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Sample records for algae bacteremia mimicking

  1. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    of infection. Both patients survived; however, one of them had extensive myonecrosis, while the other patient had an uncomplicated course. The strains were initially believed to be Shewanella putrefaciens on the basis of key characteristics and results of the API 20NE identification system (bioMerieux, Marcy l......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source...

  2. Treatment Failure Due to Emergence of Resistance to Carbapenem during Therapy for Shewanella algae Bacteremia

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Dong-Min; Kang, Cheol-In; Lee, Chang Seop; Kim, Hong-Bin; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Nam Joong; Oh, Myoung-don; Choe, Kang-Won

    2006-01-01

    We describe a case of bacteremia due to imipenem-susceptible Shewanella algae. Despite treatment with imipenem, the patient developed a spinal epidural abscess, from which imipenem-resistant S. algae was isolated. The development of resistance should be monitored when S. algae infection is treated with imipenem, even though the strain is initially susceptible to imipenem.

  3. Algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raven, John A.; Giordano, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 13 (2014), s. 590-595 ISSN 0960-9822 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : algae * life cycle * evolution Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 9.571, year: 2014

  4. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J S; Jensen, T G; Kolmos, H J

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a hospital-based cohort study among adult patients with first-time Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia (SPB) from 2000 through 2008. Patients were identified in a population-based bacteremia database and followed up for mortality through the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS...

  5. Decreasing incidence rates of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Pedersen, C; Jensen, T G

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Numerous studies have shown that the incidence rate of bacteremia has been increasing over time. However, few studies have distinguished between community-acquired, healthcare-associated and nosocomial bacteremia. METHODS: We conducted a population-based study among adults with first......-time bacteremia in Funen County, Denmark, during 2000-2008 (N = 7786). We reported mean and annual incidence rates (per 100,000 person-years), overall and by place of acquisition. Trends were estimated using a Poisson regression model. RESULTS: The overall incidence rate was 215.7, including 99.0 for community......-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. During 2000-2008, the overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% from 254.1 to 198.8 (3.3% annually, p incidence rate of community-acquired bacteremia decreased by 25.6% from 119.0 to 93.8 (3.7% annually, p

  6. Beta-hemolytic Streptococcal Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2002-01-01

    Bacteremia with beta-hemolytic Streptococci groups A, B, C and G has a mortality rate of approximately 20%. In this study we analyzed the association of various patient risk factors with mortality. Records from 241 patients with beta-hemolytic streptococcal bacteremia were reviewed with particular...... attention to which predisposing factors were predictors of death. A logistic regression model found age, burns, immunosuppressive treatment and iatrogenic procedures prior to the infection to be significant predictors of death, with odds ratios of 1.7 (per decade), 19.7, 3.6 and 6.8, respectively...

  7. The Study of Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushforth, Samuel R.

    1977-01-01

    Included in this introduction to the study of algae are drawings of commonly encountered freshwater algae, a summary of the importance of algae, descriptions of the seven major groups of algae, and techniques for collection and study of algae. (CS)

  8. Soil algae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Timothy Ademakinwa

    Also, the importance of algae in soil formation and soil fertility improvement cannot be over ... The presence of nitrogen fixing microalgae (Nostoc azollae) in the top soil of both vegetable ..... dung, fish food and dirty water from fish ponds on.

  9. Bacteremia and candidemia in hematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, D; Skinhøj, P; Bangsborg, Jette Marie

    1988-01-01

    171 episodes of bacteremia and candidemia in 142 patients were recorded during the period 1981-1985 in patients with hematological malignancies. Overall mortality, within 1 week of onset of bacteremia, was 20%. Increased mortality was found in patients with poor disease-prognosis (39%), with gran...

  10. [Current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Roman; Marešová, Veronika; Brož, Zdeněk

    2010-10-01

    to estimate tje current clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia in a group of Czech hospitals. this retrospective analysis comprised 8 444 anaerobic blood cultures in patients admitted to four Czech hospitals between 2004 and 2007. in 16 patients, blood cultures yielded significant anaerobic bacteria. Thus, anaerobic bacteremia accounted for less than 2 % of clinically significant bacteremia. Four patients (18 %) died but none of the deaths could be clearly attributable to anaerobic bacteria in the bloodstream. The most common comorbidities predisposing to anaerobic bacteremia and the most frequent sources of infection were similar to those reported by other authors. The majority of anaerobic bacteremia cases were due to gram-negative bacteria, followed by Clostridium perfringens and, surprisingly, Eubacterium spp. (particularly Eubacterium lentum). anaerobic bacteremia remains rare. The comparison of our data with those by other authors suggests that (despite the reported high mortality) the actual clinical significance of anaerobic bacteremia is rather controversial and that the anaerobic bacteremia might not correspond to more serious pathogenic role of the anaerobic bacteria as the source of infection.

  11. Algae Resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-06-01

    Algae are highly efficient at producing biomass, and they can be found all over the planet. Many use sunlight and nutrients to create biomass, which contain key components—including lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates— that can be converted and upgraded to a variety of biofuels and products. A functional algal biofuels production system requires resources such as suitable land and climate, sustainable management of water resources, a supplemental carbon dioxide (CO2) supply, and other nutrients (e.g., nitrogen and phosphorus). Algae can be an attractive feedstock for many locations in the United States because their diversity allows for highpotential biomass yields in a variety of climates and environments. Depending on the strain, algae can grow by using fresh, saline, or brackish water from surface water sources, groundwater, or seawater. Additionally, they can grow in water from second-use sources such as treated industrial wastewater; municipal, agricultural, or aquaculture wastewater; or produced water generated from oil and gas drilling operations.

  12. Vibrio parahemolyticus bacteremia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, T C; Chiang, P C; Wu, T L; Leu, H S

    1999-09-01

    Vibrio parahemolyticus (V. parahemolyticus) is a halophilic gram-negative bacillus that lives in the ocean. It is the leading cause of infectious diarrhea in Taiwan and sometimes produces soft tissue infections, but it is rarely a cause of bacteremia. There have been only 11 cases reported in the literature. Most of the cases involved a history of ingestion of seafood or exposure to seawater. In addition, those patients were all immunosuppressed, especially with leukemia and cirrhosis. We report a 60-year-old male patient with chronic hepatitis C and adrenal insufficiency. He developed V. parahemolyticus bacteremia following ingestion of seafood one week prior to admission. His condition was complicated with neck and right lower leg soft tissue infection, as well as multiple organ failure. The patient survived after intravenous ceftazidime, oral doxycycline, and surgical debridement. To our knowledge, this is the 12th reported cases on Medline, and the second bacteremic case in Taiwan. After reviewing the literature, we suggest that all patients with immunosuppressed conditions or adrenal insufficiency should eat foods that are well cooked and avoid raw seafood. Moreover, when patients who are at risk to develop fever, diarrhea, and soft tissue infection after ingestion of seafood, V. parahemolyticus infection should be suspected. All culture specimens should be inoculated on Vibrios selective media.

  13. Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of ...

  14. [Anaerobiospirillum thomasii bacteremia with fatal outcome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streitenberger, Edgardo R; Chavez, Claudio M; Rizzo, Mabel S; Suarez, Ariel I

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobiospirillum thomasii has been reported as a causative agent of diarrhea in humans; however no bacteremia associated with this pathogen has been described so far. We present here the first case of fatal A. thomasii bacteremia in an alcoholic patient. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Current management of occult bacteremia in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mekitarian Filho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To summarize the main clinical entities associated with fever without source (FWS in infants, as well as the clinical management of children with occult bacteremia, emphasizing laboratory tests and empirical antibiotics. Sources: A non-systematic review was conducted in the following databases – PubMed, EMBASE, and SciELO, between 2006 and 2015. Summary of the findings: The prevalence of occult bacteremia has been decreasing dramatically in the past few years, due to conjugated vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis. Additionally, fewer requests for complete blood count and blood cultures have been made for children older than 3 months presenting with FWS. Urinary tract infection is the most prevalent bacterial infection in children with FWS. Some known algorithms, such as Boston and Rochester, can guide the initial risk stratification for occult bacteremia in febrile infants younger than 3 months. Conclusions: There is no single algorithm to estimate the risk of occult bacteremia in febrile infants, but pediatricians should strongly consider outpatient management in fully vaccinated infants older than 3 months with FWS and good general status. Updated data about the incidence of occult bacteremia in this environment after conjugated vaccination are needed. Resumo: Objetivos: Listar as principais entidades clínicas associadas a quadros de febre sem sinais localizatórios (FSSL em lactentes, bem como o manejo dos casos de bacteremia oculta com ênfase na avaliação laboratorial e na antibioticoterapia empírica. Fonte dos dados: Foi realizada revisão não sistemática da literatura nas bases de dados PubMed, EMBASE e Scielo no período de 2006 a 2015. Síntese dos dados: A ocorrência de bacteremia oculta vem diminuindo sensivelmente em lactentes com FSSL, principalmente devido à introdução da vacinação conjugada contra Streptococcus pneumoniae e Neisseria meningitidis nos últimos anos

  16. Bacteremia with the bovis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marmolin, Ea S; Hartmeyer, Gitte N; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    DNA sequencing of the intergenic spacer (ITS) region was used to identify 53 blood culture isolates that had previously been designated to the bovis group streptococci and clinical data was collected retrospectively from patients' records using a standardized protocol. ITS sequencing identified 19....... pasteurianus (58.7%) bacteremia calls for intensive investigation for underlying disease focusing on the pancreas and the hepatobiliary system....

  17. Pyelonephritis and Bacteremia from Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin M. DuPrey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacilli are normal colonizers of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina. Infection is rare, but has been reported in individuals with predisposing conditions. Here we describe the case of a woman with pyelonephritis and bacteremia in which Lactobacillus delbrueckii was determined to be the causative agent.

  18. Pyelonephritis and Bacteremia from Lactobacillus delbrueckii

    OpenAIRE

    DuPrey, Kevin M.; McCrea, Leon; Rabinowitch, Bonnie L.; Azad, Kamran N.

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacilli are normal colonizers of the oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract, and vagina. Infection is rare, but has been reported in individuals with predisposing conditions. Here we describe the case of a woman with pyelonephritis and bacteremia in which Lactobacillus delbrueckii was determined to be the causative agent.

  19. Magnetic separation of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Pulak; Twary, Scott N.

    2016-04-26

    Described herein are methods and systems for harvesting, collecting, separating and/or dewatering algae using iron based salts combined with a magnetic field gradient to separate algae from an aqueous solution.

  20. Blue-Green Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that taking a specific blue-green algae product (Super Blue-Green Algae, Cell Tech, Klamath Falls, OR) ... system. Premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Depression. Digestion. Heart disease. Memory. Wound healing. Other conditions. More evidence is needed ...

  1. Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukrety, Shweta; Parekh, Jai; Townley, Theresa

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 61-year-old Caucasian gentleman who presented with a one-day history of fever, chills, and altered mental status. His symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to cellulitis. Blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida , a rare pathogen to cause bacteremia. Our patient was treated with ciprofloxacin for two weeks and made a complete and uneventful recovery. Our patient's uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease put him at a higher risk for developing serious P. multocida infection. The patient's dog licking the wounds on his legs was considered as the possible source of infection. As P. multicoda bacteremia is rare, but severe with a high mortality rate, it is imperative to have a high index of suspicion for this infection especially in the vulnerable immunocompromised population.

  2. Pasteurella multocida Bacteremia in an Immunocompromised Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Kukrety

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 61-year-old Caucasian gentleman who presented with a one-day history of fever, chills, and altered mental status. His symptoms were initially thought to be secondary to cellulitis. Blood cultures grew Pasteurella multocida, a rare pathogen to cause bacteremia. Our patient was treated with ciprofloxacin for two weeks and made a complete and uneventful recovery. Our patient’s uncontrolled diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease put him at a higher risk for developing serious P. multocida infection. The patient’s dog licking the wounds on his legs was considered as the possible source of infection. As P. multicoda bacteremia is rare, but severe with a high mortality rate, it is imperative to have a high index of suspicion for this infection especially in the vulnerable immunocompromised population.

  3. Bacteremia following dental implant surgery: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölükbaşı, Nilüfer; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the incidence of bacteremia, bacteriology and antibiotic susceptibility against to causative bacteria associated with dental implant installation. 30 generally healthy patients were enrolled in this study. Blood samples were collected at baseline and at 30 minutes after dental implant installation and 24 hours after dental implant surgery. Blood samples were cultured in a BACTEC system. The isolated bacteria were identified using conventional methods. Antimicrobial sensitivity tests were performed by disc diffusion. No bacteria were isolated at the baseline and 24 hours after surgery, whereas the prevalence of bacteremia at 30 minutes after dental implant installation was 23%. The isolated bacteria species were Staphylococcus epidermidis, Eubacterium spp., Corynebacterium spp. and Streptococcus viridans. The Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was isolated in three patients, was found to be resistant to penicillin which is first choice of many clinicians. Our findings suggest that installation of dental implants can produce bacteremia. Within the limitations of this study, it can be speculated that the resistance of antibiotics may compromise the routine prophylaxis against infective endocarditis. Therefore use of blood cultures and antibiograms may be suggested in risky patients. The outcome of the present study should be verified using a larger patient group with varying conditions.

  4. Bacteremia caused by Achromobacter species in an immunocompromised host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kish, M A; Buggy, B P; Forbes, B A

    1984-01-01

    A case of bacteremia caused by Achromobacter species in an immunocompromised patient is described. The patient responded to antibiotic therapy. Detailed antibiotic susceptibility data are presented. PMID:6332118

  5. Risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Yeang, Ming S; Leo, Yee-Sin; Lye, David C

    2017-06-01

    Bacteremia in dengue may occur with common exposure to pathogens in association with severe organ impairment or severe dengue, which may result in death. Cohort studies identifying risk factors for concurrent bacteremia among patients with dengue are rare. We conducted a retrospective case-control study of adult patients with dengue who were admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases at Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore from 2004 to 2008. For each case of dengue with concurrent bacteremia (within the first 72 hours of admission), we selected four controls without bacteremia, who were matched on year of infection and dengue confirmation method. Conditional logistic regression was performed to identify risk factors for concurrent bacteremia. Among 9,553 patients with dengue, 29 (0.3%) had bacteremia. Eighteen of these patients (62.1%) had concurrent bacteremia. The predominant bacteria were Staphylococcus aureus, one of which was a methicillin-resistant strain. Dengue shock syndrome occurred more frequently and hospital stay was longer among cases than among controls. Three cases did not survive, whereas none of the controls died. In multivariate analysis, being critically ill at hospital presentation was independently associated with 15 times the likelihood of a patient with dengue having concurrent bacteremia. Concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue is uncommon but presents atypically and results in more deaths and longer hospital stay. Given the associated mortality, collection of blood cultures and empiric antibiotic therapy may be considered in patients who are critically ill. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. E. coli bacteremia in comparison to K. pneumoniae bacteremia: influence of pathogen species and ESBL production on 7-day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Leistner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, we demonstrated prolonged length of hospital stay in cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-positive K. pneumoniae bacteremia compared to bacteremia cases due to E. coli (ESBL-positive and –negative and ESBL-negative K. pneumoniae. The overall mortality was significantly higher in bacteremia cases resulting from ESBL-positive pathogens but also in K. pneumoniae cases disregarding ESBL-production. In order to examine whether pathogen species rather than multidrug resistance might affect mortality risk, we reanalyzed our dataset that includes 1.851 cases of bacteremia.

  7. Mimicking Seawater For Culturing Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rygaard, Anita Mac; Sonnenschein, Eva; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum as solidif......Only about 1% of marine bacteria have been brought into culture using traditional techniques. The purpose of this study was to investigate if mimicking the natural bacterial environment can increase culturability.We used marine substrates containing defined algal polymers or gellan gum...... as solidifying agents, and enumerated bacteria from seawater and algal exudates. We tested if culturability could be influenced by addition of quorum sensing signals (AHLs). All plates were incubated at 15°C. Bacterial counts (CFU/g) from algal exudates from brown algae were highest on media containing algal...... polymers. In general, bacteria isolated from algal exudates preferred more rich media than bacteria isolated from seawater. Overall, culturability ranged from 0.01 to 0.8% as compared to total cell count. Substitution of agar with gellan gum increased the culturability of seawater bacteria approximately...

  8. Solobacterium moorei bacteremia: identification, antimicrobial susceptibility, and clinical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Micha Pedersen, Rune; Holt, Hanne Marie; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    We present five cases of Solobacterium moorei bacteremia. The isolates were identified with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and were susceptible to common antibiotics used for anaerobic infections. Bacteremia with S. moorei seems to be associated with debilitating conditions, but the prognosis of the in...

  9. The incidence and prognosis of patients with bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg

    2015-01-01

    registries and we conducted 3 studies on adult bacteremia patients with the aims: to investigate the occurrence of and trends in first-time bacteremia and distribution of microorganisms in the general population; overall and by place of acquisition (study I), to investigate the overall and daily incidences...... for an overall incidence rate of 215.7 per 100,000 person years including 99.0 for community-acquired, 50.0 for healthcare-associated and 66.7 for nosocomial bacteremia. The overall incidence rate decreased by 23.3% (95% CI, 17.8%-28.4%) from year 2000 to 2008 (3.3% per year, prates...... of community-acquired bacteremia (3.7% per year, p rate of healthcare-associated bacteremia remained more or less stable throughout the study period (p=0.17). The crude incidence rates decreased for Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus...

  10. Bacteremia associated with toothbrushing and dental extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockhart, Peter B; Brennan, Michael T; Sasser, Howell C; Fox, Philip C; Paster, Bruce J; Bahrani-Mougeot, Farah K

    2008-06-17

    Antibiotic prophylaxis recommendations for the prevention of infective endocarditis are based in part on studies of bacteremia from dental procedures, but toothbrushing may pose a greater threat. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence, duration, nature, and magnitude of endocarditis-related bacteremia from single-tooth extraction and toothbrushing and to determine the impact of amoxicillin prophylaxis on single-tooth extraction. In this double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 290 subjects were randomized to (1) toothbrushing, (2) single-tooth extraction with amoxicillin prophylaxis, or (3) single-tooth extraction with identical placebo. Blood was drawn for bacterial culturing and identification at 6 time points before, during, and after these interventions. The focus of our analysis was on bacterial species reported to cause infective endocarditis. We identified 98 bacterial species, 32 of which are reported to cause endocarditis. Cumulative incidence of endocarditis-related bacteria from all 6 blood draws was 23%, 33%, and 60% for the toothbrushing, extraction-amoxicillin, and extraction-placebo groups, respectively (Pextraction, given the greater frequency for oral hygiene, toothbrushing may be a greater threat for individuals at risk for infective endocarditis.

  11. Does this adult patient with suspected bacteremia require blood cultures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Bryan; Morris, Andrew M; Tomlinson, George; Detsky, Allan S

    2012-08-01

    Clinicians order blood cultures liberally among patients in whom bacteremia is suspected, though a small proportion of blood cultures yield true-positive results. Ordering blood cultures inappropriately may be both wasteful and harmful. To review the accuracy of easily obtained clinical and laboratory findings to inform the decision to obtain blood cultures in suspected bacteremia. A MEDLINE and EMBASE search (inception to April 2012) yielded 35 studies that met inclusion criteria for evaluating the accuracy of clinical variables for bacteremia in adult immunocompetent patients, representing 4566 bacteremia and 25,946 negative blood culture episodes. Data were extracted to determine the prevalence and likelihood ratios (LRs) of findings for bacteremia. The pretest probability of bacteremia varies depending on the clinical context, from low (eg, cellulitis: 2%) to high (eg, septic shock: 69%). Elevated temperatures alone do not accurately predict bacteremia (for ≥38°C [>100.3°F], LR, 1.9 [95% CI, 1.4-2.4]; for ≥38.5°C [>101.2°F], LR, 1.4 [95% CI, 1.1-2.0]), nor does isolated leukocytosis (LR, cultures should not be ordered for adult patients with isolated fever or leukocytosis without considering the pretest probability. SIRS and the decision rule may be helpful in identifying patients who do not need blood cultures. These conclusions do not apply to immunocompromised patients or when endocarditis is suspected.

  12. Algae Derived Biofuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahan, Kauser [Rowan Univ., Glassboro, NJ (United States)

    2015-03-31

    One of the most promising fuel alternatives is algae biodiesel. Algae reproduce quickly, produce oils more efficiently than crop plants, and require relatively few nutrients for growth. These nutrients can potentially be derived from inexpensive waste sources such as flue gas and wastewater, providing a mutual benefit of helping to mitigate carbon dioxide waste. Algae can also be grown on land unsuitable for agricultural purposes, eliminating competition with food sources. This project focused on cultivating select algae species under various environmental conditions to optimize oil yield. Membrane studies were also conducted to transfer carbon di-oxide more efficiently. An LCA study was also conducted to investigate the energy intensive steps in algae cultivation.

  13. Cellulitis and Bacteremia Caused by Bergeyella zoohelcum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ru Lin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Bergeyella zoohelcum is a rod-shaped, aerobic, Gram-negative, non-motile and non-saccharolytic bacterium. It is frequently isolated from the upper respiratory tract of dogs, cats and other mammals. Clinically, B. zoohelcum has been known to cause cellulitis, leg abscess, tenosynovitis, septicemia, pneumonia and meningitis, and is associated with animal bites. In addition, food-borne transmission was considered in a recent case report. We report a 73-year-old man with liver cirrhosis who had no history of dog bite but had dog exposure, who developed cellulitis of the left lower leg and B. zoohelcum was isolated from blood culture. This patient, without evidence of polymicrobial infection, was treated with cefazolin and gentamicin with a good outcome. B. zoohelcum is a zoonotic pathogen that may cause bacteremia in patients with underlying disease such as liver cirrhosis; it can be treated with a beta-lactam or quinolone.

  14. Raoultella Planticola Bacteremia Following Consumption of Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip W Lam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Raoultella planticola is a Gram-negative bacillus commonly found in water, soil and aquatic environments. There have only been 16 cases of R planticola infection documented in the literature to date. R planticola possesses the ability to convert histidine to histamine and can produce symptoms of scombroid poisoning when poorly prepared seafood is consumed in large amounts. The present report describes a case involving a 56-year-old woman who presented with R planticola bacteremia and symptoms consistent with cholangitis four days after consuming a seafood salad containing squid and octopus. She was successfully treated with intravenous ceftriaxone followed by oral ciprofloxacin. Recent chemotherapy, proton pump inhibitor use and altered biliary flow secondary to hepatic metastases may have been contributing factors to the pathogenesis of disease.

  15. Impact of bacteremia on the pathogenesis of experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Christian T; Holm, David; Liptrot, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bacteremia plays a major role in the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. This experimental study investigated how bacteremia influences the pathophysiologic profile of the brain. METHODS: Rats with Streptococcus pneumoniae meningitis were randomized to 1 of 3 groups of infected study...... rats: (1) rats with attenuated bacteremia resulting from intravenous injection of serotype-specific pneumococcal antibody, (2) rats with early-onset bacteremia resulting from concomitant intravenous infection, or (3) a meningitis control group. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, ventricle size......, brain water distribution, and brain pathologic findings were analyzed using magnetic resonance morphological and functional imaging. Laboratory data and clinical disease scores were obtained. RESULTS: Attenuation of the bacteremic component of pneumococcal meningitis improved clinical disease symptoms...

  16. Bacteremia causes hippocampal apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian Østergaard; Leib, S.L.; Rowland, Ian J

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Bacteremia and systemic complications both play important roles in brain pathophysiological alterations and the outcome of pneumococcal meningitis. Their individual contributions to the development of brain damage, however, still remain to be defined. METHODS: Using an adult...... rat pneumococcal meningitis model, the impact of bacteremia accompanying meningitis on the development of hippocampal injury was studied. The study comprised of the three groups: I. Meningitis (n=11), II. meningitis with attenuated bacteremia resulting from iv injection of serotype......-specific pneumococcal antibodies (n=14), and III. uninfected controls (n=6). RESULTS: Pneumococcal meningitis resulted in a significantly higher apoptosis score 0.22 (0.18-0.35) compared to uninfected controls (0.02 (0.00-0.02), Mann Whitney test, P=0.0003). Also, meningitis with an attenuation of bacteremia...

  17. OXA-48-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Causing Bacteremia, United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chulsoo Ahn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OXA-48-producing isolates were identified in approximately 4% and less than 1% of ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing bacteremia at the largest tertiary hospital in Abu Dhabi.

  18. Group B Streptococcal Colonization and Bacteremia in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arda Lembet

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We evaluated the effect of maternal administration of ampicillin/sulbactam on colonization and bacteremia in newborn rabbits after intracervical inoculation of mothers with group B streptococci (GBS.

  19. Francisella novicida bacteremia after a near-drowning accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, Meghan; Doppalapudi, Avanthi; Respicio-Kingry, Laurel B; Myers, Debra; Husband, Brigitte; Pollard, Kerry; Mead, Paul; Petersen, Jeannine M; Whitener, Cynthia J

    2012-08-01

    We describe a rare case of Francisella novicida bacteremia following a near-drowning event in seawater. We highlight the challenges associated with laboratory identification of F. novicida and differences in the epidemiology of F. novicida and Francisella tularensis infections.

  20. Risk factors for mortality in patients with Serratia marcescens bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Bean; Jeon, Yong Duk; Kim, Jung Ho; Kim, Jae Kyoung; Ann, Hea Won; Choi, Heun; Kim, Min Hyung; Song, Je Eun; Ahn, Jin Young; Jeong, Su Jin; Ku, Nam Su; Han, Sang Hoon; Choi, Jun Yong; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2015-03-01

    Over the last 30 years, Serratia marcescens (S. marcescens) has emerged as an important pathogen, and a common cause of nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors associated with mortality in patients with S. marcescens bacteremia. We performed a retrospective cohort study of 98 patients who had one or more blood cultures positive for S. marcescens between January 2006 and December 2012 in a tertiary care hospital in Seoul, South Korea. Multiple risk factors were compared with association with 28-day all-cause mortality. The 28-day mortality was 22.4% (22/98 episodes). In a univariate analysis, the onset of bacteremia during the intensive care unit stay (p=0.020), serum albumin level (p=0.011), serum C-reactive protein level (p=0.041), presence of indwelling urinary catheter (p=0.023), and Sequential Oran Failure Assessment (SOFA) score at the onset of bacteremia (pmarcescens bacteremia.

  1. Pulmonary infiltrates during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjeldsøe-Nielsen, Hans; Gjeraa, Kirsten; Berthelsen, Birgitte G

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark.......The primary aim of this study was to describe the frequency of pulmonary infiltrates on chest X-ray (CXR) during community acquired Gram-negative bacteremia at a single centre in Denmark....

  2. Bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes after a cat bite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ida Ringsborg; Justesen, Ulrik Stenz

    2011-01-01

    Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite.......Animal bite wounds are often infected with bacteria from the animal's oral flora. We report what we believe to be the first case of bacteremia with Bacteroides pyogenes resulting from an infected cat bite....

  3. Clinical Risk Factors for Infective Endocarditis in Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Vincent Bryan D; Chapagain, Bikash; Joshi, Astha; Brennessel, Debra J

    2017-02-01

    Crucial to the management of staphylococcal bacteremia is an accurate evaluation of associated endocarditis, which has both therapeutic and prognostic implications. Because the clinical presentation of endocarditis can be nonspecific, the judicious use of echocardiography is important in distinguishing patients at high risk of developing endocarditis. In the presence of high-risk clinical features, an early transesophageal echocardiogram is warranted without prior transthoracic echocardiography. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical risk factors for staphylococcal infective endocarditis that might warrant earlier transesophageal echocardiography and to describe the incidence of endocarditis in cases of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by means of chart review of 91 patients consecutively admitted to a community hospital from January 2009 through January 2013. Clinical risk factors of patients with staphylococcal bacteremia were compared with risk factors of patients who had definite diagnoses of infective endocarditis. There were 69 patients with bacteremia alone (76%) and 22 patients with endocarditis (24%), as verified by echocardiography. Univariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus ( P =0.024), the presence of an automatic implantable cardioverter-defibrillator/pacemaker ( P =0.006) or a prosthetic heart valve ( P =0.003), and recent hospitalization ( P =0.048) were significantly associated with developing infective endocarditis in patients with S. aureus bacteremia. The incidence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia was similar in the bacteremia and infective-endocarditis groups ( P =0.437). In conclusion, identified high-risk clinical factors in the presence of bacteremia can suggest infective endocarditis. Early evaluation with transesophageal echocardiography might well be warranted.

  4. Bacteremia and meningitis among infants with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachur, R; Caputo, G L

    1995-10-01

    A retrospective analysis of 354 patients urinary tract infections (UTIs) was performed to characterize patients with bacteremia or meningitis and to identify any objective predictors of these complications. Thirty-three patients with bacteremia were identified. Blood culture isolates included Escherichia coli (25), Staphylococcus aureus (4), enterococcus (1), group B Streptococcus (2), and Enterobacter (1). Besides one patient with group B Streptococcus bacteremia at 1.5 months of age, all bacteremias after one month of age were with E. coli. Bacteremia was limited to those < 6 months old and inversely related to age (R = 0.24, P = 0.0008). Grouped by age, the incidence of bacteremia was 21% for 0 < or = 1 month, 13% for 1.1-2.0 months, 4% for 2.1-3.0 months, and 8% for 3.1-6.0 months. Mean white blood cell count, initial temperature, initial serum bicarbonate, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were not statistically significant between bacteremic (B) and nonbacteremic (NB) patients. Statistically significant differences were noted for percentage of bands (6.2% [NB] vs. 12.3% [B] P < 0.001), total band count (1048 [NB] vs. 2252 [B] P < 0.001), and band-neutrophil ratio (0.16 [NB] vs. 0.36 [B] P = 0.01); however, no practical value for any of these measures would reliably discriminate between bacteremic and nonbacteremic patients. Four patients, all neonates, had meningitis; too few patients with meningitis were identified for analysis. In summary, bacteremia with UTIs was observed to be inversely related to age and limited to patients less than six months of age. No objective parameters were identified to distinguish patients with bacteremia at the time of presentation.

  5. Staphylococcus saprophyticus bacteremia after ESWL in an immunocompetent woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmans, M; Boel, A; Van Vaerenbergh, K; De Beenhouwer, H

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a well-known cause of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, especially in young and sexually active women. Presence in blood cultures is rare and often attributed to contamination. When bacteremia is significant, it occurs mostly in patients with hematologic malignancies and is predominantly catheter-related. However, we describe a case of significant bacteremia with S. saprophyticus associated with urinary tract infection after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy of an ureterolithiasis in an otherwise healthy patient.

  6. Occurrence of Shewanella algae in Danish coastal water and effects of water temperature and culture conditions on its survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Bundvad, Anemone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1999-01-01

    increased to 10(5) to 10(7) CFU/ml at room temperature. Most probable number analysis showed this result to be due to regrowth rather than resuscitation. It was hypothesized that S. algae would survive cold exposure better if in the biofilm state; however, culturable counts from S. algae biofilms decreased......The marine bacterium Shewanella algae, which was identified as the cause of human cases of bacteremia and ear infections in Denmark in the summers of 1994 and 1995, was detected in seawater only during the months (July, August, September, and October) when the water temperature was above 13 degrees...... C. The bacterium is a typical mesophilic organism, and model experiments were conducted to elucidate the fate of the organism under cold and nutrient-limited conditions. The culturable count of S. algae decreased rapidly from 10(7) CFU/ml to 10(1) CFU/ml in approximately 1 month when cells grown...

  7. Factors Associated with Non-typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia versus Typhoidal Salmonella Bacteremia in Patients Presenting for Care in an Urban Diarrheal Disease Hospital in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Shahunja

    Full Text Available Non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi bacteremia are the causes of significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a paucity of data regarding NTS bacteremia in South Asia, a region with a high incidence of typhoidal bacteremia. We sought to determine clinical predictors and outcomes associated with NTS bacteremia compared with typhoidal bacteremia.We performed a retrospective age-matched case-control study of patients admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, between February 2009 and March 2013. We compared demographic, clinical, microbiological, and outcome variables of NTS bacteremic patients with age-matched S. Typhi bacteremic patients, and a separate comparison of patients with NTS bacteremia and patients with NTS gastroenteritis.Of 20 patients with NTS bacteremia, 5 died (25% case fatality, compared to none of 60 age-matched cases of S. Typhi bacteremia. In univariate analysis, we found that compared with S. Typhi bacteremia, cases of NTS bacteremia had more severe acute malnutrition (SAM in children under five years of age, less often presented with a duration of fever ≥ 5 days, and were more likely to have co-morbidities on admission such as pneumonia and clinical signs of sepsis (p<0.05 in all cases. In multivariable logistic regression, SAM, clinical sepsis, and pneumonia were independent risk factors for NTS bacteremia compared with S. Typhi bacteremia (p<0.05 in all cases. Notably, we found marked differences in antibiotic susceptibilities, including NTS strains resistant to antibiotics commonly used for empiric therapy of patients suspected to have typhoid fever.Diarrheal patients with NTS bacteremia more often presented with co-morbidities and had a higher case fatality rate compared to those with typhoidal bacteremia. Clinicians in regions where both typhoid and NTS bacteremia are prevalent need to be vigilant about the

  8. Biofuels and algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    Bio-fuels based on micro-algae are promising, their licensing for being used in plane fuels in a mix containing 50% of fossil kerosene is expected in the coming months. In United-States research on bio-fuels has been made more important since 2006 when 2 policies were launched: 'Advanced energy initiative' and 'Twenty-in-ten', the latter aiming to develop alternative fuels. In Europe less investment has been made concerning micro-algae fuels but research programs were launched in Spain, United-Kingdom and France. In France 3 important projects were launched: SHAMASH (2006-2010) whose aim is to produce lipidic fuels from micro-algae, ALGOHUB (2008-2013) whose aim is to use micro-algae as a raw material for humane and animal food, medicine and cosmetics, SYMBIOSE (2009-2011) whose aim is the optimization of the production of methane through the anaerobic digestion of micro-algae, SALINALGUE (2010-2016) whose aim is to grow micro-algae for the production of bio-energies and bio-products. (A.C.)

  9. Multicenter Study of the Clinical Presentation of Staphylococcus lugdunensis Bacteremia in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainoda, Yusuke; Takeshita, Nozomi; Hase, Ryota; Mikawa, Takahiro; Hosokawa, Naoto; Kawamura, Ichiro; Kurai, Hanako; Abe, Masahiro; Kimura, Muneyoshi; Araoka, Hideki; Fujita, Takahiro; Totsuka, Kyoichi; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Sekiya, Noritaka; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-07-24

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis (SL) is a bacterium with a highly pathogenicity than most other coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. (CoNS). In Japan, data on this pathogen are sparse, and the current prevalence of SL bacteremia is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of SL in blood culture specimens in a prospective multicenter study across 5 facilities. A total of 3,284 patients had positive blood cultures, and 2,478 patients had bacteremia. Among the patients with bacteremia, 7 patients (0.28%) had SL bacteremia. A total of 281 patients had CoNS bacteremia, with SL accounting for 2.49% of these cases. Of the 7 patients with SL bacteremia, 1 patient (14.3%) had infective endocarditis, and 1 patient (14.3%) died within 30 days. In this study, SL resulted in the development of bacteremia in select patients. Clinicians in Japan should be aware of the prevalence of SL and the complications of SL bacteremia.

  10. Clinical characteristics associated with mortality of patients with anaerobic bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemura, Takumi; Hamada, Yukihiro; Yamagishi, Yuka; Suematsu, Hiroyuki; Mikamo, Hiroshige

    2016-06-01

    The presence of anaerobes in the blood stream is known to be associated with a higher rate of mortality. However, few prognostic risk factor analyses examining whether a patient's background characteristics are associated with the prognosis have been reported. We performed a retrospective case-controlled study to assess the prognostic factors associated with death from anaerobic bacteremia. Seventy-four patients with anaerobic bacteremia were treated between January 2005 and December 2014 at Aichi Medical University Hospital. The clinical information included drug susceptibility was used for analysis of prognostic factors for 30-day mortality. Multivariate logistic analyses revealed an association between the 30-day mortality rate and malignancy (OR: 3.64, 95% CI: 1.08-12.31) and clindamycin resistance (OR: 7.93, 95% CI: 2.33-27.94). The result of Kaplan-Meier analysis of mortality showed that the 30-day survival rate was 83% in clindamycin susceptible and 38.1% in clindamycin resistant anaerobes causing bacteremia. The result of log-rank test also showed that susceptibility to clindamycin affected mortality (P anaerobic bacteremia with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. The results of this study are important for the early and appropriate management of patients with anaerobic bacteremia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Bacteremia during adenoidectomy: a comparison of suction diathermy adenoid ablation and adenoid curettage.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casserly, Paula

    2010-08-01

    Transient bacteremia is induced by adenoidectomy when the integrity of the nasopharyngeal membrane is broken. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of bacteremia in patients undergoing adenoidectomy, to identify the causative organisms, and to compare the incidences of bacteremia between the two techniques suction diathermy and curettage.

  12. Dysgonic fermenter 3 bacteremia in a neutropenic patient with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Aronson, N E; Zbick, C J

    1988-01-01

    Persistent dysgonic fermenter 3 bacteremia occurred in a granulocytopenic leukemic patient on broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. This is the first reported case of bacteremia with this fastidious gram-negative rod. Characteristic microbiology and antibiotic susceptibility testing are reviewed. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole therapy eliminated the bacteremia.

  13. Incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing upper endoscopic ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Esparrach, Gloria; Sendino, Oriol; Araujo, Isis; Pellisé, Maria; Almela, Manel; González-Suárez, Begoña; López-Cerón, María; Córdova, Henry; Sanabria, Erwin; Uchima, Hugo; Llach, Josep; Ginès, Àngels

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bacteremia after endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) or EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is between 0% and 4%, but there are no data on this topic in cirrhotic patients. To prospectively assess the incidence of bacteremia in cirrhotic patients undergoing EUS and EUS-FNA. We enrolled 41 cirrhotic patients. Of these, 16 (39%) also underwent EUS-FNA. Blood cultures were obtained before and at 5 and 30 min after the procedure. When EUS-FNA was used, an extra blood culture was obtained after the conclusion of radial EUS and before the introduction of the sectorial echoendoscope. All patients were clinically followed up for 7 days for signs of infection. Blood cultures were positive in 16 patients. In 10 patients, blood cultures grew coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, Corynebacterium species, Propionibacterium species or Acinetobacterium Lwoffii, which were considered contaminants (contamination rate 9.8%, 95% CI: 5.7-16%). The remaining 6 patients had true positive blood cultures and were considered to have had true bacteremia (15%, 95% CI: 4-26%). Blood cultures were positive after diagnostic EUS in five patients but were positive after EUS-FNA in only one patient. Thus, the frequency of bacteremia after EUS and EUS-FNA was 12% and 6%, respectively (95% CI: 2-22% and 0.2-30%, respectively). Only one of the patients who developed bacteremia after EUS had a self-limiting fever with no other signs of infection. Asymptomatic Gram-positive bacteremia developed in cirrhotic patients after EUS and EUS-FNA at a rate higher than in non-cirrhotic patients. However, this finding was not associated with any clinically significant infections. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  14. Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Devi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi , previously known as Corynebacterium equi, is one of the most important causes of zoonotic infection in grazing animals. Increased cases of human infection with R. equi have been reported especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report a case of R. equi bacteremia in a 26-day-old immunocompetent infant with recurrent swellings on different parts of the body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever report of R. equi bacteremia from an immunocompetent patient from Northern India.

  15. Comparative Study of Plasma Endotoxin with Procalcitonin Levels in Diagnosis of Bacteremia in Intensive Care Unit Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Plasma endotoxin was more related to GN than to Gram-positive bacteremia, and that endotoxin level was species dependent, but PCT level remained relatively more stable within the GN bacteria caused bacteremia. Both GN and positive bacteria caused bacteremia in the ICU patients in different regions of China. And PCT is a more valuable biomarker than endotoxin in the diagnosis of bacteremia.

  16. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forner, Lone; Larsen, Tove; Kilian, Mogens

    2006-01-01

    SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR STUDY: Bacteremia occurs with various frequency after oral procedures. Periodontal disease may affect the incidence, magnitude, duration and bacterial spectrum of bacteremia. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The incidence and magnitude of bacteremia after scaling was significantly......: The prevention and treatment of periodontal diseases appear to be crucial for the prevention of bacteremia associated with oral procedures....... higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS...

  17. The daily risk of bacteremia during hospitalization and associated 30-day mortality evaluated in relation to the traditional classification of bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stig Lønberg; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality. METHODS:...... of bacteremia during the first 2 days followed by lower incidences that were constant beyond day 12. Thirty-day mortality was 18%-21% for patients with bacteremia on the first 2 days and 25%-35% thereafter. Our findings support the traditional classification of bacteremia.......BACKGROUND: We investigated the overall and daily incidence of bacteremia among hospitalized patients and evaluated the traditional classification of bacteremia (community-onset vs nosocomial based on a 48-hour time window) by means of the daily incidence and associated 30-day mortality. METHODS...... as the daily incidence of bacteremia per 10,000 bed-days and associated 30-day mortality. RESULTS: We included 724,339 admissions and 10,281 bacteremias for an overall incidence of 14.2 per 1,000 admissions and 23.6 per 10,000 bed-days. The daily incidence was highest on the first 2 days of admission followed...

  18. A rabbit model of non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Aruna; Tatarov, Ivan; Masek, Billie Jo; Hardick, Justin; Crusan, Annabelle; Wakefield, Teresa; Carroll, Karen; Yang, Samuel; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Lipsky, Michael M; McLeod, Charles G; Levine, Myron M; Rothman, Richard E; Gaydos, Charlotte A; DeTolla, Louis J

    2014-09-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. In this study, we focused on the development of an animal model of bacteremia induced by non-typhoidal Salmonella. New Zealand White rabbits were inoculated with a human isolate of non-typhoidal Salmonella strain CVD J73 via the intra-peritoneal route. Blood samples were collected at specific time points and at euthanasia from infected rabbits. Additionally, tissue samples from the heart, lungs, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, liver and kidneys were obtained at euthanasia. All experimentally infected rabbits displayed clinical signs of disease (fever, dehydration, weight loss and lethargy). Tissues collected at necropsy from the animals exhibited histopathological changes indicative of bacteremia. Non-typhoidal Salmonella bacteria were detected in the blood and tissue samples of infected rabbits by microbiological culture and real-time PCR assays. The development of this animal model of bacteremia could prove to be a useful tool for studying how non-typhoidal Salmonella infections disseminate and spread in humans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mejer, N; Gotland, N; Uhre, M L

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: An association between infection and arterial thromboembolic events (ATE) has been suggested. Here we examined the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and other ATE after Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). METHODS: Danish register-based nation-wide observational cohort study...

  20. Helicobacter canis bacteremia in a renal transplant patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vusse, M. L.; van Son, W. J.; Ott, A.; Manson, W.

    Here we present a case report of a 41-year-old woman suffering from high fever and bacteremia due to Helicobacter canis, 11months after kidney transplantation. Identification of H.canis was achieved by 16s rDNA sequence analysis of a positive blood culture. The patient was restored fully to health

  1. Shigella sonnei bacteremia in an elderly diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dronda, F; Parras, F; Martínez, J L; Baquero, F

    1988-06-01

    A case of Shigella sonnei bacteremia in a 65-year-old patient suffering from diabetes mellitus is discussed. The isolated strain had plasmid-mediated serum resistance and excreted aerobactin. The presence of diabetes mellitus as an underlying disease and the production by the Shigella sonnei isolate of factors related to bacterial invasion may have contributed to the bacteremic episode.

  2. Risk Factors of Endocarditis in Patients with Enterococcus faecalis Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Anders; Lauridsen, Trine K; Arpi, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  The NOVA score is a recently developed diagnostic tool to identify patients with increased risk of infective endocarditis (IE) among patients with Enterococcus faecalis (EF) bacteremia. We aim to validate an adapted version of the NOVA score and to identify risk factors for IE...

  3. Risk factors for concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Linn Thein

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Concurrent bacteremia in adult patients with dengue is uncommon but presents atypically and results in more deaths and longer hospital stay. Given the associated mortality, collection of blood cultures and empiric antibiotic therapy may be considered in patients who are critically ill.

  4. Experimental gingivitis, bacteremia and systemic biomarkers: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinane, D F; Zhang, P; Benakanakere, M; Singleton, J; Biesbrock, A; Nonnenmacher, C; He, T

    2015-12-01

    Bacteremia and systemic inflammatory markers are associated with periodontal and systemic diseases and may be linking mechanisms between these conditions. We hypothesized that in the development of gingival inflammation, systemic markers of inflammation and bacteremia would increase. To study the effect of bacteremia on systemic inflammatory markers, we recruited 80 subjects to participate in an experimental gingivitis study. Subjects were stratified based on gender, smoking and the number of bleeding sites and then randomized to one of two groups: control group (n = 40) or experimental gingivitis group (n = 40). Subjects in the control group conducted an oral hygiene regimen: brushing twice daily with a regular sodium fluoride cavity protection dentifrice and a standard manual toothbrush, flossing twice daily, and mouth rinsing with an anti-cavity fluoride rinse once daily. The experimental group stopped brushing and flossing, and used only the fluoride anti-cavity mouth rinse for 21 d. Seventy-nine of 80 subjects were evaluable. One subject in the control group was excluded from the results due to antibiotic use during the study. Our data showed the experimental gingivitis group exhibited a significant (p gingival inflammatory indices relative to baseline and the control group but a decrease in bacteremia and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels vs. baseline. Bacteremia was negatively correlated with gingival inflammatory indices and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 levels in the experimental gingivitis group, thus negating our hypothesis. We conclude that there are marked differences in systemic cytokine levels over the course of short-term experimentally induced gingivitis and further conclude that a long-term periodontitis study must be considered to address mechanisms whereby oral diseases may affect systemic diseases. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Survey of Enteric Pathogens Causing Bacteremia in Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enayatollah Kalantar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic bacteraemia, is a frequent condition among cancer patients with a significant morbidity and mortality all over the world. Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the burden of enteric pathogens causing bacteremia among cancer patients. Patients and Methods: Ten ml blood samples were withdrawn from the cancer patients under aseptic conditions. The blood specimens were added to the blood culture bottles and incubated at 37°C. The bacterial isolates from these samples were identified by routine biochemical reactions. Results: During the study period, 68 blood samples from cancer patients were analyzed for bacteremia. Of these patients, six were female (08/82% and 62 were male (91.18%; with age ranging from under 40 years to 85 years old (mean, 63 years. Gastro-intestinal cancer and cancers of head and neck were the most frequent cancer types in the studied group, accounting for 51 (75% and 15 (22.1% cases, respectively. The mean weight of patients was 69.18 Kg (range: 49-100 Kg. Similarly, the mean length of hospital stay was 8 days (range: 4-12 days. Positive blood cultures were detected in only 12 (17.65% and 11 (91.7% blood specimens from the Cancer Institute, Tehran, compared with one (08.33% from Shahid Kamali hospital, Karaj. From these patients, 15 bacteria were isolated; E. coli alone outnumbered other species and accounted for 33.33% of the episodes of bacteremia. Conclusions: In conclusion, our investigation revealed that cancers of GI tract are the most common cancer types causing bacteremia and also we identified that most common bacteria causing bacteremia in Cancer Institute, Tehran and Shahid Kamali Hospital, Karaj, are E. coli and S. aureus

  6. Genomics of Volvocine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umen, James G.; Olson, Bradley J.S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Volvocine algae are a group of chlorophytes that together comprise a unique model for evolutionary and developmental biology. The species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri represent extremes in morphological diversity within the Volvocine clade. Chlamydomonas is unicellular and reflects the ancestral state of the group, while Volvox is multicellular and has evolved numerous innovations including germ-soma differentiation, sexual dimorphism, and complex morphogenetic patterning. The Chlamydomonas genome sequence has shed light on several areas of eukaryotic cell biology, metabolism and evolution, while the Volvox genome sequence has enabled a comparison with Chlamydomonas that reveals some of the underlying changes that enabled its transition to multicellularity, but also underscores the subtlety of this transition. Many of the tools and resources are in place to further develop Volvocine algae as a model for evolutionary genomics. PMID:25883411

  7. Gastric Adenomyoma: The Unexpected Mimicker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Adriana Duran Álvarez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric adenomyoma is a rare benign tumor composed of epithelial structures and smooth muscle stroma. Here, we report an unusual case of gastric adenomyoma mostly composed of smooth muscle that was incidentally found during a laparoscopic intervention. On radiology, it mimicked an acquired hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in an adult patient, and pathologically it resembled a pure smooth muscle hamartoma. Complete submission of the lesion for histology was necessary to find the epithelial component and make the right diagnosis. As a mimicker of benign and malignant entities, gastric adenomyoma is usually an unexpected finding after surgery. The aim of this report is to analyze this adenomyoma variant in the setting of an unexplained thickening of the gastric wall, with explanations concerning histogenesis and biological potential.

  8. Multicystic Hepatocarcinoma Mimicking Liver Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC became easier in relation to the improved radiological examinations; however, the neoplasm may occur under atypical presentations mimicking other benign or malignant processes. Multicystic HCC mimicking a liver abscess associated with septic-type fever and leukocytosis is rare, has a poor prognosis, and poses diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas. We present the case of an 80-year-old patient, who presented with fever, leukocytosis, and large cystic masses involving right and left lobes of the liver initially considered abscesses and finally diagnosed as HCC after open drainage and liver biopsy. Although the patient died on the tenth postoperative day due to pulmonary oedema, the authors emphasize the high index of suspicion needed in the diagnosis of this unusual presentation of HCC.

  9. Tongue metastasis mimicking an abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavili, Ertuğrul; Oztürk, Mustafa; Yücel, Tuba; Yüce, Imdat; Cağli, Sedat

    2010-03-01

    Primary tumors metastasizing to the oral cavity are extremely rare. Lung is one of the most common primary sources of metastases to the tongue. Although the incidence of lung cancer is increasing, tongue metastasis as the initial presentation of the tumor remains uncommon. Due to the rarity of tongue metastasis, little is known about its imaging findings. Herein we report the magnetic resonance imaging and clinical findings of a lingual metastasis, mimicking an abscess, from a primary lung cancer.

  10. Clozapine Intoxication Mimicking Acute Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D. Villarreal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug prescribed for treatment-resistant schizophrenia. The risk of adverse hematologic, cardiovascular, and neurologic effects has tempered its use, and reports of overdoses remain rare. We report a case of accidental acute clozapine intoxication in a clozapine-naïve patient, who presented with symptoms mimicking acute stroke and later developed status epilepticus. Clozapine intoxication is a rare presentation in the emergency department with potential for iatrogenic harm if not correctly identified.

  11. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  12. Fatal bacteremia due to Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens: first description in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Secchi

    Full Text Available Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens is an anaerobic, Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria, which is motile by means of bipolar tuffs of flagella. This organism appears to be a rare cause of bacteremia in humans, and it usually affects patients submitted to immunosuppressive therapy. Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens resembles Campylobacter spp. in Gram-stained preparations, however, it is considered resistant to most antimicrobial drugs that are used to treat Campylobacter infections. We observed Gram-negative, spiral shaped bacteria in Gram-stained preparations from blood culture flasks. Growth occurred only under anaerobic incubation, and identification to the species level was achieved by PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA gene, followed by direct sequencing and a GenBank homology search. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported Brazilian case of Anaerobiospirillum succiniciproducens bacteremia.

  13. Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in an immunocompetent infant

    OpenAIRE

    P Devi; S Malhotra; A Chadha

    2011-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi , previously known as Corynebacterium equi, is one of the most important causes of zoonotic infection in grazing animals. Increased cases of human infection with R. equi have been reported especially in immunocompromised patients. Infection in immunocompetent patients is extremely rare. We report a case of R. equi bacteremia in a 26-day-old immunocompetent infant with recurrent swellings on different parts of the body. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever repo...

  14. Cupriavidus pauculus bacteremia in a child on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzodi, Adaora S; Schears, Gregory J; Neal, James R; Henry, Nancy K

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of bacteremia secondary to Cupriavidus pauculus in a 15-month-old boy on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). The source of the organism was water in the thermoregulator reservoir. The child responded well to cefepime and ciprofloxacin, a delayed oxygenator change out and replacement of the thermoregulator reservoir with a unit that was cleaned and decontaminated with sodium hypochlorite. Isolation of Cupriavidus pauculus from a patient on ECMO support should raise suspicion of the reservoir as a source.

  15. [Limitation of therapeutic effort in patients with bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyas Miazza, Carla; Martínez-Álvarez, Rosa María; Díez-Manglano, Jesús; Ezpeleta Galindo, Ana Isabel; Laín Miranda, María Elena; Aspiroz Sancho, Carmen

    2018-03-28

    The limitation of therapeutic effort (LTE) depends on medical, ethical and individual factors. We describe the characteristics of patients with bacteremia in which it was decided to limit the therapeutic effort. Prospective study of bacteremia in a community hospital in 2011. We collected information regarding patient variable (age, sex, Barthel index, comorbidities, Charlson Index and exogenous factors) as well as regarding the infectious episode (etiology, focus, place of adquisition, clinical expressivity, LTE and hospital mortality). The group in which LTE was performed was compared to the one that was not. We collected 233 episodes of bacteremia in 227 patients. We performed LTE in 19 patients (8.2%). Patients with LTE were older (80.7 vs. 72.6 years, p=.014), had more comorbidity (Charlson index 4.6 vs. 2.1, p<.001 and most frequently were severe dependents (57.9% vs. 18.8%, p<.001). We found no association with sex, place of adquisition or clinical expressivity. The commonest clinical focus in patients with LTE was the urinary (42.1%) and there was a predominance of gram positive bacteria (63.2%). The empirical treatment was started early in 73.7% of cases. All patients except one died. LTE is considered in an important number of patients with bacteremia. They usually are older, with more comorbidity and functional dependence, bad functional basal status and important comorbidity. Knowing their differential characteristics allow us to understand this decision. Copyright © 2018 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Lactobacillus rhamnosus bacteremia in a kidney transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falci, D R; Rigatto, M H; Cantarelli, V V; Zavascki, A P

    2015-08-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a rare clinical pathogen. A case of bacteremia caused by L. rhamnosus in a kidney transplant recipient is described. Once considered only as a contaminant or a low-virulence organism, L. rhamnosus might be an opportunistic pathogen in immunocompromised patients. To our knowledge, this is the first report of primary bloodstream infection caused by L. rhamnosus in a kidney transplant recipient. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Bacteremia and bacterial translocation in the naturally occurring canine gastric dilatation-volvulus patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Kevin P; Greenfield, Cathy L; Schaeffer, David J

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study was performed to determine the prevalence of bacteremia in the naturally occurring gastric dilatation-volvulus (GDV) patient, the possible relationship between bacteremia and survival, and whether bacteremia was a result of translocation from the stomach. Blood cultures were collected from each patient. Bacterial cultures were collected from the liver, mesenteric lymph node, and stomach. Forty-three percent of the GDV cases and 40% of the controls developed positive blood cultures. Gram-negative rods were the most frequently isolated organisms. Evidence of bacterial translocation from the stomach could not be demonstrated in GDV patients, and survival was not affected by the presence of bacteremia.

  18. Clinical Risk Factors Associated With Peripartum Maternal Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easter, Sarah Rae; Molina, Rose L; Venkatesh, Kartik K; Kaimal, Anjali; Tuomala, Ruth; Riley, Laura E

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate risk factors associated with maternal bacteremia in febrile peripartum women. We performed a case-control study of women with fevers occurring between 7 days before and up to 42 days after delivery of viable neonates at two academic hospitals. Women with positive blood cultures were matched with the next two febrile women meeting inclusion criteria with negative blood cultures in the microbiology data without other matching parameters. We compared maternal and neonatal characteristics and outcomes between women in the case group and those in the control group with univariate analysis. We then used logistic regression to examine the association between clinical characteristics and maternal bacteremia. After excluding blood cultures positive only for contaminants, we compared 115 women in the case group with 285 in the control group. Bacteremic women were more likely to experience their initial fever during labor (40.9% compared with 22.8%, P<.01) and more likely to have fever at or above 102°F (62.6% compared with 31.6%, P<.01). These associations persisted in the adjusted analysis: multiparity (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.75, 95% CI 1.07-2.87), initial fever during labor (adjusted OR 2.82, 95% CI 1.70-4.70), and fever at or above 102°F (adjusted OR 3.83, 95% CI 2.37-6.19). In an analysis restricted to neonates whose mothers had initial fevers before or in the immediate 24 hours after delivery, neonates born to women in the case group had higher rates of bacteremia compared with those born to women in the control group (9.0% compared with 1.3%, P<.01). Eight of the nine bacteremic neonates born to bacteremic mothers (89%) grew the same organism as his or her mother in blood culture. Maternal bacteremia is associated with multiparity, initial fever during labor, and fever at or above 102°F; however, 37.5% of cases of bacteremia occurred in women with maximum fevers below this threshold. Obstetricians should maintain a heightened suspicion for an

  19. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Enrico Borgonovo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis.

  20. Gout: radiographic findings mimicking infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, I.; Raymond-Tremblay, D.; Cardinal, E.; Beauregard, C.G.; Braunstein, E.M.; Saint-Pierre, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To describe radiographic features of gout that may mimic infection. Design and patients: We report five patients with acute bacterial gout who presented with clinical as well as radiological findings mimicking acute bacterial septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Three patients had delay in the appropriate treatment with the final diagnosis being established after needle aspiration and identification of urate crystals under polarized light microscopy. Two patients underwent digit amputation for not responding to antibiotic treatment and had histological findings confirming the diagnosis of gout. Conclusion: It is important for the radiologist to be aware of the radiological manifestations of acute gout that can resemble infection in order to avoid inappropriate diagnosis and delay in adequate treatment. The definitive diagnosis should rely on needle aspiration and a specific search for urate crystals. (orig.)

  1. Shewanella algae in acute gastroenteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Dey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. Previously reported cases of S. algae have mainly been associated with direct contact with seawater. Here we report the isolation of S. algae as the sole etiological agent from a patient suffering from acute gastroenteritis with bloody diarrhoea. The bacterium was identified by automated identification system and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. Our report highlights the importance of looking for the relatively rare aetiological agents in clinical samples that does not yield common pathogens. It also underscores the usefulness of automated systems in identification of rare pathogens.

  2. Cefepime vs other antibacterial agents for the treatment of Enterobacter species bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siedner, Mark J; Galar, Alicia; Guzmán-Suarez, Belisa B; Kubiak, David W; Baghdady, Nour; Ferraro, Mary Jane; Hooper, David C; O'Brien, Thomas F; Marty, Francisco M

    2014-06-01

    Carbapenems are recommended for treatment of Enterobacter infections with AmpC phenotypes. Although isolates are typically susceptible to cefepime in vitro, there are few data supporting its clinical efficacy. We reviewed all cases of Enterobacter species bacteremia at 2 academic hospitals from 2005 to 2011. Outcomes of interest were (1) persistent bacteremia ≥1 calendar day and (2) in-hospital mortality. We fit logistic regression models, adjusting for clinical risk factors and Pitt bacteremia score and performed propensity score analyses to compare the efficacy of cefepime and carbapenems. Three hundred sixty-eight patients experienced Enterobacter species bacteremia and received at least 1 antimicrobial agent, of whom 52 (14%) died during hospitalization. Median age was 59 years; 19% were neutropenic, and 22% were in an intensive care unit on the day of bacteremia. Twenty-nine (11%) patients had persistent bacteremia for ≥1 day after antibacterial initiation. None of the 36 patients who received single-agent cefepime (0%) had persistent bacteremia, as opposed to 4 of 16 (25%) of those who received single-agent carbapenem (P Enterobacter species bacteremia. Its use should be further explored as a carbapenem-sparing agent in this clinical scenario.

  3. Epidemiology, Management, and Risk-Adjusted Mortality of ICU-Acquired Enterococcal Bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ong, David S Y; Bonten, Marc J M; Safdari, Khatera; Spitoni, Cristian; Frencken, Jos F; Witteveen, Esther; Horn, Janneke; Klein Klouwenberg, Peter M C; Cremer, Olaf L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:  Enterococcal bacteremia has been associated with high case fatality, but it remains unknown to what extent death is caused by these infections. We therefore quantified attributable mortality of intensive care unit (ICU)-acquired bacteremia caused by enterococci. METHODS:  From 2011 to

  4. Genomic evolution of Staphylococcus aureus isolates colonizing the nares and progressing to bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne B Benoit

    Full Text Available Nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a key risk factor for bacteremia. The objective of this study is to identify genomic modifications occurring in nasal carriage strains of S. aureus as they progress to bacteremia in a cohort of hospitalized patients.Eight patients with S. aureus bacteremia were identified. Genomic sequences of the bloodstream isolates were compared with 57 nasal isolates collected longitudinally prior to the occurrence of bacteremia, which covered a timespan of up to 326 days before bacteremia.Within each subject, nasal colonizing strains were closely related to bacteremia strains. Within a subject, the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs observed between time points was greater than within a single time point. Co-colonization and strain replacement were observed in one case. In all cases colonization progressed to bacteremia without addition of new virulence genes. In one case, a mutation in the accessory gene regulator gene caused abrogation of agr function.S. aureus evolves in the human nares at a variable rate. Progression of S. aureus nasal colonization to nosocomial infection is seldom associated with acquisition of new virulence determinants. Mutation in the agr gene with abrogation of function was associated with progression to bacteremia in one case.

  5. Transgenic algae engineered for higher performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkefer, Pat J; Anderson, Penelope S; Knight, Thomas J

    2014-10-21

    The present disclosure relates to transgenic algae having increased growth characteristics, and methods of increasing growth characteristics of algae. In particular, the disclosure relates to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and to transgenic algae comprising a glutamine phenylpyruvate transaminase transgene and a glutamine synthetase.

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Bacteremia among Immunocompetent and Immunocompromised Patients: Relation to Initial Antibiotic Therapy and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migiyama, Yohei; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Kaku, Norihito; Harada, Yosuke; Yamada, Koichi; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Morinaga, Yoshitomo; Akamatsu, Norihiko; Matsuda, Junichi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kohrogi, Hirotsugu; Kohno, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteremia occurs mainly in immunocompromised patients. However, P. aeruginosa bacteremia in immunocompetent patients has also been reported. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of P. aeruginosa bacteremia in relation to the immune status of the patients. The medical records of 126 adult patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia in Nagasaki University Hospital were retrospectively reviewed between January 2003 and December 2012. Of 126 patients with P. aeruginosa bacteremia, 60 patients (47.6%) were classified as immunocompetent. Mortality in immunocompetent patients tended to be lower than in immunocompromised patients (7-day mortality, 8% vs. 30%, P antibiotic therapy (HR: 0.21, P immunocompromised, but not immunocompetent patients, initial appropriate antibiotic therapy was associated with lower mortality (30-day mortality 20.5% vs. 66.7%, P < 0.01 by log-rank test).

  7. Bacterial adherence to vascular grafts after in vitro bacteremia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenman, J.E.; Pearce, W.H.; Kempczinski, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    All currently used arterial prosthetics have a greater susceptibility to infection following bacteremia than does autogenous tissue. This experiment compares quantitative bacterial adherence to various prosthetic materials after bacteremia carried out in a tightly controlled and quantitative fashion. Ten centimeters long, 4 mm i.d. Dacron, umbilical vein (HUV), and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts, as well as PTFE grafts with a running suture line at the midportion were tested. Each graft was interposed into a pulsatile perfusion system modified from a Waters MOX 100 TM renal transplant pump. Indium-111-labeled Staphylococcus aureus were added to heparinized canine blood to give a mean concentration of 4.7 X 10(6) bacteria/cc. This infected blood was recirculated through each graft for 30 min at a rate of 125 cc/m, 100 Torr (sys), 60 beats/min. The gamma counts/graft were used to calculate the number of bacteria/cm2 of graft surface. After nine experiments, a mean of 9.63 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 were adherent to the Dacron, 1.04 X 10(5) bacteria/cm2 to the HUV, and 2.15 X 10(4) bacteria/cm2 to the PTFE. These differences were all significant at the 0.05 level. The addition of a suture line increased bacterial adherence to the PTFE graft by 50%. These results suggest that PTFE is the vascular graft material of choice when a prosthetic graft must be implanted despite a high risk of subsequent clinical bacteremia. An in vitro, pulsatile perfusion model gave accurate and reproducible results, and appears well suited for further studies of bacterial, or platelet adherence to grafts, as well as the biomechanics of vascular conduits

  8. Algae biotechnology: products and processes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bux, F; Chisti, Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    This book examines the utilization of algae for the development of useful products and processes with the emphasis towards green technologies and processes, and the requirements to make these viable...

  9. Algae: America's Pathway to Independence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Custer, James

    2007-01-01

    .... Oil dependency is an unacceptable risk to U.S. national strategy. This paper advocates independence from foreign oil by converting the national transportation fleet to biodiesel derived from algae...

  10. Recent and innovative methods for detection of bacteremia and fungemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reller, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    Advances continue to be made in methods for more reliable or more rapid means of detecting bacteremia and fungemia. The importance of blood sample volume and broth dilution has been established in controlled studies. New technology includes the use of resins that remove antimicrobials from blood samples, detection of radioactivity from organisms given radiolabeled substrate, use of dyes that stain microbial DNA and RNA, use of slides coated with growth media, and lysis-centrifugation for trapping microorganisms. Technology now being considered includes counterimmunoelectrophoresis, head-space gas chromatography, electrical impedance, microcalorimetry, and the use of lasers to detect pH changes and turbidity

  11. Incidence and characteristics of bacteremia among children in rural Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Verena Nielsen

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to describe systemic bacterial infections occurring in acutely ill and hospitalized children in a rural region in Ghana, regarding frequency, incidence, antimicrobial susceptibility patterns and associations with anthropometrical data.Blood cultures were performed in all children below the age of five years, who were admitted to Agogo Presbyterian Hospital (APH, Asante Region, Ghana, between September 2007 and July 2009. Medical history and anthropometrical data were assessed using a standardized questionnaire at admission. Incidences were calculated after considering the coverage population adjusted for village-dependent health-seeking behavior.Among 1,196 hospitalized children, 19.9% (n = 238 were blood culture positive. The four most frequent isolated pathogens were nontyphoidal salmonellae (NTS (53.3%; n = 129, Staphylococcus aureus (13.2%; n = 32, Streptococcus pneumoniae (9.1%; n = 22 and Salmonella ser. Typhi (7.0%; n = 17. Yearly cumulative incidence of bacteremia was 46.6 cases/1,000 (CI 40.9-52.2. Yearly cumulative incidences per 1,000 of the four most frequent isolates were 25.2 (CI 21.1-29.4 for NTS, 6.3 (CI 4.1-8.4 for S. aureus, 4.3 (CI 2.5-6.1 for S. pneumoniae and 3.3 (CI 1.8-4.9 for Salmonella ser. Typhi. Wasting was positively associated with bacteremia and systemic NTS bloodstream infection. Children older than three months had more often NTS bacteremia than younger children. Ninety-eight percent of NTS and 100% of Salmonella ser. Typhi isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin, whereas both tested 100% susceptible to ceftriaxone. Seventy-seven percent of NTS and 65% of Salmonella ser. Typhi isolates were multi-drug resistant (MDR. Systemic bacterial infections in nearly 20% of hospitalized children underline the need for microbiological diagnostics, to guide targeted antimicrobial treatment and prevention of bacteremia. If microbiological diagnostics are lacking, calculated antimicrobial

  12. Scenario studies for algae production

    OpenAIRE

    Slegers, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising biomass for the biobased economy to produce food, feed, fuel, chemicals and materials. So far, large-scale production of algae is limited and as a result estimates on the performance of such large systems are scarce. There is a need to estimate large-scale biomass productivity and energy consumption, while considering the uncertainty and complexity in such large-scale systems. In this thesis frameworks are developed to assess 1) the productivity during algae culti...

  13. Phthalate esters in marine algae

    OpenAIRE

    Gezgin, Tuncay; Güven, Kasim Cemal; Akçin, Göksel

    2001-01-01

    Abstract o-Phthalate esters as diethyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, di-isobutyl phthalate and diethylhexyl phthalate were identified at surface and inner part of algae collected in the Bosphorus, as Ulva lactuca, Enteromorpha linza, Cystoseria barbata, Pterocladia capillaceaeand Ceramium rubrum. The same esters were also detected in seawater samples taken from the same area. Thus parallelism in pollution was noted between the algae and the surrounding seawater,

  14. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety

  15. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-11-04

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  16. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Tanrıverdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC, and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important.

  17. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  18. Leiomyoma of the distal oesophagus mimicking achalasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Idenburg, F. J.; Akkermans, L. M.; Smout, A. J.; Kooijman, C. D.; Obertop, H.

    1991-01-01

    An unusual case of a patient with symptoms suggestive of oesophageal achalasia is described. Most oesophageal tumour growths causing secondary achalasia are associated with malignant tumours. This patient had a large oesophageal leiomyoma closely mimicking achalasia. Treatment consisted of

  19. Clinical analysis of Enterobacter bacteremia in pediatric patients: a 10-year study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Lan; Lu, Jen-Her; Wang, Hsin-Hui; Chen, Shu-Jen; Chen, Chun-Jen; Wu, Keh-Gong; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2014-10-01

    Enterobacter species has emerged as an important pathogen of nosocomial bacteremia. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical characteristics of bacteremia in pediatric patients. We reviewed retrospectively the medical records of patients (under the age of 18 years) having Enterobacter bacteremia who were treated at Taipei the Veterans General Hospital from January 2001 to June 2011. In total, 853 positive blood cultures were obtained from 620 patients during the study period. Among them, 96 episodes of Enterobacter bacteremia were found in 83 patients, accounting for 11.3% of all bacteremia. Eighty-two cases (98.8%) were nosocomial infections. Most of the cases were neonates (62 cases, 74.7%) and premature infants (51 cases, 61.5%). The common sources of bacteremia were the respiratory tract (53.0%), followed by intravascular catheter (10.8%), multiple sources (10.8%), and the gastrointestinal tract (8.4%). The overall case fatality rate was 18.1%, with the highest rate being reported among premature infants. The factors responsible for the deaths were leukocytosis and a higher median number of underlying diseases. Based on the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that Enterobacter species are probably an important pathogen of nosocomial bacteremia in premature neonates. The number of underlying diseases should be considered a major factor influencing the prognosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Salmonella Bacteremia Among Children in Central and Northwest Nigeria, 2008–2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaro, Stephen K.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Olateju, Eyinade K.; Umoru, Dominic; Lawson, Lovett; Olanipekun, Grace; Ibrahim, Sadeeq; Munir, Huda; Ihesiolor, Gabriel; Maduekwe, Augustine; Ohiaeri, Chinatu; Adetola, Anthony; Shetima, Denis; Jibir, Binta W.; Nakaura, Hafsat; Kocmich, Nicholas; Ajose, Therasa; Idiong, David; Masokano, Kabir; Ifabiyi, Adeyemi; Ihebuzor, Nnenna; Chen, Baojiang; Meza, Jane; Akindele, Adebayo; Rezac-Elgohary, Amy; Olaosebikan, Rasaq; Suwaid, Salman; Gambo, Mahmoud; Alter, Roxanne; Davies, Herbert D.; Fey, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Etiologic agents of childhood bacteremia remain poorly defined in Nigeria. The absence of such data promotes indiscriminate use of antibiotics and delays implementation of appropriate preventive strategies. Methods. We established diagnostic laboratories for bacteremia surveillance at regional sites in central and northwest Nigeria. Acutely ill children aged <5 years with clinically suspected bacteremia were evaluated at rural and urban clinical facilities in the Federal Capital Territory, central region and in Kano, northwest Nigeria. Blood was cultured using the automated Bactec incubator system. Results. Between September 2008 and April 2015, we screened 10 133 children. Clinically significant bacteremia was detected in 609 of 4051 (15%) in the northwest and 457 of 6082 (7.5%) in the central region. Across both regions, Salmonella species account for 24%–59.8% of bacteremias and are the commonest cause of childhood bacteremia, with a predominance of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi. The prevalence of resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, and cotrimoxazole was 38.11%, with regional differences in susceptibility to different antibiotics but high prevalence of resistance to readily available oral antibiotics. Conclusions. Salmonella Typhi is the leading cause of childhood bacteremia in central Nigeria. Expanded surveillance is planned to define the dynamics of transmission. The high prevalence of multidrug-resistant strains calls for improvement in environmental sanitation in the long term and vaccination in the short term. PMID:26449948

  1. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of cefotaxime-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Taro; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-01-07

    Cefotaxime plays an important role in the treatment of patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae, although cefotaxime resistance is reported to be increasing in association with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC β-lactamase (AmpC). We conducted a case-control study in a Japanese university hospital between 2011 and 2012. We assessed the risk factors and clinical outcomes of bacteremia due to cefotaxime-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CTXNS-En) and analyzed the resistance mechanisms. Of 316 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, 37 patients with bacteremia caused by CTXNS-En were matched to 74 patients who had bacteremia caused by cefotaxime-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CTXS-En). The most common CTXNS-En was Escherichia coli (43%), followed by Enterobacter spp. (24%) and Klebsiella spp. (22%). Independent risk factors for CTXNS-En bacteremia included previous infection or colonization of CTXNS-En, cardiac disease, the presence of intravascular catheter and prior surgery within 30 days. Patients with CTXNS-En bacteremia were less likely to receive appropriate empirical therapy and to achieve a complete response at 72 h than patients with CTXS-En bacteremia. Mortality was comparable between CTXNS-En and CTXS-En patients (5 vs. 3%). CTXNS-En isolates exhibited multidrug resistance but remained highly susceptible to amikacin and meropenem. CTX-M-type ESBLs accounted for 76% of the β-lactamase genes responsible for CTXNS E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, followed by plasmid-mediated AmpC (12%). Chromosomal AmpC was responsible for 89% of CTXNS Enterobacter spp. isolates. CTXNS-En isolates harboring ESBL and AmpC caused delays in appropriate therapy among bacteremic patients. Risk factors and antibiograms may improve the selection of appropriate therapy for CTXNS-En bacteremia. Prevalent mechanisms of resistance in CTXNS-En were ESBL and chromosomal AmpC.

  2. Algae-Based Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haoyang, Cai

    2018-03-01

    Our civilization is facing a series of environmental problems, including global warming and climate change, which are caused by the accumulation of green house gases in the atmosphere. This article will briefly analyze the current global warming problem and propose a method that we apply algae cultivation to absorb carbon and use shellfish to sequestrate it. Despite the importance of decreasing CO2 emissions or developing carbon-free energy sources, carbon sequestration should be a key issue, since the amount of carbon dioxide that already exists in the atmosphere is great enough to cause global warming. Algae cultivation would be a good choice because they have high metabolism rates and provides shellfish with abundant food that contains carbon. Shellfish’s shells, which are difficult to be decomposed, are reliable storage of carbon, compared to dead organisms like trees and algae. The amount of carbon that can be sequestrated by shellfish is considerable. However, the sequestrating rate of algae and shellfish is not high enough to affect the global climate. Research on algae and shellfish cultivation, including gene technology that aims to create “super plants” and “super shellfish”, is decisive to the solution. Perhaps the baton of history will shift to gene technology, from nuclear physics that has lost appropriate international environment after the end of the Cold War. Gene technology is vital to human survival.

  3. Aeromonas salmonicida bacteremia associated with chronic well water consumption in a patient with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Ann Moore

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aeromonas salmonicida is associated with superficial skin infections in fish. Its virulence factors allow colonization of water including surface water such as salt water, beaches, and fresh water wells. Moreover, it is possible for immunocompromised patients to develop invasive disease after chronic exposure to Aeromonas spp. through contaminated water. While there are reports of Aeromonas spp. bacteremia following water ingestion, there have been no reports of A. salmonicida bacteremia from water consumption. We report the first case of A. salmonicida bacteremia in a patient with diabetes due to chronic consumption of well water.

  4. Remote transient Lactobacillus animalis bacteremia causing prosthetic hip joint infection: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somayaji, R; Lynch, T; Powell, J N; Gregson, D

    2016-11-04

    Lactobacillus spp. are uncommon pathogens in immunocompetent hosts, and even rarer causes of prosthetic device infections. A case of chronic hip prosthetic joint infection (PJI) caused by L. animalis is described. This occurred 5 years after a transient bacteremia with the same organism. Whole genome sequencing of both isolates proved this PJI infection resulted from this remote bacteremia. We document that prosthetic joint infections may be a consequence of bacteremia as much as 3 years before the onset of symptoms.

  5. Remote transient Lactobacillus animalis bacteremia causing prosthetic hip joint infection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Somayaji

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus spp. are uncommon pathogens in immunocompetent hosts, and even rarer causes of prosthetic device infections. Case presentation A case of chronic hip prosthetic joint infection (PJI caused by L. animalis is described. This occurred 5 years after a transient bacteremia with the same organism. Whole genome sequencing of both isolates proved this PJI infection resulted from this remote bacteremia. Conclusions We document that prosthetic joint infections may be a consequence of bacteremia as much as 3 years before the onset of symptoms.

  6. Giant hydronephrosis mimicking progressive malignancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Andres Jan; Anderer, Georgia; von Knobloch, Rolf; Heidenreich, Axel; Hofmann, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Background Cases of giant hydronephroses are rare and usually contain no more than 1–2 litres of fluid in the collecting system. We report a remarkable case of giant hydronephrosis mimicking a progressive malignant abdominal tumour. Case presentation A 78-year-old cachectic woman presented with an enormous abdominal tumour, which, according to the patient, had slowly increased in diameter. Medical history was unremarkable except for a hysterectomy >30 years before. A CT scan revealed a giant cystic tumour filling almost the entire abdominal cavity. It was analysed by two independent radiologists who suspected a tumour originating from the right kidney and additionally a cystic ovarian neoplasm. Subsequently, a diagnostic and therapeutic laparotomy was performed: the tumour presented as a cystic, 35 × 30 × 25 cm expansive structure adhesive to adjacent organs without definite signs of invasive growth. The right renal hilar vessels could finally be identified at its basis. After extirpation another tumourous structure emerged in the pelvis originating from the genital organs and was also resected. The histopathological examination revealed a >15 kg hydronephrotic right kidney, lacking hardly any residual renal cortex parenchyma. The second specimen was identified as an ovary with regressive changes and a large partially calcified cyst. There was no evidence of malignant growth. Conclusion Although both clinical symptoms and the enormous size of the tumour indicated malignant growth, it turned out to be a giant hydronephrosis. Presumably, a chronic obstruction of the distal ureter had caused this extraordinary hydronephrosis. As demonstrated in our case, an accurate diagnosis of giant hydronephrosis remains challenging due to the atrophy of the renal parenchyma associated with chronic obstruction. Therefore, any abdominal cystic mass even in the absence of other evident pathologies should include the differential diagnosis of a possible hydronephrosis. Diagnostic

  7. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  8. Formation of algae growth constitutive relations for improved algae modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Drewry, Jessica Louise.

    2013-01-01

    This SAND report summarizes research conducted as a part of a two year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project to improve our abilities to model algal cultivation. Algae-based biofuels have generated much excitement due to their potentially large oil yield from relatively small land use and without interfering with the food or water supply. Algae mitigate atmospheric CO2 through metabolism. Efficient production of algal biofuels could reduce dependence on foreign oil by providing a domestic renewable energy source. Important factors controlling algal productivity include temperature, nutrient concentrations, salinity, pH, and the light-to-biomass conversion rate. Computational models allow for inexpensive predictions of algae growth kinetics in these non-ideal conditions for various bioreactor sizes and geometries without the need for multiple expensive measurement setups. However, these models need to be calibrated for each algal strain. In this work, we conduct a parametric study of key marine algae strains and apply the findings to a computational model.

  9. Indigenous algae: Potential factories for biodiesel production

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Maharajh, Dheepak M

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available advantages. Approximately 30% of South African environments favourable for isolating algae have been sampled. Samples were enriched, purified and assessed for lipid content, resulting in a database of indigenous algae. Positive isolates were grown under...

  10. Microscopic Gardens: A Close Look at Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Mary Ann

    1983-01-01

    Describes classroom activities using algae, including demonstration of eutrophication, examination of mating strains, and activities with Euglena. Includes on algal morphology/physiology, types of algae, and field sources for collecting these organisms. (JN)

  11. Bacteremia due to Aeromonas hydrophila in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, A.; Afridi, F.I.; Farooqi, B.J.; Qureshi, A.; Hussain, A.

    2013-01-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila (A. hydrophila) is a low virulent organism but may cause devastating fatal infections in immunocompromised host especially in liver cirrhosis. It is rarely reported to cause septicemia in a patient with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). The mortality rate of septicemia due to A. hydrophila is 29% to 73%. We report a case of 59-year-old female patient who was a known case of ALL, presented with the complaints of fever, lethargy and generalized weakness for one month. After taking blood samples for investigations, empirical antimicrobial therapy was started. She did not improve after 48 hours of therapy. Meanwhile blood culture revealed pure growth of A. hydrophila. After sensitivity report was available, ciprofloxacin was started. Patient became afebrile after 48 hours of treatment with ciprofloxacin. It is very vital to correctly identified and treat bacteremia due to A. hydrophila especially in the underlying leukemic patient. (author)

  12. A successful antimicrobial regime for Chromobacterium violaceum induced bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell James I

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromobacterium violaceum is a proteobacterium found in soil and water in tropical regions. The organism rarely causes infection in humans, yet can cause a severe systemic infection by entering the bloodstream via an open wound. Case presentation We recently identified a case of severe bacteremia caused by Chromobacterium violaceum at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases (HTD in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Here, we describe how rapid microbiological identification and a combination of antimicrobials was used to successfully treat this life threatening infection in a four-year-old child. Conclusions This case shows the need for rapid diagnosis when there is the suspicion of a puncture wound contaminated with water and soil in tropical regions. We suggest that the aggressive antimicrobial combination used here is considered when this infection is suspected.

  13. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Helena Urso Pitassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%. Sixteen donors (3.2% were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  14. Bartonella spp. bacteremia in blood donors from Campinas, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitassi, Luiza Helena Urso; de Paiva Diniz, Pedro Paulo Vissotto; Scorpio, Diana Gerardi; Drummond, Marina Rovani; Lania, Bruno Grosselli; Barjas-Castro, Maria Lourdes; Gilioli, Rovilson; Colombo, Silvia; Sowy, Stanley; Breitschwerdt, Edward B; Nicholson, William L; Velho, Paulo Eduardo Neves Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Bartonella species are blood-borne, re-emerging organisms, capable of causing prolonged infection with diverse disease manifestations, from asymptomatic bacteremia to chronic debilitating disease and death. This pathogen can survive for over a month in stored blood. However, its prevalence among blood donors is unknown, and screening of blood supplies for this pathogen is not routinely performed. We investigated Bartonella spp. prevalence in 500 blood donors from Campinas, Brazil, based on a cross-sectional design. Blood samples were inoculated into an enrichment liquid growth medium and sub-inoculated onto blood agar. Liquid culture samples and Gram-negative isolates were tested using a genus specific ITS PCR with amplicons sequenced for species identification. Bartonella henselae and Bartonella quintana antibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence. B. henselae was isolated from six donors (1.2%). Sixteen donors (3.2%) were Bartonella-PCR positive after culture in liquid or on solid media, with 15 donors infected with B. henselae and one donor infected with Bartonella clarridgeiae. Antibodies against B. henselae or B. quintana were found in 16% and 32% of 500 blood donors, respectively. Serology was not associated with infection, with only three of 16 Bartonella-infected subjects seropositive for B. henselae or B. quintana. Bartonella DNA was present in the bloodstream of approximately one out of 30 donors from a major blood bank in South America. Negative serology does not rule out Bartonella spp. infection in healthy subjects. Using a combination of liquid and solid cultures, PCR, and DNA sequencing, this study documents for the first time that Bartonella spp. bacteremia occurs in asymptomatic blood donors. Our findings support further evaluation of Bartonella spp. transmission which can occur through blood transfusions.

  15. Not Your Garden-Variety Bacteremia: Gardnerella in an Immunocompromised Man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Prerana; Temple, John; Kantor, Molly

    2018-04-17

    Systemic Gardnerella infections are rare and usually associated with surgical instrumentation of the genitourinary tract. We present a case of symptomatic and transient Gardnerella bacteremia in a man with AIDS after a traumatic urinary catheter insertion.

  16. Salmonella Bacteremia Among Children in Central and Northwest Nigeria, 2008–2015

    OpenAIRE

    Obaro, Stephen K.; Hassan-Hanga, Fatimah; Olateju, Eyinade K.; Umoru, Dominic; Lawson, Lovett; Olanipekun, Grace; Ibrahim, Sadeeq; Munir, Huda; Ihesiolor, Gabriel; Maduekwe, Augustine; Ohiaeri, Chinatu; Adetola, Anthony; Shetima, Denis; Jibir, Binta W.; Nakaura, Hafsat

    2015-01-01

    Background. Etiologic agents of childhood bacteremia remain poorly defined in Nigeria. The absence of such data promotes indiscriminate use of antibiotics and delays implementation of appropriate preventive strategies.

  17. Serratia sp. bacteremia in Canberra, Australia: a population-based study over 10 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, H J; Collignon, P J; Whiting, P T; Kennedy, K J

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to determine the population incidence and clinical features of Serratia sp. bacteremia in Canberra, Australia. Demographic and clinical data were collected prospectively for episodes of Serratia sp. bacteremia over a 10-year period, and was confined to Canberra residents using residential postal codes. Thirty-eight episodes of Serratia sp. bacteremia occurred, with a yearly incidence of 1.03 per 100,000 population. The majority of episodes occurred in males (68%). The respiratory tract was the most common focus of infection (21%). Twenty-nine percent of episodes were community-associated. A further 18% of episodes had their onset in the community but were healthcare-associated. The 7-day and 6-month mortality rates were 5 and 37%, respectively. Antibiotic resistance to gentamicin (3%) and ciprofloxacin (0%) was low. Serratia sp. bacteremia is more common than generally appreciated, with a large proportion (47%) of episodes having their onset in the community.

  18. Prognostic value of low blood glucose at the presentation of E. coli bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Shamsuddin; Volkova, Natalia B; Peterson, Michael W

    2006-11-01

    Septicemia is the tenth leading cause of death in the United States, and Escherichia coli is the most common isolate in blood cultures. Low blood glucose is a known complication of sepsis. The prognostic role of low blood glucose in E. coli bacteremia is unknown. The study's objective was to identify the incidence of low blood glucose at the presentation of E. coli bacteremia and determine its influence on prognosis and outcome. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in university-affiliated community hospitals. Subjects were consecutive patients diagnosed with E. coli bacteremia between 1997 and 2003. We identified 1060 patients with documented E. coli bacteremia. We excluded 105 patients who were younger than 18 years old or pregnant. We recorded demographic characteristics, discharge diagnosis, and outcome. Among the 955 patients with E. coli bacteremia, the average age was 64+/-19.4 years. Overall, 4.6% had documented low blood glucose (blood glucose <70 mg/dL) at presentation. The incidence of low blood glucose was the same in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Patients with low blood glucose had a 4.7 times higher risk of death compared to patients with non-low blood glucose. Race, age, sex, and diabetes had no influence on survival. Gastrointestinal and genitourinary sources for E. coli bacteremia were more commonly associated with low blood glucose (P <.001). The study was limited to E. coli-positive blood cultures and to the one hospital system. Low blood glucose is present at the onset of E. coli bacteremia in 4.6% of patients. This represents a potentially large number of patients because E. coli is the most common blood culture isolate. Low blood glucose predicts poor outcome, especially in patients with abnormal hepatic and renal function. Low blood glucose should be considered an early clinical sign of E. coli bacteremia and aggressive therapy should be instituted to potentially save lives.

  19. Campylobacter jejuni Bacteremia in a Liver Cirrhosis Patient and Review of Literature: A Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yoon, Jin Gu; Lee, Saem Na; Hyun, Hak Jun; Choi, Min Joo; Jeon, Ji Ho; Jung, Eunju; Kang, Seonghui; Kim, Jeeyong; Noh, Ji Yun; Choi, Won Suk; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Kim, Woo Joo

    2017-01-01

    Campylobacter infection causes gastrointestinal symptoms such as abdominal pain or diarrhea. Occasionally, Campylobacter bacteremia affects immunocompromised patients; however, serious outcomes are known to be rare. Here, we present a case of a patient with Campylobacter bacteremia who had underlying liver cirrhosis. The patient had fever and diarrhea. These symptoms subsided after treatment with cefotaxime. Campylobacter jejuni was isolated in the blood culture after 10 days. In addition, pr...

  20. Two cases of Ruminococcus gnavus bacteremia associated with diverticulitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Sanne Grønvall Kjær; Skov, Marianne N; Justesen, Ulrik S

    2013-01-01

    We report two cases of bacteremia with the anaerobic bacterium Ruminococcus gnavus. In both cases, the bacteremia was associated with diverticular disease. Preliminary conventional identification suggested peptostreptococci, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spec...... spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis did not produce scores high enough for species identification. Finally, the bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing....

  1. Incidence of bacteremia in infants and children with fever and petechiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandl, K D; Stack, A M; Fleisher, G R

    1997-09-01

    We determined the incidence of serious invasive bacteremia caused by Neisseria meningitidis and other organisms in febrile infants and children with a petechial rash. Further, we studied the diagnostic value of laboratory and clinical finding in these patients. We conducted this prospective cohort study in the emergency department of an urban pediatric teaching hospital, during an 18-month period, and enrolled consecutive patients with temperature of 38 degrees C or higher and petechiae. Our measures included (1) laboratory tests (leukocyte count, coagulation profile, blood culture, and cerebrospinal fluid bacterial culture); (2) a questionnaire requesting clinical data including general appearance, number and location of petechiae, and presence or absence of purpura; and (3) a follow-up telephone survey documenting health status. A total of 411 patients were enrolled, with 57.7% between 3 and 36 months of age. Eight patients (1.9%) had bacteremia or clinical sepsis. Six had serious invasive bacteremia: N. meningitidis (two patients), group A streptococcus (one), or sepsis with negative culture results (three). Two had occult bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and no evidence of sepsis. No patient had a positive cerebrospinal fluid culture result. None of the 357 well-appearing patients (95% confidence interval: 0.0%, 1.0%) had serious invasive bacteremia. Fifty-three patients appeared ill, including all six with serious invasive bacteremia. Ill appearance of the child had a sensitivity of 1.00 (95% confidence interval: 0.60, 1.00), and a leukocyte count of 15,000 or greater, or of less than 5000, had a sensitivity of 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.53, 1.00) for detecting serious invasive bacteremia. All children with meningococcemia had purpura. Invasive bacteremia occurred less frequently in our study than in previous series and was identified by clinical criteria. Our data support the treatment of selected well-appearing children with fever and

  2. Algae. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskern, Diana, Comp.

    The plants and plantlike organisms informally grouped together as algae show great diversity of form and size and occur in a wide variety of habitats. These extremely important photosynthesizers are also economically significant. For example, some species contaminate water supplies; others provide food for aquatic animals and for man; still others…

  3. Scenario studies for algae production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are a promising biomass for the biobased economy to produce food, feed, fuel, chemicals and materials. So far, large-scale production of algae is limited and as a result estimates on the performance of such large systems are scarce. There is a need to estimate large-scale biomass

  4. Validity of bacterial pneumonia score for predicting bacteremia in children with pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalia Theodosia Daten Beyeng

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Bacteremia in children with pneumonia reflects a severe condition, with longer duration of hospital care and potentially lethal complications. Early detection of bacteremia in patients with pneumonia may reduce serious complications. Few bacteremia screening tools have been widely used in chidren with pneumonia. One of those tools is the bacterial pneumonia score (BPS. Objective To assess the validity of the bacterial pneumonia score for predicting bacteremia in pediatric patients with pneumonia. Methods A diagnostic test was conducted on children aged 1 to 60 months hospitalized with pneumonia from December 2009 to August 2010. Subjects were collected consecutively. Pneumonia was diagnosed using the World Healt Organization (WHO criteria. Subjects underwent complete blood counts and blood culture examinations at admission. Statistical analyses included sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV/NPV, positive and negative likelihood ratio (PLR/NLR, and post-test probability. Results Our study included 229 children. Based on BPS with a cut-off score of ≥ 4, the sensitivity was 83.3%, specificity 49.7%, PPV 8.4%, NPV 98.2%, PLR 1.66, NLR 0.31, and post-test probability 8.4% for detecting bacteremia in pediatric pneumonia patients. Conclusion BPS can not be used for predicting bacteremia in pediatric patients with pneumonia.

  5. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect.

  6. Macro algae as substrate for biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Henrik; Sarker, Shiplu; Gautam, Dhan Prasad

    Algae as a substrate for biogas is superior to other crops since it has a much higher yield of biomass per unit area and since algae grows in the seawater there will be no competition with food production on agricultural lands. So far, the progress in treating different groups of algae as a source...... of energy is promising. In this study 5 different algae types were tested for biogas potential and two algae were subsequent used for co-digestion with manure. Green seaweed, Ulva lactuca and brown seaweed Laminaria digitata was co-digested with cattle manure at mesophilic and thermophilic condition...

  7. Iliacus Abscess with Radiculopathy Mimicking Herniated Nucleus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... radiculopathy mimicking herniated nucleus pulposus: Aadditional diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging. Niger J Clin Pract. 2017;20:392-3. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons. Attribution-Non Commercial-Share Alike 3.0 License, which allows ...

  8. Factor XIII as a modulator of plasma fibronectin alterations during experimental bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiener, J L; Cho, E; Saba, T M

    1986-11-01

    Fibronectin is found in plasma as well as in association with connective tissue and cell surfaces. Depletion of plasma fibronectin is often observed in septic trauma and burned patients, while experimental rats often manifest hyperfibronectinemia with sepsis. Since Factor XIII may influence the rate of clearance and deposition of plasma fibronectin into tissues, we evaluated the temporal changes in plasma fibronectin and plasma Factor XIII following bacteremia and RE blockade in rats in an attempt to understand the mechanism leading to elevation of fibronectin levels in bacteremic rats, which is distinct from that observed with RE blockade. Clearance of exogenously administered fibronectin after bacteremia was also determined. Rats received either saline, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (1 X 10(9) organisms), gelatinized RE test lipid emulsion (50 mg/100 gm B.W.), or emulsion followed by Pseudomonas. Plasma fibronectin and Factor XIII were determined at 0, 2, 24, and 48 hours post-blockade or bacteremia. At 24 and 48 hr following bacteremia alone or bacteremia after RE blockade, there was a significant elevation (p less than 0.05) of plasma fibronectin and a concomitant decrease (p less than 0.05) of plasma factor XIII activity. Extractable tissue fibronectin from liver and spleen was also increased at 24 and 48 hours following R.E. blockade plus bacteremia. In addition, the plasma clearance of human fibronectin was significantly prolonged (p less than 0.05) following bacterial challenge. Infusion of activated Factor XIII (20 units/rat) during a period of hyperfibronectinemia (908.0 +/- 55.1 micrograms/ml) resulted in a significant (p less than 0.05) decrease in plasma fibronectin (548.5 +/- 49.9 micrograms/ml) within 30 min. Thus Factor XIII deficiency in rats with bacteremia may contribute to the elevation in plasma fibronectin by altering kinetics associated with the clearance of fibronectin from the blood.

  9. Bioethanol Production from Indigenous Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuka Roy

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced rate of fossil fuel extraction is likely to deplete limited natural resources over short period of time. So search for alternative fuel is only the way to overcome this problem of upcoming energy crisis. In this aspect biofuel is a sustainable option. Agricultural lands cannot be compromised for biofuel production due to the requirement of food for the increasing population. Certain species of algae can produce ethanol during anaerobic fermentation and thus serve as a direct source for bioethanol production. The high content of complex carbohydrates entrapped in the cell wall of the microalgae makes it essential to incorporate a pre-treatment stage to release and convert these complex carbohydrates into simple sugars prior to the fermentation process. There have been researches on production of bioethanol from a particular species of algae, but this work was an attempt to produce bioethanol from easily available indigenous algae. Acid hydrolysis was carried out as pre-treatment. Gas Chromatographic analysis showed that 5 days’ fermentation by baker’s yeast had yielded 93% pure bioethanol. The fuel characterization of the bioethanol with respect to gasoline showed comparable and quite satisfactory results for its use as an alternative fuel.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ije.v4i1.12182International Journal of Environment Volume-4, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2014/15, page: 112-120  

  10. Bio diesel production from algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khola, G.; Ghazala, B.

    2011-01-01

    Algae appear to be an emerging source of biomass for bio diesel that has the potential to completely displace fossil fuel. Two thirds of earth's surface is covered with water, thus alga e would truly be renewable option of great potential for global energy needs. This study discusses specific and comparative bio diesel quantitative potential of Cladophora sp., also highlighting its biomass (after oil extraction), pH and sediments (glycerine, water and pigments) quantitative properties. Comparison of Cladophora sp., with Oedogonium sp., and Spirogyra sp., (Hossain et al., 2008) shows that Cladophora sp., produce higher quantity of bio diesel than Spirogyra sp., whereas biomass and sediments were higher than the both algal specimens in comparison to the results obtained by earlier workers. No prominent difference in pH of bio diesel was found. In Pakistan this is a first step towards bio diesel production from algae. Results indicate that Cladophora sp., provide a reasonable quantity of bio diesel, its greater biomass after oil extraction and sediments make it a better option for bio diesel production than the comparing species. (author)

  11. Bacteremia induced by Bifidobacterium breve in a newborn with cloacal exstrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shinichi; Uchida, Toshihiko; Kuwana, Shota; Sasaki, Kazuto; Watanabe, Tatsuya; Saito, Junko; Kawaji, Takahiro

    2016-11-01

    Bifidobacterium breve is an effective probiotic agent used in the field of neonatology. Although B. breve has been considered safe, a case of B. breve bacteremia has been reported. The pathogenic mechanism underlying the bacteremia is unknown. Herein, we report a second case of B. breve bacteremia that developed in a neonate with multiple abdominal organ anomalies. Following surgical repair immediately after birth, B. breve treatment was started. After 1 week, the infant developed B. breve bacteremia following the onset of adhesive ileus. The bacteremia was thought to have been associated with an intestinal obstruction. A pediatric culture bottle is theoretically unsuitable for incubating B. breve because B. breve is an obligate anaerobic bacterium. It was, however, cultured from pediatric culture bottles in the present case, suggesting that pediatric culture bottles may be useful for procuring B. breve and for determining antimicrobial susceptibility for screening purposes in neonatal patients. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  12. Multidrug Resistance Acinetobacter Bacteremia Secondary to Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia: Risk Factors and Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotfain, Evgeni; Borer, Abraham; Koyfman, Leonid; Saidel-Odes, Lisa; Frenkel, Amit; Gruenbaum, Shaun E; Rosenzweig, Vsevolod; Zlotnik, Alexander; Klein, Moti

    2017-10-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a multidrug resistant (MDR), gram-negative bacterium commonly implicated in ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in critically ill patients. Patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with VAP often subsequently develop A baumannii bacteremia, which may significantly worsen outcomes. In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical and laboratory records of 129 ICU patients spanning 6 years with MDR A baumannii VAP; 46 (35%) of these patients had concomitant MDR A baumannii bacteremia. The ICU mortality rate was higher in patients with VAP having A baumannii bacteremia compared to nonbacteremic patients (32.4% vs 9.6% respectively, P 65 years, an Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) score higher than 20, a Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score higher than 7 on the day of bacteremia, and the presence of comorbid disease (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease [COPD] and chronic renal failure) were found to be independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality in this population. Multidrug resistant A baumannii was not an independent risk factor for mortality. Although the presence of comorbid diseases (COPD and chronic renal failure) and severity of disease (APACHE > 20 and SOFA >7) were found to be independent risk factors for ICU mortality, MDR A baumannii bacteremia was not an independent risk factor for mortality in our critically ill population.

  13. Red algae and their use in papermaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yung-Bum; Lee, Youn-Woo; Lee, Chun-Han; You, Hack-Chul

    2010-04-01

    Gelidialian red algae, that contain rhizoidal filaments, except the family Gelidiellaceae were processed to make bleached pulps, which can be used as raw materials for papermaking. Red algae consist of rhizoidal filaments, cortical cells usually reddish in color, and medullary cells filled with mucilaginous carbohydrates. Red algae pulp consists of mostly rhizoidal filaments. Red algae pulp of high brightness can be produced by extracting mucilaginous carbohydrates after heating the algae in an aqueous medium and subsequently treating the extracted with bleaching chemicals. In this study, we prepared paper samples from bleached pulps obtained from two red algae species (Gelidium amansii and Gelidium corneum) and compared their properties to those of bleached wood chemical pulps. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Cellulose powder from Cladophora sp. algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, R; Gustafsson, C; Nutt, A; Iversen, T; Nyström, C

    1998-01-01

    The surface are and crystallinity was measured on a cellulose powder made from Cladophora sp. algae. The algae cellulose powder was found to have a very high surface area (63.4 m2/g, N2 gas adsorption) and build up of cellulose with a high crystallinity (approximately 100%, solid state NMR). The high surface area was confirmed by calculations from atomic force microscope imaging of microfibrils from Cladophora sp. algae.

  15. Effect of socioeconomic status on mortality after bacteremia in working-age patients. A Danish population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Kristoffer; Nørgaard, Mette; Schønheyder, Henrik Carl

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality in patients with bacteremia and the underlying factors that may mediate differences in mortality.......To examine the effect of socioeconomic status (SES) on mortality in patients with bacteremia and the underlying factors that may mediate differences in mortality....

  16. Fatal case of Herbaspirillum seropedicae bacteremia secondary to pneumonia in an end-stage renal disease patient with multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwantarat, Nuntra; Adams, La'Tonzia L; Romagnoli, Mark; Carroll, Karen C

    2015-08-01

    Herbaspirillum spp. are rare causes of human infections associated primarily with bacteremia in cancer patients. We report the first fatal case of bacteremia secondary to pneumonia caused by Herbaspirillum seropedicae in a 65-year-old man with end-stage renal disease and multiple myeloma. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Biosynthesis of 3-Dimethylsulfoniopropionate in Marine Algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhodes, David

    2000-01-01

    ...) in marine algae, including identification of intermediates and enzymes of the pathway in the macroalgae Enteromorpha Intestinalis, and three diverse marine phytoplankton species; Tetraselmis sp...

  18. Algae-production in the desert

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hildebrand, H.

    1988-11-01

    The company Koor Food Ltd. (Israel) developed in co-operation with the Weizmann-Institute (Israel) a production-plant for the industrial cultivation of algae in the desert area of Elat. For almost a year now, they succeed in harvesting large amounts of algae material with the help of the intensive sun and the Red Sea water. The alga Dunaliella with the natural US -carotine, as well as the alga Spirulina with the high content of protein find their market in the food-, cosmetic- and pharma-industry. This article will give a survey of a yet here unusual project.

  19. Invasive Aspergillosis Mimicking Metastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel J. E. G. W. Vanfleteren

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In a patient with a medical history of cancer, the most probable diagnosis of an 18FDG-avid pulmonary mass combined with intracranial abnormalities on brain imaging is metastasized cancer. However, sometimes a differential diagnosis with an infectious cause such as aspergillosis can be very challenging as both cancer and infection are sometimes difficult to distinguish. Pulmonary aspergillosis can present as an infectious pseudotumour with clinical and imaging characteristics mimicking lung cancer. Even in the presence of cerebral lesions, radiological appearance of abscesses can look like brain metastasis. These similarities can cause significant diagnostic difficulties with a subsequent therapeutic delay and a potential adverse outcome. Awareness of this infectious disease that can mimic lung cancer, even in an immunocompetent patient, is important. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman with pulmonary aspergillosis disseminated to the brain mimicking metastatic lung cancer.

  20. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Lacasse

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS. Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser’s syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms.

  1. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang

    2005-01-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  2. Intra-abdominal gout mimicking pelvic abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chia-Hui; Chen, Clement Kuen-Huang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan); National Yang-Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei (Taiwan); Yeh, Lee-Ren; Pan, Huay-Ban; Yang, Chien-Fang [Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung (Taiwan)

    2005-04-01

    Gout is the most common crystal-induced arthritis. Gouty tophi typically deposit in the extremities, especially toes and fingers. We present an unusual case of intrapelvic tophaceous gout in a patient suffering from chronic gouty arthritis. CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvic cavity disclosed calcified gouty tophi around both hips, and a cystic lesion with peripheral enhancement in the pelvic cavity along the course of the iliopsoas muscle. The intra-abdominal tophus mimicked pelvic abscess. (orig.)

  3. Mycobacterium intracellulare Infection Mimicking Progression of Scleroderma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabbe, Simon; Engelhart, Merete; Thybo, Sören

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a patient with scleroderma who developed Mycobacterium intracellulare infection, which for more than a year mimicked worsening of her connective tissue disorder. The patient was diagnosed with scleroderma based on puffy fingers that developed into sclerodactyly, abnormal......, unfortunately with significant scarring. Immunodeficiency testing was unremarkable. In summary, an infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare was mistaken for an unusually severe progression of scleroderma....

  4. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    OpenAIRE

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and ...

  5. Evaluating antibiotic stewardship programs in patients with bacteremia using administrative data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boel, J; Søgaard, M; Andreasen, V

    2015-01-01

    When introducing new antibiotic guidelines for empirical treatment of bacteremia, it is imperative to evaluate the performance of the new guideline. We examined the utility of administrative data to evaluate the effect of new antibiotic guidelines and the prognostic impact of appropriate empirical...... treatment. We categorized 2,008 adult patients diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2012 according to whether they received cephalosporins or fluoroquinolones (old regimen) or not (new regimen). We used administrative data to extract individual level data on mortality, readmission, and appropriateness.......87–1.25) for the new versus the old regimen. This study demonstrates that administrative data can be useful for evaluating the effect and quality of new bacteremia treatment guidelines...

  6. National Automated Surveillance of Hospital-Acquired Bacteremia in Denmark Using a Computer Algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gubbels, Sophie; Nielsen, Jens; Voldstedlund, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND In 2015, Denmark launched an automated surveillance system for hospital-acquired infections, the Hospital-Acquired Infections Database (HAIBA). OBJECTIVE To describe the algorithm used in HAIBA, to determine its concordance with point prevalence surveys (PPSs), and to present trends...... advantages of automated surveillance, HAIBA allows monitoring of HA bacteremia across the healthcare system, supports prioritizing preventive measures, and holds promise for evaluating interventions. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;1-8....... for hospital-acquired bacteremia SETTING Private and public hospitals in Denmark METHODS A hospital-acquired bacteremia case was defined as at least 1 positive blood culture with at least 1 pathogen (bacterium or fungus) taken between 48 hours after admission and 48 hours after discharge, using the Danish...

  7. A Retrospective Quality Study of Hemodialysis Catheter-Related Bacteremia in a Danish Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaarup, Sophie; Olesen, Bente; Pourarsalan, Mahshid

    2016-01-01

    and surveillance is a critical aspect of infection control and prevention. Aim: To analyze incidence, causative species, and treatment of HD CRB in adult chronic HD patients at Nordsjaellands Hospital (NOH), Denmark. Methods: All episodes of bacteremia in the Department of Cardiology, Nephrology and Endocrinology......%), enterobacteriaceae (20%) and enterococci (8%). The most commonly used empiric antimicrobials were cefuroxime and vancomycin and the overall efficacy was 77%. Conclusion: The well-functioning infection prevention strategy seems to be successful resulting in a relatively low incidence rate of HD CRB compared......Background: Hemodialysis catheter-related bacteremia (HD CRB) is a major complication of long-term hemodialysis (HD) therapy and bacteremia is secondary only to cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in patients receiving renal replacement therapy. A large part may be preventable...

  8. Effect of nosocomial vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia on mortality, length of stay, and costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoyan; Srinivasan, Arjun; Plaut, David; Perl, Trish M

    2003-04-01

    To determine the impact of vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia on patient outcomes and costs by assessing mortality, excess length of stay, and charges attributable to it. A population-based, matched, historical cohort study. A 1,025-bed, university-based teaching facility and referral hospital. Two hundred seventy-seven vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia case-patients and 277 matched control-patients identified between 1993 and 2000. The crude mortality rate was 50.2% and 19.9% for case-patients and control-patients, respectively, yielding a mortality rate of 30.3% attributable to vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia. The excess length of hospital stay attributable to vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia was 17 days, of which 12 days were spent in intensive care units. On average, dollars 77,558 in extra charges was attributable to each vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia. To adjust for severity of illness, 159 pairs of case-patients and control-patients, who had the same severity of illness (All Patient Refined-Diagnosis Related Group complexity level), were further analyzed. When patients were stratified by severity of illness, the crude mortality rate was 50.3% among case-patients compared with 27.7% among control-patients, accounting for an attributable mortality rate of 22.6%. Attributable excess length of stay and charges were 17 days and dollars 81,208, respectively. Vancomycin-resistant enterococcal bacteremia contributes significantly to excess mortality and economic loss, once severity of illness is considered. Efforts to prevent these infections will likely be cost-effective.

  9. Dynamic Computational Model of Symptomatic Bacteremia to Inform Bacterial Separation Treatment Requirements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinead E Miller

    Full Text Available The rise of multi-drug resistance has decreased the effectiveness of antibiotics, which has led to increased mortality rates associated with symptomatic bacteremia, or bacterial sepsis. To combat decreasing antibiotic effectiveness, extracorporeal bacterial separation approaches have been proposed to capture and separate bacteria from blood. However, bacteremia is dynamic and involves host-pathogen interactions across various anatomical sites. We developed a mathematical model that quantitatively describes the kinetics of pathogenesis and progression of symptomatic bacteremia under various conditions, including bacterial separation therapy, to better understand disease mechanisms and quantitatively assess the biological impact of bacterial separation therapy. Model validity was tested against experimental data from published studies. This is the first multi-compartment model of symptomatic bacteremia in mammals that includes extracorporeal bacterial separation and antibiotic treatment, separately and in combination. The addition of an extracorporeal bacterial separation circuit reduced the predicted time of total bacteria clearance from the blood of an immunocompromised rodent by 49%, compared to antibiotic treatment alone. Implementation of bacterial separation therapy resulted in predicted multi-drug resistant bacterial clearance from the blood of a human in 97% less time than antibiotic treatment alone. The model also proposes a quantitative correlation between time-dependent bacterial load among tissues and bacteremia severity, analogous to the well-known 'area under the curve' for characterization of drug efficacy. The engineering-based mathematical model developed may be useful for informing the design of extracorporeal bacterial separation devices. This work enables the quantitative identification of the characteristics required of an extracorporeal bacteria separation device to provide biological benefit. These devices will potentially

  10. Clinical manifestations of bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species in southern Taiwan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jen Tang

    Full Text Available This study is conducted to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species.Patients with bacteremia caused by Aeromonas species during the period 2009 to 2013 were identified from a computerized database of a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed.A total of 91 patients with bacteremia due to Aeromonas species were identified. In addition to 16 (17.6% primary bacteremia, the most common source of secondary infection is peritonitis (n = 27, 29.7%, followed by biliary tract infection (n = 18, 19.8%, and SSTI (n = 12, 13.2%, pneumonia (n = 9, 9.9%, catheter-related bloodstream infection (n =  5, 5.5%, and genitourinary tract infection (n = 4, 4.4%. A. hydrophila (n = 35, 38.5% was the most common pathogen, followed by A. veronii biovar sobria (n = 31, 34.1%, A. caviae (n = 14, 15.4%, and A. veronii biovar veronii (n = 9, 9.9%. Forty-three (47.3% patients were classified as healthcare-associated infections (HCAI causes by Aeromonas species, and patients with HCAI were more likely to have cancer, and receive immunosuppressant than patients with community-acquired bacteremia. The overall outcomes, including rate of ICU admission, acute respiratory failure, and mortality were 33.3%, 28.6%, and 23.1%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the in-hospital day mortality was significantly associated only with underlying cancer (P <.001, and initial shock (P <.001.Aeromonas species should be considered one of the causative pathogens of healthcare-associated bacteremia, especially in immunocompromised patients. In addition, it can be associated with high fatality. Cancer and initial shock were the poor prognostic factors.

  11. Elizabethkingia meningoseptica bacteremia in immunocompromised hosts: The first case series from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Ghafur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although Elizabethkingia meningoseptica (Chryseobacterium meningosepticum infections in immunocompromised hosts have been recognised, clinical data detailing these infections remain limited, especially from India. Antimicrobial susceptibility data on E. meningoseptica remain very limited, with no established breakpoints by Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The organism is usually multidrug resistant to antibiotics usually prescribed for treating Gram-negative bacterial infections, a serious challenge to the patient and the treating clinicians. Materials and Methods: The analysis was done in a tertiary care oncology and stem cell transplant center. Susceptibility testing and identification of E. meningoseptica was done using Vitek auto analyzer. Records of immunocompromised patients with E. meningoseptica bacteremia were analysed from January 2009 to March 2012. Results: A total of 29 E. meningoseptica bacteremia cases were documented between 2009 and 2012. Eleven patients were immunocompromised. Three were post stem cell transplant and one was post cord blood transplant. The mean age of the patients was 48.4 years. Mean Charlson′s comorbidity index was 5.7. Four had solid organ malignancies, five had hematological malignancies, and two had lymphoreticular malignancy. Eight patients had received chemotherapy. Mean Apache II score was 18. Mean Pitts score for bacteremia was 4.7. Two were neutropenic (one post SCT, one MDS post chemo with a mean white blood cell (WBC count of 450/mm 3 . Ten had a line at the time of bacteremia. Mean duration of the line prior to bacteremia was 8 days. Eight had line-related bacteremia. Three had pneumonia with secondary bacteremia. All received combination therapy with two or more antibiotics which included cotrimoxazole, rifampicin, piperacillin-tazobactam, tigecycline, or cefepime-tazobactam. All the isolates showed in vitro resistance to ciprofloxacin. Five patients died, but a

  12. Cultivation of macroscopic marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryther, J.H.

    1982-11-01

    The red alga Gracilaria tikvahiae may be grown outdoors year-round in central Florida with yields averaging 35.5 g dry wt/m/sup 2/.day, greater than the most productive terrestrial plants. This occurs only when the plants are in a suspended culture, with vigorous aeration and an exchange of 25 or more culture volumes of enriched seawater per day, which is not cost-effective. A culture system was designed in which Gracilaria, stocked at a density of 2 kg wet wt/m/sup 2/, grows to double its biomass in one to two weeks; it is then harvested to its starting density, and anaerobically digested to methane. The biomass is soaked for 6 hours in the digester residue, storing enough nutrients for two weeks' growth in unenriched seawater. The methane is combusted for energy and the waste gas is fed to the culture to provide mixing and CO/sub 2/, eliminating the need for aeration and seawater exchange. The green alga Ulva lactuca, unlike Gracilaria, uses bicarbonate as a photosynthesis carbon source, and can grow at high pH, with little or no free CO/sub 2/. It can therefore produce higher yields than Gracilaria in low water exchange conditions. It is also more efficiently converted to methane than is Gracilaria, but cannot tolerate Florida's summer temperatures so cannot be grown year-round. Attempts are being made to locate or produce a high-temperature tolerant strain.

  13. Modeling and optimization of algae growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thornton, Anthony Richard; Weinhart, Thomas; Bokhove, Onno; Zhang, Bowen; van der Sar, Dick M.; Kumar, Kundan; Pisarenco, Maxim; Rudnaya, Maria; Savcenco, Valeriu; Rademacher, Jens; Zijlstra, Julia; Szabelska, Alicja; Zyprych, Joanna; van der Schans, Martin; Timperio, Vincent; Veerman, Frits

    2010-01-01

    The wastewater from greenhouses has a high amount of mineral contamination and an environmentally-friendly method of removal is to use algae to clean this runoff water. The algae consume the minerals as part of their growth process. In addition to cleaning the water, the created algal bio-mass has a

  14. Algae commensal community in Genlisea traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Wołowski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The community of algae occurring in Genlisea traps and on the external traps surface in laboratory conditions were studied. A total of 29 taxa were found inside the traps, with abundant diatoms, green algae (Chlamydophyceae and four morphotypes of chrysophytes stomatocysts. One morphotype is described as new for science. There are two ways of algae getting into Genlisea traps. The majority of those recorded inside the traps, are mobile; swimming freely by flagella or moving exuding mucilage like diatoms being ablate to colonize the traps themselves. Another possibility is transport of algae by invertebrates such as mites and crustaceans. In any case algae in the Genlisea traps come from the surrounding environment. Two dominant groups of algae (Chladymonas div. and diatoms in the trap environment, show ability to hydrolyze phosphomonoseters. We suggest that algae in carnivorous plant traps can compete with plant (host for organic phosphate (phosphomonoseters. From the spectrum and ecological requirements of algal species found in the traps, environment inside the traps seems to be acidic. However, further studies are needed to test the relations between algae and carnivorous plants both in laboratory conditions and in the natural environment. All the reported taxa are described briefly and documented with 74 LM and SEM micrographs.

  15. Potential biomedical applications of marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui-Min David; Li, Xiao-Chun; Lee, Duu-Jong; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2017-11-01

    Functional components extracted from algal biomass are widely used as dietary and health supplements with a variety of applications in food science and technology. In contrast, the applications of algae in dermal-related products have received much less attention, despite that algae also possess high potential for the uses in anti-infection, anti-aging, skin-whitening, and skin tumor treatments. This review, therefore, focuses on integrating studies on algae pertinent to human skin care, health and therapy. The active compounds in algae related to human skin treatments are mentioned and the possible mechanisms involved are described. The main purpose of this review is to identify serviceable algae functions in skin treatments to facilitate practical applications in this high-potential area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cars will be fed on algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, G.

    2012-01-01

    The development of the first and second generations of bio-fuels has led to a rise in food prices and the carbon balance sheet is less good than expected. Great hopes have been put on unicellular algae for they can synthesize oils, sugar and even hydrogen and the competition with food production is far less harsh than with actual bio-fuels. Moreover, when you grow micro-algae, the loss of water through evaporation is less important than in the case of intensive farm cultures. In 2009 10.000 tonnes of micro-algae were produced worldwide, they were mainly used for the production of fish food and of complements for humane food (fat acids and antioxidants). Different research programs concern unicellular algae: they aim at modifying micro-algae genetically in order to give them a higher productivity or to make them produce an oil more adapted for motor fuel or more easily recoverable. (A.C.)

  17. Composting of waste algae: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Clarke, William; Pratt, Steven

    2014-07-01

    Although composting has been successfully used at pilot scale to manage waste algae removed from eutrophied water environments and the compost product applied as a fertiliser, clear guidelines are not available for full scale algae composting. The review reports on the application of composting to stabilize waste algae, which to date has mainly been macro-algae, and identifies the peculiarities of algae as a composting feedstock, these being: relatively low carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio, which can result in nitrogen loss as NH3 and even N2O; high moisture content and low porosity, which together make aeration challenging; potentially high salinity, which can have adverse consequence for composting; and potentially have high metals and toxin content, which can affect application of the product as a fertiliser. To overcome the challenges that these peculiarities impose co-compost materials can be employed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospects of using algae in biofuel production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Maltsev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of industry, agriculture and the transport sector is associated with the use of various energy sources. Renewable energy sources, including biofuels, are highly promising in this respect. As shown by a number of scientific studies, a promising source for biofuel production that would meet modern requirements may be algal biomass. After activation of the third generation biodiesel production it was assumed that the algae would become the most advantageous source, because it is not only able to accumulate significant amounts of lipids, but could reduce the of agricultural land involved in biofuel production and improve air quality by sequestering CO2. However, a major problem is presented by the cost of algae biomass cultivation and its processing compared to the production of biodiesel from agricultural crops. In this regard, there are several directions of increasing the efficiency of biodiesel production from algae biomass. The first direction is to increase lipid content in algae cells by means of genetic engineering. The second direction is connected with the stimulation of increased accumulation of lipids by stressing algae. The third direction involves the search for new, promising strains of algae that will be characterized by faster biomass accumulation rate, higher content of TAG and the optimal proportions of accumulated saturated and unsaturated fatty acids compared to the already known strains. Recently, a new approach in the search for biotechnologically valuable strains of algae has been formed on the basis of predictions of capacity for sufficient accumulation of lipids by clarifying the evolutionary relationships within the major taxonomic groups of algae. The outcome of these studies is the rapid cost reduction of biofuel production based on algae biomass. All this emphasizes the priority of any research aimed at both improving the process of production of biofuels from algae, and the search for new sources for

  19. Positive Predictive Value of True Bacteremia according to the Number of Positive Culture Sets in Adult Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitaura, Tsuyoshi; Chikumi, Hiroki; Fujiwara, Hiromitsu; Okada, Kensaku; Hayabuchi, Tatsuya; Nakamoto, Masaki; Takata, Miyako; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Burioka, Naoto; Shimizu, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Performing multiple blood culture sets simultaneously is a standard blood culture methodology, although it is often difficult to distinguish true bacteremia from contamination when only one of several blood culture sets is positive. This study clarified the relationship between the number of positive blood culture sets and clinical significance in patients with positive blood culture. Patients aged 18 years and over with at least 1 positive blood culture were enrolled. Positive blood culture episodes were categorized from clinical records as true bacteremia, contamination, or unknown clinical significance. The associations among episodes of true bacteremia, isolated bacteria, the number of positive blood culture sets from among the performed sets, and the clinical background of patients were analyzed. Among a total of 407 episodes, 262, 67 and 78 were true bacteremia, contamination and unknown clinical significance, respectively. The positive predictive values (PPVs) of 1 out of 1, 1 out of 2 and 2 out of 2 positive sets in cases of Staphylococcus aureus, were 81.3%, 50% and 100% respectively; those in cases of coagulase-negative Staphylococci were 20.5%, 10.8% and 63.5%, respectively. Almost all cases of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella species and Candida species were true bacteremia. The probability of true bacteremia was strongly associated with recent surgery in multivariate analysis (P sets from among the performed sets varies by microorganism. Therefore, PPVs calculated using this method may help physicians distinguish true bacteremia from contamination.

  20. Future challenges and treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia with emphasis on MRSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus V; Fowler, Vance G; Skov, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is an urgent medical problem due to its growing frequency and its poor associated outcome. As healthcare delivery increasingly involves invasive procedures and implantable devices, the number of patients at risk for SAB and its complications is likely to gro...

  1. Catheter-related Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia manifested with skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shou-Hsin Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although previously rare, catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria is now increasingly encountered, especially among cancer patients who have catheters implanted for chemotherapy treatments. A 73-year-old female patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML had Mycobacterium abscessus bacteremia with manifestations of multiple skin nodules, pneumonia, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy 4 months after the implantation of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC for the delivery of chemotherapy. The catheter-related M. abscessus bacteremia was confirmed by positive blood cultures of specimens drawn from a PICC line and a peripheral vein. She defervesced with the administration of meropenem, amikacin, levofloxacin, clarithromycin, and by the removal of PICC. Her fever subsided for 3 months with the disappearance of skin and lung lesions; however, she died of AML relapse. Bacteremia and skin infection caused by M. abscessus can be detected by culture and pathological examinations and should be considered in leukemia patients with a PICC. With appropriate laboratory diagnosis, M. abscessus bacteremia with disseminated infections can improve with catheter removal and combination antimicrobial therapy.

  2. Treatment outcomes in patients with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Catherine S; O'Neal, Hollis R; Daniels, Titus L; Talbot, Thomas R

    2012-10-01

    Infections with resistant Enterobacter spp. are increasingly described, yet data on outcomes associated with these infections are limited. A retrospective cohort study was conducted to investigate outcomes of hospitalized patients with third-generation cephalosporin-resistant (CR) Enterobacter bacteremia. Cephalosporin resistance was detected using cefotaxime and cefpodoxime. Patients with Enterobacter spp. bacteremia from January 2006 through February 2008 defined the population. We defined cases as those with CR isolates; controls were patients with bacteremia due to non-CR isolates. Treatment failure was defined as persistence of the presenting signs of infection 72 h after initial culture collection. Of the 95 Enterobacter cases identified, 31 (33%) were CR. CR cases were significantly associated with treatment failure (odds ratio (OR) 2.81, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-6.94). This association was not seen after adjustment for age, simplified acute physiology score (SAPS II), and inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy. Inappropriate empiric therapy (adjusted OR 3.86, 95% CI 1.32-11.31) and SAPS II score (adjusted OR 1.09, 95% CI 1.02-1.16) were significantly associated with treatment failure in the multivariate analysis. Third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter bacteremia is associated with treatment failure due to receipt of inappropriate empiric antibiotic therapy and severity of illness.

  3. An original case of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica bacteremia after a near-drowning accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ughetto, Estelle; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Cariou, Marie-Estelle; Pelloux, Isabelle; Maurin, Max; Caillon, Jocelyne; Moreau, Philippe; Ygout, Jean-François; Corvec, Stéphane

    2015-08-01

    We report the first case of Francisella tularensis subsp. holarctica bacteremia after water contamination in France. A 75-year-old man developed septic pneumonic tularemia after a near-drowning accident. We highlight the need for a longer incubation time for isolation of F. tularensis from blood cultures.

  4. Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae bacteremia: A multi-national population-based assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laupland, Kevin B; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Østergaard, Christian

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Haemophilus influenzae is an important cause of invasive infection but contemporary data in non-selected populations is limited. METHODS: Population-based surveillance for Haemophilus influenzae bacteremia was conducted in seven regions in Australia, Canada, and Denmark during 2000-20...

  5. Concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li Jun; Du, Xiao Qin; Nyirimigabo, Eric; Shou, Song Tao

    2014-04-01

    It is rare to see a concurrent infection with infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Tianjin, China. Until now, there is still no any single recorded case of concurrent infectious mononucleosis and community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Bacteroides fragilis Bacteremia in a US Resident: An Emerging Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Merchan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Bacteroides fragilis bacteremia associated with paraspinal and psoas abscesses in the United States. Resistance to b-lactam/b-lactamase inhibitors, carbapenems, and metronidazole was encountered despite having a recent travel history to India as the only possible risk factor for multidrug resistance. Microbiological cure was achieved with linezolid, moxifloxacin, and cefoxitin.

  7. Metastatic infectious disease and clinical outcome in Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus species bacteremia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Fidel J; Kullberg, Bart Jan; Sturm, Patrick D; Krabbe, Paul F M; van Dijk, Arie P J; Wanten, Geert J A; Oyen, Wim J G; Bleeker-Rovers, Chantal P

    Early detection of metastatic infection in patients with Gram-positive bacteremia is important as morbidity and mortality are higher in the presence of these foci, probably due to incomplete eradication of clinically silent foci during initial treatment. We performed a prospective study in 115

  8. Enterococcal bacteremia is associated with prolonged stay in the medical intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viju Moses

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although enterococci are relatively common nosocomial pathogens in surgical intensive care units (ICUs, their significance in blood cultures from patients in the medical ICU is unclear. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study spanning 2 years, the clinical and microbiological characteristics of enterococcal bacteremia among medical ICU patients were evaluated. Results: Of 1325 admissions, 35 with enterococcal bacteremia accounted for 14.8% of positive blood cultures. They were significantly older (P=0.03 and had various co-morbidities. Most had vascular (96.9% and urinary (85.3% catheters, and 67.7% were mechanically ventilated. In addition to blood, enterococci were isolated from vascular catheters (8.6% and other sites (20%, while no focus was identified in 77% of patients. Prior use of broad-spectrum antimicrobials was nearly universal. All isolates tested were sensitive to vancomycin and linezolid. Resistance to ampicillin and gentamicin were 44.7% and 52.6%, respectively. Compared with other medical ICU patients, patients with enterococcal bacteremia had a longer ICU stay (P<0.0001 and a trend toward higher ICU mortality (P=0.08. Conclusions: Enterococcal bacteremia is an important nosocomial infection in the medical ICU, with a predilection for older patients with multiple comorbidities. Its occurrence is associated with a significantly longer ICU stay and a trend to a higher mortality. The choice of antibiotics should be dictated by local susceptibility data.

  9. [Bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transversal aortic arch and myocarditis caused by Salmonella enteritidis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, L; Mesa, E; Rodríguez, J E; Sánchez, M P; Ugarte, J; Algora Weber, A; Dámaso, D; Daza, R M; Mendaza, P

    1989-02-01

    A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus had Salmonella enteritidis bacteremia associated with mycotic aneurysm of the transverse aortic arc and myocarditis. Antibiotic therapy with ampicillin and chloramphenicol was ineffective despite the fact that the microorganism was sensitive in vitro to those antimicrobials, and the patient had a progressive clinical deterioration which culminated in death.

  10. Catheter-related bacteremia due to Kocuria kristinae in a patient with ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaglia, G; Carretto, E; Barbarini, D; Moras, L; Scalone, S; Marone, P; De Paoli, P

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases.

  11. Catheter-Related Bacteremia Due to Kocuria kristinae in a Patient with Ovarian Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Basaglia, G.; Carretto, E.; Barbarini, D.; Moras, L.; Scalone, S.; Marone, P.; De Paoli, P.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the first case of a catheter-related recurrent bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae, a gram-positive microorganism belonging to the family Micrococcaceae, in a 51-year-old woman with ovarian cancer. This unusual pathogen may cause opportunistic infections in patients with severe underlying diseases.

  12. First clinical description of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia in a patient with dental abscess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kordjian, Hayarpi H; Schultz, Joyce D J H; Rosenvinge, Flemming Schønning

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Eggerthia catenaformis bacteremia originating from a dental abscess and imitating necrotizing fasciitis in a previously healthy adult. The isolates were easily identified by MALDI-TOF MS. The clinical course, surgical and antibiotic treatment as well as the successful outcome...

  13. Course and Outcome of Bacteremia Due to Staphylococcus Aureus: Evaluation of Different Clinical Case Definitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Lautenschlager (Stephan); C. Herzog (Christian); W. Zimmerli (Werner)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIn a retrospective survey of patients hospitalized in the University Hospital of Basel, Switzerland, the course and outcome of 281 cases of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus aureus over a 7-year period were analyzed. The main purpose was to evaluate different case definitions. In 78%

  14. A model of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia, septic arthritis, and osteomyelitis in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, R S; Davis, W H; Farris, K B; Campeau, R J; Mulvihill, D M; Shane, S M

    1990-11-01

    We studied the occurrence, magnitude, and kinetics of bacteremia and the resultant osteomyelitis and septic arthritis in an avian model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Thirty-day-old male broiler chicks were inoculated i.v. with 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) cfu of strain Duntravis, a beta-hemolytic, coagulase-producing, capsular type 8 isolate from the synovial fluid of a 2-year-old black boy. Bacteremia occurred in 80%, 90%, and 100% of animals inoculated with 10(5), 10(6), or 10(7) cfu, respectively. The magnitude of bacteremia in surviving, bacteremic animals increased for 96 hours after inoculation and then decreased after a plateau phase. Osteomyelitis and septic arthritis occurred only in chicks that were continuously bacteremic. The occurrence of osteomyelitis was uniform among continuously bacteremic animals and developed 1 to 23 hours after inoculation. Chickens are susceptible to systemic infections with S. aureus. Bacteremia, osteomyelitis, and septic arthritis may be induced in healthy chickens without prior manipulations that depress their resistance.

  15. Incidence of bacteremia after chewing, tooth brushing and scaling in individuals with periodontal inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, F.L.; Kilian, Mogens; Holmstrup, P.

    2006-01-01

    higher in periodontitis than in gingivitis patients and healthy control individuals. In periodontitis patients, the magnitude of bacteremia was associated with gingival index, plaque index and number of sites with bleeding on probing, but not with probing pocket depth measurements. Practical implications...

  16. Bacteremias in liver transplant recipients: shift toward gram-negative bacteria as predominant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nina; Wagener, Marilyn M; Obman, Asia; Cacciarelli, Thomas V; de Vera, Michael E; Gayowski, Timothy

    2004-07-01

    During the 1990s, gram-positive bacteria emerged as major pathogens after liver transplantation. We sought to determine whether the pathogens associated with bacteremias in liver transplant recipients have changed. Patients included 233 liver transplant recipients transplanted between 1989 and 2003. The proportion of all infections due to bacteremias increased significantly over time (P gram-negatives increased from 25% in the period of 1989-1993 to 51.8% in 1998-03, that of gram-positive bacteria decreased from 75% in the period of 1989-93 to 48.2% in the period of 1998-2003. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were the most frequent pathogens in bacteremic patients. The incidence of bacteremias due to MRSA and Pseudomonas aeruginosa has remained unchanged (P gram-negative bacteria, particularly Klebsiella pneumoniae has increased (P =.02). Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the current quartile were not clonally related. In conclusion, bacteremias as a proportion of all infections in liver transplant recipients have increased significantly over time, due in part to a decline in infections due to other major pathogens, e.g., fungi, primarily Candida species, and CMV. Gram-negative bacteria have emerged as predominant pathogens in bacteremic liver transplant recipients.

  17. [Role of anaerobic blood culture in the simultaneous blood culture taking for the diagnosis of bacteremia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo-Lara, Claudia Elena; Saldaña-Ramírez, Martha Idalia; Ayala-Gaytán, Juan Jacobo; Valdovinos-Chávez, Salvador Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Harboring a high mortality, the incidence of sepsis is increasing; thus detection, identification and susceptibility tests of the involved microorganisms become urgent. We reviewed the records from January 2013 until July 2014 of a total of 4110 blood culture bottles taken from adult patients in a private tertiary hospital. Growth of microorganisms was observed in 559 bottles (12.6%). We emphasize that 2648 blood cultures (60%) were taken in two paired aerobic and anaerobic bottles drawn at the same time (1324 pairs); from these, growth was observed in 182 inoculated bottles drawn from two different sites at the same time from 135 patients (13.7%). In 86 pairs of bottles with samples from 54 patients (40%), growth occurred only in the aerobic blood culture bottles. Also, growth of microorganisms was observed only in anaerobic bottles in 24 pairs (13.19%), corresponding to 21 patients (15.5%, panaerobic bottle. The usefulness of blood cultures for anaerobes for the identification of obligate anaerobic bacteremia which rarely occur is low (2.2% of patients with bacteremia); however, in 15.55% of the patients the risk of completely overlook bacteremia was present, and in 53% of patients with positive cultures, bacteremia was established earlier, and thus permitted earlier and accurate decision making.

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Bacteremia in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Averbuch, Diana; Tridello, Gloria; Hoek, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Background: This intercontinental study aimed to study gram-negative rod (GNR) resistance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Methods: GNR bacteremias occurring during 6 months post-HSCT (February 2014-May 2015) were prospectively collected, and analyzed for rates and risk factors...

  19. A Teenager With Sacroileitis, Rash and Fever Caused by Streptobacillus moniliformis Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Navneet K; Craft, David; Crook, Tonya; Dossett, John

    2016-12-01

    We report a rare case of sacroileitis in a teenager resulting from Streptobacillus moniliformis bacteremia, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight. We discuss the challenges of making this diagnosis and review the literature on rat bite fever.

  20. Hypertrophic Nonunion Humerus Mimicking an Enchondroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Magu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Although fractures of humeral shaft show excellent results with conservative management, nonunion does occur. Case Report. We bring forth the case of a young male with a 1.5-year-old hypertrophic nonunion of the humerus mimicking an enchondroma. The initial X-ray images of the patient appeared to be an enchondroma, which only on further evaluation and histopathological analysis was diagnosed conclusively to be a hypertrophic nonunion. Discussion. Enchondromas are often incidentally diagnosed benign tumours. It is however not common to misdiagnose a hypertrophic nonunion to be an enchondroma. We present this case to highlight the unique diagnostic dilemma the treating team had to face.

  1. Giant Spermatocele Mimicking Hydrocele: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Chih Yeh

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Spermatoceles are usually asymptomatic and often found incidentally during physical examination. We report a case of giant spermatocele that mimicked a hydrocele. A 55-year-old man suffered from right scrotal enlargement for several years. As the heavy sensation and scrotal soreness worsened in recent months, he came to our outpatient clinic for help. Hydrocele was suspected due to transilluminating appearance of the scrotal content. Surgical exploration was arranged and a giant spermatocele was found. Total excision of the spermatocele was performed and the patient recovered well. The specimen was sent for pathology and spermatocele with spermatozoa was noted.

  2. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S.; Argani, Pedram; Gearhart, John P.

    2004-01-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  3. Central skeletal sarcoidosis mimicking metastatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talmi, Danit; Smith, Stacy; Mulligan, Michael E.

    2008-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease that histologically typically shows non-caseating granulomas. The most common radiologic finding is hilar and mediastinal adenopathy. Patients with widely disseminated disease may show involvement of the peripheral appendicular skeleton in 1-13% of such cases. A primary skeletal presentation without other manifestations typical of the disease is rare. We present a case of sarcoidosis in a middle-aged Caucasian man in whom the disease presented with widespread lytic lesions in the axial skeleton and long bones, mimicking metastatic disease. There was no involvement of the peripheral skeleton, skin or lungs. (orig.)

  4. Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwegmann, J P; Enzenauer, R J

    1995-05-01

    A pediatric case of Cogan's syndrome mimicking acute Lyme arthritis is described. A 12-year-old black boy was admitted to the pediatric service for presumed right knee septic arthritis. Symptoms included acute pain and swelling with decreased range-of-motion. Although the patient's right knee symptoms and positive Lyme serology were consistent with a diagnosis of Lyme arthritis, the presence of sensorineural hearing loss and interstitial keratitis with inflammatory arthritis suggested a diagnosis of Cogan's syndrome. Subsequent Western blot analysis was negative for Borrelia burgdorferi antigens. The patient had dramatic clinical improvement of musculoskeletal and ophthalmologic complaints shortly after receiving high-dose corticosteroids, although residual sensorineural hearing loss persisted.

  5. Remote Cutaneous Breast Carcinoma Metastasis Mimicking Dermatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annakan V Navaratnam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous metastases from primary internal malignancies are an uncommon presentation. Cutaneous metastases are more frequently seen in breast cancer than in any other visceral malignancy in women. Medical practitioners should be vigilant of the possibility of unusual presentations of metastatic disease in breast cancer patients with lobular carcinoma presenting as cutaneous lesions mimicking benign dermatological conditions. Herein, we present a case of a 75-year-old woman presenting with cutaneous lobular breast carcinoma metastases on her anterior right leg, which had previously been misdiagnosed as dermatitis for 9 years.

  6. Unusual presentation of chondroblastoma mimicking Trevor's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Karkhur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondroblastoma is a benign bone tumor, represents 1%–2% of all primary bone tumors, typically seen in patients 10–25-year-old and more common in males. It occurs most frequently in the distal femur, proximal tibia, and proximal humerus. Soft tissue extension is extremely rare. Adjacent joints may develop effusions, but the tumor mass protruding into the joint has never been seen in case of chondroblastoma. We report a rare case of intra-articular chondroblastoma arising from proximal tibia in a 16-year-old boy and growing into the knee joint mimicking an intra-articular osteochondroma.

  7. Floating retained root lesion mimicking apical periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ming-Pang; Chen, Chih-Ping; Shieh, Yi-Shing

    2009-10-01

    A case of a retained root tip simulating apical periodontitis on radiographic examination is described. The retained root tip, originating from the left lower first molar, floated under the left lower second premolar apical region mimicking apical periodontitis. It appeared as an ill-defined periapical radiolucency containing a smaller radiodense mass on radiograph. The differential diagnosis included focal sclerosing osteomyelitis (condensing osteitis) and ossifying fibroma. Upon exicisional biopsy, a retained root associated with granulation tissue was found. After 1-year follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic and the periradicular lesion was healing. Meanwhile, the associated tooth showed a normal response to stimulation testing.

  8. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model. PMID:22540986

  9. Algae biodiesel - a feasibility report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Yihe

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Algae biofuels have been studied numerous times including the Aquatic Species program in 1978 in the U.S., smaller laboratory research projects and private programs. Results Using Molina Grima 2003 and Department of Energy figures, captial costs and operating costs of the closed systems and open systems were estimated. Cost per gallon of conservative estimates yielded $1,292.05 and $114.94 for closed and open ponds respectively. Contingency scenarios were generated in which cost per gallon of closed system biofuels would reach $17.54 under the generous conditions of 60% yield, 50% reduction in the capital costs and 50% hexane recovery. Price per gallon of open system produced fuel could reach $1.94 under generous assumptions of 30% yield and $0.2/kg CO2. Conclusions Current subsidies could allow biodiesel to be produced economically under the generous conditions specified by the model.

  10. Clinical Presentation, Risk Factors, and Outcomes of Hematogenous Prosthetic Joint Infection in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J; Palraj, Bharath Raj; Osmon, Douglas R; Berbari, Elie F; Baddour, Larry M; Lohse, Christine M; Steckelberg, James M; Wilson, Walter R; Sohail, M Rizwan

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia is a life-threatening condition that may lead to metastatic infection, including prosthetic joint infection. To assess clinical factors associated with hematogenous prosthetic joint infection, we retrospectively reviewed all patients with a joint arthroplasty in place at the time of a first episode of S. aureus bacteremia over a 5-year period at our institution. Patients with postsurgical prosthetic joint infection without hematogenous prosthetic joint infection were excluded. There were 85 patients (143 arthroplasties) with either no prosthetic joint infection (n = 50; 58.8%) or hematogenous prosthetic joint infection in at least one arthroplasty (n = 35; 41.2%). The odds of hematogenous prosthetic joint infection was significantly increased among patients with community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia (odds ratio [OR] 18.07; 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.64-infinity; P = .001), as compared with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia, in which there were no patients with hematogenous prosthetic joint infection. After adjusting for S. aureus bacteremia classification, the presence of ≥3 joint arthroplasties in place was associated with a nearly ninefold increased odds of hematogenous prosthetic joint infection as compared with those with 1-2 joint arthroplasties in place (OR 8.55; 95% CI 1.44-95.71; P = .012). All but one joint with prosthetic joint infection demonstrated at least one clinical feature suggestive of infection. There were 4 additional S. aureus prosthetic joint infections diagnosed during a median of 3.4 years of follow-up post hospitalization for S. aureus bacteremia. Prosthetic joint infection is frequent in patients with existing arthroplasties and concomitant S. aureus bacteremia, particularly with community-acquired S. aureus bacteremia and multiple prostheses. In contrast, occult S. aureus prosthetic joint infection without clinical features suggestive of prosthetic joint infection at the time of S. aureus bacteremia

  11. Cost Attributable to Nosocomial Bacteremia. Analysis According to Microorganism and Antimicrobial Sensitivity in a University Hospital in Barcelona.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Riu

    Full Text Available To calculate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia caused by the most common organisms, classified by their antimicrobial susceptibility.We selected patients who developed nosocomial bacteremia caused by Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These microorganisms were analyzed because of their high prevalence and they frequently present multidrug resistance. A control group consisted of patients classified within the same all-patient refined-diagnosis related group without bacteremia. Our hospital has an established cost accounting system (full-costing that uses activity-based criteria to analyze cost distribution. A logistic regression model was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia for each admission (propensity score and was used for propensity score matching adjustment. Subsequently, the propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients who developed bacteremia, as well as differences in this cost, depending on whether the microorganism was multidrug-resistant or multidrug-sensitive.A total of 571 admissions with bacteremia matched the inclusion criteria and 82,022 were included in the control group. The mean cost was € 25,891 for admissions with bacteremia and € 6,750 for those without bacteremia. The mean incremental cost was estimated at € 15,151 (CI, € 11,570 to € 18,733. Multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa bacteremia had the highest mean incremental cost, € 44,709 (CI, € 34,559 to € 54,859. Antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had the lowest mean incremental cost, € 10,481 (CI, € 8,752 to € 12,210. Despite their lower cost, episodes of antimicrobial-susceptible E. coli nosocomial bacteremia had a major impact due to their high frequency.Adjustment of hospital cost according to the organism causing bacteremia and antibiotic sensitivity could improve prevention strategies

  12. Comparison of radiometric and conventional culture systems in detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteremia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, M.J.; Zwahlen, A.; Elliott, H.L.; Ford, N.K.; Charache, F.P.; Moxon, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    To compare the efficiency of detecting Haemophilus influenzae type b bacteremia by the BACTEC radiometric system and a conventional Trypticase soy broth blood culture system, the authors developed an in vivo model of bacteremia in rats. After intravenous injection of 50 to 200 CFU into adult rats, there was a linear logarithmic increase in CFU per milliliter of rat blood during the first 10 h (r = 0.98), allowing accurate prediction of the level of bacteremia with time. Culture bottles were inoculated with 0.5 ml of blood obtained by cardiac puncture and processed as clinical samples in the microbiology laboratory with RS and conventional protocols. They found the following. (i) The first detection of bacteremia by RS was similar to that by TSB if a Gram stain of the TSB was done on day 1 and was superior if that smear was omitted (P less than 0.01). (ii) The detection times in both systems were comparable at different magnitudes of bacteremia (10(1) to 10(4) CFU/ml). (iii) Supplementation of inoculated bottles with 2 ml of sterile rat blood interfered with Gram stain detection in TSB but resulted in increased 14 CO 2 production in RS. (iv) No difference in detection time was found between RS and TSB for four different clinical isolates. These studies show that, in a biologically relevant model, the detection of positive blood cultures for H. influenzae type b by RS was comparable to or better than detection by TSB when blood was processed analogously to clinical specimens

  13. Computed tomography findings associated with bacteremia in adult patients with a urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, T Y; Kim, H R; Hwang, K E; Lee, J-M; Cho, J H; Lee, J H

    2016-11-01

    The use of computed tomography (CT) in the diagnosis of urinary tract infection (UTI) has rapidly increased recently at acute stage, but the CT findings associated with bacteremia in UTI patients are unknown. 189 UTI patients were enrolled who underwent a CT scan within 24 h after hospital admission. We classified CT findings into eight types: a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion, enlarged kidneys, perinephric fat stranding, ureteritis or pyelitis, complicated renal cyst, renal papillary necrosis, hydronephrosis, and renal and perirenal abscess. A retrospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the CT findings associated with bacteremia. The mean age of these patients was 60 ± 17.2 years, and 93.1 % were women. Concurrent bacteremia was noted in 40.2 % of the patients. Abnormal CT findings were noted in 96.3 % of the patients and 62.4 % had two or more abnormal findings. The most frequent abnormal CT finding was a focal or multifocal wedge-shaped area of hypoperfusion (77.2 %), followed by perinephric fat stranding (29.1 %). Perinephric fat stranding, hydronephrosis, and the presence of two or more abnormal CT findings were significantly associated with bacteremia in patients with community-acquired UTI. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, age [odds ratio (OR) 1.03; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.009-1.062], two or more abnormal CT findings (OR 3.163; 95 % CI 1.334-7.498), and hydronephrosis (OR 13.160; 95 % CI 1.048-165.282) were significantly associated with bacteremia. Physicians should be aware that appropriate early management is necessary to prevent fatality in patients with these CT findings.

  14. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae Kyoung Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis.

  15. Clinical and Histologic Mimickers of Celiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamboj, Amrit K; Oxentenko, Amy S

    2017-08-17

    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder of the small bowel, classically associated with diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption. The diagnosis of celiac disease is made when there are compatible clinical features, supportive serologic markers, representative histology from the small bowel, and response to a gluten-free diet. Histologic findings associated with celiac disease include intraepithelial lymphocytosis, crypt hyperplasia, villous atrophy, and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate in the lamina propria. It is important to recognize and diagnose celiac disease, as strict adherence to a gluten-free diet can lead to resolution of clinical and histologic manifestations of the disease. However, many other entities can present with clinical and/or histologic features of celiac disease. In this review article, we highlight key clinical and histologic mimickers of celiac disease. The evaluation of a patient with serologically negative enteropathy necessitates a carefully elicited history and detailed review by a pathologist. Medications can mimic celiac disease and should be considered in all patients with a serologically negative enteropathy. Many mimickers of celiac disease have clues to the underlying diagnosis, and many have a targeted therapy. It is necessary to provide patients with a correct diagnosis rather than subject them to a lifetime of an unnecessary gluten-free diet.

  16. Method and apparatus for processing algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2012-07-03

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells. The lysate separates into at least two layers including a lipid-containing hydrophobic layer and an ionic liquid-containing hydrophilic layer. A salt or salt solution may be used to remove water from the ionic liquid-containing layer before the ionic liquid is reused. The used salt may also be dried and/or concentrated and reused. The method can operate at relatively low lysis, processing, and recycling temperatures, which minimizes the environmental impact of algae processing while providing reusable biofuels and other useful products.

  17. Errors When Extracting Oil from Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, E.; Treat, R.; Ichiuji, T.

    2014-12-01

    Oil is in popular demand, but the worldwide amount of oil is decreasing and prices for it are steadily increasing. Leading scientists have been working to find a solution of attaining oil in an economically and environmentally friendly way. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have determined that "a small mixture of algae and water can be turned into crude oil in less than an hour" (Sheehan, Duhahay, Benemann, Poessler). There are various ways of growing the algae, such as closed loop and open loop methods, as well as processes of extracting oil, such as hydrothermal liquefaction and the hexane-solvent method. Our objective was to grow the algae (C. reinhardtii) and extract oil from it using NaOH and HCl, because we had easy access to those specific chemicals. After two trials of attempted algae growth, we discovered that a bacteria was killing off the algae. This led us to further contemplation on how this dead algae and bacteria are affecting our environment, and the organisms within it. Eutrophication occurs when excess nutrients stimulate rapid growth of algae in an aquatic environment. This can clog waterways and create algal blooms in blue-green algae, as well as neurotoxic red tide phytoplankton. These microscopic algae die upon consumption of the nutrients in water and are degraded by bacteria. The bacteria respires and creates an acidic environment with the spontaneous conversion of carbon dioxide to carbonic acid in water. This process of degradation is exactly what occurred in our 250 mL flask. When the phytoplankton attacked our algae, it created a hypoxic environment, which eliminated any remaining amounts of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and nutrients in the water, resulting in a miniature dead zone. These dead zones can occur almost anywhere where there are algae and bacteria, such as the ocean, and make it extremely difficult for any organism to survive. This experiment helped us realize the

  18. 21 CFR 73.275 - Dried algae meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dried algae meal. 73.275 Section 73.275 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.275 Dried algae meal. (a) Identity. The color additive dried algae meal is a dried mixture of algae cells (genus Spongiococcum, separated from its culture broth...

  19. The Biology of blue-green algae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carr, Nicholas G; Whitton, B. A

    1973-01-01

    .... Their important environmental roles, their part in nitrogen fixation and the biochemistry of phototrophic metabolism are some of the attractions of blue-geen algae to an increasing number of biologists...

  20. Diatom algae of the Guni river (Pamir)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbonova, P.A.; Hisoriev, H.H.

    2006-01-01

    There are presented the dates of the results of diatom algae (Bacillariophyta) of the Gunt river. There was found 107 species and 9 subspecies which belong to 3 classics, 12 ordos, 13 families and 28 genus

  1. 2011 Biomass Program Platform Peer Review: Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Joyce [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the 2011 U.S. Department of Energy Biomass Program’s Algae Platform Review meeting.

  2. Dipeptides from the red alga Acanthopora spicifera

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; De; Kamat, S.Y.

    An investigation of red alga Acanthophora spicifera afforded the known peptide, aurantiamide acetate and a new diastereoisomer of this dipeptide (dia-aurantiamide acetate). This is a first report of aurantiamide acetate from a marine source...

  3. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    OpenAIRE

    Baliga, Rudras; Powers, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA) are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a ...

  4. Antioxidant Activity of Hawaiian Marine Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Wright

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae are known to contain a wide variety of bioactive compounds, many of which have commercial applications in pharmaceutical, medical, cosmetic, nutraceutical, food and agricultural industries. Natural antioxidants, found in many algae, are important bioactive compounds that play an important role against various diseases and ageing processes through protection of cells from oxidative damage. In this respect, relatively little is known about the bioactivity of Hawaiian algae that could be a potential natural source of such antioxidants. The total antioxidant activity of organic extracts of 37 algal samples, comprising of 30 species of Hawaiian algae from 27 different genera was determined. The activity was determined by employing the FRAP (Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assays. Of the algae tested, the extract of Turbinaria ornata was found to be the most active. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this extract led to the isolation of a variety of different carotenoids as the active principles. The major bioactive antioxidant compound was identified as the carotenoid fucoxanthin. These results show, for the first time, that numerous Hawaiian algae exhibit significant antioxidant activity, a property that could lead to their application in one of many useful healthcare or related products as well as in chemoprevention of a variety of diseases including cancer.

  5. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chih-Chao; Wu, Chien-Hsing; Lee, Chien-Te; Liu, Han-Tsung; Chen, Jin-Bor; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Chen, Chih-Hung; Chuang, Feng-Rong

    2014-11-01

    In the face of increasing treatment options for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-Kp) hemodialysis (HD) access-related bacteremia, the difference in clinical effectiveness between ertapenem and flomoxef remains unclear. We conducted this retrospective study to determine their efficacies and treatment outcomes. Patients on maintenance HD with fistula-, graft-, or catheter-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia were enrolled. Data related to clinical features and antibiotic treatments were collected. Outcome was determined by mortality resulting from bacteremia during the 14-day period after the collection of the first positive blood culture for flomoxef-susceptible ESBL-Kp. The 64 patients studied had severe septicemia as determined by the Pitt bacteremia score; 50% (32/64) were in the intensive care unit (ICU) at the time of bacteremia. Old age (>65 years; 57.8%), malnutrition (albumin30 days; 75%) were also highly prevalent. The study population comprised nine fistula-, 10 graft-, and 45 HD catheter-related bacteremia cases, and the mortality rate was high (38/64, 59.4%). The mortality rate was significantly higher in the flomoxef treatment group than in the ertapenem treatment group (22/30, 73% vs. 16/34, 47%, pflomoxef use (odds ratio (OR) 2.52, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.34-35.17) and Pitt bacteremia score (OR 4.37, 95% CI 1.28-5.26) were independently associated with mortality. In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  6. Influence of an independent quarterly audit on publicly reported vancomycin-resistant enterocococi bacteremia data in Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematunge, Chatura; Policarpio, Michelle E; Johnstone, Jennie; Adomako, Kwaku; Nadolny, Emily; Lam, Freda; Li, Ye; Brown, Kevin A; Garber, Gary

    2018-04-13

    All Ontario hospitals are mandated to self-report vancomycin-resistant enterocococi (VRE) bacteremias to Ontario's Ministry of Health and Long-term Care for public reporting purposes. Independent quarterly audits of publicly reported VRE bacteremias between September 2013 and June 2015 were carried out by Public Health Ontario. VRE bacteremia case-reporting errors between January 2009 and August 2013 were identified by a single retrospective audit. Employing a quasiexperimental pre-post study design, the relative risk of VRE bacteremia reporting errors before and after quarterly audits were modeled using Poisson regression adjusting for hospital type, case counts reported to the Ministry of Health and Long-term Care, and autocorrelation via generalized estimating equation. Overall, 24.5% (126 out of 514) of VRE bacteremias were reported in error; 114 out of 367 (31%) VRE bacteremias reported before quarterly audits and 12 out of 147 (8.1%) reported after audits were found to be incorrect. In adjusted analysis, quarterly audits of VRE bacteremias were associated with significant reductions in reporting errors when compared with before quarterly auditing (relative risk, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.05-0.63). Risk of reporting errors among community hospitals were greater than acute teaching hospitals of the region (relative risk, 4.39; 95% CI, 3.07-5.70). This study found independent quarterly audits of publicly reported VRE bacteremias to be associated with significant reductions in reporting errors. Public reporting systems should consider adopting routine data audits and hospital-targeted training to improve data accuracy. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration on the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano, Alex; Marco, Francesc; Martínez, José A; Pisos, Elena; Almela, Manel; Dimova, Veselka P; Alamo, Dolores; Ortega, Mar; Lopez, Josefina; Mensa, Josep

    2008-01-15

    Vancomycin treatment failure in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia is not uncommon, even when MRSA is susceptible to vancomycin. The aim of our study was to evaluate whether vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration has any influence on the mortality associated with MRSA bacteremia. A total of 414 episodes of MRSA bacteremia were prospectively followed-up from 1991 through 2005. MIC of vancomycin for the first isolate was determined by E-test. Clinical variables recorded were age, comorbidity, prior administration of vancomycin, use of corticosteroids, prognosis of underlying disease, source of bacteremia, the need for mechanical ventilation, shock, and mortality. A "treatment group" variable was created and defined as follows: (1) receipt of empirical vancomycin and an isolate with a vancomycin MIC of 1 microg/mL (38 episodes), (2) receipt of empirical vancomycin and an isolate with a vancomycin MIC of 1.5 microg/mL (90 episodes), (3) receipt of empirical vancomycin and an isolate with a vancomycin MIC of 2 microg/mL (40 episodes), and (4) receipt of inappropriate empirical therapy (246 episodes). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Episodes caused by strains with a vancomycin MIC of 2 microg/mL were independently associated with a lower risk of shock (odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.75). Multivariate analysis selected receipt of empirical vancomycin and an isolate with a vancomycin MIC of 2 microg/mL (OR, 6.39; 95% CI, 1.68-24.3), receipt of inappropriate empirical therapy (OR, 3.62; 95% CI, 1.20-10.9), increasing age (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.00-1.04), use of corticosteroids (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.04-3.29), an ultimately (OR, 10.2; 95% CI, 2.85-36.8) or rapidly (OR, 1.81; 95% CI, 1.06-3.10) fatal underlying disease, high-risk (OR, 3.60; 95% CI, 1.89-6.88) and intermediate-risk (OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.17-4.04) sources of bacteremia, and shock (OR, 7.38; 95% CI, 4.11-13.3) as the best predictors of

  8. Acute perimyocarditis mimicking transmural myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Hesham R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although acute pericarditis has charachteristic electrocardiographic (ECG findings that differentiate it from acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (MI; in certain cases diagnosis is somewhat difficult especially when the ECG reveals focal instead of diffuse changes and moreover when pericarditis is associated with an underlying myocarditis causing elevation of the cardiac biomarkers therefore increasing the difficulty in differentiating between both enteties. This is especially important because adverse lethal side effect can occur if thrombolytic therapy is administered for a patient with acute pericarditis, or if a diagnosis of transmural MI is missed. In this case report we are describing an 18 year old male patient who presented with an acute onset of severe chest pain associated with focal ECG changes and elevated cardiac enzymes mimicking transmural MI. This report aims to sensitize readers to this debate and create awareness among cardiologists and intensivists with both presentations and how to reach an accurate diagnosis.

  9. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis

  10. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  11. [Primary central nervous system lymphoma mimicking ventriculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shiro; Nagano, Seiji; Shibata, Sumiya; Kunieda, Takeharu; Imai, Yukihiro; Kohara, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with deteriorated bradykinesia, gait disturbance, disorientation, and urinary incontinence for three weeks. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed dilatation of the ventricles. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination demonstrated lymphocytic pleocytosis, elevation of protein levels, and decreased of glucose levels. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed lesions in the ventricular wall and choroid plexus, mimicking ventriculitis. No evidence of bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, or viral infections were observed in the CSF. Flow cytometry of CSF showed predominance of CD20+, λ+ cells. PCR examination of CSF revealed positive IgH gene rearrangement, suggesting B cell lymphoma. Endoscopic brain biopsy showed diffuse large B cell lymphoma. As the patient had no evidence of lymphoma in the other organs, we made a diagnosed of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL). A limited intraventricular spread of PCNSL is rare but important as one of differential diagnosis of ventriculitis.

  12. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  13. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-10-07

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth.

  14. Subdural Hematoma Mimickers: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Dragos; Koziarz, Alex; Cenic, Aleksa; Nath, Siddharth; Singh, Sheila; Almenawer, Saleh A; Kachur, Edward

    2016-09-01

    A variety of subdural pathologies that may mimic hematomas are reported in the literature. We aimed to identify the atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of subdural masses that may mimic subdural hematomas. A systematic review of MEDLINE and Embase was conducted independently by 2 reviewers to identify articles describing subdural hematoma mimickers. We also present a patient from our institution with a subdural pathology mimicking a subdural hematoma. We analyzed patient clinical presentations, underlying pathologies, radiologic findings, and clinical outcomes. We included 43 articles totaling 48 patients. The mean ± SD patient age was 55.7 ± 16.8 years. Of the 45 cases describing patient history, 13 patients (27%) had a history of trauma. The underlying pathologies of the 48 subdural collections were 10 metastasis (21%), 14 lymphoma (29%), 7 sarcoma (15%), 4 infectious (8%), 4 autoimmune (8%), and 9 miscellaneous (19%). Findings on computed tomography (CT) scan were 18 hyperdense (41%), 11 hypodense (25%), 9 isodense (20%), 3 isodense/hyperdense (7%), and 3 hypodense/isodense (7%). Thirty-four patients (71%) were treated surgically; among these patients, 65% had symptom resolution. Neither the pathology (P = 0.337) nor the management strategy (P = 0.671) was correlated with improved functional outcomes. Identification of atypical history and radiologic features should prompt further diagnostic tests, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to elucidate the proper diagnosis, given that certain pathologies may be managed nonsurgically. A subdural collection that is hyperdense on CT scan and hyperintense on T2-weighted MRI, along with a history of progressive headache with no trauma, may raise the suspicion of an atypical subdural pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperspectral imaging of snow algae and green algae from aeroterrestrial habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzinger, Andreas; Allen, Michael C; Deheyn, Dimitri D

    2016-09-01

    Snow algae and green algae living in aeroterrestrial habitats are ideal objects to study adaptation to high light irradiation. Here, we used a detailed description of the spectral properties as a proxy for photo-acclimation/protection in snow algae (Chlamydomonas nivalis, Chlainomonas sp. and Chloromonas sp.) and charophyte green algae (Zygnema sp., Zygogonium ericetorum and Klebsormidium crenulatum). The hyperspectral microscopic mapping and imaging technique allowed us to acquire total absorption spectra of these microalgae in the waveband of 400-900nm. Particularly in Chlamydomonas nivalis and Chlainomonas sp., a high absorbance between 400-550nm was observed, due to naturally occurring secondary carotenoids; in Chloromonas sp. and in the charopyhte algae this high absorbance was missing, the latter being close relatives to land plants. To investigate if cellular water loss has an influence on the spectral properties, the cells were plasmolysed in sorbitol or desiccated at ambient air. While in snow algae, these treatments did hardly change the spectral properties, in the charopyhte algae the condensation of the cytoplasm and plastids increased the absorbance in the lower waveband of 400-500nm. These changes might be ecologically relevant and photoprotective, as aeroterrestrial algae are naturally exposed to occasional water limitation, leading to desiccation, which are conditions usually occurring together with higher irradiation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A Isolated from Patients with Bacteremia in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherchan, Jatan Bahadur; Morita, Masatomo; Matono, Takashi; Izumiya, Hidemasa; Ohnishi, Makoto; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Tandukar, Sarmila; Laghu, Ujjwal; Nagamatsu, Maki; Kato, Yasuyuki; Ohmagari, Norio; Hayakawa, Kayoko

    2017-12-01

    Little is known about the epidemiology of typhoid and paratyphoid fever in Nepal. We aimed to elucidate the molecular and clinical epidemiology of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Nepal. Isolates were collected from 23 cases of bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A between December 2014 and October 2015. Thirteen patients (57%) were male, and the median age was 21 years. None of the patients had an underlying chronic disease. All S. Paratyphi A isolates were sensitive to ampicillin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, ceftriaxone, and chloramphenicol. All isolates were resistant to nalidixic acid and were categorized as intermediately susceptible to levofloxacin. Phylogenetic analysis revealed close relatedness among the isolates, including several clonal groups, suggesting local spread. Patients with bacteremia due to S. Paratyphi A in Kathmandu, Nepal, were relatively young and nondebilitated. Improving control of S . Paratyphi infections should focus on effective infection control measures and selection of empirical therapy based on current resistance patterns.

  17. Familial Clustering of Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in First-Degree Relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise B.; Christiansen, Mia N.; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    the rate of the disease, and whether this rate is affected by the type of family relationship (that is, parent or sibling) or by how the relative acquired the infection. DESIGN: Register-based nationwide cohort study (1992 to 2011). SETTING: Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: First-degree relatives (children...... or siblings) of patients previously hospitalized with S aureus bacteremia. MEASUREMENTS: Poisson regression models were used to calculate standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of S aureus bacteremia, with the incidence rate in the population as a reference. RESULTS: 34 774 individuals (the exposed cohort...... in the background population. The estimate was significantly higher if the index case patient was a sibling (SIR, 5.01 [CI, 3.30 to 7.62]) than a parent (SIR, 1.96 [CI, 1.45 to 2.67]; interaction P

  18. Radiation sterilization of harmful algae in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byung Chull An; Jae-Sung Kim; Seung Sik Lee; Shyamkumar Barampuram; Eun Mi Lee; Byung Yeoup Chung

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: Drinking water, water used in food production and for irrigation, water for fish farming, waste water, surface water, and recreational water have been recently recognized as a vector for the transmission of harmful micro-organisms. The human and animal harmful algae is a waterborne risk to public health and economy because the algae are ubiquitous and persistent in water and wastewater, not completely removed by physical-chemical treatment processes, and relatively resistant to chemical disinfection. Gamma and electron beam radiation technology is of growing in the water industry since it was demonstrated that gamma and electron beam radiation is very effective against harmful algae. Materials and Methods: Harmful algae (Scenedesmus quadricauda(Turpin) Brebisson 1835 (AG10003), Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck 1896 (AG30007) and Chlamydomonas sp. (AG10061)) were distributed from Korean collection for type cultures (KCTC). Strains were cultured aerobically in Allen's medium at 25□ and 300 umol/m2s for 1 week using bioreactor. We investigated the disinfection efficiency of harmful algae irradiated with gamma (0.05 to 10 kGy for 30 min) and electron beam (1 to 19 kGy for 5 sec) rays. Results and Conclusion: We investigated the disinfection efficiency of harmful algae irradiated with gamma and electron beam rays of 50 to 19000 Gy. We established the optimum sterilization condition which use the gamma and electron beam radiation. Gamma ray disinfected harmful algae at 400 Gy for 30 min. Also, electron beam disinfected at 1000 Gy for 5 sec. This alternative disinfection practice had powerful disinfection efficiency. Hence, the multi-barrier approach for drinking water treatment in which a combination of various disinfectants and filtration technologies are applied for removal and inactivation of different microbial pathogens will guarantee a lower risk of microbial contamination.

  19. Algae production for energy and foddering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Attila; Jobbagy, Peter; Durko, Emilia [University of Debrecen, Faculty of Applied Economics and Rural Development (UD-FAERD), Centre for Agricultural and Applied Economic Sciences, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2011-09-15

    This study not only presents the results of our own experiments in alga production, but also shows the expected economic results of the various uses of algae (animal feed, direct burning, pelleting, bio-diesel production), the technical characteristics of a new pelleting method based on literature, and also our own recommended alga production technology. In our opinion, the most promising alternative could be the production of alga species with high levels of oil content, which are suitable for utilization as by-products for animal feed and in the production of bio-diesel, as well as for use in waste water management and as a flue gas additive. Based on the data from our laboratory experiments, of the four species we analyzed, Chlorella vulgaris should be considered the most promising species for use in large-scale experiments. Taking expenses into account, our results demonstrate that the use of algae for burning technology purposes results in a significant loss under the current economic conditions; however, the utilization of algae for feeding and bio-diesel purposes - in spite of their innovative nature - is nearing the level needed for competitiveness. By using the alga production technology recommended by us and described in the present study in detail, with an investment of 545 to 727 thousand EUR/ha, this technology should be able to achieve approximately 0-29 thousand EUR/ha net income, depending on size. More favorable values emerge in the case of the 1-ha (larger) size, thanks to the significant savings on fixed costs (depreciation and personnel costs). (orig.)

  20. Carbapenem Breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii Group: Supporting Clinical Outcome Data from Patients with Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yi-Tzu; Chiang, Mei-Chun; Kuo, Shu-Chen; Wang, Yung-Chih; Lee, I-Hsin; Chen, Te-Li; Yang, Ya-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The carbapenem breakpoints set by different organizations for Acinetobacter are discordant, but supporting clinical data are lacking. This study aimed to provide the first clinical outcome data to support the carbapenem breakpoints for Acinetobacter baumannii (Ab) group in patients with bacteremia. This study included 117 adults who received carbapenems for treatment of Ab group bacteremia in Taipei Veterans General Hospital over an 8-year period. We analyzed 30-day mortality rates among patient groups acquiring isolates with different carbapenem minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs). The carbapenem MIC breakpoint derived from classification and regression tree (CART) analysis to delineate the risk of 30-day mortality was between MICs of ≤ 4 mg/L and ≥ 8 mg/L. Mortality rate was higher in patients acquiring isolates with carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L than ≤ 4 mg/L, by bivariate (54.9% [28/51] vs 25.8% [17/66]; P = 0.003) and survival analysis (P = 0.001 by log-rank test). Multivariate analysis using logistic regression and Cox regression models including severity of illness indices demonstrated that treating patients with Ab group bacteremia caused by isolates with a carbapenem MIC ≥ 8 mg/L with carbapenem was an independent predictor of 30-day mortality (odds ratio, 5.125; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.946-13.498; P = 0.001, and hazard ratio, 2.630; 95% CI, 1.431-4.834; P = 0.002, respectively). The clinical outcome data confirmed that isolates with MIC ≤ 4 mg/L were susceptible to carbapenem, and those with MIC ≥ 8 mg/L were resistant in patients with Ab group bacteremia.

  1. Bacteremia caused by cellulosimicrobium in a bone marrow transplant patient: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Armando Gonzales Zamora

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, there are only 15 documented cases of Cellulosimicrobium sp. bacteremia. Our case illustrates the potential pathogenicity of this bacterium and the importance of appropriate antimicrobial therapy and removal of infected central catheters. It is essential to know that gram-positive bacilli should not be disregarded as contaminants when recovered from multiple blood cultures. In this situation, a full microbiologic identification must be attempted.

  2. First case of bacteremia caused by Moellerella wisconsensis: case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardentey-Reyes, A; Jacobs, F; Struelens, M J; Rodriguez-Villalobos, H

    2009-12-01

    Moellerella wisconsensis, a member of the Enterobacteriaceae family, is rarely isolated in clinical specimens. We report here a case of M. wisconsensis infection in a 46-year-old cirrhotic patient with acute cholecystitis. This is the first reported case of a M. wisconsensis infection in Belgium and the first reported case of human bacteremia caused by this bacterium. Our case report is followed by a review of the literature.

  3. Bacteremia due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satlin, Michael J; Cohen, Nina; Ma, Kevin C; Gedrimaite, Zivile; Soave, Rosemary; Askin, Gülce; Chen, Liang; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Walsh, Thomas J; Seo, Susan K

    2016-10-01

    To determine the prevalence, risk factors, treatments, and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSIs) due to carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in adult neutropenic patients with hematologic malignancies. We reviewed all BSIs between 2008 and 2012 in this population at two New York City oncology centers. A case-control study was conducted to identify CRE BSI risk factors, using three controls of non-CRE BSIs per case. CRE caused 43 (2.2%) of 1992 BSIs overall and 4.7% of Gram-negative bacteremias. Independent risk factors for CRE BSI were prior β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.2; P = 0.03) or carbapenem (aOR 3.0; P = 0.05) use, current trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (aOR 24; P = 0.001) or glucocorticoid (aOR 5.4, P = 0.004) use, and having a prior CRE culture (aOR 12; P = 0.03). Patients with CRE bacteremia had a median of 52 h from culture collection until receipt of active therapy. They had a 51% BSI-related mortality rate, with a median of 4 days from bacteremia onset until death. CRE-active empirical therapy was associated with a lower 30-day mortality rate (17% vs. 59%; P = 0.08). CRE are lethal emerging causes of bacteremia in neutropenic patients. New strategies are needed to shorten the delay in administration of CRE-active agents and improve outcomes in this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2016 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. THE SPECTRUM OF BACTEREMIA PATHOGENS IN PATIENTS WITH IMMUNE DEFICIENCY STATES OF VARIOUS ORIGINS

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    O. V. Polukhina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. A comparative analysis of the results of bacteriological study of blood samples obtained from 1608 patients with secondary immunodeficiency of different origins has been conducted. It was established that within the spectrum of pathogens of bacteremia in these onco-urological profile patients, enterobacteria was the predominant one. In post–liver transplantation patients micromycete was predominant, and for wounded patients and victims with serious injuries staphylococci were more often isolated.

  5. Comparative Efficacies of Amoxicillin, Clindamycin, and Moxifloxacin in Prevention of Bacteremia following Dental Extractions

    OpenAIRE

    Diz Dios, P.; Tomás Carmona, I.; Limeres Posse, J.; Medina Henríquez, J.; Fernández Feijoo, J.; Álvarez Fernández, M.

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the efficacies of oral prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin (AMX), clindamycin (CLI), and moxifloxacin (MXF) in the prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions (BDE). Two hundred twenty-one adults who required dental extractions under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to a control group, an AMX group, a CLI group, and an MXF group (the individuals in the drug treatment groups received 2 g, 600 mg, and 400 mg, respectively, 1 to 2 h before anesthesia induction...

  6. An Unusual Cause of Infective Endocarditis: Proteus mirabilis Bacteremia from an Infected Pressure Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Proteus species is a common cause of urinary tract and wound infections in humans. We herein present the case of a 71-year-old male who had fever, a new-onset heart murmur, bacteremia, and a vegetation over his native aortic valve in echocardiography. This rare case demonstrated that infective endocarditis could be caused by Proteus mirabilis from an infected pressure ulcer.

  7. Severe Sepsis Secondary to Persistent Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Lysinibacillus fusiformis and Paenibacillus amylolyticus Bacteremia

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    Eric Wenzler

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus are pervasive bacteria rarely associated with human disease. Less sophisticated microbiology techniques may frequently incorrectly identify these genera as Bacillus spp., often regarded as environmental contamination. This report describes a case of severe sepsis due to persistent Lysinibacillus and Paenibacillus bacteremia, identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopy and 16S rRNA gene sequencing.

  8. Tunneled dialysis catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption is not associated with increased rate of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Amanda M; Chaudhry, Muhammad K; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Astor, Brad; Chan, Micah R

    2015-01-01

    Tunneled dialysis catheters are the most common form of vascular access among incident dialysis patients in the United States. Fibrin sheath formation is a frequent cause of late catheter dysfunction requiring an exchange procedure with balloon disruption of the fibrin sheath. It is unknown whether fibrin sheath disruption is associated with increased incidence of bacteremia or catheter failure. We reviewed all tunneled dialysis catheter exchange procedures at the University of Wisconsin between January 2008 and December 2011. The primary outcome was incidence of bacteremia, defined as positive blood cultures within 2 weeks of the procedure. Catheter failure, requiring intervention or replacement, was examined as a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics examined included diabetic status, gender, race and age. A total of 163 procedures were reviewed; 67 (41.1%) had fibrin sheath disruption and 96 did not. Bacteremia occurred in 4.5% (3/67) of those with and 3.1% (3/97) of those without fibrin sheath disruption (p=0.65). Fibrin sheath disruption was not significantly associated with the risk of catheter failure (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]=1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87-2.10; p=0.18). Diabetes was associated with greater risk of catheter failure (aHR=1.88; 95% CI: 1.19-2.95; p=0.006), whereas higher age was associated with a lower risk of catheter failure (aHR per 10 years=0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.96; p=0.01). This study demonstrates that there is no significant increase in bacteremia and subsequent catheter dysfunction rates after fibrin sheath disruption compared to simple over the wire exchange. These results are encouraging given the large numbers of patients utilizing tunneled catheters for initial hemodialysis access and the known rates of fibrin sheath formation leading to catheter failure.

  9. Early Onset Prosthetic Joint Infection and Bacteremia due to Campylobacter fetus Subspecies fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Dumic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter fetus is a zoonotic pathogen that occasionally causes serious, relapsing, invasive disease, especially in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of relapsing C. fetus diarrheal illness in a 75-year-old woman which resulted in secondary bacteremia and seeding of the left knee prosthetic joint. Patient responded favorably to debridement and retention of prosthesis in addition to six weeks of meropenem followed by chronic oral doxycycline suppressive therapy.

  10. Post-ERCP bacteremia caused by Alcaligenes xylosoxidans in a patient with pancreas cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akcay Korhan

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alcaligenes xylosoxidans is an aerobic, motile, oxidase and catalase positive, nonfermentative Gram negative bacillus. This bacterium has been isolated from intestine of humans and from various hospital or environmental water sources. A.xylosoxidans is both waterborne and results from the poor-hygienic conditions healthcare workers are in. In this case report, the bacteremia which appeared in a patient with pancreas cancer after ERCP was described.

  11. [Ability of procalcitonin to predict bacteremia in patients with community acquired pneumonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, Agustín; Timón Zapata, Jesús; Laserna Mendieta, Emilio José; Parejo Miguez, Raquel; Flores Chacartegui, Manuel; Gallardo Schall, Pablo

    2014-04-07

    To analyze the usefulness and ability of procalcitonin (PCT) to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae) or other bacteria. This is an observational, prospective and descriptive study involving patients who were diagnosed with CAP in our Emergency Department. Data collected included socio-demographic and comorbidity variables, Charlson index, stage in the Pneumonia Severity Index and criteria of severe NAC, microbiologic studies and biomarker determinations (PCT and C reactive protein). The follow-up was carried out during 30 days to calculate the predictive power and the diagnostic performance for bacteremia caused or not by S. pneumoniae. Four hundred and seventy-four patients were finally included in the study. Blood cultures were positive in 85 individuals (17.9%) and S. pneumoniae was identified as the responsible pathogen in 75 of them (88.4%) (in 5 cases together with another agent). The area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve for PCT to predict bacteremia (caused by S. pneumoniae or not) was 0.988 (95% confidence interval 0.908-0.995; P98% and>10, respectively. The most frequently isolated serotypes of S. pneumoniae were 19A, 7F, 1 and 3. The highest mean levels of PCT were found in serotypes 7F, 19A, 3 and 1, which showed statistically significant differences with regard to the others serotypes considered (P=.008). Serotypes associated with the highest percentage of severe sepsis-septic shock, 30-days mortality and multi-lobe or bilateral affection were 3, 1 and 19A; 1, 3 and 19A; and 3, 19A and 6A, respectively. PCT had a remarkable diagnostic ability to discard or suspect bacteremia and to guide the etiology of CAP caused by S. pneumoniae. Serotypes 1, 3, 19A and 7F showed greater frequency, systemic inflammatory response and clinical severity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  12. Evaluating Children with Otitis Media for Bacteremia or Urinary Tract Infection

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    Daniel Yawman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unclear if clinicians evaluate for concurrent bacteremia or UTI in young patients diagnosed with acute otitis media (AOM. Objectives. To describe how often, and under which circumstances, emergency providers investigate for bacteremia or UTI in 2–36 month olds with AOM. Methods. Cases of AOM were analyzed from the 2001–2004 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS-Emergency Department dataset. Results. AOM was diagnosed in 17% of the 10,847 recorded visits of 2–36 month olds. Of these visits, laboratory testing included: CBC: 7%, Blood culture: 4%, urinalysis or urine culture: 5%, and any of these tests: 9%. Rates of testing for 2–6 month olds with temperature ≥ 38.0 (CBC: 13%, blood culture: 9%, urinalysis or urine culture: 7%, any of the tests: 14% were not significantly different from testing of patients aged 6–12 months, or 12–36 months (all P>.1. Patients with temperature of ≥39.0 were more likely to have all tests, with the exception of urine investigation, than patients with temperature between 38.0 and 38.9. Conclusions. 17% of 2–36 month old patients seen in the emergency department are diagnosed with AOM. Investigating for bacteremia or UTI in these patients is not routine, even in febrile infants.

  13. [Community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients attending the emergency service of a teaching hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artico, Muriel J; Rocchi, Marta; Gasparotto, Ana; Ocaña Carrizo, Valeria; Navarro, Mercedes; Mollo, Valeria; Avilés, Natalia; Romero, Vanessa; Carrillo, Sonia; Monterisi, Aída

    2012-01-01

    Bacteremia is an important cause of morbimortality. This study describes the episodes of community-acquired bacteremia in adult patients registered at our hospital. Between January 2005, and December 2009, 271 episodes were studied. The diagnostic yield of blood cultures was 13.5 %. A total of 52 % of patients were male and 48 % female. The mean age was 60. The most frequent comorbidities were: diabetes (21 %), neoplasia (18 %), cardiopathy (11 %), and HIV infection (8 %). The focus was- respiratory (21 %), urinary (15 %), cutaneous (9 %), and others (13 %). Gram-positive bacteria prevailed (51.4%). The most frequent microorganisms were Escherichia coli (25 %), Streptococcus pneumoniae (22.9 %), and Staphylococcus aureus (12.3 %). Bacteremia was polymicrobial in 7 % of the cases. Thirty three percent of E. coli isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and 6 % to ceftazidime. Fourteen percent of S. aureus strains were resistant to oxacillin whereas only 7 % of S. pneumoniae expressed high resistance to penicillin with MICs = 2 ug/ml, according to meningitis breakpoints.

  14. A case of bacteremia caused by Campylobacter fetus: an unusual presentation in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnimr AM

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Amani M Alnimr Department of Microbiology, King Fahad University Hospital, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia Abstract: Bacteremia due to Campylobacter spp. is rarely reported, and Campylobacter fetus is the species most commonly exhibiting vascular tropism, as occurred in this case report describing the diagnosis of C. fetus bacteremia in an infant presenting with respiratory tract infection. A 5-month-old baby, with undiagnosed failure to thrive, presented to the acute care service with a high fever and respiratory symptoms of 2 days duration. The initial clinical and laboratory diagnosis suggested bacteremia, but there was difficulty with recovery and identification of the organism from blood. Subsequent laboratory testing confirmed C. fetus as the etiological agent. Campylobacter isolated from blood culture bottles may give atypical laboratory features, rendering its identification challenging. Thus, such an infrequent species might be underestimated in frequency, and it should be considered in diagnostic laboratories, when a gram-negative organism with atypical findings is encountered in respiratory samples or blood culture bottles. Keywords: microbiology, vascular tropism, blood stream infection

  15. Factors Associated with Klebsiella Bacteremia and Its Outcome in Under-Five Children Admitted with Diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamima Akhter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although Klebsiella bacteremia in children is perceived to be associated with fatal consequences, data are scarce on those children presenting with diarrhea. We evaluated the factors associated with Klebsiella bacteremia in such children. In this retrospective chart analysis, data of all diarrheal children was retrieved from electronic medical record system (named as SHEBA of Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b, from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2012, who had their blood culture done. This was a study having a case-control design where comparison of clinical and laboratory characteristics was done among children with Klebsiella bacteremia (cases = 30 and those without any bacteraemia (controls = 90. Controls were selected randomly. The cases more often had fatal outcome (p<0.001. In logistic regression analysis, after adjusting for potential confounders such as young age, severe dehydration, severe wasting, abnormal mentation, hypotension, and fast breathing, the cases were independently associated with hospital-acquired infection and positive stool growth (for all, p<0.05. The study highlights the importance of obtaining blood cultures in hospitalized children under five years old with diarrheal illness in the presence of either hospital-acquired infection or positive stool culture to have better outcome.

  16. Beta Lactamase Producing Clostridium perfringens Bacteremia in an Elderly Man with Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium perfringens bacteremia is associated with adverse outcomes. Known risk factors include chronic kidney disease, malignancy, diabetes mellitus, and gastrointestinal disease. We present a 74-year-old man admitted with confusion, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Exam revealed tachycardia, hypotension, lethargy, distended abdomen, and cold extremities. He required intubation and aggressive resuscitation for septic shock. Laboratory data showed leukocytosis, metabolic acidosis, acute kidney injury, and elevated lipase. CT scan of abdomen revealed acute pancreatitis and small bowel ileus. He was started on vancomycin and piperacillin-tazobactam. Initial blood cultures were positive for C. perfringens on day five. Metronidazole and clindamycin were added to the regimen. Repeat CT (day 7 revealed pancreatic necrosis. The patient developed profound circulatory shock requiring multiple vasopressors, renal failure requiring dialysis, and bacteremia with vancomycin-resistant enterococci. Hemodynamic instability precluded surgical intervention and he succumbed to multiorgan failure. Interestingly, our isolate was beta lactamase producing. We review the epidemiology, risk factors, presentation, and management of C. perfringens bacteremia. This case indicates a need for high clinical suspicion for clostridial sepsis and that extended spectrum beta lactam antibiotic coverage may be inadequate and should be supplemented with use of clindamycin or metronidazole if culture is positive, until sensitivities are known.

  17. Characteristics of bacteremia caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Yoko; Hitomi, Shigemi; Oishi, Tsuyoshi; Kondo, Tsukasa; Ebihara, Tsugio; Funayama, Yasunori; Kawakami, Yasushi

    2013-10-01

    Although Proteus mirabilis is a common human pathogen, bacteremia caused by the organism, especially strains producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL), has rarely been investigated. We examined 64 cases of P. mirabilis bacteremia identified in the Minami Ibaraki Area, Japan, between 2001 and 2010 and compared the characteristics of cases with ESBL-producing and ESBL-non-producing strains (13 and 51 cases, respectively). All ESBL-producing strains with the gene encoding the CTX-M-2-group were genetically nonidentical. Isolation of ESBL-producing strains was significantly associated with onset in a hospital (p = 0.030), receiving hemodialysis (p = 0.0050), and previous antibiotic use within 1 month (p = 0.036; especially penicillin and/or cephalosporin (p = 0.010) and fluoroquinolone (p = 0.0069)). Isolation was also associated with inappropriate antibiotic therapy on the 1st and 4th days (p = 0.011 and 0.032, respectively) but not with mortality on the 30th day. These findings indicate that, for P. mirabilis bacteremia, isolation of ESBL-producing strains causes delay of initiating appropriate antimicrobial therapy but may not be associated with mortality.

  18. Yersinia enterocolitica bacteremia and enterocolitis in a previously healthy 20-month-old girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takao; Suzuki, Teruaki; Kawase, Jun; Fukushima, Hiroshi; Nanao, Kenji

    2012-10-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a gram-negative bacillus that can cause illness ranging from a self-limiting enterocolitis to life-threatening bacteremia. Y. enterocolitica biotype 1B, serotype O:8 (1B/O:8), is the most pathogenic of the Yersinia species because of the presence of the high-pathogenicity island and the Yersinia virulence plasmid (pYV). Here, we report a pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia and enterocolitis. A 20-month-old girl was admitted to hospital with fever,pharyngitis, and abdominal pain on day 2. Blood culture on admission was positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8. Stool culture on day 5 after cefotaxime treatment was also positive for Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8, but only after cold enrichment at 4°C for 3 weeks. PCR assays identified the pYV only in stool specimens, indicating that strains from routine blood culture at 37°C lacked the pYV. The present case showed the usefulness of stool culture with cold enrichment and agglutination test for the diagnosis of Y. enterocolitica infection. We would therefore like to emphasize the importance of collection and preservation of stool specimens for the identification of pYV. To our knowledge, this is the first reported pediatric case of Y. enterocolitica 1B/O:8 bacteremia.

  19. [Bacteremia and sepsis in patients hospitalized at the Dr. Fran Mihaljevíc Clinic for Infectious Diseases in Zagreb 1987-1991].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skerk, V; Schönwald, S; Bobinac, E; Bejuk, D; Zrinsćak, J

    1995-01-01

    A total number of 836 episodes of bacteremia and fungemia were examined in 823 hospitalized patients in the University Hospital of Infectious Diseases "Dr Fran Mihaljević" Zagreb from the beginning of 1987 to the end of 1991. Twenty-five percent of them were nosocomial bacteremias and 5% were polymicrobial bacteremias. The most frequently isolated causative agents were Salmonella spp. (26%), Escherichia coli (17%), Streptococcus pneumoniae (11%) and Staphylococcus aureus (8%). There were 34% of gram-positive bacteremias. The increased frequency of nosocomial bacteremias caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci was recorded. The frequency of coagulase-negative staphylococci strains resistant to gentamicin and Klebsiella spp. strains resistant to cefotaxime was increased. Shock was present in 19% of episodes. Relation between septic shock occurrence and causative agent of bacteremia was not proved. Mortality in patients with bacteremia was 13%, and total mortality was 20%. The outcome of the disease was in direct relation with causative agent of bacteremia. The initial empiric antimicrobial therapy was prolonged in 91% of episodes of bacteremia after blood culture results were known.

  20. Comparison of the clinical and microbiological characteristics of Campylobacter and Helicobacter bacteremia: the importance of time to blood culture positivity using the BACTEC blood culture systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kei; Hayakawa, Kayoko; Nagashima, Maki; Shimada, Kayo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Kato, Yasuyuki; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Yamada, Koji; Mezaki, Kazuhisa; Kirikae, Teruo; Ohmagari, Norio

    2017-11-28

    Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. are rare but important causes of bacteremia in humans. Distinguishing these bacteria is complicated because of their similar phenotypic profiles. We conducted clinical and microbiological investigations of Campylobacter spp. or Helicobacter spp. bacteremia. Patients diagnosed with bacteremia from 2008 to 2014 were included. The clinical and microbiological characteristics of Campylobacter spp. and Helicobacter spp. bacteremia were compared. The BACTEC system was used in blood cultures. A receiver operating characteristic curve was plotted based on the time to blood culture positivity. Sixteen cases of Helicobacter spp. bacteremia (patient age: 61 ± 18 years) and 14 cases of Campylobacter spp. bacteremia (patient age: 49 ± 21 years) were identified. Median time to blood culture positivity was longer for the Helicobacter spp. cases than the Campylobacter spp. cases (91.4 h vs 55.3 h, p culture positivity > 75 h predicted Helicobacter spp. bacteremia with a sensitivity of 0.88 and a specificity of 0.93 (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.90). In conclusion, a time to blood culture positivity was useful in distinguishing Helicobacter spp. bacteremia from Campylobacter spp. bacteremia.

  1. Effect of ferrate on green algae removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiňáková, Emília; Híveš, Ján; Gál, Miroslav; Fašková, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    Green algae Cladophora aegagropila, present in cooling water of thermal power plants, causes many problems and complications, especially during summer. However, algae and its metabolites are rarely eliminated by common removal methods. In this work, the elimination efficiency of electrochemically prepared potassium ferrate(VI) on algae from cooling water was investigated. The influence of experimental parameters, such as Fe(VI) dosage, application time, pH of the system, temperature and hydrodynamics of the solution on removal efficiency, was optimized. This study demonstrates that algae C. aegagropila can be effectively removed from cooling water by ferrate. Application of ferrate(VI) at the optimized dosage and under the suitable conditions (temperature, pH) leads to 100% removal of green algae Cladophora from the system. Environmentally friendly reduction products (Fe(III)) and coagulation properties favour the application of ferrate for the treatment of water contaminated with studied microorganisms compared to other methods such as chlorination and use of permanganate, where harmful products are produced.

  2. Phospholipids of New Zealand Edible Brown Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyssotski, Mikhail; Lagutin, Kirill; MacKenzie, Andrew; Mitchell, Kevin; Scott, Dawn

    2017-07-01

    Edible brown algae have attracted interest as a source of beneficial allenic carotenoid fucoxanthin, and glyco- and phospholipids enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids. Unlike green algae, brown algae contain no or little phosphatidylserine, possessing an unusual aminophospholipid, phosphatidyl-O-[N-(2-hydroxyethyl) glycine], PHEG, instead. When our routinely used technique of 31 P-NMR analysis of phospholipids was applied to the samples of edible New Zealand brown algae, a number of signals corresponding to unidentified phosphorus-containing compounds were observed in total lipids. NI (negative ion) ESI QToF MS spectra confirmed the presence of more familiar phospholipids, and also suggested the presence of PHEG or its isomers. The structure of PHEG was confirmed by comparison with a synthetic standard. An unusual MS fragmentation pattern that was also observed prompted us to synthesise a number of possible candidates, and was found to follow that of phosphatidylhydroxyethyl methylcarbamate, likely an extraction artefact. An unexpected outcome was the finding of ceramidephosphoinositol that has not been reported previously as occurring in brown algae. An uncommon arsenic-containing phospholipid has also been observed and quantified, and its TLC behaviour studied, along with that of the newly synthesised lipids.

  3. Radiation effects on algae and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dwivedi, Rakesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The effects of radiation on algae have been summarized in this article. Today, algae are being considered to have the great potential to fulfill the demand of food, fodder, fuel and various pharmaceutical products. Red algae are particularly rich in the content of polysaccharides present in their cell wall. For isolation of these polysaccharides, separation of cells cemented together by middle lamella is essential. The gamma rays are known to bring about biochemical changes in the cell wall and cause the breakdown of the middle lamella. These rays ate also known to speed up the starch sugar inter-conversion in the cells which is very useful for the tapping the potential of algae to be used as biofuel as well as in pharmaceutical industries. Cyanobacteria, among algae and other plants are more resistant to the radiation. In some cyanobacteria the radiation treatment is known to enhance the resistance against the antibiotics. Radiation treatment is also known to enhance the diameter of cell and size of the nitrogen fixing heterocyst. (author)

  4. Sustainable Algae Biodiesel Production in Cold Climates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudras Baliga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This life cycle assessment aims to determine the most suitable operating conditions for algae biodiesel production in cold climates to minimize energy consumption and environmental impacts. Two hypothetical photobioreactor algae production and biodiesel plants located in Upstate New York (USA are modeled. The photobioreactor is assumed to be housed within a greenhouse that is located adjacent to a fossil fuel or biomass power plant that can supply waste heat and flue gas containing CO2 as a primary source of carbon. Model results show that the biodiesel areal productivity is high (19 to 25 L of BD/m2/yr. The total life cycle energy consumption was between 15 and 23 MJ/L of algae BD and 20 MJ/L of soy BD. Energy consumption and air emissions for algae biodiesel are substantially lower than soy biodiesel when waste heat was utilized. Algae's most substantial contribution is a significant decrease in the petroleum consumed to make the fuel.

  5. Biological toxicity of lanthanide elements on algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Peidong; Zhao, Qing; Su, Dan; Li, Peijun; Stagnitti, Frank

    2010-08-01

    The biological toxicity of lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was investigated. The specific objective of this research was to establish the relationship between the abundance in the seawater of lanthanides and their biological toxicities on marine monocellular algae. The results showed that all single lanthanides had similar toxic effects on Skeletonema costatum. High concentrations of lanthanides (29.04+/-0.61 micromol L(-1)) resulted in 50% reduction in growth of algae compared to the controls (0 micromol L(-1)) after 96 h (96 h-EC50). The biological toxicity of 13 lanthanides on marine monocellular algae was unrelated with the abundance of different lanthanide elements in nature, and the "Harkins rule" was not appropriate for the lanthanides. A mixed solution that contained equivalent concentrations of each lanthanide element had the same inhibition effect on algae cells as each individual lanthanide element at the same total concentration. This phenomenon is unique compared to the groups of other elements in the periodic table. Hence, we speculate that the monocellular organisms might not be able to sufficiently differentiate between the almost chemically identical lanthanide elements. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Resistance and resilience of small-scale recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) with or without algae to pH perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giatsis, Christos; Md Yusoff, Fatimah; Verreth, Johan; Verdegem, Marc

    2018-01-01

    The experimental set-up of this study mimicked recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) where water quality parameters such as dissolved oxygen, pH, temperature, and turbidity were controlled and wastes produced by fish and feeding were converted to inorganic forms. A key process in the RAS was the conversion of ammonia to nitrite and nitrite to nitrate through nitrification. It was hypothesized that algae inclusion in RAS would improve the ammonia removal from the water; thereby improving RAS water quality and stability. To test this hypothesis, the stability of the microbiota community composition in a freshwater RAS with (RAS+A) or without algae (RAS-A) was challenged by introducing an acute pH drop (from pH 7 to 4 during three hours) to the system. Stigeoclonium nanum, a periphytic freshwater microalga was used in this study. No significant effect of the algae presence was found on the resistance to the acute pH drop on ammonia conversion to nitrite and nitrite conversion to nitrate. Also the resilience of the ammonia conversion to the pH drop disruption was not affected by the addition of algae. This could be due to the low biomass of algae achieved in the RAS. However, with regard to the conversion step of nitrite to nitrate, RAS+A was significantly more resilient than RAS-A. In terms of overall bacterial communities, the composition and predictive function of the bacterial communities was significantly different between RAS+A and RAS-A. PMID:29659617

  7. Topical antibiotics as a major contextual hazard toward bacteremia within selective digestive decontamination studies: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, James C

    2014-12-31

    Among methods for preventing pneumonia and possibly also bacteremia in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, Selective Digestive Decontamination (SDD) appears most effective within randomized concurrent controlled trials (RCCT's) although more recent trials have been cluster randomized. However, of the SDD components, whether protocolized parenteral antibiotic prophylaxis (PPAP) is required, and whether the topical antibiotic actually presents a contextual hazard, remain unresolved. The objective here is to compare the bacteremia rates and patterns of isolates in SDD-RCCT's versus the broader evidence base. Bacteremia incidence proportion data were extracted from component (control and intervention) groups decanted from studies investigating antibiotic (SDD) or non-antibiotic methods of VAP prevention and summarized using random effects meta-analysis of study and group level data. A reference category of groups derived from purely observational studies without any prevention method under study provided a benchmark incidence. Within SDD RCCTs, the mean bacteremia incidence among concurrent component groups not exposed to PPAP (27 control; 17.1%; 13.1-22.1% and 12 intervention groups; 16.2%; 9.1-27.3%) is double that of the benchmark bacteremia incidence derived from 39 benchmark groups (8.3; 6.8-10.2%) and also 20 control groups from studies of non-antibiotic methods (7.1%; 4.8 - 10.5). There is a selective increase in coagulase negative staphylococci (CNS) but not in Pseudomonas aeruginosa among bacteremia isolates within control groups of SDD-RCCT's versus benchmark groups with data available. The topical antibiotic component of SDD presents a major contextual hazard toward bacteremia against which the PPAP component partially mitigates.

  8. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Van Baelen, J.; Hurtger, C.; Cogneau, M.; Van der Ben, D.; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95m-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography

  9. Freshwater algae of the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, W.D.; Giles, K.R.

    1979-06-01

    Fifty-two species of freshwater algae were identified in samples collected from the eight known natural springs of the Nevada Test Site. Although several species were widespread, 29 species were site specific. Diatoms provided the greatest variety of species at each spring. Three-fifths of all algal species encountered were diatoms. Well-developed mats of filamentous green algae (Chlorophyta) were common in many of the water tanks associated with the springs and accounted for most of the algal biomass. Major nutrients were adequate, if not abundant, in most spring waters - growth being limited primarily by light and physical habitat. There was some evidence of cesium-137 bioconcentration by algae at several of the springs

  10. Behaviour of technetium in marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Kirchmann, R.; Baelen, J. van; Hurtgen, C.; Cogneau, M.; Ben, D. van der; Verthe, C.; Bouquegneau, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Uptake and distribution of technetium were studied in several green (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, Ulva lactuca) and brown (Ascophyllum nodosum, Fucus serratus, Fucus spiralis and Fucus vesiculosus) marine algae. Technetium was supplied to the algae as Tc-95-pertechnetate. Under laboratory conditions, the algae were capable of accumulating technetium, with the exception, however, of Boergesenia, which showed concentration factors (C.F.) comprised between 0.28 and 0.71. The concentration of technetium-99 in Fucus spiralis, collected along the Belgian coast, was measured by a radiochemical procedure. The intracellular distribution of technetium was studied by differential centrifugation in Acetabularia and by the puncturing technique in Boergesenia. The chemical forms of technetium penetrated into the cells were investigated by selective chemical extractions, molecular sieving and thin layer chromatography. (author)

  11. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo

    1996-01-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy

  12. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy.

  13. Mimicking Bone - Chemical and Physical Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie C Cox

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is known that chemical and physical features of bone contribute to its functionality, reactivity and mechanical performance. This fundamental rationale underpins the author’s research strategy. This paper presents a summary of efforts to fabricate a synthetic structure, referred to as a scaffold, that both chemically and physical emulates the intricate structure of bone. An understanding of key features of bone tissue that contribute to its remarkable properties is presented as a background to this work. Novel work aimed at improving the understanding of the synthesis of a ceramic biomaterial, namely hydroxyapatite, that is chemically similar to bone mineral is discussed. A case study involving the manufacture of porous scaffolds by 3D printing is also presented. In summary, this article highlights a number of on-going challenges that multidisciplinary tissue engineers aim to solve to get one step closer to mimicking bone, which clinically could improve the quality of life for millions of people worldwide.    Photo credit: By Doc. RNDr. Josef Reischig, CSc. (Author's archive [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0], via Wikimedia Commons

  14. Lymphocitic infundibuloneurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Maximilian Mehdorn

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available A rare case of infundibulo-neurohypophysitis mimicking a pituitary adenoma is presented. A 69-years-old female patient developed polyuria and polydipsia. Laboratory analysis revealed central diabetes insipidus. No hormonal abnormalities. Cranial-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed a left sided mass in the adenohypophysis presuming a pituitary adenoma. The mass had contact to both internal carotids. Admission to our department for neurosurgical treatment followed. Ophthalmo - logic examination and neurological examination yielded normal findings. A second MRI focussing on the sellar-region showed a leftsided (T2-MRI.hyperintense, distended adenohypophysis, without contrast enhancement in T1. The stalk appeared thickened. T1- weighted sequences of the neurohypophysis showed loss of signal intensity. We diagnosed an infundibulo-neurohypophysitis and abstai - ned from surgical removal. The patient was discharged under treatment with corticosteroids and desmopressin. Hypophysitis is rare and shows special clinical characteristics. Despite defined radiological features to differentiate between hypophysitis and adenoma the possibility of misdiagnosis, and unnecessary surgical procedures, should always kept in mind.

  15. Indirect carotid cavernous fistula mimicking ocular myasthenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishangthem, Lakshmi; Satti, Sudhakar Reddy

    2017-10-19

    71-year-old woman with progressive left-sided, monocular diplopia and ptosis. Her symptoms mimicked ocular myasthenia, but she had an indirect carotid cavernous fistula (CCF). She was diagnosed with monocular myasthenia gravis (negative acetylcholinesterase antibody) after a positive ice test and started on Mestinon and underwent a thymectomy complicated by a brachial plexus injury. Months later, she developed left-sided proptosis and ocular bruit. She was urgently referred to neuro-interventional surgery and was diagnosed with an indirect high-flow left CCF, which was treated with Onyx liquid and platinum coil embolisation. Mestinon was discontinued. Her ophthalmic symptoms resolved. However, she was left with a residual left arm and hand hemiparesis and dysmetria secondary to a brachial plexus injury. Indirect CCF usually can present with subtle and progressive symptoms leading to delayed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. It is important for ophthalmologists to consider this differential in a patient with progressive ocular symptoms. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  16. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  17. Study of metal bioaccumulation by nuclear microprobe analysis of algae fossils and living algae cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, P.; Wang, J.; Li, X.; Zhu, J.; Reinert, T.; Heitmann, J.; Spemann, D.; Vogt, J.; Flagmeyer, R.-H.; Butz, T.

    2000-01-01

    Microscopic ion-beam analysis of palaeo-algae fossils and living green algae cells have been performed to study the metal bioaccumulation processes. The algae fossils, both single cellular and multicellular, are from the late Neoproterozonic (570 million years ago) ocean and perfectly preserved within a phosphorite formation. The biosorption of the rare earth element ions Nd 3+ by the green algae species euglena gracilis was investigated with a comparison between the normal cells and immobilized ones. The new Leipzig Nanoprobe, LIPSION, was used to produce a proton beam with 2 μm size and 0.5 nA beam current for this study. PIXE and RBS techniques were used for analysis and imaging. The observation of small metal rich spores (<10 μm) surrounding both of the fossils and the living cells proved the existence of some specific receptor sites which bind metal carrier ligands at the microbic surface. The bioaccumulation efficiency of neodymium by the algae cells was 10 times higher for immobilized algae cells. It confirms the fact that the algae immobilization is an useful technique to improve its metal bioaccumulation

  18. Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Schwannoma of the left brachial plexus mimicking a cervicomediastinal ... Her voice was hoarse but there was no eye signs suggestive of thyrotoxicosis. ... A presumptive diagnosis of thyroid carcinoma with retrosternal extension was made.

  19. Deep Granuloma Annulare Mimicking Inflamed Cysts in a Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Emily L; Degesys, Catherine A; Jahan-Tigh, Richard; Chan, Audrey

    2017-07-01

    We describe deep granuloma annulare (DGA) of the forehead mimicking inflamed cysts. Reactive inflammation and sterile purulent drainage may be an underrecognized feature of DGA. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Serpins in plants and green algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Thomas Hugh; Hejgaard, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    . Serpins have been found in diverse species of the plant kingdom and represent a distinct clade among serpins in multicellular organisms. Serpins are also found in green algae, but the evolutionary relationship between these serpins and those of plants remains unknown. Plant serpins are potent inhibitors...... of mammalian serine proteinases of the chymotrypsin family in vitro but, intriguingly, plants and green algae lack endogenous members of this proteinase family, the most common targets for animal serpins. An Arabidopsis serpin with a conserved reactive centre is now known to be capable of inhibiting...

  1. Biological synthesis of metallic nanoparticles using algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Laura; Blázquez, María Luisa; Muñoz, Jesus Angel; González, Felisa; Ballester, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The increasing demand and limited natural resources of noble metals make its recovery from dilute industrial wastes attractive, especially when using environmentally friendly methods. Nowadays, the high impact that nanotechnology is having in both science and society offers new research possibilities. Gold and silver nanoparticles were biosynthesised by a simple method using different algae as reducing agent. The authors explored the application of dead algae in an eco-friendly procedure. The nanoparticle formation was followed by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The functional groups involved in the bioreduction were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  2. P-32 uptake in lentic algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strange, J.R.; Williamson, G.D.; Fletcher, D.J.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the Flat Creek Embayment of Lake Sidney Lanier near Gainesville, Georgia revealed three genera of algae, Chlorococcum, Fragillaria and Nostoc, to be prominent in this eutrophic region of the lake. The algae was grown in phosphate-rich media and subsequently labelled with P-32. All species incorporated luxury amounts of phosphorus as determined by the uptake of P-32. The results indicate that the P-32 uptake is proportional to the surface-per-volume ratio. The higher surface-per-volume ratio resulted in greater uptake of P-32

  3. Bioremediation of Heavy Metal by Algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Dwivedi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Instead of using mainly bacteria, it is also possible to use mainly algae to clean wastewater because many of the pollutant sources in wastewater are also food sources for algae. Nitrates and phosphates are common components of plant fertilizers for plants. Like plants, algae need large quantities of nitrates and phosphates to support their fast cell cycles. Certain heavy metals are also important for the normal functioning of algae. These include iron (for photosynthesis, and chromium (for metabolism. Because marine environments are normally scarce in these metals, some marine algae especially have developed efficient mechanisms to gather these heavy metals from the environment and take them up. These natural processes can also be used to remove certain heavy metals from the environment. The use of algae has several advantages over normal bacteria-based bioremediation processes. One major advantage in the removal of pollutants is that this is a process that under light conditions does not need oxygen. Instead, as pollutants are taken up and digested, oxygen is added while carbon dioxide is removed. Hence, phytoremediation could potentially be coupled with carbon sequestration. Additionally, because phytoremediation does not rely on fouling processes, odors are much less a problem. Microalgae, in particular, have been recognized as suitable vectors for detoxification and have emerged as a potential low-cost alternative to physicochemical treatments. Uptake of metals by living microalgae occurs in two steps: one takes place rapidly and is essentially independent of cell metabolism – “adsorption” onto the cell surface. The other one is lengthy and relies on cell metabolism – “absorption” or “intracellular uptake.” Nonviable cells have also been successfully used in metal removal from contaminated sites. Some of the technologies in heavy metal removals, such as High Rate Algal Ponds and Algal Turf Scrubber, have been justified for

  4. Algas: cosmética y salud

    OpenAIRE

    Arenas, Patricia Marta; Guayta, Silvina L.

    1998-01-01

    El uso de las algas con fines estéticos y terapéuticos tiene su origen en tiempos muy antiguos. El auge de la utilización de “productos naturales” ha llevado a sobrevalorar las propiedades de los vegetales en general y de las algas en particular. Por tal razón, las mismas gozan de un elevado prestigio, incluso cuando las propiedades reales son en gran medida superadas por las popularmente atribuidas. De allí que surja la necesidad de abordar estudios interdisciplinarios y de naturaleza aplica...

  5. Growth acceleration and photosynthesis of the scenedesmus algae and cocconeis algae in deuterium water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Wang Wenqing

    1998-01-01

    In order to find new way to treat the radioactive tritium waste water, scenedesmus algae and cocconeis algae are cultured in medium which contains 30% (w) deuterium water. During different time, activities of photosymthesis, absorption spectrum, growth rate and low-temperature fluorescence spectrum are measured. Accelerated growth is found in the deuterium water compared to the normal water. Activities of photosynthesis show the similar result (F v /F m ) to the growth data. It is also concluded from low-temperature fluorescence spectra that algae activities in the deuterium water, which are expressed by PS I/PS II, are more sensitive than those in the normal water

  6. WASP7 BENTHIC ALGAE - MODEL THEORY AND USER'S GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The standard WASP7 eutrophication module includes nitrogen and phosphorus cycling, dissolved oxygen-organic matter interactions, and phytoplankton kinetics. In many shallow streams and rivers, however, the attached algae (benthic algae, or periphyton, attached to submerged substr...

  7. Accumulation of polycyclic arenes in Baltic Sea algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veldre, I.A.; Itra, A.R.; Paal' me, L.P.; Kukk, Kh.A.

    1985-01-01

    The paper presents data on the level of benzo(a)pyrene (BP) and some other polycyclic arenes in alga and phanerogam specimens from different gulfs of the Baltic Sea. Algae were shown to absorb BP from sea water. The mean concentration of BP in sea water was under 0.004 microgram/1, while in algae it ranged 0.1-21.2 micrograms/kg dry weight. Algae accumulate BP to a higher degree than phanerogams. The highest concentrations of BP were found in algae Enteromorpha while the lowest ones in Furcellaria. In annual green algae, BP level was higher in autumn, i. e. at the end of vegetation period, than in spring. Brown algae Fucus vesiculosus is recommended for monitoring polycyclic arene pollution in the area from Vormsi Island to Kaesmu and green algae Cladophora or Enteromorpha in the eastern part of the Finnish Gulf.

  8. An Overview of Algae Biofuel Production and Potential Environmental Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algae are among the most potentially significant sources of sustainable biofuels in the future of renewable energy. A feedstock with virtually unlimited applicability, algae can metabolize various waste streams (e.g., municipal wastewater, carbon dioxide from industrial flue gas)...

  9. Association of thraustochytrids and fungi with living marine algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Nagarkar, S.; Raghukumar, S.

    only in C. clavulatum, Sargassum cinereum and Padina tetrastromatica whilst mycelial fungi occurred in all. Growth experiments in the laboratory indicated that the growth of thraustochytrids was inhibited on live algae, whereas killed algae supported...

  10. The effect of sediment mimicking drill cuttings on deep water rhodoliths in a flow-through system: Experimental work and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Marcia A.O.; Eide, Ingvar; Reynier, Marcia; Villas-Bôas, Alexandre B.; Tâmega, Frederico T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Collection of rhodoliths and calcareous algae from Campos Basin, Brazil. • Impact of sediment mimicking drill cuttings on photosynthetic efficiency. • Exposure–response for photosynthetic efficiency as function of sediment coverage. • Factorial design and multivariate regression used for a structured approach. - Abstract: The impact of sediment coverage on two rhodolith-forming calcareous algae species collected at 100 m water depth off the coast of Brazil was studied in an experimental flow-through system. Natural sediment mimicking drill cuttings with respect to size distribution was used. Sediment coverage and photosynthetic efficiency (maximum quantum yield of charge separation in photosystem II, ϕ PSIImax ) were measured as functions of light intensity, flow rate and added amount of sediment once a week for nine weeks. Statistical experimental design and multivariate data analysis provided statistically significant regression models which subsequently were used to establish exposure–response relationship for photosynthetic efficiency as function of sediment coverage. For example, at 70% sediment coverage the photosynthetic efficiency was reduced 50% after 1–2 weeks of exposure, most likely due to reduced gas exchange. The exposure–response relationship can be used to establish threshold levels and impact categories for environmental monitoring

  11. Increased Incidence of Urolithiasis and Bacteremia During Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii Coinfection Due to Synergistic Induction of Urease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E.; Smith, Sara N.; Yep, Alejandra; Mobley, Harry L. T.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CaUTIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections worldwide and are frequently polymicrobial. The urease-positive species Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii are two of the leading causes of CaUTIs and commonly co-colonize catheters. These species can also cause urolithiasis and bacteremia. However, the impact of coinfection on these complications has never been addressed experimentally. Methods. A mouse model of ascending UTI was utilized to determine the impact of coinfection on colonization, urolithiasis, and bacteremia. Mice were infected with P. mirabilis or a urease mutant, P. stuartii, or a combination of these organisms. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess growth dynamics and impact of co-culture on urease activity. Results. Coinfection resulted in a bacterial load similar to monospecies infection but with increased incidence of urolithiasis and bacteremia. These complications were urease-dependent as they were not observed during coinfection with a P. mirabilis urease mutant. Furthermore, total urease activity was increased during co-culture. Conclusions. We conclude that P. mirabilis and P. stuartii coinfection promotes urolithiasis and bacteremia in a urease-dependent manner, at least in part through synergistic induction of urease activity. These data provide a possible explanation for the high incidence of bacteremia resulting from polymicrobial CaUTI. PMID:24280366

  12. Increased incidence of urolithiasis and bacteremia during Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii coinfection due to synergistic induction of urease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Chelsie E; Smith, Sara N; Yep, Alejandra; Mobley, Harry L T

    2014-05-15

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CaUTIs) are the most common hospital-acquired infections worldwide and are frequently polymicrobial. The urease-positive species Proteus mirabilis and Providencia stuartii are two of the leading causes of CaUTIs and commonly co-colonize catheters. These species can also cause urolithiasis and bacteremia. However, the impact of coinfection on these complications has never been addressed experimentally. A mouse model of ascending UTI was utilized to determine the impact of coinfection on colonization, urolithiasis, and bacteremia. Mice were infected with P. mirabilis or a urease mutant, P. stuartii, or a combination of these organisms. In vitro experiments were conducted to assess growth dynamics and impact of co-culture on urease activity. Coinfection resulted in a bacterial load similar to monospecies infection but with increased incidence of urolithiasis and bacteremia. These complications were urease-dependent as they were not observed during coinfection with a P. mirabilis urease mutant. Furthermore, total urease activity was increased during co-culture. We conclude that P. mirabilis and P. stuartii coinfection promotes urolithiasis and bacteremia in a urease-dependent manner, at least in part through synergistic induction of urease activity. These data provide a possible explanation for the high incidence of bacteremia resulting from polymicrobial CaUTI.

  13. Usefulness of procalcitonin and C-reactive protein for predicting bacteremia in urinary tract infections in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julián-Jiménez, A; Gutiérrez-Martín, P; Lizcano-Lizcano, A; López-Guerrero, M A; Barroso-Manso, Á; Heredero-Gálvez, E

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze and compare the capacity of procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), lactate and leukocytes to predict the presence of bacteremia in patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs). Observational, retro-prospective analytical study of adult patients (≥15 years) diagnosed with UTI in an emergency department from August 2012 to January 2013. The study included 328 patients diagnosed with UTI, with a mean age of 52±22 years, 74% of whom were women. Of these, 43 (13.1%) had bacteremia. For predicting bacteremia, PCT achieved the largest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) at .993 (95% CI .987-1; P<.001). A cutoff≥1.16ng/mL achieves a sensitivity of 100%, a specificity of 97%, a positive predictive value of 84% and a negative predictive value of 100%. Lactate achieved an ROC-AUC of .844, and CRP achieved only .534. The mean values when comparing PCT levels in patients with UTIs with and without bacteremia were 8.08±16.37 and .34±.37ng/mL, respectively (P<.001). For patients with UTIs in the emergency department, PCT achieves considerable diagnostic performance for suspecting bacteremia, a performance greater than that of lactate, CRP and leukocytes. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Third generation cephalosporin resistant Enterobacteriaceae and multidrug resistant gram-negative bacteria causing bacteremia in febrile neutropenia adult cancer patients in Lebanon, broad spectrum antibiotics use as a major risk factor, and correlation with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima eMoghnieh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bacteremia remains a major cause of life-threatening complications in patients receiving anticancer chemotherapy. The spectrum and susceptibility profiles of causative microorganisms differ with time and place. Data from Lebanon are scarce. We aim at evaluating the epidemiology of bacteremia in cancer patients in a university hospital in Lebanon, emphasizing antibiotic resistance and risk factors of multi-drug resistant organism (MDRO-associated bacteremia.This is a retrospective study of 75 episodes of bacteremia occurring in febrile neutropenic patients admitted to the hematology-oncology unit at Makassed General Hospital, Lebanon, from October 2009-January 2012.It corresponds to epidemiological data on bacteremia episodes in febrile neutropenic cancer patients including antimicrobial resistance and identification of risk factors associated with third generation cephalosporin resistance (3GCR and MDRO-associated bacteremia. Out of 75 bacteremias, 42.7% were gram-positive (GP, and 57.3% were gram-negative (GN. GP bacteremias were mostly due to methicillin-resistant coagulase negative staphylococci (28% of total bacteremias and 66% of GP bacteremias. Among the GN bacteremias, Escherichia coli (22.7% of total, 39.5% of GN organisms and Klebsiellapneumoniae(13.3% of total, 23.3% of GN organisms were the most important causative agents. GN bacteremia due to 3GC sensitive (3GCS bacteria represented 28% of total bacteremias, while 29% were due to 3GCR bacteria and 9% were due to carbapenem-resistant organisms. There was a significant correlation between bacteremia with MDRO and subsequent intubation, sepsis and mortality. Among potential risk factors, only broad spectrum antibiotic intake >4 days before bacteremia was found to be statistically significant for acquisition of 3GCR bacteria. Using carbapenems or piperacillin/ tazobactam>4 days before bacteremia was significantly associated with the emergence of MDRO (p value<0.05.

  15. How to Identify and Control Water Weeds and Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Biochemists, Inc., Mequon, WI.

    Included in this guide to water management are general descriptions of algae, toxic algae, weed problems in lakes, ponds, and canals, and general discussions of mechanical, biological and chemical control methods. In addition, pictures, descriptions, and recommended control methods are given for algae, 6 types of floating weeds, 18 types of…

  16. Inventory of North-West European algae initiatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spruijt, J.

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 an inventory of North-West European (NWE) algae initiatives was carried out to get an impression of the market and research activities on algae production and refinery, especially for bioenergy purposes. A questionnaire was developed that would provide the EnAlgae project with information on

  17. New methodologies for integrating algae with CO2 capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernandez Mireles, I.; Stel, R.W. van der; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally recognized, that algae could be an interesting option for reducing CO2 emissions. Based on light and CO2, algae can be used for the production various economically interesting products. Current algae cultivation techniques, however, still present a number of limitations. Efficient

  18. KAROTENOID PADA ALGAE: KAJIAN TENTANG BIOSINTESIS, DISTRIBUSI SERTA FUNGSI KAROTENOID

    OpenAIRE

    Merdekawati, Windu; Karwur, Ferry F.; Susanto, A. B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRAK   Karotenoid terdistribusi pada archaea, bakteri, jamur, tumbuhan, hewan serta algae. Karotenoid dihasilkan dari komponen isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) yang mengalami proses secara bertahap untuk membentuk beragam jenis karotenoid. Terdapat dua kelompok karotenoid yaitu karoten dan xantofil dengan berbagai jenis turunannya. Struktur kimia pada karotenoid algae yaitu allene, acetylene serta acetylated carotenoids. Algae mempunyai karotenoid spesifik yang menarik untuk dipe...

  19. Composition of phytoplankton algae in Gubi Reservoir, Bauchi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies on the distribution, abundance and taxonomic composition of phytoplankton algae in Gubi reservoir were carried out for 12 months (from January to December 1995). Of the 26 algal taxa identified, 14 taxa belonged to the diatoms, 8 taxa were green algae while 4 taxa belonged to the blue-green algae. Higher cell ...

  20. Can the primary algae production be measured precisely?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olesen, M.; Lundsgaard, C.

    1996-01-01

    Algae production in seawater is extremely important as a basic link in marine food chains. Evaluation of the algae quantity is based on 14CO 2 tracer techniques while natural circulation and light absorption in seawater is taken insufficiently into account. Algae production can vary by 500% in similar nourishment conditions, but varying water mixing conditions. (EG)

  1. Agricultural importance of algae | Abdel-Raouf | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Algae are a large and diverse group of microorganisms that can carry out photosynthesis since they capture energy from sunlight. Algae play an important role in agriculture where they are used as biofertilizer and soil stabilizers. Algae, particularly the seaweeds, are used as fertilizers, resulting in less nitrogen and ...

  2. Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis-mimicking Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Han; Kim, Mi Young; Hong, Sun In; Jung, Jiwon; Lee, Hyun Joo; Yun, Sung-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee

    2015-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is occasionally confused with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) in transplant recipients, since clinical suspicion and early diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis and IPA rely heavily on imaging modes such as computed tomography (CT). We therefore investigated IPA-mimicking tuberculosis in transplant recipients. All adult transplant recipients who developed tuberculosis or IPA at a tertiary hospital in an intermediate tuberculosis-burden country during a 6-year period were enrolled. First, we tested whether experienced radiologists could differentiate pulmonary tuberculosis from IPA. Second, we determined which radiologic findings could help us differentiate them. During the study period, 28 transplant recipients developed pulmonary tuberculosis after transplantation, and 80 patients developed IPA after transplantation. Two experienced radiologists scored blindly 28 tuberculosis and 50 randomly selected IPA cases. The sensitivities of radiologists A and B for IPA were 78% and 68%, respectively (poor agreement, kappa value = 0.25). The sensitivities of radiologists A and B for tuberculosis were 64% and 61%, respectively (excellent agreement, kappa value = 0.77). We then compared the CT findings of the 28 patients with tuberculosis and 80 patients with IPA. Infarct-shaped consolidations and smooth bronchial wall thickening were more frequent in IPA, and mass-shaped consolidations and centrilobular nodules (tuberculosis. Certain CT findings appear to be helpful in differentiating between IPA and tuberculosis. Nevertheless, the CT findings of about one-third of pulmonary tuberculosis cases in transplant recipients are very close to those of IPA. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. UV effects on bottom ice algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, K.; Buckley, B.

    1993-01-01

    Antarctic sea ice can be surprisingly transparent to UV radiation, particularly during spring when ozone depletion reaches a maximum. A 5% reduction in photosynthetic production was observed in laboratory experiments for UVB levels expected under the ice at this time. In situ studies modifying the UVB radiation falling onto algae were inconclusive. (author). 5 refs

  4. Analysis, numerics, and optimization of algae growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, K.; Pisarenco, M.; Rudnaya, M.; Savcenco, V.

    2010-01-01

    We extend the mathematical model for algae growth as described in [11] to include new effects. The roles of light, nutrients and acidity of the water body are taken into account. Important properties of the model such as existence and uniqueness of solution, as well as boundedness and positivity are

  5. Isolation of glycoproteins from brown algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel process for the isolation of unique anti-oxidative glycoproteins from the pH precipitated fractions of enzymatic extracts of brown algae. Two brown seaweeds viz, Fucus serratus and Fucus vesiculosus were hydrolysed by using 3 enzymes viz, Alcalase, Viscozyme...

  6. Bromophenols in Marine Algae and Their Bioactivities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ming, Liu; Hansen, Poul Erik; Lin, Xiukun

    2011-01-01

    Marine algae contain various bromophenols that have been shown to possess a variety of biological activities, including antioxidant, antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-diabetic, and anti-thrombotic effects. Here, we briefly review the recent progress of these marine algal biomaterials, with respect...

  7. Selenium accumulation and metabolism in algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Michela; Ertani, Andrea; Parrasia, Sofia; Vecchia, Francesca Dalla

    2017-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an intriguing element because it is metabolically required by a variety of organisms, but it may induce toxicity at high doses. Algae primarily absorb selenium in the form of selenate or selenite using mechanisms similar to those reported in plants. However, while Se is needed by several species of microalgae, the essentiality of this element for plants has not been established yet. The study of Se uptake and accumulation strategies in micro- and macro-algae is of pivotal importance, as they represent potential vectors for Se movement in aquatic environments and Se at high levels may affect their growth causing a reduction in primary production. Some microalgae exhibit the capacity of efficiently converting Se to less harmful volatile compounds as a strategy to cope with Se toxicity. Therefore, they play a crucial role in Se-cycling through the ecosystem. On the other side, micro- or macro-algae enriched in Se may be used in Se biofortification programs aimed to improve Se content in human diet via supplementation of valuable food. Indeed, some organic forms of selenium (selenomethionine and methylselenocysteine) are known to act as anticarcinogenic compounds and exert a broad spectrum of beneficial effects in humans and other mammals. Here, we want to give an overview of the developments in the current understanding of Se uptake, accumulation and metabolism in algae, discussing potential ecotoxicological implications and nutritional aspects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Research for Developing Renewable Biofuels from Algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, Paul N. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Task A. Expansion of knowledge related to lipid production and secretion in algae A.1 Lipid biosynthesis in target algal species; Systems biology approaches are being used in combination with recent advances in Chlorella and Chlamydomonas genomics to address lipid accumulation in response to defined nutrient regimes. The UNL Algal Group continues screening additional species of Chlorella and other naturally occurring algae for those with optimal triglyceride production; Of the strains examined by the DOE's Aquatic Species Program, green algae, several species of Chlorella represent the largest group from which oleaginous candidates have been identified; A.1.1. Lipid profiling; Neutral lipid accumulation is routinely monitored by Nile red and BODIPY staining using high throughput strategies to screen for naturally occurring algae that accumulate triglyceride. These strategies complement those using spectrofluorometry to quantify lipid accumulation; Neutral lipid accumulation is routinely monitored by high performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lipid extracts in conjunction with; Carbon portioning experiments have been completed and the data currently are being analyzed and prepared for publication; Methods in the Black lab were developed to identify and quantify triacylglycerol (TAG), major membrane lipids [diacylglycerol trimethylhomoserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and chloroplast glycolipids], biosynthetic intermediates such as diacylglycerol, phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids and different species of acyl-coenzyme A (acyl CoA).

  9. Taxonomic Challenges and Distribution of Gracilarioid Algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reviews the taxonomical literature of the gracilarioid algae from Tanzania, and provides information about their ecology and distribution based on an intensive regime of local collection. Its aim was to provide names, even if on a preliminary basis, for local gracilarioid taxa. Our revision shows that species ...

  10. Washington State University Algae Biofuels Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    chen, Shulin [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Biological Systems Engineering; McCormick, Margaret [Targeted Growth, Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Sutterlin, Rusty [Inventure Renewables, Inc., Gig Harbor, WA (United States)

    2012-12-29

    The goal of this project was to advance algal technologies for the production of biofuels and biochemicals by establishing the Washington State Algae Alliance, a collaboration partnership among two private companies (Targeted Growth, Inc. (TGI), Inventure Chemicals (Inventure) Inc (now Inventure Renewables Inc) and Washington State University (WSU). This project included three major components. The first one was strain development at TGI by genetically engineering cyanobacteria to yield high levels of lipid and other specialty chemicals. The second component was developing an algal culture system at WSU to produce algal biomass as biofuel feedstock year-round in the northern states of the United States. This system included two cultivation modes, the first one was a phototrophic process and the second a heterotrophic process. The phototrophic process would be used for algae production in open ponds during warm seasons; the heterotrophic process would be used in cold seasons so that year-round production of algal lipid would be possible. In warm seasons the heterotrophic process would also produce algal seeds to be used in the phototrophic culture process. Selected strains of green algae and cyanobacteria developed by TGI were tested in the system. The third component was downstream algal biomass processing by Inventure that included efficiently harvesting the usable fuel fractions from the algae mass and effectively isolating and separating the usable components into specific fractions, and converting isolated fractions into green chemicals.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1120 - Brown algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... used in food only within the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum level of use in... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brown algae. 184.1120 Section 184.1120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1121 - Red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... within the following specific limitations: Category of food Maximum level of use in food (as served... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Red algae. 184.1121 Section 184.1121 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN...

  13. The ice nucleation activity of extremophilic algae

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kvíderová, Jana; Hájek, J.; Worland, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 2 (2013), s. 137-148 ISSN 0143-2044 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB601630808; GA AV ČR KJB600050708 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Ice nucleation * snow algae * lichen photobionts Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.640, year: 2013

  14. Photoprotection strategies of the alga Nannochloropsis gaditana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chukhutsina, Volha U.; Fristedt, Rikard; Morosinotto, Tomas; Croce, Roberta

    2017-01-01

    Nannochloropsis spp. are algae with high potential for biotechnological applications due to their capacity to accumulate lipids. However, little is known about their photosynthetic apparatus and acclimation/photoprotective strategies. In this work, we studied the mechanisms of non-photochemical

  15. Usos industriales de las algas diatomeas.

    OpenAIRE

    Illana Esteban, Carlos

    2007-01-01

    Las diatomeas son algas microscópicas que habitan tanto en aguas dulces como marinas. Aparte de su destacado papel en la cadena trófica de los ecosistemas acuáticos, con el tiempo forman depósitos a los que el hombre ha encontrado abundantes aplicaciones prácticas.

  16. Heterotrophic bacteria associated with the green alga

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, A.; Ktari, L.; Ahmed, M.; Bolhuis, H.; Bouhaouala-Zahar, B.; Stal, L.J.; Boudabbous, A.; El Bour, M.

    2018-01-01

    Heterotrophic bacteria associated with the green alga Ulva rigida, collected from the coast of Tunisia, were isolated andsubsequently identified by their 16S rRNA gene sequences and by phylogenetic analysis. The 71 isolates belong to four phyla:Proteobacteria (Alpha-and Gamma- subclasses),

  17. Bacteremia por Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida: relato de caso Bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Secchi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus equi é um importante agente de infecções zoonóticas, podendo causar sérias infecções em humanos, principalmente em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Neste estudo, nós relatamos o caso de uma bacteremia fatal devido a Rhodococcus equi em paciente com síndrome da imunodeficiência adquirida (HIV positivo.Rhodococcus equi is an important agent for zoonotic infections, and may cause serious infections in humans, especially immunocompromised patients. In this study, a case of fatal bacteremia due to Rhodococcus equi in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV positive is reported.

  18. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldera, Jonathan; Nedel, Wagner Luis; Cardoso, Paulo Ricardo Cerveira; d'Azevedo, Pedro Alves

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT Coagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections. CASE REPORT The case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin. CONCLUSIONS The reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections.

  19. Clostridium difficile bacteremia and meningitis as a complication of prolonged cephalosporin therapy in a case of staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abhrajit Ganguly; Saibal Das; Jayanta Kumar Dey; Somnath Mondal

    2012-01-01

    With increasing incidence of Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) associated diarrhea and pseudomembranous colitis, several extra-intestinal manifestations of the organism have been unmasked which include-bacteremia, brain abscess, pericarditis etc. We report a rare and interesting case of C. difficile bacteremia and subsequent meningitis in a 10 year old child. The child was immune competent, which further raises the question about the virulent possibilities of the organism and its implications in the near future. The condition resulted from a prolonged treatment with intravenous (I.V.) cefotaxime for staphylococcal pyogenic arthritis. The child recovered from the septic arthritis but on the 7th day post-admission developed features of bacteremia. The child was later treated with intravenous metronidazole and vancomycin and he was discharged on the 21st day post-admission. No recurrence of symptoms was noted.

  20. Cefmetazole for bacteremia caused by ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae comparing with carbapenems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Takahiko; Iwata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Saori; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Ohji, Goh

    2016-08-18

    ESBL (Extended spectrum beta-lactamase) producing enterobacteriaceae are challenging organisms with little treatment options. Carbapenems are frequently used, but the emergence of carbapenem resistant enterobacteriaceae is a concerning issue, which may hinder the use of carbapenems. Although cephamycins such as cefoxitin, cefmetazole or cefotetan are effective against ESBL-producers in vitro, there are few clinical data demonstrating effects against bacteremia caused by these organisms. We performed a retrospective observational study on cases of bacteremia caused by ESBL-producers to investigate the efficacy of cefmetazole compared with carbapenems. We also evaluated whether the trend of antibiotic choice changed over years. Sixty-nine patients (male 34, age 69.2 ± 14.4), including two relapse cases, were reviewed for this analysis. The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli (64, 93 %), followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae and K. oxytoca (2 each, 4 %). The group that received carbapenem therapy (43, 62 %) had increased severity in the Pittsburgh Bacteremic score than the group that received cefmetazole therapy, (1.5 ± 1.5 vs 2.5 ± 2.1, p = 0.048), while analysis of other factors didn't reveal any statistical differences. Five patients in the carbapenem group and one patient in the cefmetazole group died during the observation period (p = 0.24). CTX-M-9 were predominant in this series (59 %). Infectious disease physicians initially recommended carbapenems at the beginning of the current research period, which gradually changed over time favoring the use of cefmetazole instead (p = 0.002). Cefmetazole may be safely given to patients with bacteremia caused by ESBL-producers as a definitive therapy, if one can select out relatively stable patients.

  1. Improving Clinical Outcomes in Patients With Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Reported Penicillin Allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Parker, Robert A; Shenoy, Erica S; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection. First-line MSSA therapies (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin) are generally avoided in the 10% of patients reporting penicillin (PCN) allergy, but most of these patients are not truly allergic. We used a decision tree with sensitivity analyses to determine the optimal evaluation and treatment for patients with MSSA bacteremia and reported PCN allergy. Our model simulates 3 strategies: (1) no allergy evaluation, give vancomycin (Vanc); (2) allergy history-guided treatment: if history excludes anaphylactic features, give cefazolin (Hx-Cefaz); and (3) complete allergy evaluation with history-appropriate PCN skin testing: if skin test negative, give cefazolin (ST-Cefaz). Model outcomes included 12-week MSSA cure, recurrence, and death; allergic reactions including major, minor, and potentially iatrogenic; and adverse drug reactions. Vanc results in the fewest patients achieving MSSA cure and the highest rate of recurrence (67.3%/14.8% vs 83.4%/9.3% for Hx-Cefaz and 84.5%/8.9% for ST-Cefaz) as well as the greatest frequency of allergic reactions (3.0% vs 2.4% for Hx-Cefaz and 1.7% for ST-Cefaz) and highest rates of adverse drug reactions (5.2% vs 4.6% for Hx-Cefaz and 4.7% for ST-Cefaz). Even in a "best case for Vanc" scenario, Vanc yields the poorest outcomes. ST-Cefaz is preferred to Hx-Cefaz although sensitive to input variations. Patients with MSSA bacteremia and a reported PCN allergy should have the allergy addressed for optimal treatment. Full allergy evaluation with skin testing seems to be preferred, although more data are needed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Identifying Patients with Bacteremia in Community-Hospital Emergency Rooms: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Takeshima

    Full Text Available (1 To develop a clinical prediction rule to identify patients with bacteremia, using only information that is readily available in the emergency room (ER of community hospitals, and (2 to test the validity of that rule with a separate, independent set of data.Multicenter retrospective cohort study.To derive the clinical prediction rule we used data from 3 community hospitals in Japan (derivation. We tested the rule using data from one other community hospital (validation, which was not among the three "derivation" hospitals.Adults (age ≥ 16 years old who had undergone blood-culture testing while in the ER between April 2011 and March 2012. For the derivation data, n = 1515 (randomly sampled from 7026 patients, and for the validation data n = 467 (from 823 patients.We analyzed 28 candidate predictors of bacteremia, including demographic data, signs and symptoms, comorbid conditions, and basic laboratory data. Chi-square tests and multiple logistic regression were used to derive an integer risk score (the "ID-BactER" score. Sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (i.e., the AUC were computed.There were 241 cases of bacteremia in the derivation data. Eleven candidate predictors were used in the ID-BactER score: age, chills, vomiting, mental status, temperature, systolic blood pressure, abdominal sign, white blood-cell count, platelets, blood urea nitrogen, and C-reactive protein. The AUCs was 0.80 (derivation and 0.74 (validation. For ID-BactER scores ≥ 2, the sensitivities for derivation and validation data were 98% and 97%, and specificities were 20% and 14%, respectively.The ID-BactER score can be computed from information that is readily available in the ERs of community hospitals. Future studies should focus on developing a score with a higher specificity while maintaining the desired sensitivity.

  3. Spatial analysis of community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquess, John; Hu, Wenbiao; Nimmo, Graeme R; Clements, Archie C A

    2013-03-01

    To investigate and describe the relationship between indigenous Australian populations, residential aged care services, and community-onset Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) among patients admitted to public hospitals in Queensland, Australia. Ecological study. We used administrative healthcare data linked to microbiology results from patients with SAB admitted to Queensland public hospitals from 2005 through 2010 to identify community-onset infections. Data about indigenous Australian population and residential aged care services at the local government area level were obtained from the Queensland Office of Economic and Statistical Research. Associations between community-onset SAB and indigenous Australian population and residential aged care services were calculated using Poisson regression models in a Bayesian framework. Choropleth maps were used to describe the spatial patterns of SAB risk. We observed a 21% increase in relative risk (RR) of bacteremia with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA; RR, 1.21 [95% credible interval, 1.15-1.26]) and a 24% increase in RR with nonmultiresistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (nmMRSA; RR, 1.24 [95% credible interval, 1.13-1.34]) with a 10% increase in the indigenous Australian population proportion. There was no significant association between RR of SAB and the number of residential aged care services. Areas with the highest RR for nmMRSA and MSSA bacteremia were identified in the northern and western regions of Queensland. The RR of community-onset SAB varied spatially across Queensland. There was increased RR of community-onset SAB with nmMRSA and MSSA in areas of Queensland with increased indigenous population proportions. Additional research should be undertaken to understand other factors that increase the risk of infection due to this organism.

  4. The Impact of Reporting a Prior Penicillin Allergy on the Treatment of Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Kimberly G; Shenoy, Erica S; Huang, Mingshu; Kuhlen, James L; Ware, Winston A; Parker, Robert A; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia is a morbid infection with mortality benefit from receipt of parenteral β-lactam therapy. A substantial portion of MSSA bacteremia patients report penicillin allergy, but infrequently have true allergy. To determine the frequency and predictors of optimal and adequate therapy in patients with MSSA bacteremia. Retrospective cohort. Adult inpatients with MSSA bacteremia, January 2009 through October 2013. The primary measure was a trial of optimal therapy (OT), defined as ≥3 inpatient days or discharge on any first-line agents (nafcillin, oxacillin, cefazolin, or penicillin G, if susceptible). The secondary measure was completion of adequate therapy (AT), defined as ≥10 inpatient days or discharge on an agent appropriate for MSSA bacteremia. Data were electronically gathered with key variables manually validated through chart review. Log-binomial regression models were used to determine the frequency and predictors of outcomes. Of 456 patients, 346 (76%) received a trial of OT. Patients reporting penicillin allergy (13%) were less likely to receive OT trial than those without penicillin allergy (47% vs. 80%, p penicillin allergy was the largest negative predictor of OT trial (RR 0.64 [0.49, 0.83]). Infectious Disease (ID) consultation was the largest positive predictor of OT trial across all patients (RR 1.34 [1.14, 1.57]). Allergy/Immunology consultation was the single most important predictor of OT trial among patients reporting penicillin allergy (RR 2.33 [1.44, 3.77]). Of 440 patients, 391 (89%) completed AT, with ID consultation the largest positive predictor of the outcome (RR 1.28 [1.15, 1.43]). Nearly 25% of patients with MSSA bacteremia did not receive OT trial and about 10% did not receive AT completion. Reported penicillin allergy reduced, and ID consult increased, the likelihood of OT. Allergy evaluation, coupled with ID consultation, may improve outcomes in MSSA bacteremic patients.

  5. Clinical features and therapeutic interventions in 17 cases of Bacillus bacteremia in an immunosuppressed patient population.

    OpenAIRE

    Cotton, D J; Gill, V J; Marshall, D J; Gress, J; Thaler, M; Pizzo, P A

    1987-01-01

    We retrospectively examined episodes of Bacillus bacteremia at a hospital with a large proportion of immunosuppressed patients. Seventeen episodes in 9.5 years met our case definition: two of two bottles of one blood culture or one of two bottles of two or more separately obtained blood cultures drawn on the same date. During the same period, there were 59 additional episodes in which a single blood culture had only one of two bottles positive for Bacillus species. Only 2 of 59 such episodes ...

  6. A rare case of Shewanella putrefaciens bacteremia in a patient of road traffic accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Ranjan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes human infection. These are mostly found in environment and food stuffs. Shewanella are often found in mixed culture. It has been implicated in cellulitis, otitis media, and septicemia. It may be found in respiratory tract, urine, feces, and pleural fluid. There is no definite guideline for therapeutic option. In general, these are susceptible to various antimicrobial agents but are often resistant to penicillin and cephalothin. We report a rare case of bacteremia by S. putrefaciens in a patient of head injury with polytrauma after a road traffic accident.

  7. First report of Mycobacterium canariasense catheter-related bacteremia in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Ladutko, Lynn; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A; Vasireddy, Ravikiran; Vasireddy, Sruthi; Wallace, Richard J; Jakubiec, Wesley; Brecher, Stephen; Campbell, Sheldon

    2014-06-01

    Mycobacterium canariasense is a recently described late-pigmenting, rapidly growing mycobacterium linked to bacteremia in patients with underlying malignant diseases. We report a case of M. canariasense infection in a patient from Massachusetts with underlying diffuse B cell lymphoma, which was identified both by multilocus sequence typing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). To our knowledge, this is the first description after its original identification in Spain and the first report of this opportunistic pathogen in the Americas. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Streptococcus lutetiensis Bacteremia. First Clindamycin Resistant Isolate Carrying lnuB Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Almuzara, Marisa; Bonofiglio, Laura; Cittadini, Roberto Arnaldo; Vera Ocampo, C.; Montilla, A.; del Castillo, M.; Ramirez, Maria Soledad; Mollerach, Marta Eugenia; Vay, C.

    2015-01-01

    First Case of Streptococcus lutetiensis Bacteremia Involving a Clindamycin-Resistant Isolate Carrying the lnuB Gene Fil: Almuzara, Marisa. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica. Departamento de Bioquímica Clínica; Argentina; Fil: Bonofiglio, Laura. Universidad de Buenos Aires. Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquímica. Departamento de Microbiología, Inmunología y Biotecnología; Argentina; Fil: Cittadini, Roberto Arnaldo. Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia Agropecuaria;...

  9. Clostridium perfringens bacteremia caused by choledocholithiasis in the absence of gallbladder stones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atia, Antwan; Raiyani, Tejas; Patel, Pranav; Patton, Robert; Young, Mark

    2012-10-21

    A 67-years-old male presented with periumbilical abdominal pain, fever and jaundice. His anaerobic blood culture was positive for clostridium perfringens. Computed tomogram scan of the abdomen and abdominal ultrasound showed normal gallbladder and common bile duct (CBD). Subsequently magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticogram showed choledocholithiasis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticogramwith sphincterotomy and CBD stone extraction was performed. The patient progressively improved with antibiotic therapy Choledocholithiasis should be considered as a source of clostridium perfringens bacteremia especially in the setting of elevated liver enzymes with cholestatic pattern.

  10. A dangerous hobby? Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae bacteremia most probably acquired from freshwater aquarium fish handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimaki, E; Nolte, O; Overesch, G; Strahm, C

    2017-08-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae is a facultative anaerobic Gram-positive rod that occurs widely in nature and is best known in veterinary medicine for causing swine erysipelas. In humans, infections are rare and mainly considered as occupationally acquired zoonosis. A case of E. rhusiopathiae bacteremia most likely associated with home freshwater aquarium handling is reported. The route of transmission was probably a cut with the dorsal fin of a dead pet fish. A short review of clinical presentations, therapeutic considerations and pitfalls of E. rhusiopathiae infections in humans is presented.

  11. In Reply - Statin Use and Risk of Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smit, Jesper; Schønheyder, Henrik C; Nielsen, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To ascertain whether persons treated with statins experience a decreased risk of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (CA-SAB) as compared with nonusers. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using population-based medical registries, we conducted a case-control study including all adults...... with first-time CA-SAB and population controls matched on age, sex, and residence in Northern Denmark from January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2011. Statin users were categorized as current users (new or long-term use), former users, and nonusers. We used conditional logistic regression to compute odds...... ratios (ORs) for CA-SAB according to statin exposure, overall and stratified by intensity (statin...

  12. Intravenous Drug Abuse by Patients Inside the Hospital: A Cause for Sustained Bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noopur Goel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with history of intravenous drug abuse are noted to be at risk of several infections including HIV, endocarditis, and other opportunistic infections. We report the case of a patient with sustained Bacillus cereus bacteremia despite use of multiple antibiotic regimens during his inpatient stay. Our case highlights the importance of high suspicion for active drug use inside the hospital in such patients. This is important in order to minimize unnecessary diagnostic workup and provide adequate treatment and safe hospital stay for these patients.

  13. Identification of a patient with Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteremia and meningitis by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacman, D J; Zhang, Y; Rydquist-White, J; Wadowsky, R M; Post, J C; Ehrlich, G D

    1995-06-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay based on the penicillin-binding protein gene PBP2B identified the presence of DNA specific for Streptococcus pneumoniae in the serum and CSF of a patient with culture-proven bacteremia and meningitis. Positive signals were seen to dilutions of 1:125 and 1:390,625 for the blood and CSF specimens, respectively. Potential advantages of PCR over conventional culture include exquisite sensitivity, faster results and the ability to identify the organisms by the presence of species-specific DNA even in patients pretreated with antibiotics.

  14. Fatal case of bacteremia caused by an atypical strain of Corynebacterium mucifaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium species have often been considered normal skin flora or contaminants; however, in recent years they have been increasingly implicated in serious infections. Moreover, many new species have been discovered and old species renamed, especially after molecular biology techniques were introduced. Corynebacterium mucifaciens is mainly isolated from blood and from other normally-sterile body fluids; it forms slightly yellow, mucoid colonies on blood agar. We report a fatal case of bacteremia due to an atypical strain of C. mucifaciens. This strain had atypical colony morphology; analysis of the 16S rRNA gene was used to define the species.

  15. Problems in identification of Francisella philomiragia associated with fatal bacteremia in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Alice; Lemming, L E; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a rare gram-negative, halophilic coccobacillus with bizarre spherical forms on primary isolation. A case of F. philomiragia bacteremia in a 24-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease is reported. Identification of F. philomiragia was problematic with conven......Francisella philomiragia is a rare gram-negative, halophilic coccobacillus with bizarre spherical forms on primary isolation. A case of F. philomiragia bacteremia in a 24-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease is reported. Identification of F. philomiragia was problematic...

  16. Performance of nucleic acid amplification following extraction of 5 milliliters of whole blood for diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, John A; Tuohy, Marion J; Morrissey, Anne B; Ramadhani, Habib O; Njau, Boniface N; Maro, Venance P; Reller, L Barth; Procop, Gary W

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the performance of a nucleic acid amplification test (NAAT) for the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia, 5-ml aliquots of blood were inoculated into bioMérieux mycobacterial (MB) bottles and incubated, and 5-ml aliquots of blood were extracted and tested by real-time PCR. Of 25 samples from patients with M. tuberculosis bacteremia, 9 (36.0%) were positive and 1 (1.5%) of 66 control samples was positive by NAAT. The NAAT shows promise, but modifications should focus on improving sensitivity.

  17. Use of a clinical sepsis score for predicting bacteremia in neonatal dairy calves on a calf rearing farm.

    OpenAIRE

    Fecteau, G; Paré, J; Van Metre, D C; Smith, B P; Holmberg, C A; Guterbock, W; Jang, S

    1997-01-01

    In human, equine, and bovine neonates, early diagnosis of bacteremia remains a challenge for the internist. The objective of this study was to develop a predictive model for risk of bacteremia, based on a clinical evaluation system called the clinical sepsis score. Blood from 90 ill calves, 1- to 14-days-old from a calf-raising farm in the San Joaquin Valley of California was cultured. The calves were also scored according to a clinical score for hydration status, fecal appearance, general at...

  18. Biofuels from algae for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, M. Fatih

    2011-01-01

    Microalgae are photosynthetic microorganisms that can produce lipids, proteins and carbohydrates in large amounts over short periods of time. These products can be processed into both biofuels and useful chemicals. Two algae samples (Cladophora fracta and Chlorella protothecoid) were studied for biofuel production. Microalgae appear to be the only source of renewable biodiesel that is capable of meeting the global demand for transport fuels. Microalgae can be converted to biodiesel, bioethanol, bio-oil, biohydrogen and biomethane via thermochemical and biochemical methods. Industrial reactors for algal culture are open ponds, photobioreactors and closed systems. Algae can be grown almost anywhere, even on sewage or salt water, and does not require fertile land or food crops, and processing requires less energy than the algae provides. Microalgae have much faster growth-rates than terrestrial crops. the per unit area yield of oil from algae is estimated to be from 20,000 to 80,000 liters per acre, per year; this is 7-31 times greater than the next best crop, palm oil. Algal oil can be used to make biodiesel for cars, trucks, and airplanes. The lipid and fatty acid contents of microalgae vary in accordance with culture conditions. The effect of temperature on the yield of hydrogen from two algae (C. fracta and C. protothecoid) by pyrolysis and steam gasification were investigated in this study. In each run, the main components of the gas phase were CO 2 , CO, H 2 , and CH 4 .The yields of hydrogen by pyrolysis and steam gasification processes of the samples increased with temperature. The yields of gaseous products from the samples of C. fracta and C. protothecoides increased from 8.2% to 39.2% and 9.5% to 40.6% by volume, respectively, while the final pyrolysis temperature was increased from 575 to 925 K. The percent of hydrogen in gaseous products from the samples of C. fracta and C. protothecoides increased from 25.8% to 44.4% and 27.6% to 48.7% by volume

  19. Radiokinetic study in betony marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo Gouvea, V. de.

    1981-01-01

    The influx and outflux kinetics of some radionuclides in algae of the Rio de Janeiro coastline, were studied in order to select bioindicators for radioactive contamination in aquatic media, due to the presence of Nuclear Power Stations. Bioassays of the concentration and loss of radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 51 Cr, 60 Co and 131 I were performed in 1000cm 3 aquarium under controlled laboratory conditions, using a single channel gamma counting system, to study the species of algae most frequently found in the region. The concentration and loss parameters for all the species and radionuclides studied were obtained from the normalized results. The loss parameters were computerwise adjusted using Powell's multiparametric method. (author)

  20. Hyperaccumulation of radioactive isotopes by marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Toshiaki; Hirano, Shigeki; Watabe, Teruhisa

    2003-01-01

    Hyperaccumlators are effective indicator organisms for monitoring marine pollution by heavy metals and artificial radionuclides. We found a green algae, Bryopsis maxima that hyperaccumulate a stable and radioactive isotopes such as Sr-90, Tc-99, Ba-138, Re-187, and Ra-226. B. maxima showed high concentration factors for heavy alkali earth metals like Ba and Ra, compared with other marine algae in Japan. Furthermore, this species had the highest concentrations for Tc-99 and Re-187. The accumulation and excretion patterns of Sr-85 and Tc-95m were examined by tracer experiments. The chemical states of Sr and Re in living B. maxima were analyzed by HPLC-ICP/MS, LC/MS, and X-ray absorption fine structure analysis using synchrotron radiation. (author)

  1. Streptococcus intermedius Bacteremia and Liver Abscess following a Routine Dental Cleaning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachara V. Livingston

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus intermedius is a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group of bacteria. This group is part of the normal flora of the oropharynx, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal tracts; however, they have been known to cause a variety of purulent infections including meningitis, endocarditis, and abscesses, even in immunocompetent hosts. In particular, S. intermedius has been associated with the development of liver and brain abscesses. There have been several case reports of S. intermedius liver abscesses with active periodontal infection. To our knowledge, however, there has not been a case following a routine dental procedure. In fact, the development of liver abscesses secondary to dental procedures is very rare in general, and there are only a few case reports in the literature describing this in relation to any pathogen. We present a rare case of S. intermedius bacteremia and liver abscess following a dental cleaning. This case serves to further emphasize that even routine dental procedures can place a patient at risk of the development of bacteremia and liver abscesses. For this reason, the clinician must be sure to perform a detailed history and careful examination. Timely diagnosis of pyogenic liver abscesses is vital, as they are typically fatal if left untreated.

  2. Polymicrobial bacteremia caused by Escherichia coli, Edwardsiella tarda, and Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, I-Kuan; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Yu-Ming; Huang, Chiu-Ching

    2004-09-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a member of Enterobacteriaceae, is found in freshwater and marine environments and in animals living in these environments. This bacterium is primarily associated with gastrointestinal diseases, and has been isolated from stool specimens obtained from persons with or without clinical infectious diseases. Shewanella putrefaciens, a saprophytic gram-negative rod, is rarely responsible for clinical syndromes in humans. Debilitated status and exposure to aquatic environments are the major predisposing factors for E. tarda or S. putrefaciens infection. A 61-year-old woman was febrile with diarrhea 8 hours after ingesting shark meat, and two sets of blood cultures grew Escherichia coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens at the same time. She was successfully treated with antibiotics. We present this rare case of polymicrobial bacteremia caused by E. coli, E. tarda and S. putrefaciens without underlying disease, which is the first found in Taiwan. This rare case of febrile diarrhea with consequent polymicrobial bacteremia emphasizes that attention should always be extended to these unusual pathogens.

  3. Human case of bacteremia caused by Streptococcus canis sequence type 9 harboring the scm gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniyama, Daisuke; Abe, Yoshihiko; Sakai, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Takahide; Takahashi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus canis (Sc) is a zoonotic pathogen that is transferred mainly from companion animals to humans. One of the major virulence factors in Sc is the M-like protein encoded by the scm gene, which is involved in anti-phagocytic activities, as well as the recruitment of plasminogen to the bacterial surface in cooperation with enolase, and the consequent enhancement of bacterial transmigration and survival. This is the first reported human case of uncomplicated bacteremia following a dog bite, caused by Streptococcus canis harboring the scm gene. The similarity of the 16S rRNA from the infecting species to that of the Sc type strain, as well as the amplification of the species-specific cfg gene, encoding a co-hemolysin, was used to confirm the species identity. Furthermore, the isolate was confirmed as sequence type 9. The partial scm gene sequence harbored by the isolate was closely related to those of other two Sc strains. While this isolate did not possess the erm (A), erm (B), or mef (A), macrolide/lincosamide resistance genes, it was not susceptible to azithromycin: its susceptibility was intermediate. Even though human Sc bacteremia is rare, clinicians should be aware of this microorganism, as well as Pasteurella sp., Prevotella sp., and Capnocytophaga sp., when examining and treating patients with fever who maintain close contact with companion animals.

  4. [Results of the implementation of the Bacteremia Zero project in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Oliva, Glòria; Ferrer, Joan M; Riera, Alba; Palomar, Mercedes

    2014-07-01

    The nationwide Bacteremia Zero (BZ) Project consists in the simultaneous implementation of measures to prevent central venous catheter-related bacteremia (CVC-B) in critically ill patients and in the development of an integral safety plan. The objective is to present the results obtained after the implementation of the BZ project in the ICUs of the Autonomous Community of Catalonia, Spain. All patients admitted to ICUs in Catalonia participating in the ENVIN-HELICS registry between January 2009 and June 2010 were included. Information was provided by 36 (92.3%) of the total possible 39 ICUs. A total of 281 episodes of CVC-B were diagnosed (overall rate of 2.53 episodes per 1000 days of CVC). The rates have varied significantly between ICUs that participated in the project for more or less than 12 months (2.17 vs. 4.27 episodes per 1000 days of CVC, respectively; p<.0001). The implementation of the BZ Project in Catalonia has been associated with a decrease greater than 40% in the CVC-B rates in the ICUs of this community, which is much higher than the initial objective of 4 episodes per 1000 days of CVC). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  5. Assessment of periodontitis and its role in viridans streptococcal bacteremia and infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Dhotre

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the role of periodontitis in viridans group streptococci (VGS bacteremia and infective endocarditis (IE. Methods: A total of 200 subjects including two groups. Group A- 34 subjects undergoing tooth extraction with periodontitis, 46 subjects undergoing tooth extraction without periodontitis and 40 healthy controls. Group B: 40 confirmed cases of IE (17 with and 23 without periodontitis and 40 healthy controls. Subgingival plaque and blood samples were obtained and processed by standard procedures. Results: A total of 53 blood samples (66.25% yielded positive cultures after tooth extraction. The relationship between the presence of periodontitis and a positive blood culture was significantly higher (p = 0.05 for tooth extraction cases with periodontitis (79.40% than tooth extraction cases without periodontitis (56.50%. Periodontitis was observed in 42.5% of IE cases. Out of the 40 patients of IE, the blood samples yielded 40 different isolates, majority were viridans streptococci 15 (37.5% and staphylococci nine (22.5%. No statistically significant difference was observed between the subgingival plaque and blood isolates of periodontitis in both the groups, indicating similarity of biotypes of viridans streptococci isolated from the blood and the subgingival plaque. Similarity was also observed between the antibiogram profiles of viridans streptococci from both the groups. Conclusions: Periodontitis enhances viridans streptococcal bacteremia and may be a potential risk factor for IE. Keywords: Infective endocarditis, Periodontitis, Viridans group streptococci

  6. Algae-Derived Dietary Ingredients Nourish Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In the 1980s, Columbia, Maryland-based Martek Biosciences Corporation worked with Ames Research Center to pioneer the use of microalgae as a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids, work that led the company to develop its highly successful Formulaid product. Now the Nutritional Products Division of Royal DSM, the company also manufactures DHAgold, a nutritional supplement for pets, livestock and farm-raised fish that uses algae to deliver docosahexaenoic acid (DHA).

  7. Selenium Uptake and Volatilization by Marine Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxem, Katja E.; Vriens, Bas; Wagner, Bettina; Behra, Renata; Winkel, Lenny H. E.

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trace nutrient for humans. An estimated one half to one billion people worldwide suffer from Se deficiency, which is due to low concentrations and bioavailability of Se in soils where crops are grown. It has been hypothesized that more than half of the atmospheric Se deposition to soils is derived from the marine system, where microorganisms methylate and volatilize Se. Based on model results from the late 1980s, the atmospheric flux of these biogenic volatile Se compounds is around 9 Gt/year, with two thirds coming from the marine biosphere. Algae, fungi, and bacteria are known to methylate Se. Although algal Se uptake, metabolism, and methylation influence the speciation and bioavailability of Se in the oceans, these processes have not been quantified under environmentally relevant conditions and are likely to differ among organisms. Therefore, we are investigating the uptake and methylation of the two main inorganic Se species (selenate and selenite) by three globally relevant microalgae: Phaeocystis globosa, the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi, and the diatom Thalassiosira oceanica. Selenium uptake and methylation were quantified in a batch experiment, where parallel gas-tight microcosms in a climate chamber were coupled to a gas-trapping system. For E. huxleyi, selenite uptake was strongly dependent on aqueous phosphate concentrations, which agrees with prior evidence that selenite uptake by phosphate transporters is a significant Se source for marine algae. Selenate uptake was much lower than selenite uptake. The most important volatile Se compounds produced were dimethyl selenide, dimethyl diselenide, and dimethyl selenyl sulfide. Production rates of volatile Se species were larger with increasing intracellular Se concentration and in the decline phase of the alga. Similar experiments are being carried out with P. globosa and T. oceanica. Our results indicate that marine algae are important for the global cycling of Se

  8. Algae as reservoirs for coral pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Sweet

    Full Text Available Benthic algae are associated with coral death in the form of stress and disease. It's been proposed that they release exudates, which facilitate invasion of potentially pathogenic microbes at the coral-algal interface, resulting in coral disease. However, the original source of these pathogens remains unknown. This study examined the ability of benthic algae to act as reservoirs of coral pathogens by characterizing surface associated microbes associated with major Caribbean and Indo-Pacific algal species/types and by comparing them to potential pathogens of two dominant coral diseases: White Syndrome (WS in the Indo-Pacific and Yellow Band Disease (YBD in the Caribbean. Coral and algal sampling was conducted simultaneously at the same sites to avoid spatial effects. Potential pathogens were defined as those absent or rare in healthy corals, increasing in abundance in healthy tissues adjacent to a disease lesion, and dominant in disease lesions. Potentially pathogenic bacteria were detected in both WS and YBD and were also present within the majority of algal species/types (54 and 100% for WS and YBD respectively. Pathogenic ciliates were associated only with WS and not YBD lesions and these were also present in 36% of the Indo-Pacific algal species. Although potential pathogens were associated with many algal species, their presence was inconsistent among replicate algal samples and detection rates were relatively low, suggestive of low density and occurrence. At the community level, coral-associated microbes irrespective of the health of their host differed from algal-associated microbes, supporting that algae and corals have distinctive microbial communities associated with their tissue. We conclude that benthic algae are common reservoirs for a variety of different potential coral pathogens. However, algal-associated microbes alone are unlikely to cause coral death. Initial damage or stress to the coral via other competitive mechanisms is

  9. Antibody Production in Plants and Green Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusibov, Vidadi; Kushnir, Natasha; Streatfield, Stephen J

    2016-04-29

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a wide range of modern applications, including research, diagnostic, therapeutic, and industrial uses. Market demand for mAbs is high and continues to grow. Although mammalian systems, which currently dominate the biomanufacturing industry, produce effective and safe recombinant mAbs, they have a limited manufacturing capacity and high costs. Bacteria, yeast, and insect cell systems are highly scalable and cost effective but vary in their ability to produce appropriate posttranslationally modified mAbs. Plants and green algae are emerging as promising production platforms because of their time and cost efficiencies, scalability, lack of mammalian pathogens, and eukaryotic posttranslational protein modification machinery. So far, plant- and algae-derived mAbs have been produced predominantly as candidate therapeutics for infectious diseases and cancer. These candidates have been extensively evaluated in animal models, and some have shown efficacy in clinical trials. Here, we review ongoing efforts to advance the production of mAbs in plants and algae.

  10. New records of marine algae in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hau, Nhu; Ly, Bui Minh; Van Huynh, Tran; Trung, Vo Thanh

    2015-06-01

    In May, 2013, a scientific expedition was organized by the Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST) and the Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (FEBRAS) through the frame of the VAST-FEBRAS International Collaboration Program. The expedition went along the coast of Vietnam from Quang Ninh to Kien Giang. The objective was to collect natural resources to investigate the biological and biochemical diversity of the territorial waters of Vietnam. Among the collected algae, six taxa are new records for the Vietnam algal flora. They are the red algae Titanophora pikeana (Dickie) Feldmann from Cu Lao Xanh Island, Laurencia natalensis Kylin from Tho Chu Island, Coelothrix irregularis (Harvey) Børgesen from Con Dao Island, the green algae Caulerpa oligophylla Montagne, Caulerpa andamanensis (W.R. Taylor) Draisma, Prudhomme et Sauvage from Phu Quy Island, and Caulerpa falcifolia Harvey & Bailey from Ly Son Island. The seaweed flora of Vietnam now counts 833 marine algal taxa, including 415 Rhodophyta, 147 Phaeophyceae, 183 Chlorophyta, and 88 Cyanobacteria.

  11. Electro-coagulation-flotation process for algae removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Shanshan; Yang Jixian; Tian Jiayu; Ma Fang; Tu Gang; Du Maoan

    2010-01-01

    Algae in surface water have been a long-term issue all over the world, due to their adverse influence on drinking water treatment process as well as drinking water quality. The algae removal by electro-coagulation-flotation (ECF) technology was investigated in this paper. The results indicated that aluminum was an excellent electrode material for algae removal as compared with iron. The optimal parameters determined were: current density = 1 mA/cm 2 , pH = 4-7, water temperature = 18-36 deg. C, algae density = 0.55 x 10 9 -1.55 x 10 9 cells/L. Under the optimal conditions, 100% of algae removal was achieved with the energy consumption as low as 0.4 kWh/m 3 . The ECF performed well in acid and neutral conditions. At low initial pH of 4-7, the cell density of algae was effectively removed in the ECF, mainly through the charge neutralization mechanism; while the algae removal worsened when the pH increased (7-10), and the main mechanism shifted to sweeping flocculation and enmeshment. The mechanisms for algae removal at different pH were also confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis. Furthermore, initial cell density and water temperature could also influence the algae removal. Overall, the results indicated that the ECF technology was effective for algae removal, from both the technical and economical points of view.

  12. Problems in identification of Francisella philomiragia associated with fatal bacteremia in a patient with chronic granulomatous disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis-Møller, Alice; Lemming, L E; Valerius, Niels Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Francisella philomiragia is a rare gram-negative, halophilic coccobacillus with bizarre spherical forms on primary isolation. A case of F. philomiragia bacteremia in a 24-year-old patient with chronic granulomatous disease is reported. Identification of F. philomiragia was problematic...

  13. Efficacy of Minocycline and EDTA Lock Solution in Preventing Catheter-Related Bacteremia, Septic Phlebitis, and Endocarditis in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Issam; Hachem, Ray; Tcholakian, Robert K.; Sherertz, Robert

    2002-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of antibiotic catheter lock solution in preventing catheter-related infections, silicone catheters were tunneled and inserted into the jugular veins of 18 rabbits. The catheters were challenged with an intraluminal injection of 105 CFU of slime-producing Staphylococcus epidermidis in 0.1 ml of water. The catheters were maintained on heparin (100 IU/ml) flush for the first 3 days. On day 3, quantitative blood samples for culture were obtained from the catheters and ear veins, which documented catheter-related bacteremia, and the rabbits were randomized to have their catheters flushed as follows: five animals were continued on heparin (100 IU/ml), five animals received vancomycin (3 mg/ml) with heparin (100 IU/ml), and eight animals received 3 mg of minocycline per ml with 30 mg of EDTA per ml (M-EDTA). All animals were killed at day 7. Blood, catheters, jugular veins, and heart valves were cultured quantitatively. Animals maintained on heparin developed catheter-related colonization, bacteremia, septic phlebitis, and endocarditis. Vancomycin-heparin partially prevented catheter colonization, bacteremia, and phlebitis (P = 0.2). M-EDTA completely prevented catheter colonization, catheter-related bacteremia, and phlebitis in all of the animals (P phlebitis, and endocarditis in rabbits. PMID:11796338

  14. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: Case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Michael Z

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  15. Central venous catheter-related bacteremia caused by Kocuria kristinae: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Ryan; Bares, Sara; David, Michael Z

    2011-08-24

    Kocuria species are unusual human pathogens isolated most commonly from immunocompromised hosts, such as transplant recipients and cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, or from patients with chronic medical conditions. A case of catheter-related bacteremia with pulmonary septic emboli in a pregnant adult female without chronic medical conditions is described. A review of other reported Kocuria infections is provided.

  16. Bacteremia Caused by Kocuria kristinae from Egypt: Are There More? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Reem M.; Bassiouny, Dina M.; Matar, Yomna

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is opportunistic Gram-positive cocci from the family Micrococcaceae. It is usually considered part of the normal flora that rarely is isolated from clinical specimens. Here, we report a case of Kocuria kristinae bacteremia; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Egypt.

  17. Bacteremia Caused by Kocuria kristinae from Egypt: Are There More? A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Reem M; Bassiouny, Dina M; Matar, Yomna

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria kristinae is opportunistic Gram-positive cocci from the family Micrococcaceae. It is usually considered part of the normal flora that rarely is isolated from clinical specimens. Here, we report a case of Kocuria kristinae bacteremia; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Egypt.

  18. Bacteremia Caused by Kocuria kristinae from Egypt: Are There More? A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem M. Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kocuria kristinae is opportunistic Gram-positive cocci from the family Micrococcaceae. It is usually considered part of the normal flora that rarely is isolated from clinical specimens. Here, we report a case of Kocuria kristinae bacteremia; to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report from Egypt.

  19. Presence of the KPC carbapenemase gene in Enterobacteriaceae causing bacteremia, and the correlation with in vitro carbapenem susceptibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    During six months, we obtained Enterobacteriaceae isolates from patients with Gram-negative bacteremia at a 1250-bed teaching hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, and compared carbapenem susceptibility with the presence of blaKPC, a transferable carbapenemase gene. Three (1.2%) out of 243 isolates were ...

  20. Nosocomial extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia in hemodialysis patients and the implications for antibiotic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chao Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: In accordance with our previous study, our results have demonstrated the inferiority of flomoxef to carbapenems in the treatment of HD access-related ESBL-Kp bacteremia and provide an insight into the possibility of using ertapenem rather than flomoxef as an initial or de-escalating therapy for infections caused by ESBL-producing bacteria.

  1. Recurrent Bacteremia, a Complication of Cyanoacrylate Injection for Variceal Bleeding: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Galperine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the first description of recurrent bacteremia in two patients after cyanoacrylate injection for gastric varices bleeding treated with antibiotics alone. Adapted and prolonged antibiotic treatment allowed a complete resolution of the infection with no relapse after more than 6 months. According to recent data, prophylactic antibiotics should be further investigated for patients with bleeding varices undergoing cyanoacrylate injection.

  2. Campylobacter fetus Bacteremia Revealed by Cellulitis without Gastrointestinal Symptoms in the Context of Acquired Hypogammaglobulinemia: A Report of Three Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souleymane Brah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter fetus bacteremia is rare and occurs mainly in patients with immunosuppression. This infection, which often involves secondary localizations has already been reported in some primary humoral immune deficiencies. We describe three cases of severe infection due to C. fetus with cellulitis at presentation, but without any gastrointestinal symptoms, occurring in patients with acquired hypogammaglobulinemia.

  3. The associations between socioeconomic status and risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and subsequent endocarditis - a Danish nationwide cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2017-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in several countries. Since socioeconomic status (SES) is known to influence the risk of infectious diseases in general, we aimed to investigate the association between SES and SAB, and risk...

  4. Does C-reactive protein independently predict mortality in adult community-acquired bacteremia patients with known sepsis severity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradel, Kim O; Jensen, Thøger G; Kolmos, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated whether sepsis severity and C-reactive protein (CRP) level on admission prognostically corroborated or annulled each other in adult patients with incident community-acquired bacteremia (Funen, Denmark, 2000-2008). We used logistic regression and area under the receiver operating.......06), thus CRP contributed as much as sepsis severity to prognosis....

  5. Comparative antimicrobial susceptibility of aerobic and facultative bacteria from community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Chang-Phone

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ertapenem is a once-a-day carbapenem and has excellent activity against many gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic, facultative, and anaerobic bacteria. The susceptibility of isolates of community-acquired bacteremia to ertapenem has not been reported yet. The present study assesses the in vitro activity of ertapenem against aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens isolated from patients with community-acquired bacteremia by determining and comparing the MICs of cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin. The prevalence of extended broad spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing strains of community-acquired bacteremia and their susceptibility to these antibiotics are investigated. Methods Aerobic and facultative bacteria isolated from blood obtained from hospitalized patients with community-acquired bacteremia within 48 hours of admission between August 1, 2004 and September 30, 2004 in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital at Keelung, Taiwan, were identified using standard procedures. Antimicrobial susceptibility was evaluated by Etest according to the standard guidelines provided by the manufacturer and document M100-S16 Performance Standards of the Clinical Laboratory of Standard Institute. Antimicrobial agents including cefepime, cefoxitin, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ertapenem, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin were used against the bacterial isolates to test their MICs as determined by Etest. For Staphylococcus aureus isolates, MICs of oxacillin were also tested by Etest to differentiate oxacillin-sensitive and oxacillin-resistant S. aureus. Results Ertapenem was highly active in vitro against many aerobic and facultative bacterial pathogens commonly recovered from patients with community-acquired bacteremia (128/159, 80.5 %. Ertapenem had more potent activity than ceftriaxone, piperacillin

  6. Algae to Economically Viable Low-Carbon-Footprint Oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhujade, Ramesh; Chidambaram, Mandan; Kumar, Avnish; Sapre, Ajit

    2017-06-07

    Algal oil as an alternative to fossil fuel has attracted attention since the 1940s, when it was discovered that many microalgae species can produce large amounts of lipids. Economics and energy security were the motivational factors for a spurt in algae research during the 1970s, 1990s, and early 2000s. Whenever crude prices declined, research on algae stopped. The scenario today is different. Even given low and volatile crude prices ($30-$50/barrel), interest in algae continues all over the world. Algae, with their cure-all characteristics, have the potential to provide sustainable solutions to problems in the energy-food-climate nexus. However, after years of effort, there are no signs of algae-to-biofuel technology being commercialized. This article critically reviews past work; summarizes the current status of the technology; and based on the lessons learned, provides a balanced perspective on a potential path toward commercialization of algae-to-oil technology.

  7. Interspecific variation in total phenolic content in temperate brown algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Mannino

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Marine algae synthesize secondary metabolites such as polyphenols that function as defense and protection mechanisms. Among brown algae, Fucales and Dictyotales (Phaeophyceae contain the highest levels of phenolic compounds, mainly phlorotannins, that play multiple roles. Four temperate brown algae (Cystoseira amentacea, Cystoseira compressa, Dictyopteris polypodioides and Padina pavonica were studied for total phenolic contents. Total phenolic content was determined colorimetrically with the Folin-Ciocalteu reagent. Significant differences in total phenolic content were observed between leathery and sheetlike algae and also within each morphological group. Among the four species, the sheet-like alga D. polypodioides, living in the upper infralittoral zone, showed the highest concentration of phenolic compounds. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that total phenolic content in temperate brown algae is influenced by a combination of several factors, such as growth form, depth, and exposition to solar radiation.

  8. Assessing outcomes of adult oncology patients treated with linezolid versus daptomycin for bacteremia due to vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Khilna; Kabir, Rubiya; Ahmad, Samrah; Allen, Steven L

    2016-04-01

    The incidence and severity of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus blood stream infections continue to rise and is a significant burden in the healthcare setting. Literature thus far is minimal regarding treatment outcomes in patients with malignancy and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. Appropriate antibiotic selection is vital to treatment success due to high rates of resistance, limited antimicrobials and mortality in this patient population. We conducted this study to determine whether treatment outcomes differed between cancer patients treated with linezolid and those treated with daptomycin for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia. This single-center, retrospective study included adult patients hospitalized on the oncology service with documented vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium or Enterococcus faecalis bacteremia who received at least 48 h of either linezolid or daptomycin as primary treatment. A total of 65 patients were included in the analysis. Thirty-two patients received daptomycin as primary treatment, and 33 patients received linezolid as primary treatment. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients in the linezolid cohort versus 22 (71%) patients in the daptomycin cohort achieved microbiological cure (p = 0.6141). Median length of stay in days (30 vs. 42, p = 0.0714) and mortality (7/32 (20.6%) vs. 8/33 (25.8%), p = 0.6180) were also similar between the linezolid and daptomycin treated patients, respectively. No differences in microbiological cure, length of stay or mortality were identified between the groups. This study suggests that linezolid and daptomycin are each reasonable options for treating vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in oncology patients. Further prospective, randomized controlled trials are needed to assess the optimal treatment for vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in this patient population. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Huge Dermatofibrosarcoma Protuberans Mimicking a Breast Malignant Tumor with Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han-Kun Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP is an uncommon skin cancer that most commonly occurs on the trunk and extremities. DFSP of the breast has rarely been reported, and then is almost always of small size. We report a case of rapid-growing DFSP of the breast with abscess formation mimicking breast cancer, and also make a review of related literature.

  10. Ectopic decidual reaction mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, C.; Prangsgaard, Tina; Lorentzen, Torben

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic decidual reaction has been described in various intraperitoneal locations. We present a case of unusual ectopic decidual reaction in the groin mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound in a pregnant woman. This case contributes evidence illustrating the variability of the clinical...... presentation of ectopic decidual reaction....

  11. Cutaneous Silicone Granuloma Mimicking Breast Cancer after Ruptured Breast Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Asim Ghulam El-Charnoubi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous manifestations due to migration of silicone from ruptured implants are rare. Migrated silicone with cutaneous involvement has been found in the chest wall, abdominal wall, and lower extremities. We describe a case of cutaneous silicone granuloma in the breast exhibiting unusual growth mimicking breast cancer after a ruptured implant.

  12. Neoplastic stomach lesions and their mimickers: spectrum of imaging manifestations

    OpenAIRE

    Virmani, Vivek; Khandelwal, Ashish; Sethi, Vineeta; Fraser-Hill, Margret; Fasih, Najla; Kielar, Ania

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This review illustrates a wide spectrum of gastric neoplasms with emphasis on imaging findings helpful in characterizing various gastric neoplasms. Both the malignant and benign neoplasms along with focal gastric masses mimicking tumour are illustrated. Moreover, imaging clues to reach an accurate diagnosis are emphasized.

  13. Sparganosis of the Breast that Mimicked Metastasis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Woon; Hwang, Mi Soo

    2011-01-01

    Sparganosis of the breast is a rare parasitic infection of humans. If the breast is involved, then this condition presents as soft tissue masses that mimic breast cancer. We report here on the radiologic feature of sparganosis in a patient with gastric cancer and this mimicked metastasis. We also briefly review the relevant literature

  14. Effects of mimicking: Acting prosocially by being emotionally moved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stel, M.; Baaren, R.B. van; Vonk, R.

    2008-01-01

    Mimicry is functional for empathy and bonding purposes. Studies on the consequences of mimicry at a behavioral level demonstrated that mimicry increases prosocial behavior. However, these previous studies focused on the mimickee. In the present paper, we investigated whether mimickers also become

  15. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min [Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Irwon-dong, Kangnam-gu, Seoul 135-710 (Korea); Sung, Ki Woong [Department of Paediatrics, Samsung Medical Centre, Seoul 135-710 (Korea)

    2003-11-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  16. Spinal MRI of vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yun Woo; Yoon, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Jae Min; Sung, Ki Woong

    2003-01-01

    A 4.3-year-old girl with acute leukaemia, who was being treated with chemotherapy (including vincristine), developed paraplegia. Spinal MRI showed diffusely enhancing nerve roots on contrast-enhanced images. Spinal fluid analysis showed a normal protein level. Vincristine neuropathy mimicking Guillain-Barre syndrome is thought to be the cause of the MRI abnormalities. (orig.)

  17. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat

    OpenAIRE

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; MacDonald, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma.

  18. Friedreich's ataxia mimicking hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, Marios; Kalfakis, Nikolaos; Karadima, Georgia; Davaki, Panagiota; Vassilopoulos, Demetris

    2002-11-01

    Four patients from three unrelated families, with clinical and electrophysiological findings compatible with the diagnosis of hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy, are presented. The molecular analysis showed that the affected individuals were homozygous for the mutation in the X25 gene, characteristic of Friedreich's ataxia. These patients seem to represent a form of Friedreich's ataxia mimicking Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  19. Primary Papillary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ureter Mimicking Genitourinary Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulwani, Hanni; Jain, Aruna

    2010-01-01

    Primary adenocarcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter are rare and account for less than 1% of all malignancies at this site. We report a case of primary papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ureter that clinically mimicked genitourinary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is important for the better outcome. PMID:21151719

  20. Primary Papillary Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ureter Mimicking Genitourinary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanni Gulwani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary adenocarcinomas of the renal pelvis and ureter are rare and account for less than 1% of all malignancies at this site. We report a case of primary papillary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ureter that clinically mimicked genitourinary tuberculosis. Early diagnosis is important for the better outcome.

  1. Mimicking expressiveness of movements by autistic children in game play

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetteroo, D.; Shirzad, A.; Serras Pereira, M.; Zwinderman, M.J.; Duy, L.; Barakova, E.I.

    2012-01-01

    Children with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD)have marked impairments in social interaction. Imitation is a basic social interaction behavior, and mimicking as an element of imitation can be a diagnostic marker for autism and thus a skill that can be targeted by behavioral training. In a comparative

  2. Genome Annotation and Transcriptomics of Oil-Producing Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0103 GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE Sabeeha Merchant UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ANGELES Final...2010 To 12-31-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE GENOME ANNOTATION AND TRANSCRIPTOMICS OF OIL-PRODUCING ALGAE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0095 5b...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Most algae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) when they are starved for essential nutrients like N, S, P (or Si in the case of some

  3. Production and characterization of algae extract from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weston Kightlinger

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that algae extract derived from C. reinhardtii is similar, if not superior, to commercially available yeast extract in nutrient content and effects on the growth and metabolism of E. coli and S. cerevisiae. Bacto™ yeast extract is valued at USD $0.15–0.35 per gram, if algae extract was sold at similar prices, it would serve as a high-value co-product in algae-based fuel processes.

  4. Method and apparatus for iterative lysis and extraction of algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Boggs, Tabitha; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Doherty, Stephen J.

    2015-12-01

    A method and system for processing algae involves the use of an ionic liquid-containing clarified cell lysate to lyse algae cells. The resulting crude cell lysate may be clarified and subsequently used to lyse algae cells. The process may be repeated a number of times before a clarified lysate is separated into lipid and aqueous phases for further processing and/or purification of desired products.

  5. Comparative effectiveness of nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin in methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGregor Jessina C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high prevalence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA has led clinicians to select antibiotics that have coverage against MRSA, usually vancomycin, for empiric therapy for suspected staphylococcal infections. Clinicians often continue vancomycin started empirically even when methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA strains are identified by culture. However, vancomycin has been associated with poor outcomes such as nephrotoxicity, persistent bacteremia and treatment failure. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of vancomycin versus the beta-lactam antibiotics nafcillin and cefazolin among patients with MSSA bacteremia. The outcome of interest for this study was 30-day in-hospital mortality. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all adult in-patients admitted to a tertiary-care facility between January 1, 2003 and June 30, 2007 who had a positive blood culture for MSSA and received nafcillin, cefazolin or vancomycin. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess independent mortality hazards comparing nafcillin or cefazolin versus vancomycin. Similar methods were used to estimate the survival benefits of switching from vancomycin to nafcillin or cefazolin versus leaving patients on vancomycin. Each model included statistical adjustment using propensity scores which contained variables associated with an increased propensity to receive vancomycin. Results 267 patients were included; 14% (38/267 received nafcillin or cefazolin, 51% (135/267 received both vancomycin and either nafcillin or cefazolin, and 35% (94/267 received vancomycin. Thirty (11% died within 30 days. Those receiving nafcillin or cefazolin had 79% lower mortality hazards compared with those who received vancomycin alone (adjusted hazard ratio (HR: 0.21; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.09, 0.47. Among the 122 patients who initially received vancomycin empirically, those who were switched to nafcillin or cefazolin (66

  6. Method and apparatus for lysing and processing algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Geoffrey; Reich, Alton J.; Dykes, Jr., H. Waite H.; Di Salvo, Roberto

    2013-03-05

    Methods and apparatus for processing algae are described in which a hydrophilic ionic liquid is used to lyse algae cells at lower temperatures than existing algae processing methods. A salt or salt solution is used as a separation agent and to remove water from the ionic liquid, allowing the ionic liquid to be reused. The used salt may be dried or concentrated and reused. The relatively low lysis temperatures and recycling of the ionic liquid and salt reduce the environmental impact of the algae processing while providing biofuels and other useful products.

  7. Importance of algae oil as a source of biodiesel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan; Fatih Demirbas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Algae are the fastest-growing plants in the world. Industrial reactors for algal culture are open ponds, photobioreactors and closed systems. Algae are very important as a biomass source. Algae will some day be competitive as a source for biofuel. Different species of algae may be better suited for different types of fuel. Algae can be grown almost anywhere, even on sewage or salt water, and does not require fertile land or food crops, and processing requires less energy than the algae provides. Algae can be a replacement for oil based fuels, one that is more effective and has no disadvantages. Algae are among the fastest-growing plants in the world, and about 50% of their weight is oil. This lipid oil can be used to make biodiesel for cars, trucks, and airplanes. Microalgae have much faster growth-rates than terrestrial crops. the per unit area yield of oil from algae is estimated to be from 20,000 to 80,000 l per acre, per year; this is 7-31 times greater than the next best crop, palm oil. The lipid and fatty acid contents of microalgae vary in accordance with culture conditions. Most current research on oil extraction is focused on microalgae to produce biodiesel from algal oil. Algal-oil processes into biodiesel as easily as oil derived from land-based crops.

  8. Accumulation of 210Po by benthic marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouvea, R.C.; Branco, M.E.C.; Santos, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The accumulation of polonium 210 Po by various species of benthic marine seaweeds collected from 4 different points on the coast of Rio de Janeiro, showed variations by species and algal groups. The highest value found was in red alga, Plocamium brasiliensis followed by other organisms of the same group. In the group of the brown alga, the specie Sargassum stenophylum was outstanding. The Chlorophyta presented the lowest content of 210 Po. The algae collected in open sea, revealed greater concentration factors of 210 Po than the same species living in bays. The siliceous residue remaining after mineralization of the algae did not interfere with the detection of polonium. (author)

  9. Algae Bioreactor Using Submerged Enclosures with Semi-Permeable Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan D (Inventor); Gormly, Sherwin J (Inventor); Embaye, Tsegereda N (Inventor); Delzeit, Lance D (Inventor); Flynn, Michael T (Inventor); Liggett, Travis A (Inventor); Buckwalter, Patrick W (Inventor); Baertsch, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for producing hydrocarbons, including oil, by processing algae and/or other micro-organisms in an aquatic environment. Flexible bags (e.g., plastic) with CO.sub.2/O.sub.2 exchange membranes, suspended at a controllable depth in a first liquid (e.g., seawater), receive a second liquid (e.g., liquid effluent from a "dead zone") containing seeds for algae growth. The algae are cultivated and harvested in the bags, after most of the second liquid is removed by forward osmosis through liquid exchange membranes. The algae are removed and processed, and the bags are cleaned and reused.

  10. Economic evaluation of algae biodiesel based on meta-analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongli; Liu, Xiaowei; White, Mark A.; Colosi, Lisa M.

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study is to elucidate the economic viability of algae-to-energy systems at a large scale, by developing a meta-analysis of five previously published economic evaluations of systems producing algae biodiesel. Data from original studies were harmonised into a standardised framework using financial and technical assumptions. Results suggest that the selling price of algae biodiesel under the base case would be 5.00-10.31/gal, higher than the selected benchmarks: 3.77/gal for petroleum diesel, and 4.21/gal for commercial biodiesel (B100) from conventional vegetable oil or animal fat. However, the projected selling price of algal biodiesel (2.76-4.92/gal), following anticipated improvements, would be competitive. A scenario-based sensitivity analysis reveals that the price of algae biodiesel is most sensitive to algae biomass productivity, algae oil content, and algae cultivation cost. This indicates that the improvements in the yield, quality, and cost of algae feedstock could be the key factors to make algae-derived biodiesel economically viable.

  11. Interactions between arsenic species and marine algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    The arsenic concentration and speciation of marine algae varies widely, from 0.4 to 23 ng.mg/sup -1/, with significant differences in both total arsenic content and arsenic speciation occurring between algal classes. The Phaeophyceae contain more arsenic than other algal classes, and a greater proportion of the arsenic is organic. The concentration of inorganic arsenic is fairly constant in macro-algae, and may indicate a maximum level, with the excess being reduced and methylated. Phytoplankton take up As(V) readily, and incorporate a small percentage of it into the cell. The majority of the As(V) is reduced, methylated, and released to the surrounding media. The arsenic speciation in phytoplankton and Valonia also changes when As(V) is added to cultures. Arsenate and phosphate compete for uptake by algal cells. Arsenate inhibits primary production at concentrations as low as 5 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/ when the phosphate concentration is low. The inhibition is competitive. A phosphate enrichment of > 0.3 ..mu..M alleviates this inhibition; however, the As(V) stress causes an increase in the cell's phosphorus requirement. Arsenite is also toxic to phytoplankton at similar concentrations. Methylated arsenic species did not affect cell productivity, even at concentrations of 25 ..mu..g.1/sup -1/. Thus, the methylation of As(V) by the cell produces a stable, non-reactive compound which is nontoxic. The uptake and subsequent reduction and methylation of As(V) is a significant factor in determining the arsenic biogeochemistry of productive systems, and also the effect that the arsenic may have on algal productivity. Therefore, the role of marine algae in determining the arsenic speciation of marine systems cannot be ignored. (ERB)

  12. Ammonium removal using algae-bacteria consortia: the effect of ammonium concentration, algae biomass, and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Huijun; Yuan, Qiuyan

    2018-04-01

    In this study, the effects of ammonium nitrogen concentration, algae biomass concentration, and light conditions (wavelength and intensity) on the ammonium removal efficiency of algae-bacteria consortia from wastewater were investigated. The results indicated that ammonium concentration and light intensity had a significant impact on nitrification. It was found that the highest ammonia concentration (430 mg N/L) in the influent resulted in the highest ammonia removal rate of 108 ± 3.6 mg N/L/days, which was two times higher than the influent with low ammonia concentration (40 mg N/L). At the lowest light intensity of 1000 Lux, algae biomass concentration, light wavelength, and light cycle did not show a significant effect on the performance of algal-bacterial consortium. Furthermore, the ammonia removal rate was approximately 83 ± 1.0 mg N/L/days, which was up to 40% faster than at the light intensity of 2500 Lux. It was concluded that the algae-bacteria consortia can effectively remove nitrogen from wastewater and the removal performance can be stabilized and enhanced using the low light intensity of 1000 Lux that is also a cost-effective strategy.

  13. Snow algae and lichen algae differ in their resistance to freezing temperature: An ice nucleation study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajek, J.; Kvíderová, Jana; Worland, R.; Barták, M.; Elster, Josef; Vaczi, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 4 (2009), s. 37-38 ISSN 0031-8884. [International Phycological Congress /9./. 02.08.2009-08.08.2009, Tokyo] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050702; GA AV ČR KJB601630808 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : ice nucleation * algae * freezing Subject RIV: EF - Botanics

  14. Role of marine algae in organic farming

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pereira, N.; Verlecar, X.N.

    Division of Publication and Information, Indian Council of Medical Research, V. Ramalingaswami Bhawan, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi 110 029, India e - mail: encejain@yahoo.co.in Role of marine algae in organic far m ing As rightly outlined.... The Indi an Ocean, including its adjacent seas, extends over an area of about 73.44 ? 10 6 km 2 and the potential harvest of seaweeds from the Indian Ocean is about 870 thousand tonnes (wet weight) 3 . India could draw benefits from this marine...

  15. Effect of petroleum hydrocarbons on algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhadauria, S.; Sengar, R.M.S.; Mittal, S.; Bhattacharjee, S.

    1992-01-01

    Algal species (65) were isolated from oil refinery effluent. Twenty-five of these species were cultured in Benecke's medium in a growth chamber, along with controls. Retardation in algal growth, inhibition in algal photosynthesis, and discoloration was observed in petroleum enriched medium. Few forms, viz. Cyclotella sp., Cosmarium sp., and Merismopedia sp. could not survive. The lag phase lengthened by several days and slope of exponential phase was also depressed. Chlamydomonas sp., Scenedesmus sp., Ankistrodesmus sp., Nitzschia sp. and Navicula sp. were comparatively susceptible to petroleum. Depression in carbon fixation, cell numbers, and total dry algal mass was noticeable, showing toxicity to both diatoms and green algae

  16. Long-term mortality and causes of death associated with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotland, N; Uhre, M L; Mejer, N

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Data describing long-term mortality in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is scarce. This study investigated risk factors, causes of death and temporal trends in long-term mortality associated with SAB. METHODS: Nationwide population-based matched cohort study...... respiratory disease, nervous system disease, unknown causes, psychiatric disorders, cardiovascular disease and senility. Over time, rates of death decreased or were stable for all disease categories except for musculoskeletal and skin disease where a trend towards an increase was seen. CONCLUSION: Long......-term mortality after SAB was high but decreased over time. SAB cases were more likely to die of eight specific causes of death and less likely to die of five other causes of death compared to controls. Causes of death decreased for most disease categories. Risk factors associated with long-term mortality were...

  17. Rationale for and protocol of a multi-national population-based bacteremia surveillance collaborative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Church Deirdre L

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bloodstream infections are frequent causes of human illness and cause major morbidity and death. In order to best define the epidemiology of these infections and to track changes in occurrence, adverse outcome, and resistance rates over time, population based methodologies are optimal. However, few population-based surveillance systems exist worldwide, and because of differences in methodology inter-regional comparisons are limited. In this report we describe the rationale and propose first practical steps for developing an international collaborative approach to the epidemiologic study and surveillance for bacteremia. Findings The founding collaborative participants represent six regions in four countries in three continents with a combined annual surveillance population of more than 8 million residents. Conclusion Future studies from this collaborative should lead to a better understanding of the epidemiology of bloodstream infections.

  18. Increase in hippocampal water diffusion and volume during experimental pneumococcal meningitis is aggravated by bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holler, Jon G; Brandt, Christian T; Leib, Stephen L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The hippocampus undergoes apoptosis in experimental pneumococcal meningitis leading to neurofunctional deficits in learning and memory function. The aim of the present study was 1) to investigate hippocampal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and volume with MRI during the course...... and the volume and size of brain ventricles were positively correlated (Spearman Rank, p volume and the extent of apoptosis (p > 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In experimental meningitis increase in volume and water diffusion of the hippocampus are significantly...... of experimental pneumococcal meningitis, 2) to explore the influence of accompanying bacteremia on hippocampal water distribution and volume, 3) and to correlate these findings to the extent of apoptosis in the hippocampus. METHODS: Experimental meningitis in rats was induced by intracisternal injection of live...

  19. Bacteremia following T-tube cholangiography: Injection by hand versus gravity-infusion technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messmer, J.M.; Bradley, J.J.; Cho, S.R.; Turner, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Twenty-four patients were evaluated to determine if the method of performing T-tube cholangiography had bearing on the development of bacteremia. Fifteen patients underwent cholangiography after hand injection (HI) of contrast medium and 12 patients cholangiogrpahy after gravity infusion of contrast medium. In three patients both techniques were used. Injection pressures were monitored and blood and bile samples were obtained for culture. In four of the 11 patients (36%) in the HI group who were not taking antibiotics, pathogens were cultured from blood drawn immediately after cholangiographic. The remaining four patients in this group were taking antibiotics and had negative blood cultures. None of the 12 patients in the GI group had positive blood cultures. There was a correlation between the higher injection pressures generated using the HI technique and positive blood cultures

  20. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... increase for hospitalization with pneumonia associated with diabetes. The increase of risk for tuberculosis is of similar magnitude in highly developed countries, and possibly higher in low-income countries. Poor glycemic control and long diabetes duration predict higher risk for both pneumonia...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...

  1. Laboratory experience with radiometric detection of bacteremia with three culture media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicher, K.; Koscinski, D.

    1984-01-01

    In two long-term studies, the BACTEC radiometric system for detection of bacteremia was evaluated with three culture media each: (i) BACTEC media 6A (for aerobes) and 7B (for anaerobes) plus a thioglycolate medium and (ii) BACTEC media 6A, 7B, and 8A (hypertonic). In study 1, clinically significant isolates were identified in 1,873 (13.9%) of 13,432 blood cultures with all three media. The thioglycolate medium revealed 143 (1.1%) organisms not recovered from the 6A and 7B media. In study 2, isolates were identified in 1,135 (12.9%) of 8,759 cultures with all three media; 104 (1.2%) organisms were isolated only from the hypertonic medium. The increased yield of positive cultures in the three-medium system is likely due to the larger volume of blood cultured

  2. The associations between socioeconomic status and risk of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and subsequent endocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oestergaard, Louise Bruun; Schmiegelow, Michelle D.; Bruun, Niels Eske

    2017-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is the leading cause of infective endocarditis in several countries. Since socioeconomic status (SES) is known to influence the risk of infectious diseases in general, we aimed to investigate the association between SES and SAB, and risk...... of subsequent endocarditis in a nationwide adult population. Methods: All Danish residents were consecutively included at age≥30years during 1996-2010. We obtained information on SES (highest attained educational level), comorbidities, and microbiologically verified SAB by cross-linking nationwide registries....... The incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of SAB and later endocarditis were investigated using Poisson regression models adjusted for sex, age and year (reference=highest SES). Results: Our study population comprised 3,394,936 individuals (median age=43.2years). Over a median follow-up of 15.9years, 13,181 individuals...

  3. The utility of anaerobic blood culture in detecting facultative anaerobic bacteremia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Kensuke; Komuro, Hisako; Watanabe, Yasushi; Miyairi, Isao

    2013-08-01

    Routine anaerobic blood culture is not recommended in children because obligate anaerobic bacteremia is rare in the pediatric population. However, a number of facultative anaerobic bacteria can cause community and hospital acquired infections in children and the utility of anaerobic blood culture for detection of these organisms is still unclear. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all blood culture samples (n = 24,356) at a children's hospital in Japan from October 2009 to June 2012. Among the samples that had paired aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures, 717 samples were considered clinically significant with 418 (58%) organisms detected from both aerobic and anaerobic cultures, 167 (23%) detected only from aerobic culture and 132 (18%) detected only from anaerobic culture. While most facultative anaerobes were detectable by aerobic culture, over 25% of Enterobacteriaceae and 15% of Staphylococcus sp. were detected from anaerobic cultures bottles only, suggesting its potential role in selected settings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Validating severity of illness scoring systems in the prediction of outcomes in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mamta; Szpunar, Susan; Khatib, Riad

    2013-08-01

    Severity of illness scores are helpful in predicting mortality; however, no standardized scoring system has been validated in patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB). The modified Rapid Emergency Medicine Score (REMS), the CURB-65 (confusion, urea, respiratory rate, blood pressure and age 65) and the Charlson weighted index of comorbidity (CWIC) were compared in predicting outcomes at the onset of SAB. All adult inpatients with SAB from July 15, 2008, to December 31, 2009, were prospectively assessed. The 3 scoring systems were applied: REMS, CURB-65 and CWIC. The end points were attributable and overall mortality. A total of 241 patients with SAB were reviewed during the study period. The all-cause mortality rate was 22.8% and attributable mortality 14.1%. Patients who died had higher mean CURB-65 score and REMS than those who lived, whereas the difference in the CWIC score was not significant. Two logistic regression models based on CURB-65 score or REMS, after controlling for CWIC, revealed that both scores were independent predictors of mortality, with an odds ratio of 3.38 (P < 0.0001) and 1.45 (P < 0.0001) for CURB-65 and REMS, respectively. Receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed that a cutoff point of 3.0 (CURB-65) and 6.0 (REMS) provided the highest sensitivity and specificity. The area under the curves for all-cause mortality were 0.832 and 0.806, and for attributable mortality 0.845 and 0.819, for CURB-65 and REMS, respectively. REMS and CURB-65 scores outperformed CWIC as predictors of mortality in SAB and may be effective in predicting the severity of illness at the onset of bacteremia.

  5. Bifidobacterium Bacteremia: Clinical Characteristics and a Genomic Approach To Assess Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerde, Erik; Cavanagh, Jorunn Pauline; Simonsen, Gunnar Skov; Klingenberg, Claus

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bifidobacteria are commensals that colonize the orogastrointestinal tract and rarely cause invasive human infections. However, an increasing number of bifidobacterial blood culture isolates has lately been observed in Norway. In order to investigate the pathogenicity of the Bifidobacterium species responsible for bacteremia, we studied Bifidobacterium isolates from 15 patients for whom cultures of blood obtained from 2013 to 2015 were positive. We collected clinical data and analyzed phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic susceptibility. All isolates (11 Bifidobacterium longum, 2 B. breve, and 2 B. animalis isolates) were subjected to whole-genome sequencing. The 15 patients were predominantly in the extreme lower or upper age spectrum, many were severely immunocompromised, and 11 of 15 had gastrointestinal tract-related conditions. In two elderly patients, the Bifidobacterium bacteremia caused a sepsis-like picture, interpreted as the cause of death. Most bifidobacterial isolates had low MICs (≤0.5 mg/liter) to beta-lactam antibiotics, vancomycin, and clindamycin and relatively high MICs to ciprofloxacin and metronidazole. We performed a pangenomic comparison of invasive and noninvasive B. longum isolates based on 65 sequences available from GenBank and the sequences of 11 blood culture isolates from this study. Functional annotation identified unique genes among both invasive and noninvasive isolates of Bifidobacterium. Phylogenetic clusters of invasive isolates were identified for a subset of the B. longum subsp. longum isolates. However, there was no difference in the number of putative virulence genes between invasive and noninvasive isolates. In conclusion, Bifidobacterium has an invasive potential in the immunocompromised host and may cause a sepsis-like picture. Using comparative genomics, we could not delineate specific pathogenicity traits characterizing invasive isolates. PMID:28490487

  6. Novel structurally designed vaccine for S. aureus α-hemolysin: protection against bacteremia and pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajan P Adhikari

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus is a human pathogen associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI and life threatening sepsis and pneumonia. Efforts to develop effective vaccines against S. aureus have been largely unsuccessful, in part due to the variety of virulence factors produced by this organism. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin (Hla is a pore-forming toxin expressed by most S. aureus strains and reported to play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSTI and pneumonia. Here we report a novel recombinant subunit vaccine candidate for Hla, rationally designed based on the heptameric crystal structure. This vaccine candidate, denoted AT-62aa, was tested in pneumonia and bacteremia infection models using S. aureus strain Newman and the pandemic strain USA300 (LAC. Significant protection from lethal bacteremia/sepsis and pneumonia was observed upon vaccination with AT-62aa along with a Glucopyranosyl Lipid Adjuvant-Stable Emulsion (GLA-SE that is currently in clinical trials. Passive transfer of rabbit immunoglobulin against AT-62aa (AT62-IgG protected mice against intraperitoneal and intranasal challenge with USA300 and produced significant reduction in bacterial burden in blood, spleen, kidney, and lungs. Our Hla-based vaccine is the first to be reported to reduce bacterial dissemination and to provide protection in a sepsis model of S. aureus infection. AT62-IgG and sera from vaccinated mice effectively neutralized the toxin in vitro and AT62-IgG inhibited the formation of Hla heptamers, suggesting antibody-mediated neutralization as the primary mechanism of action. This remarkable efficacy makes this Hla-based vaccine a prime candidate for inclusion in future multivalent S. aureus vaccine. Furthermore, identification of protective epitopes within AT-62aa could lead to novel immunotherapy for S. aureus infection.

  7. Beta-lactam combination therapy for the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species bacteremia: A summary and appraisal of the evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Bartash

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcal bacteremia and enterococcal bacteremia are prevalent in hospitalized or recently instrumented patients, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. They are often difficult to treat due to the pathogenicity of the organisms, poor response to antibiotics, and increasing development of multidrug resistance. Therefore, there has been increasing interest in combination therapy for the treatment of these infections. The aim of this review was to summarize and assess the evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for both Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus species blood stream infections. Currently, there is promising in vitro data but little clinical evidence supporting combination beta-lactam therapy for this indication. Further clinical investigations are needed to elucidate the potential benefits of beta-lactam combination therapy over monotherapy for Gram-positive bacteremia, although combination therapy may be useful in refractory cases of bacteremia that do not respond to standard antibiotic therapy.

  8. Incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the focus of infection and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative microorganism in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the causative focus and classified by the antibiotic sensitivity of the microorganism.Patients admitted to Hospital del Mar in Barcelona from 2005 to 2012 were included. We analyzed the total hospital costs of patients with nosocomial bacteremia caused by microorganisms with a high prevalence and, often, with multidrug-resistance. A control group was defined by selecting patients without bacteremia in the same diagnosis-related group.Our hospital has a cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to estimate per-patient costs. A logistic regression was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia (propensity score) and was used for propensity-score matching adjustment. This propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients with bacteremia with differentiation of the causative focus and antibiotic sensitivity.The mean incremental cost was estimated at &OV0556;15,526. The lowest incremental cost corresponded to bacteremia caused by multidrug-sensitive urinary infection (&OV0556;6786) and the highest to primary or unknown sources of bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (&OV0556;29,186).This is one of the first analyses to include all episodes of bacteremia produced during hospital stays in a single study. The study included accurate information about the focus and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative organism and actual hospital costs. It provides information that could be useful to improve, establish, and prioritize prevention strategies for nosocomial infections.

  9. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Elizabeth A.; Mayfield, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for “molecular pharming” in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae could be poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, as they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and systemic immune reactivity. PMID:24596570

  10. Energy from algae using microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B.

    2009-08-15

    Bioelectricity production froma phytoplankton, Chlorella vulgaris, and a macrophyte, Ulva lactuca was examined in single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs were fed with the two algae (as powders), obtaining differences in energy recovery, degradation efficiency, and power densities. C. vulgaris produced more energy generation per substrate mass (2.5 kWh/kg), but U. lactuca was degraded more completely over a batch cycle (73±1% COD). Maximum power densities obtained using either single cycle or multiple cycle methods were 0.98 W/m2 (277 W/m3) using C. vulgaris, and 0.76 W/m2 (215 W/m3) using U. lactuca. Polarization curves obtained using a common method of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) overestimated maximum power densities at a scan rate of 1 mV/s. At 0.1 mV/s, however, the LSV polarization data was in better agreement with single- and multiple-cycle polarization curves. The fingerprints of microbial communities developed in reactors had only 11% similarity to inocula and clustered according to the type of bioprocess used. These results demonstrate that algae can in principle, be used as a renewable source of electricity production in MFCs. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Energy from algae using microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Velasquez-Orta, Sharon B.; Curtis, Tom P.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Bioelectricity production froma phytoplankton, Chlorella vulgaris, and a macrophyte, Ulva lactuca was examined in single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). MFCs were fed with the two algae (as powders), obtaining differences in energy recovery, degradation efficiency, and power densities. C. vulgaris produced more energy generation per substrate mass (2.5 kWh/kg), but U. lactuca was degraded more completely over a batch cycle (73±1% COD). Maximum power densities obtained using either single cycle or multiple cycle methods were 0.98 W/m2 (277 W/m3) using C. vulgaris, and 0.76 W/m2 (215 W/m3) using U. lactuca. Polarization curves obtained using a common method of linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) overestimated maximum power densities at a scan rate of 1 mV/s. At 0.1 mV/s, however, the LSV polarization data was in better agreement with single- and multiple-cycle polarization curves. The fingerprints of microbial communities developed in reactors had only 11% similarity to inocula and clustered according to the type of bioprocess used. These results demonstrate that algae can in principle, be used as a renewable source of electricity production in MFCs. © 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Algae-based oral recombinant vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Specht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are some of the safest and most effective vaccines available, but their high cost and the requirement of advanced medical infrastructure for administration make them impractical for many developing world diseases. Plant-based vaccines have shifted that paradigm by paving the way for recombinant vaccine production at agricultural scale using an edible host. However, enthusiasm for molecular pharming in food crops has waned in the last decade due to difficulty in developing transgenic crop plants and concerns of contaminating the food supply. Microalgae are poised to become the next candidate in recombinant subunit vaccine production, and they present several advantages over terrestrial crop plant-based platforms including scalable and contained growth, rapid transformation, easily obtained stable cell lines, and consistent transgene expression levels. Algae have been shown to accumulate and properly fold several vaccine antigens, and efforts are underway to create recombinant algal fusion proteins that can enhance antigenicity for effective orally-delivered vaccines. These approaches have the potential to revolutionize the way subunit vaccines are made and delivered – from costly parenteral administration of purified protein, to an inexpensive oral algae tablet with effective mucosal and system immune reactivity.

  13. Management of autotrophic mass cultures of micro-algae

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Toerien, DF

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in the mass cultivation of micro-algae as feed and foodstuff has existed since the turn of the century (Robinson and Toerien, 1962). Experiments using algae in photosynthetic research (Warburg, 1919) also led to an appreciation...

  14. EnAlgae Decision Support Toolset: model validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kenny, Philip; Visser, de Chris; Skarka, Johannes; Sternberg, Kirstin; Schipperus, Roelof; Silkina, Alla; Ginnever, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    One of the drivers behind the EnAlgae project is recognising and addressing the need for increased availability of information about developments in applications of algae biotechnology for energy, particularly in the NW Europe area, where activity has been less intense than in other areas of the

  15. Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of the activated carbon prepared from the algae Gracilaria for the biosorption of Cu(II) from aqueous solutions. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... This study shows the benefit of using activated carbon from marine red algae as a low cost sorbent for the removal of copper from aqueous solution wastewater.

  16. Rare species of fungi parasiting on algae. III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Z. Kadłubowska

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigations csrried out on algae revealed the following species of fungi from the order of Chytridialis Hawksworth et al. (1995 parasitizing on algae: Rhizophydium subgulosum, R. ganlosporum, R. planctonicum, Entophlyctis rhizina and Harpochytrium hedinii. These species arc new to Poland. The figure of resting spore of Entophlyctis rhizina is the fint graphic documentation of this species.

  17. Rare species of fungi parasiting on algae. III.

    OpenAIRE

    Joanna Z. Kadłubowska

    2014-01-01

    The investigations csrried out on algae revealed the following species of fungi from the order of Chytridialis Hawksworth et al. (1995) parasitizing on algae: Rhizophydium subgulosum, R. ganlosporum, R. planctonicum, Entophlyctis rhizina and Harpochytrium hedinii. These species arc new to Poland. The figure of resting spore of Entophlyctis rhizina is the fint graphic documentation of this species.

  18. Persistence and proliferation of some unicellular algae in drinking ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drinking water systems have a complex structure and are characterised by the absence of light, the presence of disinfectants and by low levels of nutrients. Several kinds of bacteria, protozoa, algae and fungi can be found in tap water. Little is known about the ecology of algae in drinking water systems, although their ...

  19. Isolation and Characterization of Blue Green Algae from Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    meldemellawy

    2014-02-20

    Feb 20, 2014 ... aminotransferase (AMT) domains of the mycE and ndaF genes (Jungblut et al., 2006) allowing detection of microcystin and nodularin-producing cyanobacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Isolation and cultivation of blue green algae. Blue green algae had been isolated from soil of Rice field in river.

  20. 21 CFR 73.185 - Haematococcus algae meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... stabilized color additive mixture. Color additive mixtures for fish feed use made with haematococcus algae... in color additive mixtures for coloring foods. (b) Specifications. Haematococcus algae meal shall... salmonid fish in accordance with the following prescribed conditions: (1) The color additive is used to...

  1. Study on the effect of irradiation on algae by proteomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jong Il; Yoon, Yo Han; Kim, Jae Hun

    2010-06-01

    Algae has been utilized as food material from long time ago, and recently newly recognized as functional materials and the source of bio-fuel. But, the study on the algae is just beginning and the study on protein expression and growth by the change of condition was not reported. In this study, the effect of radiation on the protein expression was investigated for the protection mechanisms and new genome source and furthermore, isolation of new mutant strains. To monitor the growth of algae, absorbance and FDA staining methods were developed and the content of lipid of algae species were measured. With these methods, the radiation sensitivity of algae species was determined. To investigate the proteome of algae, 2D-electrophoresis methods was applied. From the comparison of proteomes, the radiation specific expressed protein was identified as thioredoxin-h and its nucleotide sequences was defined. The expression of thioredoxin-h was further defined on the mRNA level. Also, the extract of algae species was analyzed for its antioxidant activity and polyphenolic content. The changes in antioxidant activity of extract by radiation was investigated. From the radiation experiments, mutant Spirogyra species having higher resistant against radical stress was obtained. The mutant strain has higher antioxidant activity. This results can provide the proteome date and mutation technology of algae and further contribute in the activation of fishery industry and national health enhancement

  2. Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    The Algae Cultivation for Carbon Capture and Utilization Workshop Summary Report summarizes a workshop hosted by the U.S. Department of Energy's Bioenergy Technologies Office on May 23–24, 2017, in Orlando, Florida. The event gathered stakeholder input through facilitated discussions focused on innovative technologies and business strategies for growing algae on waste carbon dioxide resources.

  3. Efficiency of using green algae as biological controllers against toxic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficiency of using green algae as biological controllers against toxic algal taxa in cultured ... of two green algal species as biological control of the growth of toxic blue-green algae. ... African Journal of Aquatic Science 2014, 39(4): 443–450 ...

  4. Comparative study of bacteremias caused by Enterococcus spp. with and without high-level resistance to gentamicin. The Grupo Andaluz para el estudio de las Enfermedades Infecciosas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero-Granado, F J; Cisneros, J M; Luque, R; Torres-Tortosa, M; Gamboa, F; Díez, F; Villanueva, J L; Pérez-Cano, R; Pasquau, J; Merino, D; Menchero, A; Mora, D; López-Ruz, M A; Vergara, A

    1998-02-01

    A prospective, multicenter study was carried out over a period of 10 months. All patients with clinically significant bacteremia caused by Enterococcus spp. were included. The epidemiological, microbiological, clinical, and prognostic features and the relationship of these features to the presence of high-level resistance to gentamicin (HLRG) were studied. Ninety-three patients with enterococcal bacteremia were included, and 31 of these cases were caused by HLRG (33%). The multivariate analysis selected chronic renal failure, intensive care unit stay, previous use of antimicrobial agents, and Enterococcus faecalis species as the independent risk factors that influenced the development of HLRG. The strains with HLRG showed lower levels of susceptibility to penicillin and ciprofloxacin. Clinical features (except for chronic renal failure) were similar in both groups of patients. HLRG did not influence the prognosis for patients with enterococcal bacteremia in terms of either the crude mortality rate (29% for patients with bacteremia caused by enterococci with HLRG and 28% for patients not infected with strains with HLRG) or the hospital stay after the acquisition of enterococcal bacteremia. Hemodynamic compromise, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, and mechanical ventilation were revealed in the multivariate analysis to be the independent risk factors for mortality. Prolonged hospitalization was associated with the nosocomial acquisition of bacteremia and polymicrobial infections.

  5. Clinical study of carbapenem sensitive and resistant Gram-negative bacteremia in neutropenic and nonneutropenic patients: The first series from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafur, A K; Vidyalakshmi, P R; Kannaian, P; Balasubramaniam, R

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance is a growing global concern. There is a lack of published clinical studies on the topic from Indian subcontinent. Aim of this study was to analyze clinical profile of patients with carbapenem sensitive and resistant bacteremia among neutropenic and nonneutropenic patients. Retrospective analysis of 141 patients who had carbapenem resistant or sensitive Gram-negative bacteremia, identified over a period of 1-year was done by medical records review, in Apollo Specialty Hospital, a 300-bedded tertiary care Oncology, neurosurgical and orthopedic center in South India. Of the total 141 patients with Gram-negative bacteremia, 44 had carbapenem resistant ones. Of these 44 patients, 17 were neutropenics (resistant neutropenic group) and 27 nonneutropenic patients (resistant nonneutropenic group). Of the 97 patients with carbapenem sensitive bacteremia, 43 were neutropenic (sensitive neutropenic group) and 54 nonneutropenics (sensitive nonneutropenic group). The 28 days mortality was significantly higher in carbapenem resistant bacteremic group compared to the sensitive one (P = 0.008). This is the first study from India comparing clinical features of patients with carbapenem sensitive and resistant blood stream infections. Patients with carbapenem resistant bacteremia had higher mortality compared to patients with sensitive bacteremia.

  6. Significância clínica, epidemiologia e microbiologia das bacteremias por estafilococos coagulase-negativos em Hospital de Ensino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Góngora-Rubio F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Os estafilococos coagulase-negativos (ECN são importantes agentes etiológicos das bacteremias hospitalares e freqüentemente considerados como contaminantes de hemoculturas. No período de outubro de 1990 a setembro de 1992, foram estudadas 300 hemoculturas positivas para ECN no Hospital São Paulo, sendo 141 bacteremias consideradas de origem hospitalar. Com o objetivo de diferenciar as bacteremias hospitalares verdadeiras das contaminantes por ECN, foram definidos critérios clínicos e microbiológicos. Apenas 20,6% das bacteremias hospitalares por ECN foram consideradas como verdadeiras. A maior freqüência de recém-nascidos internados na unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal, a presença de cateter intravascular e a utilização de nutrição parenteral foram achados significativos. Não houve diferença significante quanto a resistência a oxacilina e produção de SLIME entre os ECN isolados das bacteremias verdadeiras e contaminantes. O critério clínico e a positividade da hemocultura até 48 horas após a incubação, utilizados em nossa definição, foram úteis para caracterizar as bacteremias verdadeiras por ECN.

  7. Endometriosis of the mesoappendix mimicking appendicitis: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Mewa Kinoo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although appendicitis is largely a clinical diagnosis, on occasions diagnostic modalities may be needed to aid with the diagnosis. Despite the use of adjuncts and exploratory surgery, the diagnosis may not be clear until a histological diagnosis is achieved. Endometriosis of the appendix mimicking appendicitis is one of these diagnoses described in several case reports. Endometriosis of the meso-appendix has been described in association with intussusception of the appendix in several case reports. However, to our knowledge, endometriosis of the meso-appendix mimicking appendicitis has not been reported to date. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with classic clinical signs and symptoms of appendicitis endorsed on computed tomography imaging. The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendicectomy with the postoperative histology demonstrating a normal appendix with endometriosis of the meso-appendix.

  8. Rare extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma mimicking as adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Michelle; Haenen, Filip W N; Siozopoulou, Vasiliki; Van Cleemput, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma (EES) is a rare finding in comparison with Ewing's sarcoma of bone and usually manifests in young patients. However, even in older patients, one must consider the diagnosis. In this case, we describe a 52-year-old woman diagnosed with EES, mimicking as adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid. The tumor was not visualized by a multi-slice spiral computed tomography of the abdomen and pelvis with intravenous contrast, and eventually the diagnosis was made by positive immunohistochemical staining for CD99 and by molecular testing for EWSR1 translocation. This combination of the patient's age and the localization of the tumor mimicking an adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid has never been described before.

  9. Recent Advances in Marine Algae Polysaccharides: Isolation, Structure, and Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shu-Ying; Huang, Xuesong; Cheong, Kit-Leong

    2017-12-13

    Marine algae have attracted a great deal of interest as excellent sources of nutrients. Polysaccharides are the main components in marine algae, hence a great deal of attention has been directed at isolation and characterization of marine algae polysaccharides because of their numerous health benefits. In this review, extraction and purification approaches and chemico-physical properties of marine algae polysaccharides (MAPs) are summarized. The biological activities, which include immunomodulatory, antitumor, antiviral, antioxidant, and hypolipidemic, are also discussed. Additionally, structure-function relationships are analyzed and summarized. MAPs' biological activities are closely correlated with their monosaccharide composition, molecular weights, linkage types, and chain conformation. In order to promote further exploitation and utilization of polysaccharides from marine algae for functional food and pharmaceutical areas, high efficiency, and low-cost polysaccharide extraction and purification methods, quality control, structure-function activity relationships, and specific mechanisms of MAPs activation need to be extensively investigated.

  10. Uptake of americium-241 by algae and bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geisy, J P; Paine, D

    1978-01-01

    Algae and bacteria are important factors in the transport and mobilization of elements in the biosphere. These factors may be involved in trophic biomagnification, resulting in a potential human hazard or environmental degradation. Although americium, one of the most toxic elements known, is not required for plant growth, it may be concentrated by algae and bacteria. Therefore, the availability of americium-241 to algae and bacteria was studied to determine their role in the ultimate fate of this element released into the environment. Both algae and bacteria concentrated americium-241 to a high degree, making them important parts of the biomagnification process. The ability to concentrate americium-241 makes algae and bacteria potentially significant factors in cycling this element in the water column. (4 graphs, numerous references, 3 tables)

  11. A Q fever case mimicking crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O Karabay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Coxiella burnetii is the bacterium that causes Q fever. Human infection is mainly transmitted from cattle, goats and sheep. The disease is usually self-limited. Pneumonia and hepatitis are the most common clinical manifestations. In this study, we present a case of Q fever from the western part of Turkey mimicking Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever (CCHF in terms of clinical and laboratory findings.

  12. Degenerated uterine leiomyomas mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yi Boem Ha; Lee, Hae Kyung; Lee, Min Hee; Choi, Seo Youn; Chung, Soo Ho [Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-15

    Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign uterine neoplasms. Undegenerated uterine leiomyomas are easily recognizable by the typical imaging findings on radiologic studies. However, degenerated fibroids can have unusual and variable appearances. The atypical appearances due to degenerative changes may cause confusion in diagnosis of leiomyomas. In this article, we report a case of a patient with extensive cystic and myxoid degeneration of uterine leiomyoma, mimicking malignant bilateral ovarian surface epithelial tumors.

  13. Addison's Disease Mimicking as Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sayani; Rao, Karthik N; Patil, Navin; Ommurugan, Balaji; Varghese, George

    2017-04-01

    Over past two decades there has been significant improvement in medical field in elucidating the underlying pathophysiology and genetics of Addison's disease. Adrenal insufficiency (Addison's disease) is a rare disease with an incidence of 0.8/100,000 cases. The diagnosis may be delayed if the clinical presentation mimics a gastrointestinal disorder or psychiatric illness. We report a case of Addison's disease presenting as acute pain in abdomen mimicking clinical presentation of acute pancreatitis.

  14. An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An abdominal tuberculosis case mimicking an abdominal mass. Derya Erdog˘ an a. , Yasemin Ta ¸scı Yıldız b. , Esin Cengiz Bodurog˘lu c and Naciye Go¨nu¨l Tanır d. Abdominal tuberculosis is rare in childhood. It may be difficult to diagnose as it mimics various disorders. We present a 12-year-old child with an unusual ...

  15. A case of gallbladder mass: Malakoplakia (The tumor mimicker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanwaljeet Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of malakoplakia presenting as gall bladder mass is a diagnostic dilemma faced by pathologists, radiologists, and surgeons. Malakoplakia is a rare inflammatory disorder and tumor mimicker usually occurring in the urinary tract, may occasionally be found in gall bladder. Here, we present a rare case, presenting as gall bladder mass in a known case of gallstone disease, clinically suspected as carcinoma and later turned out to be malakoplakia in gall bladder.

  16. Investigation about Role of Algae in Kazeroon Sasan Spring Odor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Hamzeian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As odor for potable water is unpleasant for costumers, it needs to do researches for finding the reasons of odorous water. Sasan spring that is located in, near kazeroon city, Fars, Iran, is potable water resource for Kazeroon and Booshehr city and many other villages. Water in Sasan spring has the odor problem. With regards to important   role of algae on ado r problems in this study the role of algae on   odor was investigated. Methods: After regular sampling, the TON (threshold odor number was indicated and algae species was distinguished and the number of total algae and any species  of algae was numbers by microscopic direct numbering method .as the algae mass  is related to nitrogen and phosphor concentration, results of concentration Of nitrogen and phosphor in this spring that was examined regularity by water company was investigated and compared to concentration of these component that are need for algae growing.   Results: results shows that TON was in range  of 4.477 to 6.2 that indicated  oderous limit . Regression and diagram between TON and number of total algae showed the linear relationship. The concentration of nitrogen and phosphor, showed adequate condition for algal grow. Result of determination of algae species showed high population of Oscilatoria and Microcystis species, which are known as essential case of mold odor in water resources. Investigation on geological maps in the region around the Sasan spring, show alluvium source and is effected by surface part of it’s around land. Conclusion: because of the algae was determined as the essential cause of odor   in the spring, and algal growth is related to nutrients, and because of the surface pollution can penetrate in the alluvium lands around the spring, and effect the water in spring, so nutrient control and management is the essential way for odor control in the spring.

  17. Risk factors for hospital-acquired bacteremia due to carbapenem-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a Colombian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valderrama, Sandra Liliana; González, Pedro Felipe; Caro, María Alejandra; Ardila, Natalia; Ariza, Beatriz; Gil, Fabián; Álvarez, Carlos

    2016-02-23

    Bacteremia due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems is a public health problem due to the limitations it places on therapeutic options, as well as the increased time patients must spend in hospital, costs and the risk of mortality.  To evaluate the risk factors for presentation of bacteremia due to carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa acquired in the Hospital Universitario San Ignacio between January 2008 and June 2014.  This was a case control study in which the case patients presented bacteremia due to P. aeruginosa resistant to carbapenems and the control group included patients with P. aeruginosa susceptible to this group of antibiotics. Variables such as the previous use of meropenem and ertapenem, immunosuppression and neoplasia were measured. Mortality and duration of hospital were also described.  In all, 168 patients were evaluated, of which 42 were cases and 126 controls. Using a multivariate model, the risk factors related to bacteremia due to carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa acquired in hospital were the following: use of parenteral nutrition (OR=8.28; 95% CI: 2.56-26.79; p=0); use of meropenem (OR=1.15; 95% CI: 1.03-1.28; p=0.01); and use of ciprofloxacin (OR=81.99; 95% CI: 1.14-5884; p=0.043).  In order to prevent the emergence of carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa, antimicrobial control programs should be strengthened by promoting the prudent administration of carbapenems and quinolones. The correct use of parenteral nutrition should also be monitored.

  18. Distribution of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec Types and correlation with comorbidity and infection type in patients with MRSA bacteremia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Ling Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Molecular epidemiological definitions that are based on staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec typing and phylogenetic analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA isolates are considered a reliable way to distinguish between healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA. However, there is little information regarding the clinical features and outcomes of bacteremia patients with MRSA carrying different SCCmec types. METHODS: From January 1 through December 31, 2006, we recorded the demographic data and outcomes of 159 consecutive adult MRSA bacteremia patients from whom isolates for SCCmec analysis were collected. All participants were patients at a tertiary care center in Taiwan. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The following SCCmec types were identified in MRSA isolates: 30 SCCmec II (18.9%, 87 SCCmec III (54.7%, 22 SCCmec IV (13.8%, and 20 SCCmec V (12.6%. The time from admission to the first MRSA-positive blood culture for patients infected with isolates with the SCCmec III element (mean/median, 50.7/26 days was significantly longer than for patients infected with isolates carrying SCCmec IV or V (mean/median, 6.7/3 days for SCCmec IV; 11.1/10.5 days for SCCmec V (P<0.05. In univariate analysis, community onset, soft tissue infection, and deep-seated infection were predictors for SCCmec IV/V. In multivariate analysis, length of stay before index culture, diabetes mellitus, and being bedridden were independent risk factors associated with SCCmec II/III. CONCLUSIONS: These findings are in agreement with previous studies of the genetic characteristics of CA-MRSA. MRSA bacteremia with SCCmec II/III isolates occurred more among patients with serious comorbidities and prolonged hospitalization. Community onset, skin and soft tissue infection, and deep-seated infection best predicted SCCmec IV/V MRSA bacteremia.

  19. Phycobiliproteins: A Novel Green Tool from Marine Origin Blue-Green Algae and Red Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Rashmi; Parra, Roberto; Iqbal, Hafiz M N

    2017-01-01

    Marine species are comprising about a half of the whole global biodiversity; the sea offers an enormous resource for novel bioactive compounds. Several of the marine origin species show multifunctional bioactivities and characteristics that are useful for a discovery and/or reinvention of biologically active compounds. For millennia, marine species that includes cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) and red algae have been targeted to explore their enormous potential candidature status along with a wider spectrum of novel applications in bio- and non-bio sectors of the modern world. Among them, cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes, phylogenetically a primitive group of Gramnegative prokaryotes, ranging from Arctic to Antarctic regions, capable of carrying out photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation. In the recent decade, a great deal of research attention has been paid on the pronouncement of bio-functional proteins along with novel peptides, vitamins, fine chemicals, renewable fuel and bioactive compounds, e.g., phycobiliproteins from marine species, cyanobacteria and red algae. Interestingly, they are extensively commercialized for natural colorants in food and cosmetics, antimicrobial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, hepatoprotective agents and fluorescent neo-glycoproteins as probes for single particle fluorescence imaging fluorescent applications in clinical and immunological analysis. However, a comprehensive knowledge and technological base for augmenting their commercial utilities are lacking. Therefore, this paper will provide an overview of the phycobiliproteins-based research literature from marine cyanobacteria and red algae. This review is also focused towards analyzing global and commercial activities with application oriented-based research. Towards the end, the information is also given on the potential biotechnological and biomedical applications of phycobiliproteins. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please

  20. Bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus caused by infected pressure ulcer: case report and review of the literature

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    Jonathan Soldera

    Full Text Available CONTEXTCoagulase-negative staphylococci are common colonizers of the human skin and have become increasingly recognized as agents of clinically significant nosocomial infections.CASE REPORTThe case of a 79-year-old male patient with multi-infarct dementia who presented systemic inflammatory response syndrome is reported. This was attributed to bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii ssp. urealyticus, which was grown on blood cultures originating from an infected pressure ulcer. The few cases of Staphylococcus cohnii infection reported in the literature consist of bacteremia relating to catheters, surgical prostheses, acute cholecystitis, brain abscess, endocarditis, pneumonia, urinary tract infection and septic arthritis, generally presenting a multiresistant profile, with nearly 90% resistance to methicillin.CONCLUSIONSThe reported case is, to our knowledge, the first case of true bacteremia due to Staphylococcus cohnii subsp. urealyticus caused by an infected pressure ulcer. It shows that this species may be underdiagnosed and should be considered in the differential diagnosis for community-acquired skin infections.

  1. Neither Single nor a Combination of Routine Laboratory Parameters can Discriminate between Gram-positive and Gram-negative Bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzinger, Franz; Dedeyan, Michel; Rammerstorfer, Matthias; Perkmann, Thomas; Burgmann, Heinz; Makristathis, Athanasios; Dorffner, Georg; Loetsch, Felix; Blacky, Alexander; Ramharter, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Adequate early empiric antibiotic therapy is pivotal for the outcome of patients with bloodstream infections. In clinical practice the use of surrogate laboratory parameters is frequently proposed to predict underlying bacterial pathogens; however there is no clear evidence for this assumption. In this study, we investigated the discriminatory capacity of predictive models consisting of routinely available laboratory parameters to predict the presence of Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteremia. Major machine learning algorithms were screened for their capacity to maximize the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC) for discriminating between Gram-positive and Gram-negative cases. Data from 23,765 patients with clinically suspected bacteremia were screened and 1,180 bacteremic patients were included in the study. A relative predominance of Gram-negative bacteremia (54.0%), which was more pronounced in females (59.1%), was observed. The final model achieved 0.675 ROC-AUC resulting in 44.57% sensitivity and 79.75% specificity. Various parameters presented a significant difference between both genders. In gender-specific models, the discriminatory potency was slightly improved. The results of this study do not support the use of surrogate laboratory parameters for predicting classes of causative pathogens. In this patient cohort, gender-specific differences in various laboratory parameters were observed, indicating differences in the host response between genders. PMID:26522966

  2. Antibiotic Algae by Chemical Surface Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschgens, Isabel P; Gademann, Karl

    2018-03-02

    Chemical cell-surface engineering is a tool for modifying and altering cellular functions. Herein, we report the introduction of an antibiotic phenotype to the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by chemically modifying its cell surface. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy studies demonstrated that a hybrid of the antibiotic vancomycin and a 4-hydroxyproline oligomer binds reversibly to the cell wall without affecting the viability or motility of the cells. The modified cells were used to inhibit bacterial growth of Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis cultures. Delivery of the antibiotic from the microalgae to the bacterial cells was verified by microscopy. Our studies provide compelling evidence that 1) chemical surface engineering constitutes a useful tool for the introduction of new, previously unknown functionality, and 2) living microalgae can serve as new platforms for drug delivery. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. The economics of producing biodiesel from algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallagher, Brian J. [Ecotonics Environmental Scientists, 1801 Century Park East, Suite 2400, Los Angeles, CA 90067 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process. (author)

  4. The economics of producing biodiesel from algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallagher, Brian J.

    2011-01-01

    Biodiesel is an alternative fuel for conventional diesel that is made from natural plant oils, animal fats, and waste cooking oils. This paper discusses the economics of producing biodiesel fuel from algae grown in open ponds. There is potential for large-scale production of biodiesel from algal farms on non-arable land; however, previous studies have failed to demonstrate an economically viable process that could be scalable to a commercialized industry. The problems include inconsistent and insufficient algal productivities, uncertain capital and operating costs, volatile market prices and unknown levels of government support. Although intensive work is being done on many technological issues, the economic studies and data are incomplete and out of date. This paper presents an updated financial analysis of the production and economic conditions that could have a profound effect on the success of this important alternative fuel production process. (author)

  5. Bacteriemia en pacientes internados con celulitis Bacteremia in patients hospitalized with cellulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan S. Lasa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available La celulitis es una inflamación aguda de la dermis y tejido celular subcutáneo de causa bacteriana, que generalmente complica a heridas, úlceras y dermatosis, aunque de manera frecuente no existe sitio de entrada. Se recomienda la realización de cultivo de punción de piel y partes blandas (PPB. Los hemocultivos raramente dan resultados positivos. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la prevalencia de bacteriemia en pacientes internados en nuestra institución con diagnóstico de celulitis. Se analizaron retrospectivamente los registros clínicos de los pacientes con este diagnóstico al ingreso entre junio de 2007 y marzo de 2010. Se evaluaron los datos poblacionales, presencia de comorbilidades, y resultados de los cultivos. En ese período, se internaron 140 pacientes con diagnóstico de celulitis y a todos ellos se les realizó hemocultivo y cultivos de PPB. Setenta y cuatro eran varones (52.8%. La edad promedio: 47.5 ± 19.7 años (rango 16-94. El 40% tuvo cultivos positivos de PPB, en los que el Staphylococcus aureus meticilino resistente (SAMR fue el germen más frecuentemente aislado (35.7%; la prevalencia de bacteriemia fue del 8.6%, en donde el germen más frecuente fue Streptoccocus Beta hemolítico, grupo G (33% del total de hemocultivos positivos. La bacteriemia se asoció significativamente a mayor estadía hospitalaria (10.5 ± 8.9 vs. 4.9 ± 6, p = 0.004. Se asoció con mayor riesgo de hemocultivo positivo a ser diabético, tener cultivo de PPB positivo, consumo de alcohol y/o enfermedad pulmonar obstructiva crónica.Cellulitis is an acute inflammation of dermis and subcutaneous tissue, usually complicating wounds, ulcers, or dermatosis. Even though in these cases it is recommended to perform culture from skin and soft tissue samples, the utility of blood cultures remains controversial due to the low frequency of positive results. Here we report the prevalence of bacteremia in patients with cellulitis admitted in our

  6. Bacteremia and resistant gram-negative pathogens among under-fives in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Alexandra; Mshana, Stephen E; Kidenya, Benson R; Hokororo, Aldofineh; Morona, Domenica

    2013-05-08

    Antibiotic resistance is one of the most serious public health concerns worldwide and is increasing at an alarming rate, making daily treatment decisions more challenging. This study is aimed at identifying local bacterial isolates and their antimicrobial susceptibility patterns to avoid irrational antibiotic use, especially in settings where unguided management occurs and febrile illnesses are predominant. A hospital-based prospective cross-sectional study was conducted from September 2011 to February 2012. Febrile children were serially recruited and demographic and clinical data were collected using a standardized data collection tool. A blood culture was performed and identification of the isolates was undertaken using in-house biochemical tests. Susceptibility to common antibiotics was investigated using the disc diffusion methods. Of the 1081 children admitted during the study period, 317 (29.3%) met the inclusion criteria and were recruited, of whom 195 (61.5%) and 122 (38.5%) were male and female respectively. The median age was 18 months with an interquartile range of 9 to 36 months. Of the 317 children, 251 (79.2%) were below or equal to 36 months of age. The prevalence of bacteremia was 6.6%. A higher prevalence of bacteraemia was observed in children below 36 months than in those ≥ 36 months (7.5% vs. 3.0%, p = 0.001). Predictors of bacteraemia were an axillary temperature of >38.5 °C (OR =7, 95% CI = 2.2 - 14.8, p-value = 0.0001), a positive malaria slide (OR =5, 95% CI = 3.0 - 21.2, p-value = 0.0001) and a high neutrophils' count (OR =21 95% CI = 5.6 - 84, p-value = 0.0001). Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae accounted for 7 (33.3%) and 6 (28.6%) of all the isolates respectively. Others gram-negatives bacteria were Citrobacter spp 2 (9.5%), Enterobacter spp 1 (4.25%), Pseudomonas spp 2 (9.5%), Proteus spp 1 (4.25%) and Salmonella spp 1 (4.25%). These isolates were highly resistant to ampicillin (95%), co

  7. A screening method for cardiovascular active compounds in marine algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatonovic-Kustrin, S; Kustrin, E; Angove, M J; Morton, D W

    2018-05-18

    The interaction of bioactive compounds from ethanolic extracts of selected marine algae samples, separated on chromatographic plates, with nitric/nitrous acid was investigated. The nature of bioactive compounds in the marine algae extracts was characterised using UV absorption spectra before and after reaction with diluted nitric acid, and from the characteristic colour reaction after derivatization with anisaldehyde. It was found that diterpenes from Dictyota dichotoma, an edible brown algae, and sterols from green algae Caulerpa brachypus, bind nitric oxide and may act as a nitric oxide carrier. Although the carotenoid fucoxanthin, found in all brown marine algae also binds nitric oxide, the bonds between nitrogen and the fucoxanthin molecule are much stronger. Further studies are required to evaluate the effects of diterpenes from Dictyota dichotoma and sterols from green algae Caulerpa brachypus to see if they have beneficial cardiovascular effects. The method reported here should prove useful in screening large numbers of algae species for compounds with cardiovascular activity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Isoprenoid biosynthesis in eukaryotic phototrophs: A spotlight on algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohr M.; Schwender J.; Polle, J. E. W.

    2012-04-01

    Isoprenoids are one of the largest groups of natural compounds and have a variety of important functions in the primary metabolism of land plants and algae. In recent years, our understanding of the numerous facets of isoprenoid metabolism in land plants has been rapidly increasing, while knowledge on the metabolic network of isoprenoids in algae still lags behind. Here, current views on the biochemistry and genetics of the core isoprenoid metabolism in land plants and in the major algal phyla are compared and some of the most pressing open questions are highlighted. Based on the different evolutionary histories of the various groups of eukaryotic phototrophs, we discuss the distribution and regulation of the mevalonate (MVA) and the methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathways in land plants and algae and the potential consequences of the loss of the MVA pathway in groups such as the green algae. For the prenyltransferases, serving as gatekeepers to the various branches of terpenoid biosynthesis in land plants and algae, we explore the minimal inventory necessary for the formation of primary isoprenoids and present a preliminary analysis of their occurrence and phylogeny in algae with primary and secondary plastids. The review concludes with some perspectives on genetic engineering of the isoprenoid metabolism in algae.

  9. Capsule Production and Glucose Metabolism Dictate Fitness during Serratia marcescens Bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark T; Mitchell, Lindsay A; Zhao, Lili; Mobley, Harry L T

    2017-05-23

    Serratia marcescens is an opportunistic pathogen that causes a range of human infections, including bacteremia, keratitis, wound infections, and urinary tract infections. Compared to other members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, the genetic factors that facilitate Serratia proliferation within the mammalian host are less well defined. An in vivo screen of transposon insertion mutants identified 212 S. marcescens fitness genes that contribute to bacterial survival in a murine model of bloodstream infection. Among those identified, 11 genes were located within an 18-gene cluster encoding predicted extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis proteins. A mutation in the wzx gene contained within this locus conferred a loss of fitness in competition infections with the wild-type strain and a reduction in extracellular uronic acids correlating with capsule loss. A second gene, pgm , encoding a phosphoglucomutase exhibited similar capsule-deficient phenotypes, linking central glucose metabolism with capsule production and fitness of Serratia during mammalian infection. Further evidence of the importance of central metabolism was obtained with a pfkA glycolytic mutant that demonstrated reduced replication in human serum and during murine infection. An MgtB magnesium transporter homolog was also among the fitness factors identified, and an S. marcescens mgtB mutant exhibited decreased growth in defined medium containing low concentrations of magnesium and was outcompeted ~10-fold by wild-type bacteria in mice. Together, these newly identified genes provide a more complete understanding of the specific requirements for S. marcescens survival in the mammalian host and provide a framework for further investigation of the means by which S. marcescens causes opportunistic infections. IMPORTANCE Serratia marcescens is a remarkably prolific organism that replicates in diverse environments, including as an opportunistic pathogen in human bacteremia. The genetic requirements for

  10. Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lizotte, M.P.

    1989-01-01

    The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 μg C · μg chl -1 · h -1 higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and 14 C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and 14 C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities

  11. Multicenter Clinical and Molecular Epidemiological Analysis of Bacteremia Due to Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) in the CRE Epicenter of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Patel, Gopi; Gomez-Simmonds, Angela; Weston, Gregory; Kim, Angela C.; Seo, Susan K.; Rosenthal, Marnie E.; Sperber, Steven J.; Jenkins, Stephen G.; Hamula, Camille L.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Levi, Michael H.; Fries, Bettina C.; Juretschko, Stefan; Rojtman, Albert D.; Hong, Tao; Mathema, Barun; Jacobs, Michael R.; Walsh, Thomas J.; Bonomo, Robert A.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although the New York/New Jersey (NY/NJ) area is an epicenter for carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), there are few multicenter studies of CRE from this region. We characterized patients with CRE bacteremia in 2013 at eight NY/NJ medical centers and determined the prevalence of carbapenem resistance among Enterobacteriaceae bloodstream isolates and CRE resistance mechanisms, genetic backgrounds, capsular types (cps), and antimicrobial susceptibilities. Of 121 patients with CRE bacteremia, 50% had cancer or had undergone transplantation. The prevalences of carbapenem resistance among Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter spp., and Escherichia coli bacteremias were 9.7%, 2.2%, and 0.1%, respectively. Ninety percent of CRE were K. pneumoniae and 92% produced K. pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC-3, 48%; KPC-2, 44%). Two CRE produced NDM-1 and OXA-48 carbapenemases. Sequence type 258 (ST258) predominated among KPC-producing K. pneumoniae (KPC-Kp). The wzi154 allele, corresponding to cps-2, was present in 93% of KPC-3-Kp, whereas KPC-2-Kp had greater cps diversity. Ninety-nine percent of CRE were ceftazidime-avibactam (CAZ-AVI)-susceptible, although 42% of KPC-3-Kp had an CAZ-AVI MIC of ≥4/4 μg/ml. There was a median of 47 h from bacteremia onset until active antimicrobial therapy, 38% of patients had septic shock, and 49% died within 30 days. KPC-3-Kp bacteremia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.58; P = 0.045), cancer (aOR, 3.61, P = 0.01), and bacteremia onset in the intensive care unit (aOR, 3.79; P = 0.03) were independently associated with mortality. Active empirical therapy and combination therapy were not associated with survival. Despite a decade of experience with CRE, patients with CRE bacteremia have protracted delays in appropriate therapies and high mortality rates, highlighting the need for rapid diagnostics and evaluation of new therapeutics. PMID:28167547

  12. Comparative Effectiveness of Vancomycin Versus Daptomycin for MRSA Bacteremia With Vancomycin MIC >1 mg/L: A Multicenter Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Pamela A; Culshaw, Darren L; Wong-Beringer, Annie; Bensman, Joyce; Lamp, Kenneth C; Smith, Winter J; Bauer, Karri; Goff, Debra A; Adamson, Robert; Leuthner, Kimberly; Virata, Michael D; McKinnell, James A; Chaudhry, Saira B; Eskandarian, Romic; Lodise, Thomas; Reyes, Katherine; Zervos, Marcus J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical studies comparing vancomycin with alternative therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia are limited. The objective of this study was to compare outcomes of early daptomycin versus vancomycin treatment for MRSA bacteremia with high vancomycin MICs in a geographically diverse multicenter evaluation. This nationwide, retrospective, multicenter (N = 11), matched, cohort study compared outcomes of early daptomycin with vancomycin for MRSA bloodstream infection (BSI) with vancomycin MICs 1.5 to 2 µg/mL. Matching variables, based on propensity regression analysis, included age, intensive care unit (ICU), and type of BSI. Outcomes were as follows: (1) composite failure (60-day all-cause mortality, 7-day clinical or microbiologic failure, 30-day BSI relapse, or end-of-treatment failure (EOT; discontinue/change daptomycin or vancomycin because of treatment failure or adverse event]); (2) nephrotoxicity; and (2) day 4 BSI clearance. A total of 170 patients were included. The median (interquartile range) age was 60 years (50-74); the median (range) Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 15 (10-18); 31% were in an ICU; and 92% had an infectious disease consultation. BSI types included endocarditis/endovascular (39%), extravascular (55%), and central catheter (6%). The median daptomycin dose was 6 mg/kg, and the vancomycin trough level was 17 mg/L. Overall composite failure was 35% (59 of 170): 15% due to 60-day all-cause mortality, 14% for lack of clinical or microbiologic response by 7 days, and 17% due to failure at end of therapy (discontinue/change because of treatment failure or adverse event). Predictors of composite failure according to multivariate analysis were age >60 years (odds ratio, 3.7; P day 4 bacteremia clearance rates for immunocompromised patients (n = 26) (94% vs 56% for daptomycin vs vancomycin; P = 0.035). Results from this multicenter study provide, for the first time, a geographically diverse

  13. Photobiological hydrogen production with switchable photosystem-II designer algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James Weifu

    2014-02-18

    A process for enhanced photobiological H.sub.2 production using transgenic alga. The process includes inducing exogenous genes in a transgenic alga by manipulating selected environmental factors. In one embodiment inducing production of an exogenous gene uncouples H.sub.2 production from existing mechanisms that would downregulate H.sub.2 production in the absence of the exogenous gene. In other embodiments inducing an exogenous gene triggers a cascade of metabolic changes that increase H.sub.2 production. In some embodiments the transgenic alga are rendered non-regenerative by inducing exogenous transgenes for proton channel polypeptides that are targeted to specific algal membranes.

  14. Dinitrogen fixation by blue-green algae from paddy fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    Recent work using radioactive nitrogen on the blue-green algae of paddy fields has been reviewed. These algae fix dinitrogen and photoassimilate carbon evolving oxygen, thereby augmenting nitrogen and carbon status of the soil and also providing oxygen to the water-logged rice paddies. Further studies using radioactive isotopes 13 N, 24 Na and 22 Na on their nitrogen fixation, nitrogen assimilation pathways; regulation of nitrogenase, heterocysts production and sporulation and sodium transport and metabolism have been carried out and reported. The field application of blue green algae for N 2 fixation was found to increase the status of soil nitrogen and yield of paddy. (M.G.B.)

  15. Macro-economics of algae products : Output WP2A7.02

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voort, van der M.P.J.; Vulsteke, E.; Visser, de C.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    This report is part of the EnAlgae Workpackage 2, Action 7, directed at the economics of algae production. The goal of this report is to highlight potential markets for algae. Per type of algae market the market size, product alternatives, constraints and prices are highlighted. Based on these

  16. Group B streptococcal bacteremia in a major teaching hospital in Malaysia: a case series of eighteen patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandarian, N; Neela, V; Ismail, Z; Puzi, S M; Hamat, R A; Desa, M N M; Nordin, S A

    2013-09-01

    Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a leading cause of infections such as meningitis and septicemia in neonates and pregnant women; however the significance of invasive GBS disease has not been clearly defined in non-pregnant adults. We reviewed the hospital records of 18 cases with GBS bacteremia who attended the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre from June 2010 to October 2011. We analyzed the clinical findings of both bacteremic adults and neonates and compared them to previous studies of GBS bacteremia. Serotyping was done by latex agglutination test using 10 distinct antisera (Ia, Ib, and II-IX). During the period of 1 year and 4 months, there were 18 patients with GBS bacteremia. Five cases occurred in neonates, one in a parturient woman, and 12 in other adults. All neonates with bacteremia were males and two of them were premature. Septicemia was the most common clinical presentation in neonates. They were treated with intravenous (IV) penicillin G and gentamicin. The adults included nine men (69%) and four women (31%). Their mean age was 60 years and all patients had more than two underlying conditions. The most common clinical syndrome was pneumonia (n=6, 46.5%). The others were peritonitis (n=3, 23.1%), primary bacteremia (n=2, 15.5%), septic arthritis (n=2, 15.5%), skin and soft tissue infection (n=1, 7.7%), meningitis (n=1, 8%), urinary tract infection (n=1, 8%), and intravascular device infection (n=1, 7.7%). Cardiovascular diseases (n=7, 53.8%) were the most common underlying conditions, and diabetes mellitus (n=5, 38.5%) was second. The other co-morbid conditions were hyperlipidemia (n=3, 23.1%), renal disease (n=3, 23.1%), liver disease and/or alcohol abuse (n=3, 23.1%), autoimmune disease or immunosuppressive condition (n=2, 15.5%), malignancy (n=2, 15.5%), respiratory disease (n=1, 8%), and postpartum condition (n=1, 8%), as well as miscellaneous conditions including intravenous drug abuse, HIV infection, and trauma (n=2, 15

  17. Clear cell carcinoma of the ovary mimicking struma ovarii and carcinoid tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alduaij, Ahmad; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2011-04-01

    Clear cell carcinomas are considered as high-grade tumor often with poor prognosis. We describe 2 cases of clear cell carcinomas of the ovary mimicking benign or less aggressive tumors encountered in the female genital track. The first case is mimicking a benign monodermal teratoma, the so-called struma ovarii, and the second mimicking a carcinoid tumor. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparative Analysis of Ability of Mimicking Portfolios in Representing the Background Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Asgharian, Hossein

    2004-01-01

    Our aim is to give a comparative analysis of ability of different factor mimicking portfolios in representing the background factors. Our analysis contains a cross-sectional regression approach, a time-series regression approach and a portfolio approach for constructing factor mimicking portfolios. The focus of the analysis is the power of mimicking portfolios in the asset pricing models. We conclude that the time series regression approach, with the book-to-market sorted portfolios as the ba...

  19. A natural human monoclonal antibody targeting Staphylococcus Protein A protects against Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Sunley, Kevin M.; Bowling, Rodney A.; Kwan, Tzu-Yu; Mays, Heather R.; Rambhadran, Anu; Zhang, Yanfeng; Martin, Rebecca L.; Cavalier, Michael C.; Simard, John

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus can cause devastating and life-threatening infections. With the increase in multidrug resistant strains, novel therapies are needed. Limited success with active and passive immunization strategies have been attributed to S. aureus immune evasion. Here, we report on a monoclonal antibody, 514G3, that circumvents a key S. aureus evasion mechanism by targeting the cell wall moiety Protein A (SpA). SpA tightly binds most subclasses of immunoglobulins via their Fc region, neutralizing effector function. The organism can thus shield itself with a protective coat of serum antibodies and render humoral immunity ineffective. The present antibody reactivity was derived from an individual with natural anti-SpA antibody titers. The monoclonal antibody is of an IgG3 subclass, which differs critically from other immunoglobulin subclasses since its Fc is not bound by SpA. Moreover, it targets a unique epitope on SpA that allows it to bind in the presence of serum antibodies. Consequently, the antibody opsonizes S. aureus and maintains effector function to enable natural immune mediated clearance. The data presented here provide evidence that 514G3 antibody is able to successfully rescue mice from S. aureus mediated bacteremia. PMID:29364906

  20. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Meningitis- and Bacteremia-Causing Pneumococci Identifies a Common Core Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornick, Jennifer E.; Chaguza, Chrispin; Yalcin, Feyruz; Harris, Simon R.; Gray, Katherine J.; Kiran, Anmol M.; Molyneux, Elizabeth; French, Neil; Faragher, Brian E.; Everett, Dean B.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a nasopharyngeal commensal that occasionally invades normally sterile sites to cause bloodstream infection and meningitis. Although the pneumococcal population structure and evolutionary genetics are well defined, it is not clear whether pneumococci that cause meningitis are genetically distinct from those that do not. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing of 140 isolates of S. pneumoniae recovered from bloodstream infection (n = 70) and meningitis (n = 70) to compare their genetic contents. By fitting a double-exponential decaying-function model, we show that these isolates share a core of 1,427 genes (95% confidence interval [CI], 1,425 to 1,435 genes) and that there is no difference in the core genome or accessory gene content from these disease manifestations. Gene presence/absence alone therefore does not explain the virulence behavior of pneumococci that reach the meninges. Our analysis, however, supports the requirement of a range of previously described virulence factors and vaccine candidates for both meningitis- and bacteremia-causing pneumococci. This high-resolution view suggests that, despite considerable competency for genetic exchange, all pneumococci are under considerable pressure to retain key components advantageous for colonization and transmission and that these components are essential for access to and survival in sterile sites. PMID:26259813

  1. Elevated soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) predicts mortality in Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mölkänen, T; Ruotsalainen, E; Thorball, C W

    2011-01-01

    The soluble form of urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) is a new inflammatory marker. High suPAR levels have been shown to associate with mortality in cancer and in chronic infections like HIV and tuberculosis, but reports on the role of suPAR in acute bacteremic infections...... are scarce. To elucidate the role of suPAR in a common bacteremic infection, the serum suPAR levels in 59 patients with Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) were measured using the suPARnostic ELISA assay and associations to 1-month mortality and with deep infection focus were analyzed. On day three, after...... the first positive blood culture for S. aureus, suPAR levels were higher in 19 fatalities (median 12.3; range 5.7-64.6 ng/mL) than in 40 survivors (median 8.4; range 3.7-17.6 ng/mL, p = 0.002). This difference persisted for 10 days. The presence of deep infection focus was not associated with elevated su...

  2. Comparative efficacies of amoxicillin, clindamycin, and moxifloxacin in prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz Dios, P; Tomás Carmona, I; Limeres Posse, J; Medina Henríquez, J; Fernández Feijoo, J; Alvarez Fernández, M

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the efficacies of oral prophylactic treatment with amoxicillin (AMX), clindamycin (CLI), and moxifloxacin (MXF) in the prevention of bacteremia following dental extractions (BDE). Two hundred twenty-one adults who required dental extractions under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to a control group, an AMX group, a CLI group, and an MXF group (the individuals in the drug treatment groups received 2 g, 600 mg, and 400 mg, respectively, 1 to 2 h before anesthesia induction). Venous blood samples were collected from each patient at the baseline and 30 s, 15 min, and 1 h after the dental extractions. The samples were inoculated into BACTEC Plus aerobic and anaerobic blood culture bottles and were processed in a BACTEC 9240 instrument. Subculture and the further identification of the isolated bacteria were performed by conventional microbiological techniques. The prevalences of BDE in the control group, AMX group, CLI group, and MXF group were 96, 46, 85, and 57%, respectively, at 30 s; 64, 11, 70, and 24%, respectively, at 15 min; and 20, 4, 22, and 7%, respectively, at 1 h. Streptococcus spp. were the most frequently identified bacteria in all groups (44 to 68%), with the lowest percentage being detected in the AMX group (44%). AMX and MXF prophylaxis showed high efficacies in reducing the prevalence and duration of BDE, but CLI prophylaxis was noneffective. As a consequence, MXF prophylaxis is a promising antibiotic alternative for the prevention of BDE when beta-lactams are not indicated.

  3. Evaluation of tomosynthesis elastography in a breast-mimicking phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelken, Florian Jan; Sack, Ingolf; Klatt, Dieter; Fischer, Thomas; Fallenberg, Eva Maria; Bick, Ulrich; Diekmann, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate whether measurement of strain under static compression in tomosynthesis of a breast-mimicking phantom can be used to distinguish tumor-simulating lesions of different elasticities and to compare the results to values predicted by rheometric analysis as well as results of ultrasound elastography. Materials and methods: We prepared three soft breast-mimicking phantoms containing simulated tumors of different elasticities. The phantoms were imaged using a wide angle tomosynthesis system with increasing compression settings ranging from 0 N to 105 N in steps of 15 N. Strain of the inclusions was measured in two planes using a commercially available mammography workstation. The elasticity of the phantom matrix and inclusion material was determined by rheometric analysis. Ultrasound elastography of the inclusions was performed using two different ultrasound elastography algorithms. Results: Strain at maximal compression was 24.4%/24.5% in plane 1/plane 2, respectively, for the soft inclusion, 19.6%/16.9% for the intermediate inclusion, and 6.0%/10.2% for the firm inclusion. The strain ratios predicted by rheometrical testing were 0.41, 0.83 and 1.26 for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions, respectively. The strain ratios obtained for the soft, intermediate, and firm inclusions were 0.72 ± 0.13, 1.02 ± 0.21 and 2.67 ± 1.70, respectively for tomosynthesis elastography, 0.91, 1.64 and 2.07, respectively, for ultrasound tissue strain imaging, and 0.97, 2.06 and 2.37, respectively, for ultrasound real-time elastography. Conclusions: Differentiation of tumor-simulating inclusions by elasticity in a breast mimicking phantom may be possible by measuring strain in tomosynthesis. This method may be useful for assessing elasticity of breast lesions tomosynthesis of the breast

  4. A huge renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lal Anupam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A huge left renal capsular leiomyoma mimicking retroperitoneal sarcoma presented in a patient as an abdominal mass. Computed tomography displayed a large heterogeneous retro-peritoneal mass in the left side of the abdomen with inferior and medial displacement as well as loss of fat plane with the left kidney. Surgical exploration revealed a capsulated mass that was tightly adherent to the left kidney; therefore, total tumor resection with radical left nephrectomy was performed. Histopathology ultimately confirmed the benign nature of the mass. This is the largest leiomyoma reported in literature to the best of our knowledge.

  5. Abdominal Splenosis Mimicking Hepatic Tumor: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Lun Yeh

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis of abdominal splenosis is often undiagnosed until treatment for splenic rupture or splenectomy. This report describes a patient with splenosis mimicking hepatic tumor. The patient had a history of splenic trauma with splenectomy and chronic hepatitis C. After routine abdominal ultrasound revealed a liver nodule, further imaging studies, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography and angiography, were performed. After the patient eventually underwent surgery, pathology revealed splenic tissue. Despite its distinguishable clinical features, splenosis is difficult to identify by modern imaging modalities. Therefore, accurate and timely diagnosis of this disease requires constant vigilance.

  6. Hızma Induced Papul of Nose Mimicking Pyogenic Granuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mualla Polat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of body piercing is popular among young people, who consider it as a sign of marginality, beauty, or group identity. Piercing procedure is observed to cause a large number of complications such as infections, pain, inflammatory reactions, bleeding, dental fractures or fissures, and gingival damage, etc., mostly in young individuals. Hizma is a traditional body ornament worn by Anatolian women via a piercing procedure. Herein, we describe a papule of nose mimicking pyogenic granuloma as an uncommon complication of Hızma.

  7. Mimicking the effect of gravity using an elastic membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yecun; Zhu, Changqing; Wang, Yijun; Shi, Qingfan

    2014-01-01

    Comparing astrospace with an elastic membrane is an interesting analogy but it lacks a theoretical basis and experimental support. We develop a theoretical model that brings to light the relationship between the conceptual model of a gravity well and an elastic deformation equation of a membrane supporting a heavy ball, and further derive the ‘gravitational constant’ for such a small ‘elastic space’. The experimental data obtained are consistent with the prediction of our model, in mimicking the revolution of a small planet. Teaching practice shows that using an elastic membrane is a simple, intuitive and reliable method to enhance the quality of learning about the effect of gravity. (paper)

  8. Endometriosis mimicking the perianal fistula tract: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gül Türkcü

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is the presence of endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Nowadays, in many cases, although routine use of episiotomy perineal endo metriosis is extremely rare. A 36 year old female patient was referred to our hospital with complaints of pain in the perianal region for five months. On physical examination, stiffness was palpated and then magnetic resonance im aging (MRI was performed. MRI is compatible with fistula tract. The lesion was excised and the histopathological appearance correspond to endometriosis. Perianal endo metriosis is rare in the perianal region and in the clinic mimicking perianal fistulas and malignancy should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis

  9. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushtrim Disha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH (Stanford A, DeBakey I. This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively.

  10. Nephrogenic rests mimicking Wilms' tumor on CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhas, Naveen; Siegelman, Stanley S. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Argani, Pedram [Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States); Gearhart, John P. [Department of Pediatric Urology, Brady Urologic Institute, The Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine, 21287, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2004-02-01

    Nephrogenic rests (NR) are persistent benign remnants of embryonic renal tissue. A small percentage of these may develop into Wilms' tumor (WT). Radiologic imaging is relied upon to differentiate between these entities, with the hallmark of malignant transformation being growth on serial imaging studies. There is, however, considerable overlap in their imaging characteristics. The authors present a case of two biopsy-proven NR in a 2-year-old girl with sporadic aniridia that were indistinguishable from WT on initial radiologic studies. One of the NR grew on serial imaging studies mimicking a WT, but after resection was confirmed to be a benign hyperplastic NR on pathologic examination. (orig.)

  11. Cartilage Delamination Flap Mimicking a Torn Medial Meniscus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Zhi-Wei Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a chondral delamination lesion due to medial parapatellar plica friction syndrome involving the medial femoral condyle. This mimicked a torn medial meniscus in clinical and radiological presentation. Arthroscopy revealed a chondral delamination flap, which was debrided. Diagnosis of chondral lesions in the knee can be challenging. Clinical examination and MRI have good accuracy for diagnosis and should be used in tandem. Early diagnosis and treatment of chondral lesions are important to prevent progression to early osteoarthritis.

  12. Epithelioid sarcoma mimicking abscess: review of the MRI appearances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, E.; Forest, M.; Brasseur, J.L.; Grenier, P.; Amoura, Z.

    2001-01-01

    A case of epithelioid sarcoma involving the soft tissue of the ankle is presented. The tumor was a hemorrhagic, fluid-filled, multiloculated lesion with inflammatory changes in the surrounding planes. Tuberculous abscess was diagnosed on the basis of the clinical picture, ultrasound and MRI findings. Surgical exploration of the ankle mass was carried out because of lack of local healing while the patient's general and pulmonary status improved on antituberculosis treatment. This was an unusual case of epithelioid sarcoma mimicking a multilocular abscess. (orig.)

  13. Endometriosis After Surgical Menopause Mimicking Pelvic Malignancy: Surgeons’ Predicament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani A. Bhat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Prevalence of persistent endometriosis in women after menopause without any hormonal replacement therapy is very rare. This is a case of a woman with previous history of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for endometriosis who presented with hemoperitoneum, vaginal bleeding, pelvic mass, and pulmonary thromboembolism mimicking as rectovaginal septum carcinoma. This is the first case report with a unique mode of presentation wherein the patient presented with hemoperitoneum requiring emergency embolization of the vessel to stabilize the patient. She underwent en bloc resection of the tumor with high anterior resection of the rectum. Histopathology confirmed endometriosis.

  14. Testicular teratoma, mimicking a simple testicular cyst, in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Renzo, Dacia; Persico, Antonello; Sindici, Giulia; Lelli Chiesa, Pierluigi

    2013-09-01

    Prepubertal testicular tumors are rare, and teratoma is the second most frequent histologic type. Its typical features are those of a hard and painless scrotal mass at clinical examination, and nonhomogeneous, echoic, often with calcifications at ultrasonography. Rare but reported is the atypical presentation as a transilluminating scrotal mass, due to the presence of some internal cystic areas, detectable at ultrasonography. We report the case of an infant with a transilluminating scrotal mass, mimicking at ultrasonography and surgery a simple, fully liquid cyst, which the pathologic examination revealed to be mature cystic testicular teratoma. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelien Dinh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  16. Primary bone lymphoma of the distal tibia mimicking brodie's abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jina; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin; Park, Chan Kum

    2014-01-01

    The 'penumbra sign' on an unenhanced T1-weighted image is a well-known characteristic of Brodie's abscess, and this sign is extremely helpful for discriminating subacute osteomyelitis from other bone lesions. We present a case of primary bone lymphoma of the distal tibia mimicking subacute osteomyelitis with Brodie's abscess in a 50-year-old woman. Initial radiographs and MRI showed a lesion in the distal tibia consistent with Brodie's abscess with the penumbra sign. Histopathological examination of the surgical biopsy specimen confirmed the presence of a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma involving the bone.

  17. Femoroacetabular impingement mimicking avascular osteonecrosis on bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, Juan Pablo; Domínguez, María Luz; Nogareda, Zulema; Gómez, María Asunción; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a structural abnormality of proximal femur and/or acetabulum. It has been recently described, and there are limited reports in nuclear medicine literature because bone scintigraphy is not listed in its diagnostic protocol, but it should be included on differential diagnosis when evaluating patients, with hip-related symptoms because it may be misinterpreted as degenerative changes or avascular necrosis, and its early treatment avoid progression to osteoarthritis. We describe the case of a male who suffered from hip pain. Bone planar scintigraphic appearance mimicked avascular necrosis, but single photon emission computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of FAI

  18. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hs, Charan Babu; Rai, Bhagawan Das; Nair, Manju A; Astekar, Madhusudan S

    2012-05-29

    Simple bone cysts (SBC) are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  19. Simple bone cyst of mandible mimicking periapical cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charan Babu HS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple bone cysts (SBC are pseudocysts occurring less commonly in the maxillofacial region. The uncertain and unclear etiopathogenesis led to numerous synonyms to refer this particular cyst. These cysts are devoid of an epithelial lining and are usually empty or contain blood or straw-colored fluid. In jaws initially it mimics a periapical cyst and later can lead to cortical bone expansion warranting for radical approach, which is seldom required. SBC is predominantly diagnosed in first two decades of life. Here we report a case of solitary bone cyst mimicking a periapical cyst of a mandibular molar in a 37-year-old patient.

  20. Granulomatous mastitis caused by histoplasma and mimicking inflammatory breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, B M

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of a lobular, necrotizing granulomatous process causing a unilateral painful breast mass mimicking carcinoma are presented for comparison. While the morphologic appearance in each case was that of lobular granulomatous mastitis, the etiologic agent in one case appeared to be Histoplasma capsulatum, based on Grocott methenamine silver staining, and represents the second reported case of histoplasmosis involving only breast parenchyma. Awareness of the rare entity, granulomatous mastitis, is important for the pathologist because the definitive diagnosis is made microscopically. Thorough evaluation of the breast tissue is essential for its management and should eventually contribute to the clarification of its etiology.

  1. Scenario analysis of large scale algae production in tubular photobioreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slegers, P.M.; Beveren, van P.J.M.; Wijffels, R.H.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae productivity in tubular photobioreactors depends on algae species, location, tube diameter, biomass concentration, distance between tubes and for vertically stacked systems, the number of horizontal tubes per stack. A simulation model for horizontal and vertically stacked horizontal

  2. Kalaärimeeste kohus algas venitamisega / Hindrek Riikoja

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Riikoja, Hindrek

    2007-01-01

    Harju maakohtus algas kohtuprotsess veterinaar- ja toiduameti endise asejuhi Vladimir Razumovski väidetava altkäemaksuvõtmise üle, kus on süüdistavaid eraisikuid ja ettevõtjaid. Lisa: Kes on kohtu all?

  3. The role of algae in agriculture: a mathematical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, P K; Misra, A K; Venturino, Ezio

    2017-06-01

    Synthetic fertilizers and livestock manure are nowadays widely used in agriculture to improve crop yield but nitrogen and phosphorous runoff resulting from their use compromises water quality and contributes to eutrophication phenomena in waterbeds within the countryside and ultimately in the ocean. Alternatively, algae could play an important role in agriculture where they can be used as biofertilizers and soil stabilizers. To examine the possible reuse of the detritus generated by dead algae as fertilizer for crops, we develop three mathematical models building upon each other. A system is proposed in which algae recover waste nutrients (nitrogen and phosphorus) for reuse in agricultural production. The results of our study show that in so doing, the crop yield may be increased and simultaneously the density of algae in the lake may be reduced. This could be a way to mitigate and possibly solve the environmental and economic issues nowadays facing agriculture.

  4. Modelization of tritium transfer into the organic compartments of algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonotto, S.; Gerber, G.B.; Arapis, G.; Kirchmann, R.

    1982-01-01

    Uptake of tritium oxide and its conversion into organic tritium was studied in four different types of algae with widely varying size and growth characteristics (Acetabularia acetabulum, Boergesenia forbesii, two strains of Chlamydomonas and Dunaliella bioculata). Water in the cell and the vacuales equilibrates rapidly with external tritium water. Tritium is actively incorporated into organically bound form as the organisms grow. During the stationary phase, incorporation of tritium is slow. There exists a discrimination against the incorporation of tritium into organically bound form. A model has been elaborated taking in account these different factors. It appears that transfer of organic tritium by algae growing near the sites of release would be significant only for actively growing algae. Algae growing slowly may, however, be useful as cumulative indicators of discontinuous tritium release. (author)

  5. Studies on allergenic algae of Delhi area: botanical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, A; Agarwal, M K; Shivpuri, D N

    1979-04-01

    To study distribution of algae in and around Delhi aerobiological surveys were undertaken for two consecutive years (September, 1972, to August, 1974). The surveys were accomplished by (a) slide exposure method and (b) culture plate exposure method. A total of 850 slides were exposed using Durham's gravity sampling device. Of these, 560 slides were exposed during 1973 (272 slides at two meter and 288 at ten meter height) and the rest (290 slides) were exposed during 1974 at ten meter height. A total of 858 culture plates were exposed (276 for one hour and 282 for two hours) during 1973 and the rest (300 culture plates) were exposed during 1974 at ten meter height for two hours duration only. Air was found to be rich in algae flora during the months of September to November. The dominant forms of algae present were all blue greens. This might be due to the relative greater resistance of blue green algae to unfavorable conditions.

  6. Extreme Low Light Requirement for Algae Growth Underneath Sea Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hancke, Kasper; Lund-Hansen, Lars C.; Lamare, Maxim L.

    2018-01-01

    Microalgae colonizing the underside of sea ice in spring are a key component of the Arctic foodweb as they drive early primary production and transport of carbon from the atmosphere to the ocean interior. Onset of the spring bloom of ice algae is typically limited by the availability of light......, and the current consensus is that a few tens-of-centimeters of snow is enough to prevent sufficient solar radiation to reach underneath the sea ice. We challenge this consensus, and investigated the onset and the light requirement of an ice algae spring bloom, and the importance of snow optical properties...... for light penetration. Colonization by ice algae began in May under >1 m of first-year sea ice with approximate to 1 m thick snow cover on top, in NE Greenland. The initial growth of ice algae began at extremely low irradiance (...

  7. Composition, Occurrences and Checklist of Periphyton Algae of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    `123456789jkl''''#

    The periphyton is also an important indicator of water quality (Azim et al, 2006). Attached algae are primitive plants that get their nutrients from water passing over them. ... rung in the aquatic food chain depend directly ... influence of sea water.

  8. Planktonic algae and cyanoprokaryotes as indicators of ecosystem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Planktonic algae and cyanoprokaryotes as indicators of ecosystem quality in the Mooi River system in the North-West Province, South Africa. ... is important for maintaining the quality of potable water of Potchefstroom and surrounding areas.

  9. Chemical examination of the brown alga Stoechospermum marginatum (C. Agardh)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wahidullah, S.; DeSouza, L.; Kamat, S.Y.

    The crude methalonic extract of marine algae Stoechospermum marginatum from west coast of India was found to have spasmolytic activity. Search for the pharmacologically active compounds led to the isolation of steroids, fatty acids and an ester...

  10. The Belmont Valley integrated algae pond system in retrospect

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-26

    Mar 26, 2013 ... ness amongst all stakeholders including the public at large, the three spheres of ...... (2011) Algae biofuel from wastewater treatment high rate algal ponds. .... and OELMÜLLER R (2002) Photosynthetic electron transport.

  11. Diterpenes from the Marine Algae of the Genus Dictyota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiayun; Li, Hong; Zhao, Zishuo; Xia, Xue; Li, Bo; Zhang, Jinrong; Yan, Xiaojun

    2018-05-11

    Species of the brown algae of the genus Dictyota are rich sources of bioactive secondary metabolites with diverse structural features. Excellent progress has been made in the discovery of diterpenes possessing broad chemical defensive activities from this genus. Most of these diterpenes exhibit significant biological activities, such as antiviral, cytotoxic and chemical defensive activities. In the present review, we summarized diterpenes isolated from the brown algae of the genus.

  12. Algae Reefs in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Numerous algae reefs are seen in Shark Bay, Western Australia, Australia (26.0S, 113.5E) especially in the southern portions of the bay. The south end is more saline because tidal flow in and out of the bay is restricted by sediment deposited at the north and central end of the bay opposite the mouth of the Wooramel River. This extremely arid region produces little sediment runoff so that the waters are very clear, saline and rich in algae.

  13. Thermal algae in certain radioactive springs in Japan, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mifune, Masaaki; Hirose, Hiroyuki.

    1982-01-01

    Shikano Hot Springs are located at five km to the south of Hamamura Station on the Sanin Line in Tottori Prefecture. The water temperature and the pH of the springs are 40.2 - 61.2 0 C, and 7.5 - 7.8, respectively. They belong to simple thermals. Hamamura Hot Springs are located in the neighbourhood of Hamamura Station. The highest radon content of the hot springs is 175.1 x 10 -10 Ci/l, and the great part of the springs belong to radioactive ones. From the viewpoint of the major ionic constituents, they are also classified under weak salt springs, sulfated salt springs, and simple thermals. Regarding the habitates of the algal flora, the water temperature and the pH of the springs are 28.0 - 68.0 0 C, and 6.8 - 7.4, respectively. The thermal algae found by Ikoma and Doi at Hamamura Hot Springs were two species of Cyanophyceae. By the authors, nine species and one variety of Cyanophyceae including Ikoma and Doi's two species were newly found at Shikano and Hamamura Hot Springs. Chlorophyceous alga was not found. The dominant thermal algae of these hot springs were Mastigocladus laminosus, and the other algae which mainly consist of Oscillatoriaceous algae. From these points, it seems that the thermal algae of Shikano and Hamamura Hot Springs belong to the normal type of thermal algae, and they are different from the thermal algae of Ikeda Mineral Springs and Masutomi Hot Springs which belong to strongly radioactive springs. (author)

  14. Using the marine unicellular algae in biological monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Kapkov V. I.; Shoshina E. V.; Belenikina O. A.

    2017-01-01

    The possibility of using marine unicellular algae from natural plankton community in biomonitoring of pollution by heavy metals has been investigated. Algae of different taxa from the Mediterranean Sea have been allocated to culture. In the laboratory the culture conditions – i. e. growth medium, temperature, photoperiod, level of artificial light and initial density – have been selected for every species. The impact of heavy metals (Hg, Cd, Cu, Pb) in the form of chloride salts on the growth...

  15. Micro-algae: French players discuss the matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouveret, T.

    2013-01-01

    About 75000 species of algae have been reported so far, the domains of application are huge and investment are increasing all around the world. One of the difficulties is to find the most appropriate algae to a specific application. Some development programs have failed scientifically or economically for instance the production of protein for animal food from the chlorella algae or the production of bio-fuel from C14-C18 chains, from zeaxanthine and from phycoerytrine. On the other side some research programs have led to promising industrial applications such as the production of food for fish and farm animals. Some research fields are completely innovative such as the use of micro-algae for the construction of bio-walls for buildings. Micro-algae are diverse and fragile. Photo-bioreactors have been designed to breed fragile algae like some types of chlorophycees used in bio-fuel and in cosmetics, a prototype has been tested for 15 months and its production is about 2 kg of dry matter a day. (A.C.)

  16. Radionuclides and trace metals in eastern Mediterranean Sea algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M.S.; Mamish, S.; Budier, Y.

    2003-01-01

    Three types of sea alga distributed along the Syrian coast have been collected and analyzed for radioactivity and trace elements. Results have shown that 137 Cs concentrations in all the analyzed sample were relatively low (less than 1.2 Bq kg -1 dry weight) while the levels of naturally occurring radionuclides, such as 210 Po and 210 Pb, were found to be high in most samples; the highest observed value (27.43 Bq kg -1 dry weight) for 210 Po being in the red Jania longifurca alga. In addition, most brown alga species were also found to accumulate 210 Po, which indicates their selectivity to this isotope. On the other hand, brown alga (Cystoseira and Sargassum Vulgare) have shown a clear selectivity for some trace metals such as Cr, As, Cu and Co, this selectivity may encourage their use as biomonitor for pollution by trace metals. Moreover, the red alga species were found to contain the highest levels of Mg while the brown alga species were found to concentrate Fe, Mn, Na and K and nonmetals such as Cl, I and Br

  17. Combining of radionuclides with constituent materials of marine algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Nakahara, Motokazu; Ishii, Toshiaki; Ueda, Taishi; Shimizu, Chiaki.

    1979-01-01

    The relations between the accumulation-elimination of radionuclides and the constituent materials of marine algae were studied to determine more precisely the mechanism of the radioactive contamination of marine organisms. This will increase the information about the behavior of radionuclides in marine organisms in relation to the environmental conditions (temperature, physico-chemical state of radioisotope, and so on) and the biological conditions (feeding habits, species, and so on). Eisenia contaminated by 137 Cs and 106 Ru- 106 Rh was fractionated by solvent extraction into 6 fractions. The largest portion of 137 Cs was in the boiling water fraction; 106 Ru- 106 Rh was most extracted by 24% KOH solution. Elution patterns by Sephadex G-100 gel-filtration of samples differed largely from each other, both among the 3 kinds of radionuclides and between the 2 species of the algae. Therefore, the accumulation of the radionuclides by the marine algae was proved to be not only due to a physical absorption to the surface of the algae but also to the biological combining of the radionuclides with the constituents of the algae. Furthermore, it was found that radionuclides which combine with a few constituents of alga are not eliminated equally. This is considered to be useful for the physiological analysis of elimination curves. (author)

  18. Algae as a Biofuel: Renewable Source for Liquid Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kant Pandey

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofuels produced by algae may provide a feasible alternative to fossil fuels like petroleum sourced fuels. However, looking to limited fossil fuel associated with problems, intensive efforts have been given to search for alternative biofuels like biodiesel. Algae are ubiquitous on earth, have potential to produce biofuel. However, technology of biofuel from algae facing a number of hurdles before it can compete in the fuel market and be broadly organized. Different challenges include strain identification and improvement of algal biomass, both in terms of biofuel productivity and the production of other products to improve the economics of the entire system. Algal biofuels could be made more cost effective by extracting other valuable products from algae and algal strains. Algal oil can be prepared by culture of algae on municipal and industrial wastewaters. Photobioreactors methods provide a controlled environment that can be tailored to the specific demands of high production of algae to attain a consistently good yield of biofuel. The algal biomass has been reported to yield high oil contents and have good amount of the biodiesel production capacity. In this article, it has been attempted to review to elucidate the approaches for making algal biodiesel economically competitive with respect to petrodiesel. Consequently, R & D work has been carried out for the growth, harvesting, oil extraction and conversion to biodiesel from algal sources.

  19. Biodiesel Production From Algae to Overcome the Energy Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suliman Khan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of energy sources has reached at the level that whole world is relying on it. Being the major source of energy, fuels are considered the most important. The fear of diminishing the available sources thirst towards biofuel production has increased during last decades. Considering the food problems, algae gain the most attention to be used as biofuel producers. The use of crop and food-producing plants will never be a best fit into the priorities for biofuel production as they will disturb the food needs. Different types of algae having the different production abilities. Normally algae have 20%–80% oil contents that could be converted into different types of fuels such as kerosene oil and biodiesel. The diesel production from algae is economical and easy. Different species such as tribonema, ulothrix and euglena have good potential for biodiesel production. Gene technology can be used to enhance the production of oil and biodiesel contents and stability of algae. By increasing the genetic expressions, we can find the ways to achieve the required biofuel amounts easily and continuously to overcome the fuels deficiency. The present review article focusses on the role of algae as a possible substitute for fossil fuel as an ideal biofuel reactant.

  20. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on green fuels which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PI's have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  1. Is the Future Really in Algae?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    Having just emerged from the warmest decade on record and watching as the oceans acidify, global resources peak, the world's population continues to climb, and nearly half of all known species face extinction by the end of the century. We stand on the threshold of one of the most important transition in human history-the transition from hunting-and-gathering our energy to cultivating sustainable, carbon-neutral, environmentally-friendly energy supplies. Can we "cultivate" enerm without competing with agriculture for land, freshwater, or fertilizer? Can we develop an "ecology of technology" that optimizes our use of limited resources? Is human activity compatible with improved conditions in the world's oceans? Will our ingenuity prevail in time to make a difference for our children and the children of all species? With support from NASA ARMD and the California Energy Commission, a group of dedicated scientists and engineers are working on a project called OMEGA (Offshore Membrane Enclosures for Growing Algae), to provide practical answers to these critical questions and to leave a legacy of hope for the oceans and for the future.

  2. Detection of Cyanotoxins in Algae Dietary Supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy-Lachapelle, Audrey; Solliec, Morgan; Bouchard, Maryse F; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2017-02-25

    Algae dietary supplements are marketed worldwide as natural health products. Although their proprieties have been claimed as beneficial to improve overall health, there have been several previous reports of contamination by cyanotoxins. These products generally contain non-toxic cyanobacteria, but the methods of cultivation in natural waters without appropriate quality controls allow contamination by toxin producer species present in the natural environment. In this study, we investigated the presence of total microcystins, seven individual microcystins (RR, YR, LR, LA, LY, LW, LF), anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, epoxyanatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine in 18 different commercially available products containing Spirulina or Aphanizomenon flos-aquae . Total microcystins analysis was accomplished using a Lemieux oxidation and a chemical derivatization using dansyl chloride was needed for the simultaneous analysis of cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine. Moreover, the use of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) both coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) enabled high performance detection and quantitation. Out of the 18 products analyzed, 8 contained some cyanotoxins at levels exceeding the tolerable daily intake values. The presence of cyanotoxins in these algal dietary supplements reinforces the need for a better quality control as well as consumer's awareness on the potential risks associated with the consumption of these supplements.

  3. Detection of Cyanotoxins in Algae Dietary Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Roy-Lachapelle

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Algae dietary supplements are marketed worldwide as natural health products. Although their proprieties have been claimed as beneficial to improve overall health, there have been several previous reports of contamination by cyanotoxins. These products generally contain non-toxic cyanobacteria, but the methods of cultivation in natural waters without appropriate quality controls allow contamination by toxin producer species present in the natural environment. In this study, we investigated the presence of total microcystins, seven individual microcystins (RR, YR, LR, LA, LY, LW, LF, anatoxin-a, dihydroanatoxin-a, epoxyanatoxin-a, cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine in 18 different commercially available products containing Spirulina or Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. Total microcystins analysis was accomplished using a Lemieux oxidation and a chemical derivatization using dansyl chloride was needed for the simultaneous analysis of cylindrospermopsin, saxitoxin, and β-methylamino-l-alanine. Moreover, the use of laser diode thermal desorption (LDTD and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC both coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS enabled high performance detection and quantitation. Out of the 18 products analyzed, 8 contained some cyanotoxins at levels exceeding the tolerable daily intake values. The presence of cyanotoxins in these algal dietary supplements reinforces the need for a better quality control as well as consumer’s awareness on the potential risks associated with the consumption of these supplements.

  4. [The effects of blue algae on health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Riel, A J H P; Schets, F M; Meulenbelt, J

    2007-08-04

    Cyanobacteria (blue algae) regularly cause recreational waters to become murky and smelly. Skin irritation and mild gastrointestinal disorders have regularly been reported following recreational activities in water suspected of being contaminated with cyanobacteria. The exact cause of these effects on health is not clear. Severe effects are not to be expected from recreational exposure to water contaminated with cyanobacteria. Cyanobacteria can produce hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, cytotoxins and irritants. In Brazil lethal intoxications have occurred due to the occurrence of toxins in drinking water and in dialysis fluid. The Dutch policy is based on the Commissie Integraal Waterbeheer (Commission Integral Water Management) guidelines for recreational waters. It is not clear to what extent the other cyanotoxins occur in the Netherlands. However, several genera ofcyanobacteria capable of producing these other cyanotoxins have been found in the Netherlands. For a good risk assessment in the Netherlands, more information is needed on the effects on health of cyanobacteria. There is also a need for more data on the prevalence of different cyanobacteria and toxins in Dutch recreational waters.

  5. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Caroline; Mahta, Ali; Wheeler, Lee Adam; Tsiouris, A John; Kamel, Hooman

    2018-02-01

    Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  6. Tension pneumocephalus mimicking septic shock: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Miranda, MD

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Tension pneumocephalus can lead to rapid neurologic deterioration. We report for the first time its association with aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock and the efficacy of prompt neurosurgical intervention and critical care support in treating this condition. A 64-year-old man underwent 2-stage olfactory groove meningioma resection. The patient developed altered mental status and gait instability on postoperative day 6. Imaging showed significant pneumocephalus. The patient subsequently developed worsening mental status, respiratory failure, and profound shock requiring multiple vasopressors. Bedside needle decompression, identification and repair of the cranial fossa defect, and critical care support led to improved mental status and reversal of shock and multiorgan dysfunction. Thorough evaluation revealed no evidence of an underlying infection. In this case, tension pneumocephalus incited an aseptic systemic inflammatory response syndrome mimicking septic shock. Prompt neurosurgical correction of pneumocephalus and critical care support not only improved neurologic status, but also reversed shock. Such a complication indicates the importance of close monitoring of patients with progressive pneumocephalus.

  7. Lipid oxidation in base algae oil and water-in-algae oil emulsion: Impact of natural antioxidants and emulsifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingcan; Rao, Jiajia; Ding, Yangping; McClements, David Julian; Decker, Eric Andrew

    2016-07-01

    The impact of natural hydrophilic antioxidants, metal chelators, and hydrophilic antioxidant/metal chelator mixture on the oxidative stability of base algae oil and water-in-algae oil emulsion was investigated. The results showed that green tea extract and ascorbic acid had greatest protective effect against algae oil oxidation and generated four day lag phase, whereas rosmarinic acid, grape seed extract, grape seed extract polymer, deferoxamine (DFO), and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) had no significant protective effect. Besides, there was no synergistic effect observed between natural antioxidants and ascorbic acid. The emulsifiers are critical to the physicochemical stability of water-in-algae oil emulsions. Polyglycerol polyricinoleate (PGPR) promoted the oxidation of emulsion. Conversely, the protective effect on algae oil oxidation was appreciated when defatted soybean lecithin (PC 75) or defatted lyso-lecithin (Lyso-PC) was added. The role of hydrophilic antioxidants in emulsion was similar to that in algae oil except EDTA which demonstrated strong antioxidative effect in emulsion. The results could provide information to build up stable food products containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. SOIL ALGAE OF BLADE OF COIL IN DONETSK REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltseva I.A.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available On territory of Donbass for more than 200 years the underground coal mining has produced, accompanied by the formation of the mine dumps. Finding ways to reduce their negative impact on the environment should be based on their comprehensive study. The soil algae are active participants in the syngenetic processes in industrial dumps of different origin. The purpose of this paper is to identify the species composition and dominant algae groups in dump mine SH/U5 “Western” in the western part of Donetsk.The test blade is covered with vegetation to the middle from all sides, and on the north side of 20-25 m to the top. The vegetation cover of the lower and middle tiers of all the exposures range in 70-80%. Projective vegetation cover of upper tiers of the northern, north-eastern and north-western exposures are in the range of 20-40%, other – 5-10%. We revealed some 38 algae species as a result of our research in southern, northern, western, and eastern slopes of the blade “Western”. The highest species diversity has Chlorophyta - 14 species (36.8% of the total number of species, then Cyanophyta - 9 (23,7%, Bacillariophyta - 7 (18,4%, Xantophyta - 5 (13.2%, and Eustigmatophyta - 3 (7.9%. The dominants are represented by Hantzschia amphyoxys (Ehrenberg Grunow in Cleve et Grunow, Bracteacoccus aerius, Klebsormidium flaccidum (Kützing Silva et al., Phormidium autumnale, Pinnularia borealis Ehrenberg, Planothidium lanceolatum (Brebisson in Kützing Bukhtiyarova, Xanthonema exile (Klebs Silva.It should be noted that the species composition of algae groups in different slopes of the blade was significantly different. Jacquard coefficient was calculated for algae communities varied in the range of 15,4-39,1%. The smallest number of algae species was observed on the southern slope of the blade (14 species, maximum was registered in the areas of north and west slopes. Differences in the species composition of algae were also observed in three

  9. Breakthrough Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG bacteremia associated with probiotic use in an adult patient with severe active ulcerative colitis: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meini, Simone; Laureano, Raffaele; Fani, Lucia; Tascini, Carlo; Galano, Angelo; Antonelli, Alberto; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are widely investigated in the treatment of various bowel diseases. However, they may also have a pathogenic potential, and the role of Lactobacillus spp. as opportunistic pathogens, mostly following disruption of the intestinal mucosa, is emerging. We report on a case of bacteremia caused by L. rhamnosus GG in an adult patient affected by severe active ulcerative colitis under treatment with corticosteroids and mesalazine. Lactobacillus bacteremia was associated with candidemia and occurred while the patient was receiving a probiotic formulation containing the same strain (as determined by PFGE typing), and was being concomitantly treated with i.v. vancomycin, to which the Lactobacillus strain was resistant. L. rhamnosus GG bacteremia, therefore, was apparently related with translocation of bacteria from the intestinal lumen to the blood. Pending conclusive evidence, use of probiotics should be considered with caution in case of active severe inflammatory bowel diseases with mucosal disruption.

  10. [Consensus document for the treatment of bacteremia and endocarditis caused by methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus. Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiol, Francisco; Aguado, José María; Pascual, Alvaro; Pujol, Miquel; Almirante, Benito; Miró, José María; Cercenado, Emilia; Domínguez, María de Los Angeles; Soriano, Alex; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Vallés, Jordi; Palomar, Mercedes; Tornos, Pilar; Bouza, Emilio

    2009-02-01

    Bacteremia and endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are prevalent and clinically important. The rise in MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis is related with the increasing use of venous catheters and other vascular procedures. Glycopeptides have been the reference drugs for treating these infections. Unfortunately their activity is not completely satisfactory, particularly against MRSA strains with MICs > 1 microg/mL. The development of new antibiotics, such as linezolid and daptomycin, and the promise of future compounds (dalvabancin, ceftobiprole and telavancin) may change the expectatives in this field.The principal aim of this consensus document was to formulate several recommendations to improve the outcome of MRSA bacteremia and endocarditis, based on the latest reported scientific evidence. This document specifically analyzes the approach for three clinical situations: venous catheter-related bacteremia, persistent bacteremia, and infective endocarditis due to MRSA.

  11. High and increasing Oxa-51 DNA load predict mortality in Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia: implication for pathogenesis and evaluation of therapy.

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    Yu-Chung Chuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While quantification of viral loads has been successfully employed in clinical medicine and has provided valuable insights and useful markers for several viral diseases, the potential of measuring bacterial DNA load to predict outcome or monitor therapeutic responses remains largely unexplored. We tested this possibility by investigating bacterial loads in Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia, a rapidly increasing nosocomial infection characterized by high mortality, drug resistance, multiple and complicated risk factors, all of which urged the need of good markers to evaluate therapeutics. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We established a quantitative real-time PCR assay based on an A. baumannii-specific gene, Oxa-51, and conducted a prospective study to examine A. baumannii loads in 318 sequential blood samples from 51 adults patients (17 survivors, 34 nonsurvivors with culture-proven A. baumannii bacteremia in the intensive care units. Oxa-51 DNA loads were significantly higher in the nonsurvivors than survivors on day 1, 2 and 3 (P=0.03, 0.001 and 0.006, respectively. Compared with survivors, nonsurvivors had higher maximum Oxa-51 DNA load and a trend of increase from day 0 to day 3 (P<0.001, which together with Pitt bacteremia score were independent predictors for mortality by multivariate analysis (P=0.014 and 0.016, for maximum Oxa-51 DNA and change of Oxa-51 DNA, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis revealed significantly different survival curves in patients with different maximum Oxa-51 DNA and change of Oxa-51 DNA from day 0 to day 3. CONCLUSIONS: High Oxa-51 DNA load and its initial increase could predict mortality. Moreover, monitoring Oxa-51 DNA load in blood may provide direct parameters for evaluating new regimens against A. baumannii in future clinical studies.

  12. Increasing incidence of hospital-acquired and healthcare-associated bacteremia in northeast Thailand: a multicenter surveillance study.

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    Maliwan Hongsuwan

    Full Text Available Little is known about the epidemiology of nosocomial bloodstream infections in public hospitals in developing countries. We evaluated trends in incidence of hospital-acquired bacteremia (HAB and healthcare-associated bacteremia (HCAB and associated mortality in a developing country using routinely available databases.Information from the microbiology and hospital databases of 10 provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand was linked with the national death registry for 2004-2010. Bacteremia was considered hospital-acquired if detected after the first two days of hospital admission, and healthcare-associated if detected within two days of hospital admission with a prior inpatient episode in the preceding 30 days.A total of 3,424 patients out of 1,069,443 at risk developed HAB and 2,184 out of 119,286 at risk had HCAB. Of these 1,559 (45.5% and 913 (41.8% died within 30 days, respectively. Between 2004 and 2010, the incidence rate of HAB increased from 0.6 to 0.8 per 1,000 patient-days at risk (p<0.001, and the cumulative incidence of HCAB increased from 1.2 to 2.0 per 100 readmissions (p<0.001. The most common causes of HAB were Acinetobacter spp. (16.2%, Klebsiella pneumoniae (13.9%, and Staphylococcus aureus (13.9%, while those of HCAB were Escherichia coli (26.3%, S. aureus (14.0%, and K. pneumoniae (9.7%. There was an overall increase over time in the proportions of ESBL-producing E. coli causing HAB and HCAB.This study demonstrates a high and increasing incidence of HAB and HCAB in provincial hospitals in northeast Thailand, increasing proportions of ESBL-producing isolates, and very high associated mortality.

  13. Staphylococcus aureus bacteriuria as a prognosticator for outcome of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia: a case-control study

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    Weinstein Robert A

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When Staphylococcus aureus is isolated in urine, it is thought to usually represent hematogenous spread. Because such spread might have special clinical significance, we evaluated predictors and outcomes of S. aureus bacteriuria among patients with S. aureus bacteremia. Methods A case-control study was performed at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County among adult inpatients during January 2002-December 2006. Cases and controls had positive and negative urine cultures, respectively, for S. aureus, within 72 hours of positive blood culture for S. aureus. Controls were sampled randomly in a 1:4 ratio. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were done. Results Overall, 59% of patients were African-American, 12% died, 56% of infections had community-onset infections, and 58% were infected with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA. Among 61 cases and 247 controls, predictors of S. aureus bacteriuria on multivariate analysis were urological surgery (OR = 3.4, p = 0.06 and genitourinary infection (OR = 9.2, p = 0.002. Among patients who died, there were significantly more patients with bacteriuria than among patients who survived (39% vs. 17%; p = 0.002. In multiple Cox regression analysis, death risks in bacteremic patients were bacteriuria (hazard ratio 2.9, CI 1.4-5.9, p = 0.004, bladder catheter use (2.0, 1.0-4.0, p = 0.06, and Charlson score (1.1, 1.1-1.3, p = 0.02. Neither length of stay nor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infection was a predictor of S. aureus bacteriuria or death. Conclusions Among patients with S. aureus bacteremia, those with S. aureus bacteriuria had 3-fold higher mortality than those without bacteriuria, even after adjustment for comorbidities. Bacteriuria may identify patients with more severe bacteremia, who are at risk of worse outcomes.

  14. Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia and Endocarditis among HIV Patients: A cohort study

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    Stine Oscar C

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV patients are at increased risk of development of infections and infection-associated poor health outcomes. We aimed to 1 assess the prevalence of USA300 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA among HIV-infected patients with S. aureus bloodstream infections and. 2 determine risk factors for infective endocarditis and in-hospital mortality among patients in this population. Methods All adult HIV-infected patients with documented S. aureus bacteremia admitted to the University of Maryland Medical Center between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2005 were included. CA-MRSA was defined as a USA300 MRSA isolate with the MBQBLO spa-type motif and positive for both the arginine catabolic mobile element and Panton-Valentin Leukocidin. Risk factors for S. aureus-associated infective endocarditis and mortality were determined using logistic regression to calculate odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI. Potential risk factors included demographic variables, comorbid illnesses, and intravenous drug use. Results Among 131 episodes of S. aureus bacteremia, 85 (66% were MRSA of which 47 (54% were CA-MRSA. Sixty-three patients (48% developed endocarditis and 10 patients (8% died in the hospital on the index admission Patients with CA-MRSA were significantly more likely to develop endocarditis (OR = 2.73, 95% CI = 1.30, 5.71. No other variables including comorbid conditions, current receipt of antiretroviral therapy, pre-culture severity of illness, or CD4 count were significantly associated with endocarditis and none were associated with in-hospital mortality. Conclusions CA-MRSA was significantly associated with an increased incidence of endocarditis in this cohort of HIV patients with MRSA bacteremia. In populations such as these, in which the prevalence of intravenous drug use and probability of endocarditis are both high, efforts must be made for early detection, which may improve

  15. Integration of DPC and clinical microbiological data in Japan reveals importance of confirming a negative follow-up blood culture in patients with MRSA bacteremia.

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    Miyamoto, Naoki; Yahara, Koji; Horita, Rie; Yano, Tomomi; Tashiro, Naotaka; Morii, Daiichi; Tsutsui, Atsuko; Yaita, Kenichiro; Shibayama, Keigo; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2017-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia is one of the commonest and most life-threatening of all infectious diseases. The morbidity and mortality rates associated with MRSA bacteremia are higher than those associated with bacteremia caused by other pathogens. A common guideline in MRSA bacteremia treatment is to confirm bacteremia clearance through additional blood cultures 2-4 days after initial positive cultures and as needed thereafter. However, no study has presented statistical evidence of how and to what extent confirming a negative follow-up blood culture impacts clinical outcome. We present this evidence for the first time, by combining clinical microbiological data of blood cultures and the DPC administrative claims database; both had been systematically accumulated through routine medical care in hospitals. We used electronic medical records to investigate the clinical background and infection source in detail. By analyzing data from a university hospital, we revealed how survival curves change when a negative follow-up blood culture is confirmed. We also demonstrated confirmation of a negative culture is significantly associated with clinical outcomes: there was a more than three-fold increase in mortality risk (after adjusting for clinical background) if a negative blood culture was not confirmed within 14 days of the initial positive blood culture. Although we used data from only one university hospital, our novel approach and results will be a basis for future studies in several hospitals in Japan to provide statistical evidence of the clinical importance of confirming a negative follow-up blood culture in bacteremia patients, including those with MRSA infections. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Carbapenem therapy is associated with improved survival compared with piperacillin-tazobactam for patients with extended-spectrum β-lactamase bacteremia.

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    Tamma, Pranita D; Han, Jennifer H; Rock, Clare; Harris, Anthony D; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Hsu, Alice J; Avdic, Edina; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2015-05-01

    The effectiveness of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ) for the treatment of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) bacteremia is controversial. We compared 14-day mortality of PTZ vs carbapenems as empiric therapy in a cohort of patients with ESBL bacteremia who all received definitive therapy with a carbapenem. Patients hospitalized between January 2007 and April 2014 with monomicrobial ESBL bacteremia were included. A decrease of >3 doubling dilutions in the minimum inhibitory concentration for third-generation cephalosporins tested in combination with 4 µg/mL of clavulanic acid was used to confirm ESBL status. The primary exposure was empiric therapy, defined as antibiotic therapy administered to a patient before ESBL status was known. Patients were excluded if they did not receive a carbapenem after ESBL production was identified. The primary outcome was time to death from the first day of bacteremia. Propensity scores using inverse probability of exposure weighting (IPW) were used to estimate the probability that a patient would receive PTZ vs carbapenems empirically. We calculated overall hazard ratios for mortality censored at 14 days using Cox proportional hazards models on an IPW-adjusted cohort. A total of 331 unique patients with ESBL bacteremia were identified. One hundred three (48%) patients received PTZ empirically and 110 (52%) received carbapenems empirically. The adjusted risk of death was 1.92 times higher for patients receiving empiric PTZ compared with empiric carbapenem therapy (95% confidence interval, 1.07-3.45). PTZ appears inferior to carbapenems for the treatment of ESBL bacteremia. For patients at high risk of invasive ESBL infections, early carbapenem therapy should be considered. Our findings should not be extended to β-lactam/β-lactamase inhibitor combinations in development, as limited clinical data are available for these agents. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of

  17. Association between Accessory Gene Regulator Polymorphism and Mortality among Critically Ill Patients Receiving Vancomycin for Nosocomial MRSA Bacteremia: A Cohort Study

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    Angélica Cechinel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polymorphism of the accessory gene regulator group II (agr in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA is predictive of vancomycin failure therapy. Nevertheless, the impact of group II agr expression on mortality of patients with severe MRSA infections is not well established. Objective. The goal of our study was to evaluate the association between agr polymorphism and all-cause in-hospital mortality among critically ill patients receiving vancomycin for nosocomial MRSA bacteremia. Methods. All patients with documented bacteremia by MRSA requiring treatment in the ICU between May 2009 and November 2011 were included in the study. Cox proportional hazards regression was performed to evaluate whether agr polymorphism was associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Covariates included age, APACHE II score, initial C-reactive protein plasma levels, initial serum creatinine levels, vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration, vancomycin serum levels, and time to effective antibiotic administration. Results. The prevalence of group I and group II agr expression was 52.4% and 47.6%, respectively. Bacteremia by MRSA group III or group IV agr was not documented in our patients. The mean APACHE II of the study population was 24.3 (standard deviation 8.5. The overall cohort mortality was 66.6% (14 patients. After multivariate analysis, initial plasma C-reactive protein levels (P=0.01, initial serum creatinine levels (P=0.008, and expression of group II agr (P=0.006 were positively associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality. Patients with bacteremia by MRSA with group II agr expression had their risk of death increased by 12.6 times when compared with those with bacteremia by MRSA with group I agr expression. Conclusion. Group II agr polymorphism is associated with an increase in mortality in critically ill patients with bacteremia by MRSA treated with vancomycin.

  18. Diagnostic accuracy of presepsin (soluble CD14 subtype) for prediction of bacteremia in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome in the Emergency Department.

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    Romualdo, Luis García de Guadiana; Torrella, Patricia Esteban; González, Monserrat Viqueira; Sánchez, Roberto Jiménez; Holgado, Ana Hernando; Freire, Alejandro Ortín; Acebes, Sergio Rebollo; Otón, María Dolores Albaladejo

    2014-05-01

    Bacteremia is indicative of severe bacterial infection with significant mortality. Its early diagnosis is extremely important for implementation of antimicrobial therapy but a diagnostic challenge. Although blood culture is the "gold standard" for diagnosis of bacteremia this method has limited usefulness for the early detection of blood-stream infection. In this study we assessed the presepsin as predictor of bacteremia in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) on admission to the Emergency Department and compare it with current available infection biomarkers. A total of 226 patients admitted to the Emergency Department with SIRS were included. In 37 patients blood culture had a positive result (bacteremic SIRS group) and 189 had a negative blood culture result (non-bacteremic SIRS group). Simultaneously with blood culture, presepsin, procalcitonin (PCT) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed for each biomarker as predictor of bacteremia. Presepsin values were significantly higher in bacteremic SIRS group when compared with non-bacteremic SIRS group. ROC curve analysis and area under curve (AUC) revealed a value of 0.750 for presepsin in differentiating SIRS patients with bacteremia from those without, similar than that for PCT (0.787) and higher than that for CRP (0.602). The best cut-off value for presepsin was 729pg/mL, which was associated with a negative predictive value of 94.4%. Presepsin may contribute to rule out the diagnosis of bacteremia in SIRS patients admitted to the Emergency Department. Copyright © 2014 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases on the 28-day mortality rate of patients with Proteus mirabilis bacteremia in Korea.

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    Ahn, Jin Young; Ann, Hea Won; Jeon, Yongduk; Ahn, Mi Young; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Yong Chan; Kim, Eun Jin; Song, Je Eun; Jung, In Young; Kim, Moo Hyun; Jeong, Wooyoung; Ku, Nam Su; Jeong, Su Jin; Choi, Jun Yong; Yong, Dongeun; Song, Young Goo; Kim, June Myung

    2017-05-03

    The incidence of Proteus mirabilis antimicrobial resistance, especially that mediated by extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), has increased. We investigated the impact of ESBL production on the mortality of patients with P. mirabilis bacteremia in Korea. Patients diagnosed with P. mirabilis bacteremia between November 2005 and December 2013 at a 2000-bed tertiary care center in South Korea were included in this study. Phenotypic and molecular analyses were performed to assess ESBL expression. Characteristics and treatment outcomes were investigated among ESBL-producing and non-ESBL-producing P. mirabilis bacteremia groups. A multivariate analysis of 28-day mortality rates was performed to evaluate the independent impact of ESBLs. Among 62 P. mirabilis isolates from 62 patients, 14 expressed ESBLs (CTX-M, 2; TEM, 5; both, 6; other, 1), and the 28-day mortality rate of the 62 patients was 17.74%. No clinical factor was significantly associated with ESBL production. The 28-day mortality rate in the ESBL-producing group was significantly higher than that in the non-ESBL-producing group (50% vs. 8.3%, p = 0.001). A multivariate analysis showed that ESBL production (odds ratio [OR], 11.53, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.11-63.05, p = 0.005) was independently associated with the 28-day mortality rate in patients with P. mirabilis bacteremia. ESBL production is significantly associated with mortality in patients with bacteremia caused by P. mirabilis. Rapid detection of ESBL expression and prompt appropriate antimicrobial therapy are required to reduce mortality caused by P. mirabilis bacteremia.

  20. Prospective study of bacteremia rate after elective band ligation and sclerotherapy with cyanoacrylate for esophageal varices in patients with advanced liver disease.

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    Bonilha, Danielle Queiroz; Correia, Lucianna Motta; Monaghan, Marie; Lenz, Luciano; Santos, Marcus; Libera, Ermelindo Della

    2011-01-01

    Band ligation (BL) is the most appropriate endoscopic treatment for acute bleeding or prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding. Sclerotherapy with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate (CY) can be an alternative for patients with advanced liver disease. Bacteremia is an infrequent complication after BL while the bacteremia rate following treatment with CY for esophageal varices remains unknown. To evaluate and compare the incidence of transient bacteremia between cirrhotic patients submitted to diagnostic endoscopy, CY and BL for treatment of esophageal varices. A prospective study comprising the period from 2004 to 2007 was conducted at Hospital of Universidade Federal de São Paulo, UNIFESP, SP, Brazil. Cirrhotic patients with advanced liver disease (Child-Pugh B or C) were enrolled. The patients were divided into two groups according treatment: BL Group (patients undergoing band ligation, n = 20) and CY Group (patients receiving cyanoacrylate injection for esophageal variceal, n = 18). Cirrhotic patients with no esophageal varices or without indication for endoscopic treatment were recruited as control (diagnostic group n = 20). Bacteremia was evaluated by blood culture at baseline and 30 minutes after the procedure. After 137 scheduled endoscopic procedures, none of the 58 patients had fever or any sign suggestive of infection. All baseline cultures were negative. No positive cultures were observed after CY or in the control group - diagnostic endoscopy. Three (4.6 %) positive cultures were found out of the 65 sessions of band ligation (P = 0.187). Two of these samples were positive for coagulase-negative staphylococcus, which could be regarded as a contaminant. The isolated microorganism in the other case was Klebsiella oxytoca. The patient in this case presented no evidence of immunodeficiency except liver disease. There was no significant difference in bacteremia rate between these three groups. BL or CY injection for non-bleeding esophageal varices may be considered