, this report will provide guidance for future research addressing pond crash phenomena.

  10. Comparing new and conventional methods to estimate benthic algal biomass and composition in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Maria; McKie, Brendan G

    2014-11-01

    We compared conventional microscope-based methods for quantifying biomass and community composition of stream benthic algae with output obtained for these parameters from a new instrument (the BenthoTorch), which measures fluorescence of algal pigments in situ. Benthic algae were studied in 24 subarctic oligotrophic (1.7-26.9, median 7.2 μg total phosphorus L(-1)) streams in Northern Sweden. Readings for biomass of the total algal mat, quantified as chlorophyll a, did not differ significantly between the BenthoTorch (median 0.52 μg chlorophyll a cm(-2)) and the conventional method (median 0.53 μg chlorophyll a cm(-2)). However, quantification of community composition of the benthic algal mat obtained using the BenthoTorch did not match those obtained from conventional methods. The BenthoTorch indicated a dominance of diatoms, whereas microscope observations showed a fairly even distribution between diatoms, blue-green algae (mostly nitrogen-fixing) and green algae (mostly large filamentous), and also detected substantial biovolumes of red algae in some streams. These results most likely reflect differences in the exact parameters quantified by the two methods, as the BenthoTorch does not account for variability in cell size and the presence of non-chlorophyll bearing biomass in estimating the proportion of different algal groups, and does not distinguish red algal chlorophyll from that of other algal groups. Our findings suggest that the BenthoTorch has utility in quantifying biomass expressed as μg chlorophyll a cm(-2), but its output for the relative contribution of different algal groups to benthic algal biomass should be used with caution. PMID:25277172

  11. Phytochip: development of a DNA-microarray for rapid and accurate identification of Pseudo-nitzschia spp and other harmful algal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyer, Charlotte; Abot, Anne; Trouilh, Lidwine; Leberre, Véronique Anton; Dreanno, Catherine

    2015-05-01

    Detection of harmful algal blooms has become a challenging concern because of the direct impacts on public health and economy. The identification of toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms in monitoring programs requires an extensive taxonomic expertise and is time consuming. Advances in molecular biology have allowed the development of new approaches, more rapid, accurate and cost-effective for detecting these microorganisms. In this context, we developed a new DNA microarray (called, Phytochip) for the simultaneous detection of multiple HAB species with a particular emphasis on Pseudo-nitzschia species. Oligonucleotide probes were designed along the rRNA operon. After DNA extraction, the target rDNA genes were amplified and labeled using an asymmetric PCR; then, the amplicons were hybridized to the oligonucleotide probes present on the chips. The total assay from seawater sampling to data acquisition can be performed within a working day. Specificity and sensitivity were assessed by using monoclonal cultures, mixtures of species and field samples spiked with a known amount of cultured cells. The Phytochip with its 81 validated oligonucleotide probes was able to detect 12 species of Pseudo-nitzschia and 11 species of dinoflagellates among which were 3 species of Karenia and 3 species of Alexandrium. The Phytochip was applied to environmental samples already characterized by light microscopy and cloned into DNA libraries. The hybridizations on the Phytochip were in good agreement with the sequences retrieved from the clone libraries and the microscopic observations. The Phytochip enables a reliable multiplex detection of phytoplankton and can assist a water quality monitoring program as well as more general ecological research. PMID:25765159

  12. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys thinking within general education and management education, which uses and draws on Bloom's taxonomy, and then describes suggested uses of the taxonomy. The empirical evaluation of its effect on student achievement follows, as do thoughts about ways colleagues might use this tool to empower and motivate students as self-responsible learners in the classroom. The objective is to promote higher order thinking in college students, we understood an effort to learn how to assess critical-thinking skills in an introductory course. It means, we develop a process by which questions are prepared with both content and critical-thinking skills in mind.

  13. Recent Advances in Algal Genetic Tool Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Dahlin, Lukas; T. Guarnieri, Michael

    2016-06-24

    The goal of achieving cost-effective biofuels and bioproducts derived from algal biomass will require improvements along the entire value chain, including identification of robust, high-productivity strains and development of advanced genetic tools. Though there have been modest advances in development of genetic systems for the model alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, progress in development of algal genetic tools, especially as applied to non-model algae, has generally lagged behind that of more commonly utilized laboratory and industrial microbes. This is in part due to the complex organellar structure of algae, including robust cell walls and intricate compartmentalization of target loci, as well as prevalent gene silencing mechanisms, which hinder facile utilization of conventional genetic engineering tools and methodologies. However, recent progress in global tool development has opened the door for implementation of strain-engineering strategies in industrially-relevant algal strains. Here, we review recent advances in algal genetic tool development and applications in eukaryotic microalgae.

  14. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested fo...

  15. Species dominance and niche breadth in bloom and non-bloom phytoplankton populations

    OpenAIRE

    Ignatiades, L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the quantitative relationships between phytoplankton abundance and species number, dominance and niche breadth during ''bloom'' and ''non-bloom'' stages in a coastal marine environment of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Analysis of the relative frequency distribution of the species breadth per sample showed each assemblage to be a mixture of species with narrow ( 8) niche breadth. Assemblages with higher (> 30) numbers of species tended to ...

  16. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  17. Ship-of-opportunity based phycocyanin fluorescence monitoring of the filamentous cyanobacteria bloom dynamics in the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppälä, J.; Ylöstalo, P.; Kaitala, S.; Hällfors, S.; Raateoja, M.; Maunula, P.

    2007-07-01

    Distribution of cyanobacteria cannot be evaluated using chlorophyll a (Chl a) in vivo fluorescence, as most of their Chl a is located in non-fluorescing photosystem I. Phycobilin fluorescence, in turn, is noted as a useful tool in the detection of cyanobacterial blooms. We applied phycocyanin (PC) fluorometer in the monitoring of the filamentous cyanobacterial bloom in the Baltic Sea. For the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon flos-aquae and Nodularia spumigena, PC fluorescence maximum was identified using the excitation-emission fluorescence matrix. Consequently, the optical setup of our instrument was noted to be appropriate for the detection of PC, and with minor or no interference from Chl a and phycoerythrin fluorescence, respectively. During summer 2005, the instrument was installed on a ferryboat commuting between Helsinki (Finland) and Travemünde (Germany), and data were collected during 32 transects providing altogether 200 000 fluorescence records. PC in vivo fluorescence was compared with Chl ain vivo fluorescence and turbidity measured simultaneously, and with Chl a concentration and biomass of the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria determined from discrete water samples. PC fluorescence showed a linear relation to the biomass of the bloom forming filamentous cyanobacteria, and the other sources of PC fluorescence are considered minor in the open Baltic Sea. Estimated by PC fluorescence, cyanobacterial bloom initiated late June at the Northern Baltic Proper, rapidly extended to the central Baltic Proper and the Gulf of Finland, and peaked in the mid-July with values up to 10 mg l -1 (fresh weight). In late July, bloom vanished in most areas. During single transects, or for the whole summer, the variability in Chl a concentrations was explained more by PC fluorescence than by Chl a fluorescence. Thus, filamentous cyanobacteria dominated the overall variability in phytoplankton biomass. Consequently, we show that during the

  18. Algal and fungal diversity in Antarctic lichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Chae Haeng; Kim, Kyung Mo; Elvebakk, Arve; Kim, Ok-Sun; Jeong, Gajin; Hong, Soon Gyu

    2015-01-01

    The composition of lichen ecosystems except mycobiont and photobiont has not been evaluated intensively. In addition, recent studies to identify algal genotypes have raised questions about the specific relationship between mycobiont and photobiont. In the current study, we analyzed algal and fungal community structures in lichen species from King George Island, Antarctica, by pyrosequencing of eukaryotic large subunit (LSU) and algal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domains of the nuclear rRNA gene. The sequencing results of LSU and ITS regions indicated that each lichen thallus contained diverse algal species. The major algal operational taxonomic unit (OTU) defined at a 99% similarity cutoff of LSU sequences accounted for 78.7-100% of the total algal community in each sample. In several cases, the major OTUs defined by LSU sequences were represented by two closely related OTUs defined by 98% sequence similarity of ITS domain. The results of LSU sequences indicated that lichen-associated fungi belonged to the Arthoniomycetes, Eurotiomycetes, Lecanoromycetes, Leotiomycetes, and Sordariomycetes of the Ascomycota, and Tremellomycetes and Cystobasidiomycetes of the Basidiomycota. The composition of major photobiont species and lichen-associated fungal community were mostly related to the mycobiont species. The contribution of growth forms or substrates on composition of photobiont and lichen-associated fungi was not evident. PMID:25105247

  19. Towards developing algal synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaife, Mark Aden; Smith, Alison Gail

    2016-06-15

    The genetic, physiological and metabolic diversity of microalgae has driven fundamental research into photosynthesis, flagella structure and function, and eukaryotic evolution. Within the last 10 years these organisms have also been investigated as potential biotechnology platforms, for example to produce high value compounds such as long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, pigments and antioxidants, and for biodiesel precursors, in particular triacylglycerols (TAGs). Transformation protocols, molecular tools and genome sequences are available for a number of model species including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, although for both species there are bottlenecks to be overcome to allow rapid and predictable genetic manipulation. One approach to do this would be to apply the principles of synthetic biology to microalgae, namely the cycle of Design-Build-Test, which requires more robust, predictable and high throughput methods. In this mini-review we highlight recent progress in the areas of improving transgene expression, genome editing, identification and design of standard genetic elements (parts), and the use of microfluidics to increase throughput. We suggest that combining these approaches will provide the means to establish algal synthetic biology, and that application of standard parts and workflows will avoid parallel development and capitalize on lessons learned from other systems. PMID:27284033

  20. Microflotation performance for algal separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanotu, James; Bandulasena, H C Hemaka; Zimmerman, William B

    2012-07-01

    The performance of microflotation, dispersed air flotation with microbubble clouds with bubble size about 50 µm, for algae separation using fluidic oscillation for microbubble generation is investigated. This fluidic oscillator converts continuous air supply into oscillatory flow with a regular frequency to generate bubbles of the scale of the exit pore. Bubble characterization results showed that average bubble size generated under oscillatory air flow state was 86 µm, approximately twice the size of the diffuser pore size of 38 µm. In contrast, continuous air flow at the same rate through the same diffusers yielded an average bubble size of 1,059 µm, 28 times larger than the pore size. Following microbubble generation, the separation of algal cells under fluidic oscillator generated microbubbles was investigated by varying metallic coagulant types, concentration and pH. Best performances were recorded at the highest coagulant dose (150 mg/L) applied under acidic conditions (pH 5). Amongst the three metallic coagulants studied, ferric chloride yielded the overall best result of 99.2% under the optimum conditions followed closely by ferric sulfate (98.1%) and aluminum sulfate with 95.2%. This compares well with conventional dissolved air flotation (DAF) benchmarks, but has a highly turbulent flow, whereas microflotation is laminar with several orders of magnitude lower energy density. PMID:22290221

  1. Jellyfish blooms in China: Dominant species, causes and consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three jellyfish species, Aurelia aurita, Cyanea nozakii and Nemopilema nomurai, form large blooms in Chinese seas. We report on the distribution and increasing incidence of jellyfish blooms and their consequences in Chinese coastal seas and analyze their relationship to anthropogenically derived changes to the environment in order to determine the possible causes. A. aurita, C. nozakii and N. nomurai form blooms in the temperate Chinese seas including the northern East China Sea, Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea. N. nomurai forms offshore blooms while the other two species bloom mainly in inshore areas. Eutrophication, overfishing, habitat modification for aquaculture and climate change are all possible contributory factors facilitating plausible mechanisms for the proliferation of jellyfish blooms. In the absence of improvement in coastal marine ecosystem health, jellyfish blooms could be sustained and may even spread from the locations in which they now occur.

  2. Subsurface phytoplankton blooms fuel pelagic production in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Kathrine; Visser, Andre; Pedersen, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    The seasonal phytoplankton biomass distribution pattern in stratified temperate marine waters is traditionally depicted as consisting of spring and autumn blooms. The energy source supporting pelagic summer production is believed to be the spring bloom. However, the spring bloom disappears...... relatively quickly from the water column and a large proportion of the material sedimenting to the bottom following the spring bloom is often comprised of intact phytoplankton cells. Thus, it is easy to argue that the spring bloom is fueling the energy demands of the benthos, but more difficult to argue...... convincingly that energy fixed during the spring bloom is fueling the pelagic production occurring during summer months. We argue here that periodic phytoplankton blooms are occurring during the summer in the North Sea at depths of >25 m and that the accumulated new production [sensu (Dugdale and Goering...

  3. Preliminary Results On The Use Of Clay To Control Pyrodinium Bloom - A Mitigation Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry Padilla

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The frequent and expanded occurrence of Pyrodinium bahamense var compressum blooms in thePhilippines since 1983 has prompted the need to find mechanisms to control the harmful effects of thesetoxic dinoflagellates. A promising method now being explored is the use of powdered clay mineralswhich when added to the growth media is capable of flocculating with the algal cells. In this study, theefficiency of ball clay, brown bentonite, and Malampaya Sound sediments to remove Pyrodinium cellsin seawater was tested. The addition of 1 g/L of suspended ball clay to 50 mL of cultured Pyrodiniumcells (~1.037 x106 cells/L removed 99.56% of the algal cells after 2.5 hours. Prolonging the exposuretime to 5 and 24 hours showed no significant increase in flocculation. Brown bentonite and MalampayaSound sediments showed low to moderate removal efficiency not exceeding 70% and 50%, respectively.The effect of ball clay addition on seawater chemistry showed no change in ammonia concentration butnitrate decreased after 5 and 24 hours of clay addition. Results for nitrite and phosphate were howevermore variable.

  4. The effects of the antioxidant lipoic acid on beef longissimus bloom time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentfrow, G; Linville, M L; Stahl, C A; Olson, K C; Berg, E P

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of lipoic acid (LA) on beef LM steak bloom time, as well-as to characterize bloom time in the CIE L*, a*, and b* color space over a 93-min period. Thirty-two Simmental steers were supplemented with LA for 21 d immediately before slaughter at levels of 0, 8, 16, or 24 mg of LA/kg BW (eight steers per treatment). Lipoic acid was mixed with liquid paraffin, allowed to solidify, prilled, and top-dressed over a standard finishing diet. Steers were slaughtered at the University of Missouri abattoir in four groups of eight (two steers per treatment) over a 2-wk period. After a 24-h chill at 4 degrees C, the right LM was removed from each carcass. One 2.54cm steak was removed from the anterior portion of the LM, and its color characteristics (CIE L*, a*, and b*) were measured immediately with a standardized spectrocolorimeter. Color measurements were taken every 3 min thereafter for a total of 93-min. Hue angle (true red) and chroma (color saturation) were calculated from the color measurements. Addition of LA to the diet had no effect on bloom time (P = 0.67). When treatment means were analyzed, the addition of 24 mg of LA/kg BW to the diet resulted in higher (lighter) L* values (P 0.05) during the 93-min bloom time; however, a* and chroma values increased for 9 min and plateaued after 12 min (P < 0.01). Similarly, b* values increased (P < 0.01) for the first 6 min, and after 9 min, no further increase in yellowness was detected. Bloom time had little effect on hue angle, which stabilized after 3 min. Supplementing steers with the antioxidant LA for 21 d had no effect on the bloom time of beef LM; however, higher levels of supplemental LA affected L* values and hue angles of beef. PMID:15484956

  5. Comparative Analysis of Flower Volatiles from Nine Citrus at Three Blooming Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Azam

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Volatiles from flowers at three blooming stages of nine citrus cultivars were analyzed by headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME-GC-MS. Up to 110 volatiles were detected, with 42 tentatively identified from citrus flowers for the first time. Highest amounts of volatiles were present in fully opened flowers of most citrus, except for pomelos. All cultivars were characterized by a high percentage of either oxygenated monoterpenes or monoterpene hydrocarbons, and the presence of a high percentage of nitrogen containing compounds was also observed. Flower volatiles varied qualitatively and quantitatively among citrus types during blooming. Limonene was the most abundant flower volatile only in citrons; α-citral and β-citral ranked 2nd and 3rd only for Bergamot, and unopened flowers of Ponkan had a higher amount of linalool and β-pinene while much lower amount of γ-terpinene and p-cymene than Satsuma. Taking the average of all cultivars, linalool and limonene were the top two volatiles for all blooming stages; β-pinene ranked 3rd in unopened flowers, while indole ranked 3rd for half opened and fully opened flower volatiles. As flowers bloomed, methyl anthranilate increased while 2-hexenal and p-cymene decreased. In some cases, a volatile could be high in both unopened and fully opened flowers but low in half opened ones. Through multivariate analysis, the nine citrus cultivars were clustered into three groups, consistent with the three true citrus types. Furthermore, an influence of blooming stages on clustering was observed, especially with hybrids Satsuma and Huyou. Altogether, it was suggested that flower volatiles can be suitable markers for revealing the genetic relationships between citrus cultivars but the same blooming stage needs to be strictly controlled.

  6. Spatiotemporal molecular analysis of cyanobacteria blooms reveals Microcystis--Aphanizomenon interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd R Miller

    Full Text Available Spatial and temporal variability in cyanobacterial community composition (CCC within and between eutrophic lakes is not well-described using culture independent molecular methods. We analyzed CCC across twelve locations in four eutrophic lakes and within-lake locations in the Yahara Watershed, WI, on a weekly basis, for 5 months. Taxa were discriminated by length of MspI-digested cpcB/A intergenic spacer gene sequences and identified by comparison to a PCR-based clone library. CCC across all stations was spatially segregated by depth of sampling locations (ANOSIM R = 0.23, p < 0.001. Accordingly, CCC was correlated with thermal stratification, nitrate and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP, R = 0.2-0.3. Spatial variability in CCC and temporal trends in taxa abundances were rarely correlative between sampling locations in the same lake indicating significant within lake spatiotemporal heterogeneity. Across all stations, a total of 37 bloom events were observed based on distinct increases in phycocyanin. Out of 97 taxa, a single Microcystis, and two different Aphanizomenon taxa were the dominant cyanobacteria detected during bloom events. The Microcystis and Aphanizomenon taxa rarely bloomed together and were significantly anti-correlated with each other at 9 of 12 stations with Pearson R values of -0.6 to -0.9 (p < 0.001. Of all environmental variables measured, nutrients, especially nitrate were significantly greater during periods of Aphanizomenon dominance while the nitrate+nitrite:SRP ratio was lower. This study shows significant spatial variability in CCC within and between lakes structured by depth of the sampling location. Furthermore, our study reveals specific genotypes involved in bloom formation. More in-depth characterization of these genotypes should lead to a better understanding of factors promoting bloom events in these lakes and more reliable bloom prediction models.

  7. Algal composition and abundance in the neuston surface micro layer from a lake and pond in Virginia (U.S.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold G. MARSHALL

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study was conducted that characterized the algae within the neuston, ca 2 mm below the surface, and the algae in the water column from two freshwater habitats. There were significant differences in total algal abundance and the abundance of diatoms, cyanoprokaryotes, and chlorophytes between the neuston and water column algae of these two regions during each season and at both sites. The pond neuston was dominated by chlorophytes, with total algal abundance ranging seasonally from 0.6 to 59.6 × 10-3 cells ml-1 compared to water column algal concentrations of 4.1 to 40.4 × 10-3 cells ml-1. The lake was dystrophic, with diatoms the most common and abundant species, with the neuston algal abundance ranging from 0.09 to 1.31 × 10-3 cells ml-1, and the water column algae from 0.19 to 2.70 × 10-3 cells ml-1. Proximity to the variable nature of the surface layer was not a deterrent for neuston algal development, which frequently reached bloom status and contained a diverse assemblage of taxa.

  8. Algal Supply System Design - Harmonized Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jared Abodeely; Daniel Stevens; Allison Ray; Debor

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this design report is to provide an assessment of current technologies used for production, dewatering, and converting microalgae cultivated in open-pond systems to biofuel. The original draft design was created in 2011 and has subsequently been brought into agreement with the DOE harmonized model. The design report extends beyond this harmonized model to discuss some of the challenges with assessing algal production systems, including the ability to (1) quickly assess alternative algal production system designs, (2) assess spatial and temporal variability, and (3) perform large-scale assessments considering multiple scenarios for thousands of potential sites. The Algae Logistics Model (ALM) was developed to address each of these limitations of current modeling efforts to enable assessment of the economic feasibility of algal production systems across the United States. The (ALM) enables (1) dynamic assessments using spatiotemporal conditions, (2) exploration of algal production system design configurations, (3) investigation of algal production system operating assumptions, and (4) trade-off assessments with technology decisions and operating assumptions. The report discusses results from the ALM, which is used to assess the baseline design determined by harmonization efforts between U.S. DOE national laboratories. Productivity and resource assessment data is provided by coupling the ALM with the Biomass Assessment Tool developed at PNNL. This high-fidelity data is dynamically passed to the ALM and used to help better understand the impacts of spatial and temporal constraints on algal production systems by providing a cost for producing extracted algal lipids annually for each potential site.

  9. Hydrolysate of lipid extracted microalgal biomass residue: An algal growth promoter and enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Rahulkumar; Paliwal, Chetan; Chokshi, Kaumeel; Pancha, Imran; Ghosh, Tonmoy; Satpati, Gour Gopal; Pal, Ruma; Ghosh, Arup; Mishra, Sandhya

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the utilization of the algal hydrolysate (AH) prepared from lipid extracted residual harmful bloom-forming cyanobacteria Lyngbya majuscula biomass, as a growth supplement for the cultivation of green microalgae Chlorella vulgaris. BG-11 replacements with AH in different proportions significantly affects the cell count, dry cell weight (DCW), biomass productivity (BP) and pigments concentration. Among all, 25% AH substitution in BG11 media was found to be optimum which enhanced DCW, BP and pigments content by 39.13%, 40.81% and 129.47%, respectively, compared to control. The lipid content (31.95%) was also significantly higher in the 25% AH replacement. The volumetric productivity of neutral lipids (ideal for biodiesel) and total protein content of the cells significantly increased in all AH substitutions. Thus, lipid extracted microalgal biomass residue (LMBR) hydrolysate can be a potential growth stimulating supplement for oleaginous microalgae C. vulgaris. PMID:26890794

  10. Algal Energy Conversion and Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazendonk, P.

    2015-12-01

    We address the potential for energy conversions and capture for: energy generation; reduction in energy use; reduction in greenhouse gas emissions; remediation of water and air pollution; protection and enhancement of soil fertility. These processes have the potential to sequester carbon at scales that may have global impact. Energy conversion and capture strategies evaluate energy use and production from agriculture, urban areas and industries, and apply existing and emerging technologies to reduce and recapture energy embedded in waste products. The basis of biocrude production from Micro-algal feedstocks: 1) The nutrients from the liquid fraction of waste streams are concentrated and fed into photo bioreactors (essentially large vessels in which microalgae are grown) along with CO2 from flue gasses from down stream processes. 2) The algae are processed to remove high value products such as proteins and beta-carotenes. The advantage of algae feedstocks is the high biomass productivity is 30-50 times that of land based crops and the remaining biomass contains minimal components that are difficult to convert to biocrude. 3) The remaining biomass undergoes hydrothermal liquefaction to produces biocrude and biochar. The flue gasses of this process can be used to produce electricity (fuel cell) and subsequently fed back into the photobioreactor. The thermal energy required for this process is small, hence readily obtained from solar-thermal sources, and furthermore no drying or preprocessing is required keeping the energy overhead extremely small. 4) The biocrude can be upgraded and refined as conventional crude oil, creating a range of liquid fuels. In principle this process can be applied on the farm scale to the municipal scale. Overall, our primary food production is too dependent on fossil fuels. Energy conversion and capture can make food production sustainable.

  11. Leer Emerson, Leo Strauss, Harold Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Lastra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo ofrece una lectura comparada, una lectura fuerte, de la escritura constitucional de Emerson y Thoreau, la escritura reticente de Leo Straussy las pautas revisionistas de Harold Bloom, y discute los conceptos de influencia y canon con el propósito de establecer la posibilidad de la lectura. Este ensayo es una defensa de la ética de la literatura.This paper is a comparative reading, a b reading indeed, of the consti-tutional writing of Emerson and Thoreau, the reticent writing of Leo Strauss and the revisionist ratios of Harold Bloom. Also it disputes the notions of influence and canon and it aims to establish the possibility of reading. This paper is an apology of literary ethics.

  12. The Influence of a Eutrophic Lake to the River Downstream: Spatiotemporal Algal Composition Changes and the Driving Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Yu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Algal blooms have been frequently found at the upper reaches of the Tanglang River, which is downstream from the eutrophic Dianchi Lake. The eutrophic lake upstream is considered to be a potential source of phytoplankton, which contributes to the development of harmful algal blooms in the river downstream and can cause many serious problems for the river ecology. However, few studies focused on these kinds of rivers. Therefore, a field observation and laboratory analysis were conducted in this study. The results showed that the Tanglang River was obviously spatially heterogeneous due to the eutrophic Dianchi Lake upstream. The toxic Microcystis from the Dianchi Lake dominated the phytoplankton at the upper reaches, but these were gradually, rather than immediately, replaced by centric diatoms and chlorococalean green algae in the middle and lower reaches. The results of correlation analysis indicated that the changes in hydrodynamic conditions and underwater light intensity accounted for the spatial variations. The differences in the adaptability of different algae to changing aquatic environments explained the spatial variations of phytoplankton abundance. The dominant algae, most of which was from the Dianchi Lake upstream, determined the characteristics of the total abundance at the Tanglang River.

  13. Is Bloom's Taxonomy Appropriate for Computer Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Colin G.; Fuller, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy attempts to provide a set of levels of cognitive engagement with material being learned. It is usually presented as a generic framework. In this paper we outline some studies which examine whether the taxonomy is appropriate for computing, and how its application in computing might differ from its application elsewhere. We place this in the context of ongoing debates concerning graduateness and attempts to benchmark the content of a computing degree.

  14. Searching for a multifractal signature of the lake algal proliferation, a multifractal correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezemate, Yacine; Tchiguirinskaia, Ioulia; Bonhomme, Celine; Schertzer, Daniel; Lemaire, Bruno Jacques; Vinçon leite, Brigitte; Lovejoy, Shaun

    2013-04-01

    Green algae proliferations affect water bodies such as the Lake Bourget (France). They are an environmental issue as well as a mater of public health. In the framework of the PROLIPHYC project a system based on temperature and chlorophyll measurements coupled to a lake model was implemented to predict sudden algal blooms. This classical approach relies on the analysis of large scale trends of the measured fields and does not take into account small scale fluctuations. A more innovative approach has been developed by the R2DS PLUMMME project to investigate the correlation between environmental fields across the full range of space-time scales, down to the smallest scale of observations. The first results of the project demonstrate that multi-scaling behaviour of environmental fields, such as temperature and chlorophyll, becomes evident only after the removal of the large-scale data trends that otherwise induce biases to the multifractal parameter estimates. First, a spectral analysis of temperature and chlorophyll data is performed on sub-samples of the time series to investigate the scaling behaviour. The multifractal analysis (Trace Moment, Double Trace Moment) directly applied on each sub-sample shows unsatisfying results on some sub-samples, in particular on those having a strong gradient compared with the amplitude of the fluctuations. Hence, non-stationary and seasonal effects should be first removed from the time series. To put on evidence a good scaling of the analysed data, we choose the Hilbert-Huang transform to de-trend the data. This method has been widely used for different fields (see F.G.Schmitt et al, 2009 for review). After having applied this method, the K(q) function shows that the investigated fields are indeed multifractal and the determination of their multifractal parameters becomes robust. Then, we proceed to a multifractal correlation analysis between the fields. In conclusion, we discuss the prediction of algal blooms based on multifractal

  15. Endogenous viral elements in algal genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; YU Jun; WU Shuangxiu; LIU Tao; SUN Jing; CHI Shan; LIU Cui; LI Xingang; YIN Jinlong; WANG Xumin

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are host-genomic fragments originated from viral genomes. They have been found universally in animal and plant genomes. Here we carried out a systematic screening and analy-sis of EVEs in algal genomes and found that EVEs commonly exist in algal genomes. We classified the EVE fragments into three categories according to the length of EVE fragments. Due to the probability of sequence similarity by chance, we ignored the potential function of medium-length EVE fragments. However, long-length EVE fragments probably had capability to encode protein domains or even entire proteins, and some short-length EVE fragments had high similarity with host's siRNA sequences and possibly served functions of small RNAs. Therefore, short and long EVE fragments might provide regulomic and proteomic novelty to the host's metabolism and adaptation. We also found several EVE fragments shared by more than 3 algal genomes. By phylogenetic analysis of the shared EVEs and their corresponding species, we found that the integration of viral fragments into host genomes was an ancient event, possibly before the divergence of Chlorophytes and Ochrophytes. Our findings show that there is a frequent genetic flow from viruses to algal genomes. Moreover, study on algal EVEs shed light on the virus-host interaction in large timescale and could also help us understand the balance of marine ecosystems.

  16. Water mass interaction in the confluence zone of the Daning River and the Yangtze River--a driving force for algal growth in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbach, Andreas; Wang, Lijing; Chen, Hao; Hu, Wei; Schleicher, Nina; Zheng, Binghui; Norra, Stefan

    2013-10-01

    Increasing eutrophication and algal bloom events in the Yangtze River Three Gorges Reservoir, China, are widely discussed with regard to changed hydrodynamics and nutrient transport and distribution processes. Insights into water exchange and interaction processes between water masses related to large-scale water level fluctuations in the reservoir are crucial to understand water quality and eutrophication dynamics. Therefore, confluence zones of tributaries with the Yangtze River main stream are dedicated key interfaces. In this study, water quality data were recorded in situ and on-line in varying depths with the MINIBAT towed underwater multi-sensor system in the confluence zone of the Daning River and the Yangtze River close to Wushan City during 1 week in August 2011. Geostatistical evaluation of the water quality data was performed, and results were compared to phosphorus contents of selective water samples. The strongly rising water level throughout the measurement period caused Yangtze River water masses to flow upstream into the tributary and supply their higher nutrient and particulate loads into the tributary water body. Rapid algal growth and sedimentation occurred immediately when hydrodynamic conditions in the confluence zone became more serene again. Consequently, water from the Yangtze River main stream can play a key role in providing nutrients to the algal bloom stricken water bodies of its tributaries. PMID:23247524

  17. Comparative Study of Various Immune Parameters in Three Bivalve Species during a Natural Bloom of Dinophysis acuminata in Santa Catarina Island, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Ferraz Mello

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to verify if Dinophysis acuminata natural blooms affected the immune system of three bivalves: the oyster, Crassostrea gigas, the mussel, Perna perna, and the clam, Anomalocardia brasiliana. Animals were obtained from a renowned mariculture farm in the southern bay of Santa Catarina Island during, and 30 days after (controls, an algal bloom. Various immunological parameters were assessed in the hemolymph of the animals: total and differential hemocyte counts, percentage of apoptotic hemocytes, protein concentration, hemagglutinating titer and phenoloxidase activity. The results showed that the mussel was the most affected species, with several altered immune parameters, whereas the immunological profile of clams and oysters was partially and completely unaffected, respectively.

  18. Algal Biology Toolbox Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-08-09

    BETO works to accelerate the development of a sustainable, cost-competitive, advanced biofuel industry that can strengthen U.S. energy security, environmental quality, and economic vitality, through research, development, and demonstration projects in partnership with industry, academia, and national laboratory partners. BETO’s Advanced Algal Systems Program (also called the Algae Program) has a long-term applied research and development (R&D) strategy to increase the yields and lower the costs of algal biofuels. The team works with partners to develop new technologies, to integrate technologies at commercially relevant scales, and to conduct crosscutting analyses to bet- ter understand the potential and challenges of the algal biofuels industry. Research has indicated that this industry is capable of producing billions of gallons of renewable diesel, gasoline, and jet fuels annually. R&D activities are integrated with BETO’s longstanding effort to accelerate the commercialization of lignocellulosic biofuels.

  19. Algal tests with soil suspensions and elutriates: A comparative evaluation for PAH contaminated soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Anders; Justesen, Kasper Bo; Nyholm, Niels

    2002-01-01

    was quantified by measuring the fluorescence of solvent-extracted algal pigments. No growth rate reduction was detected for soil contents up to 20 g/l testing five non-contaminated Danish soils. Comparative testing with PAH-contaminated soil elutriates and soil suspensions showed that the suspensions......An algal growth inhibition test procedure with soil suspensions is proposed and evaluated for PAH-contaminated soil. The growth rate reduction of the standard freshwater green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (formerly known as Selenastrum capricornutum) was used as the toxicity endpoint, and...

  20. Plasticity of total and intracellular phosphorus quotas in Microcystis aeruginosa cultures and Lake Erie algal assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    StevenWWilhelm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blooms of the potentially toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis are common events globally, and as a result significant resources continue to be dedicated to monitoring and controlling these events. Recent studies have shown that a significant proportion total cell-associated phosphorus (P in phytoplankton can be surface adsorbed, and many of our current measurements do not accurately reflect the P demands of these organisms. In this study we measure the total cell-associated and intracellular P as well as growth rates of two toxic strains of Microcystis aeruginosa Kütz grown under a range of P concentrations. The results show that the intracellular P pool in Microcystis represents a percentage of total cell-associated P (50-90% similar to what has been reported for actively growing algae in marine systems. Intracellular P levels (39-147 fg cell-1 generally increased with increasing growth media P concentrations, but growth rate and the ratio of total cell-associated to intracellular P remained generally stable. Intracellular P quotas and growth rates in cells grown under the different P treatments illustrate the ability of this organism to successfully respond to changes in ambient P loads, and thus have implications for ecosystem scale productivity models employing P concentrations to predict algal bloom events.

  1. Genome reconstructions indicate the partitioning of ecological functions inside a phytoplankton bloom in the Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom O Delmont

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Antarctica polynyas support intense phytoplankton blooms, impacting their environment by a substantial depletion of inorganic carbon and nutrients. These blooms are dominated by the colony-forming haptophyte Phaeocystis antarctica and they are accompanied by a distinct bacterial population. Yet, the ecological role these bacteria may play in P. antarctica blooms awaits elucidation of their functional gene pool and of the geochemical activities they support. Here, we report on a metagenome (῀160 million reads analysis of the microbial community associated with a P. antarctica bloom event in the Amundsen Sea polynya (West Antarctica. Genomes of the most abundant Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria populations have been reconstructed and a network analysis indicates a strong functional partitioning of these bacterial taxa. Three of them (SAR92, and members of the Oceanospirillaceae and Cryomorphaceae are found in close association with P. antarctica colonies. Distinct features of their carbohydrate, nitrogen, sulfur and iron metabolisms may serve to support mutualistic relationships with P. antarctica. The SAR92 genome indicates a specialization in the degradation of fatty acids and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (compounds released by P. antarctica into dimethyl sulfide, an aerosol precursor. The Oceanospirillaceae genome carries genes that may enhance algal physiology (cobalamin synthesis. Finally, the Cryomorphaceae genome is enriched in genes that function in cell or colony invasion. A novel pico-eukaryote, Micromonas related genome (19.6 Mb, ~94% completion was also recovered. It contains the gene for an anti-freeze protein, which is lacking in Micromonas at lower latitudes. These draft genomes are representative for abundant microbial taxa across the Southern Ocean surface.

  2. Application of low-cost algal nitrogen source feeding in fuel ethanol production using high gravity sweet potato medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu; Guo, Jin-Song; Chen, You-Peng; Zhang, Hai-Dong; Zheng, Xu-Xu; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Bai, Feng-Wu

    2012-08-31

    Protein-rich bloom algae biomass was employed as nitrogen source in fuel ethanol fermentation using high gravity sweet potato medium containing 210.0 g l(-1) glucose. In batch mode, the fermentation could not accomplish even in 120 h without any feeding of nitrogen source. While, the feeding of acid-hydrolyzed bloom algae powder (AHBAP) notably promoted fermentation process but untreated bloom algae powder (UBAP) was less effective than AHBAP. The fermentation times were reduced to 96, 72, and 72 h if 5.0, 10.0, and 20.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were added into medium, respectively, and the ethanol yields and productivities increased with increasing amount of feeding AHBAP. The continuous fermentations were performed in a three-stage reactor system. Final concentrations of ethanol up to 103.2 and 104.3 g l(-1) with 4.4 and 5.3 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained using the previously mentioned medium feeding with 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP, at dilution rate of 0.02 h(-1). Notably, only 78.5 g l(-1) ethanol and 41.6 g l(-1) residual glucose were obtained in the comparative test without any nitrogen source feeding. Amino acids analysis showed that approximately 67% of the protein in the algal biomass was hydrolyzed and released into the medium, serving as the available nitrogen nutrition for yeast growth and metabolism. Both batch and continuous fermentations showed similar fermentation parameters when 20.0 and 30.0 g l(-1) AHBAP were fed, indicating that the level of available nitrogen in the medium should be limited, and an algal nitrogen source feeding amount higher than 20.0 g l(-1) did not further improve the fermentation performance. PMID:22387426

  3. An Efficient Data Fingerprint Query Algorithm Based on Two-Leveled Bloom Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zhou

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The function of the comparing fingerprints algorithm was to judge whether a new partitioned data chunk was in a storage system a decade ago.  At present, in the most de-duplication backup system the fingerprints of the big data chunks are huge and cannot be stored in the memory completely. The performance of the system is unavoidably retarded by data chunks accessing the storage system at the querying stage. Accordingly, a new query mechanism namely Two-stage Bloom Filter (TBF mechanism is proposed. Firstly, as a representation of the entirety for the first grade bloom filter, each bit of the second grade bloom filter in the TBF represents the chunks having the identical fingerprints reducing the rate of false positives. Secondly, a two-dimensional list is built corresponding to the two grade bloom filter for the absolute addresses of the data chunks with the identical fingerprints.  Finally, a new hash function class with the strong global random characteristic is set up according to the data fingerprints’ random characteristics. To reduce the comparing data greatly, TBF decreases the number of accessing disks, improves the speed of detecting the redundant data chunks, and reduces the rate of false positives which helps the improvement of the overall performance of system.

  4. A catchment-scale palaeolimnological investigation into multiple forcings of algal community change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorhouse, H. L.; McGowan, S.; Jones, M.; Brayshaw, S.; Barker, P.; Leavitt, P.

    2013-12-01

    A catchment-scale palaeolimnological investigation of sedimentary algal pigments spanning the past ~200 years was undertaken on lakes which drain into Windermere, England's largest and longest lake. We aimed to determine the relative influence of past regional (climatic, atmospheric deposition) and local (land-use, hydrological modification, point-source pollution) drivers of algal community change by comparing three fertile lowland lakes (Blelham Tarn, Esthwaite Water and Rydal Water) and two upland tarns (Stickle and Easedale Tarns) to better inform a catchment-wide management strategy for Windermere. Drivers of change at the upland sites included atmospheric acid deposition, climatic change and structural modifications caused by dam installation, whereas the influence of agriculture and point-source pollution is greater in the lakes in the lowland parts of the catchment. As a result, contrasting algal responses were noted in the lakes. For example, the cyanobacterial pigment zeaxanthin and the cryptophte pigment alloxanthin increased at Stickle Tarn (359% and 321% respectively) corresponding with the establishment of a dam at the outflow of the tarn in 1838. However, post-1900's the concentration of these pigments declined both at Stickle and at Easedale Tarn coincident with increased storm events and in the later decades of the century (~1980s onwards) decreases in acid deposition. In the lowland sites the cyanobacterial pigment aphanizophyll increased by 400-7000% and the indicator of total algal production β-carotene increased as much as six-fold indicating a substantial degradation in water quality and the onset of cyanobacterial blooms since the 1950's. In the lowland sites, degradation of water quality was closely linked to sewage installations and treatment work upgrades during the 1950's-70's and intensification of agricultural practices most notably increases in sheep stocking densities, which expanded in the 1950's. In lowland lakes with a higher

  5. Pyrolysis Strategies for Effective Utilization of Lignocellulosic and Algal Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddi, Balakrishna

    protein degradation). Algal bio-char also had a significantly higher N-content. Overall, our results suggest that it is feasible to convert algal cultures deficient in lipids, such as nuisance algae obtained from natural blooms, into liquid fuels by thermochemical methods. Next, pyrolysis characteristics of each of the major components present in lignocellulosic as well as algal biomass were studied independently in a thermo-gravimetric analyzer, using model compounds. From those studies, we have established that, with algae and oil seed feed stocks, triglycerides degrade at distinctly higher temperatures (T>350 C) compared to both protein and carbohydrate fractions (T ~ 250-350 C). Similar trend was not seen for lignocellulosic biomass, where degradation temperature interval of lignin overlapped with that of carbohydrates. This unique trend observed for algal biomass (and oil seeds) can be exploited in multiple ways. First, it permits to separately collect high value triglyceride degradation products not contaminated with N-compounds from protein and oxygenates from carbohydrates; this observation formed the basis of a novel "pyrolytic fractionation technique" developed in this thesis. Second, it led to the development of a new and simple analytical method for rapid estimation of the triglyceride content of oleaginous feed stocks. Pyrolytic fractionation is a two-step pyrolysis approach that can be implemented for oleaginous feed stocks (algae and oil-seeds) to separately recover triglyceride degradation products as a "high-quality" bio-oil fraction. The first step is a low-temperature pyrolysis (T ~ 300-320 C) to produce bio-oils from degradation of protein and carbohydrate fractions. Solid residues left behind can subsequently be subjected to a second higher temperature pyrolysis (T ~ 420-430 C) to volatilize and/or degrade triglycerides to produce fatty acids and their derivatives (such as mono-, di- and tri-glycerides) and long chain hydrocarbons. Proof

  6. Cochlodinium polykrikoides red tide detection in the South Sea of Korea using spectral classification of MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Young Baek; Ishizaka, Joji; Jeong, Jong-Chul; Kim, Hyun-Choel; Lee, Taehee

    2011-12-01

    To distinguish true red tide water (particularly Cochlodinium polykrikoides blooms) from non-red tide water (false satellite high chlorophyll water) in the South Sea of Korea, we developed a systematic classification method using spectral information from MODIS level products and applied it to five different harmful algal bloom events. Red tide and nonred tide waters were classified based on four different criteria. The first step revealed that the radiance peaks of potential red tide water occurred at 555 and 678 nm. The second step separated optically different waters that were influenced by relatively low and high contributions of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) (including detritus) to chlorophyll. The third and fourth steps discriminated red tide water from non-red tide water based on the blue-to-green ratio in areas with lower and higher contributions of CDOM to chlorophyll, respectively. After applying the red tide classification (using the four criteria), the spectral response of the red tide water, which is influenced by pigment concentration, showed different slopes for the blue and green bands (lower slope at blue bands and higher slope at green bands). The opposite result was found for non-red tide water, due to decreasing phytoplankton absorption and increasing detritus/CDOM absorption at blue bands. The results were well matched with the discoloration of water (blue to dark red/brown) and delineated the areal coverage of C. polykrikoides blooms, revealing the nature of spatial and temporal variations in red tides. This simple spectral classification method led to increase user accuracy for C. polykrikoides and non-red tide blooms (>46% and >97%) and provided a more reliable and robust identification of red tides over a wide range of oceanic environments than was possible using chlorophyll a concentration, chlorophyll anomaly, fluorescence analysis, or proposed red tide detection algorithms.

  7. Sentinel 3 for Inland Water Quality Monitoring- Advanced in Earth Observation Based Technologies to Assist Algal Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malthus, Tim J.; Anstee, Janet; Botha, Hannelie; Hestir, Erin; Dekker, Arnold

    2015-12-01

    Using both modeled and real measurements of spectral reflectance over Australian inland water bodies of varying water quality the potential of the Sentinel 3 OLCI sensor for monitoring inland optical water quality dynamics, notably algal greening, was investigated. Established semi-empirical water quality algorithms for chlorophyll were tested for their potential to form the basis of an algal alerting system for water managers. Given the possession of the additional spectral band at ~705-710 nm both Sentinels 3 and 2 will be better able to resolve chlorophyll and NAP than conventional MS sensors lacking this spectral band. Such algorithms will have an accuracy sufficient for alerting algal blooms/green-up with semi-empirical algorithms displaying RMSEs of ~4 - 9 mg m-3 Chl and RMSEs for semi-analytical inversion approaches within a similar range (~7- 8 mg m-3 Chl). Whilst the results bode well for S3, the potential for S2 for accurate retrieval of chlorophyll estimates will be highly dependent on its SNR. We further report on some other challenges before such sensors can be used as an inland water quality monitoring tool.

  8. Toxic cyanobacteria blooms in the Lithuanian part of the Curonian Lagoon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artūras Razinkovas

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of cyanobacteria (blue-green algae blooms in the Baltic and the surrounding freshwater bodies has been known for several decades. The presence of cyanobacterial toxic metabolites in the Curonian Lagoon has been investigated and demonstrated for the first time in this work (2006-2007. Microcystis aeruginosa was the most common and widely distributed species in the 2006 blooms. Nodularia spumigena was present in the northern part of the Curonian Lagoon, following the intrusion of brackish water from the Baltic Sea; this is the first time that this nodularin-(NOD-producing cyanobacterium has been recorded in the lagoon. With the aid of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC, four microcystins (MC-LR, MC-RR, MC-LY, MC-YR and nodularin were detected in 2006. The presence of these cyanobacterial hepatotoxic cyclic peptides was additionally confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and protein phosphatase inhibition assay (PP1. Microcystin-LR, the most frequent of them, was present in every sample at quite high concentrations (from <0.1 to 134.2 µg dm-3. In 2007, no cyanobacterial bloom was recorded and cyanotoxins were detected in only 4% of the investigated samples. A comparably high concentration of nodularin was detected in the northern part of the Curonian Lagoon. In one sample dimethylated MC-RR was also detected (concentration 7.5 µg dm-3.

  9. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Recently, high-quality data were published on the algal growth inhibition caused by 50 non-polar narcotic compounds, of which 39 were liquid compounds with defined water solubility. In the present study, the toxicity data for these liquids were applied to challenge the chemical activity range for...

  10. Linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Stine N.; Mayer, Philipp

    chemical activity, as opposed to e.g. the total concentration. Baseline toxicity (narcosis) for neutral hydrophobic organic compounds has been shown to initiate in the narrow chemical activity range of 0.01 to 0.1. This presentation focuses on linking algal growth inhibition to chemical activity with the...

  11. THERMAL BLOOMING OF HIGH POWER LASER BEAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Philbert, M.; Billard, M.; Fertin, G.; Lefèvre, J.

    1980-01-01

    With a view to better predicting the effects of thermal defocusing within the atmosphere, an experimental simulation set-up has been designed at ONERA. This consists essentially of a vertical airtight cell containing a gas or gas mixture sufficiently absorbing to induce "blooming" of a CO2 laser beam over a distance of about 3 m. A return wind tunnel, integrated within the cell, creates a uniform wind on the beam propagation path ; the wind velocity may be precisely adjusted between 0.1 and 2...

  12. Further Studies on the Physical and Biogeochemical Causes for Large Interannual Changes in the Patagonian Shelf Spring-Summer Phytoplankton Bloom Biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Signorini, Sergio R.; Garcia, Virginia M.T.; Piola, Alberto R.; Evangelista, Heitor; McClain, Charles R.; Garcia, Carlos A.E.; Mata, Mauricio M.

    2009-01-01

    A very strong and persistent phytoplankton bloom was observed by ocean color satellites during September - December 2003 along the northern Patagonian shelf. The 2003 bloom had the highest extent and chlorophyll a (Chl-a) concentrations of the entire Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) period (1997 to present). SeaWiFS-derived Chl-a exceeded 20 mg/cu m in November at the bloom center. The bloom was most extensive in December when it spanned more than 300 km across the shelf and nearly 900 km north-south (35degS to 43degS). The northward reach and the deep penetration on the shelf of the 2003 bloom were quite anomalous when compared with other years, which showed the bloom more confined to the Patagonian shelf break (PSB). The PSB bloom is a conspicuous austral spring-summer feature detected by ocean color satellites and its timing can be explained using the Sverdrup critical depth theory. Based on high-resolution numerical simulations, in situ and remote sensing data, we provide some suggestions for the probable mechanisms responsible for that large interannual change of biomass as seen by ocean color satellites. Potential sources of macro and micro (e.g., Fe) nutrients that sustain the high phytoplankton productivity of the Patagonian shelf waters are identified, and the most likely physical processes that maintain the nutrient balance in the region are discussed.

  13. Sustainability of algal biofuel production using integrated renewable energy park (IREP) and algal biorefinery approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal biomass can provide viable third generation feedstock for liquid transportation fuel. However, for a mature commercial industry to develop, sustainability as well as technological and economic issues pertinent to algal biofuel sector must be addressed first. This viewpoint focuses on three integrated approaches laid out to meet these challenges. Firstly, an integrated algal biorefinery for sequential biomass processing for multiple high-value products is delineated to bring in the financial sustainability to the algal biofuel production units. Secondly, an integrated renewable energy park (IREP) approach is proposed for amalgamating various renewable energy industries established in different locations. This would aid in synergistic and efficient electricity and liquid biofuel production with zero net carbon emissions while obviating numerous sustainability issues such as productive usage of agricultural land, water, and fossil fuel usage. A 'renewable energy corridor' rich in multiple energy sources needed for algal biofuel production for deploying IREPs in the United States is also illustrated. Finally, the integration of various industries with algal biofuel sector can bring a multitude of sustainable deliverables to society, such as renewable supply of cheap protein supplements, health products and aquafeed ingredients. The benefits, challenges, and policy needs of the IREP approach are also discussed.

  14. Algal MIPs, high diversity and conserved motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanson Urban

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major intrinsic proteins (MIPs also named aquaporins form channels facilitating the passive transport of water and other small polar molecules across membranes. MIPs are particularly abundant and diverse in terrestrial plants but little is known about their evolutionary history. In an attempt to investigate the origin of the plant MIP subfamilies, genomes of chlorophyte algae, the sister group of charophyte algae and land plants, were searched for MIP encoding genes. Results A total of 22 MIPs were identified in the nine analysed genomes and phylogenetic analyses classified them into seven subfamilies. Two of these, Plasma membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIPs and GlpF-like Intrinsic Proteins (GIPs, are also present in land plants and divergence dating support a common origin of these algal and land plant MIPs, predating the evolution of terrestrial plants. The subfamilies unique to algae were named MIPA to MIPE to facilitate the use of a common nomenclature for plant MIPs reflecting phylogenetically stable groups. All of the investigated genomes contained at least one MIP gene but only a few species encoded MIPs belonging to more than one subfamily. Conclusions Our results suggest that at least two of the seven subfamilies found in land plants were present already in an algal ancestor. The total variation of MIPs and the number of different subfamilies in chlorophyte algae is likely to be even higher than that found in land plants. Our analyses indicate that genetic exchanges between several of the algal subfamilies have occurred. The PIP1 and PIP2 groups and the Ca2+ gating appear to be specific to land plants whereas the pH gating is a more ancient characteristic shared by all PIPs. Further studies are needed to discern the function of the algal specific subfamilies MIPA-E and to fully understand the evolutionary relationship of algal and terrestrial plant MIPs.

  15. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Hong

    Full Text Available Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods.

  16. Algal toxins alter copepod feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jiarong; Talapatra, Siddharth; Katz, Joseph; Tester, Patricia A; Waggett, Rebecca J; Place, Allen R

    2012-01-01

    Using digital holographic cinematography, we quantify and compare the feeding behavior of free-swimming copepods, Acartia tonsa, on nutritional prey (Storeatula major) to that occurring during exposure to toxic and non-toxic strains of Karenia brevis and Karlodinium veneficum. These two harmful algal species produce polyketide toxins with different modes of action and potency. We distinguish between two different beating modes of the copepod's feeding appendages-a "sampling beating" that has short durations (<100 ms) and involves little fluid entrainment and a longer duration "grazing beating" that persists up to 1200 ms and generates feeding currents. The durations of both beating modes have log-normal distributions. Without prey, A. tonsa only samples the environment at low frequency. Upon introduction of non-toxic food, it increases its sampling time moderately and the grazing period substantially. On mono algal diets for either of the toxic dinoflagellates, sampling time fraction is high but the grazing is very limited. A. tonsa demonstrates aversion to both toxic algal species. In mixtures of S. major and the neurotoxin producing K. brevis, sampling and grazing diminish rapidly, presumably due to neurological effects of consuming brevetoxins while trying to feed on S. major. In contrast, on mixtures of cytotoxin producing K. veneficum, both behavioral modes persist, indicating that intake of karlotoxins does not immediately inhibit the copepod's grazing behavior. These findings add critical insight into how these algal toxins may influence the copepod's feeding behavior, and suggest how some harmful algal species may alter top-down control exerted by grazers like copepods. PMID:22629336

  17. A trait-based framework for stream algal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Katharina; Townsend, Colin Richard; Matthaei, Christoph David

    2016-01-01

    The use of trait-based approaches to detect effects of land use and climate change on terrestrial plant and aquatic phytoplankton communities is increasing, but such a framework is still needed for benthic stream algae. Here we present a conceptual framework of morphological, physiological, behavioural and life-history traits relating to resource acquisition and resistance to disturbance. We tested this approach by assessing the relationships between multiple anthropogenic stressors and algal traits at 43 stream sites. Our "natural experiment" was conducted along gradients of agricultural land-use intensity (0-95% of the catchment in high-producing pasture) and hydrological alteration (0-92% streamflow reduction resulting from water abstraction for irrigation) as well as related physicochemical variables (total nitrogen concentration and deposited fine sediment). Strategic choice of study sites meant that agricultural intensity and hydrological alteration were uncorrelated. We studied the relationships of seven traits (with 23 trait categories) to our environmental predictor variables using general linear models and an information-theoretic model-selection approach. Life form, nitrogen fixation and spore formation were key traits that showed the strongest relationships with environmental stressors. Overall, FI (farming intensity) exerted stronger effects on algal communities than hydrological alteration. The large-bodied, non-attached, filamentous algae that dominated under high farming intensities have limited dispersal abilities but may cope with unfavourable conditions through the formation of spores. Antagonistic interactions between FI and flow reduction were observed for some trait variables, whereas no interactions occurred for nitrogen concentration and fine sediment. Our conceptual framework was well supported by tests of ten specific hypotheses predicting effects of resource supply and disturbance on algal traits. Our study also shows that investigating a

  18. Four novel algal virus genomes discovered from Yellowstone Lake metagenomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Jinglie; Liu, Taigang; Yu, Yongxin; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are algae-infecting large dsDNA viruses that are widely distributed in aquatic environments. Here, partial genomic sequences of four novel algal viruses were assembled from a Yellowstone Lake metagenomic data set. Genomic analyses revealed that three Yellowstone Lake phycodnaviruses (YSLPVs) had genome lengths of 178,262 bp, 171,045 bp, and 171,454 bp, respectively, and were phylogenetically closely related to prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae). The fourth (YSLGV), with a genome length of 73,689 bp, was related to group III in the extended family Mimiviridae comprising Organic Lake phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus 16 T (OLPG). A pair of inverted terminal repeats was detected in YSLPV1, suggesting that its genome is nearly complete. Interestingly, these four putative YSL giant viruses also bear some genetic similarities to Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs). For example, they share nine non-redundant homologous genes, including ribonucleotide reductase small subunit (a gene conserved in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses) and Organic Lake virophage OLV2 (conserved in the majority of YSLVs). Additionally, putative multidrug resistance genes (emrE) were found in YSLPV1 and YSLPV2 but not in other viruses. Phylogenetic trees of emrE grouped YSLPVs with algae, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer occurred between giant viruses and their potential algal hosts. PMID:26459929

  19. RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM USING BLOOM FILTER IN MAPREDUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Pagare

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many clients like to use the Web to discover product details in the form of online reviews. The reviews are provided by other clients and specialists. Recommender systems provide an important response to the information overload problem as it presents users more practical and personalized information facilities. Collaborative filtering methods are vital component in recommender systems as they generate high-quality recommendations by influencing the likings of society of similar users. The collaborative filtering method has assumption that people having same tastes choose the same items. The conventional collaborative filtering system has drawbacks as sparse data problem & lack of scalability. A new recommender system is required to deal with the sparse data problem & produce high quality recommendations in large scale mobile environment. MapReduce is a programming model which is widely used for large-scale data analysis. The described algorithm of recommendation mechanism for mobile commerce is user based collaborative filtering using MapReduce which reduces scalability problem in conventional CF system. One of the essential operations for the data analysis is join operation. But MapReduce is not very competent to execute the join operation as it always uses all records in the datasets where only small fraction of datasets are applicable for the join operation. This problem can be reduced by applying bloomjoin algorithm. The bloom filters are constructed and used to filter out redundant intermediate records. The proposed algorithm using bloom filter will reduce the number of intermediate results and will improve the join performance.

  20. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  1. The Evolution of Educational Objectives: Bloom's Taxonomy and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.; LaMonaca, Frank H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    It is crucial for teachers to communicate effectively about educational objectives to students, colleagues, and others in education. In 1956, Bloom developed a cognitive learning taxonomy to enhance communication between college examiners. The Bloom taxonomy consists of 6 hierarchical levels of learning (knowledge, comprehension, application,…

  2. Effect of bloom strength on radiochromic gel dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fricke gel dosimeter has been the widely used dosimeter among the gel dosimeters because of its dose response characteristics and easy preparation. The ferrous to ferric conversion that happens in this gel dosimeter on irradiation, corresponds to the absorbed dose of radiation. Gel dosimetry in India is not moving forward because of the import restrictions on the commercially available high bloom strength gelatin (imported 300 bloom). The feasibility of using Fricke gel dosimeter prepared with the locally available gelatin of 240 bloom and 200 bloom were compared with the 300 bloom gelatin taken as standard. The gel samples were prepared with 5% gelatin by weight and irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation for a dose range from 0-3 Gy used clinically. The optical absorption of gel samples were analyzed using spectrophotometer at 585 nm and dose response curves were generated. The results indicate that Fricke gels prepared with 240 bloom have linear dose response and comparable with those prepared with 300 bloom but the use of gels prepared with 200 bloom was found to be limited because of its poor optical transmittance

  3. Closing Achievement Gaps: Revisiting Benjamin S. Bloom's "Learning for Mastery"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guskey, Thomas R.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of achievement gaps among different subgroups of students has been evident in education for many years. This manuscript revisits the work of renowned educator Benjamin S. Bloom, who saw reducing gaps in the achievement of various groups of students as a simple problem of reducing variation in student learning outcomes. Bloom observed…

  4. WATER BLOOM OF BLUEGREEN ALGE IN CARP FISHPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Mihaljević

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The massive development of bluegreen algae (Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria, the so--called water bloom, is a frequent phenomenon in fishpond ecosystems. This study analyses water bloom development in three carp fishponds owned by a fishbreeding company at Donji Miholjac (Croatia, where one-year-old carps (Cyprinus carpio , were bred in defferent fishstock densities. Analyses of physicallychemical properties of water and phytoplankton biomass were per- formed in fortnight intervals from May till October, 1992. In all there investigated fishponds the water bloom of bluegreen algae developed, but at a different time and showing a different qualitative composition. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 250 kg/ha water bloom consisted of the species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, and the biggest biomass (131.92 mg/I was found in August. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 437 kg/ha a water bloom consisting of species from the genues Anabaena and species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae developed at the end of July. In the fishpond with the so--called intensive breeding (fishstock density of 750 kg/ha water bloom of the species Microcystis aeruginosa developed as late as September. The beginning of water bloom development was caused by the low value (lower than 7 of the ratio between the quantities of total phosphorus and total nitrogen. However, the qualitative composition of water bloom was influenced by one-year-old carp fingerlings density.

  5. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC or calcium carbonate, particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (POC, PON and POP, respectively, as well as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. Results were compared with other studies undertaken in this area since the JGOFS NABE program. Characteristics of the spring bloom generally agreed well with the accepted scenario for the development of the autotrophic community. The NEA seasonal diatom bloom was in the late stages when we sampled the area and diatoms were constrained to the northern part of our transect, over the Icelandic Basin (IB and Icelandic Shelf (IS. Coccolithophores dominated the phytoplankton community, with a large distribution over the Rockall-Hatton Plateau (RHP and IB. The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP region at the southern end of our transect was the region with the lowest biomass, as demonstrated by very low chl-a concentrations and a community dominated by picophytoplankton. Early depletion of dissolved silicic acid (DSi and increased stratification of the surface layer most likely triggered the end of the diatom bloom, leading to coccolithophore dominance. The chronic Si deficiency observed in the NEA could be linked to moderate Fe limitation, which increases the efficiency of the Si pump. TEP closely mirrored the distribution of both biogenic silica at depth and prymnesiophytes in the surface layer suggesting the sedimentation of the diatom bloom in the form of aggregates, but the relative contribution of diatoms and

  6. Distribution of calcifying and silicifying phytoplankton in relation to environmental and biogeochemical parameters during the late stages of the 2005 North East Atlantic Spring Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Leblanc

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The late stage of the North East Atlantic (NEA spring bloom was investigated during June 2005 along a transect section from 45 to 66° N between 15 and 20° W in order to characterize the contribution of siliceous and calcareous phytoplankton groups and describe their distribution in relation to environmental factors. We measured several biogeochemical parameters such as nutrients, surface trace metals, algal pigments, biogenic silica (BSi, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC or calcium carbonate, particulate organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus (POC, PON and POP, respectively, as well as transparent exopolymer particles (TEP. Results were compared with other studies undertaken in this area since the JGOFS NABE program. Characteristics of the spring bloom generally agreed well with the accepted scenario for the development of the autotrophic community. The NEA seasonal diatom bloom was in the late stages when we sampled the area and diatoms were constrained to the northern part of our transect, over the Icelandic Basin (IB and Icelandic Shelf (IS. Coccolithophores dominated the phytoplankton community, with a large distribution over the Rockall-Hatton Plateau (RHP and IB. The Porcupine Abyssal Plain (PAP region at the southern end of our transect was the region with the lowest biomass, as demonstrated by very low Chla concentrations and a community dominated by picophytoplankton. Early depletion of dissolved silicic acid (DSi and increased stratification of the surface layer most likely triggered the end of the diatom bloom, leading to coccolithophore dominance. The chronic Si deficiency observed in the NEA could be linked to moderate Fe limitation, which increases the efficiency of the Si pump. TEP closely mirrored the distribution of both biogenic silica at depth and prymnesiophytes in the surface layer suggesting the sedimentation of the diatom bloom in the form of aggregates, but the relative contribution of diatoms and

  7. Controlling harmful cyanobacterial blooms in a world experiencing anthropogenic and climatic-induced change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harmful (toxic, food web altering, hypoxia generating) cyanobacterial algal blooms (CyanoHABs) are proliferating world-wide due to anthropogenic nutrient enrichment, and they represent a serious threat to the use and sustainability of our freshwater resources. Traditionally, phosphorus (P) input reductions have been prescribed to control CyanoHABs, because P limitation is widespread and some CyanoHABs can fix atmospheric nitrogen (N2) to satisfy their nitrogen (N) requirements. However, eutrophying systems are increasingly plagued with non N2 fixing CyanoHABs that are N and P co-limited or even N limited. In many of these systems N loads are increasing faster than P loads. Therefore N and P input constraints are likely needed for long-term CyanoHAB control in such systems. Climatic changes, specifically warming, increased vertical stratification, salinization, and intensification of storms and droughts play additional, interactive roles in modulating CyanoHAB frequency, intensity, geographic distribution and duration. In addition to having to consider reductions in N and P inputs, water quality managers are in dire need of effective tools to break the synergy between nutrient loading and hydrologic regimes made more favorable for CyanoHABs by climate change. The more promising of these tools make affected waters less hospitable for CyanoHABs by 1) altering the hydrology to enhance vertical mixing and/or flushing and 2) decreasing nutrient fluxes from organic rich sediments by physically removing the sediments or capping sediments with clay. Effective future CyanoHAB management approaches must incorporate both N and P loading dynamics within the context of altered thermal and hydrologic regimes associated with climate change. - Research Highlights: → Toxic cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs) increasingly threaten global water supplies. → Human (nutrient) and climate (hydrology, temperature) changes synergistically promote CyanoHABs. → CyanoHAB control involves

  8. Thermodynamic analysis of algal biocrude production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although algal biofuels possess great potential, profitable production is quite challenging. Much of this challenge is rooted in the thermodynamic constraints associated with producing fuels with high energy, low entropy, and high exergy from dispersed materials. In this study, a preliminary thermodynamic analysis is presented that calculates the energy, entropy, and exergy of the intermediate products for algal biocrude production. These values are also used in an initial attempt to characterize the thermodynamic efficiency of that system. The production pathway is simplified by assuming ideal solutions throughout. Results for the energy and exergy efficiencies, and the first-order energy and exergy return on investment, of the system are given. The summary finding is that the first-order energy return on investment in the best case considered could be as high as 520, as compared to 1.7 × 10−3 in the experimental unit under development. While this analysis shows that significant improvement may be possible, the ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of algal biofuels likely lies closer to the moderate case examined here, which yielded a first-order energy return on investment of 10. For perspective, the first-order energy return on investment for oil and gas production has been estimated in the literature to be ∼35. -- Highlights: ► A first-principles thermodynamic analysis was conducted for algal biocrude production. ► The energy, entropy, and exergy was determined for each intermediate product by assuming the products were ideal solutions. ► The thermodynamic properties were used to calculate the energy and exergy return on investments for three cases. ► It was determined that the energy and exergy return on investments could be as high as ∼500. ► More realistic assumptions for efficient systems yielded return on investments on the order of 10.

  9. Energy balance of algal biogas production

    OpenAIRE

    Milledge, J.J.; Heaven, S.

    2014-01-01

    A mechanistic energy balance model was successfully developed for the production of biogas from the anaerobic digestion of micro-algal biomass from raceways. The energy balance model was used to consider the energetic viability of a number of production scenarios, and to identify the most critical parameters affecting net energy production. The output of the model demonstrated that no single method of harvesting studied (centrifugation, settlement or flocculation), produced a sufficiently gr...

  10. Mining Metatranscriptomic Data of a Cyanobacterial Bloom for Patterns of Secondary Metabolism Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, K.; Wang, J.; Thompson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    The secondary metabolism of bacterial cells produces small molecules that can have both medicinal properties and toxigenic effects. This study focuses on mining metatranscriptomes from a tropical eutrophic water reservoir in Singapore experiencing a cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Bloom dominated by Microcystis, to identify the types of secondary metabolites genes being expressed and by what taxa. A phylogenomic approach as implemented in the online tool Natural Product Domain Seeker (NaPDoS) was used. NaPDoS was recently developed to classify ketosynthase and condensation domains from polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, respectively, to provide insight into potential types of pathway products. Water samples from the reservoir were collected six times over a day/night cycle. Total RNA was extracted and subjected to ribosomal depletion followed by cDNA synthesis and next-generation Illumina DNA sequencing, generating 493,468 to 678,064 95-101 base pairs post-quality control reads per sample. Evidence for expression of PKS and NRPS type genes based on identification of a ketosynthase and condensation domains are present in all time points. KS domains fall into to two main phylogenetic groups, type I and type II, within the type II group of domains are domains for fatty acid biosynthesis (fab), which is considered a part of primary metabolism. Type I KS domains are part of the classic PKS natural product biosynthetic genes that make things such as antibiotics and other toxins such as microcystin. 2849 KS domains were detected in the combined reservoir samples, of these 1141 were likely from fatty acid biosynthesis and 1708 were related to secondary metabolism type KS domains. The most abundant KS domains (485) besides the fab genes are closely related to a KS domain that is not currently experimentally linked to a known secondary metabolite but the domain is found in four Microcystis genomes along with two other species of cyanobacteria. The three

  11. Liquid transportation fuels from algal oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daichuan

    Liquid transportation fuels from renewable sources are becoming more prominent and important in modem society. Processing of hydrocarbon oils from algae has not been studied in detail in the past, so components which have been proposed for incorporation in algal oils via genetic engineering, such as cuparene, farnesene, phytol and squalene, have been subjected to processing via catalytic cracking in a pulse reactor at different temperatures. The cracking results showed that liquid products contained numerous high octane molecules which make it feasible for use in automobiles. Additionally, canola oil, chosen as an algal oil model compound, was studied as a feed for catalytic cracking in a fixed-bed reactor at atmospheric pressure over different types of zeolites. The results showed that MFI catalysts gave the highest yield of gasoline range products and lowest coke formation. Gallium loaded MFI zeolites increased the total aromatics yield for the canola oil cracking relative to the acid form of the zeolite. Finally, algal oils were cracked on several selected zeolites, and the results showed the same trend as canola oil cracking. MFI gave the highest gasoline yield (43.8 wt%) and lowest coke (4.7 wt%). The total aromatics yield from algae oil cracking is improved 7.8 wt% when MFI is loaded with gallium.

  12. Novel method for the detection of cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR using a centrifugal microfluidic (Lab-On-A-Disc) sensing system

    OpenAIRE

    Maguire, Ivan; Fitzgerald, Jenny; Heery, Brendan; Murphy, Caroline; Nwankire, Charles; O'Kennedy, Richard; Ducree, Jens; Regan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the most prevalent cyanobacterial toxins, in blooms from fresh and brackish waters, are the cyclic peptide toxins of the microcystin family. The need for on-site algal-toxin monitoring has become increasingly urgent due to the amplified demand for fresh-water and for safe, ‘toxinfree’ shellfish and fish stocks. Along with routine testing of shellfish stocks for biotoxins including microcystin, the EU also require routine monitoring for the presence of the causative algal species. He...

  13. Emerging health issues of cyanobacterial blooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Manganelli

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes emerging issue related to cyanobacterial dynamics and toxicity and human health risks. Data show an increasing cyanobacteria expansion and dominance in many environments. However there are still few information on the toxic species fitness, or on the effects of specific drivers on toxin production. Open research fields are related to new exposure scenario (cyanotoxins in water used for haemodialysis and in food supplements; to new patterns of co-exposure between cyanotoxins and algal toxins and/or anthropogenic chemicals; to dynamics affecting toxicity and production of different cyanotoxin variants under environmental stress; to the accumulation of cyanotoxins in the food web. In addition, many data gaps exist in the characterization of the toxicological profiles, especially about long term effects.

  14. Dinoflagellate community structure from the stratified environment of the Bay of Bengal, with special emphasis on harmful algal bloom species

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, R.K.; Hegde, S.; Anil, A.C.

    and cannibalism on the bioluminescence of the heterotrophic dinoflagellates Protoperidinium spp. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 132, 275-285. Legrand, C., Granéli, E., & Carlsson, P. (1998). Induced phagotrophy in the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Heterocapsa...

  15. Evaluation of ERTS data for certain oceanographic uses. [sunglint, algal bloom, water temperature, upwelling, and turbidity of Great Lakes waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. (1) Sunglint effects over water can be expected in ERTS-1 images whenever solar elevations exceed 55 deg. (2) Upwellings were viewed coincidently by ERTS-1 and NOAA-2 in Lake Michigan on two occasions during August 1973. (3) A large oil slick was identified 100 km off the Maryland coast in the Atlantic Ocean. Volume of the oil was estimated to be least 200,000 liters (50,000 gallons). (4) ERTS-1 observations of turbidity patterns in Lake St. Clair provide circulation information that correlates well with physical model studies made 10 years ago. (5) Good correlation has been established between ERTS-1 water color densities and NOAA-2 thermal infrared surface temperature measurements. Initial comparisons have been made in Lake Erie during March 1973.

  16. Revised Bloom Taxonomy And Its Apllication In Algebra Area

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet BEKDEMİR; SELİM, Yavuz

    2008-01-01

     The aim of this study was to introduce “Revised Bloom Taxonomy” and apply it to field of learning algebra in New Elementary Turkish Mathematics Pro- grams (for grades 6-8). Anderson at all (2001) revised Bloom Taxonomy in order to eliminate defi- ciencies and contradictions, improve and make it more modern, and renamed it as “Revised Bloom Taxonomy”. It has a two-dimension framework: Knowledge which indicates subject matter (content) and cognitive process which indicates a description of wha...

  17. Testing a Microarray to Detect and Monitor Toxic Microalgae in Arcachon Bay in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K. Medlin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs occur worldwide, causing health problems and economic damages to fisheries and tourism. Monitoring agencies are therefore essential, yet monitoring is based only on time-consuming light microscopy, a level at which a correct identification can be limited by insufficient morphological characters. The project MIDTAL (Microarray Detection of Toxic Algae—an FP7-funded EU project—used rRNA genes (SSU and LSU as a target on microarrays to identify toxic species. Furthermore, toxins were detected with a newly developed multiplex optical Surface Plasmon Resonance biosensor (Multi SPR and compared with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In this study, we demonstrate the latest generation of MIDTAL microarrays (version 3 and show the correlation between cell counts, detected toxin and microarray signals from field samples taken in Arcachon Bay in France in 2011. The MIDTAL microarray always detected more potentially toxic species than those detected by microscopic counts. The toxin detection was even more sensitive than both methods. Because of the universal nature of both toxin and species microarrays, they can be used to detect invasive species. Nevertheless, the MIDTAL microarray is not completely universal: first, because not all toxic species are on the chip, and second, because invasive species, such as Ostreopsis, already influence European coasts.

  18. Available Resources for Algal Biofuel Development in China

    OpenAIRE

    Li Chen; Changle Pang; Zhenhong Yuan; Shunni Zhu; Zhongming Wang; Shuhao Huo; Renjie Dong

    2011-01-01

    Microalgal biofuel research in China has made noticeable progress, and algae cultivation for biofuel production is considered to be an important contribution to Greenhouse Gas (GHG) mitigation and energy security. In this paper, the algal biofuel potentiality in China was reviewed from the points of view of algal biodiversity, algal culture collection, GHGs (especially CO 2 ) mitigation, and the availability of the required sunlight, wastewater and land resources. The cultivation of microalga...

  19. The ins and outs of algal metal transport

    OpenAIRE

    Blaby-Haas, Crysten E.; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2012-01-01

    Metal transporters are a central component in the interaction of algae with their environment. They represent the first line of defense to cellular perturbations in metal concentration, and by analyzing algal metal transporter repertoires, we gain insight into a fundamental aspect of algal biology. The ability of individual algae to thrive in environments with unique geochemistry, compared to non-algal species commonly used as reference organisms for metal homeostasis, provides an opportunity...

  20. Nodularia spumigena blooms and the occurrence of hepatotoxin in the Gulf of Gdańsk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Mazur

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Nodularia spumigena forms extensive summer blooms in the Baltic Sea. The occurrence of the blooms is determined by water temperature, light intensity and nutrient concentration; levels of nitrogen and phosphorus in particular are critical. The time of the seasonal maximum and intensity of the Nodularia bloomin the Gulf of Gdansk vary significantly from year to year. In2001 a rapid and massive proliferation of N. spumigenawas observed in late June - early July. The concentration ofnodularin in water ranged from 90 to 18135 µg dm-3and in lyophilised phytoplankton samples from 3000 to 3520µg g-1 d.w. (dry weight.Such a high concentration of toxin in the recreational watersof the Gulf of Gdansk constitutes a health risk for users ofbathing areas. In 2002, the N. spumigena bloom wasless dense, but lasted longer, with a maximum in late July- early August. In 2002 the concentration of nodularin did notexceed 12.6 µg dm-3 in water and 919 µg g-1d.w. in lyophilised phytoplankton samples. Other cyanobacterial toxins- microcystins and anatoxin-a - were also detected in the coastal waters ofthe Gulf of Gdansk.

  1. Algal Attributes: An Autecological Classification of Algal Taxa Collected by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen D.

    2008-01-01

    Algae are excellent indicators of water-quality conditions, notably nutrient and organic enrichment, and also are indicators of major ion, dissolved oxygen, and pH concentrations and stream microhabitat conditions. The autecology, or physiological optima and tolerance, of algal species for various water-quality contaminants and conditions is relatively well understood for certain groups of freshwater algae, notably diatoms. However, applications of autecological information for water-quality assessments have been limited because of challenges associated with compiling autecological literature from disparate sources, tracking name changes for a large number of algal species, and creating an autecological data base from which algal-indicator metrics can be calculated. A comprehensive summary of algal autecological attributes for North American streams and rivers does not exist. This report describes a large, digital data file containing 28,182 records for 5,939 algal taxa, generally species or variety, collected by the U.S. Geological Survey?s National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. The data file includes 37 algal attributes classified by over 100 algal-indicator codes or metrics that can be calculated easily with readily available software. Algal attributes include qualitative classifications based on European and North American autecological literature, and semi-quantitative, weighted-average regression approaches for estimating optima using regional and national NAWQA data. Applications of algal metrics in water-quality assessments are discussed and national quartile distributions of metric scores are shown for selected indicator metrics.

  2. DNA repair enzymes in Ataxia telangiectasia and Bloom's syndrome fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ataxia telangiectasia, Bloom's syndrome and normal fibroblasts were compared as to the capacity of their cellular extracts to enhance the priming activity of γ-irradiated colicin E1 DNA for purified DNA polymerase. It was found that an ataxia strain had substantially lower, and a Bloom's syndrome strain had slightly lower capacity than a normal strain; while the activities of apurinic site specific endonuclease in these extracts were comparable

  3. Seasonal Variations of Phytoplankton Blooms in Suat Ugurlu (Samsun - Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Gönülol, Arif

    1998-01-01

    The seasonal variations in phytoplankton blooms in Suat Uğurlu Reservoir were studied between July 1992 and De-cember 1993. In certain months, the species Asterionella formosa Hassal, Cyclotella planctonica Brunthaler, Melosira granulata (Ehr.) Ralfs (Bacillariophyta); Pediastrum simplex Meyen, Pandorina morum Borry (Chlorophyta) and Ceratium hirundinella (O F. Müller) Schrank (Dinophyta) produced blooms in the lake. During the study period, the measured N/P ratio in the water varied from...

  4. Competing phytoplankton undermines allelopathy of a bloom-forming dinoflagellate

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, Emily K; Myers, Tracey L; Naar, Jerome; Kubanek, Julia

    2008-01-01

    Biotic interactions in the plankton can be both complex and dynamic. Competition among phytoplankton is often chemically mediated, but no studies have considered whether allelopathic compounds are modified by biotic interactions. Here, we show that compounds exuded during Karenia brevis blooms were allelopathic to the cosmopolitan diatom Skeletonema costatum, but that bloom allelopathy varied dramatically among collections and years. We investigated several possible causes of this variability...

  5. Stimulation of bacterial DNA synthesis by algal exudates in attached algal-bacterial consortia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal-bacterial consortia attached to polystyrene surfaces were prepared in the laboratory by using the marine diatom Amphora coffeaeformis and the marine bacterium Vibrio proteolytica (the approved name of this bacterium is Vibrio proteolyticus. The organisms were attached to the surfaces at cell densities of approximately 5 x 104 cells cm-2 (diatoms) and 5 x 106 cells cm-2 (bacteria). The algal-bacterial consortia consistently exhibited higher rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation than did biofilms composed solely of bacteria. The rates of [3H]thymidine incorporation by the algal-bacterial consortia were fourfold greater than the rates of incorporation by monobacterial biofilms 16 h after biofilm formation and were 16-fold greater 70 h after biofilm formation. Extracellular material released from the attached Amphora cells supported rates of bacterial activity (0.8 x 10-21 mol to 17.9 x 10-21 mol of [3H]thymidine incorporated cell -1 h-1) and growth (doubling time, 29.5 to 1.4 days) comparable to values reported for a wide variety of marine and freshwater ecosystems. In the presence of sessile diatom populations, DNA synthesis by attached V. proteolytica cells was light dependent and increased with increasing algal abundance. The metabolic activity of diatoms thus appears to be the rate-limiting process in biofilm development on illuminated surfaces under conditions of low bulk-water dissolved organic carbon

  6. Addressing the challenges for sustainable production of algal biofuels: I. Algal strains and nutrient supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelaziz, Ahmed E M; Leite, Gustavo B; Hallenbeck, Patrick C

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae hold promise for the production of sustainable replacement of fossil fuels due to their high growth rates, ability to grow on non-arable land and their high content, under the proper conditions, of high energy compounds that can be relatively easily chemically converted to fuels using existing technology. However, projected large-scale algal production raises a number of sustainability concerns concerning land use, net energy return, water use and nutrient supply. The state-of-the-art of algal production of biofuels is presented with emphasis on some possible avenues to provide answers to the sustainability questions that have been raised. Here, issues concerning algal strains and supply of nutrients for large-scale production are discussed. Since sustainability concerns necessitate the use of wastewaters for supply of bulk nutrients, emphasis is placed on the composition and suitability of different wastewater streams. At the same time, algal cultivation has proven useful in waste treatment processes, and thus this aspect is also treated in some detail. PMID:24350435

  7. Doom and boom on a resilient reef: climate change, algal overgrowth and coral recovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Diaz-Pulido

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coral reefs around the world are experiencing large-scale degradation, largely due to global climate change, overfishing, diseases and eutrophication. Climate change models suggest increasing frequency and severity of warming-induced coral bleaching events, with consequent increases in coral mortality and algal overgrowth. Critically, the recovery of damaged reefs will depend on the reversibility of seaweed blooms, generally considered to depend on grazing of the seaweed, and replenishment of corals by larvae that successfully recruit to damaged reefs. These processes usually take years to decades to bring a reef back to coral dominance. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In 2006, mass bleaching of corals on inshore reefs of the Great Barrier Reef caused high coral mortality. Here we show that this coral mortality was followed by an unprecedented bloom of a single species of unpalatable seaweed (Lobophora variegata, colonizing dead coral skeletons, but that corals on these reefs recovered dramatically, in less than a year. Unexpectedly, this rapid reversal did not involve reestablishment of corals by recruitment of coral larvae, as often assumed, but depended on several ecological mechanisms previously underestimated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These mechanisms of ecological recovery included rapid regeneration rates of remnant coral tissue, very high competitive ability of the corals allowing them to out-compete the seaweed, a natural seasonal decline in the particular species of dominant seaweed, and an effective marine protected area system. Our study provides a key example of the doom and boom of a highly resilient reef, and new insights into the variability and mechanisms of reef resilience under rapid climate change.

  8. Recommendations for Life Cycle Assessment of algal fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A review of 41 publications about LCA of algal biofuels has been carried out. • We define methodological guidelines to standardize microalgae LCA. • We rank the issues by their effect on the results. • The proposed framework has to regularly be updated by studies of new impacts. - Abstract: Many studies have used the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) methodology to assess the environmental impacts and energetic suitability of microalgal biofuels. This paper presents a critical review focused on goal and scope, system boundaries, functional unit, Life Cycle Inventories (LCI) and environmental impacts of 41 LCA of algal biofuels. The comparison between these LCA has been made difficult by the heterogeneity of their underlying hypotheses and perimeters. Hence we propose to define methodological guidelines to harmonize results presentation in order to improve the validity of each new contribution and to ease its comparison to other studies. LCA allows detecting pollution transfers between production stages as well as between distinct environmental impacts. At the Life Cycle Inventory (LCI) level, a special attention should be paid to the perimeter of the study (e.g. inclusion of infrastructures) and to the handling of the co-products (allocation or substitution). Moreover the inventory data have to be treated in a consistent way in order to guarantee the comparability of LCI between different studies. Hence we recommend that data of all the production steps should be given at a unit process level, i.e. the smallest element for which input and output data can be quantified. At the Life Cycle Impact Assessment level, other impacts than the greenhouse gases balance have to be taken into account, like impacts related to the use of fertilizers (acidification and eutrophication) and phytosanitary products (human toxicity and ecotoxicity), impacts of direct and indirect land use change, and water consumptions. Finally, as biofuel is aiming at replacing

  9. Collision Free Intelligent Bloom Join Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sunita M. Mahajan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In operation research, there is no single method available for solving all optimization problems. Hence a number of techniques have been developed for solving different types of optimization problems. Optimization is the act of obtaining the best result under given circumstances. The ultimate goal of optimization is either to minimize the efforts required or to maximize the desired benefit [5]. Query Optimization is one of the optimization problems in database management system. It is a process of determining the most efficient way to execute a given query by considering the possible query plans. The approach suggested in the paper is mainly focused on join operation of the query. Previous work done was based on semi-join approach for query optimization but a semi-join needs more local processing such as projection and higher data transmission. To improve the previous approach, the filter based approach is utilized. The evaluation of filter is done by considering the collisions occurred, using perfect hash function and using sets of filters. Paper focuses on importance of optimization and Intelligent Bloom Join filter approach for data reduction in query optimization.

  10. The Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT): A Discipline-Specific Rubric for Utilizing Bloom's Taxonomy in the Design and Evaluation of Assessments in the Anatomical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew R.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy is a resource commonly used to assess the cognitive level associated with course assignments and examination questions. Although widely utilized in educational research, Bloom's taxonomy has received limited attention as an analytical tool in the anatomical sciences. Building on previous research, the Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT)…

  11. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.; Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the cultivation of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  12. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  13. Luminescent Solar Concentrators in the Algal Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellier, Katie; Corrado, Carley; Carter, Sue; Detweiler, Angela; Bebout, Leslie

    2013-03-01

    Today's industry for renewable energy sources and highly efficient energy management systems is rapidly increasing. Development of increased efficiency Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) has brought about new applications for commercial interests, including greenhouses for agricultural crops. This project is taking first steps to explore the potential of LSCs to enhance production and reduce costs for algae and cyanobacteria used in biofuels and nutraceuticals. This pilot phase uses LSC filtered light for algal growth trials in greenhouses and laboratory experiments, creating specific wavelength combinations to determine effects of discrete solar light regimes on algal growth and the reduction of heating and water loss in the system. Enhancing the optimal spectra for specific algae will not only increase production, but has the potential to lessen contamination of large scale production due to competition from other algae and bacteria. Providing LSC filtered light will reduce evaporation and heating in regions with limited water supply, while the increased energy output from photovoltaic cells will reduce costs of heating and mixing cultures, thus creating a more efficient and cost effective production system.

  14. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5−20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan De Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  15. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, Blake T; Deodato, Chloe R; Hunsperger, Heather M; Ryken, Scott A; Yost, Will; Jha, Ramesh K; Patterson, Johnathan; Monnat, Raymond J; Barlow, Steven B; Starkenburg, Shawn R; Cattolico, Rose Ann

    2015-01-01

    Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales), is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales), and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb), compact (∼ 40% of the genome is protein coding) and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two "red" RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes. PMID:26397803

  16. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analyses of Chrysochromulina tobin: Metabolic Tools for Enhanced Algal Fitness in the Prominent Order Prymnesiales (Haptophyceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake T Hovde

    Full Text Available Haptophytes are recognized as seminal players in aquatic ecosystem function. These algae are important in global carbon sequestration, form destructive harmful blooms, and given their rich fatty acid content, serve as a highly nutritive food source to a broad range of eco-cohorts. Haptophyte dominance in both fresh and marine waters is supported by the mixotrophic nature of many taxa. Despite their importance the nuclear genome sequence of only one haptophyte, Emiliania huxleyi (Isochrysidales, is available. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Chrysochromulina tobin (Prymnesiales, and transcriptome data collected at seven time points over a 24-hour light/dark cycle. The nuclear genome of C. tobin is small (59 Mb, compact (∼ 40% of the genome is protein coding and encodes approximately 16,777 genes. Genes important to fatty acid synthesis, modification, and catabolism show distinct patterns of expression when monitored over the circadian photoperiod. The C. tobin genome harbors the first hybrid polyketide synthase/non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene complex reported for an algal species, and encodes potential anti-microbial peptides and proteins involved in multidrug and toxic compound extrusion. A new haptophyte xanthorhodopsin was also identified, together with two "red" RuBisCO activases that are shared across many algal lineages. The Chrysochromulina tobin genome sequence provides new information on the evolutionary history, ecology and economic importance of haptophytes.

  17. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  18. Algal biofuels: key issues, sustainability and life cycle assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Anoop; Olsen, Stig Irving

    2011-01-01

    capital investment. The harvested algal biomass and its extracts can be efficiently converted to different biofuels such as bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and biohydrogen by implementation of various process technologies. Comprehensive life cycle assessments (LCA) of algal biofuels illustrating...... wastewater. Algae capture CO2 from atmosphere and industrial flue gases and transform it in to organic biomass that can be used for the production of biofuels. Like other biomass, algal biomass is also a carbon neutral source for the production of bioenergy. Therefore cultivation of algal biomass provides...... dual benefits; while being able to utilize nutrients in waste water thus reducing impacts on inland waters it produce biomass for the production of biofuels. However, reaching commercial scale production of algal biofuels is difficult. The main drawbacks include the harvesting of dry biomass and higher...

  19. Uniform algal growth in photobioreactors using surface scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahsan, Syed S.; Pereyra, Brandon; Erickson, David

    2014-03-01

    Cultures of algae, such as cyanobacteria, are a promising source of renewable energy. However, algal growth is highly dependent on light intensity and standard photobioreactors do a poor job of distributing light uniformly for algal utilization due to shading effects in dense algal cultures. Engineered scattering schemes are already employed in current slab-waveguide technologies, like edge-lit LEDs. Stacking such slab-waveguides that uniformly distribute light could potentially yield photobioreactors to overcome the shading effect and grow extremely high densities of algal cultures that would lower monetary and energetic costs. Here, we characterize and design a scattering scheme for specific application within photobioreactors which employs a gradient distribution of surface scatterers with uniform lateral scattering intensity. This uniform scattering scheme is shown to be superior for algal cultivation.

  20. Tracking the Effect of Algal Mats on Coral Bleaching Using Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Askary, H. M.; Johnson, S. H.; Idris, N.; Qurban, M. A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Benthic habitats rely on relatively stable environmental conditions for survival. The introduction of algal mats into an ecosystem can have a notable effect on the livelihood of organisms such as coral reefs by causing changes in the biogeochemistry of the surrounding water. Increasing levels of acidity and new competition for sunlight caused by congregations of cyanobacteria essentially starve coral reefs of natural resources. These changes are particularly prevalent in waters near quickly developing population centers, such as the ecologically diverse Arabian Gulf. While ground-truthing studies to determine the extensiveness of coral death proves useful on a microcosmic level, new ventures in remote sensing research allow scientists to utilize satellite data to track these changes on a broader scale. Satellite images acquired from Landsat 5, 1987, Landsat 7, 2000, and Landsat 8, 2013 along with higher resolution IKONOS data are digitally analyzed in order to create spectral libraries for relevant benthic types, which in turn can be used to perform supervised classifications and change detection analyses over a larger area. The supervised classifications performed over the three scenes show five significant marine-related classes, namely coral, mangroves, macro-algae, and seagrass, in different degrees of abundance, yet here we focus only on the algal mats impact on corals bleaching. The change detection analysis is introduced to study see the degree of algal mats impact on coral bleaching over the course of time with possible connection to the local meteorology and current climate scenarios.

  1. Potential utilization of algal protein concentrate as a food ingredient in space habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhost, Z.; Karel, M.

    1989-01-01

    Green alga Scenedesmus obliquus was studied as one of the potential sources of macronutrients in a space habitat. Algal protein concentrate (70.5% protein) was incorporated into a variety of food products such as bran muffins, fettuccine (spinach noodle imitation) and chocolate chip cookies. Food products containing 20 to 40% of incorporated algal proteins were considered. In the sensory analysis the greenish color of the bran muffins and cookies was not found to be objectional. The mild spinachy flavor (algae flavor) was less detectable in chocolate chip cookies than in bran muffins. The color and taste of the algae noodles were found to be pleasant and compared well with commercially available spinach noodles. Commercially available spray-dried Spirulina algae was also incorporated so the products can be compared with those containing Scenedesmus obliquus concentrate. Food products containing commercial algae had a dark green color and a "burnt after taste" and were less acceptable to the panelists.

  2. Factors affecting spring bloom in the South of Cheju Island in the East China Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Dongyang; HUANG Zhaojun; ZHANG Yuanzhi; PAN Delu; DING Youzhua; LIU Dazhao; ZHANG Ying; MAO Zhihua; CHEN Jianfang

    2015-01-01

    A soil circulation occurs in the south of Cheju Island in the spring. Nutrients and its influence on chloro-phyll a (Chla) around the circulations were studied from April 9 to May 6, 2007. Spring bloom with elevated concentrations of Chla was observed during the investigation. High concentrations of phosphate, nitrate and silicate at 0.6, 12, and 8 mmol/m3, respectively, were detected. A low water temperature prevented the growth of phytoplankton. Chla concentrations in the study area might be strongly associated with the high silicate concentration.

  3. Optical characterization of black water blooms in eutrophic waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongtao; Ma, Ronghua; Loiselle, Steven Arthur; Shen, Qiushi; Yin, Hongbin; Zhang, Yuchao

    2014-06-01

    In the summer of 2007, blooms of "black" water in Lake Taihu entered into the potable water supply of Wuxi City and left more than 1million people without water. Attempts to monitor these black water blooms have not been successful due to their irregular nature. In May 2012, two black water blooms were observed in one of the lake's eutrophic bays. The bio-optical analyses of these blooms show that they were dominated by higher concentrations of dissolved organic matter and lower backscattering coefficients with respect to the surrounding lake conditions. We show the contribution of each optically active component to the perceived radiance and demonstrate that elevated absorption due to dissolved organic matter and phytoplankton combined with reduced backscattering led to the perception of these water areas as "black", while the true color was dark green. The present analysis indicates that formation of black water blooms is favored during springtime conditions in the macrophyte dominated areas of the lake's hypereutrophic bays. PMID:24657365

  4. Use of biosensors for the detection of marine toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartlin, Daniel A; Lochhead, Michael J; Connell, Laurie B; Doucette, Gregory J; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    Increasing occurrences of harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the ocean are a major concern for countries around the globe, and with strong links between HABs and climate change and eutrophication, the occurrences are only set to increase. Of particular concern with regard to HABs is the presence of toxin-producing algae. Six major marine biotoxin groups are associated with HABs. Ingestion of such toxins via contaminated shellfish, fish, or other potential vectors, can lead to intoxication syndromes with moderate to severe symptoms, including death in extreme cases. There are also major economic implications associated with the diverse effects of marine biotoxins and HABs. Thus, effective monitoring programmes are required to manage and mitigate their detrimental global effect. However, currently legislated detection methods are labour-intensive, expensive and relatively slow. The growing field of biosensor diagnostic devices is an exciting area that has the potential to produce robust, easy-to-use, cost-effective, rapid and accurate detection methods for marine biotoxins and HABs. This review discusses recently developed biosensor assays that target marine biotoxins and their microbial producers, both in harvested fish/shellfish samples and in the open ocean. The effective deployment of such biosensor platforms could address the pressing need for improved monitoring of HABs and marine biotoxins, and could help to reduce their global economic impact. PMID:27365035

  5. Reporter Gene Assay for Detection of Shellfish Toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG YANG; MIN-YI WU; JIE-SHENG LIU; XI-CHUN PENG; HONG-YE LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential reporter gene assay for the detection of sodium channel-specific toxins in shellfish as an alternative for screening harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, considering the fact that the existing methods including HPLC and bioassay are inappropriate for identifying HAB toxins which poses a serious problem on human health and shellfish industry. Methods A reporter plasmid pEGFP-c-fos containing c-fos promoter and EGFP was constructed and transfected into T24 cells using LipofectAMINE 2000. Positive transfectants were screened by G418 to produce a pEGFP-c-fos-T24 cell line. After addition of increasing neurotoxic shellfish poison (NSP) or GTX2,3, primary components of paralytic shellfish poison (PSP), changes in expression of EGFP in the cell line were observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope and quantified with Image-pro Plus software. Results Dose-dependent changes in the intensity of green fluorescence were observed for NSP in a range from 0 to 10 ng/mL and for GTX 2,3 from 0 to 16 ng/mL. Conclusion pEGFP-c-fos-T24 can be applied in detecting HAB toxins, and cell-based assay can be used as an alternative for screening sodium channel-specific HAB toxins.

  6. Current-oriented swimming by jellyfish and its role in bloom maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossette, Sabrina; Gleiss, Adrian Christopher; Chalumeau, Julien; Bastian, Thomas; Armstrong, Claire Denise; Vandenabeele, Sylvie; Karpytchev, Mikhail; Hays, Graeme Clive

    2015-02-01

    Cross-flows (winds or currents) affect animal movements [1-3]. Animals can temporarily be carried off course or permanently carried away from their preferred habitat by drift depending on their own traveling speed in relation to that of the flow [1]. Animals able to only weakly fly or swim will be the most impacted (e.g., [4]). To circumvent this problem, animals must be able to detect the effects of flow on their movements and respond to it [1, 2]. Here, we show that a weakly swimming organism, the jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus, can orientate its movements with respect to currents and that this behavior is key to the maintenance of blooms and essential to reduce the probability of stranding. We combined in situ observations with first-time deployment of accelerometers on free-ranging jellyfish and simulated the behavior observed in wild jellyfish within a high-resolution hydrodynamic model. Our results show that jellyfish can actively swim countercurrent in response to current drift, leading to significant life-history benefits, i.e., increased chance of survival and facilitated bloom formation. Current-oriented swimming may be achieved by jellyfish either directly detecting current shear across their body surface [5] or indirectly assessing drift direction using other cues (e.g., magnetic, infrasound). Our coupled behavioral-hydrodynamic model provides new evidence that current-oriented swimming contributes to jellyfish being able to form aggregations of hundreds to millions of individuals for up to several months, which may have substantial ecosystem and socioeconomic consequences [6, 7]. It also contributes to improve predictions of jellyfish blooms' magnitude and movements in coastal waters. PMID:25619761

  7. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate-inducible proteins are synthesized at an increased rate in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts.

    OpenAIRE

    Mallick, U; Rahmsdorf, H J; N Yamamoto; Ponta, H; Wegner, R D; Herrlich, P

    1982-01-01

    A set of proteins, which in normal fibroblasts were barely, if at all, detectable, were synthesized at an increased rate in fibroblasts from patients with Bloom syndrome (BS). The same set of proteins was induced in normal human fibroblasts by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA). In BS cells, TPA caused a further 2-fold increase in the rate of synthesis. Production of these proteins was inhibited by the addition of fluocinolone acetonide to the culture medium. One of the...

  8. Available Resources for Algal Biofuel Development in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Microalgal biofuel research in China has made noticeable progress, and algae cultivation for biofuel production is considered to be an important contribution to Greenhouse Gas (GHG mitigation and energy security. In this paper, the algal biofuel potentiality in China was reviewed from the points of view of algal biodiversity, algal culture collection, GHGs (especially CO2 mitigation, and the availability of the required sunlight, wastewater and land resources. The cultivation of microalgae utilizing power plants gas with large amounts of CO2 and wastewaters from urban households, industry and animal husbandry are suitable for large scale production in China. Land is hardly a limitation for algae cultivation.

  9. Production of biofuel using molluscan pseudofeces derived from algal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Keshav C.; Chinnasamy, Senthil; Shelton, James; Wilde, Susan B.; Haynie, Rebecca S.; Herrin, James A.

    2012-08-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for novel strategies to harvest algal lipids using mollusks which after feeding algae from the growth medium can convert algal lipids into their biomass or excrete lipids in their pseudofeces which makes algae harvesting energy efficient and cost effective. The bioconverter, filter-feeding mollusks and their pseudofeces can be harvested and converted to biocrude using an advanced thermochemical liquefaction technology. Methods, systems, and materials are disclosed for the harvest and isolation of algal lipids from the mollusks, molluscan feces and molluscan pseudofeces.

  10. Hydrodynamics and light climate structure alongshore phytoplankton blooms in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Brandt

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are a recurring phenomenon that have significant impact on annual biogeochemistry and food-web dynamics in many aquatic ecosystems. The causes for their variability, which is high especially in coastal seas, remain poorly understood. We present an example for distinct differences in the spatio-temporal chlorophyll-a (CHL-a distribution on an interannual scale, integrating high-frequency data from an autonomous measuring device (FerryBox, which operated on an alongshore route in the coastal North Sea. While in one year CHL-a was spatially homogeneous (2004, a bloom only developed in one part of the transect in the following spring period (2005. In this study, we use a one-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model, which operates along the mean current direction, combined with a NPZ-model to identify the mechanisms controlling interannual bloom variability on an alongshore transect. The model results clearly indicate that in 2004, the local light climate triggered phytoplankton growth, whereas in the following year, advective transport determined the spatial structure of the spring bloom. A pronounced eastward inflow event in 2005 imported a high CHL-a patch into the western half of the study area from the adjacent Southern Bight. It did, however, not last long enough to also spread the bloom into the eastern part, where high turbidity prevented local phytoplankton growth. The model identified two interacting mechanisms, light climate and hydrodynamics that control the alongshore dynamics. Especially the occurrence of a pronounced spring bloom despite unfavourable light conditions in 2005 underlines the need to carefully consider hydrodynamics to understand ecosystem functioning in coastal environments.

  11. Hydrodynamics and light climate structure alongshore phytoplankton blooms in spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, G.; Wirtz, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are a recurring phenomenon that have significant impact on annual biogeochemistry and food-web dynamics in many aquatic ecosystems. The causes for their variability, which is high especially in coastal seas, remain poorly understood. We present an example for distinct differences in the spatio-temporal chlorophyll-a (CHL-a) distribution on an interannual scale, integrating high-frequency data from an autonomous measuring device (FerryBox), which operated on an alongshore route in the coastal North Sea. While in one year CHL-a was spatially homogeneous (2004), a bloom only developed in one part of the transect in the following spring period (2005). In this study, we use a one-dimensional Lagrangian particle tracking model, which operates along the mean current direction, combined with a NPZ-model to identify the mechanisms controlling interannual bloom variability on an alongshore transect. The model results clearly indicate that in 2004, the local light climate triggered phytoplankton growth, whereas in the following year, advective transport determined the spatial structure of the spring bloom. A pronounced eastward inflow event in 2005 imported a high CHL-a patch into the western half of the study area from the adjacent Southern Bight. It did, however, not last long enough to also spread the bloom into the eastern part, where high turbidity prevented local phytoplankton growth. The model identified two interacting mechanisms, light climate and hydrodynamics that control the alongshore dynamics. Especially the occurrence of a pronounced spring bloom despite unfavourable light conditions in 2005 underlines the need to carefully consider hydrodynamics to understand ecosystem functioning in coastal environments.

  12. [Causes of jellyfish blooms and their influence on marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Jellyfish blooms have damaged the normal composition and function of marine ecosystem and ecological environments, which have been one of the new marine ecological disasters. In this study, we summarized the possible inducements of jellyfish blooms, and the influences of jellyfish blooms on biogenic elements, dissolved oxygen, seawater acidity and biological community were discussed emphatically. The results showed that jellyfish blooms had a close contact with its physiological structure and life history, which had favorable characteristics including simple body struc- ture, rapid growth, thriving reproduction and short generation interval to tolerate harsh environment better. Jellyfish abundance increased rapidly when it encountered suitable conditions. The temperature variations of seawater might be the major inducing factor which could result in jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish blooms may benefit from warmer temperature that could increase the food availability of jellyfish and promote jellyfish reproduction, especially for warm temperate jellyfish species. Eutrophication, climate change, overfishing, alien invasions and habitat modification were all possible important contributory factors of jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish could significantly influence the form distribution and biogeochemical cycling of biogenic elements. Jellyfish excreted NH4+ and P04(3-) at a rate of 59.1-91.5 micromol N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 1.1-1.8 micromol P x kg(-1) x h(-1), which could meet about 8%-10% and 21.6% of the phytoplankton primary production requirement of N and P, respectively. Live jellyfish released dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at a rate of 1.0 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). As jellyfish decomposing, the effluxes of total N and total P were 4000 micromol N x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 120 micromol P x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively, while the efflux of DOC reached 30 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). Jellyfish decomposition could cause seawater acidification and lowered level of dissolved oxygen

  13. Intense blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum (Cyanophyta) in the open waters along east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Murukesh, N.; Haridas, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Venugopal, P.

    -1) was obtained in these regions, which indicated the enhancement of primary production in the earlier stages of the bloom. Very low NO3-N concentrations, brownish yellow bloom colour, undisturbed patches and high primary production strongly...

  14. Mutagenicity of algal metabolites of benzo(a)pyrene for Salmonella typhimurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The metabolism and growth effects of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) were studied using a freshwater green alga, Selenastrum capricornutum. Algal cultures were incubated under gold light with BaP added at concentrations of 40, 160, 400, and 1200 μg/liter for the periods of 1-4 days. The metabolites and BaP were identified and quantified from ethyl acetate extracts of both algal cells and incubation medium. The ethyl acetate extracts were evaluated for genotoxicity using a micro-volume Salmonella typhimurium forward mutation assay with resistance to 8-azaguanine for selection. This assay detected the presence of small quantities of BaP and was particularly sensitive to the mutagenicity of BaP diols. Of those extracts prepared from algae and medium from cultures exposed to 400 μg BaP/liter (10 μg/25 ml culture), only algal cell extracts from one day's growth were mutagenic. In cultures exposed to 1200 μg BaP/liter (30 μg/25 ml culture), mutagenic materials were produced or persisted in both algae and media throughout the 4-day incubation. The observed mutagenic response can be attributed in part to the presence of unmetabolized BaP or to BaP diols

  15. An analysis of the productivity of a CELSS continuous algal culture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radmer, R.; Behrens, P.; Fernandez, E.; Arnett, K.

    1986-01-01

    One of the most attractive aspects of using algal cultures as plant components for a Closed Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) is the efficiency with which they can be grown. Although algae are not necessarily intrinsically more efficient than higher plants, the ease which they can be handled and manipulated (more like chemical reagents than plants), and the culturing techniques available, result in much higher growth rates than are usually attainable with higher plants. Furthermore, preliminary experiments have demonstrated that algal growth and physiology is not detectable altered in a microgravity environment, (1) whereas the response of higher plants to zero gravity is unknown. In order to rationally design and operate culture systems, it is necessary to understand how the macroparameters of a culture system, e.g., productivity, are related to the physiological aspects of the algal culture. A first principles analysis of culture system is discussed, and a mathematical model that describes the relationship of culture productivity to the cell concentration of light-limited culture is derived. The predicted productivity vs cell concentration curve agrees well with the experimental data obtained to test this model, indicating that this model permits an accurate prediction of culture productivity given the growth parameters of the system.

  16. High-Throughput Biosensor Discriminates Between Different Algal H2-Photoproducing Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wecker, Matt S. A. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ghirardi, Maria L. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-27

    A number of species of microalgae and cyanobacteria photosynthetically produce H2 gas by coupling water oxidation with the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen, generating renewable energy from sunlight and water. Photosynthetic H2 production, however, is transitory, and there is considerable interest in increasing and extending it for commercial applications. Here we report a Petri-plate version of our previous, microplate-based assay that detects photosynthetic H2 production by algae. The assay consists of an agar overlay of H2-sensing Rhodobacter capsulatus bacteria carrying a green fluorescent protein that responds to H2 produced by single algal colonies in the bottom agar layer. The assay distinguishes between algal strains that photoproduce H2 at different levels under high light intensities, and it does so in a simple, inexpensive, and high-throughput manner. The assay will be useful for screening both natural populations and mutant libraries for strains having increased H2 production, and useful for identifying various genetic factors that physiologically or genetically alter algal hydrogen production.

  17. Karenia mikimotoi: An Exceptional Dinoflagellate Bloom in Western Irish Waters, Summer 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Silke, J.; O'Beirn, F.; Cronin, M.

    2005-01-01

    A protracted bloom of Karenia mikimotoi was present in summer 2005 along the northern half of the western Irish coastline. The onset of this bloom was identified in late May / early June. This event subsequently dissipated over the month of July and was succeeded by a bloom of the same species in the southwest in late July. The bloom was very intense and resulted in discolouration of seawater and foaming in coastal embayments. Major mortalities of benthic and pelagic marine organisms were obs...

  18. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    OpenAIRE

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J.; Boyer, Gregory L.; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic comm...

  19. Algal Biofuels R&D at NREL (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-09-01

    An overview of NREL's algal biofuels projects, including U.S. Department of Energy-funded work, projects with U.S. and international partners, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development projects.

  20. Raceways-based production of algal crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisti, Yusuf [Massey Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). School of Engineering

    2013-11-01

    Raceway ponds, or 'high-rate algal ponds', of various configurations have been used to treat wastewater since the 1950s. They are also known as Oswald ponds after their inventor W. J. Oswald. Large-scale outdoor culture of microalgae and cyanobacteria in raceways is well established (Terry and Raymond 1985; Oswald 1988; Borowitzka and Borowitzka 1989; Becker 1994; Lee 1997; Molina Grima 1999; Pulz 2001; Borowitzka 2005; Spolaore et al. 2006). Raceway culture is used commercially in the United States, Thailand, China, Israel and elsewhere, mostly to produce algae for relatively high-value applications. This chapter is focused on raceways typically used in the production of algal biomass and not in the treatment of wastewater. The engineering design, operation and performance characteristics of raceways are discussed. The biomass productivity of the raceways is assessed in relation to limits imposed by algal biology. The economics of algal oil production in raceways are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Context discovery using attenuated Bloom filters in ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Fei; Heijenk, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach to performing context discovery in ad-hoc networks based on the use of attenuated Bloom filters is proposed in this paper. A Bloom filter is an efficient spacesaving data structure to represent context information. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to advertise the availability of c

  2. A Preliminary Bloom's Taxonomy Assessment of End-of-Chapter Problems in Business School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennings B.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines textbook problems used in a sampling of some of the most common core courses found in schools of business to ascertain what level of learning, as defined by Bloom's Taxonomy, is required to provide a correct answer. A set of working definitions based on Bloom's Taxonomy (Bloom & Krathwohl, 1956) was developed for the six…

  3. Improving the Algae Bloom Prediction through the Assimilation of the Remotely Sensed Chlorophyll-A Data in a Generic Ecological Model in the North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Serafy, Ghada

    2010-05-01

    Harmful algae can cause damage to co-existing organisms, tourism and farmers. Accurate predictions of algal future composition and abundance as well as when and where algal blooms may occur could help early warning and mitigating. The Generic Ecological Model, GEM, [Blauw et al 2008] is an instrument that can be applied to any water system (fresh, transitional or coastal) to calculate the primary production, chlorophyll-a concentration and phytoplankton species composition. It consists of physical, chemical and ecological model components which are coupled together to build one generic and flexible modeling tool. For the North Sea, the model has been analyzed to assess sensitivity of the simulated chlorophyll-a concentration to a subset of ecologically significant set of factors. The research led to the definition of the most significant set of parameters to the algae blooming process in the North Sea [Salacinska et al 2009]. In order to improve the prediction of the model, the set of parameters and the chlorophyll-a concentration can be further estimated through the use of data assimilation. In this research, the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation technique is used to assimilate the chlorophyll-a data of the North Sea, retrieved from MEdium Resolution Imaging Sensor (MERIS) spectrometer data [Peters et al 2005], in the GEM model. The chlorophyll-a data includes concentrations and error information that enable their use in data assimilation. For the same purpose, the uncertainty of the ecological generic model, GEM has been quantified by means of Monte Carlo approach. Through a study covering the year of 2003, the research demonstrates that both data and model are sufficiently robust for a successful assimilation. The results show that through the assimilation of the satellite data, a better description of the algae bloom has been achieved and an improvement of the capability of the model to predict the algae bloom for the North Sea has been confirmed

  4. Marine algal toxins: origins, health effects, and their increased occurrence.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Dolah, F M

    2000-01-01

    Certain marine algae produce potent toxins that impact human health through the consumption of contaminated shellfish and finfish and through water or aerosol exposure. Over the past three decades, the frequency and global distribution of toxic algal incidents appear to have increased, and human intoxications from novel algal sources have occurred. This increase is of particular concern, since it parallels recent evidence of large-scale ecologic disturbances that coincide with trends in globa...

  5. Oligotrophic Bacteria Enhance Algal Growth under Iron-Deficient Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Keshtacher-Liebso..., E.; Hadar, Y; Chen, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A Halomonas sp., a marine halophilic and oligotrophic bacterium, was grown on exudates of Dunaliella bardawil. The bacteria increased the solubility of Fe, thereby enhancing its availability to the algae. As a result, the algal growth rate increased. Because of these syntrophic relations, growth of the marine alga D. bardawil was facilitated at Fe levels that would otherwise induce Fe deficiency and inhibit algal growth.

  6. 2016 National Algal Biofuels Technology Review Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Algae-based biofuels and bioproducts offer great promise in contributing to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Bioenergy Technologies Office’s (BETO’s) vision of a thriving and sustainable bioeconomy fueled by innovative technologies. The state of technology for producing algal biofuels continues to mature with ongoing investment by DOE and the private sector, but additional research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) is needed to achieve widespread deployment of affordable, scalable, and sustainable algal biofuels.

  7. Bio-optical characteristics of a phytoplankton bloom event off Baja California Peninsula (30 31°N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barocio-León, Óscar A.; Millán-Núñez, Roberto; Santamaría-del-Ángel, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Silvera, Adriana; Trees, Charles C.; Orellana-Cepeda, Elizabeth

    2008-03-01

    A phytoplankton bloom was detected in the Southern California Current System, off the Baja California Peninsula (Mexico) on June 2003 with chlorophyll- a concentration (TChl a) of 10.13 mg m -3. Two stations (D1 and D2) were sampled on June 24, and D2 was resampled 6 days later; chlorophyll- a concentration had decreased by about one half. LAC MODIS-Chl a images were obtained and showed the spread of the bloom on the day after sampling. The phytoplankton community consisted primarily of dinoflagellate temporary cysts, mainly at the surface and at 5 m in station D1. Two Pseudo-nitzschia species ( P. australis, P. seriata) were also very abundant. Samples from the bloom had a specific phytoplankton absorption coefficient ( aph*(λ)) lower than the rest of the samples. Values varied from 0.0186 to 0.0455 m 2 mg -1 for aph*(440) and from 0.0092 to 0.0294 m 2 mg -1 for aph*(675), with ratios aph*(440): aph*(675) ranging from 0.99 to 2.20. These low ratios were associated with the combined effect of packaging, and with the relatively high ratios of fucoxanthin, peridinin, diadinoxanthin and chlorophyll- c2 to TChl a. Samples from the surface and 5 m depth at station D1 had higher ratios of Perid:TChl a (0.12-0.32) than the rest of the samples, suggesting that cysts have similar Perid:TChl a as free-living dinoflagellates. An unusual absorption spectrum with a broad maximum around 480-500 nm was associated with the high proportion of cysts and diatoms. The slope of the spectra between 443 and 488 nm was a good index to differentiate bloom samples containing high proportions of dinoflagellate temporary cysts. Further investigation of the absorption properties of dinoflagellate cysts is needed in order to detect these waters by remote sensing. Although much work is still necessary to understand and explain the bio-optical properties of a bloom, the present study is the first assessment off the Baja California coast to simultaneously consider aspects such as absorption

  8. Bio-oil production through pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB): Product distribution and bio-oil characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrolysis experiments of blue-green algae blooms (BGAB) were carried out in a fixed-bed reactor to determine the effects of pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate on pyrolysis product yields and bio-oil properties. The pyrolysis temperature, particle size and sweep gas flow rate were varied in the ranges of 300–700 °C, below 0.25–2.5 mm and 50–400 mL min−1, respectively. The maximum oil yield of 54.97% was obtained at a pyrolysis temperature of 500 °C, particle size below 0.25 mm and sweep gas flow rate of 100 mL min−1. The elemental analysis and calorific value of the oil were determined, and the chemical composition of the oil was investigated using gas chromatography–mass spectroscopy (GC–MS) technique. The analysis of bio-oil composition showed that bio-oil from BGAB could be a potential source of renewable fuel with a heating value of 31.9 MJ kg−1. - Highlights: ► Bio-oil production from pyrolysis of blue-green algae blooms in fixed bed reactor. ► Effects of pyrolysis conditions on product distribution were investigated. ► The maximum bio-oil yield reached 54.97 wt %. ► The bio-oil has high heating value and may be suitable as renewable fuel. ► Pyrolysis of algal biomass beneficial for energy recovery, eutrophication control

  9. Algal biofuels: key issues, sustainability and life cycle assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, A.; Irving Olsen, S.

    2011-05-15

    In recent years research activities are intensively focused on renewable fuels in order to fulfill the increasing energy demand and to reduce the fossil fuels consumption and external oil dependency either in order to provide local energetic resources and or as a means for reducing greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions to reduce the climate change effects. Among the various renewable energy sources algal biofuels is a very promising source of biomass as algae sequester huge quantities of carbon from atmosphere and are very efficient in utilizing the nutrients from the industrial effluent and municipal wastewater. Algae capture CO{sub 2} from atmosphere and industrial flue gases and transform it in to organic biomass that can be used for the production of biofuels. Like other biomass, algal biomass is also a carbon neutral source for the production of bioenergy. Therefore cultivation of algal biomass provides dual benefits; while being able to utilize nutrients in waste water thus reducing impacts on inland waters it produce biomass for the production of biofuels. However, reaching commercial scale production of algal biofuels is difficult. The main drawbacks include the harvesting of dry biomass and higher capital investment. The harvested algal biomass and its extracts can be efficiently converted to different biofuels such as bioethanol, biodiesel, biogas and biohydrogen by implementation of various process technologies. Comprehensive life cycle assessments (LCA) of algal biofuels illustrating environmental benefits and impacts can be a tool for policy decisions and for technology development. (Author)

  10. Algal Turf Scrubbers: Cleaning Water While Capturing Solar Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algal Turfs and Algal Turf Scrubbers (ATS) Algal Turfs are bio diverse communities of unicellular to filamentous algae of all major algal phyla. Algal Turf Scrubbers (ATS) are bioengineered ecosystems dominated by algal turfs. They clean water to very high quality, and remove CO2 from the atmosphere by capturing solar energy at rates 10 times that of agriculture and 50 times that of forestry. ATS was invented at the Smithsonian Institution, by scientist, Walter Adey in the 1980s as a tool for controlling water quality in highly diverse model ecosystems. The technology received extensive R and D for aqua cultural, municipal, and industrial water cleaning by Dr. Adey, using venture capital, through the 1990s. Later, Hydro Mentia, Inc., of Ocala, Florida, engineered ATS to landscape scale of 20-50 Mgpd (it is important to note that this is a modular system, capable of expanding to any size.) A 2005 independent study of ATS, by the South Florida Water Management District and the IFAS Institute of the University of Florida, certified ATS as 5-100 times more cost efficient at removing nutrients from Everglades canal waters than the next competitor, the STA, a managed marsh system. ATS and STA were the final contestants in a 15-year study of nine technologies, and ATS was the only technology that created a use able byproduct.

  11. Rapid successions affect microbial N-acetyl-glucosamine uptake patterns during a lacustrine spring phytoplankton bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Ester M; Salcher, Michaela M; Posch, Thomas; Eugster, Bettina; Pernthaler, Jakob

    2012-03-01

    The vernal successions of phytoplankton, heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNF) and viruses in temperate lakes result in alternating dominance of top-down and bottom-up factors on the bacterial community. This may lead to asynchronous blooms of bacteria with different life strategies and affect the channelling of particular components of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) through microbial food webs. We followed the dynamics of several bacterial populations and of other components of the microbial food web throughout the spring phytoplankton bloom period in a pre-alpine lake, and we assessed bacterial uptake patterns of two constituents of the labile DOM pool (N-acetyl-glucosamine [NAG] and leucine). There was a clear genotypic shift within the bacterial assemblage, from fast growing Cytophaga-Flavobacteria (CF) affiliated with Fluviicola and from Betaproteobacteria (BET) of the Limnohabitans cluster to more grazing resistant AcI Actinobacteria (ACT) and to filamentous morphotypes. This was paralleled by successive blooms of viruses and HNF. We also noted the transient rise of other CF (related to Cyclobacteriaceae and Sphingobacteriaceae) that are not detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization with the general CF probe. Both, the average uptake rates of leucine and the fractions of leucine incorporating bacteria were approximately five to sixfold higher than of NAG. However, the composition of the NAG-active community was much more prone to genotypic successions, in particular of bacteria with different life strategies: While 'opportunistically' growing BET and CF dominated NAG uptake in the initial period ruled by bottom-up factors, ACT constituted the major fraction of NAG active cells during the subsequent phase of high predation pressure. This indicates that some ACT could profit from a substrate that might in parts have originated from the grazing of protists on their bacterial competitors. PMID:22082109

  12. Was Bloom's Taxonomy Pointed in the Wrong Direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineburg, Sam; Schneider, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Bloom's Taxonomy usually is depicted as a pyramid with knowledge at the lowest level and evaluation at the top. For the history classroom, however, that arrangement might be upside down. In history, evaluation is often necessary before new knowledge can be learned. (Contains 1 figure.)

  13. Toxins produced in cyanobacterial water blooms – toxicity and risks

    OpenAIRE

    Bláha, Luděk; Babica, Pavel; Maršálek, Blahoslav

    2009-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms in freshwaters represent a major ecological and human health problem worldwide. This paper briefly summarizes information on major cyanobacterial toxins (hepatotoxins, neurotoxins etc.) with special attention to microcystins-cyclic heptapeptides with high acute and chronic toxicities. Besides discussion of human health risks, microcystin ecotoxicology and consequent ecological risks are also highlighted. Although significant research attention has been paid to microcysti...

  14. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  15. The Unfortunate Consequences of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The sequenced levels of thinking articulated in Bloom's original taxonomy (or in the multitude of subsequent variations) is the most widely known list in education. In addition to enduring popularity, it is arguably one of the most destructive theories in education. In this article, the author explains what makes it so damaging and how…

  16. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Teach Students about Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosen, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Melissa A. Vosen outlines a unit she has designed to help students comprehend the often unclear boundaries and issues surrounding plagiarism. Using Bloom's taxonomy of the cognitive domain, students complete increasingly complex tasks, learning to construct a works cited page and assess scholarly opinions. They also research the consequences of…

  17. Fungal parasitism: life cycle, dynamics and impact on cyanobacterial blooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Gerphagnon

    Full Text Available Many species of phytoplankton are susceptible to parasitism by fungi from the phylum Chytridiomycota (i.e. chytrids. However, few studies have reported the effects of fungal parasites on filamentous cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the missing components of bloom ecosystems, we examined an entire field bloom of the cyanobacterium Anabaena macrospora for evidence of chytrid infection in a productive freshwater lake, using a high resolution sampling strategy. A. macrospora was infected by two species of the genus Rhizosiphon which have similar life cycles but differed in their infective regimes depending on the cellular niches offered by their host. R. crassum infected both vegetative cells and akinetes while R. akinetum infected only akinetes. A tentative reconstruction of the developmental stages suggested that the life cycle of R. crassum was completed in about 3 days. The infection affected 6% of total cells (and 4% of akinètes, spread over a maximum of 17% of the filaments of cyanobacteria, in which 60% of the cells could be parasitized. Furthermore, chytrids may reduce the length of filaments of Anabaena macrospora significantly by "mechanistic fragmentation" following infection. All these results suggest that chytrid parasitism is one of the driving factors involved in the decline of a cyanobacteria blooms, by direct mortality of parasitized cells and indirectly by the mechanistic fragmentation, which could weaken the resistance of A. macrospora to grazing.

  18. Eutrophic urban ponds suffer from cyanobacterial blooms: Dutch examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijenberg, G.W.A.M.; Faassen, E.J.; Lurling, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ponds play an important role in urban areas. However, cyanobacterial blooms counteract the societal need for a good water quality and pose serious health risks for citizens and pets. To provide insight into the extent and possible causes of cyanobacterial problems in urban ponds, we conducted a surv

  19. Fooling Mother Nature: Forcing Flower Bulbs for Indoor Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Graine, George; Scoggins, Holly Lynne, 1962-

    2014-01-01

    Think about bulb forcing as an orderly process. This includes choosing the bulb, storing it if necessary, selecting the right size container, determining the potting mix, planting (including fertilizer, water and location), providing a cooling treatment if necessary and after care. Other considerations may be color, fragrance, and timing for seasonal enjoyment of winter or early spring bloom.

  20. Benthic algal vegetation in Isfjorden, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Fredriksen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Benthic algal vegetation was investigated at 10 sites in Isfjorden, Svalbard. Five sites were visited during summer 2010 and five during summer 2012. Both the littoral and sublittoral vegetation were sampled, the littoral by hand-picking and use of a throwable rake and the sublittoral using a triangular dredge. A total of 88 different taxa were registered, comprising 17 Chlorophyta, 40 Ochrophyta, 30 Rhodophyta and the Xantophyceae Vaucheria sp. The green algae Ulvaria splendens (Ruprecht Vinogradova was recorded in Svalbard for the first time. Most of the sites consisted of hard bottom substrate, but one site, Kapp Wijk, consisted of loose-lying calcareous red algae (rhodoliths and had species not recorded elsewhere. The sublittoral at the other sites was dominated by kelp. Molecular analysis confirmed the presence of the red alga Ceramium virgatum and a dwarf form of the brown alga Fucus vesiculosus. This study provides a baseline for future studies investigating changes in the vegetation due to environmental changes.

  1. Tropical cyanobacterial blooms: a review of prevalence, problem taxa, toxins and influencing environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine A.D. Mowe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a major issue in freshwater systems in many countries. The potentially toxic species and their ecological causes are likely to be different in tropical zones from those in temperate water bodies; however, studies on tropical toxic cyanobacterial blooms are sporadic and currently there is no global synthesis. In this review, we examined published information on tropical cyanobacterial bloom occurrence and toxin production to investigate patterns in their growth and distribution. Microcystis was the most frequently occurring bloom genus throughout tropical Asia, Africa and Central America, while Cylindrospermopsis and Anabaena blooms occurred in various locations in tropical Australia, America and Africa. Microcystis blooms were more prevalent during the wet season while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more prevalent during the dry period. Microcystin was the most encountered toxin throughout the tropics. A meta-analysis of tropical cyanobacterial blooms showed that Microcystis blooms were more associated with higher total nitrogen concentrations, while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more associated with higher maximum temperatures. Meta-analysis also showed a positive linear relationship between levels of microcystin and N:P (nitrate:phosphate ratio. Tropical African Microcystis blooms were found to have the lowest microcystin levels in relation to biomass and N:P (nitrate:phosphate compared to tropical Asian, Australian and American blooms. There was also no significant correlation between microcystin concentration and cell concentration for tropical African blooms as opposed to tropical Asian and American blooms. Our review illustrates that some cyanobacteria and toxins are more prevalent in tropical areas. While some tropical countries have considerable information regarding toxic blooms, others have few or no reported studies. 

  2. ESA-MERIS 10-Year Mission Reveals Contrasting Phytoplankton Bloom Dynamics in Two Tropical Regions of Northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Blondeau-Patissier

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The spatial and temporal variability of phytoplankton blooms was investigated in two tropical coastal regions of northern Australia using the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS full mission (2002–2012 reduced resolution dataset. Satellite-derived proxies for phytoplankton (Chlorophyll-a (Chl, Fluorescence Line Height (FLH, Maximum Chlorophyll Index (MCI and suspended sediment (Total Suspended Matter (TSM were jointly analyzed for two clusters of the Great Barrier Reef Wet tropics (GBRW; 15°–19.5°S; Queensland and the Van Diemen Gulf (VDG; 9°–13°S; Northern Territory. The analysis of time-series and Hovmöller diagrams of the four MERIS products provided a unique perspective on the processes linking phytoplankton blooms and river runoff, or resuspension, across spatio-temporal scales. Both regions are characterized by a complex oceanography and seasonal inflows of sediment, freshwater and nutrients during the tropical wet season months (November to April. The GBRW is characterized by a great variability in water clarity (Secchi depth 0–25 m. A long history of agricultural land use has led to a large increase in the seasonal discharge of sediments and nutrients, triggering seasonal phytoplankton blooms (>0.4 mg∙m−3 between January and April. In contrast, the VDG is a poorly flushed, turbid (Secchi depth <5 m environment with strong tidal-energy (4–8 m and very limited land use. Phytoplankton blooms here were found to have higher Chl concentrations (>1.0 mg∙m−3 than in the GBRW, occurring up to twice a year between January and April. Over the 10-year MERIS mission, a weak decline in Chl and TSM was observed for the VDG (Sen slope: −2.85%/decade, τ = −0.32 and −3.57%/decade, τ = −0.24; p 0.05, while no significant trend in those two satellite products was observed in the GBRW. Cyanobacteria surface algal blooms occur in both regions between August and October. The MCI and FLH products were found to

  3. Model investigations of the North Atlantic spring bloom initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Angela M.; Fennel, Katja; Mattern, Jann Paul

    2015-11-01

    The spring bloom - a massive growth of phytoplankton that occurs annually during the spring season in mid and high latitudes - plays an important role in carbon export to the deep ocean. The onset of this event has been explained from bottom-up and top-down perspectives, exemplified by the "critical-depth" and the "dilution-recoupling" hypotheses, respectively. Both approaches differ in their key expectations about how seasonal fluctuations of the mixed layer affect the plankton community. Here we assess whether the assumptions inherent to these hypotheses are met inside a typical onedimensional Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD) model, optimized to best represent climatological annual cycles of satellite-based phytoplankton biomass in the Subpolar North Atlantic. The optimized model is used in idealized experiments that isolate the effects of mixed layer fluctuations and zooplankton grazing, in order to elucidate their significance. We analyzed the model sensitivity qualitatively and using a second-order Taylor series decomposition of the model equations. Our results show that the conceptual bases of both bottom-up and top-down approaches are required to explain the process of blooming; however, neither of their bloom initiation mechanisms fully applies in the experiments. We find that a spring bloom can develop in the absence of mixed layer fluctuations, and both its magnitude and timing seem to strongly depend on nutrient and light availability. Furthermore, although zooplankton populations modulate the phytoplankton concentrations throughout the year, directly prescribed and physically driven changes in zooplankton grazing do not produce significant time shifts in bloom initiation, as hypothesized. While recognizing its limitations, our study emphasizes the processes that require further testing in order to discern among competing hypotheses.

  4. Floraciones algales nocivas en la costa pacífica de Costa Rica: toxicología y sus efectos en el ecosistema y salud pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Freer

    2003-10-01

    ón paralizante, amnésica, diarréica, neurotóxica, ciguatera y fiebre de Tamandré. Es importante que el personal de salud tenga un buen conocimiento de las FAN y se necesita con urgencia un adecuado programa de monitoreo y control en Costa Rica, para proteger a la población.Justification and Objectives: The first cases of intoxication due to Harmful Algae Blooms (HAB in Costa Rica were reported in 1990. However, towards the end of 1999 a drastic increase of poisoned people was observed, especially along our pacific coast. There is lack of information regarding the problems of HAB. Due to the impact of HAB on public health, local tourism and the ecosystem, it is necessary to describe toxic species and their toxins in order to apply adequate control and preventive measures. Methods: Water samples were taken in various locations along the costarican pacific coast with the aim of detecting potentially toxic and harmful species of microalgae. Species identification was carried out morphologically by means of light and scanning electron microscopy. These findings were compared with current literature and the potential toxin of these microalgae was proposed as well as the methods of toxico-logical analysis and the clinical findings of those affected. Results: Recently, an increase in the number of HAB producing microalgae species has been observed in Costa Rica. This study reports these findings together with ones from those of other authors related to HAB producing species in Costa Rica. In few algal bloom samples, large intracellular bacillary bacteria were found, mainly within the dinoflagellate Prorocentrum micans. This relation may be associated with the toxicity of the algae. Discussion: It is believed that the increase in coastal zone pollution and the transportation of species by means of ships ballast water may be the cause of the appearance of these microalgaes. The presence of 26 dinoflagellates, 8 diatoms and 1 cyanobacteria, all potentially harmful in HAB events, was

  5. New Insights into the Parasitoid Parvilucifera sinerae Life Cycle: The Development and Kinetics of Infection of a Bloom-forming Dinoflagellate Host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alacid, Elisabet; Reñé, Albert; Garcés, Esther

    2015-12-01

    Parvilucifera sinerae is a parasitoid of dinoflagellates, the major phytoplankton group responsible for harmful algal bloom events. Here we provide a detailed description of both the life cycle of P. sinerae, based on optical, confocal, and transmission electron microscopy observations, and its infection kinetics and dynamics. P. sinerae completes its life cycle in 3-4 days. The zoospore encounters and penetrates the host cell within 24h after its addition to the host culture. Inside the host, the parasitoid develops a trophocyte, which constitutes the longest stage of its life cycle. The trophocyte replicates and divides by schizogony to form hundreds of new zoospores contained within a sporangium. Under laboratory conditions, P. sinerae has a short generation time, a high rate of asexual reproduction, and is highly prevalent (up to 80%) in the Alexandrium minutum population. Prevalence was shown to depend on both the parasitoid inoculum size and host density, which increase the encounter probability rate. The parasitoid infection parameters described in this study are the first reported for the genus Parvilucifera. They show that P. sinerae is well-adapted to its dinoflagellate hosts and may be an important factor in the termination of A. minutum blooms in the natural environment. PMID:26605683

  6. Phosphorus fractionation in sediment cores collected in 2005 before and after onset of an Aphanizomenon flos-aquae bloom in upper Klamath Lake, OR, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, N.S.; Lynch, D.; Gallaher, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there would be measurable losses of phosphorus (P) from surficial sediments of Upper Klamath Lake (UKL), Oregon, if sediments were a source of P during an algal bloom. We compared concentrations of total and forms of P at various depths in cores collected before and after the onset of a large Aphanizomenon flos-aquae bloom. Concentrations of inorganic P were determined in extraction solutions of MgCl2 (1 M, pH 8), citrate-dithionite-bicarbonate, and 1 M HCl. Sediments below 2 cm were dominated by residual P which is defined as total P minus inorganic P. During the study period, data from the top 2-cm of sediment indicated (a) significant decrease in total P concentration, primarily associated with iron oxyhydroxides at one site, and (b) significant increase in total P concentration associated with residual P at a second site. Data from two other sites indicated no net changes in concentrations of total P. ?? 2009 US Government.

  7. Nutrient availability in support of Karenia brevis blooms on the central West Florida Shelf: What keeps Karenia blooming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargo, Gabriel A.; Heil, Cynthia A.; Fanning, Kent A.; Dixon, L. Kellie; Neely, Merrie Beth; Lester, Kristen; Ault, Danylle; Murasko, Susan; Havens, Julie; Walsh, John; Bell, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Identifying nutrient sources, primarily nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), sufficient to support high biomass blooms of the red tide dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, has remained problematic. The West Florida Shelf is oligotrophic, yet populations >10 6 cells L -1 frequently occur and blooms can persist for months. Here we examine the magnitude and variety of sources for N and P that are available to support blooms. Annual average in situ or background concentrations of inorganic N in the region where blooms occur range 0.02-0.2 μM while inorganic P ranges 0.025-0.24 μM. Such concentrations would be sufficient to support the growth of populations up to ˜3×10 4 cells L -1 with at least a 1 d turnover rate. Organic N concentrations average 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than inorganic N, 8-14 μM while organic P concentrations average 0.2-0.5 μM. Concentrations of organic N are sufficient to support blooms >10 5 cells L -1 but the extent to which this complex mixture of N species is utilizable is unknown. Other sources of nutrients included in our analysis are aerial deposition, estuarine flux, benthic flux, zooplankton excretion, N 2-fixation, and subsequent release of organic and inorganic N by Trichodesmium spp., and release of N and P from dead and decaying fish killed by the blooms. Inputs based on atmospheric deposition, benthic flux, and N 2-fixation, were minor contributors to the flux required to support growth of populations >2.6×10 4 cells L -1. N and P from decaying fish could theoretically maintain populations at moderate concentrations but insufficient data on the flux and subsequent mixing rates does not allow us to calculate average values. Zooplankton excretion rates, based on measured zooplankton population estimates and excretion rates could also supply all of the N and P required to support populations of 10 5 and 10 6 cells L -1, respectively, but excretion is considered as "regenerated" nutrient input and can only maintain biomass rather

  8. Development and Evaluation of Real-time Acoustic Detection System of Harmful Red-tide Using Ultrasonic Sound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donhyug Kang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The toxic, Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs caused by the Cochlodinium polykrikoides have a serious impact on the coastal waters of Korea. In this study, the acoustic detection system was developed for rapid HABs detection, based on the acoustic backscattering properties of the C. polykrikoides. The developed system was mainly composed of a pulser-receiver board, a signal processor board, a control board, a network board, a power board, ultrasonic sensors (3.5 and 5.0 MHz, an environmental sensor, GPS, and a land-based control unit. To evaluate the performance of the system, a trail was done at a laboratory, and two in situ trials were conducted: (1 when there was no red tide, and (2 when there was red tide. In the laboratory evaluation, the system performed well in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides in the received level. Second, under the condition when there was no red tide in the field, there was a good correlation between the acoustic data and sampling data. Finally, under the condition when there was red tide in the field, the system successfully worked at various densities in accordance with the number of C. polykrikoides, and the results corresponded with the sampling data and monitoring result of NFRDI (National Fisheries Research & Development Institute. From the laboratory and field evaluations, the developed acoustic detection system for early detecting HABs has demonstrated that it could be a significant system to monitor the occurrence of HABs in coastal regions.

  9. The exceptional surface turbidity of the North-West European shelf seas during the stormy 2013-2014 winter: Consequences for the initiation of the phytoplankton blooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohin, F.; Bryère, P.; Griffiths, J. W.

    2015-08-01

    A succession of storms during the winter 2013-2014 enhanced the resuspension of sediments in the surface waters of the North-West European shelf seas. The effects of waves on satellite-derived non-algal SPM (Suspended Particulate Matters) are discussed for the January 2008-March 2014 period. A simple statistical model relating locally SPM to tidal intensity and waves helps us analyse the main characteristics of the winter 2013-2014. The exceptional run of storms observed in this stormy and rainy winter has resulted in the highest SPM concentration in the Celtic Sea and the Bay of Biscay ever observed by remote-sensing during the 1998-2014 period. Despite the lower clarity of the surface waters over a large part of the continental shelf during the first days of March 2014, blooms occurred early off the coast of Southern Brittany (Bay of Biscay) and later in April, as usual, in the Celtic Sea. Off the coast of southern Brittany, a region of freshwater influence, the lower clarity of the waters was counterbalanced by stronger haline stratification, due to high river discharges, enabling the initiation of blooms in late winter when the solar irradiance is sufficient; which was the case in March 2014 with 7 sunny days in a row just after the last storm. As a consequence, we can postulate that a possible increase in the intensity of waves occurring from December to early March, along with a possible scenario of global change, would not restrict the productive period in the Bay of Biscay. However an extension of the period of storms later in March would delay the timing of the blooms as observed in March 2008 in most of the investigated area.

  10. Effect of algal growth phase on Aureococcus anophagefferens susceptibility to hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randhawa, Varunpreet; Thakkar, Megha; Wei, Liping, E-mail: liping.wei@njit.edu

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •Brown tide alga's susceptibility to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was examined via growth and physiology responses. •The study was designed equalizing the influence of the media and cell density in test cultures. •Stationary cells was more sensitive to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} than exponential cells. •Stationary cells showed weaker non-protein thiol up-regulation than exponential cells. •Stationary cells mediated greater H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition than exponential cells did. -- Abstract: A cell's growth phase could affect its susceptibility to a biocide in microbial control. This study examines the growth phase dependent susceptibility of a brown tide bloom alga Aureococcus anophagefferens to microbial biocide hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Test cultures of A. anophagefferens cells in exponential and stationary growth phase and similar initial cell density (1.6 × 10{sup 6} cells mL{sup −1}) were exposed to 0.4–1.6 mg L{sup −1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Changes in algal growth (in vivo fluorescence, total chlorophyll a, and cell density), cell physiology (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II, and total intracellular non-protein thiols), and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition were quantified. Results show that the stationary phase cells are more susceptible to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} than the exponential phase cells, and this is attributed to the weaker ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging system and consequently greater cell damage in stationary phase cells. The stationary phase cells potentially require 30–40% less H{sub 2}O{sub 2} to reach 90% removal within 12 h of treatment as compared to the exponential phase cells. The results have practical implications in brown tide bloom control with respect to the timing and the dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} application.

  11. Groundwater contamination by microcystin from toxic cyanobacteria blooms in Lake Chaohu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhen; Kong, Fanxiang; Zhang, Min

    2016-05-01

    Lake Chaohu is a eutrophic lake that experiences massive cyanobacterial blooms. The high concentrations of microcystin observed in this lake are the result of the bloom's high proportion of toxic cyanobacteria strains. Groundwater is the important source of water for drinking, washing, and irrigation in the watershed of Lake Chaohu. This study examines the space-time distribution of microcystins and related environmental factors in wells near Lake Chaohu. All collected groundwater samples from the Lake Chaohu region had detectable concentrations of microcystins. The highest concentration of microcystins, 1.07 μg L(-1), occurred in a well hundreds of meters from the western coast of the lake in September. The distance from the lake shore to the well was significantly and positively correlated with the microcystin concentration in the groundwater. Moreover, a correlation analysis shows that the microcystin concentration in the groundwater was positively correlated with the total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) and microcystin concentration of the nearby lake water. Therefore, the microcystin in the groundwater likely originates from penetration by nearby lake water. Our results suggest that the groundwater near Lake Chaohu poses a significant health risk for the local residents when used for drinking water. PMID:27068532

  12. Multiplex biotoxin surface plasmon resonance method for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Sara E; Elliott, Christopher T; Delahaut, Philippe; Campbell, Katrina

    2013-10-01

    A multiplex surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor method for the detection of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) toxins, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid was developed. This method was compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Seawater samples (n=256) from around Europe were collected by the consortia of an EU project MIcroarrays for the Detection of Toxic Algae (MIDTAL) and evaluated using each method. A simple sample preparation procedure was developed which involved lysing and releasing the toxins from the algal cells with glass beads followed by centrifugation and filtering the extract before testing for marine biotoxins by both multi-SPR and ELISA. Method detection limits based on IC20 values for PSP, okadaic acid and domoic acid toxins were 0.82, 0.36 and 1.66 ng/ml, respectively, for the prototype multiplex SPR biosensor. Evaluation by SPR for seawater samples has shown that 47, 59 and 61 % of total seawater samples tested positive (result greater than the IC20) for PSP, okadaic acid (and analogues) and domoic acid toxins, respectively. Toxic samples were received mainly from Spain and Ireland. This work has demonstrated the potential of multiplex analysis for marine biotoxins in algal and seawater samples with results available for 24 samples within a 7 h period for three groups of key marine biotoxins. Multiplex immunological methods could therefore be used as early warning monitoring tools for a variety of marine biotoxins in seawater samples. PMID:23250726

  13. Comparative proteomics reveals highly and differentially expressed proteins in field-collected and laboratory-cultured blooming cells of the diatom Skeletonema costatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Wang, Da-Zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Zhang, Shu-Fei; Wang, Ming-Hua; Lin, Lin

    2015-10-01

    Diatoms are a major phytoplankton group causing extensive blooms in the ocean. However, little is known about the intracellular biological processes occurring during the blooming period. This study compared the protein profiles of field-collected and laboratory-cultured blooming cells of Skeletonema costatum, and identified highly and differentially expressed proteins using the shotgun proteomic approach. A total of 1372 proteins were confidently identified with two or more peptides. Among them, 222 and 311 proteins were unique to the laboratory and field samples respectively. Proteins involved in photosynthesis, translation, nucleosome assembly, carbohydrate and energy metabolism dominated the protein profiles in both samples. However, different features of specific proteins were also found: proteins participated in light harvesting, photosynthetic pigment biosynthesis, photoprotection, cell division and redox homeostasis were highly detected in the field sample, whereas proteins involved in translation, amino acid and protein metabolic processes, and nitrogen and carbon assimilation presented high detection rates in the laboratory sample. ATP synthase cf1 subunit beta and light harvest complex protein were the most abundant protein in the laboratory and field samples respectively. These results indicated that S. costatum had evolved adaptive mechanisms to the changing environment, and integrating field and laboratory proteomic data should provide comprehensive understanding of bloom mechanisms. PMID:26014042

  14. Small herbivores suppress algal accumulation on Agatti atoll, Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cernohorsky, Nicole H.; McClanahan, Timothy R.; Babu, Idrees; Horsák, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Despite large herbivorous fish being generally accepted as the main group responsible for preventing algal accumulation on coral reefs, few studies have experimentally examined the relative importance of herbivore size on algal communities. This study used exclusion cages with two different mesh sizes (1 × 1 cm and 6 × 6 cm) to investigate the impact of different-sized herbivores on algal accumulation rates on the shallow (8 cm body depth) while allowing smaller fishes to access the plots. In contrast to the conclusions of most previous studies, the exclusion of large herbivores had no significant effect on the accumulation of benthic algae and the amount of algae present within the coarse-mesh cages was relatively consistent throughout the experimental period (around 50 % coverage and 1-2 mm height). The difference in algal accumulation between the fine-mesh and coarse-mesh cages appears to be related to the actions of small individuals from 12 herbivorous fish species (0.17 ind. m-2 and 7.7 g m-2) that were able to enter through the coarse mesh. Although restricted to a single habitat, these results suggest that when present in sufficient densities and diversity, small herbivorous fishes can prevent the accumulation of algal biomass on coral reefs.

  15. Evaluation of attached periphytical algal communities for biofuel feedstock generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandefur, H.N.; Matlock, M.D.; Costello, T.A. [Arkansas Univ., Division of Agriculture, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Center for Agricultural and Rural Sustainability

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that investigated the feasibility of using algal biomass as a feedstock for biofuel production. Algae has a high lipid content, and with its high rate of production, it can produce more oil on less land than traditional bioenergy crops. In addition, algal communities can remove nutrients from wastewater. Enclosed photobioreactors and open pond systems are among the many different algal growth systems that can be highly productive. However, they can also be difficult to maintain. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the ability of a pilot scale algal turf scrubber (ATS) to facilitate the growth of attached periphytic algal communities for the production of biomass feedstock and the removal of nutrients from a local stream in Springdale, Arizona. The ATS operated for a 9 month sampling period, during which time the system productivity averaged 26 g per m{sup 2} per day. The removal of total phosphorus and total nitrogen averaged 48 and 13 per cent, respectively.

  16. Sedimentation of phytoplankton during a diatom bloom : Rates and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Hansen, J.L.S.; Alldredge, A.L.;

    1996-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are uncoupled from grazing and are normally terminated by sedimentation. There are several potential mechanisms by which phytoplankton cells may settle out of the photic zone: sinking of individual cells or chains, coagulation of cells into aggregates with high settling...... fjord, and evaluated their potential to control phytoplankton population dynamics. Overall specific sedimentation rates of intact phytoplankton cells were low during the Ii-day study period, averaging ca. 0.1 d(-1), and mass sedimentation and bloom termination did not occur. Most cells settled attached...... to marine snow aggregates formed from discarded larvacean houses, whereas settling of unaggregated cells was insignificant. Formation rates of phytoplankton aggregates by physical coagulation was very low, and losses by this mechanism were much less than 0.07 d(-1); phytoplankton aggregates were...

  17. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    OpenAIRE

    Armin Oskoueian; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.; Rudi Hendra; Ehsan Oskoueian; Ehsan Karimi

    2012-01-01

    Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and fla...

  18. Bloom's Taxonomy (Classification of cognitive areas – remembering, understanding, applying)

    OpenAIRE

    Petrova Gjorgjeva, Emilija

    2011-01-01

    Traditional teaching is based upon the products of thought, but it neglects the processes which lead to these products. Efficacy in learning depends on the student‘s consciousness about the process of learning itself and on the usage of self-regulating learning mechanisms. The taxonomy conceived by Benjamin Bloom and his associates enables teachers to distinguish the questions that instigate lower and higher levels of students‘ thinking, i.e. to make the distinction between questions requi...

  19. Evaluating ILI Advanced Series through Bloom's Revised Taxonomy

    OpenAIRE

    MAHDIPOUR, Nasim; SADEGHI, Bahador

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study investigated Iran Language Institute Advanced Series in terms of learning objectives based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. It examined the cognitive, affective and psychomotor domains to see how the critical thinking skills are used and to what extent these books are different from each other. For these purposes, the frequencies, percentages and Standard Residual were analyzed. Results revealed that the lower-order cognitive skills (i.e. remembering, understanding and applyi...

  20. Winter bloom of a rare betaproteobacterium in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    LauraAlonso-Saez; MichaelZeder; TommyHarding; JakobPernthaler; ConnieLovejoy; StefanBertilsson; CarlosPedrós-Alió

    2014-01-01

    Extremely low abundance microorganisms (members of the ‘rare biosphere’) are believed to include dormant taxa, which can sporadically become abundant following environmental triggers. Yet, microbial transitions from rare to abundant have seldom been captured in situ, and it is uncertain how widespread these transitions are. A bloom of a single ribotype (≥99% similarity in the 16S ribosomal RNA gene) of a widespread betaproteobacterium (Janthinobacterium sp.) occurred over two weeks in Arctic ...

  1. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds. PMID:25972565

  2. Novel one-step centrifugal sensor system for the detection of cyanobacterial toxin microcystin-LR

    OpenAIRE

    Fitzgerald, Jenny; Maguire, Ivan; Heery, Brendan; Murphy, Caroline; Nwankire, Charles; O'Kennedy, Richard; Regan, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    Globally, the most prevalent cyanobacterial toxins, in blooms from fresh and brackish waters, are the cyclic peptide toxins of the microcystin family. The need for on-site algal-toxin monitoring has become increasingly urgent due to the amplified demand for fresh-water and for safe, ‘toxin-free’ shellfish and fish stocks. Along with routine testing of shellfish stocks for biotoxins including microcystin, the EU also require routine monitoring for the presence of the causative ...

  3. Algal lectins as promising biomolecules for biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sarup; Thakur, Shivani Rani; Bansal, Parveen

    2015-02-01

    Lectins are natural bioactive ubiquitous proteins or glycoproteins of non-immune response that bind reversibly to glycans of glycoproteins, glycolipids and polysaccharides possessing at least one non-catalytic domain causing agglutination. Some of them consist of several carbohydrate-binding domains which endow them with the properties of cell agglutination or precipitation of glycoconjugates. Lectins are rampant in nature from plants, animals and microorganisms. Among microorganisms, algae are the potent source of lectins with unique properties specifically from red algae. The demand of peculiar and neoteric biologically active substances has intensified the developments on isolation and biomedical applications of new algal lectins. Comprehensively, algal lectins are used in biomedical research for antiviral, antinociceptive, anti-inflammatory, anti-tumor activities, etc. and in pharmaceutics for the fabrication of cost-effective protein expression systems and nutraceutics. In this review, an attempt has been made to collate the information on various biomedical applications of algal lectins. PMID:23855360

  4. Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-COMM) Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayfield, Stephen P. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-12-04

    The Consortium for Algal Biofuel Commercialization (CAB-Comm) was established in 2010 to conduct research to enable commercial viability of alternative liquid fuels produced from algal biomass. The main objective of CAB-Comm was to dramatically improve the viability of algae as a source of liquid fuels to meet US energy needs, by addressing several significant barriers to economic viability. To achieve this goal, CAB-Comm took a diverse set of approaches on three key aspects of the algal biofuels value chain: crop protection; nutrient utilization and recycling; and the development of genetic tools. These projects have been undertaken as collaboration between six academic institutions and two industrial partners: University of California, San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography; University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Rutgers University; University of California, Davis; Johns Hopkins University; Sapphire Energy; and Life Technologies.

  5. Marine algal toxins: origins, health effects, and their increased occurrence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Certain marine algae produce potent toxins that impact human health through the consumption of contaminated shellfish and finfish and through water or aerosol exposure. Over the past three decades, the frequency and global distribution of toxic algal incidents appear to have increased, and human intoxications from novel algal sources have occurred. This increase is of particular concern, since it parallels recent evidence of large-scale ecologic disturbances that coincide with trends in global warming. The extent to which human activities have contributed to their increase therefore comes into question. This review summarizes the origins and health effects of marine algal toxins, as well as changes in their current global distribution, and examines possible causes for the recent increase in their occurrence. (Author)

  6. Distribution and recurrence of phytoplankton blooms around South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borrione

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available South Georgia phytoplankton blooms are amongst the largest of the Southern Ocean and are associated with a rich ecosystem and strong atmospheric carbon drawdown. Both aspects depend on the intensity of blooms, but also on their regularity. Here we use data from 12 yr of SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor ocean colour imagery and calculate the frequency of bloom occurrence (FBO to re-examine spatial and temporal bloom distributions. We find that upstream of the island and outside the borders of the Georgia Basin, blooms occurred in less than 4 out of the 12 yr (FBO < 4. In contrast, FBO was mostly greater than 8 downstream of the island, i.e., to the north and northwest, and in places equal to 12, indicating that blooms occurred every year. The typical bloom area, defined as the region where blooms occurred in at least 8 out of the 12 yr, covers the entire Georgia Basin and the northern shelf of the island. The time series of surface chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations averaged over the typical bloom area shows that phytoplankton blooms occurred in every year between September 1997 and September 2010, and that Chl a values followed a clear seasonal cycle, with concentration peaks around December followed in many years by a second peak during late austral summer or early autumn, suggesting a bi-modal bloom pattern. The bloom regularity we describe here is in contrast with results of Park et al. (2010 who used a significantly different study area including regions that almost never exhibit bloom conditions.

  7. Cementing mechanism of algal crusts from desert area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    34-, 17-, 4-, 1.5-year old natural algal crusts were collected from Shapotou Scientific Station of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 40-day old field and greenhouse artificial algal crusts were in situ developed in the same sandy soil and the same place (37°27′N, 104°57′E). Their different cohesions both against wind force and pressure were measured respectively by a sandy wind-tunnel experiment and a penetrometer. On the basis of these algal crusts, the cementing mechanism was revealed from many subjects and different levels. The results showed that in the indoor artificial crusts with the weakest cohesion bunchy algal filaments were distributed in the surface of the crusts, produced few extracellular polymers (EPS), the binding capacity of the crusts just accomplished by mechanical bundle of algal filaments. For field crusts, most filaments grew toward the deeper layers of algal crusts, secreted much more EPS, and when organic matter content was more than 2.4 times of chlorophyll a, overmuch organic matter (primarily is EPS) began to gather onto the surface of the crusts and formed an organic layer in the relatively lower micro-area, and this made the crust cohesion increase 2.5 times. When the organic layer adsorbed and intercepted amounts of dusts, soil particles and sand grains scattered down from wind, it changed gradually into an inorganic layer in which inorganic matter dominated, and this made the crusts cohesion further enhanced 2-6 times. For crust-building species Microcoleus vaginatus, 88.5% of EPS were the acidic components, 78% were the acidic proteglycan of 380 kD. The uronic acid content accounted for 8% of proteglycan, and their free carboxyls were important sites of binding with metal cations from surrounding matrix.

  8. Carbohydrate-degrading bacteria closely associated with Tetraselmis indica: Influence on algal growth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Arora, M.; Anil, A.C.; Delany, J.; Rajarajan, N.; Emami, K.; Mesbahi, E.

    to promote growth of the algae. These experiments revealed that microbes associated with the alga differentially influence algal growth dynamics. Bacterial presence on the cast-off cell wall products of the alga suggested the likely utilisation of algal cell...

  9. Incorporation of 14C in chemical constituents of algal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two marine algal species Dunaliella premodecta, Chlamydemonas sp. and one fresh water species Scenedesmus obliquus were studied for 14C incorporation under laboratory conditions. The uptake of 14C in dry marine algal species was found to be more compared to that in fresh water species for the same initial concentration in the respective media. A sequential extraction technique was employed to study the distribution of 14C in different organic constituents. 14C fixation was found to be more in fatty acid fractions followed by protein and nucleoprotein fraction. (author). 13 refs., 2 tabs

  10. Microorganisms living on algae : An interesting reservoir of enzymes hydrolyzing algal biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Marjolaine; Biver, Sophie; Barbeyron, Tristan; Michel, Gurvan; Portetelle, Daniel; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2013-01-01

    Algal polysaccharides are increasingly used in food industry for their gelling properties and in pharmacology for their therapeutic properties. Furthermore, increasingly interest is taken on algae for their use in the production of biofuels and bioenergies. To purify algal polysaccharides and degrade algal biomass, specific microbial enzymes are needed. Microorganisms living on algae are an interesting source of those enzymes, as they are in constant interaction with algal biomass. The aim...

  11. Characterization and Performance of Algal Biofilms for Wastewater Treatment and Industrial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Kesaano, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out on algal biofilms grown using rotating algal biofilm reactors (RABRs) with the aim of: i) characterizing their growth in terms of photosynthetic activity and morphology ii) evaluating their performance as a wastewater treatment option and a feedstock for biofuels production, and iii) examining the algal-bacteria interactions. A review of algal biofilm technologies currently employed in wastewater treatment processes was made to compare nutrient removal efficienci...

  12. Transcriptome sequencing of essential marine brown and red algal species in China and its significance in algal biology and phylogeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Shuangxiu; YU Jun; SUN Jing; CHI Shan; WANG Liang; WANG Xumin; LIU Cui; LI Xingang; YIN Jinlong; LIU Tao

    2014-01-01

    Most phaeophytes (brown algae) and rhodophytes (red algae) dwell exclusively in marine habitats and play important roles in marine ecology and biodiversity. Many of these brown and red algae are also important resources for industries such as food, medicine and materials due to their unique metabolisms and me-tabolites. However, many fundamental questions surrounding their origins, early diversification, taxonomy, and special metabolisms remain unsolved because of poor molecular bases in brown and red algal study. As part of the 1 000 Plant Project, the marine macroalgal transcriptomes of 19 Phaeophyceae species and 21 Rhodophyta species from China's coast were sequenced, covering a total of 2 phyla, 3 classes, 11 orders, and 19 families. An average of 2 Gb per sample and a total 87.3 Gb of RNA-seq raw data were generated. Approxi-mately 15 000 to 25 000 unigenes for each brown algal sample and 5 000 to 10 000 unigenes for each red algal sample were annotated and analyzed. The annotation results showed obvious differences in gene expres-sion and genome characteristics between red algae and brown algae;these differences could even be seen between multicellular and unicellular red algae. The results elucidate some fundamental questions about the phylogenetic taxonomy within phaeophytes and rhodophytes, and also reveal many novel metabolic pathways. These pathways include algal CO2 fixation and particular carbohydrate metabolisms, and related gene/gene family characteristics and evolution in brown and red algae. These findings build on known algal genetic information and significantly improve our understanding of algal biology, biodiversity, evolution, and potential utilization of these marine algae.

  13. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  14. Effects of algal hydrolysate as reaction medium on enzymatic hydrolysis of lignocelluloses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algal biomass has been proposed as a source of lipids and sugars for biofuel productions. However, a substantial portion of potentially valuable algal material remains as a liquid hydrolysate after sugar and lipid extractions. This study examined the effects of an algal hydrolysate on the enzymatic...

  15. Seismic delineation of Algal Mound Reservoirs, Humble City South Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caughey, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Pennsylvanian algal mounds near Lovington, New Mexico, typify the targets remaining for exploration in the Permian basin. The Strawn trend new Lovington comprises numerous small (200-800 ac) reservoirs of clean algal limestone encased in unfossiliferous carbonate mudrocks. Vuggy porosity occurs in algal micrites and sporadically in crinoidal or foraminiferal grainstones associated with the mound. Some of the Lovington area fields encountered downdip water, but difficulty in finding the mound facies remains the principal dry-hole hazard. Vague acoustical boundaries complicate seismic detection of relatively minor (50-150 ft) carbonate buildups at depths of 11,200-11,600 ft. Stratigraphic interpretation of high-resolution seismic data recently led to several new field discoveries and major extensions. Development drilling, however, can be an even greater challenge to reservoir prediction. Humble City South field illustrates the difficulty of developing a stratigraphic oil field in an area of poor seismic definition and sparse well control. A shooting program following the wildcat discovery only heightened confusion about the size and shape of the new reservoir. Two subsequent dry holes missed the mound entirely and provided only negative control. Seismic modeling, careful stratigraphic interpretation, and saturation coverage with a three-dimensional seismic project ultimately defined the existing reservoir and revealed the presence of a separate, nearby pool. Exact reservoir delineation remains difficult, but this program presented the first clear picture of overall mount geometry. The Humble City experience showed that three-dimensional seismic can be an important tool in the critical period following a wildcat discovery.

  16. Researches of Water Bloom Emergency Management Decision-making Method and System Based on Fuzzy Multiple Attribute Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevention and management of water blooms is an important measure of environment protection. At present, although there is a variety of research achievement in water bloom management methods, the related reports in water blooms emergency management decision are hardly ever. Because the forming mechanism of water bloom is still unknown, it is difficult to come up with optimal water bloom management decision-making methods. Based on the deep research of mechanism characteristic and emergency management decision model of water bloom, this paper puts forward a Multiple Attribute Decision Making (MADM based on water bloom emergency management decision-making methods, and applying to the lake reservoir water bloom emergency management programs selection, making model validation according to the lake reservoir as well, and then providing effective informational decision basis for environmental protection department to prevent and manage the water bloom.

  17. Context discovery using attenuated Bloom filters in ad-hoc networks

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Fei; Heijenk, Geert

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach to performing context discovery in ad-hoc networks based on the use of attenuated Bloom filters is proposed in this paper. A Bloom filter is an efficient spacesaving data structure to represent context information. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to advertise the availability of context information multiple hops away, and to guide queries to discover it. In order to investigate the performance of this approach, a model has been developed. This paper describes the model and ...

  18. Critical Examination of a Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy for the Development of Art Education Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Nakamura, Kazuyo; Yamato, Hiroko; Nakashima, Atsuo; Kikkawa, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    This paper is aimed at developing Art Education Taxonomy Table through critically examining a revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives contrived by Anderson and Krathwohl. First, the overview of the history of Bloom's Taxonomy is provided in relation to art education. Second, the influence of Bloom's theory of educational evaluation and Taxonomy on the classroom practice of art education in Japan is discussed. Third, aiming at using for the development of art education curriculu...

  19. Diversity and Dynamics of a Widespread Bloom of the Toxic Dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense

    OpenAIRE

    Erdner, Deana L.; Richlen, Mindy; McCauley, Linda A. R.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2011-01-01

    Historically, cosmopolitan phytoplankton species were presumed to represent largely unstructured populations. However, the recent development of molecular tools to examine genetic diversity have revealed differences in phytoplankton taxa across geographic scales and provided insight into the physiology and ecology of blooms. Here we describe the genetic analysis of an extensive bloom of the toxic dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense that occurred in the Gulf of Maine in 2005. This bloom was n...

  20. Progressive eutrophication behind the world-largest super floating macroalgal blooms in the Yellow Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Q.; Gao, M; Gao, X; Tosi, L.; Schmitt, F G; Zhang, Y.; Shi, P.; Wei, J.; Luo, Y.

    2014-01-01

    World-largest super floating macroalgal blooms of Ulva prolifera have lasted 7 years by now in every summer in the Yellow Sea, the outer part of a semi-enclosed coastal sea. Evaluation of the inter-annual variability in the trophic status is one of fundamental tasks for prediction and management of the blooms. We show the new findings of a progressive eutrophication in the large Yellow Sea basin behind the super floating macroalgal blooms. The inter-annual...