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Sample records for aldo-keto reductase superfamily

  1. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  2. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Adrenal Cortex Physiology.

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    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, A Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AKR1B) proteins are monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates, such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. Due to the involvement of human aldose reductases in pathologies, such as diabetic complications and cancer, AKR1B subgroup enzymatic properties have been extensively characterized. However, the issue of AKR1B function in non-pathologic conditions remains poorly resolved. Adrenal activities generated large amount of harmful aldehydes from lipid peroxidation and steroidogenesis, including 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal), which can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase (PGFS) activity, suggesting that, in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, the adrenal gland is one of the major sites for human and murine AKR1B expression, suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover, chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms. This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal-specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  3. Aldo-keto reductases 1B in adrenal cortex physiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie PASTEL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase proteins are cytosolic monomeric enzymes, belonging to the aldo-keto reductase (AKR superfamily. They perform oxidoreduction of carbonyl groups from a wide variety of substrates such as aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes or ketones. The Aldose reductase subgroup (AKR1B is one of the most characterized because of its involvement in human diseases such as diabetic complications resulting from the ability of its human archetype AKR1B1 to reduce glucose into sorbitol. However the issue of AKR1B function in non pathologic condition remains poorly resolved. Adrenal steroidogenesis is strongly associated with high production of endogenous harmful lipid aldehyde by-products including isocaproaldehyde (4-methylpentanal derived from cholesterol side chain cleavage (the first step of steroid synthesis and 4-hydroxynonenal (4- HNE that can both be reduced by AKR1B proteins. More recently, some AKR1B isoforms have been shown to be endowed with prostaglandin F synthase activity, suggesting that in addition to possible scavenger function, they could instigate paracrine signals. Interestingly, previous studies have established that the adrenal gland is one of the major site for human and murine AKR1B expression suggesting that their detoxifying/signaling activity could be specifically required for the correct handling of adrenal function. Moreover chronic effects of ACTH result in a coordinated regulation of genes encoding the steroidogenic enzymes and some AKR1B isoforms.This review presents the molecular mechanisms accounting for the adrenal specific expression of some AKR1B genes. Using data from recent mouse genetic models, we will try to connect their enzymatic properties and regulation with adrenal functions.

  4. Aldo-Keto Reductases 1B in Endocrinology and Metabolism.

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    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Volat, Fanny; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    The aldose reductase (AR; human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3) has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of AR function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. AR-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7, and Akr1b8) are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide AR, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products, and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the AR shows ubiquitous expression, AR-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on three organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic, and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of messengers.

  5. Enzymatic detection of γ-hydroxybutyrate using aldo-keto reductase 7A2.

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    Bendinskas, Kestutis; Sattelberg, Patricia; Crossett, Daniel; Banyikwa, Andrew; Dempsey, Daniel; MacKenzie, James A

    2011-05-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) is a prescribed medication as well as a drug of abuse. Its detection in various matrices for in-field forensic scientists remains a challenge. We have developed an assay that uses aldo-keto reductase 7A2 (AKR7A2) for the specific determination of GHB in various drinks. AKR7A2 was purified using Ni-affinity chromatography. The Michaelis-Menten constant for the GHB oxidation reaction was 10 mM, and the minimum detection limit was 4 mM. Ethanol was not a substrate for AKR7A2. In a coupled reaction with NADP(+), phenazine methosulfate (PMS), and 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol, various beverages (orange juice, milk, soda, and numerous alcoholic drinks) containing GHB turned from blue to light yellow. In a second coupled reaction where diaphorase replaced PMS, the presence of GHB also caused the expected change of color in various beers.

  6. Lignases and aldo-keto reductases for conversion of lignin-containing materials to fermentable products

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    Scharf, Michael; Sethi, Amit

    2016-09-13

    Termites have specialized digestive systems that overcome the lignin barrier in wood to release fermentable simple sugars. Using the termite Reticulitermes flavipes and its gut symbionts, high-throughput titanium pyrosequencing and proteomics approaches experimentally compared the effects of lignin-containing diets on host-symbiont digestome composition. Proteomic investigations and functional digestive studies with recombinant lignocellulases conducted in parallel provided strong evidence of congruence at the transcription and translational levels and provide enzymatic strategies for overcoming recalcitrant lignin barriers in biofuel feedstocks. Briefly described, therefore, the disclosure provides a system for generating a fermentable product from a lignified plant material, the system comprising a cooperating series of at least two catalytically active polypeptides, where said catalytically active polypeptides are selected from the group consisting of: cellulase Cell-1, .beta.-glu cellulase, an aldo-keto-reductase, a catalase, a laccase, and an endo-xylanase.

  7. Putative Role of the Aldo-Keto Reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi in Benznidazole Metabolism.

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    Garavaglia, Patricia Andrea; Laverrière, Marc; Cannata, Joaquín J B; García, Gabriela Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Benznidazole (Bz), the drug used for treatment of Chagas' disease (caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi), is activated by a parasitic NADH-dependent type I nitroreductase (NTR I). However, several studies have shown that other enzymes are involved. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the aldo-keto reductase from T. cruzi (TcAKR), a NADPH-dependent oxido-reductase previously described by our group, uses Bz as the substrate. We demonstrated that both recombinant and native TcAKR enzymes reduce Bz by using NADPH, but not NADH, as a cofactor. TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes showed higher NADPH-dependent Bz reductase activity and a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) value for Bz 1.8-fold higher than that of the controls, suggesting that TcAKR is involved in Bz detoxification instead of activation. To understand the role of TcAKR in Bz metabolism, we studied TcAKR expression and NADPH/NADH-dependent Bz reductase activities in two T. cruzi strains with differential susceptibility to Bz: CL Brener and Nicaragua. Taking into account the results obtained with TcAKR-overexpressing epimastigotes, we expected the more resistant strain, Nicaragua, to have higher TcAKR levels than CL Brener. However, the results were the opposite. CL Brener showed 2-fold higher TcAKR expression and 5.7-fold higher NADPH-Bz reduction than the Nicaragua strain. In addition, NADH-dependent Bz reductase activity, characteristic of NTR I, was also higher in CL Brener than in Nicaragua. We conclude that although TcAKR uses Bz as the substrate, TcAKR activity is not a determinant of Bz resistance in wild-type strains and may be overcome by other enzymes involved in Bz activation, such as NADPH- and NADH-dependent reductases.

  8. Activity improvement of a Kluyveromyces lactis aldo-keto reductase KlAKR via rational design.

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    Luo, Xi; Wang, Ya-Jun; Shen, Wei; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2016-04-20

    Optically pure t-butyl 6-cyano-(3R, 5R)-dihydroxyhexanoate ((R)-1b) is the key chiral precursor for atorvastatin calcium, the most widely used cholesterol-lowering drug. Wild-type aldo-keto reductase KlAKR from Kluyveromyces lactis has ideal diastereoselectivity toward t-butyl 6-cyano-(5R)-hydroxy-3-oxohexanoate (1a, dep>99.5%) but poor activity. A rational engineering was used to improve the KlAKR activity. Based on homology modeling and molecular docking, two amino acid residues (295 and 296) were selected as mutation sites, and two rounds of site-saturation mutagenesis were performed. Among the mutants, KlAKR-Y295W/W296L exhibited the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) toward 1a up to 12.37s(-1)mM(-1), which was 11.25-fold higher than that of wild-type KlAKR. Moreover, the majority of mutations have no negative impact on stereoselectivity. Using KlAKR-Y295W/W296L coupled with Exiguobacterium sibiricum glucose dehydrogenase (EsGDH) for cofactor regeneration, (R)-1b was accumulated up to 162.7mM with dep value above 99.5%. KlAKR-Y295W/W296L represents a robust tool for (R)-1b synthesis.

  9. Aldo-keto reductase enzymes detoxify glyphosate and improve herbicide resistance in plants.

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    Vemanna, Ramu S; Vennapusa, Amaranatha Reddy; Easwaran, Murugesh; Chandrashekar, Babitha K; Rao, Hanumantha; Ghanti, Kirankumar; Sudhakar, Chinta; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Udayakumar, M

    2016-09-09

    In recent years, concerns about the use of glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops have increased because of glyphosate residual levels in plants and development of herbicide-resistant weeds. In spite of identifying glyphosate detoxifying genes from microorganisms, the plant mechanism to detoxify glyphosate has not been studied. We characterized an Aldo-keto reductase gene from Pseudomonas (PsAKR1) and rice (OsAKR1) and showed, by docking studies, both PsAKR1 and OsAKR1 can efficiently bind to glyphosate. Silencing AKR1 homologs in rice and Nicotiana benthamiana or mutation of AKR1 in yeast and Arabidopsis showed increased sensitivity to glyphosate. External application of AKR proteins rescued glyphosate-mediated cucumber seedlings growth inhibition. Regeneration of tobacco transgenic lines expressing PsAKR1 or OsAKRI on glyphosate suggests that AKR can be used as selectable marker to develop transgenic crops. PsAKR1 or OsAKRI expressing tobacco and rice transgenic plants showed improved tolerance to glyphosate with reduced accumulation of shikimic acid without affecting the normal photosynthetic rates. These results suggested that AKR1 when overexpressed detoxifies glyphosate in planta. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. 9,10-Phenanthrenequinone promotes secretion of pulmonary aldo-keto reductases with surfactant.

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    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Haga, Mariko; Watanabe, Gou; Shinoda, Yuhki; Endo, Satoshi; Kajiwara, Yu; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Inagaki, Naoki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2012-02-01

    9,10-Phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust particles, induces apoptosis via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) because of 9,10-PQ redox cycling. We have found that intratracheal infusion of 9,10-PQ facilitates the secretion of surfactant into rat alveolus. In the cultured rat lung, treatment with 9,10-PQ results in an increase in a lower-density surfactant by ROS generation through redox cycling of the quinone. The surfactant contains aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C15, which reduces 9,10-PQ and the enzyme level in the surfactant increases on treatment with 9,10-PQ suggesting an involvement of AKR1C15 in the redox cycling of the quinone. In six human cell types (A549, MKN45, Caco2, Hela, Molt4 and U937) only type II epithelial A549 cells secrete three human AKR1C subfamily members (AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3) with the surfactant into the medium; this secretion is highly increased by 9,10-PQ treatment. Using in vitro enzyme inhibition analysis, we have identified AKR1C3 as the most abundantly secreted AKR1C member. The AKR1C enzymes in the medium efficiently reduce 9,10-PQ and initiate its redox cycling accompanied by ROS production. The exposure of A549 cells to 9,10-PQ provokes viability loss, which is significantly protected by the addition of the AKR1C3 inhibitor and antioxidant enzyme and by the removal of the surfactants from the culture medium. Thus, the AKR1C enzymes secreted in pulmonary surfactants probably participate in the toxic mechanism triggered by 9,10-PQ.

  11. Effect of cytochrome P450 and aldo-keto reductase inhibitors on progesterone inactivation in primary bovine hepatic cell cultures.

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    Lemley, C O; Wilson, M E

    2010-10-01

    Progesterone is required for maintenance of pregnancy, and peripheral concentrations of progesterone are affected by both production and inactivation. Hepatic cytochrome P450 (EC 1.14.14.1) and aldo-keto reductase (EC 1.1.1.145-151) enzymes play a pivotal role in the first step of steroid inactivation, which involves the addition of hydroxyl groups to various sites of the cyclopentanoperhydrophenanthrene nucleus. The current objective was to discern the proportional involvement of hepatic progesterone inactivating enzymes on progesterone decay using specific enzyme inhibitors. Ticlopidine, diltiazem, curcumin, dicumarol, and naproxen were used because of their selective inhibition of cytochrome P450s, aldo-keto reductases, and glucuronosyltransferases. Liver biopsies were collected from 6 lactating Holstein dairy cows, and cells were dissociated using a nonperfusion technique. Confluent wells were preincubated for 4 h with enzyme inhibitor and then challenged with progesterone for 1 h. Cell viability was unaffected by inhibitor treatment and averaged 84±1%. In control wells, 50% of the progesterone had been inactivated after a 1-h challenge with 5 ng/mL of progesterone. Preincubation with curcumin, ticlopidine, or naproxen caused the greatest reduction in progesterone inactivation compared with controls and averaged 77, 39, or 37%, respectively. Hydroxylation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by approximately 65% after treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine. Glucuronidation of phenol red or 4-nitrocatechol in intact cells was inhibited by treatment with curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen. In cytoplasmic preparations, aldo-keto reductase 1C activity was inhibited by curcumin, dicumarol, or naproxen treatment. Microsomal cytochrome P450 2C activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or ticlopidine, whereas cytochrome P450 3A activity was inhibited by treatment with curcumin or diltiazem. The contribution of cytochrome P450 2C and

  12. Cisplatin resistance by induction of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 in human bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shirato, Akitomi; KIKUGAWA, TADAHIKO; Miura, Noriyoshi; Tanji, Nozomu; Takemori, Nobuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is currently the most effective anti-tumor agent available against bladder cancer. To clarify the mechanism underlying cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer, the present study examined the role of the aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2) protein on chemoresistance using a human bladder cancer cell line. The function of AKR1C2 in chemoresistance was studied using the human HT1376 bladder cancer cell line and the cisplatin-resistant HT1376-CisR subline. AKR1C2 was expresse...

  13. The aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 coexpresses with renin without influencing renin production and secretion.

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    Machura, Katharina; Iankilevitch, Elina; Neubauer, Björn; Theuring, Franz; Kurtz, Armin

    2013-03-01

    On the basis of evidence that within the adult kidney, the aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 (aldo-keto reductase family 1, member 7, also known as mouse vas deferens protein, MVDP) is selectively expressed in renin-producing cells, we aimed to define a possible role of AKR1B7 for the regulation and function of renin cells in the kidney. We could confirm colocalization and corecruitment of renin and of AKR1B7 in wild-type kidneys. Renin cells in AKR1B7-deficient kidneys showed normal morphology, numbers, and intrarenal distribution. Plasma renin concentration (PRC) and renin mRNA levels of AKR1B7-deficient mice were normal at standard chow and were lowered by a high-salt diet directly comparable to wild-type mice. Treatment with a low-salt diet in combination with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor strongly increased PRC and renin mRNA in a similar fashion both in AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. Under this condition, we also observed a strong retrograde recruitment of renin-expressing cell along the preglomerular vessels, however, without a difference between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. The isolated perfused mouse kidney model was used to study the acute regulation of renin secretion by ANG II and by perfusion pressure. Regarding these parameters, no differences were observed between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type kidneys. In summary, our data suggest that AKR1B7 is not of major relevance for the regulation of renin production and secretion in spite of its striking coregulation with renin expression.

  14. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 and its role in proliferation capacity of drug-resistant cancers

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    Toshiyuki eMatsunaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human aldo-keto reductase AKR1B10, originally identified as an aldose reductase-like protein and human small intestine aldose reductase, is a cytosolic NADPH-dependent reductase that metabolizes a variety of endogenous compounds, such as aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes and dicarbonyl compounds, and some drug ketones. The enzyme is highly expressed in solid tumors of several tissues including lung and liver, and as such has received considerable interest as a relevant biomarker for the development of those tumors. In addition, AKR1B10 has been recently reported to be significantly up-regulated in some cancer cell lines (medulloblastoma D341 and colon cancer HT29 acquiring resistance towards chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide and mitomycin c, suggesting the validity of the enzyme as a chemoresistance marker. Although the detailed information on the AKR1B10-mediated mechanisms leading to the drug resistance process is not well understood so far, the enzyme has been proposed to be involved in functional regulations of cell proliferation and metabolism of drugs and endogenous lipids during the development of chemoresistance. This article reviews the current literature focusing mainly on expression profile and roles of AKR1B10 in the drug resistance of cancer cells. Recent developments of AKR1B10 inhibitors and their usefulness in restoring sensitivity to anticancer drugs are also reviewed.

  15. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones

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    Li eZhang; Yi eJin; Meng eHuang; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-...

  16. Overexpression of Aldo-Keto-Reductase in Azole-resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Glabrata Determined by cDNA-AFLP

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    Mansour Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida glabrata causes significant medical problems in immunocompromised patients. Many strains of this yeast are intrinsically resistant to azole antifungal agents, and treatment is problematic, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates in immunosuppressed individuals. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the genes involved in the drug resistance of clinical isolates of C. glabrata.Methods: The clinical isolates of C. glabrata were collected in an epidemiological survey of candidal infection inimmunocompromised patients and consisted of four fluconazole and itraconazole resistant isolates, two fluconazoleand itraconazole sensitive isolates, and C. glabrata CBS 138 as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility patterns ofthe organisms were determined beforehand by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The potentialgene(s implicated in antifungal resistance were investigated using complementary DNA- Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to evaluate the expression of gene(s in resistant isolates as compared to sensitive and reference strains.Results and conclusions: The aldo-keto-reductase superfamily (AKR gene was upregulated in the resistant clinicalisolates as assessed by cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed AKR mRNA expression approximately twice that seen in the sensitive isolates. Overexpression of the AKR gene was associated with increased fluconazole and itraconazole resistance in C. glabrata. The data suggest that upregulation of the AKR gene might give a new insight into the mechanism of azole resistance.

  17. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

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    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir, E-mail: wsol@faf.cuni.cz

    2014-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  18. Expression of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C1 (AKR1C1 gene in porcine ovary and uterine endometrium during the estrous cycle and pregnancy

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    Hwang Sue-Yun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C1 (AKR1C1 belongs to a superfamily of NADPH-dependent reductases that convert a wide range of substrates, including carbohydrates, steroid hormones, and endogenous prostaglandins. The 20alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (20alpha-HSD is a member of AKR family. The aims of this study were to determine its expression in the ovary and uterus endometrium during the estrous cycle and pregnancy. Methods Rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE experiments were performed to obtain the 5' and 3' ends of the porcine 20alpha-HSD cDNA. Reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR, real-time PCR, northern blot analysis, and western blot analysis were performed to examine the expression of porcine 20alpha-HSD. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to determine the localization in the ovary. Results The porcine 20alpha-HSD cDNA is 957 bp in length and encodes a protein of 319 amino acids. The cloned cDNA was virtually the same as the porcine AKR1C1 gene (337 amino acids reported recently, and only differed in the C-terminal region (the AKR1C1 gene has a longer C-terminal region than our sequence. The 20alpha-HSD gene (from now on referred to as AKR1C1 cloned in this paper encodes a deletion of 4 amino acids, compared with the C-terminal region of AKR1C1 genes from other animals. Porcine AKR1C1 mRNA was expressed on day 5, 10, 12, 15 of the cycle and 0-60 of pregnancy in the ovary. The mRNA was also specifically detected in the uterine endometrium on day 30 of pregnancy. Western blot analysis indicated that the pattern of AKR1C1 protein in the ovary during the estrous cycle and uterus during early pregnancy was similar to that of AKR1C1 mRNA expression. The recombinant protein produced in CHO cells was detected at approximately 37 kDa. Immunohistochemical analysis also revealed that pig AKR1C1 protein was localized in the large luteal cells in the early stages of the estrous cycle and before parturition

  19. Characterization of the aldo-keto reductase 1C gene cluster on pig chromosome 10: possible associations with reproductive traits

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    Nonneman Dan J

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of pubertal development and weaning to estrus interval are correlated and affect reproductive efficiency of swine. Quantitative trait loci (QTL for age of puberty, nipple number and ovulation rate have been identified in Meishan crosses on pig chromosome 10q (SSC10 near the telomere, which is homologous to human chromosome 10p15 and contains an aldo-keto reductase (AKR gene cluster with at least six family members. AKRs are tissue-specific hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases that interconvert weak steroid hormones to their more potent counterparts and regulate processes involved in development, homeostasis and reproduction. Because of their location in the swine genome and their implication in reproductive physiology, this gene cluster was characterized and evaluated for effects on reproductive traits in swine. Results Screening the porcine CHORI-242 BAC library with a full-length AKR1C4 cDNA identified 7 positive clones and sample sequencing of 5 BAC clones revealed 5 distinct AKR1C genes (AKR1CL2 and AKR1C1 through 4, which mapped to 126–128 cM on SSC10. Using the IMpRH7000rad and IMNpRH212000rad radiation hybrid panels, these 5 genes mapped between microsatellite markers SWR67 and SW2067. Comparison of sequence data with the porcine BAC fingerprint map show that the cluster of genes resides in a 300 kb region. Twelve SNPs were genotyped in gilts observed for age at first estrus and ovulation rate from the F8 and F10 generations of one-quarter Meishan descendants of the USMARC resource population. Age at puberty, nipple number and ovulation rate data were analyzed for association with genotypes by MTDFREML using an animal model. One SNP, a phenylalanine to isoleucine substitution in AKR1C2, was associated with age of puberty (p = 0.07 and possibly ovulation rate (p = 0.102. Two SNP in AKR1C4 were significantly associated with nipple number (p ≤ 0.03 and another possibly associated with age at puberty (p = 0

  20. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones.

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    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  1. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1) of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Chhavi; Sen, Sonia; Yadav, Shivam; Rai, Shweta; Rai, Lal Chand

    2015-01-01

    Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as- (i) conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii) excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde), and (iii) obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl) 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis.

  2. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR17A1 of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 Degrades the Rice Field Herbicide Butachlor and Confers Tolerance to Abiotic Stresses in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chhavi Agrawal

    Full Text Available Present study deals with the identification of a novel aldo/keto reductase, AKR17A1 from Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and adds on as 17th family of AKR superfamily drawn from a wide variety of organisms. AKR17A1 shares many characteristics of a typical AKR such as- (i conferring tolerance to multiple stresses like heat, UV-B, and cadmium, (ii excellent activity towards known AKR substrates (isatin and 2-nitrobenzaldehyde, and (iii obligate dependence on NADPH as a cofactor for enzyme activity. The most novel attribute of AKR17A1, first reported in this study, is its capability to metabolize butachlor, a persistent rice field herbicide that adversely affects agro-ecosystem and non-target organisms. The AKR17A1 catalyzed- degradation of butachlor resulted into formation of 1,2-benzene dicarboxylic acid and 2,6 bis (1,1, dimethylethyl 4,-methyl phenol as the major products confirmed by GC-MS analysis.

  3. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhong, Linlin [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Ziwen [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Department of Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100730 (China); Yan, Ruilan [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States); Johnson, Stephen [Carbon Dynamics Institute, LLC, 2835 via Verde Drive, Springfield, IL 62703-4325 (United States); Zhao, Yupei [Department of Surgery, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing 100730 (China); Fang, Xiubin [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Cao, Deliang, E-mail: dcao@siumed.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology, Immunology, and Cell Biology, SimmonsCooper Cancer Institute, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, 913 N. Rutledge Street, Springfield, IL 62794-9626 (United States)

    2009-09-18

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 {mu}M, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 {mu}M, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 {mu}M, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 {mu}M, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 {mu}M (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  4. Aldo-keto reductase 1C1 induced by interleukin-1β mediates the invasive potential and drug resistance of metastatic bladder cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ryuji; Tsuda, Masumi; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Tanino, Mishie; Kimura, Taichi; Nishihara, Hiroshi; Abe, Takashige; Shinohara, Nobuo; Nonomura, Katsuya; Tanaka, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    In treating bladder cancer, determining the molecular mechanisms of tumor invasion, metastasis, and drug resistance are urgent to improving long-term patient survival. One of the metabolic enzymes, aldo-keto reductase 1C1 (AKR1C1), plays an essential role in cancer invasion/metastasis and chemoresistance. In orthotopic xenograft models of a human bladder cancer cell line, UM-UC-3, metastatic sublines were established from tumors in the liver, lung, and bone. These cells possessed elevated levels of EMT-associated markers, such as Snail, Slug, or CD44, and exhibited enhanced invasion. By microarray analysis, AKR1C1 was found to be up-regulated in metastatic lesions, which was verified in metastatic human bladder cancer specimens. Decreased invasion caused by AKR1C1 knockdown suggests a novel role of AKR1C1 in cancer invasion, which is probably due to the regulation of Rac1, Src, or Akt. An inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-1β, was found to increase AKR1C1 in bladder cancer cell lines. One particular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, flufenamic acid, antagonized AKR1C1 and decreased the cisplatin-resistance and invasion potential of metastatic sublines. These data uncover the crucial role of AKR1C1 in regulating both metastasis and drug resistance; as a result, AKR1C1 should be a potent molecular target in invasive bladder cancer treatment. PMID:27698389

  5. Discovery of (R)-2-(6-Methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)butanoic Acid as a Potent and Selective Aldo-keto Reductase 1C3 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniji, Adegoke; Uddin, Md Jashim; Zang, Tianzhu; Tamae, Daniel; Wangtrakuldee, Phumvadee; Marnett, Lawrence J; Penning, Trevor M

    2016-08-25

    Type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) converts Δ(4)-androstene-3,17-dione and 5α-androstane-3,17-dione to testosterone (T) and 5α-dihydrotestosterone, respectively, in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In CRPC, AKR1C3 is implicated in drug resistance, and enzalutamide drug resistance can be surmounted by indomethacin a potent inhibitor of AKR1C3. We examined a series of naproxen analogues and find that (R)-2-(6-methoxynaphthalen-2-yl)butanoic acid (in which the methyl group of R-naproxen was replaced by an ethyl group) acts as a potent AKR1C3 inhibitor that displays selectivity for AKR1C3 over other AKR1C enzymes. This compound was devoid of inhibitory activity on COX isozymes and blocked AKR1C3 mediated production of T and induction of PSA in LNCaP-AKR1C3 cells as a model of a CRPC cell line. R-Profens are substrate selective COX-2 inhibitors and block the oxygenation of endocannabinoids and in the context of advanced prostate cancer R-profens could inhibit intratumoral androgen synthesis and act as analgesics for metastatic disease.

  6. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance.

  7. Exposure to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone accelerates malignant progression of lung cancer cells through up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase 1B10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki, E-mail: matsunagat@gifu-pu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Haga, Mariko; Endo, Satoshi [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Soda, Midori; Yamamura, Keiko [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); El-Kabbani, Ossama [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Tajima, Kazuo [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa 920-1181 (Japan); Ikari, Akira [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hara, Akira [Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Inhalation of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust, exerts fatal damage against a variety of cells involved in respiratory function. Here, we show that treatment with high concentrations of 9,10-PQ evokes apoptosis of lung cancer A549 cells through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, 9,10-PQ at its concentrations of 2 and 5 μM elevated the potentials for proliferation, invasion, metastasis and tumorigenesis, all of which were almost completely inhibited by addition of an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, inferring a crucial role of ROS in the overgrowth and malignant progression of lung cancer cells. Comparison of mRNA expression levels of six aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells advocated up-regulation of AKR1B10 as a major cause contributing to the lung cancer malignancy. In support of this, the elevation of invasive, metastatic and tumorigenic activities in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells was significantly abolished by the addition of a selective AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid. Intriguingly, zymographic and real-time PCR analyses revealed remarkable increases in secretion and expression, respectively, of matrix metalloproteinase 2 during the 9,10-PQ treatment, and suggested that the AKR1B10 up-regulation and resultant activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are predominant mechanisms underlying the metalloproteinase induction. In addition, HPLC analysis and cytochrome c reduction assay in in vitro 9,10-PQ reduction by AKR1B10 demonstrated that the enzyme catalyzes redox-cycling of this quinone, by which ROS are produced. Collectively, these results suggest that AKR1B10 is a key regulator involved in overgrowth and malignant progression of the lung cancer cells through ROS production due to 9,10-PQ redox-cycling. - Highlights: • 9,10-PQ promotes invasion, metastasis and tumorigenicity in lung cancer cells. • The 9,10-PQ-elicited promotion is possibly due to AKR1B10 up

  8. Crystal structures of three classes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in complex with aldo-keto reductase 1C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack U Flanagan

    Full Text Available Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3 catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of carbonyl groups in a number of important steroid and prostanoid molecules. The enzyme is also over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer and its expression is correlated with the aggressiveness of the disease. The steroid products of AKR1C3 catalysis are important in proliferative signalling of hormone-responsive cells, while the prostanoid products promote prostaglandin-dependent proliferative pathways. In these ways, AKR1C3 contributes to tumour development and maintenance, and suggest that inhibition of AKR1C3 activity is an attractive target for the development of new anti-cancer therapies. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one well-known class of compounds that inhibits AKR1C3, yet crystal structures have only been determined for this enzyme with flufenamic acid, indomethacin, and closely related analogues bound. While the flufenamic acid and indomethacin structures have been used to design novel inhibitors, they provide only limited coverage of the NSAIDs that inhibit AKR1C3 and that may be used for the development of new AKR1C3 targeted drugs. To understand how other NSAIDs bind to AKR1C3, we have determined ten crystal structures of AKR1C3 complexes that cover three different classes of NSAID, N-phenylanthranilic acids (meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, arylpropionic acids (flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen, and indomethacin analogues (indomethacin, sulindac, zomepirac. The N-phenylanthranilic and arylpropionic acids bind to common sites including the enzyme catalytic centre and a constitutive active site pocket, with the arylpropionic acids probing the constitutive pocket more effectively. By contrast, indomethacin and the indomethacin analogues sulindac and zomepirac, display three distinctly different binding modes that explain their relative inhibition of the AKR1C family members. This new data from ten crystal structures greatly broadens

  9. Bioequivalence studies of tibolone in premenopausal women and effects on expression of the tibolone-metabolizing enzyme AKR1C (aldo-keto reductase) family caused by estradiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keon W; Kim, Yoon G

    2008-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the bioequivalence of a test formulation of tibolone with the marketed reference formulation in 24 young healthy female volunteers. Tibolone is a synthetic steroid hormone for menopausal women. Volunteers were treated with the 2 formulations of tibolone (total dose of active ingredient 2.5 mg) according to a 2 x 2 crossover design with a 1-week washout period. Plasma concentrations of 3alpha- and 3beta-hydroxytibolone, which are major metabolites of tibolone, were assayed in timed samples over a 24-hour period with a validated gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method that had a lower limit of quantification of 0.5 ng/mL. The reference and test formulations gave a mean 3alpha-hydroxytibolone C(max) of 5.0 and 5.2 ng/mL, respectively, and a mean 3beta-hydroxytibolone C(max) of 16.4 and 16.5 ng/mL, respectively. The mean AUC(t) of 3alpha-hydroxytibolone was 24.7 and 24.3 ng h/mL, whereas the mean AUC(t) of 3beta-hydroxytibolone was 57.6 and 54.8 ng h/mL for the test and reference formulations, respectively. The authors did not find significant differences in pharmacokinetic parameters between the 2 formulations, but metabolite formation was different from reports in postmenopausal women. The authors therefore measured the effects of estradiol on the expression of the tibolone-metabolizing enzymes, from the aldo-keto reductase (AKR1C) family, using HepG2 cell (human hepatoma cells) and MCF-7 cell (human breast cancer cells). Estradiol increased mRNA levels of AKR1C1, AKR1C2, and AKR1C3 and protein levels of total AKR1C in HepG2 cells. Estradiol selectively enhanced levels of AKR1C2 mRNA in MCF-7 cells. Thus, changes in the major metabolites of tibolone might result from changes in AKR1C family expression by patient estrogen status.

  10. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH-catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quiniones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  11. Sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis in LSL-KrasG12D-LSL-Trp53R172H-Pdx-1-Cre mice via suppressing aldo-keto reductase family 1B10 (AKR1B10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Yang, Allison L; Chung, Yeon Tae; Zhang, Wanying; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Sulindac has been identified as a competitive inhibitor of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10), an enzyme that plays a key role in carcinogenesis. AKR1B10 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and exhibits lipid substrate specificity, especially for farnesyl and geranylgeranyl. There have been no studies though showing that the inhibition of PDAC by sulindac is via inhibition of AKR1B10, particularly the metabolism of farnesyl/geranylgeranyl and Kras protein prenylation. To determine the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on pancreatic carcinogenesis, 5-week-old LSL-Kras(G12D)-LSL-Trp53(R172H)-Pdx-1-Cre mice (Pan(kras/p53) mice) were fed an AIN93M diet with or without 200 p.p.m. sulindac (n = 20/group). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that average animal survival in Pan(kras/p53) mice was 143.7 ± 8.8 days, and average survival with sulindac was increased to 168.0 ± 8.8 days (P sulindac, the incidence of PDAC was reduced to 56% (P sulindac significantly decreased Ki-67-labeled cell proliferation and markedly reduced the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Raf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2. In in vitro experiments with PDAC cells from Pan(kras/p53) mice, sulindac exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of AKR1B10 activity. By silencing AKR1B10 expression through small interfering RNA or by sulindac treatment, these in vitro models showed a reduction in Kras and human DNA-J homolog 2 protein prenylation, and downregulation of phosphorylated C-raf, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 expression. Our results demonstrate that sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis by the inhibition of Kras protein prenylation by targeting AKR1B10.

  12. Aldo-keto synthesis effect on Eu3+fluorescence in YBO3 compared with solid state diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.A. Koparkar; N.S. Bajaj; S.K. Omanwar

    2015-01-01

    The red-orange emitting phosphor YBO3:Eu3+was prepared by aldo-keto method and solid state diffusion. Aldo-keto method implied to decrease the processing time and heating temperature. The red-orange emitting phosphor was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), as well as emission and excitation photoluminescence spectra re-corded at room temperature. The result of aldo-keto method showed that the phosphor YBO3:Eu3+could be obtained at 900 °C in less time~60%as compared to solid state diffusion (SSD). The material showed that the strongest emission peak at 595 nm under excitation at 233 nm was only due to forced magnetic dipole 5D0→7F1 transition of Eu3+ions. Significantly, the emission inten-sity of YBO3:Eu3+phosphor prepared by aldo-keto method was relatively higher as compared to that obtained by the solid state diffusion.

  13. Aldo-keto Reductase Family 1 B10 as a Novel Target for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    cells via identifying the functional domain(s). Body 1) AKR1B10 silencing inhibits breast cancer cells BT-20 growth in culture and...Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Guangdong Province, Tsinghua University Graduate School at Shenzhen , Guangdong 518055 and 6School of Medicine, Tsinghua...breast cancer. Silencing of AKR1B10 in BT-20 human breast cancer cells inhibited cell growth in culture and tumorigenesis in female nude mice. Taken

  14. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  15. Pharmacological Characterization of a Novel Bifunctional Aldo-Keto Reductase 1C3 Inhibitor and Androgen Receptor Antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    efficacious therapy for APC. References 1. Altekruse SF , K. C., Krapcho M, Neyman N, Aminou R, Waldron W, Ruhl J, Howlader N...cancer. Br J Cancer 2004, 90, 2317- 2325. 9. Reid, A. H.; Attard, G.; Danila, D. C.; Oommen, N. B.; Olmos, D.; Fong , P. C.; Molife, L. R.; Hunt, J

  16. 5β-Reduced steroids and human Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid 5β-reductase (AKR1D1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mo; Penning, Trevor M

    2014-05-01

    5β-Reduced steroids are non-planar steroids that have a 90° bend in their structure to create an A/B cis-ring junction. This novel property is required for bile-acids to act as emulsifiers, but in addition 5β-reduced steroids have remarkable physiology and may act as potent tocolytic agents, endogenous cardiac glycosides, neurosteroids, and can act as ligands for orphan and membrane bound receptors. In humans there is only a single 5β-reductase gene AKR1D1, which encodes Δ(4)-3-ketosteroid-5β-reductase (AKR1D1). This enzyme is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, but possesses an altered catalytic tetrad, in which Glu120 replaces the conserved His residue. This predominant liver enzyme generates all 5β-dihydrosteroids in the C19-C27 steroid series. Mutations exist in the AKR1D1 gene, which result in loss of protein stability and are causative in bile-acid deficiency.

  17. Reductive detoxification of acrolein as a potential role for aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kwon, Myoungsu; Homma, Takujiro; Saito, Yuka; Lee, Jaeyong; Takahashi, Motoko; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2014-09-12

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, suppresses diabetic complications via a reduction in metabolic intermediates; it also plays a role in ascorbic acid biosynthesis in mice. Because primates cannot synthesize ascorbic acid, a principle role of AKR1A appears to be the reductive detoxification of aldehydes. In this study, we isolated and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild-type (WT) and human Akr1a-transgenic (Tg) mice and used them to investigate the potential roles of AKR1A under culture conditions. Tg MEFs showed higher methylglyoxal- and acrolein-reducing activities than WT MEFs and also were more resistant to cytotoxicity. Enzymatic analyses of purified rat AKR1A showed that the efficiency of the acrolein reduction was about 20% that of glyceraldehyde. Ascorbic acid levels were quite low in the MEFs, and while the administration of ascorbic acid to the cells increased the intracellular levels of ascorbic acid, it had no affect on the resistance to acrolein. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and protein carbonylation induced by acrolein treatment were less evident in Tg MEFs than in WT MEFs. These data collectively indicate that one of the principle roles of AKR1A in primates is the reductive detoxification of aldehydes, notably acrolein, and protection from its detrimental effects.

  18. Evolution of the ferric reductase domain (FRD) superfamily: modularity, functional diversification, and signature motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuezhi; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Xenarios, Ioannis; Soldati, Thierry; Boeckmann, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    A heme-containing transmembrane ferric reductase domain (FRD) is found in bacterial and eukaryotic protein families, including ferric reductases (FRE), and NADPH oxidases (NOX). The aim of this study was to understand the phylogeny of the FRD superfamily. Bacteria contain FRD proteins consisting only of the ferric reductase domain, such as YedZ and short bFRE proteins. Full length FRE and NOX enzymes are mostly found in eukaryotic cells and all possess a dehydrogenase domain, allowing them to catalyze electron transfer from cytosolic NADPH to extracellular metal ions (FRE) or oxygen (NOX). Metazoa possess YedZ-related STEAP proteins, possibly derived from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. Phylogenetic analyses suggests that FRE enzymes appeared early in evolution, followed by a transition towards EF-hand containing NOX enzymes (NOX5- and DUOX-like). An ancestral gene of the NOX(1-4) family probably lost the EF-hands and new regulatory mechanisms of increasing complexity evolved in this clade. Two signature motifs were identified: NOX enzymes are distinguished from FRE enzymes through a four amino acid motif spanning from transmembrane domain 3 (TM3) to TM4, and YedZ/STEAP proteins are identified by the replacement of the first canonical heme-spanning histidine by a highly conserved arginine. The FRD superfamily most likely originated in bacteria.

  19. Insights from modeling the 3D structure of NAD(P)H-dependent D-xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis and its binding interactions with NAD and NADP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Fang; Wei, Dong-Qing; Lin, Ying; Wang, Yong-Hua; Du, Hong-Li; Li, Yi-Xve; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2007-07-27

    NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. The enzyme has the special function to catalyze the first step in the assimilation of xylose into yeast metabolic pathways. Performing this function via reducing the open chain xylose to xylitol, the xylose reductase of Pichia stipitis is one of the most important enzymes that can be used to construct recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for utilizing xylose and producing alcohol. To investigate into the interaction mechanism of the enzyme with its ligand NAD and NADP, the 3D structure was developed for the NAD(P)H-dependent d-xylose reductase from P. stipitis. With the 3D structure, the molecular docking operations were conducted to find the most stable bindings of the enzyme with NAD and NADP, respectively. Based on these results, the binding pockets of the enzyme for NAD and NADP have been explicitly defined. It has been found that the residues in forming the binding pockets for both NAD and NADP are almost the same and mainly hydrophilic. These findings may be used to guide mutagenesis studies, providing useful clues to modify the enzyme to improve the utilization of xylose for producing alcohol. Also, because human aldose reductases have the function to reduce the open chain form of glucose to sorbitol, a process physiologically significant for diabetic patients at the time that their blood glucose levels are elevated, the information gained through this study may also stimulate the development of new strategies for therapeutic treatment of diabetes.

  20. Subdivision of the MDR superfamily of medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases through iterative hidden Markov model refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medium-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases (MDR form a protein superfamily whose size and complexity defeats traditional means of subclassification; it currently has over 15000 members in the databases, the pairwise sequence identity is typically around 25%, there are members from all kingdoms of life, the chain-lengths vary as does the oligomericity, and the members are partaking in a multitude of biological processes. There are profile hidden Markov models (HMMs available for detecting MDR superfamily members, but none for determining which MDR family each protein belongs to. The current torrential influx of new sequence data enables elucidation of more and more protein families, and at an increasingly fine granularity. However, gathering good quality training data usually requires manual attention by experts and has therefore been the rate limiting step for expanding the number of available models. Results We have developed an automated algorithm for HMM refinement that produces stable and reliable models for protein families. This algorithm uses relationships found in data to generate confident seed sets. Using this algorithm we have produced HMMs for 86 distinct MDR families and 34 of their subfamilies which can be used in automated annotation of new sequences. We find that MDR forms with 2 Zn2+ ions in general are dehydrogenases, while MDR forms with no Zn2+ in general are reductases. Furthermore, in Bacteria MDRs without Zn2+ are more frequent than those with Zn2+, while the opposite is true for eukaryotic MDRs, indicating that Zn2+ has been recruited into the MDR superfamily after the initial life kingdom separations. We have also developed a web site http://mdr-enzymes.org that provides textual and numeric search against various characterised MDR family properties, as well as sequence scan functions for reliable classification of novel MDR sequences. Conclusions Our method of refinement can be readily applied to

  1. Dimerization and enzymatic activity of fungal 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristan Katja

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase from the fungus Cochliobolus lunatus (17β-HSDcl is a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily. SDR proteins usually function as dimers or tetramers and 17β-HSDcl is also a homodimer under native conditions. Results We have investigated here which secondary structure elements are involved in the dimerization of 17β-HSDcl and examined the importance of dimerization for the enzyme activity. Sequence similarity with trihydroxynaphthalene reductase from Magnaporthe grisea indicated that Arg129 and His111 from the αE-helices interact with the Asp121, Glu117 and Asp187 residues from the αE and αF-helices of the neighbouring subunit. The Arg129Asp and His111Leu mutations both rendered 17β-HSDcl monomeric, while the mutant 17β-HSDcl-His111Ala was dimeric. Circular dichroism spectroscopy analysis confirmed the conservation of the secondary structure in both monomers. The three mutant proteins all bound coenzyme, as shown by fluorescence quenching in the presence of NADP+, but both monomers showed no enzymatic activity. Conclusion We have shown by site-directed mutagenesis and structure/function analysis that 17β-HSDcl dimerization involves the αE and αF helices of both subunits. Neighbouring subunits are connected through hydrophobic interactions, H-bonds and salt bridges involving amino acid residues His111 and Arg129. Since the substitutions of these two amino acid residues lead to inactive monomers with conserved secondary structure, we suggest dimerization is a prerequisite for catalysis. A detailed understanding of this dimerization could lead to the development of compounds that will specifically prevent dimerization, thereby serving as a new type of inhibitor.

  2. Long-term In Vitro Treatment of Human Glioblastoma Cells with Temozolomide Increases Resistance In Vivo through Up-regulation of GLUT Transporter and Aldo-Keto Reductase Enzyme AKR1C Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Le Calvé

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most frequent malignant glioma. Treatment of GBM patients is multimodal with maximum surgical resection, followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with the alkylating drug temozolomide (TMZ. The present study aims to identify genes implicated in the acquired resistance of two human GBM cells of astrocytic origin, T98G and U373, to TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was induced by culturing these cells in vitro for months with incremental TMZ concentrations up to 1 mM. Only partial resistance to TMZ has been achieved and was demonstrated in vivo in immunocompromised mice bearing orthotopic U373 and T98G xenografts. Our data show that long-term treatment of human astroglioma cells with TMZ induces increased expression of facilitative glucose transporter/solute carrier GLUT/SLC2A family members, mainly GLUT-3, and of the AKR1C family of proteins. The latter proteins are phase 1 drug-metabolizing enzymes involved in the maintenance of steroid homeostasis, prostaglandin metabolism, and metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. GLUT-3 has been previously suggested to exert roles in GBM neovascularization processes, and TMZ was found to exert antiangiogenic effects in experimental gliomas. AKR1C1 was previously shown to be associated with oncogenic potential, with proproliferative effects similar to AKR1C3 in the latter case. Both AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 proteins are involved in cancer pro-proliferative cell chemoresistance. Selective targeting of GLUT-3 in GBM and/or AKR1C proteins (by means of jasmonates, for example could thus delay the acquisition of resistance to TMZ of astroglioma cells in the context of prolonged treatment with this drug.

  3. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of a novel erythrose reductase from Candida magnoliae JH110

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryu Yeon-Woo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Erythrose reductase (ER catalyzes the final step of erythritol production, which is reducing erythrose to erythritol using NAD(PH as a cofactor. ER has gained interest because of its importance in the production of erythritol, which has extremely low digestibility and approved safety for diabetics. Although ERs were purified and characterized from microbial sources, the entire primary structure and the corresponding DNA for ER still remain unknown in most of erythritol-producing yeasts. Candida magnoliae JH110 isolated from honeycombs produces a significant amount of erythritol, suggesting the presence of erythrose metabolizing enzymes. Here we provide the genetic sequence and functional characteristics of a novel NADPH-dependent ER from C. magnoliae JH110. Results The gene encoding a novel ER was isolated from an osmophilic yeast C. magnoliae JH110. The ER gene composed of 849 nucleotides encodes a polypeptide with a calculated molecular mass of 31.4 kDa. The deduced amino acid sequence of ER showed a high degree of similarity to other members of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily including three ER isozymes from Trichosporonoides megachiliensis SNG-42. The intact coding region of ER from C. magnoliae JH110 was cloned, functionally expressed in Escherichia coli using a combined approach of gene fusion and molecular chaperone co-expression, and subsequently purified to homogeneity. The enzyme displayed a temperature and pH optimum at 42°C and 5.5, respectively. Among various aldoses, the C. magnoliae JH110 ER showed high specific activity for reduction of erythrose to the corresponding alcohol, erythritol. To explore the molecular basis of the catalysis of erythrose reduction with NADPH, homology structural modeling was performed. The result suggested that NADPH binding partners are completely conserved in the C. magnoliae JH110 ER. Furthermore, NADPH interacts with the side chains Lys252, Thr255, and Arg258, which could

  4. Primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency: Two cases in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Zhao; Ling-Juan Fang; Kenneth DR Setchell; Rui Chen; Li-Ting Li; Jian-She Wang

    2012-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) deficiency,a rare but life-threatening form of bile acid deficiency,has not been previously described in China.Here,we describe the first two primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency patients in Mainland China diagnosed by fast atom bombardment-mass spectroscopy of urinary bile acids and confirmed by genetic analysis.A high proportion of atypical 3-oxo-A4-bile acids in the urine indicated a deficiency in A4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase.All of the coding exons and adjacent intronic sequence of the AKR1D1 gene were sequenced using peripheral lymphocyte genomic DNA of two patients and one of the patient's parents.One patient exhibited compound heterozygous mutations:c.396C>A and c.722A>T,while the other was heterozygous for the mutation c.797G>A.Based on these mutations,a diagnosis of primary △4-3-oxosteroid 5β-reductase deficiency could be confirmed.With ursodeoxycholic acid treatment and fat-soluble vitamin supplements,liver function tests normalized rapidly,and the degree of hepatomegaly was markedly reduced in both patients.

  5. Cystatin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Josiah; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2010-02-01

    Cystatins, the classical inhibitors of C1 cysteine proteinases, have been extensively studied and reviewed in the literature. Over the last 20 years, however, proteins containing cystatin domains but lacking protease inhibitory activities have been identified, and most likely more will be described in the near future. These proteins together with family 1, 2, and 3 cystatins constitute the cystatin superfamily. Mounting evidence points to the new roles that some members of the superfamily have acquired over the course of their evolution. This review is focused on the roles of cystatins in: 1) tumorigenesis, 2) stabilization of matrix metalloproteinases, 3) glomerular filtration rate, 4) immunomodulation, and 5) neurodegenerative diseases. It is the goal of this review to get as many investigators as possible to take a second look at the cystatin superfamily regarding their potential involvement in serious human ailments.

  6. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  7. Cloning, expression, and characterization of a novel xylose reductase from Rhizopus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Jiang, Shao-tong; Zheng, Zhi; Li, Xing-jiang; Luo, Shui-zhong; Wu, Xue-feng

    2015-07-01

    Rhizopus oryzae is valuable as a producer of organic acids via lignocellulose catalysis. R. oryzae metabolizes xylose, which is one component of lignocellulose hydrolysate. In this study, a novel NADPH-dependent xylose reductase gene from R. oryzae AS 3.819 (Roxr) was cloned and expressed in Pichia pastoris GS115. Homology alignment suggested that the 320-residue protein contained domains and active sites belonging to the aldo/keto reductase family. SDS-PAGE demonstrated that the recombinant xylose reductase has a molecular weight of approximately 37 kDa. The optimal catalytic pH and temperature of the purified recombinant protein were 5.8 and 50 °C, respectively. The recombinant protein was stable from pH 4.4 to 6.5 and at temperatures below 42 °C. The recombinant enzyme has bias for D-xylose and L-arabinose as substrates and NADPH as its coenzyme. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR tests suggested that native Roxr expression is regulated by a carbon catabolite repression mechanism. Site-directed mutagenesis at two possible key sites involved in coenzyme binding, Thr(226)  → Glu(226) and Val(274)  → Asn(274), were performed, respectively. The coenzyme specificity constants of the resulted RoXR(T226E) and RoXR(V274N) for NADH increased 18.2-fold and 2.4-fold, which suggested possibility to improve the NADH preference of this enzyme through genetic modification.

  8. Detoxifying enzymes at the cross-roads of inflammation, oxidative stress and drug hypersensitivity: role of glutathione transferase P1-1 and aldose reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sánchez-Gómez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR and glutathione transferases (GST metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and AKR1B1 and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity.

  9. Identification of a novel polyfluorinated compound as a lead to inhibit the human enzymes aldose reductase and AKR1B10: structure determination of both ternary complexes and implications for drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousido-Siah, Alexandra; Ruiz, Francesc X; Mitschler, André; Porté, Sergio; de Lera, Ángel R; Martín, María J; Manzanaro, Sonia; de la Fuente, Jesús A; Terwesten, Felix; Betz, Michael; Klebe, Gerhard; Farrés, Jaume; Parés, Xavier; Podjarny, Alberto

    2014-03-01

    Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are mostly monomeric enzymes which fold into a highly conserved (α/β)8 barrel, while their substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity are determined by interaction with residues located in three highly variable external loops. The closely related human enzymes aldose reductase (AR or AKR1B1) and AKR1B10 are of biomedical interest because of their involvement in secondary diabetic complications (AR) and in cancer, e.g. hepatocellular carcinoma and smoking-related lung cancer (AKR1B10). After characterization of the IC50 values of both AKRs with a series of polyhalogenated compounds, 2,2',3,3',5,5',6,6'-octafluoro-4,4'-biphenyldiol (JF0064) was identified as a lead inhibitor of both enzymes with a new scaffold (a 1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol). An ultrahigh-resolution X-ray structure of the AR-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex has been determined at 0.85 Å resolution, allowing it to be observed that JF0064 interacts with the catalytic residue Tyr48 through a negatively charged hydroxyl group (i.e. the acidic phenol). The non-competitive inhibition pattern observed for JF0064 with both enzymes suggests that this acidic hydroxyl group is also present in the case of AKR1B10. Moreover, the combination of surface lysine methylation and the introduction of K125R and V301L mutations enabled the determination of the X-ray crystallographic structure of the corresponding AKR1B10-NADP(+)-JF0064 complex. Comparison of the two structures has unveiled some important hints for subsequent structure-based drug-design efforts.

  10. Conversion of Human Steroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) into 3[beta]-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase by Single Point Mutation E120H: Example of Perfect Enzyme Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mo; Drury, Jason E.; Christianson, David W.; Penning, Trevor M. (UPENN)

    2012-10-10

    Human aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) and AKR1C enzymes are essential for bile acid biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism. AKR1D1 catalyzes the 5{beta}-reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids, whereas AKR1C enzymes are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs). These enzymes share high sequence identity and catalyze 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH to an electrophilic carbon but differ in that one residue in the conserved AKR catalytic tetrad, His120 (AKR1D1 numbering), is substituted by a glutamate in AKR1D1. We find that the AKR1D1 E120H mutant abolishes 5{beta}-reductase activity and introduces HSD activity. However, the E120H mutant unexpectedly favors dihydrosteroids with the 5{alpha}-configuration and, unlike most of the AKR1C enzymes, shows a dominant stereochemical preference to act as a 3{beta}-HSD as opposed to a 3{alpha}-HSD. The catalytic efficiency achieved for 3{beta}-HSD activity is higher than that observed for any AKR to date. High resolution crystal structures of the E120H mutant in complex with epiandrosterone, 5{beta}-dihydrotestosterone, and {Delta}{sup 4}-androstene-3,17-dione elucidated the structural basis for this functional change. The glutamate-histidine substitution prevents a 3-ketosteroid from penetrating the active site so that hydride transfer is directed toward the C3 carbonyl group rather than the {Delta}{sup 4}-double bond and confers 3{beta}-HSD activity on the 5{beta}-reductase. Structures indicate that stereospecificity of HSD activity is achieved because the steroid flips over to present its {alpha}-face to the A-face of NADPH. This is in contrast to the AKR1C enzymes, which can invert stereochemistry when the steroid swings across the binding pocket. These studies show how a single point mutation in AKR1D1 can introduce HSD activity with unexpected configurational and stereochemical preference.

  11. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H;

    2001-01-01

    Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions are hi...

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZOLALPYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA AND POLYDEOXYNUCLEOTIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bcnzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  13. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZO(A)PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzo[alpyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  14. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance in Vigna mungo is altered by overexpression of ALDRXV4 gene via reactive carbonyl detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Preeti; Kumar, Deepak; Sarin, Neera Bhalla

    2016-06-01

    Vigna mungo (blackgram) is an important leguminous pulse crop, which is grown for its protein rich edible seeds. Drought and salinity are the major abiotic stresses which adversely affect the growth and productivity of crop plants including blackgram. The ALDRXV4 belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily of enzymes that catalyze the reduction of carbonyl metabolites in the cells and plays an important role in the osmoprotection and detoxification of the reactive carbonyl species. In the present study, we developed transgenic plants of V. mungo using Agrobacterium mediated transformation. The transgene integration was confirmed by Southern blot analysis whereas the expression was confirmed by RT-PCR, Western blot and enzyme activity. The T1 generation transgenic plants displayed improved tolerance to various environmental stresses, including drought, salt, methyl viologen and H2O2 induced oxidative stress. The increased aldose reductase activity, higher sorbitol content and less accumulation of the toxic metabolite, methylglyoxal in the transgenic lines under non-stress and stress (drought and salinity) conditions resulted in increased protection through maintenance of better photosynthetic efficiency, higher relative water content and less photooxidative damage. The accumulation of reactive oxygen species was remarkably decreased in the transgenic lines as compared with the wild type plants. This study of engineering multiple stress tolerance in blackgram, is the first report to date and this strategy for trait improvement is proposed to provide a novel germplasm for blackgram production on marginal lands.

  15. Maternal and offspring genetic variants of AKR1C3 and the risk of childhood leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chen-Yu; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Pan, Pi-Chen; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Ho, Chi-Kung; Su, Li; Xu, Xin; Li, Yi; Christiani, David C.

    2008-01-01

    The aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) gene located on chromosome 10p15-p14, a regulator of myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation, represents an important candidate gene for studying human carcinogenesis. In a prospectively enrolled population-based case–control study of Han Chinese conducted in Kaohsiung in southern Taiwan, a total of 114 leukemia cases and 221 controls

  16. AcEST: DK957526 [AcEST

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available WD-40 repeat-containing protein MSI5 OS=Ara... 32 1.9 sp|Q5T2L2|AKCL1_HUMAN Aldo-keto reductase family 1 mem...EDVAFCPSSA--- 285 Query: 235 QQTCTVSSDSCLPL-DARQKRAP 300 Q+ C+V DSCL L DAR +P Sbjct: 286 QEFCSVGDDSCLMLWDARTGTSP 308 >sp|Q5T2L2

  17. Independent evolution of four heme peroxidase superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Hofbauer, Stefan; Schaffner, Irene; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Nicolussi, Andrea; Soudi, Monika; Pirker, Katharina F; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2015-05-15

    Four heme peroxidase superfamilies (peroxidase-catalase, peroxidase-cyclooxygenase, peroxidase-chlorite dismutase and peroxidase-peroxygenase superfamily) arose independently during evolution, which differ in overall fold, active site architecture and enzymatic activities. The redox cofactor is heme b or posttranslationally modified heme that is ligated by either histidine or cysteine. Heme peroxidases are found in all kingdoms of life and typically catalyze the one- and two-electron oxidation of a myriad of organic and inorganic substrates. In addition to this peroxidatic activity distinct (sub)families show pronounced catalase, cyclooxygenase, chlorite dismutase or peroxygenase activities. Here we describe the phylogeny of these four superfamilies and present the most important sequence signatures and active site architectures. The classification of families is described as well as important turning points in evolution. We show that at least three heme peroxidase superfamilies have ancient prokaryotic roots with several alternative ways of divergent evolution. In later evolutionary steps, they almost always produced highly evolved and specialized clades of peroxidases in eukaryotic kingdoms with a significant portion of such genes involved in coding various fusion proteins with novel physiological functions.

  18. Quinone Reductase 2 Is a Catechol Quinone Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yue; Buryanovskyy, Leonid; Zhang, Zhongtao (NYMEDCO)

    2008-09-05

    The functions of quinone reductase 2 have eluded researchers for decades even though a genetic polymorphism is associated with various neurological disorders. Employing enzymatic studies using adrenochrome as a substrate, we show that quinone reductase 2 is specific for the reduction of adrenochrome, whereas quinone reductase 1 shows no activity. We also solved the crystal structure of quinone reductase 2 in complexes with dopamine and adrenochrome, two compounds that are structurally related to catecholamine quinones. Detailed structural analyses delineate the mechanism of quinone reductase 2 specificity toward catechol quinones in comparison with quinone reductase 1; a side-chain rotational difference between quinone reductase 1 and quinone reductase 2 of a single residue, phenylalanine 106, determines the specificity of enzymatic activities. These results infer functional differences between two homologous enzymes and indicate that quinone reductase 2 could play important roles in the regulation of catecholamine oxidation processes that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson disease.

  19. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  20. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) in bacteria: a bioinformatic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiela, Michael; Skarka, Adam; Ebert, Bettina; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    Steroidal compounds including cholesterol, bile acids and steroid hormones play a central role in various physiological processes such as cell signaling, growth, reproduction, and energy homeostasis. Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs), which belong to the superfamily of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR) or aldo-keto reductases (AKR), are important enzymes involved in the steroid hormone metabolism. HSDs function as an enzymatic switch that controls the access of receptor-active steroids to nuclear hormone receptors and thereby mediate a fine-tuning of the steroid response. The aim of this study was the identification of classified functional HSDs and the bioinformatic annotation of these proteins in all complete sequenced bacterial genomes followed by a phylogenetic analysis. For the bioinformatic annotation we constructed specific hidden Markov models in an iterative approach to provide a reliable identification for the specific catalytic groups of HSDs. Here, we show a detailed phylogenetic analysis of 3α-, 7α-, 12α-HSDs and two further functional related enzymes (3-ketosteroid-Δ(1)-dehydrogenase, 3-ketosteroid-Δ(4)(5α)-dehydrogenase) from the superfamily of SDRs. For some bacteria that have been previously reported to posses a specific HSD activity, we could annotate the corresponding HSD protein. The dominating phyla that were identified to express HSDs were that of Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, and Firmicutes. Moreover, some evolutionarily more ancient microorganisms (e.g., Cyanobacteria and Euryachaeota) were found as well. A large number of HSD-expressing bacteria constitute the normal human gastro-intestinal flora. Another group of bacteria were originally isolated from natural habitats like seawater, soil, marine and permafrost sediments. These bacteria include polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading species such as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Rhodococcus. In conclusion, HSDs are found in a wide variety of microorganisms including

  1. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijiang Guo

    Full Text Available The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW, a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  2. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Aijiang

    2015-01-01

    The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG) was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW), a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  3. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth.

  4. 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase, an enzyme of the sex hormone pathway of Mucor mucedo: purification, cloning of the corresponding gene, and developmental expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (-) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from beta-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (-) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (-) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation.

  5. 4-Dihydrotrisporin-Dehydrogenase, an Enzyme of the Sex Hormone Pathway of Mucor mucedo: Purification, Cloning of the Corresponding Gene, and Developmental Expression▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, Jana; Scheibner, Olaf; Burmester, Anke; Schimek, Christine; Wöstemeyer, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    The NADP-dependent 4-dihydrotrisporin-dehydrogenase is a (−) mating-type-specific enzyme in the pathway from β-carotene to trisporic acid. This substance and its isomers and derivatives represent the general system of sexual communication in zygomycetes. The (−) mating type of Mucor mucedo was stimulated by trisporic acid and the enzyme was purified by ion exchange and affinity chromatography. Several peptides of the 26-kDa protein, digested with trypsin, were sequenced by mass spectrometry. Oligonucleotides based on protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic DNA. The primary PCR fragment was sequenced and the complete gene, TSP2, was isolated. A labeled TSP2 hybridization probe detects a single-copy gene in the genome of M. mucedo. Northern blot analysis with RNAs from different growth stages reveals that the expression of the gene depends on the developmental stage of the mycelium in both mating types of M. mucedo. At the enzyme level, activity is found exclusively in the (−) mating type. However, renaturation of proteins in sodium dodecyl sulfate-containing gels revealed the TSP2 gene product in both mating types. Analyzing the protein sequence places the enzyme in the short chain dehydrogenase superfamily. Thus, it has an evolutionary origin distinct from that of the previously isolated 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase, which belongs to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Apart from the TSP2 genes in the three sequenced zygomycetous genomes (Phycomyces blakesleeanus, Rhizopus oryzae, and Mucor circinelloides), the closest relative is the Myxococcus xanthus CsgA gene product, which is also a short chain dehydrogenase, involved in C signaling and fruiting body formation. PMID:18931040

  6. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranyee A Chiang

    Full Text Available The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized

  7. Single-molecule enzymology of steroid transforming enzymes: Transient kinetic studies and what they tell us.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Trevor M

    2016-07-01

    Structure-function studies on steroid transforming enzymes often use site-directed mutagenesis to inform mechanisms of catalysis and effects on steroid binding, and data are reported in terms of changes in steady state kinetic parameters kcat, Km and kcat/Km. However, this dissection of function is limited since kcat is governed by the rate-determining step and Km is a complex macroscopic kinetic constant. Often site-directed mutagenesis can lead to a change in the rate-determining step which cannot be revealed by just reporting a decrease in kcat alone. These issues are made more complex when it is considered that many steroid transforming enzymes have more than one substrate and product. We present the case for using transient-kinetics performed with stopped-flow spectrometry to assign rate constants to discrete steps in these multi-substrate reactions and their use to interpret enzyme mechanism and the effects of disease and engineered mutations. We demonstrate that fluorescence kinetic transients can be used to measure ligand binding that may be accompanied by isomerization steps, revealing the existence of new enzyme intermediates. We also demonstrate that single-turnover reactions can provide a klim for the chemical step and Ks for steroid-substrate binding and that when coupled with kinetic isotope effect measurements can provide information on transition state intermediates. We also demonstrate how multiple turnover experiments can provide evidence for either "burst-phase" kinetics, which can reveal a slow product release step, or linear-phase kinetics, in which the chemical step can be rate-determining. With these assignments it becomes more straightforward to analyze the effects of mutations. We use examples from the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (AKR1Cs) and human steroid 5β-reductase (AKR1D1) to illustrate the utility of the approach, which are members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily.

  8. The Plant Short-Chain Dehydrogenase (SDR superfamily: genome-wide inventory and diversification patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moummou Hanane

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs form one of the largest and oldest NAD(P(H dependent oxidoreductase families. Despite a conserved ‘Rossmann-fold’ structure, members of the SDR superfamily exhibit low sequence similarities, which constituted a bottleneck in terms of identification. Recent classification methods, relying on hidden-Markov models (HMMs, improved identification and enabled the construction of a nomenclature. However, functional annotations of plant SDRs remain scarce. Results Wide-scale analyses were performed on ten plant genomes. The combination of hidden Markov model (HMM based analyses and similarity searches led to the construction of an exhaustive inventory of plant SDR. With 68 to 315 members found in each analysed genome, the inventory confirmed the over-representation of SDRs in plants compared to animals, fungi and prokaryotes. The plant SDRs were first classified into three major types — ‘classical’, ‘extended’ and ‘divergent’ — but a minority (10% of the predicted SDRs could not be classified into these general types (‘unknown’ or ‘atypical’ types. In a second step, we could categorize the vast majority of land plant SDRs into a set of 49 families. Out of these 49 families, 35 appeared early during evolution since they are commonly found through all the Green Lineage. Yet, some SDR families — tropinone reductase-like proteins (SDR65C, ‘ABA2-like’-NAD dehydrogenase (SDR110C, ‘salutaridine/menthone-reductase-like’ proteins (SDR114C, ‘dihydroflavonol 4-reductase’-like proteins (SDR108E and ‘isoflavone-reductase-like’ (SDR460A proteins — have undergone significant functional diversification within vascular plants since they diverged from Bryophytes. Interestingly, these diversified families are either involved in the secondary metabolism routes (terpenoids, alkaloids, phenolics or participate in developmental processes (hormone biosynthesis or

  9. Phylogenomic analysis of the cystatin superfamily in eukaryotes and prokaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turk Vito

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cystatin superfamily comprises cysteine protease inhibitors that play key regulatory roles in protein degradation processes. Although they have been the subject of many studies, little is known about their genesis, evolution and functional diversification. Our aim has been to obtain a comprehensive insight into their origin, distribution, diversity, evolution and classification in Eukaryota, Bacteria and Archaea. Results We have identified in silico the full complement of the cystatin superfamily in more than 2100 prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. The analysis of numerous eukaryotic genomes has provided strong evidence for the emergence of this superfamily in the ancestor of eukaryotes. The progenitor of this superfamily was most probably intracellular and lacked a signal peptide and disulfide bridges, much like the extant Giardia cystatin. A primordial gene duplication produced two ancestral eukaryotic lineages, cystatins and stefins. While stefins remain encoded by a single or a small number of genes throughout the eukaryotes, the cystatins have undergone a more complex and dynamic evolution through numerous gene and domain duplications. In the cystatin superfamily we discovered twenty vertebrate-specific and three angiosperm-specific orthologous families, indicating that functional diversification has occurred only in multicellular eukaryotes. In vertebrate orthologous families, the prevailing trends were loss of the ancestral inhibitory activity and acquisition of novel functions in innate immunity. Bacterial cystatins and stefins may be emergency inhibitors that enable survival of bacteria in the host, defending them from the host's proteolytic activity. Conclusion This study challenges the current view on the classification, origin and evolution of the cystatin superfamily and provides valuable insights into their functional diversification. The findings of this comprehensive study provide guides for future

  10. Structure and Function of the LmbE-like Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Viars

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The LmbE-like superfamily is comprised of a series of enzymes that use a single catalytic metal ion to catalyze the hydrolysis of various substrates. These substrates are often key metabolites for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, which makes the LmbE-like enzymes important targets for drug development. Herein we review the structure and function of the LmbE-like proteins identified to date. While this is the newest superfamily of metallohydrolases, a growing number of functionally interesting proteins from this superfamily have been characterized. Available crystal structures of LmbE-like proteins reveal a Rossmann fold similar to lactate dehydrogenase, which represented a novel fold for (zinc metallohydrolases at the time the initial structure was solved. The structural diversity of the N-acetylglucosamine containing substrates affords functional diversity for the LmbE-like enzyme superfamily. The majority of enzymes identified to date are metal-dependent deacetylases that catalyze the hydrolysis of a N-acetylglucosamine moiety on substrate using a combination of amino acid side chains and a single bound metal ion, predominantly zinc. The catalytic zinc is coordinated to proteins via His2-Asp-solvent binding site. Additionally, studies indicate that protein dynamics play important roles in regulating access to the active site and facilitating catalysis for at least two members of this protein superfamily.

  11. Isolated menthone reductase and nucleic acid molecules encoding same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croteau, Rodney B; Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L

    2013-04-23

    The present invention provides isolated menthone reductase proteins, isolated nucleic acid molecules encoding menthone reductase proteins, methods for expressing and isolating menthone reductase proteins, and transgenic plants expressing elevated levels of menthone reductase protein.

  12. 4-Dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from Mucor mucedo, an enzyme of the sexual hormone pathway: purification, and cloning of the corresponding gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czempinski, K; Kruft, V; Wöstemeyer, J; Burmester, A

    1996-09-01

    We have purified the NADP-dependent 4-dihydromethyltrisporate dehydrogenase from the zygomycete Mucor mucedo. The enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of trisporic acid, the sexual hormone of zygomycetes, which induces the first steps of zygophore development. Protein was obtained from the (-) mating type of M. mucedo after induction with trisporic acid, and purified by gel filtration and affinity chromatography steps. On SDS-PAGE a band with an apparent molecular mass of 33 kDa was ascribed to the enzyme. After transferring onto PVDF membranes the protein was digested with endoprotease Lys-C, and several peptides were sequenced. Oligonucleotides derived from protein sequence data were used for PCR amplification of genomic M. mucedo DNA. The PCR fragment was used as probe for isolation of the corresponding cDNA and complete genomic DNA clones. Comparison of protein and DNA sequence data showed that the cloned fragment corresponded to the purified protein. Search for similarity with protein sequences of the Swiss-Prot database revealed a relationship to enzymes belonging to the aldo/keto reductase superfamily. Southern-blot analysis of genomic DNA with the labelled cloned fragment detected a single-copy gene in both mating types of M. mucedo. PCR with genomic DNA from other zygomycetes gave rise to several fragments. Hybridization analysis with the cloned M. mucedo fragment showed that a fragment of similar length cross-hybridized in Blakeslea trispora (Choanephoraceae) as well as in Parasitella parasitica and Absidia glauca (Mucoraceae). The promoter region of the gene contains DNA elements with similarity to a cAMP-regulated gene of Dictyostelium discoideum.

  13. Drug interaction of boceprevir and amlodipine in a patient with hepatitis C: A cardiovascular follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çiğdem Kader

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Boceprevir is a NS3/4A hepatitis C virus (HCV protease inhibitor, used in combination with peginterferon and ribavirin to treat HCV. Boceprevir undergoes extensive metabolism via cytochrome P450-mediated oxidation and ketoreduction by cytosolic aldo-keto reductases. Amlodipine has been used for the treatment of patients with hypertension and also metabolised through cytochrome P450 pathway. Here, we presented a case of boceprevir and amlodipine interaction in a patient with chronic HCV and her echocardiography and electrocardiographic follow-up results. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2015;5(1: 32-35

  14. Trametes versicolor carboxylate reductase uncovered

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Margit; Winkler, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first carboxylate reductase from Trametes versicolor was identified, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme reduces aromatic acids such as benzoic acid and derivatives, cinnamic acid, and 3-phenylpropanoic acid, but also aliphatic acids such as octanoic acid are reduced. Graphical abstract

  15. Metabolism of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Abdelrahman, Doaa R; Fokina, Valentina M; Hankins, Gary D V; Ahmed, Mahmoud S; Nanovskaya, Tatiana N

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the biotransformation of bupropion by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes, identify the enzyme(s) catalyzing the reaction(s) and determine its kinetics. Bupropion was metabolized by baboon hepatic and placental microsomes to hydroxybupropion (OH-BUP), threo- (TB) and erythrohydrobupropion (EB). OH-bupropion was the major metabolite formed by hepatic microsomes (Km 36±6 μM, Vmax 258±32 pmol mg protein(-1) min(-1)), however the formation of OH-BUP by placental microsomes was below the limit of quantification. The apparent Km values of bupropion for the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes were similar. The selective inhibitors of CYP2B6 (ticlopidine and phencyclidine) and monoclonal antibodies raised against human CYP2B6 isozyme caused 80% inhibition of OH-BUP formation by baboon hepatic microsomes. The chemical inhibitors of aldo-keto reductases (flufenamic acid), carbonyl reductases (menadione), and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (18β-glycyrrhetinic acid) significantly decreased the formation of TB and EB by hepatic and placental microsomes. Data indicate that CYP2B of baboon hepatic microsomes is responsible for biotransformation of bupropion to OH-BUP, while hepatic and placental short chain dehydrogenases/reductases and to a lesser extent aldo-keto reductases are responsible for the reduction of bupropion to TB and EB.

  16. Repertoire and evolution of TNF superfamily in Crassostrea gigas: implications for expansion and diversification of this superfamily in Mollusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dahai; Qiu, Limei; Gao, Qiang; Hou, Zhanhui; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor superfamily (TNFSF) members represent a group of cytokines participating in diverse immunological, pathological and developmental pathways. However, compared with deuterostomia and cnidaia, the composition and evolution of TNF homologous in protostomia are still not well understood. In the present study, a total of 81 TNF superfamily (TNFSF) genes from 15 mollusk species, including 23 TNFSF genes from Crassostrea gigas, were surveyed by genome-wide bioinformatics analysis. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 14 out of 23 C. gigas TNFSF genes in five clades exhibited orthologous relationships with Pinctada fucata TNFSF genes. Moreover, there were 15 C. gigas TNFSF genes located in oyster-specific clusters, which were contributed by small-scaled tandem and/or segmental duplication events in oyster. By comparing the sequences of duplicated TNFSF pairs, exon loss and variant in exon/intron length were revealed as the major modes of divergence in gene structure. Most of the duplicated C. gigas TNFSF pairs were evolved under purifying selection with consistent tissue expression patterns, implying functional constraint shaped diversification. This study demonstrated the expansion and early divergence of TNF superfamily in C. gigas, which provides potential insight into revealing the evolution and function of this superfamily in mollusk.

  17. Nitrate Reductase: Properties and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nitrate Reductase (NR) is a rating-limit and key enzyme of nitrate assimilation in plants ,so ,NR activity is important for growth,development and the dry matter accumulation of plants. The regulation of NR activity appears to be rather complex and many studies have been devoted to the description of regulation and properties,but in this paper we focus on the properties and regulation of NR in higher plants.

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the kinesin superfamily from Physcomitrella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyuan eShen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kinesins are an ancient superfamily of microtubule dependent motors. They participate in an ex-tensive and diverse list of essential cellular functions, including mitosis, cytokinesis, cell polari-zation, cell elongation, flagellar development, and intracellular transport. Based on phylogenetic relationships, the kinesin superfamily has been subdivided into 14 families, which are represented in most eukaryotic phyla. The functions of these families are sometimes conserved between species, but important variations in function across species have been observed. Plants possess most kinesin families including a few plant-specific families. With the availability of an ever in-creasing number of genome sequences from plants, it is important to document the complete complement of kinesins present in a given organism. This will help develop a molecular frame-work to explore the function of each family using genetics, biochemistry and cell biology. The moss Physcomitrella patens has emerged as a powerful model organism to study gene function in plants, which makes it a key candidate to explore complex gene families, such as the kinesin superfamily. Here we report a detailed phylogenetic characterization of the 71 kinesins of the kinesin superfamily in Physcomitrella. We found a remarkable conservation of families and sub-family classes with Arabidopsis, which is important for future comparative analysis of function. Some of the families, such as kinesins 14s are composed of fewer members in moss, while other families, such as the kinesin 12s are greatly expanded. To improve the comparison between spe-cies, and to simplify communication between research groups, we propose a classification of subfamilies based on our phylogenetic analysis.

  19. Periplasmic binding proteins: a versatile superfamily for protein engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Mary A; Hellinga, Homme W

    2004-08-01

    The diversity of biological function, ligand binding, conformational changes and structural adaptability of the periplasmic binding protein superfamily have been exploited to engineer biosensors, allosteric control elements, biologically active receptors and enzymes using a combination of techniques, including computational design. Extensively redesigned periplasmic binding proteins have been re-introduced into bacteria to function in synthetic signal transduction pathways that respond to extracellular ligands and as biologically active enzymes.

  20. CD147 Immunoglobulin Superfamily Receptor Function and Role in Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Iacono, Kathryn T.; Brown, Amy L.; Greene, Mark I.; Saouaf, Sandra J.

    2007-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to up-regulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is intr...

  1. Plasmodium interspersed repeats: the major multigene superfamily of malaria parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Christoph S.; Phillips, R. Stephen; Turner, C. Michael R.; Barrett, Michael P.

    2004-01-01

    Functionally related homologues of known genes can be difficult to identify in divergent species. In this paper, we show how multi-character analysis can be used to elucidate the relationships among divergent members of gene superfamilies. We used probabilistic modelling in conjunction with protein structural predictions and gene-structure analyses on a whole-genome scale to find gene homologies that are missed by conventional similarity-search strategies and identified a variant gene superfamily in six species of malaria (Plasmodium interspersed repeats, pir). The superfamily includes rif in P.falciparum, vir in P.vivax, a novel family kir in P.knowlesi and the cir/bir/yir family in three rodent malarias. Our data indicate that this is the major multi-gene family in malaria parasites. Protein localization of products from pir members to the infected erythrocyte membrane in the rodent malaria parasite P.chabaudi, demonstrates phenotypic similarity to the products of pir in other malaria species. The results give critical insight into the evolutionary adaptation of malaria parasites to their host and provide important data for comparative immunology between malaria parasites obtained from laboratory models and their human counterparts. PMID:15507685

  2. The Evolution of the Actin Binding NET Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim eHawkins

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The arabidopsis Networked protein superfamily are plant-specific actin binding proteins which specifically label different membrane compartments and identify specialized sites of interaction between actin and membranes unique to plants. There are 13 members of the superfamily in arabidopsis which group into 4 distinct clades or subfamilies. NET homologues are absent from the genomes of metazoa and fungi, furthermore in Plantae NET sequences are also absent from the genome of mosses and more ancient extant plant clades. A single subfamily of the NET proteins are found encoded in the club moss genome; an extant species of the earliest vascular plants. Gymnosperms have examples from subfamilies 4 and 3 with a hybrid form of NET1 and 2 which shows characteristics of both NET1 and NET2. In addition to NET3 and 4 subfamilies, the NET1 and pollen-expressed NET2 subfamilies are only found as independent sequences in angiosperms. This is consistent with the divergence of reproductive actin. The four subfamilies are conserved across monocots and eudicots with the numbers of members of each clade expanding at this point due in part to regions of genome duplication. Since the emergence of the NET superfamily at the dawn of vascular plants they have continued to develop and diversify in a manner which has mirrored the divergence and complexity of plant species through evolution in the ‘March of Progress’.

  3. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  4. Arabidopsis thaliana dehydroascorbate reductase 2: Conformational flexibility during catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodra, Nandita; Young, David; Astolfi Rosado, Leonardo; Pallo, Anna; Wahni, Khadija; De Proft, Frank; Huang, Jingjing; Van Breusegem, Frank; Messens, Joris

    2017-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) catalyzes the glutathione (GSH)-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate and plays a direct role in regenerating ascorbic acid, an essential plant antioxidant vital for defense against oxidative stress. DHAR enzymes bear close structural homology to the glutathione transferase (GST) superfamily of enzymes and contain the same active site motif, but most GSTs do not exhibit DHAR activity. The presence of a cysteine at the active site is essential for the catalytic functioning of DHAR, as mutation of this cysteine abolishes the activity. Here we present the crystal structure of DHAR2 from Arabidopsis thaliana with GSH bound to the catalytic cysteine. This structure reveals localized conformational differences around the active site which distinguishes the GSH-bound DHAR2 structure from that of DHAR1. We also unraveled the enzymatic step in which DHAR releases oxidized glutathione (GSSG). To consolidate our structural and kinetic findings, we investigated potential conformational flexibility in DHAR2 by normal mode analysis and found that subdomain mobility could be linked to GSH binding or GSSG release. PMID:28195196

  5. Helical assembly in the death domain (DD) superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrao, Ryan; Wu, Hao

    2012-04-01

    Death domain (DD) superfamily members play a central role in apoptotic and inflammatory signaling through formation of oligomeric molecular scaffolds. These scaffolds promote the activation of proinflammatory and apoptotic initiator caspases, as well as Ser/Thr kinases. Interactions between DDs are facilitated by a conserved set of interaction surfaces, type I, type II, and type III. Recently structural information on a ternary complex containing the DDs of MyD88, IRAK4, and IRAK2 and a binary complex containing Fas and FADD DDs has become available. This review will focus on how the three DD interaction surfaces cooperate to facilitate the assembly of these oligomeric signaling complexes.

  6. Structural advances for the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Nieng

    2013-03-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is one of the largest groups of secondary active transporters conserved from bacteria to humans. MFS proteins selectively transport a wide spectrum of substrates across biomembranes and play a pivotal role in multiple physiological processes. Despite intense investigation, only seven MFS proteins from six subfamilies have been structurally elucidated. These structures were captured in distinct states during a transport cycle involving alternating access to binding sites from either side of the membrane. This review discusses recent progress in MFS structure analysis and focuses on the molecular basis for substrate binding, co-transport coupling, and alternating access.

  7. Inhibitors of Nucleotidyltransferase Superfamily Enzymes Suppress Herpes Simplex Virus Replication

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Herpesviruses are large double-stranded DNA viruses that cause serious human diseases. Herpesvirus DNA replication depends on multiple processes typically catalyzed by nucleotidyltransferase superfamily (NTS) enzymes. Therefore, we investigated whether inhibitors of NTS enzymes would suppress replication of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2. Eight of 42 NTS inhibitors suppressed HSV-1 and/or HSV-2 replication by >10-fold at 5 μM, with suppression at 50 μM reaching ∼1 million-fold. Five...

  8. Identification of protein superfamily from structure- based sequence motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structure-based sequence motif of the distant proteins in evolution, protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) Ⅰ and Ⅱ superfamilies, as an example, has been defined by the structural comparison, structure-based sequence alignment and analyses on substitution patterns of residues in common sequence conserved regions. And the phosphatases Ⅰ and Ⅱ can be correctly identified together by the structure-based PTP sequence motif from SWISS-PROT and TrEBML databases. The results show that the correct rates of identification are over 98%. This is the first time to identify PTP Ⅰ and Ⅱ together by this motif.

  9. Depressed levels of prostaglandin F2α in mice lacking Akr1b7 increase basal adiposity and predispose to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volat, Fanny E; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Pastel, Emilie; Morio, Béatrice; Sion, Benoit; Hamard, Ghislaine; Guichardant, Michel; Colas, Romain; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    Negative regulators of white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion are poorly documented in vivo. Prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) is a potent antiadipogenic factor in cultured preadipocytes, but evidence for its involvement in physiological context is lacking. We previously reported that Akr1b7, an aldo-keto reductase enriched in adipose stromal vascular fraction but absent from mature adipocytes, has antiadipogenic properties possibly supported by PGF(2α) synthase activity. To test whether lack of Akr1b7 could influence WAT homeostasis in vivo, we generated Akr1b7(-/-) mice in 129/Sv background. Akr1b7(-/-) mice displayed excessive basal adiposity resulting from adipocyte hyperplasia/hypertrophy and exhibited greater sensitivity to diet-induced obesity. Following adipose enlargement and irrespective of the diet, they developed liver steatosis and progressive insulin resistance. Akr1b7 loss was associated with decreased PGF(2α) WAT contents. Cloprostenol (PGF(2α) agonist) administration to Akr1b7(-/-) mice normalized WAT expansion by affecting both de novo adipocyte differentiation and size. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Akr1b7(-/-) mice with cloprostenol suggested that decreased adipocyte size resulted from inhibition of lipogenic gene expression. Hence, Akr1b7 is a major regulator of WAT development through at least two PGF(2α)-dependent mechanisms: inhibition of adipogenesis and lipogenesis. These findings provide molecular rationale to explore the status of aldo-keto reductases in dysregulations of adipose tissue homeostasis.

  10. Identification of a functional antioxidant responsive element in the promoter of the Chinese hamster carbonyl reductase 3 (Chcr3) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takeshi; Taketomi, Ayako; Nakabayashi, Toshikatsu; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki

    2015-07-01

    CHCR3, a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily, is a carbonyl reductase 3 enzyme in Chinese hamsters. Carbonyl reductase 3 in humans has been believed to involve the metabolism and/or pharmacokinetics of anthracycline drugs, and the mechanism underlying the gene regulation has been investigated. In this study, the nucleotide sequence of the Chcr3 promoter was originally determined, and its promoter activity was characterised. The proximal promoter region is TATA-less and GC-rich, similar to the promoter region of human carbonyl reductase 3. Cobalt stimulated the transcriptional activity of the Chcr3 gene. The results of a luciferase gene reporter assay demonstrated that cobalt-induced stimulation required an antioxidant responsive element. Forced expression of Nrf2, the transcription factor that binds to antioxidant responsive elements, enhanced the transcriptional activity of the Chcr3 gene. These results suggest that cobalt induces the expression of the Chcr3 gene via the Nrf2-antioxidant responsive element pathway.

  11. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  12. Transient receptor potential (TRP gene superfamily encoding cation channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Transient receptor potential (TRP non-selective cation channels constitute a superfamily, which contains 28 different genes. In mammals, this superfamily is divided into six subfamilies based on differences in amino acid sequence homology between the different gene products. Proteins within a subfamily aggregate to form heteromeric or homomeric tetrameric configurations. These different groupings have very variable permeability ratios for calcium versus sodium ions. TRP expression is widely distributed in neuronal tissues, as well as a host of other tissues, including epithelial and endothelial cells. They are activated by environmental stresses that include tissue injury, changes in temperature, pH and osmolarity, as well as volatile chemicals, cytokines and plant compounds. Their activation induces, via intracellular calcium signalling, a host of responses, including stimulation of cell proliferation, migration, regulatory volume behaviour and the release of a host of cytokines. Their activation is greatly potentiated by phospholipase C (PLC activation mediated by coupled GTP-binding proteins and tyrosine receptors. In addition to their importance in maintaining tissue homeostasis, some of these responses may involve various underlying diseases. Given the wealth of literature describing the multiple roles of TRP in physiology in a very wide range of different mammalian tissues, this review limits itself to the literature describing the multiple roles of TRP channels in different ocular tissues. Accordingly, their importance to the corneal, trabecular meshwork, lens, ciliary muscle, retinal, microglial and retinal pigment epithelial physiology and pathology is reviewed.

  13. Ancient origin of the new developmental superfamily DANGER.

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    Nikolas Nikolaidis

    Full Text Available Developmental proteins play a pivotal role in the origin of animal complexity and diversity. We report here the identification of a highly divergent developmental protein superfamily (DANGER, which originated before the emergence of animals (approximately 850 million years ago and experienced major expansion-contraction events during metazoan evolution. Sequence analysis demonstrates that DANGER proteins diverged via multiple mechanisms, including amino acid substitution, intron gain and/or loss, and recombination. Divergence for DANGER proteins is substantially greater than for the prototypic member of the superfamily (Mab-21 family and other developmental protein families (e.g., WNT proteins. DANGER proteins are widely expressed and display species-dependent tissue expression patterns, with many members having roles in development. DANGER1A, which regulates the inositol trisphosphate receptor, promotes the differentiation and outgrowth of neuronal processes. Regulation of development may be a universal function of DANGER family members. This family provides a model system to investigate how rapid protein divergence contributes to morphological complexity.

  14. TNF Superfamily: A Growing Saga of Kidney Injury Modulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Sanchez-Niño

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the TNF superfamily participate in kidney disease. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF and Fas ligand regulate renal cell survival and inflammation, and therapeutic targeting improves the outcome of experimental renal injury. TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL and its potential decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the two most upregulated death-related genes in human diabetic nephropathy. TRAIL activates NF-kappaB in tubular cells and promotes apoptosis in tubular cells and podocytes, especially in a high-glucose environment. By contrast, osteoprotegerin plays a protective role against TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Another family member, TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK induces inflammation and tubular cell death or proliferation, depending on the microenvironment. While TNF only activates canonical NF-kappaB signaling, TWEAK promotes both canonical and noncanonical NF-kappaB activation in tubular cells, regulating different inflammatory responses. TWEAK promotes the secretion of MCP-1 and RANTES through NF-kappaB RelA-containing complexes and upregulates CCl21 and CCL19 expression through NF-kappaB inducing kinase (NIK- dependent RelB/NF-kappaB2 complexes. In vivo TWEAK promotes postnephrectomy compensatory renal cell proliferation in a noninflammatory milieu. However, in the inflammatory milieu of acute kidney injury, TWEAK promotes tubular cell death and inflammation. Therapeutic targeting of TNF superfamily cytokines, including multipronged approaches targeting several cytokines should be further explored.

  15. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  16. Plant tropane alkaloid biosynthesis evolved independently in the Solanaceae and Erythroxylaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirschitzka, Jan; Schmidt, Gregor W; Reichelt, Michael; Schneider, Bernd; Gershenzon, Jonathan; D'Auria, John Charles

    2012-06-26

    The pharmacologically important tropane alkaloids have a scattered distribution among angiosperm families, like many other groups of secondary metabolites. To determine whether tropane alkaloids have evolved repeatedly in different lineages or arise from an ancestral pathway that has been lost in most lines, we investigated the tropinone-reduction step of their biosynthesis. In species of the Solanaceae, which produce compounds such as atropine and scopolamine, this reaction is known to be catalyzed by enzymes of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. However, in Erythroxylum coca (Erythroxylaceae), which accumulates cocaine and other tropane alkaloids, no proteins of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family were found that could catalyze this reaction. Instead, purification of E. coca tropinone-reduction activity and cloning of the corresponding gene revealed that a protein of the aldo-keto reductase family carries out this reaction in E. coca. This protein, designated methylecgonone reductase, converts methylecgonone to methylecgonine, the penultimate step in cocaine biosynthesis. The protein has highest sequence similarity to other aldo-keto reductases, such as chalcone reductase, an enzyme of flavonoid biosynthesis, and codeinone reductase, an enzyme of morphine alkaloid biosynthesis. Methylecgonone reductase reduces methylecgonone (2-carbomethoxy-3-tropinone) stereospecifically to 2-carbomethoxy-3β-tropine (methylecgonine), and has its highest activity, protein level, and gene transcript level in young, expanding leaves of E. coca. This enzyme is not found at all in root tissues, which are the site of tropane alkaloid biosynthesis in the Solanaceae. This evidence supports the theory that the ability to produce tropane alkaloids has arisen more than once during the evolution of the angiosperms.

  17. The cellulose synthase superfamily in fully sequenced plants and algae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellulose synthase superfamily has been classified into nine cellulose synthase-like (Csl families and one cellulose synthase (CesA family. The Csl families have been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of the backbones of hemicelluloses of plant cell walls. With 17 plant and algal genomes fully sequenced, we sought to conduct a genome-wide and systematic investigation of this superfamily through in-depth phylogenetic analyses. Results A single-copy gene is found in the six chlorophyte green algae, which is most closely related to the CslA and CslC families that are present in the seven land plants investigated in our analyses. Six proteins from poplar, grape and sorghum form a distinct family (CslJ, providing further support for the conclusions from two recent studies. CslB/E/G/H/J families have evolved significantly more rapidly than their widely distributed relatives, and tend to have intragenomic duplications, in particular in the grape genome. Conclusion Our data suggest that the CslA and CslC families originated through an ancient gene duplication event in land plants. We speculate that the single-copy Csl gene in green algae may encode a mannan synthase. We confirm that the rest of the Csl families have a different evolutionary origin than CslA and CslC, and have proposed a model for the divergence order among them. Our study provides new insights about the evolution of this important gene family in plants.

  18. Implications of Mycobacterium Major Facilitator Superfamily for Novel Measures against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhang, Zhen; Xie, Longxiang; Xie, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is an important secondary membrane transport protein superfamily conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. The MFS proteins are widespread among bacteria and are responsible for the transfer of substrates. Pathogenic Mycobacterium MFS transporters, their distribution, function, phylogeny, and predicted crystal structures were studied to better understand the function of MFS and to discover specific inhibitors of MFS for better tuberculosis control.

  19. The conserved scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily in therapy and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Moestrup, Søren Kragh; Holmskov, Uffe;

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily of soluble or membrane-bound protein receptors is characterized by the presence of one or several repeats of an ancient and highly conserved protein module, the SRCR domain. This superfamily (SRCR-SF) has been in constant and progressive...

  20. The ribonuclease A superfamily of mammals and birds : identifying new members and tracing evolutionary histories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, S; Beintema, JJ; Zhang, JZ

    2005-01-01

    The RNase A superfamily has been important in biochemical, structural, and evolutionary studies and is believed to be the sole vertebratespecific enzyme family. To understand the origin and diversification of the superfamily, we here determine its entire repertoire in the sequenced genomes of human,

  1. Short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramm, Anneke; Kisiela, Michael; Schulz, Rüdiger; Maser, Edmund

    2012-03-01

    The short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) represent a large superfamily of enzymes, most of which are NAD(H)-dependent or NADP(H)-dependent oxidoreductases. They display a wide substrate spectrum, including steroids, alcohols, sugars, aromatic compounds, and xenobiotics. On the basis of characteristic sequence motifs, the SDRs are subdivided into two main (classical and extended) and three smaller (divergent, intermediate, and complex) families. Despite low residue identities in pairwise comparisons, the three-dimensional structure among the SDRs is conserved and shows a typical Rossmann fold. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach to determine whether and which SDRs are present in cyanobacteria, microorganisms that played an important role in our ecosystem as the first oxygen producers. Cyanobacterial SDRs could indeed be identified, and were clustered according to the SDR classification system. Furthermore, because of the early availability of its genome sequence and the easy application of transformation methods, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, one of the most important cyanobacterial strains, was chosen as the model organism for this phylum. Synechocystis sp. SDRs were further analysed with bioinformatics tools, such as hidden Markov models (HMMs). It became evident that several cyanobacterial SDRs show remarkable sequence identities with SDRs in other organisms. These so-called 'homologous' proteins exist in plants, model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis  elegans, and even in humans. As sequence identities of up to 60% were found between Synechocystis and humans, it was concluded that SDRs seemed to have been well conserved during evolution, even after dramatic terrestrial changes such as the conversion of the early reducing atmosphere to an oxidizing one by cyanobacteria.

  2. Enzymes of the AKR1B and AKR1C subfamilies and uterine diseases

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    Tea eLanisnik Rizner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial and cervical cancers, uterine myoma, and endometriosis are very common uterine diseases. Worldwide, more than 800,000 women are affected annually by gynecological cancers, as a result of which, more than 360,000 die. During their reproductive age, about 70% of women develop uterine myomas, 10% to 15% suffer from endometriosis, and 35% to 50% from infertility associated with endometriosis. Uterine diseases are associated with aberrant inflammatory responses and concomitant increased production of prostaglandins (PG. They are also related to decreased differentiation, due to low levels of protective progesterone and retinoic acid, and to enhanced proliferation, due to high local concentrations of estrogens. The pathogenesis of these diseases can thus be attributed to disturbed PG, estrogen and retinoid metabolism and actions. Five human members of the aldo-keto reductase 1B (AKR1B and 1C (AKR1C superfamilies, i.e., AKR1B1, AKR1B10, AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, have roles in these processes and can thus be implicated in uterine diseases. AKR1B1 and AKR1C3 catalyze the formation of PGF2alpha which stimulates cell proliferation. AKR1C3 converts PGD2 to 9alpha,11beta-PGF2, and thus counteracts the formation of 15deoxy-PGJ2, which can activate pro-apoptotic peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor beta. AKR1B10 catalyzes the reduction of retinal to retinol, and in thus lessens the formation of retinoic acid, with potential pro-differentiating actions. The AKR1C1-AKR1C3 enzymes also act as 17-keto- and 20-ketosteroid reductases to varying extents, and are implicated in increased estradiol and decreased progesterone levels. This review comprises a short introduction to uterine diseases, followed by an overview of the current literature on the AKR1B and AKR1C expression in the uterus and in uterine diseases. The potential implications of the AKR1B and AKR1C enzymes and their pathophysiologies are then discussed, followed by conclusions and

  3. Benzo(a)pyrene induces hepatic AKR1A1 mRNA expression in tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Yáñez, Citlalli; García-Tavera, José Luis; Pérez-Núñez, Maria Teresa; Poblete-Naredo, Irais; Muñoz, Balam; Barron-Vivanco, Briscia S; Rothenberg, Stephen J; Zapata-Pérez, Omar; Albores, Arnulfo

    2012-07-01

    AKR1A1 or aldehyde reductase is a member of the aldo-keto reductases superfamily that is evolutionarily conserved among species. AKR1A1 is one of the five AKRs (AKR1A1 and 1C1-1C4) implicated in the metabolic benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) activation to reactive BaP 7,8-dione. BaP is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) widely distributed in aquatic ecosystems and its metabolic activation is necessary to produce its toxic effects. Although the presence of AKR1A1 in fish has been reported, its tissue distribution in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) and AKR1A1 inducibility by BaP are not known yet. Moreover, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) mRNA expression in fish has been used as a PAH biomarker of effect. Therefore, BaP effects on AKR1A1 and CYP1A gene expressions in tilapia, a species of commercial interest, were investigated by real-time RT-PCR. A partial AKR1A1 cDNA was identified, sequenced and compared with AKR1A1 reported sequences in the GenBank DNA database. Constitutive AKR1A1 mRNA expression was detected mainly in liver, similarly to that of CYP1A. BaP exposure resulted in statistically significant AKR1A1 and CYP1A mRNA induction in liver (20- and 120-fold, respectively) at 24 h. On the other hand, ethoxyquin (EQ) was used as control inducer for AKR1A1 mRNA. Interestingly, EQ also induced CYP1A mRNA levels in tilapia liver. Our results suggest that teleost AKR1A1, in addition to CYP1A, are inducible by BaP. The mechanism of AKR1A1 induction by BaP and its role in fish susceptibility to BaP toxic effects remains to be elucidated.

  4. Excision of transposable elements from the chalcone isomerase and dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes may contribute to the variegation of the yellow-flowered carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yoshio; Higeta, Daisuke; Suzuki, Akane; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozeki, Yoshihiro

    2002-05-01

    In the "Rhapsody" cultivar of the carnation, which bears white flowers variegated with red flecks and sectors, a transposable element, dTdic1, belonging to the Ac/Ds superfamily, was found within the dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) gene. The red flecks and sectors of "Rhapsody" may be attributable to a reversion to DFR activity after the excision of dTdic1. The yellow color of the carnation petals is attributed to the synthesis and accumulation of chalcone 2'-glucoside. In several of the carnation cultivars that bear yellow flowers variegated with white flecks and sectors, both the chalcone isomerase (CHI) and DFR genes are disrupted by dTdic1.

  5. Functions of Kinesin Superfamily Proteins in Neuroreceptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity is widely regarded as the cellular basis of learning and memory. Understanding the molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity has been one of center pieces of neuroscience research for more than three decades. It has been well known that the trafficking of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazoloe-4-propionic acid- (AMPA- type, N-methyl-D-aspartate- (NMDA- type glutamate receptors to and from synapses is a key molecular event underlying many forms of synaptic plasticity. Kainate receptors are another type of glutamate receptors playing important roles in synaptic transmission. In addition, GABA receptors also play important roles in modulating the synaptic plasticity. Kinesin superfamily proteins (also known as KIFs transport various cargos in both anterograde and retrograde directions through the interaction with different adaptor proteins. Recent studies indicate that KIFs regulate the trafficking of NMDA receptors, AMPA receptors, kainate receptors, and GABA receptors and thus play important roles in neuronal activity. Here we review the essential functions of KIFs in the trafficking of neuroreceptor and synaptic plasticity.

  6. Chemical synthesis of peptides within the insulin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fa; Zaykov, Alexander N; Levy, Jay J; DiMarchi, Richard D; Mayer, John P

    2016-05-01

    The synthesis of insulin has inspired fundamental advances in the art of peptide science while simultaneously revealing the structure-function relationship of this centrally important metabolic hormone. This review highlights milestones in the chemical synthesis of insulin that can be divided into two separate approaches: (i) disulfide bond formation driven by protein folding and (ii) chemical reactivity-directed sequential disulfide bond formation. Common to the two approaches are the persistent challenges presented by the hydrophobic nature of the individual A-chain and B-chain and the need for selective disulfide formation under mildly oxidative conditions. The extension and elaboration of these synthetic approaches have been ongoing within the broader insulin superfamily. These structurally similar peptides include the insulin-like growth factors and also the related peptides such as relaxin that signal through G-protein-coupled receptors. After a half-century of advances in insulin chemistry, we have reached a point where synthesis is no longer limiting structural and biological investigation within this family of peptide hormones. The future will increasingly focus on the refinement of structure to meet medicinal purposes that have long been pursued, such as the development of a glucose-sensitive insulin. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  8. Two-Stage Approach for Protein Superfamily Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Vipsita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal with the problem of protein superfamily classification in which the family membership of newly discovered amino acid sequence is predicted. Correct prediction is a matter of great concern for the researchers and drug analyst which helps them in discovery of new drugs. As this problem falls broadly under the category of pattern classification problem, we have made all efforts to optimize feature extraction in the first stage and classifier design in the second stage with an overall objective to maximize the performance accuracy of the classifier. In the feature extraction phase, Genetic Algorithm- (GA- based wrapper approach is used to select few eigenvectors from the principal component analysis (PCA space which are encoded as binary strings in the chromosome. On the basis of position of 1’s in the chromosome, the eigenvectors are selected to build the transformation matrix which then maps the original high-dimension feature space to lower dimension feature space. Using PCA-NSGA-II (non-dominated sorting GA, the nondominated solutions obtained from the Pareto front solve the trade-off problem by compromising between the number of eigenvectors selected and the accuracy obtained by the classifier. In the second stage, recursive orthogonal least square algorithm (ROLSA is used for training radial basis function network (RBFN to select optimal number of hidden centres as well as update the output layer weighting matrix. This approach can be applied to large data set with much lower requirements of computer memory. Thus, very small architectures having few number of hidden centres are obtained showing higher level of performance accuracy.

  9. Evolution of plant defense mechanisms. Relationships of phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases to pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, D R; Kasahara, H; Xia, Z Q; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Bauw, G; Boerjan, W; Van Montagu, M; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-03-12

    Pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductase classes are phylogenetically related, as is a third, the so-called "isoflavone reductase homologs." This study establishes the first known catalytic function for the latter, as being able to engender the NADPH-dependent reduction of phenylcoumaran benzylic ethers. Accordingly, all three reductase classes are involved in the biosynthesis of important and related phenylpropanoid-derived plant defense compounds. In this investigation, the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase from the gymnosperm, Pinus taeda, was cloned, with the recombinant protein heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme reduces the benzylic ether functionalities of both dehydrodiconiferyl alcohol and dihydrodehydrodiconiferyl alcohol, with a higher affinity for the former, as measured by apparent Km and Vmax values and observed kinetic 3H-isotope effects. It abstracts the 4R-hydride of the required NADPH cofactor in a manner analogous to that of the pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases. A similar catalytic function was observed for the corresponding recombinant reductase whose gene was cloned from the angiosperm, Populus trichocarpa. Interestingly, both pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases and isoflavone reductases catalyze enantiospecific conversions, whereas the phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase only shows regiospecific discrimination. A possible evolutionary relationship among the three reductase classes is proposed, based on the supposition that phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases represent the progenitors of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and isoflavone reductases.

  10. Uncovering the Transmembrane Metal Binding Site of the Novel Bacterial Major Facilitator Superfamily-Type Copper Importer CcoA

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    Bahia Khalfaoui-Hassani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Uptake and trafficking of metals and their delivery to their respective metalloproteins are important processes. Cells need precise control of each step to avoid exposure to excessive metal concentrations and their harmful consequences. Copper (Cu is a required micronutrient used as a cofactor in proteins. However, in large amounts, it can induce oxidative damage; hence, Cu homeostasis is indispensable for cell survival. Biogenesis of respiratory heme-Cu oxygen (HCO reductases includes insertion of Cu into their catalytic subunits to form heme-Cu binuclear centers. Previously, we had shown that CcoA is a major facilitator superfamily (MFS-type bacterial Cu importer required for biogenesis of cbb3-type cytochrome c oxidase (cbb3-Cox. Here, using Rhodobacter capsulatus, we focused on the import and delivery of Cu to cbb3-Cox. By comparing the CcoA amino acid sequence with its homologues from other bacterial species, we located several well-conserved Met, His, and Tyr residues that might be important for Cu transport. We determined the topology of the transmembrane helices that carry these residues to establish that they are membrane embedded, and substituted for them amino acids that do not ligand metal atoms. Characterization of these mutants for their uptake of radioactive 64Cu and cbb3-Cox activities demonstrated that Met233 and His261 of CcoA are essential and Met237 and Met265 are important, whereas Tyr230 has no role for Cu uptake or cbb3-Cox biogenesis. These findings show for the first time that CcoA-mediated Cu import relies on conserved Met and His residues that could act as metal ligands at the membrane-embedded Cu binding domain of this transporter.

  11. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jaewoong; Liu, Z Lewis

    2015-04-01

    The aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of an intermediate subfamily within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily that clarified mechanisms of in situ detoxification of 2-furaldehyde and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) are common among tolerant candidate genes identified for lignocellulose-to-advanced biofuels conversion. This study presents partially purified proteins of two ORFs, YDR541C and YGL039W, and direct enzyme assay evidence against aldehyde-inhibitory compounds commonly encountered during lignocellulosic biomass fermentation processes. Each of the partially purified proteins encoded by these ORFs showed a molecular mass of approximately 38 kDa, similar to Ari1p, a protein encoded by aldehyde reductase gene. Both proteins demonstrated strong aldehyde reduction activities toward 14 aldehyde substrates, with high levels of reduction activity for Ydr541cp toward both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. While Ydr541cp was observed to have a significantly higher specific enzyme activity at 20 U/mg using co-factor NADPH, Ygl039wp displayed a NADH preference at 25 U/mg in reduction of butylaldehyde. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a characteristic catalytic triad, Ser, Tyr and Lys; a conserved catalytic motif of Tyr-X-X-X-Lys; and a cofactor-binding sequence motif, Gly-X-X-Gly-X-X-Ala, near the N-terminus that are shared by Ydr541cp, Ygl039wp, Yol151wp/GRE2 and Ari1p. Findings of aldehyde reductase genes contribute to the yeast gene annotation and aids development of the next-generation biocatalyst for advanced biofuels production.

  12. Cloning and expression of the gene encoding (R)-specific carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC M203011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The gene which encodes (R)-specific carbonyl reductase (rCR) from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC M203011 was cloned, sequenced and compared with genes from the GenBank. The results indicated that rCR gene was 1011 bp, encoding a protein of 336 amino acids with a molecular weight of 35.9 kDa, and its nucleotide sequence showed 99% similarity to those of other members of the alcohol dehydrogenase superfamily. The rCR gene could express in recombinant strain Escherichia coli JM 109, and the expression plasmid could produce (R)-1-pheny-1,2-ethanediol (100% e.e., 80.14% yield) fromβ-hydroxyacetophenone without any additive to regenerate NAD+ from NADH.

  13. Utility of the Amborella trichopoda expansin superfamily in elucidating the history of angiosperm expansins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seader, Victoria H; Thornsberry, Jennifer M; Carey, Robert E

    2016-03-01

    Expansins form a superfamily of plant proteins that assist in cell wall loosening during growth and development. The superfamily is divided into four families: EXPA, EXPB, EXLA, and EXLB (Sampedro and Cosgrove in Genome Biol 6:242, 2005. doi: 10.1186/gb-2005-6-12-242 ). Previous studies on Arabidopsis, rice, and Populus trichocarpa have clarified the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms (Sampedro et al. in Plant J 44:409-419, 2005. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2005.02540.x ). Amborella trichopoda is a flowering plant that diverged very early. Thus, it is a sister lineage to all other extant angiosperms (Amborella Genome Project in 342:1241089, 2013. doi: 10.1126/science.1241089 ). Because of this relationship, comparing the A. trichopoda expansin superfamily with those of other flowering plants may indicate which expansin genes were present in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms. The A. trichopoda expansin superfamily was assembled using BLAST searches with angiosperm expansin queries. The search results were analyzed and annotated to isolate the complete A. trichopoda expansin superfamily. This superfamily is similar to other angiosperm expansin superfamilies, but is somewhat smaller. This is likely because of a lack of genome duplication events (Amborella Genome Project 2013). Phylogenetic and syntenic analyses of A. trichopoda expansins have improved our understanding of the evolutionary history of expansins in angiosperms. Nearly all of the A. trichopoda expansins were placed into an existing Arabidopsis-rice expansin clade. Based on the results of phylogenetic and syntenic analyses, we estimate there were 12-13 EXPA genes, 2 EXPB genes, 1 EXLA gene, and 2 EXLB genes in the last common ancestor of all angiosperms.

  14. Oxidative DNA damage induced by benz[a]anthracene dihydrodiols in the presence of dihydrodiol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seike, Kazuharu; Murata, Mariko; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Deyashiki, Yoshihiro; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2004-11-01

    Tobacco smoke and polluted air are risk factors for lung cancer and contain many kinds of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) including benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and benz[a]anthracene (BA). BA, as well as B[a]P, is assessed as probably carcinogenic to humans (IARC group 2A). BA is metabolized to several dihydrodiols. Dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (DD), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, catalyzes NAD(P)+-linked oxidation of dihydrodiols of aromatic hydrocarbons to corresponding catechols. To clarify the role of DD on PAH carcinogenesis, we examined oxidative DNA damage induced by trans-dihydrodiols of BA and B[a]P treated with DD using 32P-5'-end-labeled DNA fragments obtained from the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In addition, we investigated the formation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA by using HPLC with an electrochemical detector. DD-catalyzed BA-1,2-dihydrodiol caused Cu(II)-mediated DNA damage including 8-oxodG formation in the presence of NAD+. BA-1,2-dihydrodiol induced a Fpg sensitive and piperidine labile G lesion at the 5'-ACG-3' sequence complementary to codon 273 of the human p53 tumor suppressor gene, which is known as a hotspot. DNA damage was inhibited by catalase and bathocuproine, suggesting the involvement of H2O2 and Cu(I). The observation of NADH production by UV-visible spectroscopy suggested that DD catalyzed BA-1,2-dihydrodiol most efficiently to the corresponding catechol among the PAH-dihydrodiols tested. A time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study showed that the catechol form of BA-1,2-dihydrodiol formed after DD treatment. In conclusion, BA-1,2-dihydrodiol can induce DNA damage more efficiently than B[a]P-7,8-dihydrodiol and other BA-dihydrodiols in the presence of DD. The reaction mechanism on oxidative DNA damage may be explained by theoretical calculations with an enthalpy change of dihydrodiols and oxidation potential of their catechol forms. DD

  15. Cloning, sequencing, and functional analysis of the 5'-flanking region of the rat 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H K; Penning, T M

    1995-09-15

    Rat liver 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid/dihydrodiol dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD/DD) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase gene superfamily. It displays high constitutive expression and inactivates circulating steroid hormones and suppresses the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon anti- and syn-diol-epoxides (ultimate carcinogens). To elucidate mechanisms responsible for constitutive expression of the 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene a rat genomic library obtained from adult Sprague-Dawley female liver (HaeIII partial digest) was screened, using a probe corresponding to the 5'-end of the cDNA (-15 to +250), and a 15.8-kb genomic clone was isolated. Sequencing revealed that 6.3 kb contained exon 1 (+16 to +138 bp) plus additional introns and exons. The transcription start site (+1) was located by primer extension analysis, and the initiation codon, ATG, was located at +55 bp. The remaining 9.5 kb represented the 5'-flanking region of the rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene. A 1.6-kb fragment of this region was sequenced. A TATTTAA sequence (TATA box) was found at 33 bp upstream from the major transcription start site. cis-acting elements responsible for the constitutive expression of the rat 3 alpha-HSD/DD gene were located on the 5'-flanking region by transient transfection of reporter-gene (chloramphenicol acetyl transferase, CAT) constructs into human hepatoma cells (HepG2). CAT assays identified the basal promoter between (-199 and +55 bp), the presence of a proximal enhancer (-498 to -199 bp) which stimulated CAT activity 6-fold, the existence of a powerful silencer (-755 to -498 bp), and a strong distal enhancer (-4.0 to -2.0 kb) which increased CAT activity by 20-40-fold. A computer search of available consensus sequences for trans-acting factors revealed that a cluster of Oct-sites were uniquely located in the silencer region. Using the negative response element (-797 to -498 bp) as a probe and nuclear extracts from HepG2 cells, three bands were identified by gel mobility shift

  16. Spectroscopic Signature of a Ubiquitous Metal Binding Site in the Metallo-beta-lactamase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V Campos-Bermudez; J Gonzalez; D Tierney; A Vila

    2011-12-31

    The metallo-{beta}-lactamase (M{beta}L) superfamily is a functionally diverse group of metalloproteins sharing a distinctive {alpha}{beta}/{alpha}{beta} fold and a characteristic metal binding motif. A large number of open reading frames identified in genomic sequencing efforts have been annotated as members of this superfamily through sequence comparisons. However, structural and functional studies performed on purified proteins are normally needed to unequivocally include a newly discovered protein in the M{beta}L superfamily. Here we report the spectroscopic characterization of recombinant YcbL, a gene product annotated as a member of the M{beta}L superfamily whose function in vivo remains unknown. By taking advantage of the structural features characterizing the M{beta}L superfamily metal binding motif, we performed spectroscopic studies on Zn(II)- and Co(II)-substituted YcbL to structurally interrogate the metal binding site. The dinuclear center in Co(II)-YcbL was shown to display characteristic electronic absorption features in the visible region, which were also observed in an engineered M{beta}L aimed at mimicking this metal site. Thus, the spectroscopic features reported herein can be employed as a signature to readily identify and characterize the presence of these ubiquitous metal binding sites.

  17. Geometric restraint drives on- and off-pathway catalysis by the Escherichia coli menaquinol:fumarate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasiak, Thomas M; Archuleta, Tara L; Andréll, Juni; Luna-Chávez, César; Davis, Tyler A; Sarwar, Maruf; Ham, Amy J; McDonald, W Hayes; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Stern, Harry A; Johnston, Jeffrey N; Maklashina, Elena; Cecchini, Gary; Iverson, Tina M

    2011-01-28

    Complex II superfamily members catalyze the kinetically difficult interconversion of succinate and fumarate. Due to the relative simplicity of complex II substrates and their similarity to other biologically abundant small molecules, substrate specificity presents a challenge in this system. In order to identify determinants for on-pathway catalysis, off-pathway catalysis, and enzyme inhibition, crystal structures of Escherichia coli menaquinol:fumarate reductase (QFR), a complex II superfamily member, were determined bound to the substrate, fumarate, and the inhibitors oxaloacetate, glutarate, and 3-nitropropionate. Optical difference spectroscopy and computational modeling support a model where QFR twists the dicarboxylate, activating it for catalysis. Orientation of the C2-C3 double bond of activated fumarate parallel to the C(4a)-N5 bond of FAD allows orbital overlap between the substrate and the cofactor, priming the substrate for nucleophilic attack. Off-pathway catalysis, such as the conversion of malate to oxaloacetate or the activation of the toxin 3-nitropropionate may occur when inhibitors bind with a similarly activated bond in the same position. Conversely, inhibitors that do not orient an activatable bond in this manner, such as glutarate and citrate, are excluded from catalysis and act as inhibitors of substrate binding. These results support a model where electronic interactions via geometric constraint and orbital steering underlie catalysis by QFR.

  18. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant short-chain NAD(H)-dependent dehydrogenase/reductase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchio, Angela; Giordano, Assunta; Pucci, Biagio; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2010-03-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) superfamily was identified in the aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain DSM 639. The saadh gene was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein (SaADH) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. SaADH is a tetrameric enzyme consisting of identical 28,978-Da subunits, each composed of 264 amino acids. The enzyme has remarkable thermophilicity and thermal stability, displaying activity at temperatures up to 75 degrees C and a 30-min half-inactivation temperature of ~90 degrees C, and shows good tolerance to common organic solvents. SaADH has a strict requirement for NAD(H) as the coenzyme, and displays a preference for the reduction of alicyclic, bicyclic and aromatic ketones and alpha-keto esters, but is poorly active on aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic alcohols, and shows no activity on aldehydes. The enzyme catalyses the reduction of alpha-methyl and alpha-ethyl benzoylformate, and methyl o-chlorobenzoylformate with 100% conversion to methyl (S)-mandelate [17% enantiomeric excess (ee)], ethyl (R)-mandelate (50% ee), and methyl (R)-o-chloromandelate (72% ee), respectively, with an efficient in situ NADH-recycling system which involves glucose and a thermophilic glucose dehydrogenase. This study provides further evidence supporting the critical role of the D37 residue in discriminating NAD(H) from NAD(P)H in members of the SDR superfamily.

  19. Discovery of pinoresinol reductase genes in sphingomonads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Y; Kamimura, N; Nakajima, M; Hishiyama, S; Hara, H; Kasai, D; Tsuji, Y; Narita-Yamada, S; Nakamura, S; Katano, Y; Fujita, N; Katayama, Y; Fukuda, M; Kajita, S; Masai, E

    2013-01-10

    Bacterial genes for the degradation of major dilignols produced in lignifying xylem are expected to be useful tools for the structural modification of lignin in plants. For this purpose, we isolated pinZ involved in the conversion of pinoresinol from Sphingobium sp. strain SYK-6. pinZ showed 43-77% identity at amino acid level with bacterial NmrA-like proteins of unknown function, a subgroup of atypical short chain dehydrogenases/reductases, but revealed only 15-21% identity with plant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. PinZ completely converted racemic pinoresinol to lariciresinol, showing a specific activity of 46±3 U/mg in the presence of NADPH at 30°C. In contrast, the activity for lariciresinol was negligible. This substrate preference is similar to a pinoresinol reductase, AtPrR1, of Arabidopsis thaliana; however, the specific activity of PinZ toward (±)-pinoresinol was significantly higher than that of AtPrR1. The role of pinZ and a pinZ ortholog of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 were also characterized.

  20. A new method of research on molecular evolution of pro-teinase superfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The molecular evolutionary tree, also known as a phylogenetic tree, of the serine proteinase superfamily was constructed by means of structural alignment. Three-dimensional structures of proteins were aligned by the SSAP program of Orengo and Taylor to obtain evolutionary dis-tances. The resulting evolutionary tree provides a topology graph that can reflect the evolution of structure and function of homology proteinase. Moreover, study on evolution of the serine proteinase superfamily can lead to better under-standing of the relationship and evolutionary difference among proteins of the superfamily, and is of significance to protein engineering, molecular design and protein structure prediction. Structure alignment is one of the useful methods of research on molecular evolution of protein.

  1. The nitric-oxide reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans uses a single specific proton pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Beek, Josy; Krause, Nils; Reimann, Joachim; Lachmann, Peter; Ädelroth, Pia

    2013-10-18

    The NO reductase from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces NO to N2O (2NO + 2H(+) + 2e(-) → N2O + H2O) with electrons donated by periplasmic cytochrome c (cytochrome c-dependent NO reductase; cNOR). cNORs are members of the heme-copper oxidase superfamily of integral membrane proteins, comprising the O2-reducing, proton-pumping respiratory enzymes. In contrast, although NO reduction is as exergonic as O2 reduction, there are no protons pumped in cNOR, and in addition, protons needed for NO reduction are derived from the periplasmic solution (no contribution to the electrochemical gradient is made). cNOR thus only needs to transport protons from the periplasm into the active site without the requirement to control the timing of opening and closing (gating) of proton pathways as is needed in a proton pump. Based on the crystal structure of a closely related cNOR and molecular dynamics simulations, several proton transfer pathways were suggested, and in principle, these could all be functional. In this work, we show that residues in one of the suggested pathways (denoted pathway 1) are sensitive to site-directed mutation, whereas residues in the other proposed pathways (pathways 2 and 3) could be exchanged without severe effects on turnover activity with either NO or O2. We further show that electron transfer during single-turnover reduction of O2 is limited by proton transfer and can thus be used to study alterations in proton transfer rates. The exchange of residues along pathway 1 showed specific slowing of this proton-coupled electron transfer as well as changes in its pH dependence. Our results indicate that only pathway 1 is used to transfer protons in cNOR.

  2. Keanekaragaman Jenis Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidae di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Oqtafiana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupu-kupu turut memberi andil dalam mempertahankan keseimbangan ekosistem dan memperkaya keanekaragaman hayati. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu Desa Limbangan Kecamatan Limbangan Kabupaten Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS dan persawahan.Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah semua jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang ada di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. Sampel penelitian ini adalah jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang teramati di Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, DAS dan persawahan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode Indeks Point Abudance (IPA atau metode titik hitung.Hasil penelitian ditemukan sebanyak 62 jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang terdiri dari 737 individu yang tergolong kedalam empat famili yaitu Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae dan Nymphalidae. Hasil analisis indeks keanekaragaman jenis berkisar antara 2,74-3,09, indeks kemerataan jenis berkisar antara 0,86-0,87 dan memiliki dominansi berkisar antara 0,07-0,09. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis dan indeks kemerataan jenis tertinggi tercatat pada habitat permukiman yaitu 3,09 dan 0,87 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07 sedangkan terendah tercatat pada habitat persawahan yaitu 2,74 dan 0,86 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07.Butterfly also contribute in maintaining the ecological balance and enrich biodiversity. The aim of this research was to determine the diversity of butterflies’ superfamily Papilionoidae in Banyuwindu Hamlet Limbangan Sub district Kendal Regency, especially in the secondary forest habitat, settlements, river flow area (RFA and rice field. The population in this research were all kinds of butterflies’ Papilionoidae superfamily in Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. The sample was kind of butterfly superfamily Papilionoidae that observed in Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal

  3. PASS2: an automated database of protein alignments organised as structural superfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowdhamini Ramanathan

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The functional selection and three-dimensional structural constraints of proteins in nature often relates to the retention of significant sequence similarity between proteins of similar fold and function despite poor sequence identity. Organization of structure-based sequence alignments for distantly related proteins, provides a map of the conserved and critical regions of the protein universe that is useful for the analysis of folding principles, for the evolutionary unification of protein families and for maximizing the information return from experimental structure determination. The Protein Alignment organised as Structural Superfamily (PASS2 database represents continuously updated, structural alignments for evolutionary related, sequentially distant proteins. Description An automated and updated version of PASS2 is, in direct correspondence with SCOP 1.63, consisting of sequences having identity below 40% among themselves. Protein domains have been grouped into 628 multi-member superfamilies and 566 single member superfamilies. Structure-based sequence alignments for the superfamilies have been obtained using COMPARER, while initial equivalencies have been derived from a preliminary superposition using LSQMAN or STAMP 4.0. The final sequence alignments have been annotated for structural features using JOY4.0. The database is supplemented with sequence relatives belonging to different genomes, conserved spatially interacting and structural motifs, probabilistic hidden markov models of superfamilies based on the alignments and useful links to other databases. Probabilistic models and sensitive position specific profiles obtained from reliable superfamily alignments aid annotation of remote homologues and are useful tools in structural and functional genomics. PASS2 presents the phylogeny of its members both based on sequence and structural dissimilarities. Clustering of members allows us to understand diversification of

  4. A robust and extracellular heme-containing peroxidase from Thermobifida fusca as prototype of a bacterial peroxidase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bloois, Edwin; Torres Pazmino, Daniel; Winter, Remko T.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2010-01-01

    DyP-type peroxidases comprise a novel superfamily of heme-containing peroxidases which is unrelated to the superfamilies of known peroxidases and of which only a few members have been characterized in some detail. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a DyP-type peroxidase (TfuD

  5. Transforming growth factor-β superfamily, implications in development and differentiation of stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Juan F; Kocic, Jelena

    2012-10-01

    Abstract Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members, including TGF-βs and bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), play important roles in directing the fate of stem cells. In embryonic stem cells, the TGF-β superfamily participates in almost all stages of cell development, such as cell maintenance, lineage selection, and progression of differentiation. In adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), TGF-βs can provide competence for early stages of chondroblastic and osteoblastic differentiation, but they inhibit myogenesis, adipogenesis, and late-stage osteoblast differentiation. BMPs also inhibit adipogenesis and myogenesis, but they strongly promote osteoblast differentiation. The TGF-β superfamily members signal via specific serine/threonine kinase receptors and their nuclear effectors termed Smad proteins as well as through non-Smad pathways, which explain their pleiotropic effects in self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the pleiotropic effects of the TGF-β superfamily of growth factors on the fate of stem cells and also discusses the mechanisms by which the TGF-β superfamily members control embryonic and MSCs differentiation.

  6. Targeting of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand and cognate TNF receptor superfamilies constitute an important regulatory axis that is pivotal for immune homeostasis and correct execution of immune responses. TNF ligands and receptors are involved in diverse biological processes ranging from the selective in

  7. Phylogeny, Function and evolution of the cupins, a structurally conserved, functionally diverse superfamily of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khuri, S.; Bakker, F.T.; Dunwell, J.M.

    2001-01-01

    The cupin superfamily is a group of functionally diverse proteins that are found in all three kingdoms of life, Archaea, Eubacteria, and Eukaryota. These proteins have a characteristic signature domain comprising two histidine- containing motifs separated by an intermotif region of variable length.

  8. Precursor De13.1 from Conus delessertii defines the novel G gene superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Manuel B; Ortiz, Ernesto; Kaas, Quentin; López-Vera, Estuardo; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D; de la Cotera, Edgar P Heimer

    2013-03-01

    Peptide de13a was previously purified from the venom of the worm-hunting cone snail Conus delessertii from the Yucatán Channel, México. This peptide has eight cysteine (Cys) residues in the unique arrangement C-C-C-CC-C-C-C, which defines the cysteine framework XIII ("-" represents one or more non-Cys residues). Remarkably, δ-hydroxy-lysine residues have been found only in conotoxin de13a, which also contains an unusually high proportion of hydroxylated amino acid residues. Here, we report the cDNA cloning of the complete precursor De13.1 of a related peptide, de13b, which has the same Cys framework and inter-Cys spacings as peptide de13a, and shares high protein/nucleic acid sequence identity (87%/90%) with de13a, suggesting that both peptides belong to the same conotoxin gene superfamily. Analysis of the signal peptide of precursor De13.1 reveals that this precursor belongs to a novel conotoxin gene superfamily that we chose to name gene superfamily G. Thus far superfamily G only includes two peptides, each of which contains the same, distinctive Cys framework and a high proportion of amino acid residues with hydroxylated side chains.

  9. Disease causing mutations in the TNF and TNFR superfamilies: Focus on molecular mechanisms driving disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Lobito; T.L. Gabriel; J.P. Medema; F.C. Kimberley

    2011-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and TNF receptor (TNFR) superfamilies comprise multidomain proteins with diverse roles in cell activation, proliferation and cell death. These proteins play pivotal roles in the initiation, maintenance and termination of immune responses and have vital roles outside t

  10. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug...

  11. Plant science. Morphinan biosynthesis in opium poppy requires a P450-oxidoreductase fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winzer, Thilo; Kern, Marcelo; King, Andrew J; Larson, Tony R; Teodor, Roxana I; Donninger, Samantha L; Li, Yi; Dowle, Adam A; Cartwright, Jared; Bates, Rachel; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry; Walker, Carol; Bowser, Tim A; Graham, Ian A

    2015-07-17

    Morphinan alkaloids from the opium poppy are used for pain relief. The direction of metabolites to morphinan biosynthesis requires isomerization of (S)- to (R)-reticuline. Characterization of high-reticuline poppy mutants revealed a genetic locus, designated STORR [(S)- to (R)-reticuline] that encodes both cytochrome P450 and oxidoreductase modules, the latter belonging to the aldo-keto reductase family. Metabolite analysis of mutant alleles and heterologous expression demonstrate that the P450 module is responsible for the conversion of (S)-reticuline to 1,2-dehydroreticuline, whereas the oxidoreductase module converts 1,2-dehydroreticuline to (R)-reticuline rather than functioning as a P450 redox partner. Proteomic analysis confirmed that these two modules are contained on a single polypeptide in vivo. This modular assembly implies a selection pressure favoring substrate channeling. The fusion protein STORR may enable microbial-based morphinan production.

  12. Cold acclimation induced genes of trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can-kui; Lang, Ping; Dane, Fenny; Ebel, Robert C; Singh, Narendra K; Locy, Robert D; Dozier, William A

    2005-03-01

    Commercial citrus varieties are sensitive to low temperature. Poncirus trifoliata is a close relative of Citrus species and has been widely used as a cold-hardy rootstock for citrus production in low-temperature environments. mRNA differential display-reverse transcription (DDRT)-PCR and quantitative relative-RT-PCR were used to study gene expression of P. trifoliata under a gradual cold-acclimation temperature regime. Eight up-regulated cDNA fragments were isolated and sequenced. These fragments showed high similarities at the amino acid level to the following genes with known functions: betaine/proline transporter, water channel protein, aldo-keto reductase, early light-induced protein, nitrate transporter, tetratricopeptide-repeat protein, F-box protein, and ribosomal protein L15. These cold-acclimation up-regulated genes in P. trifoliata are also regulated by osmotic and photo-oxidative signals in other plants.

  13. Two mutations of dihydropteridine reductase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O; Ferraris, S; Bracco, G; Niederwieser, A; Cotton, R G

    1988-02-01

    Two patients with dihydropteridine reductase (DHPR) deficiency, in one case due to the absence of any enzyme protein (DHPR- cross reactive material (CRM)-) and in the other case due to the production of a mutant type devoid of catalytic activity (DHPR- CRM+) were examined. This latter form of malignant phenylketonuria, whose relative frequency seems to be higher in the Italian population, possibly has a worse prognosis. The earlier onset and the greater severity of clinical symptoms are associated with a more pronounced hydroxylation defect, as shown by higher degree of neonatal hyperphenylalaninaemia, unresponsiveness to an oral tetrahydrobiopterin load, lower concentrations of neurotransmitter metabolites, and reduced tyrosine production after an oral phenylalanine load.

  14. Biliverdin Reductase: a Target for Cancer Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eGibbs

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin reductase (BVR is a multifunctional protein that is the primary source of the potent antioxidant, bilirubin. BVR regulates activities/functions in the insulin/IGF-1/IRK/PI3K/MAPK pathways. Activation of certain kinases in these pathways is/are hallmark(s of cancerous cells. The protein is a scaffold/bridge and intracellular transporter of kinases that regulate growth and proliferation of cells, including PKCs, ERK and Akt, and their targets including NF-κB, Elk1, HO-1 and iNOS. The scaffold and transport functions enable activated BVR to relocate from the cytosol to the nucleus or to the plasma membrane, depending on the activating stimulus. This enables the reductase to function in diverse signaling pathways. And, its expression at the transcript and protein levels are increased in human tumors and the infiltrating T-cells, monocytes and circulating lymphocytes, as well as the circulating and infiltrating macrophages. These functions suggest that the cytoprotective role of BVR may be permissive for cancer/tumor growth. In this review, we summarize the recent developments that define the pro-growth activities of BVR, particularly with respect to its input into the MAPK signaling pathway and present evidence that BVR-based peptides inhibit activation of protein kinases, including MEK, PKCδ and ERK as well as downstream targets including Elk1 and iNOS, and thus offers a credible novel approach to reduce cancer cell proliferation.

  15. Iron-mediated effects on nitrate reductase in marine phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmermans, K.R.; Stolte, W.; Baar, H.J.W. de

    1994-01-01

    The potential activity of nitrate reductase was determined in uni-algal cultures in the laboratory and in natural marine phytoplankton assemblages. In the laboratory bioassays, distinct differences in nitrate reductase activity were observed in iron replete versus depleted cultures for Emiliania hux

  16. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii: cloning and heterologous expression of the native gene (Texr) and a double mutant (TexrK271R+N273D) with altered coenzyme specificity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sara Fernandes; Maria G Tuohy; Patrick G Murray

    2009-12-01

    Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose catabolic pathway. The gene encoding xylose reductase (Texr) was isolated from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. Texr encodes a 320 amino acid protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa, which exhibited high sequence identity with other xylose reductase sequences and was shown to be a member of the aldoketoreductase (AKR) superfamily with a preference for reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as coenzyme. Given the potential application of xylose reductase enzymes that preferentially utilize the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) rather than NADPH in the fermentation of five carbon sugars by genetically engineered microorganisms, the coenzyme selectivity of TeXR was altered by site-directed mutagenesis. The TeXRK271R+N273D double mutant displayed an altered coenzyme preference with a 16-fold improvement in NADH utilization relative to the wild type and therefore has the potential to reduce redox imbalance of xylose fermentation in recombinant S. cerevisiae strains. Expression of Texr was shown to be inducible by the same carbon sources responsible for the induction of genes encoding enzymes relevant to lignocellulose hydrolysis, suggesting a coordinated expression of intracellular and extracellular enzymes relevant to hydrolysis and metabolism of pentose sugars in T. emersonii in adaptation to its natural habitat. This indicates a potential advantage in survival and response to a nutrient-poor environment.

  17. Coordinate expression of NADPH-dependent flavin reductase, Fre-1, and Hint-related 7meGMP-directed hydrolase, DCS-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnicka, Dorota A; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Thacker, Colin; Brenner, Charles; Vincent, Steven R

    2003-10-03

    A novel human cytosolic flavin reductase, Nr1, was recently described that contains FMN, FAD, and NADPH cofactors. Though the targets of the related NADPH-dependent flavoprotein reductases, cytochrome P450 reductase, methionine synthase reductase, and nitric oxide synthase, are known, the cellular function of Nr1 is not clear. To explore expression and regulation of Nr1, we cloned fre-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of Nr1, and discovered that it is transcribed as a bicistronic pre-mRNA together with dcs-1, the ortholog of the recently described scavenger mRNA decapping enzyme. We used the novel substrate, 7meGpppBODIPY, to demonstrate that DCS-1 has low micromolar specificity for guanine ribonucleotides with the 7me modification, whereas trimethylated G substrates are poor competitors. Contrary to earlier classification, DCS-1 is not a pyrophosphatase but a distant member of the Hint branch of the histidine triad superfamily of nucleotide hydrolases and transferases. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis that DCS-1 homologs may function in the metabolism of capped oligonucleotides generated following exosome-dependent degradation of short-lived mRNA transcripts. We find that fre-1 and dcs-1 are coordinately expressed through worm development, are induced by heat shock, and have a nearly identical expression profile in human tissues. Furthermore, immunocytochemical analysis of the endogenous proteins in COS cells indicates that both are present in the nucleus and concentrated in a distinct perinuclear structure. Though no connection between these enzymes had been anticipated, our data and data from global expression and protein association studies suggest that the two enzymes jointly participate in responses to DNA damage, heat shock, and other stresses.

  18. Superfamily assignments for the yeast proteome through integration of structure prediction with the gene ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Malmström

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01.

  19. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a circulating member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Krogh, T N; Støving, René Klinkby;

    1997-01-01

    We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3.2% and an aver......We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3...

  20. The cytochrome P450 superfamily:Key players in plant development and defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jun; WANG Xin-yu; GUO Wang-zhen

    2015-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) superfamily is the largest enzymatic protein family in plants, and it also widely exists in mammals, fungi, bacteria, insects and so on. Members of this superfamily are involved in multiple metabolic pathways with distinct and complex functions, playing important roles in a vast array of reactions. As a result, numerous secondary metabolites are synthesized that function as growth and developmental signals or protect plants from various biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we summarize the characterization of CYPs, as wel as their phylogenetic classiifcation. We also focus on recent advances in elucidating the roles of CYPs in mediating plant growth and development as wel as biotic and abiotic stresses responses, providing insights into their potential utilization in plant breeding.

  1. The TNF receptor and Ig superfamily members form an integrated signaling circuit controlling dendritic cell homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Trez, Carl; Ware, Carl F.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) constitute the most potent antigen presenting cells of the immune system, playing a key role bridging innate and adaptive immune responses. Specialized DC subsets differ depending on their origin, tissue location and the influence of trophic factors, the latter remain to be fully understood. Stromal cell and myeloid-associated Lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR) signaling is required for the local proliferation of lymphoid tissue DC. This review focuses the LTβR signaling cascade as a crucial positive trophic signal in the homeostasis of DC subsets. The noncanonical coreceptor pathway comprised of the Immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily member, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA) and TNFR superfamily member, Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) counter regulates the trophic signaling by LTβR. Together both pathways form an integrated signaling circuit achieving homeostasis of DC subsets. PMID:18511331

  2. Regulation of TGF-β Superfamily Signaling by SMAD Mono-Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xie

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β(transforming growth factor-β superfamily signaling mediators are important regulators of diverse physiological and pathological events. TGF-β signals are transduced by transmembrane type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors and their downstream effectors, the SMAD(drosophila mothers against decapentaplegic protein proteins. Numerous studies have already demonstrated crucial regulatory roles for modification of TGF-β pathway components by poly-ubiquitination. Recently, several studies also uncovered mono-ubiquitination of SMADs as a mechanism for SMAD activation or inactivation. Mono-ubiquitination and subsequent deubiquitination of SMAD proteins accordingly play important roles in the control of TGF-β superfamily signaling. This review highlights the major pathways regulated by SMAD mono-ubiquitination.

  3. A Comprehensive Bioinformatics Analysis of the Nudix Superfamily in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Gunawardana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nudix enzymes are a superfamily with a conserved common reaction mechanism that provides the capacity for the hydrolysis of a broad spectrum of metabolites. We used hidden Markov models based on Nudix sequences from the PFAM and PROSITE databases to identify Nudix hydrolases encoded by the Arabidopsis genome. 25 Nudix hydrolases were identified and classified into 11 individual families by pairwise sequence alignments. Intron phases were strikingly conserved in each family. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all multimember families formed monophyletic clusters. Conserved familial sequence motifs were identified with the MEME motif analysis algorithm. One motif (motif 4 was found in three diverse families. All proteins containing motif 4 demonstrated a degree of preference for substrates containing an ADP moiety. We conclude that HMM model-based genome scanning and MEME motif analysis, respectively, can significantly improve the identification and assignment of function of new members of this mechanistically-diverse protein superfamily.

  4. Identification of a 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid Reductase, FlRed, in an Alginolytic Bacterium Flavobacterium sp. Strain UMI-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In alginate-assimilating bacteria, alginate is depolymerized to unsaturated monosaccharide by the actions of endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3 and EC 4.2.2.11. The monosaccharide is non-enzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-l-ery thro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH, then reduced to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG by a specific reductase, and metabolized through the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. Recently, the NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R that belongs to short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily was identified as the DEH-reductase in Sphingomonas sp. A1. We have subsequently noticed that an SDR-like enzyme gene, flred, occurred in the genome of an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. In the present study, we report on the deduced amino-acid sequence of flred and DEH-reducing activity of recombinant FlRed. The deduced amino-acid sequence of flred comprised 254 residues and showed 34% amino-acid identities to that of A1-R from Sphingomonas sp. A1 and 80%–88% to those of SDR-like enzymes from several alginolytic bacteria. Common sequence motifs of SDR-superfamily enzymes, e.g., the catalytic tetrad Asn-Lys-Tyr-Ser and the cofactor-binding sequence Thr-Gly-x-x-x-Gly-x-Gly in Rossmann fold, were completely conserved in FlRed. On the other hand, an Arg residue that determined the NADPH-specificity of Sphingomonas A1-R was replaced by Glu in FlRed. Thus, we investigated cofactor-preference of FlRed using a recombinant enzyme. As a result, the recombinant FlRed (recFlRed was found to show high specificity to NADH. recFlRed exhibited practically no activity toward variety of aldehyde, ketone, keto ester, keto acid and aldose substrates except for DEH. On the basis of these results, we conclude that FlRed is the NADH-dependent DEH-specific SDR of Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

  5. Mechanistic and Evolutionary Insights from Comparative Enzymology of Phosphomonoesterases and Phosphodiesterases across the Alkaline Phosphatase Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunden, Fanny; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Lyubimov, Artem Y; Ressl, Susanne; Wiersma-Koch, Helen; Borland, Jamar; Brown, Clayton L; Johnson, Tory A; Singh, Zorawar; Herschlag, Daniel

    2016-11-02

    Naively one might have expected an early division between phosphate monoesterases and diesterases of the alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily. On the contrary, prior results and our structural and biochemical analyses of phosphate monoesterase PafA, from Chryseobacterium meningosepticum, indicate similarities to a superfamily phosphate diesterase [Xanthomonas citri nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP)] and distinct differences from the three metal ion AP superfamily monoesterase, from Escherichia coli AP (EcAP). We carried out a series of experiments to map out and learn from the differences and similarities between these enzymes. First, we asked why there would be independent instances of monoesterases in the AP superfamily? PafA has a much weaker product inhibition and slightly higher activity relative to EcAP, suggesting that different metabolic evolutionary pressures favored distinct active-site architectures. Next, we addressed the preferential phosphate monoester and diester catalysis of PafA and NPP, respectively. We asked whether the >80% sequence differences throughout these scaffolds provide functional specialization for each enzyme's cognate reaction. In contrast to expectations from this model, PafA and NPP mutants with the common subset of active-site groups embedded in each native scaffold had the same monoesterase:diesterase specificities; thus, the >10(7)-fold difference in native specificities appears to arise from distinct interactions at a single phosphoryl substituent. We also uncovered striking mechanistic similarities between the PafA and EcAP monoesterases, including evidence for ground-state destabilization and functional active-site networks that involve different active-site groups but may play analogous catalytic roles. Discovering common network functions may reveal active-site architectural connections that are critical for function, and identifying regions of functional modularity may facilitate the design of new enzymes

  6. Taxonomic distribution and origins of the extended LHC (light-harvesting complex antenna protein superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinkmann Henner

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extended light-harvesting complex (LHC protein superfamily is a centerpiece of eukaryotic photosynthesis, comprising the LHC family and several families involved in photoprotection, like the LHC-like and the photosystem II subunit S (PSBS. The evolution of this complex superfamily has long remained elusive, partially due to previously missing families. Results In this study we present a meticulous search for LHC-like sequences in public genome and expressed sequence tag databases covering twelve representative photosynthetic eukaryotes from the three primary lineages of plants (Plantae: glaucophytes, red algae and green plants (Viridiplantae. By introducing a coherent classification of the different protein families based on both, hidden Markov model analyses and structural predictions, numerous new LHC-like sequences were identified and several new families were described, including the red lineage chlorophyll a/b-binding-like protein (RedCAP family from red algae and diatoms. The test of alternative topologies of sequences of the highly conserved chlorophyll-binding core structure of LHC and PSBS proteins significantly supports the independent origins of LHC and PSBS families via two unrelated internal gene duplication events. This result was confirmed by the application of cluster likelihood mapping. Conclusions The independent evolution of LHC and PSBS families is supported by strong phylogenetic evidence. In addition, a possible origin of LHC and PSBS families from different homologous members of the stress-enhanced protein subfamily, a diverse and anciently paralogous group of two-helix proteins, seems likely. The new hypothesis for the evolution of the extended LHC protein superfamily proposed here is in agreement with the character evolution analysis that incorporates the distribution of families and subfamilies across taxonomic lineages. Intriguingly, stress-enhanced proteins, which are universally found in the

  7. cDNA Cloning of Two Novel T-superfamily Conotoxins from Conus leopardus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Hua CHEN; Yu-Hong HAN; Qi WANG; Xiao-Wei MIAO; Ling OU; Xiao-Xia SHAO

    2006-01-01

    The full-length cDNAs of two novel T-superfamily conotoxins, Lp5.1 and Lp5.2, were cloned from a vermivorous cone snail Conus leopardus using 3′/5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The cDNA of Lp5.1 encodes a precursor of 65 residues, including a 22-residue signal peptide, a 28-residue propeptide and a 15-residue mature peptide. Lp5.1 is processed at the common signal site -X-Arg- immediately before the mature peptide sequences. In the case of Lp5.2, the precursor includes a 25-residue signal peptide and a 43-residue sequence comprising the propeptide and mature peptide, which is probably cleaved to yield a 29-residue propeptide and a 14-residue mature toxin. Although these two conotoxins share a similar signal sequence and a conserved disulfide pattern with the known T-superfamily, the pro-region and mature peptides are of low identity, especially Lp5.2 with an identity as low as 10.7% compared with the reference Mr5. 1a.The elucidated cDNAs of these two toxins will facilitate a better understanding of the species distribution,the sequence diversity of T-superfamily conotoxins, the special gene structure and the evolution of these peptides.

  8. Analysis and update of the human solute carrier (SLC gene superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Lei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The solute-carrier gene (SLC superfamily encodes membrane-bound transporters. The SLC superfamily comprises 55 gene families having at least 362 putatively functional protein-coding genes. The gene products include passive transporters, symporters and antiporters, located in all cellular and organelle membranes, except, perhaps, the nuclear membrane. Transport substrates include amino acids and oligopeptides, glucose and other sugars, inorganic cations and anions (H+, HCO3-, Cl-, Na+, K+, Ca2+, Mg2+, PO43-, HPO42-, H2PO4-, SO42-, C2O42-, OH-,CO32-, bile salts, carboxylate and other organic anions, acetyl coenzyme A, essential metals, biogenic amines, neurotransmitters, vitamins, fatty acids and lipids, nucleosides, ammonium, choline, thyroid hormone and urea. Contrary to gene nomenclature commonly assigned on the basis of evolutionary divergence http://www.genenames.org/, the SLC gene superfamily has been named based largely on transporter function by proteins having multiple transmembrane domains. Whereas all the transporters exist for endogenous substrates, it is likely that drugs, non-essential metals and many other environmental toxicants are able to 'hitch-hike' on one or another of these transporters, thereby enabling these moieties to enter (or leave the cell. Understanding and characterising the functions of these transporters is relevant to medicine, genetics, developmental biology, pharmacology and cancer chemotherapy.

  9. Evolutionary trace analysis of eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I superfamily: Identification of novel antitumor drug binding site

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG; Yunlong; QI; Yunpeng; ZHANG; Wannian; SHENG; Chunqu

    2005-01-01

    The studies of novel inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase I (Topo I) have already become very promising in cancer chemotherapy. Identifying the new drug-binding residues is playing an important role in the design and optimization of Topo I inhibitors. The designed compounds may have novel scaffolds, thus will be helpful to overcome the toxicities of current camptothecin (CPT) drugs and may provide a solution to cross resistance with these drugs. Multiple sequence alignments were performed on eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase I superfamily and thus the evolutionary tree was constructed. The Evolutionary Trace method was applied to identify functionally important residues of human Topo I. It has been demonstrated that class-specific hydrophobic residues Ala351, Met428, Pro431 are located around the 7,9-position of CPT, indicating suitable substitution of hydrophobic group on CPT will increase antitumor activity. The conservative residue Lys436 in the superfamily is of particular interest and new CPT derivatives designed based on this residue may greatly increase water solubility of such drugs. It has also been demonstrated that the residues Asn352 and Arg364 were conservative in the superfamily, whose mutation will render CPT resistance. As our molecular docking studies demonstrated they did not make any direct interaction with CPT, they are important drug-binding site residues for future design of novel non-camptothecin lead compounds. This work provided a strong basis for the design and synthesis of novel highly potent CPT derivatives and virtual screening for novel lead compounds.

  10. Origination, expansion, evolutionary trajectory, and expression bias of AP2/ERF superfamily in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV. This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance.

  11. Turning points in the evolution of peroxidase-catalase superfamily: molecular phylogeny of hybrid heme peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zámocký, Marcel; Gasselhuber, Bernhard; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2014-12-01

    Heme peroxidases and catalases are key enzymes of hydrogen peroxide metabolism and signaling. Here, the reconstruction of the molecular evolution of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily (annotated in pfam as PF00141) based on experimentally verified as well as numerous newly available genomic sequences is presented. The robust phylogenetic tree of this large enzyme superfamily was obtained from 490 full-length protein sequences. Besides already well-known families of heme b peroxidases arranged in three main structural classes, completely new (hybrid type) peroxidase families are described being located at the border of these classes as well as forming (so far missing) links between them. Hybrid-type A peroxidases represent a minor eukaryotic subfamily from Excavates, Stramenopiles and Rhizaria sharing enzymatic and structural features of ascorbate and cytochrome c peroxidases. Hybrid-type B peroxidases are shown to be spread exclusively among various fungi and evolved in parallel with peroxidases in land plants. In some ascomycetous hybrid-type B peroxidases, the peroxidase domain is fused to a carbohydrate binding (WSC) domain. Both here described hybrid-type peroxidase families represent important turning points in the complex evolution of the whole peroxidase-catalase superfamily. We present and discuss their phylogeny, sequence signatures and putative biological function.

  12. A Comparative Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias Pattern in Human Albumin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda Mirsafian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Synonymous codon usage bias is an inevitable phenomenon in organismic taxa across the three domains of life. Though the frequency of codon usage is not equal across species and within genome in the same species, the phenomenon is non random and is tissue-specific. Several factors such as GC content, nucleotide distribution, protein hydropathy, protein secondary structure, and translational selection are reported to contribute to codon usage preference. The synonymous codon usage patterns can be helpful in revealing the expression pattern of genes as well as the evolutionary relationship between the sequences. In this study, synonymous codon usage bias patterns were determined for the evolutionarily close proteins of albumin superfamily, namely, albumin, α-fetoprotein, afamin, and vitamin D-binding protein. Our study demonstrated that the genes of the four albumin superfamily members have low GC content and high values of effective number of codons (ENC suggesting high expressivity of these genes and less bias in codon usage preferences. This study also provided evidence that the albumin superfamily members are not subjected to mutational selection pressure.

  13. Origination, Expansion, Evolutionary Trajectory, and Expression Bias of AP2/ERF Superfamily in Brassica napus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoming; Wang, Jinpeng; Ma, Xiao; Li, Yuxian; Lei, Tianyu; Wang, Li; Ge, Weina; Guo, Di; Wang, Zhenyi; Li, Chunjin; Zhao, Jianjun; Wang, Xiyin

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV). This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance. PMID:27570529

  14. Duplication and divergent evolution of the CHS and CHS-like genes in the chalcone synthase (CHS) superfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The enzymes of the CHS-superfamily are responsible for biosynthesis of a wide range of natural products in plants. They are important for flower pigmentation, protection against UV light and defense against phytopathogens. Many plants were found to contain multiple copies of CHS genes. This review summarizes the recent progress in the studies of the CHS-superfamily, focusing on the duplication and divergent evolution of the CHS and CHS-like genes. Comparative analyses of gene structure, expression patterns and catalytic properties revealed extensive differentiation in both regulation and function among duplicate CHS genes. It is also proposed that the CHS-like enzymes in the CHS-superfamily evolved from CHS at different times in various organisms. The CHS-superfamily thus offers a valuable model to study the rates and patterns of sequence divergence between duplicate genes.

  15. KEANEKARAGAMAN JENIS KUPU-KUPU SUPERFAMILI PAPILIONOIDAE DI DUKUH BANYUWINDU DESA LIMBANGAN KECAMATAN LIMBANGAN KABUPATEN KENDAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahayuningsih

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kupu-kupu merupakan bagian dari biodiversitas yang harus dijaga kelestariannya. Kupu-kupu memberikan keuntungan bagi kehidupan manusia. Secara ekologis kupu-kupu memberikan sumbangan dalam menjaga keseimbangan ekosistem dan memperkaya biodiversitas. Dukuh Banyuwindu merupakan salah satu pedukuhan di Desa Limbangan terletak di lembah dan berperan sebagai daerah ekoturisme. Tujuan kajian ini adalah untuk menentukan keanekaragaman spesies kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu Desa Limbangan Kabupaten Kendal, khususnya pada habitat hutan sekunder, pemukiman, daerah aliran sungai, dan persawahan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode Abundance Point Index. Penelitian menunjukkan terdapat 62 spesies kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang terdiri dari 737 individu dan diklasifikasikan menjadi empat famili dinamai Papilionoidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae, dan Nymphalidae. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu berkisar antara 2,74-3,09, indeks kemerataan jenis berkisar antara 0,86-0,87 dan memiliki dominansi berkisar antara 0,07-0,09. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis dan indeks kemerataan jenis tertinggi tercatat pada habitat pemukiman yaitu 3,09 dan 0,87 sedangkan terendah tercatat pada habitat persawahan masing-masing sebesar 2,74 dan 0,86. The butterflies are part of biodiversity which must be preserved. These insect provide benefits to human life. Ecologically, butterfly contributed in maintain the balance of ecosystem and enrich the biodiversity. Banyuwindu Hamlet is one of the hamlets in Limbangan Village, located in the hills and will serve as an ecotourism area. The purpose of this study was to determine the diversity of butterfly species in the superfamily Papilionoidae at Banyuwindu Hamlet, Limbangan Village, Limbangan District, Kendal Regency, especially in secondary forest habitats, settlements, watershed, and rice fields. Research performed with Abundance Point Index Method. The

  16. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: D-Mannonate Dhydratase from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glasner, M.; Vick, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) function was assigned to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily by screening a library of acid sugars. Structures of the wild type ManD from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans were determined at pH 7.5 in the presence of Mg2+ and also in the presence of Mg2+ and the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate dehydration product; the structure of the catalytically active K271E mutant was determined at pH 5.5 in the presence of the d-mannonate substrate. As previously observed in the structures of other members of the enolase superfamily, ManD contains two domains, an N-terminal a+{beta} capping domain and a ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel domain. The barrel domain contains the ligands for the essential Mg2+, Asp 210, Glu 236, and Glu 262, at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands of the barrel domain, respectively. However, the barrel domain lacks both the Lys acid/base catalyst at the end of the second {beta}-strand and the His-Asp dyad acid/base catalyst at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, that are found in many members of the superfamily. Instead, a hydrogen-bonded dyad of Tyr 159 in a loop following the second {beta}-strand and Arg 147 at the end of the second {beta}-strand are positioned to initiate the reaction by abstraction of the 2-proton. Both Tyr 159 and His 212, at the end of the third {beta}-strand, are positioned to facilitate both syn-dehydration and ketonization of the resulting enol intermediate to yield the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate product with the observed retention of configuration. The identities and locations of these acid/base catalysts as well as of cationic amino acid residues that stabilize the enolate anion intermediate define a new structural strategy for catalysis (subgroup) in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily. With these differences, we provide additional evidence that the ligands for the essential Mg2+ are the only

  17. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. PMID:26364851

  18. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-04

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function.

  19. Cyclic Voltammetric Responses of Nitrate Reductase on Chemical Modified Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaRuSONG; HuiBoSHAO; 等

    2002-01-01

    Electrochemistry of nitrate reductases (NR) incorporated into 2-aminoethanethiol self-assembled on the gold electrode and polyacrylamide cast on the pyrolytic graphite electrode was examined. NR on chemical modified electrode showed electrochemical cyclic voltammetric responses in phosphate buffers.

  20. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  1. Purification and characterization of assimilatory nitrite reductase from Candida utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, S; Shaila, M S; Rao, G R

    1996-07-01

    Nitrate assimilation in many plants, algae, yeasts and bacteria is mediated by two enzymes, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.2) and nitrite reductase (EC 1.7.7.1). They catalyse the stepwise reduction of nitrate to nitrite and nitrite to ammonia respectively. The nitrite reductase from an industrially important yeast, Candida utilis, has been purified to homogeneity. Purified nitrite reductase is a heterodimer and the molecular masses of the two subunits are 58 and 66 kDa. The native enzyme exhibits a molecular mass of 126 kDa as analysed by gel filtration. The identify of the two subunits of nitrite reductase was confirmed by immunoblotting using antibody for Cucurbita pepo leaf nitrite reductase. The presence of two different sized transcripts coding for the two subunits was confirmed by (a) in vitro translation of mRNA from nitrate-induced C. utilis followed by immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translated products with heterologous nitrite reductase antibody and (b) Northern-blot analysis. The 66 kDa subunit is acidic in nature which is probably due to its phosphorylated status. The enzyme is stable over a range of temperatures. Both subunits can catalyse nitrite reduction, and the reconstituted enzyme, at a higher protein concentration, shows an activity similar to that of the purified enzyme. Each of these subunits has been shown to contain a few unique peptides in addition to a large number of common peptides. Reduced Methyl Viologen has been found to be as effective an electron donor as NADPH in the catalytic process, a phenomenon not commonly seen for nitrite reductases from other systems.

  2. Distribution of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activity among microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka; Yoda, Koji; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Nimura-Matsune, Kaori; Mura, Kiyoshi; Tokue, Chiyoko; Katoh, Tetzuya; Kawasaki, Shinji; Niimura, Youichi

    2004-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin (Prx) constitutes a large family of enzymes found in microorganisms, animals, and plants, but the detection of the activities of Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductases (peroxiredoxin reductases) in cell extracts, and the purification based on peroxide reductase activity, have only been done in bacteria and Trypanosomatidae. A peroxiredoxin reductase (NADH oxidase) from a bacterium, Amphibacillus, displayed only poor activities in the presence of purified Prx from Saccharomyces or Synechocystis, while it is highly active in the presence of bacterial Prx. These results suggested that an enzyme system different from that in bacteria might exist for the reduction of Prx in yeast and cyanobacteria. Prx-linked hydroperoxide reductase activities were detected in cell extracts of Saccharomyces, Synechocystis, and Chlorella, and the enzyme activities of Saccharomyces and Chlorella were induced under vigorously aerated culture conditions and intensive light exposure conditions, respectively. Partial purification of Prx-linked peroxidase from the induced yeast cells indicated that the Prx-linked peroxidase system consists of two protein components, namely, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase. This finding is consistent with the previous report on its purification based on its protein protection activity against oxidation [Chae et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269, 27670-27678 (1994)]. In this study we have confirmed that Prx-linked peroxidase activity are widely distributed, not only in bacteria species and Trypanosomatidae, but also in yeast and photosynthetic microorganisms, and showed reconstitution of the activity from partially purified interspecies components.

  3. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy.

  4. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Activity and Folate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursen Keser

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Folate is a vital B vitamin which is easily water-soluble. It is a natural source which is found in the herbal and animal foods. Folate has important duties in the human metabolism, one of them is the adjustment of the level of plasma homocysteine. Reduction in MTHFR (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase,which is in charge of the metabolism of homocysteine activity affects the level of homocysteine. Therefore MTHFR is an important enzyme in folate metabolism. Some of the mutations occurring in the MTHFR gene is a risk factor for various diseases and may be caused the hyperhomocysteinemia or the homocystinuria, and they also may lead to metabolic problems. MTHFR is effective in the important pathways such as DNA synthesis, methylation reactions and synthesis of RNA. C677T and A1298C are the most commonly occurring polymorphisms in the gene of MTHFR. The frequency of these polymorphisms show differences in the populations. MTHFR, folate distribution, metabolism of homocysteine and S-adenosylmethionine, by the MTHFR methylation the genetic defects have the potential of affecting the risk of disease in the negative or positive way.

  5. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress and diabetic mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiho eTang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance 1. DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR [ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21], a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis and myocardium (heart failure leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in 2. In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications.

  6. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Menggen; Liu, Z Lewis; Xiang, Quanju; Li, Xi; Liu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors (such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the reduction enzymes involved in this reaction remain largely unknown. In this study, we reported that an uncharacterized open reading frame PICST_72153 (putative GRE2) from S. stipitis was highly induced in response to furfural and HMF stresses. Overexpression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae improved yeast tolerance to furfural and HMF. GRE2 was identified as an aldehyde reductase which can reduce furfural to FM with either NADH or NADPH as the co-factor and reduce HMF to FDM with NADPH as the co-factor. This enzyme can also reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that it is a member of the subclass "intermediate" of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Although GRE2 from S. stipitis is similar to GRE2 from S. cerevisiae in a three-dimensional structure, some differences were predicted. GRE2 from S. stipitis forms loops at D133-E137 and T143-N145 locations with two α-helices at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations, different GRE2 from S. cerevisiae with an α-helix at D133-E137 and a β-sheet at T143-N145 locations, and two loops at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations. This research provided guidelines for the study of other SDR enzymes from S. stipitis and other yeasts on tolerant mechanisms to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

  7. Staying green postharvest: how three mutations in the Arabidopsis chlorophyll b reductase gene NYC1 delay degreening by distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibran, Rubina; Sullivan, Kerry L; Crowhurst, Ross; Erridge, Zoe A; Chagné, David; McLachlan, Andrew R G; Brummell, David A; Dijkwel, Paul P; Hunter, Donald A

    2015-11-01

    Stresses such as energy deprivation, wounding and water-supply disruption often contribute to rapid deterioration of harvested tissues. To uncover the genetic regulation behind such stresses, a simple assessment system was used to detect senescence mutants in conjunction with two rapid mapping techniques to identify the causal mutations. To demonstrate the power of this approach, immature inflorescences of Arabidopsis plants that contained ethyl methanesulfonate-induced lesions were detached and screened for altered timing of dark-induced senescence. Numerous mutant lines displaying accelerated or delayed timing of senescence relative to wild type were discovered. The underlying mutations in three of these were identified using High Resolution Melting analysis to map to a chromosomal arm followed by a whole-genome sequencing-based mapping method, termed 'Needle in the K-Stack', to identify the causal lesions. All three mutations were single base pair changes and occurred in the same gene, NON-YELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), a chlorophyll b reductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. This was consistent with the mutants preferentially retaining chlorophyll b, although substantial amounts of chlorophyll b were still lost. The single base pair mutations disrupted NYC1 function by three distinct mechanisms, one by producing a termination codon, the second by interfering with correct intron splicing and the third by replacing a highly conserved proline with a non-equivalent serine residue. This non-synonymous amino acid change, which occurred in the NADPH binding domain of NYC1, is the first example of such a mutation in an SDR protein inhibiting a physiological response in plants.

  8. Evolution and diversity of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases.

  9. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  10. Using sequence similarity networks for visualization of relationships across diverse protein superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Atkinson

    Full Text Available The dramatic increase in heterogeneous types of biological data--in particular, the abundance of new protein sequences--requires fast and user-friendly methods for organizing this information in a way that enables functional inference. The most widely used strategy to link sequence or structure to function, homology-based function prediction, relies on the fundamental assumption that sequence or structural similarity implies functional similarity. New tools that extend this approach are still urgently needed to associate sequence data with biological information in ways that accommodate the real complexity of the problem, while being accessible to experimental as well as computational biologists. To address this, we have examined the application of sequence similarity networks for visualizing functional trends across protein superfamilies from the context of sequence similarity. Using three large groups of homologous proteins of varying types of structural and functional diversity--GPCRs and kinases from humans, and the crotonase superfamily of enzymes--we show that overlaying networks with orthogonal information is a powerful approach for observing functional themes and revealing outliers. In comparison to other primary methods, networks provide both a good representation of group-wise sequence similarity relationships and a strong visual and quantitative correlation with phylogenetic trees, while enabling analysis and visualization of much larger sets of sequences than trees or multiple sequence alignments can easily accommodate. We also define important limitations and caveats in the application of these networks. As a broadly accessible and effective tool for the exploration of protein superfamilies, sequence similarity networks show great potential for generating testable hypotheses about protein structure-function relationships.

  11. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  12. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  13. Understanding transport by the major facilitator superfamily (MFS): structures pave the way.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quistgaard, Esben M; Löw, Christian; Guettou, Fatma; Nordlund, Pär

    2016-02-01

    Members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transport proteins are essential for the movement of a wide range of substrates across biomembranes. As this transport requires a series of conformational changes, structures of MFS transporters captured in different conformational states are needed to decipher the transport mechanism. Recently, a large number of MFS transporter structures have been determined, which has provided us with an unprecedented opportunity to understand general aspects of the transport mechanism. We propose an updated model for the conformational cycle of MFS transporters, the 'clamp-and-switch model', and discuss the role of so-called 'gating residues' and the substrate in modulating these conformational changes.

  14. Modulation of Bacterial Multidrug Resistance Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanath Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections pose a serious public health concern, especially when an infectious disease has a multidrug resistant causative agent. Such multidrug resistant bacteria can compromise the clinical utility of major chemotherapeutic antimicrobial agents. Drug and multidrug resistant bacteria harbor several distinct molecular mechanisms for resistance. Bacterial antimicrobial agent efflux pumps represent a major mechanism of clinical resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is one of the largest groups of solute transporters to date and includes a significant number of bacterial drug and multidrug efflux pumps. We review recent work on the modulation of multidrug efflux pumps, paying special attention to those transporters belonging primarily to the MFS.

  15. [Scarabaeoidea superfamily (Insecta: Coleoptera) as a bioindicator element of anthropogenic disturbance in an amazon national park].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otavo, Samuel Eduardo; Parrado-Rosselli, Angela; Noriega, Jorge Ari

    2013-06-01

    Abstract: Scarabaeoidea superfamily (Insecta: Coleoptera) as a bioindicator element of anthropogenic disturbance in an amazon national park. Insects have been recognized to be important indicators of the quality elements of ecosystems, among others, because of their rapid response to environmental variability and ease cost-effective capture. In this work we evaluated whether beetles of the Scarabaeoidea superfamily may be used as bioindicators of anthropogenic disturbance of Amazonian terra firme rain forests, in order to provide guidelines for monitoring strategies of the Amacayacu National Park. We considered three different levels of anthropogenic disturbance (i.e. low, medium, high) in 12 transects (four in each intervention level), and caught all beetle species of this superfamily. Three interception traps, two light traps, three pitfalls and four bottle fruit traps were used per transect, as well as manual catch. In total, 593 individuals belonging to 92 species, 44 genera and seven families were collected. Scarabaeidae (n = 232, 27 spp.) and Dynastidae (n = 161, 26 spp.) were the families with the highest number of individuals and species, while Aphodiidae, Cetoniidae and Geotrupidae exhibited the lowest. The most abundant species per family were Ateuchus sp. (33.2%) from Scarabaeidae, Cyclocephala verticalis (55.9%) from Dynastidae, Astaena sp. (75.8%) from Melolonthidae, Ceratocanthus amazonicus (66.7%) from Ceratocanthidae y Chaetodus asuai (96.8%) from Hybosoridae. Results showed that the number of species and individuals increased with the anthropogenic disturbance. The Margalef and Shannon indexes also revealed that the highest richness and equity occurred in the high-disturbed site, respectively. Dynastidae exhibited the highest number of exclusive species per gradient, while Scarabaeidae shared most of its species. Ten species were recorded in the three disturbance levels, 26 species in two and 56 species were exclusive to one level. The most

  16. General survey of hAT transposon superfamily with highlight on hobo element in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladevèze, Véronique; Chaminade, Nicole; Lemeunier, Françoise; Periquet, Georges; Aulard, Sylvie

    2012-09-01

    The hAT transposons, very abundant in all kingdoms, have a common evolutionary origin probably predating the plant-fungi-animal divergence. In this paper we present their general characteristics. Members of this superfamily belong to Class II transposable elements. hAT elements share transposase, short terminal inverted repeats and eight base-pairs duplication of genomic target. We focus on hAT elements in Drosophila, especially hobo. Its distribution, dynamics and impact on genome restructuring in laboratory strains as well as in natural populations are reported. Finally, the evolutionary history of hAT elements, their domestication and use as transgenic tools are discussed.

  17. Stability for Function Trade-Offs in the Enolase Superfamily 'Catalytic Module'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, R.A.; Gonzalez, A.; Shoichet, B.K.; Brinen, L.S.; Babbitt, P.C.; /UC, San Francisco /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-07-12

    Enzyme catalysis reflects a dynamic interplay between charged and polar active site residues that facilitate function, stabilize transition states, and maintain overall protein stability. Previous studies show that substituting neutral for charged residues in the active site often significantly stabilizes a protein, suggesting a stability trade-off for functionality. In the enolase superfamily, a set of conserved active site residues (the ''catalytic module'') has repeatedly been used in nature in the evolution of many different enzymes for the performance of unique overall reactions involving a chemically diverse set of substrates. This catalytic module provides a robust solution for catalysis that delivers the common underlying partial reaction that supports all of the different overall chemical reactions of the superfamily. As this module has been so broadly conserved in the evolution of new functions, we sought to investigate the extent to which it follows the stability-function trade-off. Alanine substitutions were made for individual residues, groups of residues, and the entire catalytic module of o-succinylbenzoate synthase (OSBS), a member of the enolase superfamily from Escherichia coli. Of six individual residue substitutions, four (K131A, D161A, E190A, and D213A) substantially increased protein stability (by 0.46-4.23 kcal/mol), broadly consistent with prediction of a stability-activity trade-off. The residue most conserved across the superfamily, E190, is by far the most destabilizing. When the individual substitutions were combined into groups (as they are structurally and functionally organized), nonadditive stability effects emerged, supporting previous observations that residues within the module interact as two functional groups within a larger catalytic system. Thus, whereas the multiple-mutant enzymes D161A/E190A/D213A and K131A/K133A/D161A/E190A/D213A/K235A (termed 3KDED) are stabilized relative to the wild-type enzyme (by 1

  18. Identification, immunolocalization, and characterization analyses of an exopeptidase of papain superfamily, (cathepsin C) from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pei; He, Lei; Xu, Yanquan; Chen, Xueqing; Huang, Yan; Ren, Mengyu; Liang, Chi; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Lu, Gang; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-10-01

    Cathepsin C is an important exopeptidase of papain superfamily and plays a number of great important roles during the parasitic life cycle. The amino acid sequence of cathepsin C from Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) showed 54, 53, and 49% identities to that of Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, and Homo sapiens, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis utilizing the sequences of papain superfamily of C. sinensis demonstrated that cathepsin C and cathepsin Bs came from a common ancestry. Cathepsin C of C. sinensis (Cscathepsin C) was identified as an excretory/secretory product by Western blot analysis. The results of transcriptional level and translational level of Cscathepsin C at metacercaria stage were higher than that at adult worms. Immunolocalization analysis indicated that Cscathepsin C was specifically distributed in the suckers (oral sucker and ventral sucker), eggs, vitellarium, intestines, and testis of adult worms. In the metacercaria, it was mainly detected on the cyst wall and excretory bladder. Combining with the results mentioned above, it implies that Cscathepsin C may be an essential proteolytic enzyme for proteins digestion of hosts, nutrition assimilation, and immune invasion of C. sinensis. Furthermore, it may be a potential diagnostic antigen and drug target against C. sinensis infection.

  19. The cellulose synthase (CESA) gene superfamily of the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Alison W; Bushoven, John T

    2007-01-01

    The CESA gene superfamily of Arabidopsis and other seed plants comprises the CESA family, which encodes the catalytic subunits of cellulose synthase, and eight families of CESA-like (CSL) genes whose functions are largely unknown. The CSL genes have been proposed to encode processive beta-glycosyl transferases that synthesize noncellulosic cell wall polysaccharides. BLAST searches of EST and shotgun genomic sequences from the moss Physcomitrella patens (Hedw.) B.S.G. were used to identify genes with high similarity to vascular plant CESAs, CSLAs, CSLCs, and CSLDs. However, searches using Arabidopsis CSLBs, CSLEs, and CSLGs or rice CSLFs or CSLHs as queries identified no additional CESA superfamily members in P. patens, indicating that this moss lacks representatives of these families. Intron insertion sites are highly conserved between Arabidopsis and P. patens in all four shared gene families. However, phylogenetic analysis strongly supports independent diversification of the shared families in mosses and vascular plants. The lack of orthologs of vascular plant CESAs in the P. patens genome indicates that the divergence of mosses and vascular plants predated divergence and specialization of CESAs for primary and secondary cell wall syntheses and for distinct roles within the rosette terminal complexes. In contrast to Arabidopsis, the CSLD family is highly represented among P. patens ESTs. This is consistent with the proposed function of CSLDs in tip growth and the central role of tip growth in the development of the moss protonema.

  20. Roles for the TGFβ superfamily in the development and survival of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Shane V; Sullivan, Aideen M; O'Keeffe, Gerard W

    2014-10-01

    The adult midbrain contains 75% of all dopaminergic neurons in the CNS. Within the midbrain, these neurons are divided into three anatomically and functionally distinct clusters termed A8, A9 and A10. The A9 group plays a functionally non-redundant role in the control of voluntary movement, which is highlighted by the motor syndrome that results from their progressive degeneration in the neurodegenerative disorder, Parkinson's disease. Despite 50 years of investigation, treatment for Parkinson's disease remains symptomatic, but an intensive research effort has proposed delivering neurotrophic factors to the brain to protect the remaining dopaminergic neurons, or using these neurotrophic factors to differentiate dopaminergic neurons from stem cell sources for cell transplantation. Most neurotrophic factors studied in this context have been members of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily. In recent years, an intensive research effort has focused on understanding the function of these proteins in midbrain dopaminergic neuron development and their role in the molecular architecture that regulates the development of this brain region, with the goal of applying this knowledge to develop novel therapies for Parkinson's disease. In this review, the current evidence showing that TGFβ superfamily members play critical roles in the regulation of midbrain dopaminergic neuron induction, differentiation, target innervation and survival during embryonic and postnatal development is analysed, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Homology models guide discovery of diverse enzyme specificities among dipeptide epimerases in the enolase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, Tiit; Sakai, Ayano; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana D.; Imker, Heidi J.; Song, Ling; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Toro, Rafael; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Vetting, Matthew W.; Nair, Satish K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advance in genome sequencing presents substantial challenges for protein functional assignment, with half or more of new protein sequences inferred from these genomes having uncertain assignments. The assignment of enzyme function in functionally diverse superfamilies represents a particular challenge, which we address through a combination of computational predictions, enzymology, and structural biology. Here we describe the results of a focused investigation of a group of enzymes in the enolase superfamily that are involved in epimerizing dipeptides. The first members of this group to be functionally characterized were Ala-Glu epimerases in Eschericiha coli and Bacillus subtilis, based on the operon context and enzymological studies; these enzymes are presumed to be involved in peptidoglycan recycling. We have subsequently studied more than 65 related enzymes by computational methods, including homology modeling and metabolite docking, which suggested that many would have divergent specificities;, i.e., they are likely to have different (unknown) biological roles. In addition to the Ala-Phe epimerase specificity reported previously, we describe the prediction and experimental verification of: (i) a new group of presumed Ala-Glu epimerases; (ii) several enzymes with specificity for hydrophobic dipeptides, including one from Cytophaga hutchinsonii that epimerizes D-Ala-D-Ala; and (iii) a small group of enzymes that epimerize cationic dipeptides. Crystal structures for certain of these enzymes further elucidate the structural basis of the specificities. The results highlight the potential of computational methods to guide experimental characterization of enzymes in an automated, large-scale fashion. PMID:22392983

  2. Structural basis for amino acid export by DMT superfamily transporter YddG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Hirotoshi; Doki, Shintaro; Takemoto, Mizuki; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Higuchi, Takashi; Fukui, Keita; Usuda, Yoshihiro; Tabuchi, Eri; Nagatoishi, Satoru; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Nishizawa, Tomohiro; Ito, Koichi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2016-05-30

    The drug/metabolite transporter (DMT) superfamily is a large group of membrane transporters ubiquitously found in eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea, and includes exporters for a remarkably wide range of substrates, such as toxic compounds and metabolites. YddG is a bacterial DMT protein that expels aromatic amino acids and exogenous toxic compounds, thereby contributing to cellular homeostasis. Here we present structural and functional analyses of YddG. Using liposome-based analyses, we show that Escherichia coli and Starkeya novella YddG export various amino acids. The crystal structure of S. novella YddG at 2.4 Å resolution reveals a new membrane transporter topology, with ten transmembrane segments in an outward-facing state. The overall structure is basket-shaped, with a large substrate-binding cavity at the centre of the molecule, and is composed of inverted structural repeats related by two-fold pseudo-symmetry. On the basis of this intramolecular symmetry, we propose a structural model for the inward-facing state and a mechanism of the conformational change for substrate transport, which we confirmed by biochemical analyses. These findings provide a structural basis for the mechanism of transport of DMT superfamily proteins.

  3. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

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    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  4. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase catalyzing the final step of noscapine biosynthesis is localized to laticifers in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid noscapine involves a purported dehydrogenation of the narcotinehemiacetal keto moiety. A short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR), designated noscapine synthase (NOS), that catalyzes dehydrogenation of narcotinehemiacetal to noscapine was identified in opium poppy and functionally characterized. The NOS gene was isolated using an integrated transcript and metabolite profiling strategy and subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli. Noscapine synthase is highly divergent from other characterized members of the NADPH-dependent SDR superfamily involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism, and it exhibits exclusive substrate specificity for narcotinehemiacetal. Kinetic analyses showed that NOS exhibits higher catalytic efficiency with NAD+ as the cofactor compared with NADP+. Suppression of NOS transcript levels in opium poppy plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing resulted in a corresponding reduction in the accumulation of noscapine and an increase in narcotinehemiacetal levels in the latex. Noscapine and NOS transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs, but both were most abundant in stems. Unlike other putative biosynthetic genes clustered in the opium poppy genome, and their corresponding proteins, NOS transcripts and the cognate enzyme were abundant in latex, indicating that noscapine metabolism is completed in a distinct cell type compared with the rest of the pathway.

  5. Insights into ascorbate regeneration in plants: investigating the redox and structural properties of dehydroascorbate reductases from Populus trichocarpa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Pierre-Alexandre; Roret, Thomas; Tsan, Pascale; Gualberto, José M; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Didierjean, Claude; Rouhier, Nicolas; Hecker, Arnaud

    2016-03-15

    Dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs), enzymes belonging to the GST superfamily, catalyse the GSH-dependent reduction of dehydroascorbate into ascorbate in plants. By maintaining a reduced ascorbate pool, they notably participate to H2O2 detoxification catalysed by ascorbate peroxidases (APXs). Despite this central role, the catalytic mechanism used by DHARs is still not well understood and there is no supportive 3D structure. In this context, we have performed a thorough biochemical and structural analysis of the three poplar DHARs and coupled this to the analysis of their transcript expression patterns and subcellular localizations. The transcripts for these genes are mainly detected in reproductive and green organs and the corresponding proteins are expressed in plastids, in the cytosol and in the nucleus, but not in mitochondria and peroxisomes where ascorbate regeneration is obviously necessary. Comparing the kinetic properties and the sensitivity to GSSG-mediated oxidation of DHAR2 and DHAR3A, exhibiting 1 or 3 cysteinyl residues respectively, we observed that the presence of additional cysteines in DHAR3A modifies the regeneration mechanism of the catalytic cysteine by forming different redox states. Finally, from the 3D structure of DHAR3A solved by NMR, we were able to map the residues important for the binding of both substrates (GSH and DHA), showing that DHAR active site is very selective for DHA recognition and providing further insights into the catalytic mechanism and the roles of the additional cysteines found in some DHARs.

  6. The Nox/Ferric reductase/Ferric reductase-like families of Eumycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Bidard, Frédérique; Grognet, Pierre; Grossetete, Sandrine; Silar, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are involved in plant biomass degradation by fungi and development of fungal structures. While the ROS-generating NADPH oxidases from filamentous fungi are under strong scrutiny, much less is known about the related integral Membrane (or Ferric) Reductases (IMRs). Here, we present a survey of these enzymes in 29 fungal genomes covering the entire available range of fungal diversity. IMRs are present in all fungal genomes. They can be classified into at least 24 families, underscoring the high diversity of these enzymes. Some are differentially regulated during colony or fruiting body development, as well as by the nature of the carbon source of the growth medium. Importantly, functional characterization of IMRs has been made on proteins belonging to only two families, while nothing or very little is known about the proteins of the other 22 families.

  7. 4-Dimethylaminoazobenzenes: carcinogenicities and reductive cleavage by microsomal azo reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambooy, J P; Koffman, B M

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-four 4-dimethylaminoazobenzenes (DABs) in which systematic structural modifications have been made in the prime ring have been studied for substrate specificity for microsomal azo reductase. The DABs were also evaluated for carcinogenicity and it was found that there was no correlation between carcinogenicity and extent of azo bond cleavage by azo reductase. While any substituent in the prime ring reduces the rate of cleavage of the azo bond relative to the unsubstituted dye, there is a correlation between substituent size and susceptibility to the enzyme. Substituent size was also found to be a significant factor in the induction of hepatomas by the dyes. Preliminary studies have shown that there appears to be a positive correlation between microsomal riboflavin content and the activity of the azo reductase.

  8. Mitochondrial Thioredoxin-Glutathione Reductase from Larval Taenia crassiceps (Cysticerci

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    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial thioredoxin-glutathione reductase was purified from larval Taenia crassiceps (cysticerci. The preparation showed NADPH-dependent reductase activity with either thioredoxin or GSSG, and was able to perform thiol/disulfide exchange reactions. At 25∘C specific activities were 437  ±  27 mU mg-1 and 840  ±  49 mU mg-1 with thioredoxin and GSSG, respectively. Apparent Km values were 0.87  ±  0.04  μM, 41  ±  6  μM and 19  ±  10  μM for thioredoxin, GSSG and NADPH, respectively. Thioredoxin from eukaryotic sources was accepted as substrate. The enzyme reduced H2O2 in a NADPH-dependent manner, although with low catalytic efficiency. In the presence of thioredoxin, mitochondrial TGR showed a thioredoxin peroxidase-like activity. All disulfide reductase activities were inhibited by auranofin, suggesting mTGR is dependent on selenocysteine. The reductase activity with GSSG showed a higher dependence on temperature as compared with the DTNB reductase activity. The variation of the GSSG- and DTNB reductase activities on pH was dependent on the disulfide substrate. Like the cytosolic isoform, mTGR showed a hysteretic kinetic behavior at moderate or high GSSG concentrations, but it was less sensitive to calcium. The enzyme was able to protect glutamine synthetase from oxidative inactivation, suggesting that mTGR is competent to contend with oxidative stress.

  9. NITRATE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY DURING HEAT SHOCK IN WINTER WHEAT

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    Klimenko S.B.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Nitrates are the basic source of nitrogen for the majority of plants. Absorption and transformation of nitrates in plants are determined by external conditions and, first of all, temperature and light intensity. The influence of the temperature increasing till +40 0С on activity of nitrate reductase was studied. It is shown, that the rise of temperature was accompanied by sharp decrease of activity nitrate reductase in leaves of winter wheat, what, apparently, occurred for the account deactivations of enzyme and due to its dissociation.

  10. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

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    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  11. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

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    Daniel L Parton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (superfamilies, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest, reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human

  12. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Daniel L; Grinaway, Patrick B; Hanson, Sonya M; Beauchamp, Kyle A; Chodera, John D

    2016-06-01

    The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (super)families, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest), reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs)-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human tyrosine kinase

  13. Expression profiling and integrative analysis of the CESA/CSL superfamily in rice

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    Tu Yuanyuan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cellulose synthase and cellulose synthase-like gene superfamily (CESA/CSL is proposed to encode enzymes for cellulose and non-cellulosic matrix polysaccharide synthesis in plants. Although the rice (Oryza sativa L. genome has been sequenced for a few years, the global expression profiling patterns and functions of the OsCESA/CSL superfamily remain largely unknown. Results A total of 45 identified members of OsCESA/CSL were classified into two clusters based on phylogeny and motif constitution. Duplication events contributed largely to the expansion of this superfamily, with Cluster I and II mainly attributed to tandem and segmental duplication, respectively. With microarray data of 33 tissue samples covering the entire life cycle of rice, fairly high OsCESA gene expression and rather variable OsCSL expression were observed. While some members from each CSL family (A1, C9, D2, E1, F6 and H1 were expressed in all tissues examined, many of OsCSL genes were expressed in specific tissues (stamen and radicles. The expression pattern of OsCESA/CSL and OsBC1L which extensively co-expressed with OsCESA/CSL can be divided into three major groups with ten subgroups, each showing a distinct co-expression in tissues representing typically distinct cell wall constitutions. In particular, OsCESA1, -3 & -8 and OsCESA4, -7 & -9 were strongly co-expressed in tissues typical of primary and secondary cell walls, suggesting that they form as a cellulose synthase complex; these results are similar to the findings in Arabidopsis. OsCESA5/OsCESA6 is likely partially redundant with OsCESA3 for OsCESA complex organization in the specific tissues (plumule and radicle. Moreover, the phylogenetic comparison in rice, Arabidopsis and other species can provide clues for the prediction of orthologous gene expression patterns. Conclusions The study characterized the CESA/CSL of rice using an integrated approach comprised of phylogeny, transcriptional

  14. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  15. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Rhamnonate Dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glaner, M.; Hubbard, B.; Delli, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonate (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and

  16. Tools and techniques to study ligand-receptor interactions and receptor activation by TNF superfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Pascal; Willen, Laure; Smulski, Cristian R

    2014-01-01

    Ligands and receptors of the TNF superfamily are therapeutically relevant targets in a wide range of human diseases. This chapter describes assays based on ELISA, immunoprecipitation, FACS, and reporter cell lines to monitor interactions of tagged receptors and ligands in both soluble and membrane-bound forms using unified detection techniques. A reporter cell assay that is sensitive to ligand oligomerization can identify ligands with high probability of being active on endogenous receptors. Several assays are also suitable to measure the activity of agonist or antagonist antibodies, or to detect interactions with proteoglycans. Finally, self-interaction of membrane-bound receptors can be evidenced using a FRET-based assay. This panel of methods provides a large degree of flexibility to address questions related to the specificity, activation, or inhibition of TNF-TNF receptor interactions in independent assay systems, but does not substitute for further tests in physiologically relevant conditions.

  17. Proton-coupled sugar transport in the prototypical major facilitator superfamily protein XylE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisedchaisri, Goragot; Park, Min-Sun; Iadanza, Matthew G; Zheng, Hongjin; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-08-04

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) is the largest collection of structurally related membrane proteins that transport a wide array of substrates. The proton-coupled sugar transporter XylE is the first member of the MFS that has been structurally characterized in multiple transporting conformations, including both the outward and inward-facing states. Here we report the crystal structure of XylE in a new inward-facing open conformation, allowing us to visualize the rocker-switch movement of the N-domain against the C-domain during the transport cycle. Using molecular dynamics simulation, and functional transport assays, we describe the movement of XylE that facilitates sugar translocation across a lipid membrane and identify the likely candidate proton-coupling residues as the conserved Asp27 and Arg133. This study addresses the structural basis for proton-coupled substrate transport and release mechanism for the sugar porter family of proteins.

  18. Myosin superfamily: The multi-functional and irreplaceable factors in spermatogenesis and testicular tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan-Ruide; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-01-15

    Spermatogenesis is a fundamental process in sexual development and reproduction, in which the diploid spermatogonia transform into haploid mature spermatozoa. This process is under the regulation of multiple factors and pathway. Myosin has been implicated in various aspects during spermatogenesis. Myosins constitute a diverse superfamily of actin-based molecular motors that translocate along microfilament in an ATP-dependent manner, and six kinds of myosins have been proved that function during spermatogenesis. In mitosis and meiosis, myosins play an important role in spindle assembly and positioning, karyokinesis and cytokinesis. During spermiogenesis, myosins participate in acrosomal formation, nuclear morphogenesis, mitochondrial translocation and spermatid individualization. In this review, we summarize current understanding of the functions of myosin in spermatogenesis and some reproductive system diseases such as testicular tumors and prostate cancer, and discuss the roles of possible upstream molecules which regulate myosin in these processes.

  19. The Tumor Necrosis Factor Superfamily of Cytokines in the Inflammatory Myopathies: Potential Targets for Therapy

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    Boel De Paepe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IM represent a heterogeneous group of autoimmune diseases, of which dermatomyositis (DM, polymyositis (PM, and sporadic inclusion body myositis (IBM are the most common. The crucial role played by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα in the IM has long been recognized. However, so far, 18 other members of the TNF superfamily have been characterized, and many of these have not yet received the attention they deserve. In this paper, we summarize current findings for all TNF cytokines in IM, pinpointing what we know already and where current knowledge fails. For each TNF family member, possibilities for treating inflammatory diseases in general and the IM in particular are explored.

  20. Structure of Bacterial LigD -phosphoesterase Unveils a DNA Repair Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, P.; Smith, P; Shuman, S

    2010-01-01

    The DNA ligase D (LigD) 3{prime}-phosphoesterase (PE) module is a conserved component of the bacterial nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) apparatus that performs 3{prime} end-healing reactions at DNA double-strand breaks. Here we report the 1.9 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PE, which reveals that PE exemplifies a unique class of DNA repair enzyme. PE has a distinctive fold in which an eight stranded {beta} barrel with a hydrophobic interior supports a crescent-shaped hydrophilic active site on its outer surface. Six essential side chains coordinate manganese and a sulfate mimetic of the scissile phosphate. The PE active site and mechanism are unique vis a vis other end-healing enzymes. We find PE homologs in archaeal and eukaryal proteomes, signifying that PEs comprise a DNA repair superfamily.

  1. Inhibition of Albendazole and Oxfendazole on the Activity of Fumaric Reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xue-jun; LI Qing-zhang; LI Xia

    2004-01-01

    The activity of fumaric reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae tissue homogenate with albendazole and oxfendazole individually was detected. Results showed that the two kinds of drugs both could inhabite the activity of fumaric reductase. The results indicate that the mechanism of action of benzimidazole carbamate drugs is probably inhabiting the complex of fumaric reductase noncompetently, thus lead to the exhaostion of energy and death.

  2. Functional interaction of Parkinson's disease-associated LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafa, Klodjan; Tsika, Elpida; Moser, Roger; Musso, Alessandra; Glauser, Liliane; Jones, Amy; Biskup, Saskia; Xiong, Yulan; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Moore, Darren J.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in LRRK2 cause autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 encodes a multi-domain protein containing GTPase and kinase domains, and putative protein–protein interaction domains. Familial PD mutations alter the GTPase and kinase activity of LRRK2 in vitro. LRRK2 is suggested to regulate a number of cellular pathways although the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. To explore such mechanisms, it has proved informative to identify LRRK2-interacting proteins, some of which serve as LRRK2 kinase substrates. Here, we identify common interactions of LRRK2 with members of the dynamin GTPase superfamily. LRRK2 interacts with dynamin 1–3 that mediate membrane scission in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and with dynamin-related proteins that mediate mitochondrial fission (Drp1) and fusion (mitofusins and OPA1). LRRK2 partially co-localizes with endosomal dynamin-1 or with mitofusins and OPA1 at mitochondrial membranes. The subcellular distribution and oligomeric complexes of dynamin GTPases are not altered by modulating LRRK2 in mouse brain, whereas mature OPA1 levels are reduced in G2019S PD brains. LRRK2 enhances mitofusin-1 GTP binding, whereas dynamin-1 and OPA1 serve as modest substrates of LRRK2-mediated phosphorylation in vitro. While dynamin GTPase orthologs are not required for LRRK2-induced toxicity in yeast, LRRK2 functionally interacts with dynamin-1 and mitofusin-1 in cultured neurons. LRRK2 attenuates neurite shortening induced by dynamin-1 by reducing its levels, whereas LRRK2 rescues impaired neurite outgrowth induced by mitofusin-1 potentially by reversing excessive mitochondrial fusion. Our study elucidates novel functional interactions of LRRK2 with dynamin-superfamily GTPases that implicate LRRK2 in the regulation of membrane dynamics important for endocytosis and mitochondrial morphology. PMID:24282027

  3. The cytochrome P450 superfamily: biochemistry, evolution and drug metabolism in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, P B

    2002-12-01

    Cytochrome p450s comprise a superfamily of heme-thiolate proteins named for the spectral absorbance peak of their carbon-monoxide-bound species at 450 nm. Having been found in every class of organism, including Archaea, the p450 superfamily is believed to have originated from an ancestral gene that existed over 3 billion years ago. Repeated gene duplications have subsequently given rise to one of the largest of multigene families. These enzymes are notable both for the diversity of reactions that they catalyze and the range of chemically dissimilar substrates upon which they act. Cytochrome p450s support the oxidative, peroxidative and reductive metabolism of such endogenous and xenobiotic substrates as environmental pollutants, agrochemicals, plant allelochemicals, steroids, prostaglandins and fatty acids. In humans, cytochrome p450s are best know for their central role in phase I drug metabolism where they are of critical importance to two of the most significant problems in clinical pharmacology: drug interactions and interindividual variability in drug metabolism. Recent advances in our understanding of cytochrome p450-mediated drug metabolism have been accelerated as a result of an increasing emphasis on functional genomic approaches to p450 research. While human cytochrome p450 databases have swelled with a flood of new human sequence variants, however, the functional characterization of the corresponding gene products has not kept pace. In response researchers have begun to apply the tools of proteomics as well as homology-based and ab initio modeling to salient questions of cytochrome p450 structure/function. This review examines the latest advances in our understanding of human cytochrome p450s.

  4. The barber's pole worm CAP protein superfamily--A basis for fundamental discovery and biotechnology advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohandas, Namitha; Young, Neil D; Jabbar, Abdul; Korhonen, Pasi K; Koehler, Anson V; Amani, Parisa; Hall, Ross S; Sternberg, Paul W; Jex, Aaron R; Hofmann, Andreas; Gasser, Robin B

    2015-12-01

    Parasitic worm proteins that belong to the cysteine-rich secretory proteins, antigen 5 and pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) superfamily are proposed to play key roles in the infection process and the modulation of immune responses in host animals. However, there is limited information on these proteins for most socio-economically important worms. Here, we review the CAP protein superfamily of Haemonchus contortus (barber's pole worm), a highly significant parasitic roundworm (order Strongylida) of small ruminants. To do this, we mined genome and transcriptomic datasets, predicted and curated full-length amino acid sequences (n=45), undertook systematic phylogenetic analyses of these data and investigated transcription throughout the life cycle of H. contortus. We inferred functions for selected Caenorhabditis elegans orthologs (including vap-1, vap-2, scl-5 and lon-1) based on genetic networking and by integrating data and published information, and were able to infer that a subset of orthologs and their interaction partners play pivotal roles in growth and development via the insulin-like and/or the TGF-beta signalling pathways. The identification of the important and conserved growth regulator LON-1 led us to appraise the three-dimensional structure of this CAP protein by comparative modelling. This model revealed the presence of different topological moieties on the canonical fold of the CAP domain, which coincide with an overall charge separation as indicated by the electrostatic surface potential map. These observations suggest the existence of separate sites for effector binding and receptor interactions, and thus support the proposal that these worm molecules act in similar ways as venoms act as ligands for chemokine receptors or G protein-coupled receptor effectors. In conclusion, this review should guide future molecular studies of these molecules, and could support the development of novel interventions against haemonchosis.

  5. Annotation error in public databases: misannotation of molecular function in enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Schnoes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid release of new data from genome sequencing projects, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized; rather, sequences are annotated using computational analysis. The level of misannotation and the types of misannotation in large public databases are currently unknown and have not been analyzed in depth. We have investigated the misannotation levels for molecular function in four public protein sequence databases (UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, GenBank NR, UniProtKB/TrEMBL, and KEGG for a model set of 37 enzyme families for which extensive experimental information is available. The manually curated database Swiss-Prot shows the lowest annotation error levels (close to 0% for most families; the two other protein sequence databases (GenBank NR and TrEMBL and the protein sequences in the KEGG pathways database exhibit similar and surprisingly high levels of misannotation that average 5%-63% across the six superfamilies studied. For 10 of the 37 families examined, the level of misannotation in one or more of these databases is >80%. Examination of the NR database over time shows that misannotation has increased from 1993 to 2005. The types of misannotation that were found fall into several categories, most associated with "overprediction" of molecular function. These results suggest that misannotation in enzyme superfamilies containing multiple families that catalyze different reactions is a larger problem than has been recognized. Strategies are suggested for addressing some of the systematic problems contributing to these high levels of misannotation.

  6. Direct Electrochemistry With Nitrate Reductase in Chitosan Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xia CHEN; Jing Bo HU; Hong WU; Hui Bo SHAO

    2004-01-01

    Stable films made from chitosan(CS)on pyrolytic graphite electrode(PGE)gave direct electrochemistry for incorporated enzyme nitrate reductase(NR).Cyclic voltammetry of CS/NR films showed a pair of well-defined and nearly reversible redox peaks at about-0.430 V vs.SCE at pH 7.0 phosphate buffers.

  7. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna;

    2003-01-01

    ) reductases reported previously. Downstream of the butA gene of L. pseudomesenteroides, but coding in the opposite orientation, a putative DNA recombinase was identified. A two-step PCR approach was used to construct FPR02, a butA mutant of the wild-type strain, CHCC2114. FPR02 had significantly reduced...

  8. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  9. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi;

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  10. The effect of copper on human erythrocyte glutathione reductase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flikweert, J.P.; Hoorn, R.K.J.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. The influence of copper on purified human erythrocyte glutathione reductase (E.C. 1.6.4.2) was studied. The holoenzyme was inhibited at low oxidized glutathione (GSSG) concentrations. At a glutathione concentration of 1 mM and higher no inhibition at all was found. The inhibition was independe

  11. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process...

  12. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  13. Modeling-dependent protein characterization of the rice aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH superfamily reveals distinct functional and structural features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon O Kotchoni

    Full Text Available The completion of the rice genome sequence has made it possible to identify and characterize new genes and to perform comparative genomics studies across taxa. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH gene superfamily encoding for NAD(P(+-dependent enzymes is found in all major plant and animal taxa. However, the characterization of plant ALDHs has lagged behind their animal- and prokaryotic-ALDH homologs. In plants, ALDHs are involved in abiotic stress tolerance, male sterility restoration, embryo development and seed viability and maturation. However, there is still no structural property-dependent functional characterization of ALDH protein superfamily in plants. In this paper, we identify members of the rice ALDH gene superfamily and use the evolutionary nesting events of retrotransposons and protein-modeling-based structural reconstitution to report the genetic and molecular and structural features of each member of the rice ALDH superfamily in abiotic/biotic stress responses and developmental processes. Our results indicate that rice-ALDHs are the most expanded plant ALDHs ever characterized. This work represents the first report of specific structural features mediating functionality of the whole families of ALDHs in an organism ever characterized.

  14. Cloning, crystallization and preliminary X-ray study of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Ying-Der; Chin, Ko-Hsin [Institute of Biochemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 40227,Taiwan (China); Shr, Hui-Lin [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Core Facility for Protein Crystallography, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Gao, Fei Philip [National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lyu, Ping-Chiang [Department of Life Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsin-Chu,Taiwan (China); Wang, Andrew H.-J. [Institute of Biological Chemistry, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Core Facility for Protein Crystallography, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei,Taiwan (China); Chou, Shan-Ho, E-mail: shchou@nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Biochemistry, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung 40227,Taiwan (China)

    2006-10-01

    A CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen X. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. CN-hydrolase superfamily proteins are involved in a wide variety of non-peptide carbon–nitrogen hydrolysis reactions, producing some important natural products such as auxin, biotin, precursors of antibiotics etc. These reactions all involve attack on a cyano or carbonyl carbon by a conserved novel catalytic triad Glu-Lys-Cys through a thiol acylenzyme intermediate. However, classification into the CN-hydrolase superfamily based on sequence similarity alone is not straightforward and further structural data are necessary to improve this categorization. Here, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1258, a CN-hydrolase superfamily protein from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris (Xcc), are reported. The SeMet-substituted XC1258 crystals diffracted to a resolution of 1.73 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2, with unit-cell parameters a = 143.8, b = 154.63, c = 51.3 Å, respectively.

  15. TGF-β superfamily members from the helminth Fasciola hepatica show intrinsic effects on viability and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Japa, Ornampai; Hodgkinson, Jane E; Emes, Richard D; Flynn, Robin J

    2015-03-11

    The helminth Fasciola hepatica causes fasciolosis throughout the world, a major disease of livestock and an emerging zoonotic disease in humans. Sustainable control mechanisms such as vaccination are urgently required. To discover potential vaccine targets we undertook a genome screen to identify members of the transforming growth factor (TGF) family of proteins. Herein we describe the discovery of three ligands belonging to this superfamily and the cloning and characterisation of an activin/TGF like molecule we term FhTLM. FhTLM has a limited expression pattern both temporally across the parasite stages but also spatially within the worm. Furthermore, a recombinant form of this protein is able to enhance the rate (or magnitude) of multiple developmental processes of the parasite indicating a conserved role for this protein superfamily in the developmental biology of a major trematode parasite. Our study demonstrates for the first time the existence of this protein superfamily within F. hepatica and assigns a function to one of the three identified ligands. Moreover further exploration of this superfamily may yield future targets for diagnostic or vaccination purposes due to its stage restricted expression and functional role.

  16. Systematics of some Lower and Middle Devonian spiriferid brachiopods from Gaspe with a revision of the superfamily Delthyridoidea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizzarro, Martin; Lespérance, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    The component subfamilies of the Delthyridoidea are critically reviewed and subjected to phylogenetic analysis. This shows the presence of two clades, assigned to the Delthyrididae and Acrospiriferidae, within the superfamily. The subfamilial categories are redefined mainly on the basis of the ch...

  17. 3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from oilseed rape (Brassica napus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, P S; Kekwick, R G; Smith, C G; Sidebottom, C; Slabas, A R

    1992-04-01

    3-Oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase (E.C. 1.1.1.100, alternatively known as beta-ketoacyl-[ACP] reductase), a component of fatty acid synthetase has been purified from seeds of rape by ammonium sulphate fractionation, Procion Red H-E3B chromatography, FPLC gel filtration and high performance hydroxyapatite chromatography. The purified enzyme appears on SDS-PAGE as a number of 20-30 kDa components and has a strong tendency to exist in a dimeric form, particularly when dithiothreitol is not present to reduce disulphide bonds. Cleveland mapping and cross-reactivity with antiserum raised against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase both indicate that the multiple components have similar primary structures. On gel filtration the enzyme appears to have a molecular mass of 120 kDa suggesting that the native structure is tetrameric. The enzyme has a strong preference for the acetoacetyl ester of acyl carrier protein (Km = 3 microM) over the corresponding esters of the model substrates N-acetyl cysteamine (Km = 35 mM) and CoA (Km = 261 microM). It is inactivated by dilution but this can be partly prevented by the inclusion of NADPH. Using an antiserum prepared against avocado 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase, the enzyme has been visualised inside the plastids of rape embryo and leaf tissues by immunoelectron microscopy. Amino acid sequencing of two peptides prepared by digestion of the purified enzyme with trypsin showed strong similarities with 3-oxoacyl-[ACP] reductase from avocado pear and the Nod G gene product from Rhizobium meliloti.

  18. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  19. (+)-Pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia. Protein purification, cDNA cloning, heterologous expression and comparison to isoflavone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkova-Kostova, A T; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Chu, A; Lewis, N G

    1996-11-15

    Lignans are a widely distributed class of natural products, whose functions and distribution suggest that they are one of the earliest forms of defense to have evolved in vascular plants; some, such as podophyllotoxin and enterodiol, have important roles in cancer chemotherapy and prevention, respectively. Entry into lignan enzymology has been gained by the approximately 3000-fold purification of two isoforms of (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase, a pivotal branchpoint enzyme in lignan biosynthesis. Both have comparable ( approximately 34.9 kDa) molecular mass and kinetic (Vmax/Km) properties and catalyze sequential, NADPH-dependent, stereospecific, hydride transfers where the incoming hydride takes up the pro-R position. The gene encoding (+)-pinoresinol/(+)-lariciresinol reductase has been cloned and the recombinant protein heterologously expressed as a functional beta-galactosidase fusion protein. Its amino acid sequence reveals a strong homology to isoflavone reductase, a key branchpoint enzyme in isoflavonoid metabolism and primarily found in the Fabaceae (angiosperms). This is of great evolutionary significance since both lignans and isoflavonoids have comparable plant defense properties, as well as similar roles as phytoestrogens. Given that lignans are widespread from primitive plants onwards, whereas the isoflavone reductase-derived isoflavonoids are mainly restricted to the Fabaceae, it is tempting to speculate that this branch of the isoflavonoid pathway arose via evolutionary divergence from that giving the lignans.

  20. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K; Gang, David R; Halls, Steven C; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-12-12

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  1. Development of a CART Model to Predict the Synthesis of Cardiotoxic Daunorubicinol in Heart Tissue Samples From Donors With and Without Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefer, Carrie C; Blair, Rachael Hageman; Blanco, Javier G

    2016-06-01

    Daunorubicin (DAUN) and doxorubicin (DOX) are used to treat a variety of cancers. The use of DAUN and DOX is hampered by the development of cardiotoxicity. Clinical evidence suggests that patients with leukemia and Down syndrome are at increased risk for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity. Carbonyl reductases and aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) catalyze the reduction of DAUN and DOX into cardiotoxic C-13 alcohol metabolites. Anthracyclines also exert cardiotoxicity by triggering mitochondrial dysfunction. In recent studies, a collection of heart samples from donors with and without Down syndrome was used to investigate determinants for anthracycline-related cardiotoxicity including cardiac daunorubicin reductase activity (DA), carbonyl reductase/AKRs protein expression, mitochondrial DNA content (mtDNA), and AKR7A2 DNA methylation status. In this study, the available demographic, biochemical, genetic, and epigenetic data were integrated through classification and regression trees analysis with the aim of pinpointing the most relevant variables for the synthesis of cardiotoxic daunorubicinol (i.e., DA). Seventeen variables were considered as potential predictors. Leave-one-out-cross-validation was performed for model selection and to estimate the generalization error. The classification and regression trees analysis model and variable importance measures suggest that cardiac mtDNA content, mtDNA(4977) deletion frequency, and AKR7A2 protein content are the most important variables in determining DA.

  2. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G. (Pullman, WA); Davin, Laurence B. (Pullman, WA); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. (Baltimore, MD); Fujita, Masayuki (Kita-gun, JP), Gang; David R. (Ann Arbor, MI), Sarkanen; Simo (Minneapolis, MN), Ford; Joshua D. (Pullman, WA)

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  3. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Norman G. (Pullman, WA); Davin, Laurence B. (Pullman, WA); Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T. (Baltimore, MD); Fujita, Masayuki (Kagawa, JP); Gang, David R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Sarkanen, Simo (S. Minneapolis, MN); Ford, Joshua D. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  4. p53 Superfamily proteins in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Charles W; Van Beneden, Rebecca J; Muttray, Annette F; Böttger, S Anne; Kelley, Melissa L; Tucker, Abraham E; Thomas, W Kelley

    2011-01-01

    The human p53 tumour suppressor protein is inactivated in many cancers and is also a major player in apoptotic responses to cellular stress. The p53 protein and the two other members of this protein family (p63, p73) are encoded by distinct genes and their functions have been extensively documented for humans and some other vertebrates. The structure and relative expression levels for members of the p53 superfamily have also been reported for most major invertebrate taxa. The functions of homologous proteins have been investigated for only a few invertebrates (specifically, p53 in flies, nematodes and recently a sea anemone). These studies of classical model organisms all suggest that the gene family originally evolved to mediate apoptosis of damaged germ cells or to protect germ cells from genotoxic stress. Here, we have correlated data from a number of molluscan and other invertebrate sequencing projects to provide a framework for understanding p53 signalling pathways in marine bivalve cancer and stress biology. These data suggest that (a) the two identified p53 and p63/73-like proteins in soft shell clam (Mya arenaria), blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) and Northern European squid (Loligo forbesi) have identical core sequences and may be splice variants of a single gene, while some molluscs and most other invertebrates have two or more distinct genes expressing different p53 family members; (b) transcriptional activation domains (TADs) in bivalve p53 and p63/73-like protein sequences are 67-69% conserved with human p53, while those in ecdysozoan, cnidarian, placozoan and choanozoan eukaryotes are ≤33% conserved; (c) the Mdm2 binding site in the transcriptional activation domain is 100% conserved in all sequenced bivalve p53 proteins (e.g. Mya, Mytilus, Crassostrea and Spisula) but is not present in other non-deuterostome invertebrates; (d) an Mdm2 homologue has been cloned for Mytilus trossulus; (e) homologues for both human p53 upstream regulatory and

  5. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parton, Daniel L.; Grinaway, Patrick B.; Hanson, Sonya M.; Beauchamp, Kyle A.; Chodera, John D.

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (super)families, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences—from a single sequence to an entire superfamily—and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest), reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics—such as Markov state models (MSMs)—which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human tyrosine

  6. Functional Annotation of Two New Carboxypeptidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Xu, C; Kumaran, D; Brown, A; Sauder, M; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    Two proteins from the amidohydrolase superfamily of enzymes were cloned, expressed, and purified to homogeneity. The first protein, Cc0300, was from Caulobacter crescentus CB-15 (Cc0300), while the second one (Sgx9355e) was derived from an environmental DNA sequence originally isolated from the Sargasso Sea (gi|44371129). The catalytic functions and the substrate profiles for the two enzymes were determined with the aid of combinatorial dipeptide libraries. Both enzymes were shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Xaa dipeptides in which the amino acid at the N-terminus was relatively unimportant. These enzymes were specific for hydrophobic amino acids at the C-terminus. With Cc0300, substrates terminating in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, tyrosine, valine, methionine, and tryptophan were hydrolyzed. The same specificity was observed with Sgx9355e, but this protein was also able to hydrolyze peptides terminating in threonine. Both enzymes were able to hydrolyze N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of the hydrophobic amino acids and tripeptides. The best substrates identified for Cc0300 were l-Ala-l-Leu with kcat and kcat/Km values of 37 s-1 and 1.1 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively, and N-formyl-l-Tyr with kcat and kcat/Km values of 33 s-1 and 3.9 x 105 M-1 s-1, respectively. The best substrate identified for Sgx9355e was l-Ala-l-Phe with kcat and kcat/Km values of 0.41 s-1 and 5.8 x 103 M-1 s-1. The three-dimensional structure of Sgx9355e was determined to a resolution of 2.33 Angstroms with l-methionine bound in the active site. The a-carboxylate of the methionine is ion-paired to His-237 and also hydrogen bonded to the backbone amide groups of Val-201 and Leu-202. The a-amino group of the bound methionine interacts with Asp-328. The structural determinants for substrate recognition were identified and compared with other enzymes in this superfamily that hydrolyze dipeptides with different specificities.

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the MYB transcription factor superfamily in soybean

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    Du Hai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MYB superfamily constitutes one of the most abundant groups of transcription factors described in plants. Nevertheless, their functions appear to be highly diverse and remain rather unclear. To date, no genome-wide characterization of this gene family has been conducted in a legume species. Here we report the first genome-wide analysis of the whole MYB superfamily in a legume species, soybean (Glycine max, including the gene structures, phylogeny, chromosome locations, conserved motifs, and expression patterns, as well as a comparative genomic analysis with Arabidopsis. Results A total of 244 R2R3-MYB genes were identified and further classified into 48 subfamilies based on a phylogenetic comparative analysis with their putative orthologs, showed both gene loss and duplication events. The phylogenetic analysis showed that most characterized MYB genes with similar functions are clustered in the same subfamily, together with the identification of orthologs by synteny analysis, functional conservation among subgroups of MYB genes was strongly indicated. The phylogenetic relationships of each subgroup of MYB genes were well supported by the highly conserved intron/exon structures and motifs outside the MYB domain. Synonymous nucleotide substitution (dN/dS analysis showed that the soybean MYB DNA-binding domain is under strong negative selection. The chromosome distribution pattern strongly indicated that genome-wide segmental and tandem duplication contribute to the expansion of soybean MYB genes. In addition, we found that ~ 4% of soybean R2R3-MYB genes had undergone alternative splicing events, producing a variety of transcripts from a single gene, which illustrated the extremely high complexity of transcriptome regulation. Comparative expression profile analysis of R2R3-MYB genes in soybean and Arabidopsis revealed that MYB genes play conserved and various roles in plants, which is indicative of a divergence in

  8. The respiratory arsenate reductase from Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afkar, E.; Lisak, J.; Saltikov, C.; Basu, P.; Oremland, R.S.; Stolz, J.F.

    2003-01-01

    The respiratory arsenate reductase from the Gram-positive, haloalkaliphile, Bacillus selenitireducens strain MLS10 was purified and characterized. It is a membrane bound heterodimer (150 kDa) composed of two subunits ArrA (110 kDa) and ArrB (34 kDa), with an apparent Km for arsenate of 34 ??M and Vmax of 2.5 ??mol min-1 mg-1. Optimal activity occurred at pH 9.5 and 150 g l-1 of NaCl. Metal analysis (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) of the holoenzyme and sequence analysis of the catalytic subunit (ArrA; the gene for which was cloned and sequenced) indicate it is a member of the DMSO reductase family of molybdoproteins. ?? 2003 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Selective regulation of axonal growth from developing hippocampal neurons by tumor necrosis factor superfamily member APRIL☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osório, Catarina; Chacón, Pedro J.; White, Matthew; Kisiswa, Lilian; Wyatt, Sean; Rodríguez-Tébar, Alfredo; Davies, Alun M.

    2014-01-01

    APRIL (A Proliferation-Inducing Ligand, TNFSF13) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that regulates lymphocyte survival and activation and has been implicated in tumorigenesis and autoimmune diseases. Here we report the expression and first known activity of APRIL in the nervous system. APRIL and one of its receptors, BCMA (B-Cell Maturation Antigen, TNFRSF17), are expressed by hippocampal pyramidal cells of fetal and postnatal mice. In culture, these neurons secreted APRIL, and function-blocking antibodies to either APRIL or BCMA reduced axonal elongation. Recombinant APRIL enhanced axonal elongation, but did not influence dendrite elongation. The effect of APRIL on axon elongation was inhibited by anti-BCMA and the expression of a signaling-defective BCMA mutant in these neurons, suggesting that the axon growth-promoting effect of APRIL is mediated by BCMA. APRIL promoted phosphorylation and activation of ERK1, ERK2 and Akt and serine phosphorylation and inactivation of GSK-3β in cultured hippocampal pyramidal cells. Inhibition of MEK1/MEK2 (activators of ERK1/ERK2), PI3-kinase (activator of Akt) or Akt inhibited the axon growth-promoting action of APRIL, as did pharmacological activation of GSK-3β and the expression of a constitutively active form of GSK-3β. These findings suggest that APRIL promotes axon elongation by a mechanism that depends both on ERK signaling and PI3-kinase/Akt/GSK-3β signaling. PMID:24444792

  10. Function, Structure, and Evolution of the Major Facilitator Superfamily: The LacY Manifesto

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    M. Gregor Madej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The major facilitator superfamily (MFS is a diverse group of secondary transporters with members found in all kingdoms of life. A paradigm for MFS is the lactose permease (LacY of Escherichia coli, which couples the stoichiometric translocation of a galactopyranoside and an H+ across the cytoplasmic membrane. LacY has been the test bed for the development of many methods applied for the analysis of transport proteins. X-ray structures of an inward-facing conformation and the most recent structure of an almost occluded conformation confirm many conclusions from previous studies. Although structure models are critical, they are insufficient to explain the catalysis of transport. The clues to understanding transport are based on the principles of enzyme kinetics. Secondary transport is a dynamic process—static snapshots of X-ray crystallography describe it only partially. However, without structural information, the underlying chemistry is virtually impossible to conclude. A large body of biochemical/biophysical data derived from systematic studies of site-directed mutants in LacY suggests residues critically involved in the catalysis, and a working model for the symport mechanism that involves alternating access of the binding site is presented. The general concepts derived from the bacterial LacY are examined for their relevance to other MFS transporters.

  11. New species and records of mites of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) from mammals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, Andre V; Valim, Michel P

    2016-01-01

    Sixteen species of the superfamily Sarcoptoidea (Acariformes: Psoroptidia) belonging to 10 genera of the families Atopomelidae, Listrophoridae, Chirodiscidae, and Listropsoralgidae are recorded in Brazil. Among them, three species, Prolistrophorus hylaeamys sp. nov. from Hylaeamys laticeps (Lund, 1840) (Cricetidae: Sigmodontinae) from Minas Gerais, Lynxacarus serrafreirei sp. nov. from Galictis cuja (Molina, 1782) (Carnivora: Mustelidae) from Rio de Janeiro (Listrophoridae), and Didelphoecius micoureus sp. nov. (Atopomelidae) from Micoureus paraguayanus (Tate, 1931) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais are described as new for science. Three species of the family Listrophoridae, Prolistrophorus bidentatus Fain et Lukoschus, 1984 from Akodon cursor (Winge, 1887) (Rodentia: Cricetidae) (new host), Prolistrophorus ctenomys Fain, 1970 from Ctenomys torquatus Lichtenstein, 1830 (Rodentia: Ctenomyidae) (new host), and Leporacarus sylvilagi Fain, Whitaker et Lukoschus, 1981 from Sylvilagus brasiliensis (Linnaeus, 1758) (Lagomorpha: Leporidae) (new host) -from Minas Gerais and Rio Grande do Sul, and one species of the family Chirodiscidae, Parakosa tadarida McDaniel and Lawrence, 1962 from Molossus molossus (Pallas, 1766) (Chiroptera: Molossidae) are recorded for the first time in Brazil. The previously unknown female of Didelphoecius validus Fain, Zanatta-Coutinho et Fonseca, 1996 (Atopomelidae) from Metachirus nudicaudatus (Geoffroy, 1803) (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae) from Minas Gerais is described. All data on host-parasite associations of sarcoptoids in Brazil are summarized. Totally, 61 sarcoptoid species of 8 families are recorded in Brazil.

  12. Roles of major facilitator superfamily transporters in phosphate response in Drosophila.

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    Clemens Bergwitz

    Full Text Available The major facilitator superfamily (MFS transporter Pho84 and the type III transporter Pho89 are responsible for metabolic effects of inorganic phosphate in yeast. While the Pho89 ortholog Pit1 was also shown to be involved in phosphate-activated MAPK in mammalian cells, it is currently unknown, whether orthologs of Pho84 have a role in phosphate-sensing in metazoan species. We show here that the activation of MAPK by phosphate observed in mammals is conserved in Drosophila cells, and used this assay to characterize the roles of putative phosphate transporters. Surprisingly, while we found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of the fly Pho89 ortholog dPit had little effect on the activation of MAPK in Drosophila S2R+ cells by phosphate, two Pho84/SLC17A1-9 MFS orthologs (MFS10 and MFS13 specifically inhibited this response. Further, using a Xenopus oocyte assay, we show that MSF13 mediates uptake of [(33P]-orthophosphate in a sodium-dependent fashion. Consistent with a role in phosphate physiology, MSF13 is expressed highest in the Drosophila crop, midgut, Malpighian tubule, and hindgut. Altogether, our findings provide the first evidence that Pho84 orthologs mediate cellular effects of phosphate in metazoan cells. Finally, while phosphate is essential for Drosophila larval development, loss of MFS13 activity is compatible with viability indicating redundancy at the levels of the transporters.

  13. Roles of major facilitator superfamily transporters in phosphate response in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Rasmussen, Matthew D; DeRobertis, Charles; Wee, Mark J; Sinha, Sumi; Chen, Hway H; Huang, Joanne; Perrimon, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter Pho84 and the type III transporter Pho89 are responsible for metabolic effects of inorganic phosphate in yeast. While the Pho89 ortholog Pit1 was also shown to be involved in phosphate-activated MAPK in mammalian cells, it is currently unknown, whether orthologs of Pho84 have a role in phosphate-sensing in metazoan species. We show here that the activation of MAPK by phosphate observed in mammals is conserved in Drosophila cells, and used this assay to characterize the roles of putative phosphate transporters. Surprisingly, while we found that RNAi-mediated knockdown of the fly Pho89 ortholog dPit had little effect on the activation of MAPK in Drosophila S2R+ cells by phosphate, two Pho84/SLC17A1-9 MFS orthologs (MFS10 and MFS13) specifically inhibited this response. Further, using a Xenopus oocyte assay, we show that MSF13 mediates uptake of [(33)P]-orthophosphate in a sodium-dependent fashion. Consistent with a role in phosphate physiology, MSF13 is expressed highest in the Drosophila crop, midgut, Malpighian tubule, and hindgut. Altogether, our findings provide the first evidence that Pho84 orthologs mediate cellular effects of phosphate in metazoan cells. Finally, while phosphate is essential for Drosophila larval development, loss of MFS13 activity is compatible with viability indicating redundancy at the levels of the transporters.

  14. Mycobacterium smegmatis MSMEG_3705 encodes a selective major facilitator superfamily efflux pump with multiple roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Rui; Xie, Jianping

    2015-06-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155 MSMEG_3705 gene was annotated to encode a transporter protein that contains 12 alpha-helical transmembrane domains. We predicted MSMEG_3705 encoding a major facilitator superfamily (MFS) member. To confirm the prediction, the M. smegmatis mc(2)155 MSMEG_3705 gene was deleted. The MSMEG_3705 deletion mutant strain M. smegmatis mc(2)155 ∆MSMEG_3705 was more sensitive to capreomycin. Moreover, M. smegmatis mc(2)155 ∆MSMEG_3705 strain accumulated more ethidium bromide intracellular than wild-type M. smegmatis mc(2)155. Quite unexpectedly, M. smegmatis mc(2)155 ∆MSMEG_3705 grew faster than the wild-type M. smegmatis mc(2)155. The upregulation of the expression of MSMEG_3706, a gene encoding isocitrate lyase downstream MSMEG_3705, in the deletion mutant, might underlie such faster growth in the mutant. The study showed that MSMEG_3705 encodes a genuine MFS member and plays significant role in bacterial growth and antibiotics resistance.

  15. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  16. A new gene superfamily of pathogen-response (repat) genes in Lepidoptera: classification and expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Cerrillo, G; Hernández-Martínez, P; Vogel, H; Ferré, J; Herrero, S

    2013-01-01

    Repat (REsponse to PAThogens) genes were first identified in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in response to Bacillus thuringiensis and baculovirus exposure. Since then, additional repat gene homologs have been identified in different studies. In this study the comprehensive larval transcriptome from S. exigua was analyzed for the presence of novel repat-homolog sequences. These analyses revealed the presence of at least 46 repat genes in S. exigua, establishing a new gene superfamily in this species. Phylogenetic analysis and studies of conserved motifs in these hypothetical proteins have allowed their classification in two main classes, αREPAT and βREPAT. Studies on the transcriptional response of repat genes have shown that αREPAT and βREPAT differ in their sequence but also in the pattern of regulation. The αREPAT were mainly regulated in response to the Cry1Ca toxin from B. thuringiensis but not to the increase in the midgut microbiota load. In contrast, βREPAT were neither responding to Cry1Ca toxin nor to midgut microbiota. Differential expression between midgut stem cells and the whole midgut tissue was studied for the different repat genes revealing changes in the gene expression distribution between midgut stem cells and midgut tissue in response to midgut microbiota. This high diversity found in their sequence and in their expression profile suggests that REPAT proteins may be involved in multiple processes that could be of relevance for the understanding of the insect gut physiology.

  17. Evolution of the B3 DNA binding superfamily: new insights into REM family gene diversification.

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    Elisson A C Romanel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B3 DNA binding domain includes five families: auxin response factor (ARF, abscisic acid-insensitive3 (ABI3, high level expression of sugar inducible (HSI, related to ABI3/VP1 (RAV and reproductive meristem (REM. The release of the complete genomes of the angiosperm eudicots Arabidopsis thaliana and Populus trichocarpa, the monocot Orysa sativa, the bryophyte Physcomitrella patens,the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri and the red algae Cyanidioschyzon melorae provided an exceptional opportunity to study the evolution of this superfamily. METHODOLOGY: In order to better understand the origin and the diversification of B3 domains in plants, we combined comparative phylogenetic analysis with exon/intron structure and duplication events. In addition, we investigated the conservation and divergence of the B3 domain during the origin and evolution of each family. CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate that showed that the B3 containing genes have undergone extensive duplication events, and that the REM family B3 domain has a highly diverged DNA binding. Our results also indicate that the founding member of the B3 gene family is likely to be similar to the ABI3/HSI genes found in C. reinhardtii and V. carteri. Among the B3 families, ABI3, HSI, RAV and ARF are most structurally conserved, whereas the REM family has experienced a rapid divergence. These results are discussed in light of their functional and evolutionary roles in plant development.

  18. Superfamily-wide portrait of serine hydrolase inhibition achieved by library-versus-library screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachovchin, Daniel A; Ji, Tianyang; Li, Weiwei; Simon, Gabriel M; Blankman, Jacqueline L; Adibekian, Alexander; Hoover, Heather; Niessen, Sherry; Cravatt, Benjamin F

    2010-12-07

    Serine hydrolases (SHs) are one of the largest and most diverse enzyme classes in mammals. They play fundamental roles in virtually all physiological processes and are targeted by drugs to treat diseases such as diabetes, obesity, and neurodegenerative disorders. Despite this, we lack biological understanding for most of the 110+ predicted mammalian metabolic SHs, in large part because of a dearth of assays to assess their biochemical activities and a lack of selective inhibitors to probe their function in living systems. We show here that the vast majority (> 80%) of mammalian metabolic SHs can be labeled in proteomes by a single, active site-directed fluorophosphonate probe. We exploit this universal activity-based assay in a library-versus-library format to screen 70+ SHs against 140+ structurally diverse carbamates. Lead inhibitors were discovered for ∼40% of the screened enzymes, including many poorly characterized SHs. Global profiles identified carbamate inhibitors that discriminate among highly sequence-related SHs and, conversely, enzymes that share inhibitor sensitivity profiles despite lacking sequence homology. These findings indicate that sequence relatedness is not a strong predictor of shared pharmacology within the SH superfamily. Finally, we show that lead carbamate inhibitors can be optimized into pharmacological probes that inactivate individual SHs with high specificity in vivo.

  19. Fauna Europaea: Coleoptera 2 (excl. series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and superfamily Curculionoidea

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    Paolo Audisio

    2015-04-01

    Coleoptera represent a huge assemblage of holometabolous insects, including as a whole more than 200 recognized families and some 400,000 described species worldwide. Basic information is summarized on their biology, ecology, economic relevance, and estimated number of undescribed species worldwide. Little less than 30,000 species are listed from Europe. The Coleoptera 2 section of the Fauna Europaea database (Archostemata, Myxophaga, Adephaga and Polyphaga excl. the series Elateriformia, Scarabaeiformia, Staphyliniformia and the superfamily Curculionoidea encompasses 80 families (according to the previously accepted family-level systematic framework and approximately 13,000 species. Tabulations included a complete list of the families dealt with, the number of species in each, the names of all involved specialists, and, when possible, an estimate of the gaps in terms of total number of species at an European level. A list of some recent useful references is appended. Most families included in the Coleoptera 2 Section have been updated in the most recent release of the Fauna Europaea index, or are ready to be updated as soon as the FaEu data management environment completes its migration from Zoological Museum Amsterdam to Berlin Museum für Naturkunde.

  20. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar; Haque, Abdul; De Zorzi, Rita; Mirza, Osman; Walz, Thomas; Rahman, Moazur

    2015-05-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874 conferred resistance to at least ten of the tested antimicrobials: ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, levofloxacin, kanamycin, streptomycin, gentamycin, nalidixic acid, chloramphenicol, ethidium bromide, and acriflavine, including fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which were drugs of choice to treat S. Typhi infections. Cell-based functional studies using ethidium bromide and acriflavine showed that STY4874 functions as a H(+)-dependent exporter. These results suggest that STY4874 may be an important drug target, which can now be tested by studying the susceptibility of a STY4874-deficient S. Typhi strain to antimicrobials.

  1. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

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    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  2. Expression Divergence of Duplicate Genes in the Protein Kinase Superfamily in Pacific Oyster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Dahai; Ko, Dennis C; Tian, Xinmin; Yang, Guang; Wang, Liuyang

    2015-01-01

    Gene duplication has been proposed to serve as the engine of evolutionary innovation. It is well recognized that eukaryotic genomes contain a large number of duplicated genes that evolve new functions or expression patterns. However, in mollusks, the evolutionary mechanisms underlying the divergence and the functional maintenance of duplicate genes remain little understood. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive analysis of duplicate genes in the protein kinase superfamily using whole genome and transcriptome data for the Pacific oyster. A total of 64 duplicated gene pairs were identified based on a phylogenetic approach and the reciprocal best BLAST method. By analyzing gene expression from RNA-seq data from 69 different developmental and stimuli-induced conditions (nine tissues, 38 developmental stages, eight dry treatments, seven heat treatments, and seven salty treatments), we found that expression patterns were significantly correlated for a number of duplicate gene pairs, suggesting the conservation of regulatory mechanisms following divergence. Our analysis also identified a subset of duplicate gene pairs with very high expression divergence, indicating that these gene pairs may have been subjected to transcriptional subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization after the initial duplication events. Further analysis revealed a significant correlation between expression and sequence divergence (as revealed by synonymous or nonsynonymous substitution rates) under certain conditions. Taken together, these results provide evidence for duplicate gene sequence and expression divergence in the Pacific oyster, accompanying its adaptation to harsh environments. Our results provide new insights into the evolution of duplicate genes and their expression levels in the Pacific oyster.

  3. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

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    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  4. Roles for transforming growth factor beta superfamily proteins in early folliculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Daniel J; Woodruff, Teresa K; Mayo, Kelly E

    2009-01-01

    Primordial follicle formation and the subsequent transition of follicles to the primary and secondary stages encompass the early events during folliculogenesis in mammals. These processes establish the ovarian follicle pool and prime follicles for entry into subsequent growth phases during the reproductive cycle. Perturbations during follicle formation can affect the size of the primordial follicle pool significantly, and alterations in follicle transition can cause follicles to arrest at immature stages or result in premature depletion of the follicle reserve. Determining the molecular events that regulate primordial follicle formation and early follicle growth may lead to the development of new fertility treatments. Over the last decade, many of the growth factors and signaling proteins that mediate the early stages of folliculogenesis have been identified using mouse genetic models, in vivo injection studies, and ex vivo organ culture approaches. These studies reveal important roles for the transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) superfamily of proteins in the ovary. This article reviews these roles for TGF-beta family proteins and focuses in particular on work from our laboratories on the functions of activin in early folliculogenesis.

  5. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

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    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  6. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Harshavardhanan; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Shanmugam, Ashokraj; Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Park, Jong-In; Kim, HyeRan; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-07-27

    Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18) are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Currently, understanding of their function(s) during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST) and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible) under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT) and cold susceptible (CS) lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  7. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhanan Vijayakumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18 are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Currently, understanding of their function(s during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT and cold susceptible (CS lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  8. Redox regulation by thioredoxin superfamily; protection against oxidative stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, T; Nakamura, H; Nishiyama, A; Hosoi, F; Masutani, H; Wada, H; Yodoi, J

    2000-12-01

    Thioredoxin (TRX) is a 12 kD protein with redox-active dithiol in the active site; -Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-. We originally cloned human TRX as adult T cell leukemia derived factor (ADF) produced by HTLV-I transformed cells. TRX and related molecules maintain a cellular reducing enviroment, working in concert with the glutathione system. Physiologically, TRX has cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress. TRX promotes DNA binding of transcription factors such as NF-kB, AP-1, p53, and PEBP-2. The TRX superfamily, including thioredoxin-2 (mitochondrial thioredoxin) and glutaredoxin, are involved in biologically important phenomena via the redox-regulating system. Thioredoxin-binding protein-2, which we recently identified by a yeast two-hybrid system, is a type of endogenous modulator of TRX activity. TRX is secreted from the cells and exhibits cytokine-like and chemokine-like activities. Redox regulation by TRX plays a crucial role in biological responses against oxidative stress.

  9. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Buus, Ole Thomsen; Wollenweber, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underly......Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline) which are the potential sites of asparagine (N) linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins...... and their underlying causes have largely been unexplored. We computed the actual and probabilistic occurrence of NXS/T sequons in ABC protein superfamilies from eight diverse eukaryotic organisms. The ABC proteins contained significantly higher NXS/T sequon numbers compared to respective genome-wide average......-against the recent findings of only threonine specific Darwinian selection of sequons in proteins. The occurrence of sequons was positively correlated with the frequency of sequon specific amino acids and negatively correlated with proline and the NPS/T sequences. Further, the NPS/T sequences were significantly...

  10. Manipulation of receptor oligomerization as a strategy to inhibit signaling by TNF superfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Julia T; Nelson, Christopher A; Decker, Corinne E; Zou, Wei; Fremont, Daved H; Teitelbaum, Steven L

    2014-08-19

    Signaling by receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK) in response to its ligand RANKL, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily of cytokines, stimulates osteoclast formation and bone resorption. Thus, this ligand-receptor pair is a therapeutic target for various disorders, such as osteoporosis and metastasis of cancer to bone. RANKL exists as a physiological homotrimer, with each monomer recognizing a single molecule of RANK or the decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG), which inhibits osteoclastogenesis. We engineered a RANKL protein in which all three monomers of RANKL were encoded as a single polypeptide chain, which enabled us to independently control receptor binding at each binding interface. To generate an effective RANK inhibitor, we used an unbiased forward genetic approach to identify mutations in RANKL that had a 500-fold increased affinity for RANK but had decreased affinity for the decoy receptor OPG. Incorporating mutations that blocked receptor binding into this high-affinity RANKL variant generated a mutant RANKL that completely inhibited wild-type RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro and bone resorption in mice. Our approach may be generalized to enable the inhibition of other TNF receptor signaling systems, which are implicated in a wide range of pathological conditions.

  11. Primase-polymerases are a functionally diverse superfamily of replication and repair enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilliam, Thomas A; Keen, Benjamin A; Brissett, Nigel C; Doherty, Aidan J

    2015-08-18

    Until relatively recently, DNA primases were viewed simply as a class of proteins that synthesize short RNA primers requisite for the initiation of DNA replication. However, recent studies have shown that this perception of the limited activities associated with these diverse enzymes can no longer be justified. Numerous examples can now be cited demonstrating how the term 'DNA primase' only describes a very narrow subset of these nucleotidyltransferases, with the vast majority fulfilling multifunctional roles from DNA replication to damage tolerance and repair. This article focuses on the archaeo-eukaryotic primase (AEP) superfamily, drawing on recently characterized examples from all domains of life to highlight the functionally diverse pathways in which these enzymes are employed. The broad origins, functionalities and enzymatic capabilities of AEPs emphasizes their previous functional misannotation and supports the necessity for a reclassification of these enzymes under a category called primase-polymerases within the wider functional grouping of polymerases. Importantly, the repositioning of AEPs in this way better recognizes their broader roles in DNA metabolism and encourages the discovery of additional functions for these enzymes, aside from those highlighted here.

  12. Stonefish toxin defines an ancient branch of the perforin-like superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellisdon, Andrew M; Reboul, Cyril F; Panjikar, Santosh; Huynh, Kitmun; Oellig, Christine A; Winter, Kelly L; Dunstone, Michelle A; Hodgson, Wayne C; Seymour, Jamie; Dearden, Peter K; Tweten, Rodney K; Whisstock, James C; McGowan, Sheena

    2015-12-15

    The lethal factor in stonefish venom is stonustoxin (SNTX), a heterodimeric cytolytic protein that induces cardiovascular collapse in humans and native predators. Here, using X-ray crystallography, we make the unexpected finding that SNTX is a pore-forming member of an ancient branch of the Membrane Attack Complex-Perforin/Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin (MACPF/CDC) superfamily. SNTX comprises two homologous subunits (α and β), each of which comprises an N-terminal pore-forming MACPF/CDC domain, a central focal adhesion-targeting domain, a thioredoxin domain, and a C-terminal tripartite motif family-like PRY SPla and the RYanodine Receptor immune recognition domain. Crucially, the structure reveals that the two MACPF domains are in complex with one another and arranged into a stable early prepore-like assembly. These data provide long sought after near-atomic resolution insights into how MACPF/CDC proteins assemble into prepores on the surface of membranes. Furthermore, our analyses reveal that SNTX-like MACPF/CDCs are distributed throughout eukaryotic life and play a broader, possibly immune-related function outside venom.

  13. Patterning of cell assemblies regulated by adhesion receptors of the cadherin superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, M; Nakagawa, S; Aono, S; Usui, T; Uemura, T

    2000-07-29

    During morphogenesis, cell-cell association patterns are dynamically altered. We are interested in how cell adhesion molecules can regulate the patterning of cellular assemblies. Cadherins, a group of cell-cell adhesion receptors, are crucial for the organized assembly of many cell types, but they also regulate dynamic aspects of cell association. For example, during neural crest emigration from the neural tube, the cadherin subtypes expressed by crest cells are switched from one subtype to another. Artificial perturbation of this switch results in blocking of their escape from the neural tube. Intracellular modulations of cadherin activity also seem to play a role in regulation of cell adhesion. We identified p120ctn as a regulator of cadherin function in carcinoma cells. With such regulators, cells may make a choice as to whether they should maintain stable cell contacts or disrupt their association. Finally, we found another type of cadherin-mediated cell patterning: Flamingo, a seven-pass transmembrane cadherin, regulates planar cell polarity in Drosophila imaginal discs. Thus, the cadherin superfamily receptors control the patterning of cell assemblies through a variety of mechanisms.

  14. Correlated Mutation in the Evolution of Catalysis in Uracil DNA Glycosylase Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bo; Liu, Yinling; Guevara, Jose; Li, Jing; Jilich, Celeste; Yang, Ye; Wang, Liangjiang; Dominy, Brian N.; Cao, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Enzymes in Uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) superfamily are essential for the removal of uracil. Family 4 UDGa is a robust uracil DNA glycosylase that only acts on double-stranded and single-stranded uracil-containing DNA. Based on mutational, kinetic and modeling analyses, a catalytic mechanism involving leaving group stabilization by H155 in motif 2 and water coordination by N89 in motif 3 is proposed. Mutual Information analysis identifies a complexed correlated mutation network including a strong correlation in the EG doublet in motif 1 of family 4 UDGa and in the QD doublet in motif 1 of family 1 UNG. Conversion of EG doublet in family 4 Thermus thermophilus UDGa to QD doublet increases the catalytic efficiency by over one hundred-fold and seventeen-fold over the E41Q and G42D single mutation, respectively, rectifying the strong correlation in the doublet. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the correlated mutations in the doublet in motif 1 position the catalytic H155 in motif 2 to stabilize the leaving uracilate anion. The integrated approach has important implications in studying enzyme evolution and protein structure and function.

  15. Plum, an immunoglobulin superfamily protein, regulates axon pruning by facilitating TGF-β signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaomeng M; Gutman, Itai; Mosca, Timothy J; Iram, Tal; Ozkan, Engin; Garcia, K Christopher; Luo, Liqun; Schuldiner, Oren

    2013-05-08

    Axon pruning during development is essential for proper wiring of the mature nervous system, but its regulation remains poorly understood. We have identified an immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) transmembrane protein, Plum, that is cell autonomously required for axon pruning of mushroom body (MB) γ neurons and for ectopic synapse refinement at the developing neuromuscular junction in Drosophila. Plum promotes MB γ neuron axon pruning by regulating the expression of Ecdysone Receptor-B1, a key initiator of axon pruning. Genetic analyses indicate that Plum acts to facilitate signaling of Myoglianin, a glial-derived TGF-β, on MB γ neurons upstream of the type-I TGF-β receptor Baboon. Myoglianin, Baboon, and Ecdysone Receptor-B1 are also required for neuromuscular junction ectopic synapse refinement. Our study highlights both IgSF proteins and TGF-β facilitation as key promoters of developmental axon elimination and demonstrates a mechanistic conservation between MB axon pruning during metamorphosis and the refinement of ectopic larval neuromuscular connections.

  16. The first mitochondrial genome for the wasp superfamily Platygastroidea: the egg parasitoid Trissolcus basalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng; Valerio, Alejandro; Austin, Andrew D; Dowton, Mark; Johnson, Norman F

    2012-03-01

    The nearly complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of an egg parasitoid, Trissolcus basalis (Wollaston), was sequenced using both 454 and Illumina next-generation sequencing technologies. A portion of the noncoding region remained unsequenced, possibly owing to the presence of repeats. The sequenced portion of the genome is 15,768 bp and has a high A+T content (84.2%), as is typical for hymenopteran mt genomes. A total of 36 of the 37 genes normally present in animal mt genomes were located. The one exception was trnR; a truncated version of this gene is present between trnS(1) and nd5, but it is unclear whether this gene fragment could code for the entire trnR gene. The mt gene arrangement of T. basalis is different from other Proctotrupomorpha mt genomes, with a number of trn genes in different positions. However, no shared derived gene rearrangements were identified in the present study. Bayesian analyses of mt genomes from 29 hymenopteran taxa and seven other orders of holometabolous insects support some uncontroversial evolutionary relationships, but indicate that much higher levels of taxonomic sampling are necessary for the resolution of family and superfamily relationships.

  17. Thioredoxin and glutaredoxin-mediated redox regulation of ribonucleotide reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajib; Sengupta; Arne; Holmgren

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase(RNR), the rate-limitingenzyme in DNA synthesis, catalyzes reduction of thedifferent ribonucleotides to their corresponding deoxyri-bonucleotides. The crucial role of RNR in DNA synthesishas made it an important target for the development ofantiviral and anticancer drugs. Taking account of the re-cent developments in this field of research, this reviewfocuses on the role of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin sys-tems in the redox reactions of the RNR catalysis.

  18. A Two-component NADPH Oxidase (NOX)-like System in Bacteria Is Involved in the Electron Transfer Chain to the Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase MsrP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juillan-Binard, Céline; Picciocchi, Antoine; Andrieu, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Jerome; Petit-Hartlein, Isabelle; Caux-Thang, Christelle; Vivès, Corinne; Nivière, Vincent; Fieschi, Franck

    2017-02-10

    MsrPQ is a newly identified methionine sulfoxide reductase system found in bacteria, which appears to be specifically involved in the repair of periplasmic proteins oxidized by hypochlorous acid. It involves two proteins: a periplasmic one, MsrP, previously named YedY, carrying out the Msr activity, and MsrQ, an integral b-type heme membrane-spanning protein, which acts as the specific electron donor to MsrP. MsrQ, previously named YedZ, was mainly characterized by bioinformatics as a member of the FRD superfamily of heme-containing membrane proteins, which include the NADPH oxidase proteins (NOX/DUOX). Here we report a detailed biochemical characterization of the MsrQ protein from Escherichia coli We optimized conditions for the overexpression and membrane solubilization of an MsrQ-GFP fusion and set up a purification scheme allowing the production of pure MsrQ. Combining UV-visible spectroscopy, heme quantification, and site-directed mutagenesis of histidine residues, we demonstrated that MsrQ is able to bind two b-type hemes through the histidine residues conserved between the MsrQ and NOX protein families. In addition, we identify the E. coli flavin reductase Fre, which is related to the dehydrogenase domain of eukaryotic NOX enzymes, as an efficient cytosolic electron donor to the MsrQ heme moieties. Cross-linking experiments as well as surface Plasmon resonance showed that Fre interacts with MsrQ to form a specific complex. Taken together, these data support the identification of the first prokaryotic two-component protein system related to the eukaryotic NOX family and involved in the reduction of periplasmic oxidized proteins.

  19. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinesha L. Hollman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases.

  20. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-07

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters.

  1. Molecular cloning, bioinformatics analysis and functional characterization of HWTX-XI toxin superfamily from the spider Ornithoctonus huwena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liping; Deng, Meichun; Duan, Zhigui; Tang, Xing; Liang, Songping

    2014-04-01

    Spider venom contains a very valuable repertoire of natural resources to discover novel components for molecular diversity analyses and therapeutic applications. In this study, HWTX-XI toxins from the spider venom glands of Ornithoctonus huwena which are Kunitz-type toxins (KTTs) and were directly cloned, analyzed and functionally characterized. To date, the HWTX-XI superfamily consists of 38 members deduced from 121 high-quality expressed sequence tags, which is the largest spider KTT superfamily with significant molecular diversity mainly resulted from cDNA tandem repeats as well as focal hypermutation. Among them, HW11c40 and HW11c50 may be intermediate variants between native Kunitz toxins and sub-Kunitz toxins based on evolutionary analyses. In order to elucidate their biological activities, recombinant HW11c4, HW11c24, HW11c27 and HW11c39 were successfully expressed, further purified and functionally characterized. Both HW11c4 and HW11c27 display inhibitory activities against trypsin, chymotrypsin and kallikrein. Moreover, HW11c4 is also an inhibitor relatively specific for Kv1.1 channels. HW11c24 and HW11c39 are found to be inactive on chymotrysin, trypsin, kallikrein, thrombin and ion channels. These findings provide molecular evidence for toxin diversification of the HWTX-XI superfamily and useful molecular templates of serine protease inhibitors and ion channel blockers for the development of potentially clinical applications.

  2. Mechanistic Diversity in the RuBisCO Superfamily: The Enolase in the Methionine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imker,H.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    D-Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the most abundant enzyme, is the paradigm member of the recently recognized mechanistically diverse RuBisCO superfamily. The RuBisCO reaction is initiated by abstraction of the proton from C3 of the D-ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate substrate by a carbamate oxygen of carboxylated Lys 201 (spinach enzyme). Heterofunctional homologues of RuBisCO found in species of Bacilli catalyze the tautomerization ('enolization') of 2,3-diketo-5-methylthiopentane 1-phosphate (DK-MTP 1-P) in the methionine salvage pathway in which 5-methylthio-D-ribose (MTR) derived from 5'-methylthioadenosine is converted to methionine [Ashida, H., Saito, Y., Kojima, C., Kobayashi, K., Ogasawara, N., and Yokota, A. (2003) A functional link between RuBisCO-like protein of Bacillus and photosynthetic RuBisCO, Science 302, 286-290]. The reaction catalyzed by this 'enolase' is accomplished by abstraction of a proton from C1 of the DK-MTP 1-P substrate to form the tautomerized product, a conjugated enol. Because the RuBisCO- and 'enolase'-catalyzed reactions differ in the regiochemistry of proton abstraction but are expected to share stabilization of an enolate anion intermediate by coordination to an active site Mg{sup 2+}, we sought to establish structure-function relationships for the 'enolase' reaction so that the structural basis for the functional diversity could be established. We determined the stereochemical course of the reaction catalyzed by the 'enolases' from Bacillus subtilis and Geobacillus kaustophilus. Using stereospecifically deuterated samples of an alternate substrate derived from D-ribose (5-OH group instead of the 5-methylthio group in MTR) as well as of the natural DK-MTP 1-P substrate, we determined that the 'enolase'-catalyzed reaction involves abstraction of the 1-proS proton. We also determined the structure of the activated 'enolase' from G

  3. Novel members of the adipokinetic hormone family in beetles of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gäde, Gerd; Šimek, Petr; Marco, Heather G

    2016-12-01

    Eight beetle species of the superfamily Scarabaeoidea were investigated with respect to peptides belonging to the adipokinetic hormone (AKH) family in their neurohemal organs, the corpora cardiaca (CC). The following beetle families are represented: Scarabaeidae, Lucanidae, and Geotrupidae. AKH peptides were identified through a heterospecific trehalose-mobilizing bioassay and by sequence analyses, using liquid chromatography coupled to positive electrospray mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) and analysis of the tandem MS(2) spectra obtained by collision-induced dissociation. All the beetle species have octapeptide AKHs; some have two AKHs, while others have only one. Novel AKH members were found in Euoniticellus intermedius and Circellium bacchus (family Scarabaeidae), as well as in Dorcus parallelipipedus (family Lucanidae). Two species of the family Geotrupidae and two species of the Scarabaeidae subfamily Cetoniinae contain one known AKH peptide, Melme-CC, while E. intermedius produces a novel peptide code named Euoin-AKH: pEINFTTGWamide. Two AKH peptides were each identified in CC of C. bacchus and D. parallelipipedus: the novel Cirba-AKH: pEFNFSAGWamide and the known peptide, Scade-CC-I in the former, and the novel Dorpa-AKH: pEVNYSPVW amide and the known peptide, Melme-CC in the latter. Kheper bonelli (subfamily Scarabaeinae) also has two AKHs, the known Scade-CC-I and Scade-CC-II. All the novel peptides were synthesized and the amino acid sequence assignments were unequivocally confirmed by co-elution of the synthetic peptides with their natural equivalent, and identical MS parameters of the two forms. The novel synthetic peptides are all active in inducing hypertrehalosemia in cockroaches.

  4. Functional Identification of Incorrectly Annotated Prolidases from the Amidohydrolase Superfamily of Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, D.; Patskovsky, Y; Xu, C; Meyer, A; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The substrate profiles for two proteins from Caulobacter crescentus CB15 (Cc2672 and Cc3125) and one protein (Sgx9359b) derived from a DNA sequence (gi|44368820) isolated from the Sargasso Sea were determined using combinatorial libraries of dipeptides and N-acyl derivatives of amino acids. These proteins are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and are currently misannotated in NCBI as catalyzing the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Pro dipeptides. Cc2672 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides and the N-acetyl and N-formyl derivatives of lysine and arginine. This enzyme will also hydrolyze longer peptides that terminate in either lysine or arginine. The N-methyl phosphonate derivative of l-lysine was a potent competitive inhibitor of Cc2672 with a Ki value of 120 nM. Cc3125 was shown to catalyze the hydrolysis of l-Xaa-l-Arg/Lys dipeptides but will not hydrolyze tripeptides or the N-formyl and N-acetyl derivatives of lysine or arginine. The substrate profile for Sgx9359b is similar to that of Cc2672 except that compounds with a C-terminal lysine are not recognized as substrates. The X-ray structure of Sgx9359b was determined to a resolution of 2.3 Angstroms. The protein folds as a (e/a)8-barrel and self-associates to form a homooctamer. The active site is composed of a binuclear metal center similar to that found in phosphotriesterase and dihydroorotase. In one crystal form, arginine was bound adventitiously to the eight active sites within the octamer. The orientation of the arginine in the active site identified the structural determinants for recognition of the a-carboxylate and the positively charged side chains of arginine-containing substrates. This information was used to identify 18 other bacterial sequences that possess identical or similar substrate profiles.

  5. Evolutionary Dynamics of the Cellulose Synthase Gene Superfamily in Grasses1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, Julian G.; Wright, Frank; Oehme, Daniel; Wagner, John M.; Shirley, Neil J.; Burton, Rachel A.; Schreiber, Miriam; Zimmer, Jochen; Marshall, David F.; Waugh, Robbie; Fincher, Geoffrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of cellulose synthase (CesA) and cellulose synthase-like (Csl) families from the cellulose synthase gene superfamily were used to reconstruct their evolutionary origins and selection histories. Counterintuitively, genes encoding primary cell wall CesAs have undergone extensive expansion and diversification following an ancestral duplication from a secondary cell wall-associated CesA. Selection pressure across entire CesA and Csl clades appears to be low, but this conceals considerable variation within individual clades. Genes in the CslF clade are of particular interest because some mediate the synthesis of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucan, a polysaccharide characteristic of the evolutionarily successful grasses that is not widely distributed elsewhere in the plant kingdom. The phylogeny suggests that duplication of either CslF6 and/or CslF7 produced the ancestor of a highly conserved cluster of CslF genes that remain located in syntenic regions of all the grass genomes examined. A CslF6-specific insert encoding approximately 55 amino acid residues has subsequently been incorporated into the gene, or possibly lost from other CslFs, and the CslF7 clade has undergone a significant long-term shift in selection pressure. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics of the CslF6 protein were used to define the three-dimensional dispositions of individual amino acids that are subject to strong ongoing selection, together with the position of the conserved 55-amino acid insert that is known to influence the amounts and fine structures of (1,3;1,4)-β-glucans synthesized. These wall polysaccharides are attracting renewed interest because of their central roles as sources of dietary fiber in human health and for the generation of renewable liquid biofuels. PMID:25999407

  6. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  7. Comparative studies on the soluble and plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase from Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Kłobus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical comparison between two forms of nitrate reductase from cucumber roots: the soluble enzyme and the plasma membrane-associated one was made. Soluble nitrate reductase was purified on the blue-Sepharose 4B. The nitrate reductase bound with plasma membranes was isolated from cucumber roots by partition of microsomes in the 6.5% dextran-PEG two phase system. The molecular weight of native enzyme estimated with HPLC was 240 kDa and 114 kDa for the soluble and membrane bounded enzyme, respectively. Temperature induced phase separation in Triton X-114 indicated a huge difference in hydrophobicity of the plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase and soluble form of enzyme. Small differences were observed in partial activities of plasma membrane nitrate reductase and soluble nitrate reductase. Also experiments with polyclonal antiserum raised against the native nitrate reductase showed some differences in the immunological properties of both forms of the nitrate reductase. The above results indicated that in cucumber roots two different forms of the nitrate reductase are present.

  8. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  9. Identification and characterization of trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline dehydratase and Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase involved in trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline metabolism of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available trans-4-Hydroxy-l-proline (T4LHyp and trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline (T3LHyp occur mainly in collagen. A few bacteria can convert T4LHyp to α-ketoglutarate, and we previously revealed a hypothetical pathway consisting of four enzymes at the molecular level (J Biol Chem (2007 282, 6685–6695; J Biol Chem (2012 287, 32674–32688. Here, we first found that Azospirillum brasilense has the ability to grow not only on T4LHyp but also T3LHyp as a sole carbon source. In A. brasilense cells, T3LHyp dehydratase and NAD(PH-dependent Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (Pyr2C reductase activities were induced by T3LHyp (and d-proline and d-lysine but not T4LHyp, and no effect of T3LHyp was observed on the expression of T4LHyp metabolizing enzymes: a hypothetical pathway of T3LHyp → Pyr2C → l-proline was proposed. Bacterial T3LHyp dehydratase, encoded to LhpH gene, was homologous with the mammalian enzyme. On the other hand, Pyr2C reductase encoded to LhpI gene was a novel member of ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin superfamily, differing from known bacterial protein. Furthermore, the LhpI enzymes of A. brasilense and another bacterium showed several different properties, including substrate and coenzyme specificities. T3LHyp was converted to proline by the purified LhpH and LhpI proteins. Furthermore, disruption of LhpI gene from A. brasilense led to loss of growth on T3LHyp, d-proline and d-lysine, indicating that this gene has dual metabolic functions as a reductase for Pyr2C and Δ1-piperidine-2-carboxylate in these pathways, and that the T3LHyp pathway is not linked to T4LHyp and l-proline metabolism.

  10. Biochemical and structural characterization of recombinant short-chain NAD(H)-dependent dehydrogenase/reductase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius highly enantioselective on diaryl diketone benzil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchio, Angela; Sannino, Vincenzo; Sorrentino, Giosuè; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A; Esposito, Luciana

    2013-05-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases superfamily was identified in the aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain DSM 639. The saadh2 gene was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the resulting protein (SaADH2) was purified to homogeneity and both biochemically and structurally characterized. The crystal structure of the SaADH2 NADH-bound form reveals that the enzyme is a tetramer consisting of identical 27,024-Da subunits, each composed of 255 amino acids. The enzyme has remarkable thermophilicity and thermal stability, displaying activity at temperatures up to 80 °C and a 30-min half-inactivation temperature of ∼88 °C. It also shows good tolerance to common organic solvents and a strict requirement for NAD(H) as the coenzyme. SaADH2 displays a preference for the reduction of alicyclic, bicyclic and aromatic ketones and α-ketoesters, but is poorly active on aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic alcohols, showing no activity on aldehydes. Interestingly, the enzyme catalyses the asymmetric reduction of benzil to (R)-benzoin with both excellent conversion (98 %) and optical purity (98 %) by way of an efficient in situ NADH-recycling system involving a second thermophilic ADH. The crystal structure of the binary complex SaADH2-NADH, determined at 1.75 Å resolution, reveals details of the active site providing hints on the structural basis of the enzyme enantioselectivity.

  11. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Bhumika S., E-mail: bhumika.shah@mq.edu.au; Tetu, Sasha G. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Harrop, Stephen J. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2014-09-25

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access.

  12. Terpenoids from Diplophyllum taxifolium with quinone reductase-inducing activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Jiao-Zhen; Zhou, Jin-Chuan; Shen, Tao; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    Two new ent-prenylaromadendrane-type diterpenoids, diplotaxifols A (1) and B (2), a new ent-eudesmol, ent-eudesma-4(15),11(13)-dien-6α,12-diol (3), eight new eudesmanolides enantiomers (4-11) of the corresponding compounds from higher plants along with four known ent-eudesmanolides (12-15) were isolated from the 95% EtOH extract of Chinese liverwort Diplophyllum taxifolium. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of MS, NMR and IR spectral data, and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The quinone reductase-inducing activity of the compounds was evaluated.

  13. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  15. INHIBITION OF RAT LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE BY QUERCETAGETIN AND PATULETIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the results of inhibition of the Aldose reductase(AR) activity on Wistar rat lens by Quercetagetin extracted from Tagetes erects Linn and by Patuletin extracted from Tagetes patula Linn are reported.Quercetagetin inhibited AR of the rat lens by 93.9% at 10~(-4)M, 76.0% at 10~(-5)M and 13.3% at 10~(-6)M. Patuletin inhibited AR of the rat lens by 100% at 10~(-1)M, 80% at 10~(-5)M and 22.7% at 10~(-6)M respectively. The results show that these two flavones are lens AR Inhibitors, but further ...

  16. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Widderich

    Full Text Available Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa, we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (SaEctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of

  17. Biochemistry and Crystal Structure of Ectoine Synthase: A Metal-Containing Member of the Cupin Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Kobus, Stefanie; Höppner, Astrid; Riclea, Ramona; Seubert, Andreas; Dickschat, Jeroen S; Heider, Johann; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2016-01-01

    Ectoine is a compatible solute and chemical chaperone widely used by members of the Bacteria and a few Archaea to fend-off the detrimental effects of high external osmolarity on cellular physiology and growth. Ectoine synthase (EctC) catalyzes the last step in ectoine production and mediates the ring closure of the substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid through a water elimination reaction. However, the crystal structure of ectoine synthase is not known and a clear understanding of how its fold contributes to enzyme activity is thus lacking. Using the ectoine synthase from the cold-adapted marine bacterium Sphingopyxis alaskensis (Sa), we report here both a detailed biochemical characterization of the EctC enzyme and the high-resolution crystal structure of its apo-form. Structural analysis classified the (Sa)EctC protein as a member of the cupin superfamily. EctC forms a dimer with a head-to-tail arrangement, both in solution and in the crystal structure. The interface of the dimer assembly is shaped through backbone-contacts and weak hydrophobic interactions mediated by two beta-sheets within each monomer. We show for the first time that ectoine synthase harbors a catalytically important metal co-factor; metal depletion and reconstitution experiments suggest that EctC is probably an iron-dependent enzyme. We found that EctC not only effectively converts its natural substrate N-gamma-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid into ectoine through a cyclocondensation reaction, but that it can also use the isomer N-alpha-acetyl-L-2,4-diaminobutyric acid as its substrate, albeit with substantially reduced catalytic efficiency. Structure-guided site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeting amino acid residues that are evolutionarily highly conserved among the extended EctC protein family, including those forming the presumptive iron-binding site, were conducted to functionally analyze the properties of the resulting EctC variants. An assessment of enzyme activity

  18. Discovery of a distinct superfamily of Kunitz-type toxin (KTT from tarantulas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hua Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of ktts in spiders (TARANTULAS: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana, which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (omega for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications

  19. Isolation of a novel member of small G protein superfamily and its expression in colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Yan; Wen-Liang Wang; Feng Zhu; Sheng-Quan Chen; Qing-Long Li; Li Wang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: APMCF1 is a novel human gene whose transcripts are up-regulated in apoptotic MCF-7 cells. In order to learn more about this gene′s function in other tumors, we cloned its full length cDNA and prepared its polyclonal antibody to investigate its expression in colon cancers with immunohistochemistry.METHODS: With the method of 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA end (RACE) and EST assembled in GenBank, we extended the length of APMCF1 at 5′ end. Then the sequence encoding the APMCF1 protein was amplified by RT-PCR from the total RNA of apoptotic MCF-7 cells and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pGEX-KG to construct recombinant expression vector pGEX-APMCF1. The GSTAPMCF1 fusion protein was expressed in E. coli and used to immunize rabbits to get the rabbit anti-APMCF1 serum. The specificity of polyclonal anti-APMCF1 antibody was determined by Western blot. Then we investigated the expression of Apmcf1 in colon cancers and normal colonic mucosa with immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: A cDNA fragment with a length of 1 745 bp was obtained. APMCF1 was mapped to chromosome 3q22.2and spanned at least 14.8 kb of genomic DNA with seven exons and six introns contained. Bioinformatic analysis showed the protein encoded by APMCF1 contained a small GTP-binding protein (G proteins) domain and was homologous to mouse signal recognition particle receptor β(SRβ). A coding region covering 816 bp was cloned and polyclonal anti-APMCF1 antibody was prepared successfully.The immunohistochemistry study showed that APMCF1 had a strong expression in colon cancer.CONCLUSION: APMCF1 may be the gene coding human signal recognition particle receptor β and belongs to the small-G protein superfamily. Its strong expression pattern in colon cancer suggests it may play a role in colon cancer development.

  20. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    OpenAIRE

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  1. Properties of the arsenate reductase of plasmid R773.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladysheva, T B; Oden, K L; Rosen, B P

    1994-06-14

    Resistance to toxic oxyanions in Escherichia coli is conferred by the ars operon carried on plasmid R773. The gene products of this operon catalyze extrusion of antimonials and arsenicals from cells of E. coli, thus providing resistance to those toxic oxyanions. In addition, resistance to arsenate is conferred by the product of the arsC gene. In this report, purified ArsC protein was shown to catalyze reduction of arsenate to arsenite. The enzymatic activity of the ArsC protein required glutaredoxin as a source of reducing equivalents. Other reductants, including glutathione and thioredoxin, were not effective electron donors. A spectrophotometric assay was devised in which arsenate reduction was coupled to NADPH oxidation. The results obtained with the coupled assay corresponded to those found by direct reduction of radioactive arsenate to arsenite. The only substrate of the reaction was arsenate (Km = 8 mM); other oxyanions including phosphate, sulfate, and antimonate were not reduced. Phosphate and sulfate were weak inhibitors, while the product, arsenite, was a stronger inhibitor (Ki = 0.1 mM). Arsenate reductase activity exhibited a pH optimum of 6.3-6.8. These results indicate that the ArsC protein is a novel reductase, and elucidation of its enzymatic mechanism should be of interest.

  2. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Christina; Dietrich, Michael; Herrmann, Ann-Kathrin; Schacht, Teresa

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH) and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR), a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase. PMID:28116039

  3. Stereospecificity of (+)-pinoresinol and (+)-lariciresinol reductases from Forsythia intermedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, A; Dinkova, A; Davin, L B; Bedgar, D L; Lewis, N G

    1993-12-25

    Pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase catalyzes the first known example of a highly unusual benzylic ether reduction in plants; its mechanism of hydride transfer is described. The enzyme was found in Forsythia intermedia and catalyzes the presumed regulatory branch-points in the pathway leading to benzylaryltetrahydrofuran, dibenzylbutane, dibenzylbutyrolactone, and aryltetrahydronaphthalene lignans. Using [7,7'-2H2]-pinoresinol and [7,7'-2H3]lariciresinol as substrates, the hydride transfers of the highly unusual reductase were demonstrated to be completely stereospecific (> 99%). The incoming hydrides were found to take up the pro-R position at C-7' (and/or C-7) in lariciresinol and secoisolariciresinol, thereby eliminating the possibility of random hydride delivery to a planar quinone methide intermediate. As might be expected, the mode of hydride abstraction from NADPH was also stereospecific: using [4R-3H] and [4S-3H]NADPH, it was found that only the 4 pro-R hydrogen was abstracted for enzymatic hydride transfer.

  4. Dimethyl Fumarate Induces Glutathione Recycling by Upregulation of Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Hoffmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal degeneration in multiple sclerosis has been linked to oxidative stress. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF is an effective oral therapeutic option shown to reduce disease activity and progression in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. DMF activates the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2 leading to increased synthesis of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH and prominent neuroprotection in vitro. We previously demonstrated that DMF is capable of raising GSH levels even when glutathione synthesis is inhibited, suggesting enhanced GSH recycling. Here, we found that DMF indeed induces glutathione reductase (GSR, a homodimeric flavoprotein that catalyzes GSSG reduction to GSH by using NADPH as a reducing cofactor. Knockdown of GSR using a pool of E. coli RNase III-digested siRNAs or pharmacological inhibition of GSR, however, also induced the antioxidant response rendering it impossible to verify the suspected attenuation of DMF-mediated neuroprotection. However, in cystine-free medium, where GSH synthesis is abolished, pharmacological inhibition of GSR drastically reduced the effect of DMF on glutathione recycling. We conclude that DMF increases glutathione recycling through induction of glutathione reductase.

  5. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  6. Genome-wide identification and phylogenetic analysis of the AP2/ERF gene superfamily in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, T M; Polido, P B; Rampim, M C; Kaschuk, G; Souza, S G H

    2014-09-26

    Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) plays an important role in the economy of more than 140 countries, but it is grown in areas with intermittent stressful soil and climatic conditions. The stress tolerance could be addressed by manipulating the ethylene response factor (ERF) transcription factors because they orchestrate plant responses to environmental stress. We performed an in silico study on the ERFs in the expressed sequence tag database of C. sinensis to identify potential genes that regulate plant responses to stress. We identified 108 putative genes encoding protein sequences of the AP2/ERF superfamily distributed within 10 groups of amino acid sequences. Ninety-one genes were assembled from the ERF family containing only one AP2/ERF domain, 13 genes were assembled from the AP2 family containing two AP2/ERF domains, and four other genes were assembled from the RAV family containing one AP2/ERF domain and a B3 domain. Some conserved domains of the ERF family genes were disrupted into a few segments by introns. This irregular distribution of genes in the AP2/ERF superfamily in different plant species could be a result of genomic losses or duplication events in a common ancestor. The in silico gene expression revealed that 67% of AP2/ERF genes are expressed in tissues with usual plant development, and 14% were expressed in stressed tissues. Because the AP2/ERF superfamily is expressed in an orchestrated way, it is possible that the manipulation of only one gene may result in changes in the whole plant function, which could result in more tolerant crops.

  7. Intracellular mediators of transforming growth factor β superfamily signaling localize to endosomes in chicken embryo and mouse lenses in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishii Shunsuke

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endocytosis is a key regulator of growth factor signaling pathways. Recent studies showed that the localization to endosomes of intracellular mediators of growth factor signaling may be required for their function. Although there is substantial evidence linking endocytosis and growth factor signaling in cultured cells, there has been little study of the endosomal localization of signaling components in intact tissues or organs. Results Proteins that are downstream of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily signaling pathway were found on endosomes in chicken embryo and postnatal mouse lenses, which depend on signaling by members of the TGFβ superfamily for their normal development. Phosphorylated Smad1 (pSmad1, pSmad2, Smad4, Smad7, the transcriptional repressors c-Ski and TGIF and the adapter molecules Smad anchor for receptor activation (SARA and C184M, localized to EEA-1- and Rab5-positive vesicles in chicken embryo and/or postnatal mouse lenses. pSmad1 and pSmad2 also localized to Rab7-positive late endosomes. Smad7 was found associated with endosomes, but not caveolae. Bmpr1a conditional knock-out lenses showed decreased nuclear and endosomal localization of pSmad1. Many of the effectors in this pathway were distributed differently in vivo from their reported distribution in cultured cells. Conclusion Based on the findings reported here and data from other signaling systems, we suggest that the localization of activated intracellular mediators of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily to endosomes is important for the regulation of growth factor signaling.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Sfh3, a member of the Sec14 protein superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jihui; Schaaf, Gabriel; Bankaitis, Vytas A.; Ortlund, Eric A.; Pathak, Manish C. (Emory-MED); (UNC)

    2012-03-26

    Sec14 is the major phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is the founding member of the Sec14 protein superfamily. Recent functional data suggest that Sec14 functions as a nanoreactor for PtdCho-regulated presentation of PtdIns to PtdIns kinase to affect membrane trafficking. Extrapolation of this concept to other members of the Sec14 superfamily suggests a mechanism by which a comprehensive cohort of Sec14-like nanoreactors sense correspondingly diverse pools of lipid metabolites. In turn, metabolic information is translated to signaling circuits driven by phosphoinositide metabolism. Sfh3, one of five Sec14 homologs in yeast, exhibits several interesting functional features, including its unique localization to lipid particles and microsomes. This localization forecasts novel regulatory interfaces between neutral lipid metabolism and phosphoinositide signaling. To launch a detailed structural and functional characterization of Sfh3, the recombinant protein was purified to homogeneity, diffraction-quality crystals were produced and a native X-ray data set was collected to 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. To aid in phasing, SAD X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.93 {angstrom} resolution from an SeMet-labeled crystal at the Southeast Regional Collaborative Access Team at the Advanced Photon Source. Here, the cloning and purification of Sfh3 and the preliminary diffraction of Sfh3 crystals are reported, enabling structural analyses that are expected to reveal novel principles governing ligand binding and functional specificity for Sec14-superfamily proteins.

  9. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Carmona-Antoñanzas

    Full Text Available Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837, are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences, C (11 and G (2. The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance.

  10. Determination of potential N2O-reductase activity in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, S.P.; Yuan, H.J.; Hu, C.S.; Oenema, O.; Zhang, Y.M.; Li, X.X.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of N2O-reductase activity in soil is important for understanding the microbial regulation of nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations in soil. Unfortunately, there are no easily applicable and accurate methods for determining N2O-reductase activity, which frustrates the understanding of the

  11. THE EFFECTS OF AN ALDOSE REDUCTASE INHIBITOR ON THE PROGRESSION OF DIABETIC-RETINOPATHY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TROMP, A; HOOYMANS, JMM; BARENDSEN, BC; VONDOORMAAL, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The polyol pathway has long been associated with diabetic retinopathy. Glucose is converted to sorbitol with the aid of the enzyme aldose reductase. Aldose reductase inhibitors can prevent changes induced by diabetes. A total of 30 patients with minimal background retinopathy were randomly divided i

  12. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Celle...

  13. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  14. Use of RNA Interference by In Utero Electroporation to Study Cortical Development: The Example of the Doublecortin Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raanan Greenman

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The way we study cortical development has undergone a revolution in the last few years following the ability to use shRNA in the developing brain of the rodent embryo. The first gene to be knocked-down in the developing brain was doublecortin (Dcx. Here we will review knockdown experiments in the developing brain and compare them with knockout experiments, thus highlighting the advantages and disadvantages using the different systems. Our review will focus on experiments relating to the doublecortin superfamily of proteins.

  15. Involvement of major facilitator superfamily proteins SfaA and SbnD in staphyloferrin secretion in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannauer, Mélissa; Sheldon, Jessica R; Heinrichs, David E

    2015-03-12

    A paucity of information exists concerning the mechanism(s) by which bacteria secrete siderophores into the extracellular compartment. We investigated the role of SfaA and SbnD, two major facilitator superfamily (MFS)-type efflux proteins, in the secretion of the Staphylococcus aureus siderophores staphyloferrin A (SA) and staphyloferrin B (SB), respectively. Deletion of sfaA resulted in a drastic reduction of SA secreted into the supernatant with a corresponding accumulation of SA in the cytoplasm and a significant growth defect in cells devoid of SB synthesis. In contrast, sbnD mutants showed transiently lowered levels of secreted SB, suggesting the involvement of additional efflux mechanisms.

  16. Complement system proteins which interact with C3b or C4b A superfamily of structurally related proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, K B M; Bentley, D R; Campbell, R D;

    1986-01-01

    , while the precise number of units in CR1 is not known yet. These structurally homologous complement proteins are also functionally related as they all interact with C3b and C4b during activation of the cascade. The repeating units also occur in the functionally unrelated proteins subcomponent C1r, β2......-glycoprotein 1, blood clotting factor XIII and interleukin-2 receptor. In this review Ken Reid and his colleagues propose that this could be a general feature of a superfamily of structurally related proteins....

  17. The cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel gene superfamily of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sattelle David B

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the cys-loop ligand-gated ion channel (cys-loop LGIC superfamily mediate chemical neurotransmission and are studied extensively as potential targets of drugs used to treat neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Insect cys-loop LGICs are also of interest as they are targets of highly successful insecticides. The red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, is a major pest of stored agricultural products and is also an important model organism for studying development. Results As part of the T. castaneum genome sequencing effort, we have characterized the beetle cys-loop LGIC superfamily which is the third insect superfamily to be described after those of Drosophila melanogaster and Apis mellifera, and also the largest consisting of 24 genes. As with Drosophila and Apis, Tribolium possesses ion channels gated by acetylcholine, γ-amino butyric acid (GABA, glutamate and histamine as well as orthologs of the Drosophila pH-sensitive chloride channel subunit (pHCl, CG8916 and CG12344. Similar to Drosophila and Apis, Tribolium cys-loop LGIC diversity is broadened by alternative splicing although the beetle orthologs of RDL and GluCl possess more variants of exon 3. Also, RNA A-to-I editing was observed in two Tribolium nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits, Tcasα6 and Tcasβ1. Editing in Tcasα6 is evolutionarily conserved with D. melanogaster, A. mellifera and Heliothis virescens, whereas Tcasβ1 is edited at a site so far only observed in the beetle. Conclusion Our findings reveal that in diverse insect species the cys-loop LGIC superfamily has remained compact with only minor changes in gene numbers. However, alternative splicing, RNA editing and the presence of divergent subunits broadens the cys-loop LGIC proteome and generates species-specific receptor isoforms. These findings on Tribolium castaneum enhance our understanding of cys-loop LGIC functional genomics and provide a useful basis for the

  18. Naegleria fowleri: a free-living highly pathogenic amoeba contains trypanothione/trypanothione reductase and glutathione/glutathione reductase systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondarza, Raúl N; Hurtado, Gerardo; Tamayo, Elsa; Iturbe, Angélica; Hernández, Eva

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents definitive data showing that the thiol-bimane compound isolated and purified by HPLC from Naegleria fowleri trophozoites unequivocally corresponds by matrix assisted laser-desorption ionization-time-of-flight MS, to the characteristic monoprotonated ion of trypanothione-(bimane)(2) [M(+)H(+)] of m/z 1104.57 and to the trypanothione-(bimane) of m/z 914.46. The trypanothione disulfide T(S)(2) was also found to have a molecular ion of m/z 723.37. Additionally HPLC demonstrated that thiol-bimane compounds corresponding to cysteine and glutathione were present in Naegleria. The ion patterns of the thiol-bimane compounds prepared from commercial trypanothione standard, Entamoeba histolytica and Crithidia luciliae are identical to the Naegleria thiol-bimane compound. Partially purified extracts from N. fowleri showed the coexistence of glutathione and trypanothione reductases activities. There is not doubt that the thiol compound trypanothione, which was previously thought to occur only in Kinetoplastida, is also present in the human pathogens E. histolytica and N. fowleri, as well as in the non-pathogenic euglenozoan E. gracilis. The presence of the trypanothione/trypanothione reductase system in N. fowleri creates the possibility of using this enzyme as a new "drug target" for rationally designed drugs to eliminate the parasite, without affecting the human host.

  19. Peach MYB7 activates transcription of the proanthocyanidin pathway gene encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase, but not anthocyanidin reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui eZhou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs are a group of natural phenolic compounds that have a great effect on both flavour and nutritious value of fruit. It has been shown that PA synthesis is regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factors (TFs via activation of PA-specific pathway genes encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a MYB gene designated PpMYB7 in peach. The peach PpMYB7 represents a new group of R2R3-MYB genes regulating PA synthesis in plants. It is able to activate transcription of PpLAR1 but not PpANR, and has a broader selection of potential bHLH partners compared with PpMYBPA1. Transcription of PpMYB7 can be activated by the peach basic leucine-zipper 5 TF (PpbZIP5 via response to ABA. Our study suggests a transcriptional network regulating PA synthesis in peach, with the results aiding the understanding of the functional divergence between R2R3-MYB TFs in plants.

  20. Proximal FAD histidine residue influences interflavin electron transfer in cytochrome P450 reductase and methionine synthase reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meints, Carla E; Parke, Sarah M; Wolthers, Kirsten R

    2014-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and methionine synthase reductase (MSR) transfer reducing equivalents from NADPH to FAD to FMN. In CPR, hydride transfer and interflavin electron transfer are kinetically coupled steps, but in MSR the two catalytic steps are represented by two distinct kinetic phases leading to transient formation of the FAD hydroquinone. In human CPR, His(322) forms a hydrogen-bond with the highly conserved Asp(677), a member of the catalytic triad. The catalytic triad is present in MSR, but Ala(312) replaces the histidine residue. To examine if this structural variation accounts for differences in their kinetic behavior, reciprocal substitutions were created. Substitution of His(322) for Ala in CPR does not affect the rate of NADPH hydride transfer or the FAD redox potentials, but does impede interflavin electron transfer. For MSR, swapping Ala(312) for a histidine residue resulted in the kinetic coupling of hydride and interflavin electron transfer, and eliminated the formation of the FAD hydroquinone intermediate. For both enzymes, placement of the His residue in the active site weakens coenzyme binding affinity. The data suggest that the proximal FAD histidine residue accelerates proton-coupled electron transfer from FADH2 to the higher potential FMN; a mechanism for this catalytic role is discussed.

  1. Novel oxime-bearing coumarin derivatives act as potent Nrf2/ARE activators in vitro and in mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ken-Ming; Chen, Huang-Hui; Wang, Tai-Chi; Chen, I-Li; Chen, Yu-Tsen; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Chen, Yeh-Long; Chang, Hsin-Huei; Huang, Chih-Hsiang; Chang, Jang-Yang; Shih, Chuan; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Tzeng, Cherng-Chyi

    2015-12-01

    We have designed and synthesized certain novel oxime- and amide-bearing coumarin derivatives as nuclear factor erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) activators. The potency of these compounds was measured by antioxidant responsive element (ARE)-driven luciferase activity, level of Nrf2-related cytoprotective genes and proteins, and antioxidant activity. Among them, (Z)-3-(2-(hydroxyimino)-2-phenylethoxy)-2H-chromen-2-one (17a) was the most active, and more potent than the positive t-BHQ in the induction of ARE-driven luciferase activity. Exposure of HSC-3 cells to various concentrations of 17a strongly increased Nrf2 nuclear translocation and the expression level of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective proteins in a concentration-dependent manner. HSC-3 cells pretreated with 17a significantly reduced t-BOOH-induced oxidative stress. In the animal experiment, Nrf2-mediated cytoprotective proteins, such as aldo-keto reductase 1 subunit C-1 (AKR1C1), glutathione reductase (GR), and heme oxygenase (HO-1), were obviously elevated in the liver of 17a-treated mice than that of control. These results suggested that novel oxime-bearing coumarin 17a is able to activate Nrf2/ARE pathway in vivo and are therefore seen as a promising candidate for further investigation.

  2. Sulforaphane promotes murine hair growth by accelerating the degradation of dihydrotestosterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Mari; Shinozaki, Shohei; Shimokado, Kentaro

    2016-03-25

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) causes the regression of human hair follicles in the parietal scalp, leading to androgenic alopecia (AGA). Sulforaphane (SFN) increases the expression of DHT degrading enzymes, such as 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (3α-HSDs), and, therefore, SFN treatment may improve AGA. To determine the effects of SFN on hair growth, we administered SFN (10 mg/kg BW, IP) or vehicle (DMSO) to ob/ob mice for six weeks and examined hair regeneration and the plasma levels of testosterone and DHT. We also tested the effects of SFN on the expression of two forms of 3α-HSD, aldo-keto reductase 1c21 and dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR family) member 9, both in vitro and in vivo. SNF significantly enhanced hair regeneration in ob/ob mice. The mice treated with SFN showed lower plasma levels of testosterone and DHT than those treated with vehicle. SFN increased the mRNA and protein levels of the two forms of 3α-HSD in the liver of the mice and in cultured murine hepatocyte Hepa1c1c7 cells. These results suggest that SFN treatment increases the amount of 3α-HSDs in the liver, accelerates the degradation of blood DHT, and subsequently blocks the suppression of hair growth by DHT.

  3. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah R Malcolm

    Full Text Available In Escherichia coli (E. coli the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B, E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics.

  4. Mutations in a Conserved Domain of E. coli MscS to the Most Conserved Superfamily Residue Leads to Kinetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Hannah R; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In Escherichia coli (E. coli) the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance, MscS, gates in response to membrane tension created from acute external hypoosmotic shock, thus rescuing the bacterium from cell lysis. E. coli MscS is the most well studied member of the MscS superfamily of channels, whose members are found throughout the bacterial and plant kingdoms. Homology to the pore lining helix and upper vestibule domain of E. coli MscS is required for inclusion into the superfamily. Although highly conserved, in the second half of the pore lining helix (TM3B), E. coli MscS has five residues significantly different from other members of the superfamily. In superfamilies such as this, it remains unclear why variations within such a homologous region occur: is it tolerance of alternate residues, or does it define functional variance within the superfamily? Point mutations (S114I/T, L118F, A120S, L123F, F127E/K/T) and patch clamp electrophysiology were used to study the effect of changing these residues in E. coli MscS on sensitivity and gating. The data indicate that variation at these locations do not consistently lead to wildtype channel phenotypes, nor do they define large changes in mechanosensation, but often appear to effect changes in the E. coli MscS channel gating kinetics.

  5. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushegian, Arcady R; Elena, Santiago F

    2015-02-01

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts.

  6. The enzymatic nature of an anonymous protein sequence cannot reliably be inferred from superfamily level structural information alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Daniel Barry; Brüls, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    As the largest fraction of any proteome does not carry out enzymatic functions, and in order to leverage 3D structural data for the annotation of increasingly higher volumes of sequence data, we wanted to assess the strength of the link between coarse grained structural data (i.e., homologous superfamily level) and the enzymatic versus non-enzymatic nature of protein sequences. To probe this relationship, we took advantage of 41 phylogenetically diverse (encompassing 11 distinct phyla) genomes recently sequenced within the GEBA initiative, for which we integrated structural information, as defined by CATH, with enzyme level information, as defined by Enzyme Commission (EC) numbers. This analysis revealed that only a very small fraction (about 1%) of domain sequences occurring in the analyzed genomes was found to be associated with homologous superfamilies strongly indicative of enzymatic function. Resorting to less stringent criteria to define enzyme versus non-enzyme biased structural classes or excluding highly prevalent folds from the analysis had only modest effect on this proportion. Thus, the low genomic coverage by structurally anchored protein domains strongly associated to catalytic activities indicates that, on its own, the power of coarse grained structural information to infer the general property of being an enzyme is rather limited.

  7. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2.

  8. Two major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters from Trichoderma reesei and their roles in induction of cellulase biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixin; Kou, Yanbo; Xu, Jintao; Cao, Yanli; Zhao, Guolei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Hai; Wang, Zhixing; Bao, Xiaoming; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2013-11-15

    Proper perception of the extracellular insoluble cellulose is key to initiating the rapid synthesis of cellulases by cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei. Uptake of soluble oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis represents a potential point of control in the induced cascade. In this study, we identified a major facilitator superfamily sugar transporter Stp1 capable of transporting cellobiose by reconstructing a cellobiose assimilation system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The absence of Stp1 in T. reesei resulted in differential cellulolytic response to Avicel versus cellobiose. Transcriptional profiling revealed a different expression profile in the Δstp1 strain from that of wild-type strain in response to Avicel and demonstrated that Stp1 somehow repressed induction of the bulk of major cellulase and hemicellulose genes. Two other putative major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters were, however, up-regulated in the profiling. Deletion of one of them identified Crt1 that was required for growth and enzymatic activity on cellulose or lactose, but was not required for growth or hemicellulase activity on xylan. The essential role of Crt1 in cellulase induction did not seem to rely on its transporting activity because the overall uptake of cellobiose or sophorose by T. reesei was not compromised in the absence of Crt1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologs of Crt1 exist in the genomes of many filamentous ascomycete fungi capable of degrading cellulose. These data thus shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei senses and transmits the cellulose signal and offers potential strategies for strain improvement.

  9. Structure of the stress response protein DR1199 from Deinococcus radiodurans: a member of the DJ-1 superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioravanti, Emanuela; Durá, M Asunción; Lascoux, David; Micossi, Elena; Franzetti, Bruno; McSweeney, Sean

    2008-11-01

    The expression level of protein DR1199 is observed to increase considerably in the radio-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans following irradiation. This protein belongs to the DJ-1 superfamily, which includes proteins with diverse functions, such as the archaeal proteases PhpI and PfpI, the bacterial chaperone Hsp31 and hyperosmotic stress protein YhbO, and the human Parkinson's disease-related protein DJ-1. All members of the superfamily are oligomeric, and the oligomerization interface varies from protein to protein. Although for many of these proteins, their function remains obscure, most of them are involved in cellular protection against environmental stresses. We have determined the structure of DR1199 to a resolution of 2.15 A, and we have tested its function and studied its role in the response to irradiation and more generally to oxidative stress in D. radiodurans. The protein is a dimer displaying an oligomerization interface similar to that observed for the YhbO and PhpI proteins. The cysteine in the catalytic triad (Cys 115) is oxidized in our structure, similar to modifications seen in the corresponding cysteine of the DJ-1 protein. The oxidation occurs spontaneously in DR1199 crystals. In solution, no proteolytic or chaperone activity was detected. On the basis of our results, we suggest that DR1199 might work as a general stress protein involved in the detoxification of the cell from oxygen reactive species, rather than as a peptidase in D. radiodurans.

  10. CD177: A member of the Ly-6 gene superfamily involved with neutrophil proliferation and polycythemia vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettinotti Maria

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes in the Leukocyte Antigen 6 (Ly-6 superfamily encode glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored glycoproteins (gp with conserved domains of 70 to 100 amino acids and 8 to 10 cysteine residues. Murine Ly-6 genes encode important lymphocyte and hematopoietic stem cell antigens. Recently, a new member of the human Ly-6 gene superfamily has been described, CD177. CD177 is polymorphic and has at least two alleles, PRV-1 and NB1. CD177 was first described as PRV-1, a gene that is overexpressed in neutrophils from approximately 95% of patients with polycythemia vera and from about half of patients with essential thrombocythemia. CD177 encodes NB1 gp, a 58–64 kD GPI gp that is expressed by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors. NB1 gp carries Human Neutrophil Antigen (HNA-2a. Investigators working to identify the gene encoding NB1 gp called the CD177 allele they described NB1. NB1 gp is unusual in that neutrophils from some healthy people lack the NB1 gp completely and in most people NB1 gp is expressed by a subpopulation of neutrophils. The function of NB1 gp and the role of CD177 in the pathogenesis and clinical course of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are not yet known. However, measuring neutrophil CD177 mRNA levels has become an important marker for diagnosing the myeloproliferative disorders polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

  11. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  12. Proteins with an alpha/beta hydrolase fold: Relationships between subfamilies in an ever-growing superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenfant, Nicolas; Hotelier, Thierry; Bourne, Yves; Marchot, Pascale; Chatonnet, Arnaud

    2013-03-25

    Alpha/beta hydrolases function as hydrolases, lyases, transferases, hormone precursors or transporters, chaperones or routers of other proteins. The amount of structural and functional available data related to this protein superfamily expands exponentially, as does the number of proteins classified as alpha/beta hydrolases despite poor sequence similarity and lack of experimental data. However the superfamily can be rationally divided according to sequence or structural homologies, leading to subfamilies of proteins with potentially similar functions. Since the discovery of proteins homologous to cholinesterases but devoid of enzymatic activity (e.g., the neuroligins), divergent functions have been ascribed to members of other subfamilies (e.g., lipases, dipeptidylaminopeptidase IV, etc.). To study the potentially moonlighting properties of alpha/beta hydrolases, the ESTHER database (for ESTerase and alpha/beta Hydrolase Enzymes and Relatives; http://bioweb.ensam.inra.fr/esther), which collects, organizes and disseminates structural and functional information related to alpha/beta hydrolases, has been updated with new tools and the web server interface has been upgraded. A new Overall Table along with a new Tree based on HMM models has been included to tentatively group subfamilies. These tools provide starting points for phylogenetic studies aimed at pinpointing the origin of duplications leading to paralogous genes (e.g., acetylcholinesterase versus butyrylcholinesterase, or neuroligin versus carboxylesterase). Another of our goals is to implement new tools to distinguish catalytically active enzymes from non-catalytic proteins in poorly studied or annotated subfamilies.

  13. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  14. A putative cell surface receptor for white spot syndrome virus is a member of a transporter superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Ting Huang

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV, a large enveloped DNA virus, can cause the most serious viral disease in shrimp and has a wide host range among crustaceans. In this study, we identified a surface protein, named glucose transporter 1 (Glut1, which could also interact with WSSV envelope protein, VP53A. Sequence analysis revealed that Glut1 is a member of a large superfamily of transporters and that it is most closely related to evolutionary branches of this superfamily, branches that function to transport this sugar. Tissue tropism analysis showed that Glut1 was constitutive and highly expressed in almost all organs. Glut1's localization in shrimp cells was further verified and so was its interaction with Penaeus monodon chitin-binding protein (PmCBP, which was itself identified to interact with an envelope protein complex formed by 11 WSSV envelope proteins. In vitro and in vivo neutralization experiments using synthetic peptide contained WSSV binding domain (WBD showed that the WBD peptide could inhibit WSSV infection in primary cultured hemocytes and delay the mortality in shrimps challenged with WSSV. These findings have important implications for our understanding of WSSV entry.

  15. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  16. Dynamic Changes of Nitrate Reductase Activity within 24 Hours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the circadian rhythm of nitrate re- ductase activity (NRA) in plant. [Method] The wheat plants at heading stage were used as the materials for the measurement of dynamic changes of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) within 24 h under the conditions of constant high temperature. [Resulti The fluctuation of NRA in wheat changed greatly from 20:00 pm to 11:00 am. The enzyme activity remained constant, but at 14:00 the enzyme activity was the high- est, higher than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at11:00. The enzyme activity was the lowest of 17:00, which was lower than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at 2:00. [Conclusion] There were autonomous rhythm changes of NRA in wheat in a certain degree.

  17. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  18. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  19. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria;

    2008-01-01

    Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism...... disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences...

  20. Go Green: The Antiinflammatory Effects of Biliverdin Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara eWegiel

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Biliverdin (BV has emerged as a cytoprotective and important anti-inflammatory molecule. Conversion of BV to bilirubin (BR is catalyzed by biliverdin reductase (BVR and is required for the downstream signaling and nuclear localization of BVR. Recent data by others and us make clear that BVR is a critical regulator of innate immune responses resulting from acute insult and injury and moreover, that a lack of BVR results in an enhanced pro-inflammatory phenotype. In macrophages, BVR is regulated by its substrate BV which leads to activation of the PI3K-Akt-IL10 axis and inhibition of TLR4 expression via direct binding of BVR to the TLR4 promoter. In this review, we will summarize recent findings on the role of BVR and the bile pigments in inflammation in context with its activity as an enzyme, receptor and transcriptional regulator.

  1. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum

    CERN Document Server

    Nivière, V; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species.

  2. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  3. Steroid 5β-Reductase from Leaves of Vitis vinifera: Molecular Cloning, Expression, and Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Mona; Munkert, Jennifer; Campa, Manuela; Malnoy, Mickael; Martens, Stefan; Müller-Uri, Frieder

    2015-11-25

    A steroid 5β-reductase gene corresponding to the hypothetical protein LOC100247199 from leaves of Vitis vinifera (var. 'Chardonnay') was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed 5β-reductase activity when progesterone was used as a substrate. The reaction was stereoselective, producing only 5β-products such as 5β-pregnane-3,20-dione. Other small substrates (terpenoids and enones) were also accepted as substrates, indicating the highly promiscuous character of the enzyme class. Our results show that the steroid 5β-reductase gene, encoding an orthologous enzyme described as a key enzyme in cardenolide biosynthesis, is also expressed in leaves of the cardenolide-free plant V. vinifera. We emphasize the fact that, on some occasions, different reductases (e.g., progesterone 5β-reductase and monoterpenoid reductase) can also use molecules that are similar to the final products as a substrate. Therefore, in planta, the different reductases may contribute to the immense number of diverse small natural products finally leading to the flavor of wine.

  4. Glyphosate inhibition of ferric reductase activity in iron deficient sunflower roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozturk, Levent; Yazici, Atilla; Eker, Selim; Gokmen, Ozgur; Römheld, Volker; Cakmak, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is increasingly being observed in cropping systems with frequent glyphosate applications. A likely reason for this is that glyphosate interferes with root uptake of Fe by inhibiting ferric reductase in roots required for Fe acquisition by dicot and nongrass species. This study investigated the role of drift rates of glyphosate (0.32, 0.95 or 1.89 mm glyphosate corresponding to 1, 3 and 6% of the recommended herbicidal dose, respectively) on ferric reductase activity of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) roots grown under Fe deficiency conditions. Application of 1.89 mm glyphosate resulted in almost 50% inhibition of ferric reductase within 6 h and complete inhibition 24 h after the treatment. Even at lower rates of glyphosate (e.g. 0.32 mm and 0.95 mm), ferric reductase was inhibited. Soluble sugar concentration and the NAD(P)H oxidizing capacity of apical roots were not decreased by the glyphosate applications. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the effects of glyphosate on ferric reductase activity. The nature of the inhibitory effect of glyphosate on ferric reductase could not be identified. Impaired ferric reductase could be a major reason for the increasingly observed Fe deficiency in cropping systems associated with widespread glyphosate usage.

  5. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  6. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix” Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  7. TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 is a physiological appetite and body weight regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky Wang-Wei Tsai

    Full Text Available The TGF-b superfamily cytokine MIC-1/GDF15 circulates in all humans and when overproduced in cancer leads to anorexia/cachexia, by direct action on brain feeding centres. In these studies we have examined the role of physiologically relevant levels of MIC-1/GDF15 in the regulation of appetite, body weight and basal metabolic rate. MIC-1/GDF15 gene knockout mice (MIC-1(-/- weighed more and had increased adiposity, which was associated with increased spontaneous food intake. Female MIC-1(-/- mice exhibited some additional alterations in reduced basal energy expenditure and physical activity, possibly owing to the associated decrease in total lean mass. Further, infusion of human recombinant MIC-1/GDF15 sufficient to raise serum levels in MIC-1(-/- mice to within the normal human range reduced body weight and food intake. Taken together, our findings suggest that MIC-1/GDF15 is involved in the physiological regulation of appetite and energy storage.

  8. Analysis of the Active-Site Mechanism of Tyrosyl-DNA Phosphodiesterase I: A Member of the Phospholipase D Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gajewski, Stefan; Comeaux, Evan Q.; Jafari, Nauzanene; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.; van Waardenburg, Robert C.A.M. (UAB); (SJCH)

    2012-03-15

    Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a member of the phospholipase D superfamily that hydrolyzes 3'-phospho-DNA adducts via two conserved catalytic histidines - one acting as the lead nucleophile and the second acting as a general acid/base. Substitution of the second histidine specifically to arginine contributes to the neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy (SCAN1). We investigated the catalytic role of this histidine in the yeast protein (His432) using a combination of X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, yeast genetics, and theoretical chemistry. The structures of wild-type Tdp1 and His432Arg both show a phosphorylated form of the nucleophilic histidine that is not observed in the structure of His432Asn. The phosphohistidine is stabilized in the His432Arg structure by the guanidinium group that also restricts the access of nucleophilic water molecule to the Tdp1-DNA intermediate. Biochemical analyses confirm that His432Arg forms an observable and unique Tdp1-DNA adduct during catalysis. Substitution of His432 by Lys does not affect catalytic activity or yeast phenotype, but substitutions with Asn, Gln, Leu, Ala, Ser, and Thr all result in severely compromised enzymes and DNA topoisomerase I-camptothecin dependent lethality. Surprisingly, His432Asn did not show a stable covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate that suggests another catalytic defect. Theoretical calculations revealed that the defect resides in the nucleophilic histidine and that the pK{sub a} of this histidine is crucially dependent on the second histidine and on the incoming phosphate of the substrate. This represents a unique example of substrate-activated catalysis that applies to the entire phospholipase D superfamily.

  9. Identification and characterization of RBEL1 subfamily of GTPases in the Ras superfamily involved in cell growth regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbano, JoAnne; Lui, Ki; Sheikh, M Saeed; Huang, Ying

    2009-07-03

    Recently, we reported the identification of a novel gene named RBEL1 (Rab-like protein 1) and characterized its two encoded isoforms, RBEL1A and RBEL1B, that function as novel GTPases of Ras superfamily. Here we report the identification of two additional splice variants of RBEL1 that we have named RBEL1C and -D. All four RBEL1 isoforms (A, B, C, and D) have identical N termini harboring the Rab-like GTPase domains but contain variable C termini. Although all isoforms can be detected in both cytoplasm and nucleus, RBEL1A is predominantly cytoplasmic, whereas RBEL1B is mostly nuclear. RBEL1C and -D, by contrast, are evenly distributed between the cytoplasm and nucleus. Furthermore, all four RBEL1 proteins are also capable of associating with cellular membrane. The RBEL1 proteins also exhibit a unique nucleotide-binding potential and, whereas the larger A and B isoforms are mainly GTP-bound, the smaller C and D variants bind to both GTP and GDP. Furthermore, a regulatory region at amino acid position 236-302 immediately adjacent to the GTP-binding domain is important for GTP-binding potential of RBEL1A, because deletion of this region converts RBEL1A from predominantly GTP-bound to GDP-bound. RBEL1 knockdown via RNA interference results in marked cell growth suppression, which is associated with morphological and biochemical features of apoptosis as well as inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Taken together, our results indicate that RBEL1 proteins are linked to cell growth and survival and possess unique biochemical, cellular, and functional characteristics and, therefore, appear to form a novel subfamily of GTPases within the Ras superfamily.

  10. The evolutionary ecology of biotic association in a megadiverse bivalve superfamily: sponsorship required for permanent residency in sediment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Marine lineage diversification is shaped by the interaction of biotic and abiotic factors but our understanding of their relative roles is underdeveloped. The megadiverse bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea represents a promising study system to address this issue. It is composed of small-bodied clams that are either free-living or have commensal associations with invertebrate hosts. To test if the evolution of this lifestyle dichotomy is correlated with specific ecologies, we have performed a statistical analysis on the lifestyle and habitat preference of 121 species based on 90 source documents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Galeommatoidea has significant diversity in the two primary benthic habitats: hard- and soft-bottoms. Hard-bottom dwellers are overwhelmingly free-living, typically hidden within crevices of rocks/coral heads/encrusting epifauna. In contrast, species in soft-bottom habitats are almost exclusively infaunal commensals. These infaunal biotic associations may involve direct attachment to a host, or clustering around its tube/burrow, but all commensals locate within the oxygenated sediment envelope produced by the host's bioturbation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: the formation of commensal associations by Galeommatoidean clams is robustly correlated with an abiotic environmental setting: living in sediments (P < 0.001. Sediment-dwelling bivalves are exposed to intense predation pressure that drops markedly with depth of burial. Commensal galeommatoideans routinely attain depth refuges many times their body lengths, independent of siphonal investment, by virtue of their host's burrowing and bioturbation. In effect, they use their much larger hosts as giant auto-irrigating siphon substitutes. The evolution of biotic associations with infaunal bioturbating hosts may have been a prerequisite for the diversification of Galeommatoidea in sediments and has likely been a key factor in the success of this exceptionally diverse

  11. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  12. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES MEDLI

  13. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES MEDLI

  14. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT—Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOESHWERSHUKLA

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium(NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated.Methods:The fresh frozen tissue sections(8m thickness)were prepared and incuated in medium containing NBT,reduced glutathione(GSH) and Phosphate uffer,The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange.Results:The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has een found to be localized in the areas rich in glutatione and actively proliferating area of the skin.Conclusion:The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutatione contents.

  15. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dos...

  16. Measurement of nitrite reductase in leaf tissue of Vigna mungo : A new method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R C; Bose, B; Mukerji, D; Mathur, S N; Srivastava, H S

    1979-12-01

    The enzyme nitrite reductase (EC 1.6.6.4) is generally assayed in terms of disappearance of nitrite from the assay medium. We describe a technique which allowed estimation of the enzyme level in leaf tissues of Vigna mungo (L). Hepper in terms of the release of the product (NH3) of the enzyme reaction. The technique is offered as an alternative, possibly more convenient method for assay of nitrite reductase in plant tissue in vivo.

  17. Localization and Solubilization of the Iron(III) Reductase of Geobacter sulfurreducens

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    The iron(III) reductase activity of Geobacter sulfurreducens was determined with the electron donor NADH and the artificial electron donor horse heart cytochrome c. The highest reduction rates were obtained with Fe(III) complexed by nitrilotriacetic acid as an electron acceptor. Fractionation experiments indicated that no iron(III) reductase activity was present in the cytoplasm, that approximately one-third was found in the periplasmic fraction, and that two-thirds were associated with the m...

  18. Characterization of two alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C homologs alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H1 and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H2 in Bacillus subtilis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mee-Kyung; Cha; Yoo-Jeen; Bae; Kyu-Jeong; Kim; Byung-Joon; Park; Il-Han; Kim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C(AhpC) homologs in Bacillus subtilis(B. subtilis) and to characterize their structural and biochemical properties. AhpC is responsible for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in bacteria.METHODS: Two AhpC homologs(AhpC_H1 and AhpC_H2) were identified by searching the B. subtilis database; these were then cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. AhpC mutants carrying substitutions of catalytically important Cys residues(C37S, C47 S, C166 S, C37/47 S, C37/166 S, C47/166 S, and C37/47/166 S for AhpC_H1; C52 S, C169 S, and C52/169 S for AhpC_H2) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and purified, and their structure-function relationship was analyzed. The B. subtilis ahp C genes were disrupted by the short flanking homology method, and the phenotypes of the resulting AhpC-deficient bacteria were examined.RESULTS: Comparative characterization of AhpC homologs indicates that AhpC_H1 contains an extra C37, which forms a disulfide bond with the peroxidatic C47, and behaves like an atypical 2-Cys AhpC, while AhpC_H2 functions like a typical 2-Cys AhpC. Tryptic digestion analysis demonstrated the presence of intramolecular Cys37-Cys47 linkage, which could be reduced by thioredoxin, resulting in the association of the dimer into higher-molecular-mass complexes. Peroxidase activity analysis of Cys→Ser mutants indicated that three Cys residues were involved in the catalysis. AhpC_H1 was resistant to inactivation by peroxide substrates, but had lower activity at physiological H2O2 concentrations compared to AhpC_H2, suggesting that in B. subtilis, the enzymes may be physiologically functional at different substrate concentrations. The exposure to organic peroxides induced AhpC_H1 expression, while AhpC_H1-deficient mutants exhibited growth retardation in the stationary phase, suggesting the role of AhpC_H1 as an antioxidant scavenger of lipid hydroperoxides and a stress-response factor in B. subtilis

  19. X-ray structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata at 2. 4- angstrom resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuriyan, J.; Xiangpeng Kong; Krishna, T.S.R.; Murgolo, N.J.; Field, H.; Cerami, A.; Henderson, G.B. (Rockefeller Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    Trypanosomes and related protozoan parasites lack glutathione reductase and possess instead a closely related enzyme that serves as the reductant of a bis(glutathione)-spermidien conjugate, trypanothione. The human and parasite enzymes have mutually exclusive substrate specificities, providing a route for the design of therapeutic agents by specific inhibition of the parasite enzyme. The authors report here the three-dimensional structure of trypanothione reductase from Crithidia fasciculata and show that it closely resembles the structure of human glutathione reductase. In particular, the core structure surrounding the catalytic machinery is almost identical in the two enzymes. However, significant differences are found at the substrate binding sites. A cluster of basic residues in glutathione reductase is replaced by neutral, hydrophobic, or acidic residues in trypanothione reductase, consistent with the nature of the spermidine linkage and the change in overall charge of the substrate from {minus}2 to +1, respectively. The binding site is more open in trypanothione reductase due to rotations of about 4{degree} in the domains that form in site, with relative shifts of as much as 2-3 {angstrom} in residues that can interact with potential inhibitors and complement previous modeling and mutagenesis studies on the two enzymes.

  20. Secretion of natural and synthetic toxic compounds from filamentous fungi by membrane transporters of the ATP-binding cassette and major facilitator superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stergiopoulos, I.; Zwiers, L.H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    This review provides an overview of members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator superfamily (MFS) of transporters identified in filamentous fungi. The most common function of these membrane proteins is to provide protection against natural toxic compounds present in the environme

  1. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, K.; Schoonbeek, H.; Waard, De M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant

  2. Aspergillus niger protein estA defines a new class of fungal esterases within the alfa/beta hydrolase fold superfamily of proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourne, Y.; Hasper, A.A.; Chahinian, H.; Juin, M.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2004-01-01

    From the fungus Aspergillus niger, we identified a new gene encoding protein EstA, a member of the alpha/beta-hydrolase fold superfamily but of unknown substrate specificity. EstA was overexpressed and its crystal structure was solved by molecular replacement using a lipaseacetylcholinesterase chime

  3. Structural Basis for the Thermostability of Sulfur Oxygenase Reductases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尤晓颜; 孟珍; 陈栋炜; 郭旭; Josef Zeyer; 刘双江; 姜成英

    2012-01-01

    The thermostability of three sulfur oxygenase reductases (SORs) was investigated from thermoacidophilic achaea Acidianus tengchongensis (SORAT) and Sulfolobus tokodaii (SORsT) as well as the moderately thermophilic bacterium Acidithiobacillus sp. SM-1 (SORsB). The optimal temperatures for catalyzing sulfur oxidation were 80 ℃ (SORAT), 85 ℃ (SORsT), and 70 ℃ (SORsB), respectively. The half-lives of the three SORs at their optimal catalytic conditions were 100 min (SORAT), 58 min (SORsT), and 37 min (SORsB). In order to reveal the structural basis of the thermostability of these SORs, three-dimensional structural models of them were generated by homology modeling using the previously reported high-resolution X-ray structure of SORAA (from Acidianus ambivalens) as a template. The results suggest that thermostability was dependent on: (a) high number of the charged amino acid glutamic acid and the flexible amino acid proline, (b) low number of the therraolabile amino acid glutamine, (c) increased number of ion pairs, (d) decreased ratio of hydrophobie accessible solvent surface area (ASA) to charged ASA, and (e) increased volumes of the cavity. The number of cavities and the number of hydrogen bonds did not signifieantly affect the thermostability of SORs, whereas the cavity volumes increased as the thermal stability increased.

  4. Binding of Natural and Synthetic Polyphenols to Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

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    José Neptuno Rodríguez-López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for antifolate drugs. Fluorescence quenching experiments show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and (--epicatechin gallate (ECG are potent inhibitors of DHFR with dissociation constants (KD of 0.9 and 1.8 μM, respectively, while polyphenols lacking the ester bound gallate moiety [e.g., (--epigallocatechin (EGC and (--epicatechin (EC] did not bind to this enzyme. To avoid stability and bioavailability problems associated with tea catechins we synthesized a methylated derivative of ECG (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--epicatechin; TMECG, which effectively binds to DHFR (KD = 2.1 μM. In alkaline solution, TMECG generates a stable quinone methide product that strongly binds to the enzyme with a KD of 8.2 nM. Quercetin glucuronides also bind to DHFR but its effective binding was highly dependent of the sugar residue, with quercetin-3-xyloside being the stronger inhibitor of the enzyme with a KD of 0.6 μM. The finding that natural polyphenols are good inhibitors of human DHFR could explain the epidemiological data on their prophylactic effects for certain forms of cancer and open a possibility for the use of natural and synthetic polyphenols in cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Molecular Characterization of a Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Pinus bungeana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Ling Yang; Ying-Ru Zhao; Cai-Ling Wang; Zhi-Ling Yang; Qing-Yin Zeng; Hai Lu

    2009-01-01

    Dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) plays a critical role in the ascorbate-glutathione recycling reaction for most higher plants. To date, studies on DHAR in higher plants have focused largely on Arabidopsis and agricultural plants, and there is virtually no information on the molecular characteristics of DHAR in gymnosperms. The present study reports the cloning and characteristics of a DHAR (PbDHAR) from a pine, Pinus bungeana Zucc. ex Endl. The PbDHAR gene encodes a protein of 215 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 24.26 kDa. The predicted 3-D structure of PbDHAR showed a typical glutathione S-transferase fold. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that the PbDHAR was a constitutive expression gene in P. bungeana. The expression level of PbDHAR mRNA in P. bungeana seedlings did not show significant change under high temperature stress. The recombinant PbDHAR was overexpressed in Escherichia coll following purification with affinity chromatography. The recombinant PbDHAR exhibited enzymatic activity (19.84μmol/min per mg) and high affinity (a K_m of 0.08 mM) towards the substrates dehydroascorbate (DHA). Moreover, the recombinant PbDHAR was a thermostable enzyme, and retained 77% of its initial activity at 55 ℃. The present study is the first to provide a detailed molecular characterization of the DHAR in P. bungeana.

  6. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes, Dietary Habits and Susceptibility to Stomach Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangmingGao; TakezakiToshiro; JianzhongWu; JianhuoDing; YantingLiu; SupingLi; PingSu; XuHu; TianliongXu; HamajimaNobuyuki; TajimaKazuo

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relation among methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotypes, dietary habits and the risk of stomach cancer (SC).METHODS A case-control study was conducted with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Chuzhou district, Huaian, Jiangsu province, China. The epidemiological data were collected, and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained from all of the subjects..MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP. RESULTS (1) The prevalence of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes was found to be significantly different between controls (68.5%) and SC cases (79.4%,P=0.0416), the increased risk had an adjusted OR of 1.79 (95%C1:1.01-3.19). (2) Among subjects who had a low intake of garlic or Chinese onion, MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes significantly increased the risk of developing SC. Among non-tea drinkers or among subjects who had a frequent intakeof meat, the carriers of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes had a higher risk of SC than individuals with the C/C type MTHFR. CONCLUSION The polymorphism of MTHFR C677T was associated with increased risk of developing SC, and that individuals with differing genotypes may have different susceptibilities to SC, based on their exposure level to environmental factors.

  7. Solvent effects on catalysis by Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveridge, E Joel; Tey, Lai-Hock; Allemann, Rudolf K

    2010-01-27

    Hydride transfer catalyzed by dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) has been described previously within an environmentally coupled model of hydrogen tunneling, where protein motions control binding of substrate and cofactor to generate a tunneling ready conformation and modulate the width of the activation barrier and hence the reaction rate. Changes to the composition of the reaction medium are known to perturb protein motions. We have measured kinetic parameters of the reaction catalyzed by DHFR from Escherichia coli in the presence of various cosolvents and cosolutes and show that the dielectric constant, but not the viscosity, of the reaction medium affects the rate of reaction. Neither the primary kinetic isotope effect on the reaction nor its temperature dependence were affected by changes to the bulk solvent properties. These results are in agreement with our previous report on the effect of solvent composition on catalysis by DHFR from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima. However, the effect of solvent on the temperature dependence of the kinetic isotope effect on hydride transfer catalyzed by E. coli DHFR is difficult to explain within a model, in which long-range motions couple to the chemical step of the reaction, but may indicate the existence of a short-range promoting vibration or the presence of multiple nearly isoenergetic conformational substates of enzymes with similar but distinct catalytic properties.

  8. A second target of benzamide riboside: dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Breton; Johnson-Farley, Nadine; Kerrigan, John E; Scotto, Kathleen W; Banerjee, Debabrata; Felczak, Krzysztof; Pankiewicz, Krzysztof W; Gounder, Murugesan; Lin, HongXia; Abali, Emine Ercikan; Bertino, Joseph R

    2012-11-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) is an essential enzyme involved in de novo purine and thymidine biosynthesis. For several decades, selective inhibition of DHFR has proven to be a potent therapeutic approach in the treatment of various cancers including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, osteogenic sarcoma, carcinoma of the breast, and head and neck cancer. Therapeutic success with DHFR inhibitor methotrexate (MTX) has been compromised in the clinic, which limits the success of MTX treatment by both acquired and intrinsic resistance mechanisms. We report that benzamide riboside (BR), via anabolism to benzamide adenine dinucleotide (BAD) known to potently inhibit inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), also inhibits cell growth through a mechanism involving downregulation of DHFR protein. Evidence to support this second site of action of BR includes the finding that CCRF-CEM/R human T-cell lymphoblasic leukemia cells, resistant to MTX as a consequence of gene amplification and overexpression of DHFR, are more resistant to BR than are parental cells. Studies of the mechanism by which BR lowers DHFR showed that BR, through its metabolite BAD, reduced NADP and NADPH cellular levels by inhibiting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide kinase (NADK). As consequence of the lack of NADPH, DHFR was shown to be destabilized. We suggest that, inhibition of NADK is a new approach to downregulate DHFR and to inhibit cell growth.

  9. Inhibition of Aldose Reductase by Gentiana lutea Extracts

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    Chandrasekhar Akileshwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2 activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  10. Functional characterization of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Trypanosoma spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Diego G; Cabeza, Matías S; Erben, Esteban D; Carranza, Pedro G; Lujan, Hugo D; Téllez Iñón, María T; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A

    2011-01-01

    Methionine is an amino acid susceptible to being oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (MetSO). The reduction of MetSO to methionine is catalyzed by methionine sulfoxide reductase (MSR), an enzyme present in almost all organisms. In trypanosomatids, the study of antioxidant systems has been mainly focused on the involvement of trypanothione, a specific redox component in these organisms. However, no information is available concerning their mechanisms for repairing oxidized proteins, which would be relevant for the survival of these pathogens in the various stages of their life cycle. We report the molecular cloning of three genes encoding a putative A-type MSR in trypanosomatids. The genes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the corresponding recombinant proteins were purified and functionally characterized. The enzymes were specific for L-Met(S)SO reduction, using Trypanosoma cruzi tryparedoxin I as the reducing substrate. Each enzyme migrated in electrophoresis with a particular profile reflecting the differences they exhibit in superficial charge. The in vivo presence of the enzymes was evidenced by immunological detection in replicative stages of T. cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. The results support the occurrence of a metabolic pathway in Trypanosoma spp. involved in the critical function of repairing oxidized macromolecules.

  11. Identification and Validation of HCC-specific Gene Transcriptional Signature for Tumor Antigen Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrizzo, Annacarmen; Caruso, Francesca Pia; Tagliamonte, Maria; Tornesello, Maria Lina; Ceccarelli, Michele; Costa, Valerio; Aprile, Marianna; Esposito, Roberta; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Buonaguro, Franco M; Buonaguro, Luigi

    2016-07-08

    A novel two-step bioinformatics strategy was applied for identification of signatures with therapeutic implications in hepatitis-associated HCC. Transcriptional profiles from HBV- and HCV-associated HCC samples were compared with non-tumor liver controls. Resulting HCC modulated genes were subsequently compared with different non-tumor tissue samples. Two related signatures were identified, namely "HCC-associated" and "HCC-specific". Expression data were validated by RNA-Seq analysis carried out on unrelated HCC samples and protein expression was confirmed according to The Human Protein Atlas" (http://proteinatlas.org/), a public repository of immunohistochemistry data. Among all, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10, and IGF2 mRNA-binding protein 3 were found strictly HCC-specific with no expression in 18/20 normal tissues. Target peptides for vaccine design were predicted for both proteins associated with the most prevalent HLA-class I and II alleles. The described novel strategy showed to be feasible for identification of HCC-specific proteins as highly potential target for HCC immunotherapy.

  12. De novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provides First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Meena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavour, fragrance, cosmetic and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step towards understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases (TPS, pyrophosphatases (PPase, alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH, aldo-keto reductases (AKR, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD, alcohol acetyltransferases (AAT and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified enzymes in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats (SSRs were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

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    Zhiqi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC, but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and hydroxyl radical (HO∙, are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS. In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC.

  14. Neurosteroid biosynthetic pathways changes in prefrontal cortex in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Sabina; Bossers, Koen; Van de Bilt, Saskia; Agrapart, Vincent; Morales, Rafael Ramirez; Frajese, Giovanni Vanni; Swaab, Dick F

    2011-11-01

    Expression of the genes for enzymes involved in neurosteroid biosynthesis was studied in human prefrontal cortex (PFC) in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) (n=49). Quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR) revealed that mRNA levels of diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), which is involved in the first step of steroidogenesis and in GABAergic transmission, were increased, as were mRNA levels for several neurosteroid biosynthetic enzymes. Aromatase, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD17B1) and aldo-keto reductase 1C2 (AKR1C2), were all increased in the late stages of AD. Several GABA-A subunits were significantly reduced in AD. Increased expression of aromatase in the PFC was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and was found to be localized predominantly in astrocytes. These data suggest a role for estrogens and allopregnanolone produced by astrocytes in the PFC in AD, possibly as part of a rescue program. The reduced gene expression of some synaptic and extra-synaptic GABA-A subunits may indicate a deficit of modulation of GABA-A receptors by neuroactive steroids, which may contribute to the neuropsychiatric characteristics of this disease.

  15. Involvement of an octose ketoreductase and two acyltransferases in the biosynthesis of paulomycins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jine; Wang, Min; Ding, Yong; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    C-4 hydroxyethyl branched octoses have been observed in polysaccharides of several genera of gram negative bacteria and in various antibiotics produced by gram positive bacteria. The C-4 hydroxyethyl branch was proposed to be converted from C-4 acetyl branch by an uncharacterized ketoreduction step. Paulomycins (PAUs) are glycosylated antibiotics with potent inhibitory activity against gram positive bacteria and are structurally defined by its unique C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branched paulomycose moiety. A novel aldo-keto-reductase, Pau7 was characterized as the enzyme catalyzing the stereospecific ketoreduction of 7‧-keto of PAU E (1) to give the C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branched paulomycose moiety of PAU F (2). An acyltransferase Pau6 further decorates the C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branch of paulomycose moiety of 2 by attaching various fatty acyl chains to 7‧-OH to generate diverse PAUs. In addition, another acyltransferase Pau24 was proposed to be responsible for the 13-O-acetylation of PAUs.

  16. Cooperative function of antioxidant and redox systems against oxidative stress in male reproductive tissues

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JunichiFujii; YoshihitoIuchi; ShingoMatsuki; TatsuyaIshii

    2003-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced under oxidative stress, such as high oxygen concentration and during the metabolic consumption of oxygen molecules. Male reproductive tissues appear to be continuously exposed to ROS produced by active metabolism. In addition, spermatozoa must pass through a high oxygen environ-ment during the mating process. Thus, to maintain viable reproductive ability, a protective mechanism against oxida-tive stress is of importance. Here, we overview our current understanding of the cooperative function of antioxidative and redox systems that are involved in male fertility. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase are major enzymes that scavenge harmful ROS in male reproductive organs. In turn, glutathione and thioredoxin systems constitute the main redox systems that repair oxidized and damaged molecules and also play a role in regulating a variety of cellular functions. While glutathione functions as an antioxidant by donating electrons to glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin donates electrons to peroxiredoxin as a counterpart of glutathione peroxidase. In addition,aldo-keto reductases, which detoxify carbonyl compounds produced by oxidative stress, are present at high levels in the epithelia of the genital tract and Sertoli cells of the testis. Since these systems are involved in cross-talk, a comprehensive understanding will be required to maintain the physiological functions of male reproductive system.( Asian J Andro12003 Sep; 5: 231-242)

  17. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  18. High expression of AKR1B10 predicts low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Yan; Qi, Lu-Nan; Zhong, Jian-Hong; Qin, Hong-Gui; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Lu, Shi-Dong; Ma, Liang; Xiang, Bang-De; Li, Le-Qun; You, Xue-Mei

    2017-01-01

    To clarify the relationship between aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) expression and early hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence, this study detected AKR1B10 expression in tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues from 110 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC underwent liver resection and analyzed its correlations with clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of these patients. Detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, AKR1B10 mRNA expression showed significantly higher in HCC tissues than in adjacent non-tumor tissues, with a low level in normal liver tissues. Similar results was confirmed at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. High AKR1B10 expression was negatively correlated with serum alpha-fetoprotein level and positively correlated with HBV-DNA level. Patients with high AKR1B10 expression had significantly higher disease-free survival than those with low expression within 2 years after liver resection. Multivariate analysis also confirmed high AKR1B10 expression to be a predictor of low risk of early HCC recurrence. In addition, high AKR1B10 expression was found to be a favorable factor of overall survival. These results suggest that AKR1B10 is involved in HBV-related hepatocarcinogenesis, but its high expression could predict low risk of early tumor recurrence in patients with HBV-related HCC after liver resection. PMID:28181486

  19. Engineering Escherichia coli for renewable benzyl alcohol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawn Pugh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Benzyl alcohol is an aromatic hydrocarbon used as a solvent and an intermediate chemical in the pharmaceutical, cosmetics, and flavor/fragrance industries. The de novo biosynthesis of benzyl alcohol directly from renewable glucose was herein explored using a non-natural pathway engineered in Escherichia coli. Benzaldehyde was first produced from endogenous phenylpyruvate via three heterologous steps, including hydroxymandelate synthase (encoded by hmaS from Amycolatopsis orientalis, followed by (S-mandelate dehydrogenase (encoded by mdlB and phenylglyoxylate decarboxylase (encoded by mdlC from Pseudomonas putida ATCC 12633. The subsequent rapid and efficient reduction of benzaldehyde to benzyl alcohol occurred by the combined activity and native regulation of multiple endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and/or aldo-keto reductases. Through systematic deletion of competing aromatic amino acid biosynthesis pathways to promote endogenous phenylpyruvate availability, final benzyl alcohol titers as high as 114±1 mg/L were realized, representing a yield of 7.6±0.1 mg/g on glucose and a ~5-fold improvement over initial strains.

  20. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R.; Venkata Rao, D. K.; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H. B.; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K.; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition. PMID:27516768

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in Indian stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalita J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: In view of the prevailing controversy about the role of Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutation in stroke and paucity of studies from India, this study has been undertaken to evaluate MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in consecutive ischemic stroke patients and correlate these with folic acid, homocysteine (Hcy and conventional risk factors. Settings and Design: Ischemic stroke patients prospectively evaluated in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Computerized tomography proven ischemic stroke patients were prospectively evaluated including clinical, family history of stroke, dietary habits and addictions. Their fasting and postprandial blood sugar, lipid profile, vitamin B12, folic acid and MTHFR gene analysis were done. Statistical Analysis: MTHFR gene polymorphism was correlated with serum folic acid, Vitamin B12 and Hcy levels; family history of stroke in first-degree relatives; and dietary habits; employing Chi-square test. Results: There were 58 patients with ischemic stroke, whose mean age was 50 (4-79 years; among them, 10 were females. MTHFR gene polymorphism was present in 19 (32.8% patients, 3 were homozygous and 16 were heterozygous. Both serum folate and B12 levels were low in 29 (50% patients and Hcy in 48 (83%. Hypertension was present in 28 (48% patients, diabetes in 12 (21%, hyperlipidemia in 52 (90%, smoking in 17 (29%, obesity in 1 (1.7% and family history of stroke in first-degree relatives in 13 (22.4%. There was no significant relationship of MTHFR gene polymorphism with folic acid, B12, Hcy levels, dietary habits and number of risk factors. Vitamin B12 level was low in vegetarians ( P Conclusion: MTHFR gene polymorphism was found in one-third of patients with ischemic stroke and was insignificantly associated with higher frequency of elevated Hcy.

  2. Rational Design of a Structural and Functional Nitric Oxide Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, N.; Lin, Y; Gao, Y; Zhao, X; Russell, B; Lei, L; Miner, L; Robinson, H; Lu, Y

    2009-01-01

    Protein design provides a rigorous test of our knowledge about proteins and allows the creation of novel enzymes for biotechnological applications. Whereas progress has been made in designing proteins that mimic native proteins structurally, it is more difficult to design functional proteins. In comparison to recent successes in designing non-metalloproteins, it is even more challenging to rationally design metalloproteins that reproduce both the structure and function of native metalloenzymes. This is because protein metal-binding sites are much more varied than non-metal-containing sites, in terms of different metal ion oxidation states, preferred geometry and metal ion ligand donor sets. Because of their variability, it has been difficult to predict metal-binding site properties in silico, as many of the parameters, such as force fields, are ill-defined. Therefore, the successful design of a structural and functional metalloprotein would greatly advance the field of protein design and our understanding of enzymes. Here we report a successful, rational design of a structural and functional model of a metalloprotein, nitric oxide reductase (NOR), by introducing three histidines and one glutamate, predicted as ligands in the active site of NOR, into the distal pocket of myoglobin. A crystal structure of the designed protein confirms that the minimized computer model contains a haem/non-haem FeB centre that is remarkably similar to that in the crystal structure. This designed protein also exhibits NO reduction activity, and so models both the structure and function of NOR, offering insight that the active site glutamate is required for both iron binding and activity. These results show that structural and functional metalloproteins can be rationally designed in silico.

  3. Prokaryotic arsenate reductase enhances arsenate resistance in Mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Tao, Xuanyu; Wu, Gaofeng; Li, Xiangkai; Liu, Pu

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a well-known heavy metal toxicant in the environment. Bioremediation of heavy metals has been proposed as a low-cost and eco-friendly method. This article described some of recent patents on transgenic plants with enhanced heavy metal resistance. Further, to test whether genetic modification of mammalian cells could render higher arsenic resistance, a prokaryotic arsenic reductase gene arsC was transfected into human liver cancer cell HepG2. In the stably transfected cells, the expression level of arsC gene was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that arsC was expressed in HepG2 cells and the expression was upregulated by 3 folds upon arsenate induction. To further test whether arsC has function in HepG2 cells, the viability of HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells exposed to arsenite or arsenate was compared to that of HepG2-pCI cells without arsC gene. The results indicated that arsC increased the viability of HepG2 cells by 25% in arsenate, but not in arsenite. And the test of reducing ability of stably transfected cells revealed that the concentration of accumulated trivalent arsenic increased by 25% in HepG2-pCI-ArsC cells. To determine the intracellular localization of ArsC, a fusion vector with fluorescent marker pEGFP-N1-ArsC was constructed and transfected into.HepG2. Laser confocal microscopy showed that EGFP-ArsC fusion protein was distributed throughout the cells. Taken together, these results demonstrated that prokaryotic arsenic resistant gene arsC integrated successfully into HepG2 genome and enhanced arsenate resistance of HepG2, which brought new insights of arsenic detoxification in mammalian cells.

  4. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  5. Metabolism of bupropion by carbonyl reductases in liver and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connarn, Jamie N; Zhang, Xinyuan; Babiskin, Andrew; Sun, Duxin

    2015-07-01

    Bupropion's metabolism and the formation of hydroxybupropion in the liver by cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) has been extensively studied; however, the metabolism and formation of erythro/threohydrobupropion in the liver and intestine by carbonyl reductases (CR) has not been well characterized. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the relative contribution of the two metabolism pathways of bupropion (by CYP2B6 and CR) in the subcellular fractions of liver and intestine and to identify the CRs responsible for erythro/threohydrobupropion formation in the liver and the intestine. The results showed that the liver microsome generated the highest amount of hydroxybupropion (Vmax = 131 pmol/min per milligram, Km = 87 μM). In addition, liver microsome and S9 fractions formed similar levels of threohydrobupropion by CR (Vmax = 98-99 pmol/min per milligram and Km = 186-265 μM). Interestingly, the liver has similar capability to form hydroxybupropion (by CYP2B6) and threohydrobupropion (by CR). In contrast, none of the intestinal fractions generate hydroxybupropion, suggesting that the intestine does not have CYP2B6 available for metabolism of bupropion. However, intestinal S9 fraction formed threohydrobupropion to the extent of 25% of the amount of threohydrobupropion formed by liver S9 fraction. Enzyme inhibition and Western blots identified that 11β-dehydrogenase isozyme 1 in the liver microsome fraction is mainly responsible for the formation of threohydrobupropion, and in the intestine AKR7 may be responsible for the same metabolite formation. These quantitative comparisons of bupropion metabolism by CR in the liver and intestine may provide new insight into its efficacy and side effects with respect to these metabolites.

  6. The Characteristics and Regulatory Mechanisms of Superoxide Generation from eNOS Reductase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Peng

    Full Text Available In addition to superoxide (O2.- generation from nitric oxide synthase (NOS oxygenase domain, a new O2.- generation site has been identified in the reductase domain of inducible NOS (iNOS and neuronal NOS (nNOS. Cysteine S-glutathionylation in eNOS reductase domain also induces O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain. However, the characteristics and regulatory mechanism of the O2.- generation from NOS reductase domain remain unclear. We cloned and purified the wild type bovine eNOS (WT eNOS, a mutant of Serine 1179 replaced with aspartic acid eNOS (S1179D eNOS, which mimics the negative charge caused by phosphorylationand truncated eNOS reductase domain (eNOS RD. Both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS generated significant amount of O2.- in the absence of BH4 and L-arginine. The capacity of O2.- generation from S1179D eNOS was significantly higher than that of WT eNOS (1.74:1. O2.- generation from both WT eNOS and S1179D eNOS were not completely inhibited by 100nM tetrahydrobiopterin(BH4. This BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation from eNOS was blocked by 10mM flavoprotein inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium (DPI. Purified eNOS reductase domain protein confirmed that this BH4 un-inhibited O2.- generation originates at the FMN or FAD/NADPH binding site of eNOS reductase domain. DEPMPO-OOH adduct EPR signals and NADPH consumptions analyses showed that O2.- generation from eNOS reductase domain was regulated by Serine 1179 phosphorylation and DPI, but not by L-arginine, BH4 or calmodulin (CaM. In addition to the heme center of eNOS oxygenase domain, we confirmed another O2.- generation site in the eNOS reductase domain and characterized its regulatory properties.

  7. Sinorhizobium meliloti Phage ΦM9 Defines a New Group of T4 Superfamily Phages with Unusual Genomic Features but a Common T=16 Capsid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew C.; Tatum, Kelsey B.; Lynn, Jason S.; Brewer, Tess E.; Lu, Stephen; Washburn, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Relatively little is known about the phages that infect agriculturally important nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria. Here we report the genome and cryo-electron microscopy structure of the Sinorhizobium meliloti-infecting T4 superfamily phage ΦM9. This phage and its close relative Rhizobium phage vB_RleM_P10VF define a new group of T4 superfamily phages. These phages are distinctly different from the recently characterized cyanophage-like S. meliloti phages of the ΦM12 group. Structurally, ΦM9 has a T=16 capsid formed from repeating units of an extended gp23-like subunit that assemble through interactions between one subunit and the adjacent E-loop insertion domain. Though genetically very distant from the cyanophages, the ΦM9 capsid closely resembles that of the T4 superfamily cyanophage Syn9. ΦM9 also has the same T=16 capsid architecture as the very distant phage SPO1 and the herpesviruses. Despite their overall lack of similarity at the genomic and structural levels, ΦM9 and S. meliloti phage ΦM12 have a small number of open reading frames in common that appear to encode structural proteins involved in interaction with the host and which may have been acquired by horizontal transfer. These proteins are predicted to encode tail baseplate proteins, tail fibers, tail fiber assembly proteins, and glycanases that cleave host exopolysaccharide. IMPORTANCE Despite recent advances in the phylogenetic and structural characterization of bacteriophages, only a small number of phages of plant-symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria have been studied at the molecular level. The effects of phage predation upon beneficial bacteria that promote plant growth remain poorly characterized. First steps in understanding these soil bacterium-phage dynamics are genetic, molecular, and structural characterizations of these groups of phages. The T4 superfamily phages are among the most complex phages; they have large genomes packaged within an icosahedral head and a long

  8. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalvetti, A; Peña-Díaz, J; Hurtado, R; Ruiz-Pérez, L M; González-Pacanowska, D

    2000-07-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better understanding of the role of this enzyme in trypanosomatids, the effect of possible regulators of isoprenoid biosynthesis in cultured promastigote cells was studied. Neither mevalonic acid nor serum sterols appear to modulate enzyme activity whereas incubation with lovastatin results in significant increases in the amount of reductase protein. Western- and Northern-blot analyses indicate that this activation is apparently performed via post-transcriptional control.

  9. Expression of 5α-Reductase Type 2 Gene in Human Testis, Epididymis and Vas Deferens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘德瑜; 吴燕婉; 罗宏志; 张桂元

    2002-01-01

    Objectives To study the expression pattern of 5α-reductase type 2 gene in human malereproductive organsMethods The expression level of 5α-reductase type 2 gene inhuman testis, epididymisand vas deferens tissues was determined by in situ hybridization using Digoxin labeled5α-reductase type 2 cRNA probe.Results The brown granules of hybridizing signals distributed in the cytoplasm ofSertoli and Leydig cells of the testis, the principle cells of epididymis and the epithe-lial cells of vas deferens, but there was no positive signal in the nuclei of above-men-tioned cells. No positive signal was observed in germ cells, basement of the testis,interstium of epididymis and basement, as well as smooth muscle of vas deferens.Conclusion This study confirmed that the 5α-reductase type 2 gene expressed in Ser-toli, Leydig cells of the testis, and the principle cells of epididymis. The expressionpattern of the gene in these cells in human was similar to that of rat and monkey. Thepresence of 5a-reductase type 2 gene in epithelial cells of the vas deferens suggested itmight possess an important physiological role in human reproduction.

  10. Recombinant pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) catalyze opposite enantiospecific conversions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, M; Gang, D R; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1999-01-01

    Although the heartwood of woody plants represents the main source of fiber and solid wood products, essentially nothing is known about how the biological processes leading to its formation are initiated and regulated. Accordingly, a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-guided cloning strategy was employed to obtain genes encoding pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductases from western red cedar (Thuja plicata) as a means to initiate the study of its heartwood formation. (+)-Pinoresinol-(+)-lariciresinol reductase from Forsythia intermedia was used as a template for primer construction for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplifications, which, when followed by homologous hybridization cloning, resulted in the isolation of two distinct classes of putative pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase cDNA clones from western red cedar. A representative of each class was expressed as a fusion protein with beta-galactosidase and assayed for enzymatic activity. Using both deuterated and radiolabeled (+/-)-pinoresinols as substrates, it was established that each class of cDNA encoded a pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase of different (opposite) enantiospecificity. Significantly, the protein from one class converted (+)-pinoresinol into (-)-secoisolariciresinol, whereas the other utilized the opposite (-)-enantiomer to give the corresponding (+)-form. This differential substrate specificity raises important questions about the role of each of these individual reductases in heartwood formation, such as whether they are expressed in different cells/tissues or at different stages during heartwood development.

  11. Cloning of thioredoxin h reductase and characterization of the thioredoxin reductase-thioredoxin h system from wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrato, Antonio J; Pérez-Ruiz, Juan M; Cejudo, Francisco J

    2002-10-15

    Thioredoxins h are ubiquitous proteins reduced by NADPH- thioredoxin reductase (NTR). They are able to reduce disulphides in target proteins. In monocots, thioredoxins h accumulate at high level in seeds and show a predominant localization in the nucleus of seed cells. These results suggest that the NTR-thioredoxin h system probably plays an important role in seed physiology. To date, the study of this system in monocots is limited by the lack of information about NTR. In the present study, we describe the cloning of a full-length cDNA encoding NTR from wheat ( Triticum aestivum ). The polypeptide deduced from this cDNA shows close similarity to NTRs from Arabidopsis, contains FAD- and NADPH-binding domains and a disulphide probably interacting with the disulphide at the active site of thioredoxin h. Wheat NTR was expressed in Escherichia coli as a His-tagged protein. The absorption spectrum of the purified recombinant protein is typical of flavoenzymes. Furthermore, it showed NADPH-dependent thioredoxin h reduction activity, thus confirming that the cDNA clone reported in the present study encodes wheat NTR. Using the His-tagged NTR and TRXhA (wheat thioredoxin h ), we successfully reconstituted the wheat NTR-thioredoxin h system in vitro, as shown by the insulin reduction assay. A polyclonal antibody was raised against wheat NTR after immunization of rabbits with the purified His-tagged protein. This antibody efficiently detected a single polypeptide of the corresponding molecular mass in seed extracts and it allowed the analysis of the pattern of accumulation of NTR in different wheat organs and developmental stages. NTR shows a wide distribution in wheat, but, surprisingly, its accumulation in seeds is low, in contrast with the level of thioredoxins h.

  12. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase, a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sokurenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase. RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73% and barnase (74% was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91. The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization.

  13. Identification of a pan-cancer oncogenic microRNA superfamily anchored by a central core seed motif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Mark P.; Rajapakshe, Kimal; Hartig, Sean M.; Reva, Boris; McLellan, Michael D.; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Zack, Travis I.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Wheeler, David A.; Coarfa, Cristian; McGuire, Sean E.

    2013-11-01

    MicroRNAs modulate tumorigenesis through suppression of specific genes. As many tumour types rely on overlapping oncogenic pathways, a core set of microRNAs may exist, which consistently drives or suppresses tumorigenesis in many cancer types. Here we integrate The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) pan-cancer data set with a microRNA target atlas composed of publicly available Argonaute Crosslinking Immunoprecipitation (AGO-CLIP) data to identify pan-tumour microRNA drivers of cancer. Through this analysis, we show a pan-cancer, coregulated oncogenic microRNA ‘superfamily’ consisting of the miR-17, miR-19, miR-130, miR-93, miR-18, miR-455 and miR-210 seed families, which cotargets critical tumour suppressors via a central GUGC core motif. We subsequently define mutations in microRNA target sites using the AGO-CLIP microRNA target atlas and TCGA exome-sequencing data. These combined analyses identify pan-cancer oncogenic cotargeting of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, TGFβ and p53 pathways by the miR-17-19-130 superfamily members.

  14. Functional genetic identification of PRP1, an ABC transporter superfamily member conferring pentamidine resistance in Leishmania major.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Adriano C; Beverley, Stephen M; Cotrim, Paulo C

    2003-08-31

    Pentamidine (PEN) is a second-line agent in the treatment of leishmaniasis whose mode of action and resistance is not well understood. Here, we used a genetic strategy to search for loci able to mediate PEN resistance (PENr) when overexpressed in Leishmania major. A shuttle cosmid library containing genomic DNA inserts was transfected into wild-type promastigotes and screened for PEN-resistant transfectants. Two different cosmids identifying the same locus were found, which differed from other known Leishmania drug resistance genes. The PENr gene was mapped by deletion and transposon mutagenesis to an open reading frame (ORF) belonging to the P-glycoprotein (PGP)/MRP ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that we named pentamidine resistance protein 1 (PRP1). The predicted PRP1 protein encodes 1,807 amino acids with the typical dimeric structure involving 10 transmembrane domains and two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs). PRP1-mediated PENr could be reversed by verapamil and PRP1 overexpressors showed cross-resistance to trivalent antimony but not to pentavalent antimony (glucantime). Although the degree of PENr was modest (1.7- to 3.7-fold), this may be significant in clinical drug resistance given the marginal efficacy of PEN against Leishmania.

  15. Protein evolution by molecular tinkering: diversification of the nuclear receptor superfamily from a ligand-dependent ancestor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie T Bridgham

    Full Text Available Understanding how protein structures and functions have diversified is a central goal in molecular evolution. Surveys of very divergent proteins from model organisms, however, are often insufficient to determine the features of ancestral proteins and to reveal the evolutionary events that yielded extant diversity. Here we combine genomic, biochemical, functional, structural, and phylogenetic analyses to reconstruct the early evolution of nuclear receptors (NRs, a diverse superfamily of transcriptional regulators that play key roles in animal development, physiology, and reproduction. By inferring the structure and functions of the ancestral NR, we show--contrary to current belief--that NRs evolved from a ligand-activated ancestral receptor that existed near the base of the Metazoa, with fatty acids as possible ancestral ligands. Evolutionary tinkering with this ancestral structure generated the extraordinary diversity of modern receptors: sensitivity to different ligands evolved because of subtle modifications of the internal cavity, and ligand-independent activation evolved repeatedly because of various mutations that stabilized the active conformation in the absence of ligand. Our findings illustrate how a mechanistic dissection of protein evolution in a phylogenetic context can reveal the deep homology that links apparently "novel" molecular functions to a common ancestral form.

  16. Specificity Evaluation and Disease Monitoring in Arthritis Imaging with Complement Receptor of the Ig superfamily targeting Nanobodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fang; Perlman, Harris; Matthys, Patrick; Wen, Yurong; Lahoutte, Tony; Muyldermans, Serge; Lu, Shemin; De Baetselier, Patrick; Schoonooghe, Steve; Devoogdt, Nick; Raes, Geert

    2016-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography combined with micro-CT (SPECT/μCT) imaging using Nanobodies against complement receptor of the Ig superfamily (CRIg), found on tissue macrophages such as synovial macrophages, has promising potential to visualize joint inflammation in experimental arthritis. Here, we further addressed the specificity and assessed the potential for arthritis monitoring. Signals obtained with 99mTc-labelled NbV4m119 Nanobody were compared in joints of wild type (WT) versus CRIg−/− mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) or K/BxN serum transfer-induced arthritis (STIA). In addition, SPECT/μCT imaging was used to investigate arthritis development in STIA and in CIA under dexamethasone treatment. 99mTc-NbV4m119 accumulated in inflamed joints of WT, but not CRIg−/− mice with CIA and STIA. Development and spontaneous recovery of symptoms in STIA was reflected in initially increased and subsequently reduced joint accumulation of 99mTc-NbV4m119. Dexamethasone treatment of CIA mice reduced 99mTc-NbV4m119 accumulation as compared to saline control in most joints except knees. SPECT/μCT imaging with 99mTc-NbV4m119 allows specific assessment of inflammation in different arthritis models and provides complementary information to clinical scoring for quantitatively and non-invasively monitoring the pathological process and the efficacy of arthritis treatment. PMID:27779240

  17. SC1, an immunoglobulin-superfamily cell adhesion molecule, is involved in the brain metastatic activity of lung cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    KUBOTA, YUKA; KIRIMURA, NAOKI; SHIBA, HATSUKI; ADACHI, KAZUHIDE; TSUKAMOTO, YASUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    SC1 is a cell adhesion molecule that belongs to the immunoglobulin superfamily; this molecule was initially purified from the chick embryonic nervous system and was reported to exhibit homophilic adhesion activity. SC1 is transiently expressed in various organs during development and has been identified in numerous neoplastic tissues, including lung cancer and colorectal carcinomas. The present study focused on the encephalic metastasis of lung cancer cells with respect to the potential function of SC1, as this molecule is known to be consistently expressed in the central nervous system as well as lung cancers. SC1 complementary DNA was introduced into A549 cells, a human lung cancer-derived cell line. The stable overexpression of the SC1 protein in A549 cells was demonstrated to enhance the self-aggregation of the cells. In addition, the SC1 transfectants enhanced the metastatic and invasive potential to the encephalic parenchyma following implantation into nude mice. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that cell adhesion due interactions between SC1 on brain tissue and SC1 on lung cancer cells was involved in the malignant aspects of lung cancer, including invasion and metastasis to the brain. PMID:26622821

  18. [SPC/E and TIP4P models for investigation of the conformational mobility of the insulin superfamily peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontova, O I

    2014-01-01

    In this work we carried out a comparative analysis of the two most popular water models-SPC/E and TIP4P and estimated the ability of using ones for insulin superfamily peptides-proinsulin and insulin-like growth factors (IGF1 and IGF2). It was shown that root-mean-square deviations and radius of gyration had tend to be in reversed phase when both water models were used. Only IGF1 had a plateau after 9000 ps. In addition, it was shown that in spite of the general nature of insulin-like packing maintenance, there were some differences in the secondary structures, when we used TIP4P and SPC/E. These differences could influence on the overall molecule dynamics and the ability to accept necessary conformation for interaction with cognate receptors. On the basis of the received data we concluded that it is necessary to use several, not one, water models for the study of the peptides conformational mobility.

  19. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  20. Isolation and immunological characterization of a novel Cladosporium herbarum allergen structurally homologous to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rid, Raphaela; Onder, Kamil; Hawranek, Thomas; Laimer, Martin; Bauer, Johann W; Holler, Claudia; Simon-Nobbe, Birgit; Breitenbach, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Because the ascomycete Cladosporium herbarum embodies one of the most important, world-wide occurring fungal species responsible for eliciting typical IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions ranging from rhinitis and ocular symptoms to severe involvement of the lower respiratory tract, a more comprehensive definition of its detailed allergen repertoire is unquestionably of critical medical as well as therapeutic significance. By screening a C. herbarum cDNA library with IgE antibodies pooled from 3 mold-reactive sera, we were able to identify, clone and affinity-purify a novel allergen candidate (29.9 kDa) exhibiting considerable (three-dimensional) homology to the alpha/beta hydrolase fold superfamily. The latter covers a collection of hydrolytic enzymes of widely differing phylogenetic origin as well as catalytic activity (operating in countless biological contexts) that in general exhibit only little sequence similarity yet show a remarkable conservation of structural topology. Our present study (i) characterizes recombinant non-fusion C. herbarum hydrolase as a natively folded, minor mold allergen that displays a prevalence of IgE reactivity of approximately 17% in our in vitro immunoblot experiments, (ii) proposes the existence of several putative (speculatively cross-reactive) ascomycete orthologues as determined via genome-wide in silico predictions, and (iii) finally implies that C. herbarum hydrolase could be included in forthcoming minimal testing sets when fungal allergy is suspected.

  1. Role of a major facilitator superfamily transporter in adaptation capacity of Penicillium funiculosum under extreme acidic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jinyin; Xu, Houjuan; Li, Duochuan

    2014-08-01

    Fungal species present in extreme low pH environments are expected to have adapted for tolerance to high H(+) concentrations. However, their adaptability mechanism is unclear. In this study, we isolated an acid-tolerant strain of Penicillium funiculosum, which can grow actively at pH 1.0 and thrived in pH 0.6. A major facilitator superfamily transporter (PfMFS) was isolated from an acid-sensitive random insertional mutant (M4) of the fungus. It encodes a putative protein of 551 residues and contains 14 transmembrane-spanning segments. A targeted mutant (M7) carrying an inactivated copy of PfMFS showed an obvious reduction of growth compared with the wild type (WT) and complementation of M7 with PfMFS restored the wild-type level of growth at pH 1.0. Further data showed that the wild-type showed higher intracellular pH than M7 in response to pH 1. Subcellular localization showed that PfMFS was a cell membrane protein. Homology modeling showed structural similarity with an MFS transporter EmrD from Escherichiacoli. These results demonstrate that the PfMFS transporter is involved in the acid resistance and intracellular pH homeostasis of P. funiculosum.

  2. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase), a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadyrova, Alsu; Ulyanova, Vera; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase) and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase). RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73%) and barnase (74%) was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91). The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization. PMID:27656652

  3. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development.

  4. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  5. Side chain conformational averaging in human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Lisa M; Dyson, H Jane; Wright, Peter E

    2014-02-25

    The three-dimensional structures of the dihydrofolate reductase enzymes from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR or ecE) and Homo sapiens (hDHFR or hE) are very similar, despite a rather low level of sequence identity. Whereas the active site loops of ecDHFR undergo major conformational rearrangements during progression through the reaction cycle, hDHFR remains fixed in a closed loop conformation in all of its catalytic intermediates. To elucidate the structural and dynamic differences between the human and E. coli enzymes, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of side chain flexibility and dynamics in complexes of hDHFR that represent intermediates in the major catalytic cycle. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation dispersion experiments show that, in marked contrast to the functionally important motions that feature prominently in the catalytic intermediates of ecDHFR, millisecond time scale fluctuations cannot be detected for hDHFR side chains. Ligand flux in hDHFR is thought to be mediated by conformational changes between a hinge-open state when the substrate/product-binding pocket is vacant and a hinge-closed state when this pocket is occupied. Comparison of X-ray structures of hinge-open and hinge-closed states shows that helix αF changes position by sliding between the two states. Analysis of χ1 rotamer populations derived from measurements of (3)JCγCO and (3)JCγN couplings indicates that many of the side chains that contact helix αF exhibit rotamer averaging that may facilitate the conformational change. The χ1 rotamer adopted by the Phe31 side chain depends upon whether the active site contains the substrate or product. In the holoenzyme (the binary complex of hDHFR with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate), a combination of hinge opening and a change in the Phe31 χ1 rotamer opens the active site to facilitate entry of the substrate. Overall, the data suggest that, unlike ecDHFR, hDHFR requires minimal backbone conformational rearrangement as

  6. Cuminaldehyde: Aldose Reductase and alpha-Glucosidase Inhibitor Derived from Cuminum cyminum L. Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoi-Seon

    2005-04-06

    The inhibitory activity of Cuminum cyminum seed-isolated component was evaluated against lens aldose reductase and alpha-glucosidase isolated from Sprague-Dawley male rats and compared to that of 11 commercially available components derived from C. cyminum seed oil, as well as quercitrin as an aldose reductase inhibitor and acarbose as an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor. The biologically active constituent of C. cyminum seed oil was characterized as cuminaldehyde by various spectral analyses. The IC(50) value of cuminaldehyde is 0.00085 mg/mL against aldose reductase and 0.5 mg/mL against alpha-glucosidase, respectively. Cuminaldehyde was about 1.8 and 1.6 times less in inhibitory activity than acarbose and quercitin, respectively. Nonetheless, cuminaldehyde may be useful as a lead compound and a new agent for antidiabetic therapeutics.

  7. [Progress in research of aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chang-Gen; Zhang, Lin-Xia; Liu, Xia

    2005-10-01

    The traditional medicinal herbs are natural product, and have no obviously toxic action and side effect, and their resources are extensive. The adverse effects produced by aldose reductase inhibitors in traditional medicinal herbs are less than those from chemical synthesis and micro-organism, they can effectively prevent and delay diabetic complication, such as diabetic nephropathy, vasculopathy, retinopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and so on. They will have a wonderful respect. Flavonoid compounds and their derivates from traditional medicinal herbs are active inhibitors to aldose reductase, such as quercetin, silymarin, puerarin, baicalim, berberine and so on. In addition, some compound preparations show more strongly activity in inhibiting aldose reductase and degrading sorbitol contents, such as Shendan in traditional medicinal herbs being active inhibitors and Jianyi capsule, Jinmaitong composita, Liuwei Di-huang pill, et al. The progresses definite functions of treating diabetes complications have been reviewed.

  8. Circadian variation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity in swine liver and ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D H; Kim, D N; Lee, K T; Reiner, J M; Thomas, W A

    1981-07-01

    The temporal variation of HMG-CoA reductase activity in the liver and intestine of swine was investigated. The thin-layer chromatographic method widely used in the assay of the reductase was successfully applied to the porcine enzymes. Parallel circadian rhythms were demonstrated in both hepatic and ileal reductases from mash-fed animals. Peak activity occurred approximately 6 hr after feeding, 2.7-fold over the basal level in the liver, and 1.6-fold in the ileum. A milk-cholesterol diet caused a marked depression of both rhythms (90% in liver, 50% in ileum); however, the hourly variation in activity persisted in both organs. Cholestyramine was found to elevate hepatic activity (2.7-fold throughout the rhythm) without affecting that of the intestine. Clofibrate had no effect on either enzyme at any time during the cycle despite a 34% reduction in serum cholesterol concentrations.

  9. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A;

    1997-01-01

    We report the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone containing the open reading frame sequence for 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase from Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas' disease. The protozoan gene encoded for a smaller polypeptide than the rest...... sensitive to proteolytic inactivation. Furthermore the enzyme can be efficiently overexpressed in a highly active form by using the expression vector pET-11c. Thus Trypanosoma cruzi HMG-CoA reductase is unique in the sense that it totally lacks the membrane-spanning sequences present in all eukaryotic HMG...... cellular distribution of enzymic activity was investigated after differential centrifugation of Trypanosoma cell extracts. Reductase activity was primarily associated with the cellular soluble fraction because 95% of the total cellular activity was recovered in the supernatant and was particularly...

  10. Denitrification by plant roots? New aspects of plant plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Manuela; Stöhr, Christine

    2012-10-01

    A specific form of plasma membrane-bound nitrate reductase in plants is restricted to roots. Two peptides originated from plasma membrane integral proteins isolated from Hordeum vulgare have been assigned as homologues to the subunit NarH of respiratory nitrate reductase of Escherichia coli. Corresponding sequences have been detected for predicted proteins of Populus trichocarpa with high degree of identities for the subunits NarH (75%) and NarG (65%), however, with less accordance for the subunit NarI. These findings coincide with biochemical properties, particularly in regard to the electron donors menadione and succinate. Together with the root-specific and plasma membrane-bound nitrite/NO reductase, nitric oxide is produced under hypoxic conditions in the presence of nitrate. In this context, a possible function in nitrate respiration of plant roots and an involvement of plants in denitrification processes are discussed.

  11. Directed Molecular Evolution of Nitrite Oxido-reductase by DNA-shuffling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JUN-WEN LI; JIN-LAI ZHENG; XIN-WEI WANG; MIN JIN; FU-HUAN CHAO

    2007-01-01

    Objective To develtop directly molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase using DNA-shuffling technique because nitrobacteria grow extremely slow and are unable to nitrify effectively inorganic nitrogen in wastewater treatment. Methods The norB gene coding the nitrite oxido-reductase in nitrobacteria was cloned and sequenced. Then, directed molecular evolution of nitrite oxido-reductase was developed by DNA-shuffling of 15 norB genes from different nitrobacteria. Results After DNA-shuffling with sexual PCR and staggered extension process PCR, the sequence was different from its parental DNA fragments and the homology ranged from 98% to 99%. The maximum nitrification rate of the modified bacterium of X16 by modified bacterium had the same characteristics of its parental bacteria of E. coli and could grow rapidly in normal cultures.Conclusion DNA-shuffling was successfully used to engineer E. coli, which had norB gene and could degrade inorganic nitrogen effectively.

  12. A substrate-bound structure of cyanobacterial biliverdin reductase identifies stacked substrates as critical for activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Haruna; Hirabayashi, Kei; Nishigaya, Yuki; Kouriki, Haruna; Nakaniwa, Tetsuko; Hagiwara, Yoshinori; Harada, Jiro; Sato, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Sakakibara, Yoichi; Suiko, Masahito; Asada, Yujiro; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Ken; Fukuyama, Keiichi; Sugishima, Masakazu; Wada, Kei

    2017-01-01

    Biliverdin reductase catalyses the last step in haem degradation and produces the major lipophilic antioxidant bilirubin via reduction of biliverdin, using NAD(P)H as a cofactor. Despite the importance of biliverdin reductase in maintaining the redox balance, the molecular details of the reaction it catalyses remain unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of biliverdin reductase in complex with biliverdin and NADP+. Unexpectedly, two biliverdin molecules, which we designated the proximal and distal biliverdins, bind with stacked geometry in the active site. The nicotinamide ring of the NADP+ is located close to the reaction site on the proximal biliverdin, supporting that the hydride directly attacks this position of the proximal biliverdin. The results of mutagenesis studies suggest that a conserved Arg185 is essential for the catalysis. The distal biliverdin probably acts as a conduit to deliver the proton from Arg185 to the proximal biliverdin, thus yielding bilirubin. PMID:28169272

  13. A DFT-based QSAR study on inhibition of human dihydrofolate reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Sedat; Sizochenko, Natalia; Orhan, Adnan; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Diaminopyrimidine derivatives are frequently used as inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase, for example in treatment of patients whose immune system are affected by human immunodeficiency virus. Forty-seven dicyclic and tricyclic potential inhibitors of human dihydrofolate reductase were analyzed using the quantitative structure-activity analysis supported by DFT-based and DRAGON-based descriptors. The developed model yielded an RMSE deviation of 1.1 a correlation coefficient of 0.81. The prediction set was characterized by R(2)=0.60 and RMSE=3.59. Factors responsible for inhibition process were identified and discussed. The resulting model was validated via cross validation and Y-scrambling procedure. From the best model, we found several mass-related descriptors and Sanderson electronegativity-related descriptors that have the best correlations with the investigated inhibitory concentration. These descriptors reflect results from QSAR studies based on characteristics of human dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors.

  14. Essential Role for the Lymphostromal Plasma Membrane Ly-6 Superfamily Molecule Thymic Shared Antigen 1 in Development of the Embryonic Adrenal Gland

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    Thymic shared antigen 1 (TSA-1) is a plasma membrane protein of the Ly-6 superfamily expressed on thymocytes, thymic stromal cells, and other cells of the hematopoietic system. TSA-1 is also expressed in other nonhematopoietic tissues, in particular, embryonic and adult adrenal glands. To address the function of TSA-1, we generated mutant mice in which TSA-1 expression was inactivated by gene targeting. Here we show that deletion of both TSA-1 alleles results in abnormal adrenal gland develop...

  15. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: Stereochemically Distinct Mechanisms in Two Families of cis,cis-Muconate Lactonizing Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, A.; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Schnoes, A; Glasner, M; Burley, S; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily is a paradigm for elucidating Nature's strategies for divergent evolution of enzyme function. Each of the different reactions catalyzed by members of the superfamily is initiated by abstraction of the a-proton of a carboxylate substrate that is coordinated to an essential Mg2+. The muconate lactonizing enzyme (MLE) from Pseudomonas putida, a member of a family that catalyzes the syn-cycloisomerization of cis,cis-muconate to (4S)-muconolactone in the e-ketoadipate pathway, has provided critical insights into the structural bases for evolution of function within the superfamily. A second, divergent family of homologous MLEs that catalyzes anti-cycloisomerization has been identified. Structures of members of both families liganded with the common (4S)-muconolactone product (syn, Pseudomonas fluorescens, gi 70731221; anti, Mycobacterium smegmatis, gi 118470554) document that the conserved Lys at the end of the second e-strand in the (e/a)7e-barrel domain serves as the acid catalyst in both reactions. The different stereochemical courses (syn and anti) result from different structural strategies for determining substrate specificity: although the distal carboxylate group of the cis,cis-muconate substrate attacks the same face of the proximal double bond, opposite faces of the resulting enolate anion intermediate are presented to the conserved Lys acid catalyst. The discovery of two families of homologous, but stereochemically distinct, MLEs likely provides an example of 'pseudoconvergent' evolution of the same function from different homologous progenitors within the enolase superfamily, in which different spatial arrangements of active site functional groups and substrate specificity determinants support catalysis of the same reaction.

  16. Characterisation of a desmosterol reductase involved in phytosterol dealkylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora F Ciufo

    Full Text Available Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C(29 and C(28 yielding cholesterol (C(27. The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735. Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD-dependent reaction.Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250 kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation.

  17. 5{alpha}-reductase expression by prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.M.; Masters, J.R.W. [Univ. College of London (United Kingdom)]|[Pfizer Central Research, Kent (United Kingdom); Ballard, S.A.; Worman, N. [Pfizer Central Research, Sandwich (United Kingdom)

    1996-04-01

    5{alpha}-Reductase (5{alpha}R) activity in two human prostate cancer cell lines was compared to that in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue and COS cells transfected with and expressing the human genes for 5{alpha}-reductase type 1 (5{alpha}R1) and type 2 (5{alpha}R2). Comparisons were based on pH profiles and sensitivities to selective inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase. In the cancer lines, activity was greatest over the pH range 7-8, compared to a sharp peak of activity between pH 5-5.5 in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2. Finasteride and SKF105,657 were potent inhibitors of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in BPH tissue and COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R2, but weak inhibitors in the cancer lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. In contrast, LTK1 17,026 was a more potent inhibitor of 5{alpha}-reductase activity in the prostate cancer cell lines and in COS cells expressing 5{alpha}R1. These data indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines express 5{alpha}-reductase activity similar to that in COS cells transfected with 5{alpha}R1, but different from that in BPH tissue. This may be a consequence of in vitro culture. Alternatively, it may reflect a change occurring as a result of neoplastic transformation, in which case it will be important to select appropriate inhibitors in the clinic. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Adverse Effects and Safety of 5-alpha Reductase Inhibitors (Finasteride, Dutasteride): A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshburg, Jason M.; Kelsey, Petra A.; Therrien, Chelsea A.; Gavino, A. Carlo; Reichenberg, Jason S.

    2016-01-01

    Finasteride and dutasteride, both 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, are considered first-line treatment for androgenetic hair loss in men and used increasingly in women. In each case, patients are expected to take the medications indefinitely despite the lack of research regarding long-term adverse effects. Concerns regarding the adverse effects of these medications has led the United States National Institutes of Health to add a link for post-finasteride syndrome to its Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center. Herein, the authors report the results of a literature search reviewing adverse events of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors as they relate to prostate cancer, psychological effects, sexual health, and use in women. Several large studies found no increase in incidence of prostate cancer, a possible increase of high-grade cancer when detected, and no change in survival rate with 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use. Currently, there is no direct link between 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use and depression; however, several small studies have led to depression being listed as a side effect on the medication packaging. Sexual effects including erectile dysfunction and decreased libido and ejaculate were reported in as many as 3.4 to 15.8 percent of men. To date, there are very few studies evaluating 5-alpha reductase inhibitor use in women. Risks include birth defects in male fetuses if used in pregnancy, decreased libido, headache, gastrointestinal discomfort, and isolated reports of changes in menstruation, acne, and dizziness. Overall, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors were well-tolerated in both men and women, but not without risk, highlighting the importance of patient education prior to treatment. PMID:27672412

  19. A Novel Two Domain-Fusion Protein in Cyanobacteria with Similarity to the CAB/ELIP/HLIP Superfamily: Evolutionary Implications and Regulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oliver Kilian; Anne Soisig Steunou; Arthur R.Grossman; Devaki Bhaya

    2008-01-01

    Vascular plants contain abundant, light-harvesting complexes in the thylakoid membrane that are non-covalently associated with chlorophylls and carotenoids. These light-harvesting chlorophyll a/b binding (LHC) proteins are members of an extended CAB/ELIP/HLIP superfamily of distantly related polypeptides, which have between one and four transmembrane helices (TMH). This superfamily includes the single TMH, high-light-inducible proteins (Hlips), found in cyanobacteria that are induced by various stress conditions, including high light, and are considered ancestral to the LHC proteins. The roles of, and evolutionary relationships between, these superfamily members are of particular interest,since they function in both light harvesting and photoprotection and may have evolved through tandem gene duplication and fusion events. We have investigated the Hlips (hli gene family) in the thermophilic unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus OS-B'. The five hli genes present on the genome of Synechococcus OS-B' are relatively similar, but transcript analyses indicate that there are different patterns of transcript accumulation when the cells are exposed to various growth conditions, suggesting that different Hlips may have specific functions. Hlip5 has an additional TMH at the N-terminus as a result of a novel fusion event. This additional TMH is very similar to a conserved hypothetical, single membrane-spanning polypeptide present in most cyanobacteria. The evolutionary significance of these results is discussed.

  20. Structural analysis of papain-like NlpC/P60 superfamily enzymes with a circularly permuted topology reveals potential lipid binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, "closed" conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6 identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  1. Structural Analysis of Papain-Like NlpC/P60 Superfamily Enzymes with a Circularly Permuted Topology Reveals Potential Lipid Binding Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Rawlings, Neil D.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Miller, Mitchell D.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A. (SG); (Wellcome)

    2012-07-11

    NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, 'closed' conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6) identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  2. Structure of Hordeum vulgare NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase 2. Unwinding the reaction mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkensgaard, Kristine Groth; Hägglund, Per; Finnie, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Thioredoxins (Trxs) are protein disulfide reductases that regulate the intracellular redox environment and are important for seed germination in plants. Trxs are in turn regulated by NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRs), which provide reducing equivalents to Trx using NADPH to recycle Trxs...... relative to the FAD domain in comparison with AtNTR-B. The structure may represent an intermediate between the two conformations described previously: the flavin-oxidizing (FO) and the flavin-reducing (FR) conformations. Here, analysis of interdomain contacts as well as phylogenetic studies lead...

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  4. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  5. Characterization of a periplasmic nitrate reductase in complex with its biosynthetic chaperone

    OpenAIRE

    Dow, J. M.; Grahl, S.; Ward, R; Evans, R.; Byron, O; Norman, D. G.; Palmer, T; Sargent, F

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli is a Gram‐negative bacterium that can use nitrate during anaerobic respiration. The catalytic subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase NapA contains two types of redox cofactor and is exported across the cytoplasmic membrane by the twin‐arginine protein transport pathway. NapD is a small cytoplasmic protein that is essential for the activity of the periplasmic nitrate reductase and binds tightly to the twin‐arginine signal peptide of NapA. Here we show, using spin labelli...

  6. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... or unwilling to undergo surgical resection of the prostate will benefit from such therapy....

  7. Feedback regulation of cholesterol synthesis:sterol-accelerated ubiquitination and degradation of HMG CoA reductase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Russell A DeBose-Boyd

    2008-01-01

    3Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase produces mevalonate,an important intermediate in the synthesis of cholesterol and essential nonsterol isoprenoids.The reductase is subject to an exorbitant amount of feedback control through multiple mechanisms that are mediated by sterol and nonsterol end-products of mevalonate metabolism.Here,Ⅰwill discuss recent advances that shed light on one mechanism for control of reductase,which involves rapid degradation of the enzyme.Accumulation of certain sterols triggers binding of reductase to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane proteins called Insig-1 and Insig-2.Reductase-Insig binding results in recruitment of a membrane-associated ubiquitin ligase called gp78,which initiates ubiquitination of reductase.This ubiquitination is an obligatory reaction for recognition and degradation of reductase from ER membranes by cytosolic 26S proteasomes.Thus,sterol-accelerated degradation of reductase represents an example of how a general cellular process (ER-associated degradation) is used to control an important metabolic pathway (cholesterol synthesis).

  8. Studies on some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.)leaves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiWenhua; YanGuiping; 等

    1994-01-01

    Some characteristics of nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves shown in this paper were as follows:The nitrate reductase from sugar beet leaves required NADH as an electron donor.Accordingly,the nitrate reductase was classified as NADH-dependent(E.C.1.6.61).The Km value of the nitrate reductase for NADH and NO3- were 0.86m mol and 0.18μ mol respectively.The optimum pH in reaction mixture solution for nitrate reduction activity was 7.5.The effect of variable concentrations of inorganic phosphorus in the reaction buffer on nitrate reductase activity was investigated.When the inorganic phosphorus concentration was below 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was increased with increase of inorganic phosphorus concentration.Conversely,when the inorganic phosphorus concentration was over 35m mol,the nitrate reductase activity was inhibited.The nitrate reductase activity assayed in vitro was 3.2 and 5.6times of that assayed in vivo under the condition of exogenous and endogenous ground substance respectively.

  9. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp PCC7120

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Riego, Ana M.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, CarlaV.; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of t

  10. Rubredoxin Reductase of Pseudomonas oleovorans. Structural Relationship to Other Flavoprotein Oxidoreductases Based on One NAD and Two FAD Fingerprints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, Gerrit; Engel, Henk; Vriend, Gert; Terpstra, Peter; Witholt, Bernard

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation of alkanes to alkanols by Pseudomonas oleovorans involves a three-component enzyme system: alkane hydroxylase, rubredoxin and rubredoxin reductase. Alkane hydroxylase and rubredoxin are encoded by the alkBPGHJKL operon, while previous studies indicated that rubredoxin reductase is most

  11. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and “Ene” Reduction in Short‐Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M.; Toogood, Helen S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (−)‐menthone:(−)‐menthol reductase and (−)‐menthone:(+)‐neomenthol reductase, and the “ene” reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue‐swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β‐unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  12. A major facilitator superfamily transporter plays a dual role in polar auxin transport and drought stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Estelle; Cabrito, Tânia R; Baster, Pawel; Batista, Rita A; Teixeira, Miguel C; Friml, Jiri; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Duque, Paula

    2013-03-01

    Many key aspects of plant development are regulated by the polarized transport of the phytohormone auxin. Cellular auxin efflux, the rate-limiting step in this process, has been shown to rely on the coordinated action of PIN-formed (PIN) and B-type ATP binding cassette (ABCB) carriers. Here, we report that polar auxin transport in the Arabidopsis thaliana root also requires the action of a Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) transporter, Zinc-Induced Facilitator-Like 1 (ZIFL1). Sequencing, promoter-reporter, and fluorescent protein fusion experiments indicate that the full-length ZIFL1.1 protein and a truncated splice isoform, ZIFL1.3, localize to the tonoplast of root cells and the plasma membrane of leaf stomatal guard cells, respectively. Using reverse genetics, we show that the ZIFL1.1 transporter regulates various root auxin-related processes, while the ZIFL1.3 isoform mediates drought tolerance by regulating stomatal closure. Auxin transport and immunolocalization assays demonstrate that ZIFL1.1 indirectly modulates cellular auxin efflux during shootward auxin transport at the root tip, likely by regulating plasma membrane PIN2 abundance. Finally, heterologous expression in yeast revealed that ZIFL1.1 and ZIFL1.3 share H(+)-coupled K(+) transport activity. Thus, by determining the subcellular and tissue distribution of two isoforms, alternative splicing dictates a dual function for the ZIFL1 transporter. We propose that this MFS carrier regulates stomatal movements and polar auxin transport by modulating potassium and proton fluxes in Arabidopsis cells.

  13. Genome-wide analysis of the AP2/ERF superfamily genes and their responses to abiotic stress in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun eShu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1–123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants.

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of the AP2/ERF Superfamily Genes and their Responses to Abiotic Stress in Medicago truncatula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Yongjun; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Jun; Song, Lili; Guo, Changhong

    2016-01-01

    The AP2/ERF superfamily is a large, plant-specific transcription factor family that is involved in many important processes, including plant growth, development, and stress responses. Using Medicago truncatula genome information, we identified and characterized 123 putative AP2/ERF genes, which were named as MtERF1–123. These genes were classified into four families based on phylogenetic analysis, which is consistent with the results of other plant species. MtERF genes are distributed throughout all chromosomes but are clustered on various chromosomes due to genomic tandem and segmental duplication. Using transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing data, and qRT-PCR analysis, we assessed the expression patterns of the MtERF genes in tissues during development and under abiotic stresses. In total, 87 MtERF genes were expressed in plant tissues, most of which were expressed in specific tissues during development or under specific abiotic stress treatments. These results support the notion that MtERF genes are involved in developmental regulation and environmental responses in M. truncatula. Furthermore, a cluster of DREB subfamily members on chromosome 6 was induced by both cold and freezing stress, representing a positive gene regulatory response under low temperature stress, which suggests that these genes might contribute to freezing tolerance to M. truncatula. In summary, our genome-wide characterization, evolutionary analysis, and expression pattern analysis of MtERF genes in M. truncatula provides valuable information for characterizing the molecular functions of these genes and utilizing them to improve stress tolerance in plants. PMID:26834762

  15. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Rongrong; Li, Jun; Singer, Stacy D; Zhang, Yucheng; Yin, Xiangjing; Zheng, Yi; Fan, Chonghui; Wang, Xiping

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) represent a protein superfamily encoding NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes that oxidize a wide range of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes and play a role in the response to environmental stress. In this study, a total of 39 ALDH genes from ten families were identified in the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) genome. Synteny analysis of the apple ALDH (MdALDH) genes indicated that segmental and tandem duplications, as well as whole genome duplications, have likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of these gene families in apple. Moreover, synteny analysis between apple and Arabidopsis demonstrated that several MdALDH genes were found in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes appeared before the divergence of lineages that led to apple and Arabidopsis. In addition, phylogenetic analysis, as well as comparisons of exon-intron and protein structures, provided further insight into both their evolutionary relationships and their putative functions. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the MdALDH genes demonstrated diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns, while their expression profiles under abiotic stress and various hormone treatments indicated that many MdALDH genes were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as different plant hormones. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles, of the apple MdALDH genes will not only be useful for the further analysis of ALDH genes and their roles in stress response, but may also aid in the future improvement of apple stress tolerance.

  16. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C; Lee, Alison P; Hoffmann, Federico G; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F

    2015-07-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  17. Expression of the immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules in the developing spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zirong; Imai, Fumiyasu; Kim, In Jung; Fujita, Hiroko; Katayama, Kei ichi; Mori, Kensaku; Yoshihara, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control synaptic specificity through hetero- or homophilic interactions in different regions of the nervous system. In the developing spinal cord, monosynaptic connections of exquisite specificity form between proprioceptive sensory neurons and motor neurons, however, it is not known whether IgSF molecules participate in regulating this process. To determine whether IgSF molecules influence the establishment of synaptic specificity in sensory-motor circuits, we examined the expression of 157 IgSF genes in the developing dorsal root ganglion (DRG) and spinal cord by in situ hybridization assays. We find that many IgSF genes are expressed by sensory and motor neurons in the mouse developing DRG and spinal cord. For instance, Alcam, Mcam, and Ocam are expressed by a subset of motor neurons in the ventral spinal cord. Further analyses show that Ocam is expressed by obturator but not quadriceps motor neurons, suggesting that Ocam may regulate sensory-motor specificity in these sensory-motor reflex arcs. Electrophysiological analysis shows no obvious defects in synaptic specificity of monosynaptic sensory-motor connections involving obturator and quadriceps motor neurons in Ocam mutant mice. Since a subset of Ocam+ motor neurons also express Alcam, Alcam or other functionally redundant IgSF molecules may compensate for Ocam in controlling sensory-motor specificity. Taken together, these results reveal that IgSF molecules are broadly expressed by sensory and motor neurons during development, and that Ocam and other IgSF molecules may have redundant functions in controlling the specificity of sensory-motor circuits.

  18. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of the CDPK-SnRK Superfamily Genes in Chinese Cabbage and Its Evolutionary Implications in Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Wang, Wenli; Duan, Weike; Li, Ying; Hou, Xilin

    2017-01-01

    The CDPK-SnRK (calcium-dependent protein kinase/Snf1-related protein kinase) gene superfamily plays important roles in signaling pathways for disease resistance and various stress responses, as indicated by emerging evidence. In this study, we constructed comparative analyses of gene structure, retention, expansion, whole-genome duplication (WGD) and expression patterns of CDPK-SnRK genes in Brassica rapa and their evolution in plants. A total of 49 BrCPKs, 14 BrCRKs, 3 BrPPCKs, 5 BrPEPRKs, and 56 BrSnRKs were identified in B. rapa. All BrCDPK-SnRK proteins had highly conserved kinase domains. By statistical analysis of the number of CDPK-SnRK genes in each species, we found that the expansion of the CDPK-SnRK gene family started from angiosperms. Segmental duplication played a predominant role in CDPK-SnRK gene expansion. The analysis showed that PEPRK was more preferentially retained than other subfamilies and that CPK was retained similarly to SnRK. Among the CPKs and SnRKs, CPKIII and SnRK1 genes were more preferentially retained than other groups. CRK was closest to CPK, which may share a common evolutionary origin. In addition, we identified 196 CPK genes and 252 SnRK genes in 6 species, and their different expansion and evolution types were discovered. Furthermore, the expression of BrCDPK-SnRK genes is dynamic in different tissues as well as in response to abiotic stresses, demonstrating their important roles in development in B. rapa. In summary, this study provides genome-wide insight into the evolutionary history and mechanisms of CDPK-SnRK genes following whole-genome triplication in B. rapa.

  20. Mammalian antimicrobial proteins and peptides: overview on the RNase A superfamily members involved in innate host defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Ester; Nogués, M Victòria

    2007-05-01

    The review starts with a general outlook of the main mechanisms of action of antimicrobial proteins and peptides, with the final aim of understanding the biological function of antimicrobial RNases, and identifying the key events that account for their selective properties. Although most antibacterial proteins and peptides do display a wide-range spectrum of action, with a cytotoxic activity against bacteria, fungi, eukaryotic parasites and viruses, we have only focused on their bactericidal activity. We start with a detailed description of the main distinctive structural features of the bacteria target and on the polypeptides, which act as selective host defence weapons.Following, we include an overview of all the current available information on the mammalian RNases which display an antimicrobial activity. There is a wealth of information on the structural, catalytic mechanism and evolutionary relationships of the RNase A superfamily. The bovine pancreatic RNase A (RNase A), the reference member of the mammalian RNase family, has been the main research object of several Nobel laureates in the 60s, 70s and 80s. A potential antimicrobial function was only recently suggested for several members of this family. In fact, the recent evolutionary studies indicate that this protein family may have started off with a host defence function. Antimicrobial RNases constitute an interesting example of proteins involved in the mammalian innate immune defence system. Besides, there is wealth of available information on the mechanism of action of short antimicrobial peptides, but little is known on larger polypeptides, that is, on proteins. Therefore, the identification of the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial RNases would contribute to the understanding of the proteins involved in the innate immunity.

  1. Part of respiratory nitrate reductase of Klebsiella aerogenes is intimately associated with the peptidoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, P R; Wientjes, F B; Nanninga, N; Van't Riet, J

    1987-02-01

    Lysozyme digestion and sonication of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-purified Klebsiella aerogenes murein sacculi resulted in the quantitative release of both subunits of nitrate reductase, as well as a number of other cytoplasmic membrane polypeptides (5.2%, by weight, of the total membrane proteins). Similar results were obtained after lysozyme digestion of SDS-prepared peptidoglycan fragments, which excluded the phenomenon of simple trapping of the polypeptides by the surrounding peptidoglycan matrix. About 28% of membrane-bound nitrate reductase appears to be tightly associated with the peptidoglycan. Additional evidence for this association was demonstrated by positive immunogold labeling of SDS-murein sacculi and thin sections of plasmolyzed bacteria. Qualitative amino acid analysis of trypsin-treated sacculi, a tryptic product of holo-nitrate reductase, and amino- and carboxypeptidase digests of both nitrate reductase subunits indicated the possible existence of a terminal anchoring peptide containing the following amino acids: (Gly)n, Trp, Ser, Pro, Ile, Leu, Phe, Cys, Tyr, Asp, and Lys.

  2. Sensing nitrite through a pseudoazurin-nitrite reductase electron transfer relay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Astier, Y; Canters, GW; Davis, JJ; Hill, HAO; Verbeet, MP; Wijma, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Nitrite is converted to nitric oxide by haem or copper-containing enzymes in denitrifying bacteria during the process of denitrification. In designing an efficient biosensor, this enzymic turnover must be quantitatively assessed. The enzyme nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis contains a redo

  3. Structural and docking studies of Leucaena leucocephala Cinnamoyl CoA reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Nirmal K; Vindal, Vaibhav; Kumar, Vikash; Kabra, Ashish; Phogat, Navneet; Kumar, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    Lignin, a major constituent of plant call wall, is a phenolic heteropolymer. It plays a major role in the development of plants and their defense mechanism against pathogens. Therefore Lignin biosynthesis is one of the critical metabolic pathways. In lignin biosynthesis, the Cinnamoyl CoA reductase is a key enzyme which catalyzes the first step in the pathway. Cinnamoyl CoA reductase provides the substrates which represent the main transitional molecules of lignin biosynthesis pathway, exhibits a high in vitro kinetic preference for feruloyl CoA. In present study, the three-dimensional model of cinnamoyl CoA reductase was constructed based on the crystal structure of Grape Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase. Furthermore, the docking studies were performed to understand the substrate interactions to the active site of CCR. It showed that residues ARG51, ASN52, ASP54 and ASN58 were involved in substrate binding. We also suggest that residue ARG51 in CCR is the determinant residue in competitive inhibition of other substrates. This structural and docking information have prospective implications to understand the mechanism of CCR enzymatic reaction with feruloyl CoA, however the approach will be applicable in prediction of substrates and engineering 3D structures of other enzymes as well.

  4. In silico docking studies of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of commercially available flavonoids

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    Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the aldose reductase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like biochanin, butein, esculatin, fisetin and herbacetin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -9.33 kcal/mol to -7.23 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-8.73 kcal/mol. Inhibition constant (144.13 µM to 4.98 µM and intermolecular energy (-11.42 kcal/mol to -7.83 kcal/mol of the flavonoids also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural properties. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  5. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  6. Phellinstatin, a new inhibitor of enoyl-ACP reductase produced by the medicinal fungus Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jun-Young; Kwon, Yun-Ju; Sohn, Mi-Jin; Seok, Soon-Ja; Kim, Won-Gon

    2011-03-15

    A new trimeric hispidin derivative, phellinstatin, was isolated from a culture broth of the medicinal fungus Phellinus linteus and its structure was established by various spectral analysis. Phellinstatin strongly inhibited Staphylococcus aureus enoyl-ACP reductase with an IC(50) of 6 μM and also showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and MRSA.

  7. Cloning, expression and antigenicity of the L. donovani reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Kemp, K; Theander, T G

    2001-01-01

    (K). Only 2 of 22 plasma samples from patients with visceral leishmaniasis were found to have detectable anti-reductase antibodies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from one of three individuals previously infected with visceral leishmaniasis proliferated in the presence of recombinant...

  8. Electrochemical Single‐Molecule AFM of the Redox Metalloenzyme Copper Nitrite Reductase in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hao, Xian; Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager;

    2012-01-01

    We studied the electrochemical behavior of the redox metalloenzyme copper nitrite reductase (CNiR, Achromobacter xylosoxidans) immobilized on a Au(111)‐electrode surface modified by a self‐assembled cysteamine molecular monolayer (SAM) using a combination of cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical...

  9. Aldose reductase induced by hyperosmotic stress mediates cardiomyocyte apoptosis: differential effects of sorbitol and mannitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez, Anita S; Ulloa, Juan Alberto; Chiong, Mario; Criollo, Alfredo; Eisner, Verónica; Barros, Luis Felipe; Lavandero, Sergio

    2003-10-03

    Cells adapt to hyperosmotic conditions by several mechanisms, including accumulation of sorbitol via induction of the polyol pathway. Failure to adapt to osmotic stress can result in apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we assessed the role of aldose reductase, the key enzyme of the polyol pathway, in cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmotic stress, elicited by exposure of cultured rat cardiac myocytes to the nonpermeant solutes sorbitol and mannitol, caused identical cell shrinkage and adaptive hexose uptake stimulation. In contrast, only sorbitol induced the polyol pathway and triggered stress pathways as well as apoptosis-related signaling events. Sorbitol resulted in activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p54 c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and protein kinase B. Furthermore, sorbitol treatment resulting in induction and activation of aldose reductase, decreased expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xL, increased DNA fragmentation, and glutathione depletion. Apoptosis was attenuated by aldose reductase inhibition with zopolrestat and also by glutathione replenishment with N-acetylcysteine. In conclusion, our data show that hypertonic shrinkage of cardiac myocytes alone is not sufficient to induce cardiac myocyte apoptosis. Hyperosmolarity-induced cell death is sensitive to the nature of the osmolyte and requires induction of aldose reductase as well as a decrease in intracellular glutathione levels.

  10. Proximal hypospadias in a male patient with 5α-reductase deficiency: A case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Basuguy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypospadias is a congenital disorder of male external genital. The newborn showed penoscrotal hypospadias with chordee and microphallus. Endocrine data and a normal male karyotype were suggestive of 5α-reductase deficiency. Penoscrotalhypospadias repair of the patient was made.

  11. 5 Alpha-reductase inhibitory and antiandrogenic activities of novel steroids in hamster seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Marisa; Bratoeff, Eugene; Flores, Eugenio; Ramírez, Elena; Calleros, Jorge; Montes, Diana; Quiroz, Alexandra; Heuze, Ivonne

    2002-11-01

    The pharmacological activity of several 16-bromosubstituted trienediones 4 and 5, 16-methyl substituted dienediones 6 and 7 and the 16-methyl substituted trienedione 8 was determined on gonadectomized hamster seminal vesicles by measuring the in vitro conversion of testosterone (T) to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) as 5alpha-reductase inhibitors and also the ability of these steroids to bind to the androgen receptor. Steroids 6 and 7 when injected together with T decreased the weight of the seminal vesicles thus showing an antiandrogenic effect. Compounds 5 and 6 reduced substantially the conversion of T to DHT and therefore can be considered good inhibitors for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase; however both steroids failed to form a complex with the androgen receptor. On the other hand compound 7 which showed a very small inhibitory activity for the enzyme 5alpha-reductase, exhibited a very high affinity for the androgen receptor and thus can be considered an effective antiandrogen. This compound also reduced substantially the weight of the seminal vesicles. Steroids 4 and 8 did not reduce the weight of the seminal vesicles and exhibited a low affinity for the androgen receptor; 8 showed a weak 5alpha-reductase inhibitory activity, whereas 4 exhibited a weak androgenic effect.

  12. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  13. pH dependence of copper geometry, reduction potential, and nitrite affinity in nitrite reductase.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobson, F.; Pistorius, A.M.A.; Farkas, D.; Grip, W.J. de; Hansson, O.; Sjolin, L.; Neutze, R.

    2007-01-01

    Many properties of copper-containing nitrite reductase are pH-dependent, such as gene expression, enzyme activity, and substrate affinity. Here we use x-ray diffraction to investigate the structural basis for the pH dependence of activity and nitrite affinity by examining the type 2 copper site and

  14. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea;

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower propo...

  15. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of menthone reductases from peppermint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Edward M; Ringer, Kerry L; McConkey, Marie E; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    (-)-Menthone is the predominant monoterpene produced in the essential oil of maturing peppermint (Mentha x piperita) leaves during the filling of epidermal oil glands. This early biosynthetic process is followed by a second, later oil maturation program (approximately coincident with flower initiation) in which the C3-carbonyl of menthone is reduced to yield (-)-(3R)-menthol and (+)-(3S)-neomenthol by two distinct NADPH-dependent ketoreductases. An activity-based in situ screen, by expression in Escherichia coli of 23 putative redox enzymes from an immature peppermint oil gland expressed sequence tag library, was used to isolate a cDNA encoding the latter menthone:(+)-(3S)-neomenthol reductase. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the former menthone:(-)-(3R)-menthol reductase directly from mRNA isolated from the oil gland secretory cells of mature leaves. The deduced amino acid sequences of these two reductases share 73% identity, provide no apparent subcellular targeting information, and predict inclusion in the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase family of enzymes. The menthone:(+)-(3S)-neomenthol reductase cDNA encodes a 35,722-D protein, and the recombinant enzyme yields 94% (+)-(3S)-neomenthol and 6% (-)-(3R)-menthol from (-)-menthone as substrate, and 86% (+)-(3S)-isomenthol and 14% (+)-(3R)-neoisomenthol from (+)-isomenthone as substrate, has a pH optimum of 9.3, and K(m) values of 674 mum, > 1 mm, and 10 mum for menthone, isomenthone, and NADPH, respectively, with a k(cat) of 0.06 s(-1). The recombinant menthone:(-)-(3R)-menthol reductase has a deduced size of 34,070 D and converts (-)-menthone to 95% (-)-(3R)-menthol and 5% (+)-(3S)-neomenthol, and (+)-isomenthone to 87% (+)-(3R)-neoisomenthol and 13% (+)-(3S)-isomenthol, displays optimum activity at neutral pH, and has K(m) values of 3.0 mum, 41 mum, and 0.12 mum for menthone, isomenthone, and NADPH, respectively, with a k(cat) of 0.6 s(-1). The respective activities of

  16. Biliverdin Reductase-A correlates with inducible nitric oxide synthasein in atorvastatin treated aged canine brain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fabio Di Domenico; Marzia Perluigi; Eugenio Barone

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive impairment and neuropathology. Recent preclinical and epidemiological studies proposed statins as a possible therapeutic drug for Alzheimer’s disease, but the exact mechanisms of action are stil unknown. Biliverdin reductase-A is a pleiotropic enzyme involved in cel ular stress responses. It not only transforms biliverdin-IX alpha into the antioxidant bilirubin-IX alpha but its serine/threonine/tyrosine kinase activity is able to modulate cel signaling networks. We previously reported the beneficial effects of atorvastatin treatment on biliverdin reductase-A and heme oxygenase-1 in the brains of a well characterized pre-clinical model of Alzheimer’s disease, aged beagles, together with observed improvement in cognition. Here we extend our knowledge of the effects of atorvastatin on inducible nitric oxide synthase in parietal cortex, cerebel um and liver of the same animals. We demonstrated that atorvastatin treatment (80 mg/day for 14.5 months) to aged beagles selectively increased inducible nitric oxide synthase in the parietal cortex but not in the cerebel um. In contrast, inducible nitric oxide synthase protein levels were significantly decreased in the liver. Significant positive correlations were found between biliverdin reductase-A and inducible nitric oxide synthase as wel as heme oxygenase-1 protein levels in the parietal cortex. The opposite was observed in the liver. Inducible nitric oxide synthase up-regulation in the parietal cortex was positively associated with improved biliverdin reductase-A functions, whereas the oxidative-induced impairment of biliverdin reductase-A in the liver negatively affected inducible nitric oxide synthase expression, thus suggesting a role for biliverdin reductase-A in atorvastatin-dependent inducible nitric oxide synthase changes. Interestingly, increased inducible nitric oxide synthase levels in the parietal cortex were not

  17. Sequence diversity and enzyme activity of ferric-chelate reductase LeFRO1 in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Danyu; Chen, Chunlin; Wu, Huilan; Li, Ye; Li, Junming; Ling, Hong-Qing

    2013-11-20

    Ferric-chelate reductase which functions in the reduction of ferric to ferrous iron on root surface is a critical protein for iron homeostasis in strategy I plants. LeFRO1 is a major ferric-chelate reductase involved in iron uptake in tomato. To identify the natural variations of LeFRO1 and to assess their effect on the ferric-chelate reductase activity, we cloned the coding sequences of LeFRO1 from 16 tomato varieties collected from different regions, and detected three types of LeFRO1 (LeFRO1(MM), LeFRO1(Ailsa) and LeFRO1(Monita)) with five amino acid variations at the positions 21, 24, 112, 195 and 582. Enzyme activity assay revealed that the three types of LeFRO1 possessed different ferric-chelate reductase activity (LeFRO1(Ailsa) > LeFRO1(MM) > LeFRO1(Monita)). The 112th amino acid residue Ala of LeFRO1 is critical for maintaining the high activity of ferric-chelate reductase, because modification of this amino acid resulted in a significant reduction of enzyme activity. Further, we showed that the combination of the amino acid residue Ile at the site 24 with Lys at the site 582 played a positive role in the enzyme activity of LeFRO1. In conclusion, the findings are helpful to understand the natural adaptation mechanisms of plants to iron-limiting stress, and may provide new knowledge to select and manipulate LeFRO1 for improving the iron deficiency tolerance in tomato.

  18. Protein method for investigating mercuric reductase gene expression in aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-02-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21 (Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through NADPH oxidation. Residual NADPH was determined by titration with phenazine methosulfate-catalyzed reduction of methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium to produce visible formazan. Spectrophotometric determination of formazan concentration showed a positive correlation with the amount of NADPH remaining in the reaction mixture (r2 = 0.99). Mercuric reductase activity in the protein extracts was inversely related to the amount of NADPH remaining and to the amount of formazan produced. A qualitative nitrocellulose membrane-based version of the method was also developed, where regions of mercuric reductase activity remained colorless against a stained-membrane background. The assay detected induced mercuric reductase activity from 10(2) CFU, and up to threefold signal intensity was detected in seeded freshwater samples amended with mercury compared to that in mercury-free samples. The efficiency of extraction of bacterial proteins from the freshwater samples was (97 +/- 2)% over the range of population densities investigated (10(2) to 10(8) CFU/ml). The method was validated by detection of enzyme activity in protein extracts of water samples from a polluted site harboring naturally occurring mercury-resistant bacteria. The new method is proposed as a supplement to the repertoire of molecular techniques available for assessing specific gene expression in heterogeneous microbial communities impacted by mercury pollution.

  19. Annotating Enzymes of Uncertain Function: The Deacylation of d-Amino Acids by Members of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, J.; Fedorov, A; Xu, C; Brown, S; Fedorov, E; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.2 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.4 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.2 x 104 M{sup -1} s-1), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (kcat/Km = 4.1 x 104 M-1 s-1), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (kcat/Km = 1.5 x 104 M-1 s-1). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the {alpha}-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional {approx}250

  20. Evolutionary relationship between 5+5 and 7+7 inverted repeat folds within the amino acid-polyamine-organocation superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Västermark, Åke; Saier, Milton H

    2014-02-01

    Evidence has been presented that 5+5 TMS and 7+7 TMS inverted repeat fold transporters are members of a single superfamily named the Amino acid-Polyamine-organoCation (APC) superfamily. However, the evolutionary relationship between the 5+5 and the 7+7 topological types has not been established. We have identified a common fold, consisting of a spiny membrane helix/sheet, followed by a U-like structure and a V-like structure that is recurrent between domain duplicated units of 5+5 and 7+7 inverted repeat folds. This fold is found in the following protein structures: AdiC, ApcT, LeuT, Mhp1, BetP, CaiT, and SglT (all 5+5 TMS repeats), as well as UraA and SulP (7+7 TMS repeats). AdiC, LeuT and Mhp1 have two extra TMSs after the second duplicated domain, SglT has four extra C-terminal TMSs, and BetP has two extra TMSs before the first duplicated domain. UraA and SulP on the other hand have two extra TMSs at the N-terminus of each duplicated domain unit. These observations imply that multiple hairpin and domain duplication events occurred during the evolution of the APC superfamily. We suggest that the five TMS architecture was primordial and that families gained two TMSs on either side of this basic structure via dissimilar hairpin duplications either before or after intragenic duplication. Evidence for homology between TMSs 1-2 of AdiC and TMSs 1-2 and 3-4 of UraA suggests that the 7+7 topology arose via an internal duplication of the N-terminal hairpin loop within the five TMS repeat unit followed by duplication of the 7 TMS domain.

  1. 拟南芥B3转录因子基因超家族%Research progress of Arabidopsis B3 transcription factor gene superfamily

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗光宇; 叶玲飞; 陈信波

    2013-01-01

    B3类转录因子基因组成了植物所特有的B3基因超家族,按照其结构和功能的特征可将其进一步分为LAV(LEAFY COTYLEDON2 [LEC2]-ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 [ABI3]-VAL)、RF(AUXINRESPONSE FACTOR)、RAV(RELATED TO ABI3 and VPl)和REM(REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM)等4个家族.B3基因超家族主要存在于裸子植物、苔藓和绿藻类植物中,并在植物逆境胁迫响应和生长发育过程中起着极其重要的作用.目前已在拟南芥中发现了118个B3类转录因子,本文综述了拟南芥中B3转录因子基因超家族的系统发育和功能鉴定方面的研究进展.%The B3 transcription factor genes form a plant-specific B3 gene superfamily and can be further classified into four families:LAV (LEAFY COTYLEDON2 [LEC2]-ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 [ABI3]-VAL),ARF (AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR),RAV (RELATED TO ABI3 and VP1) and REM (REPRODUCTIVE MERISTEM) family.The B3 transcription factor genes exist mainly in gymnosperms,mosses and green algae and play extremely important roles in plant stress responses and plant growth and development.In Arabidopsis,118 B3 superfamily transcription factor genes have been identified.This review aims to overview the research progress of the phylogenetical and functional characterization of the B3 gene superfamily in Arabidopsis.

  2. A glutathione-independent glyoxalase of the DJ-1 superfamily plays an important role in managing metabolically generated methylglyoxal in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasim, Sahar; Hussin, Nur Ahmad; Alomar, Fadhel; Bidasee, Keshore R; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Wilson, Mark A

    2014-01-17

    Methylglyoxal is a cytotoxic reactive carbonyl compound produced by central metabolism. Dedicated glyoxalases convert methylglyoxal to d-lactate using multiple catalytic strategies. In this study, the DJ-1 superfamily member ORF 19.251/GLX3 from Candida albicans is shown to possess glyoxalase activity, making this the first demonstrated glutathione-independent glyoxalase in fungi. The crystal structure of Glx3p indicates that the protein is a monomer containing the catalytic triad Cys(136)-His(137)-Glu(168). Purified Glx3p has an in vitro methylglyoxalase activity (Km = 5.5 mM and kcat = 7.8 s(-1)) that is significantly greater than that of more distantly related members of the DJ-1 superfamily. A close Glx3p homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (YDR533C/Hsp31) also has glyoxalase activity, suggesting that fungal members of the Hsp31 clade of the DJ-1 superfamily are all probable glutathione-independent glyoxalases. A homozygous glx3 null mutant in C. albicans strain SC5314 displays greater sensitivity to millimolar levels of exogenous methylglyoxal, elevated levels of intracellular methylglyoxal, and carbon source-dependent growth defects, especially when grown on glycerol. These phenotypic defects are complemented by restoration of the wild-type GLX3 locus. The growth defect of Glx3-deficient cells in glycerol is also partially complemented by added inorganic phosphate, which is not observed for wild-type or glucose-grown cells. Therefore, C. albicans Glx3 and its fungal homologs are physiologically relevant glutathione-independent glyoxalases that are not redundant with the previously characterized glutathione-dependent GLO1/GLO2 system. In addition to its role in detoxifying glyoxals, Glx3 and its close homologs may have other important roles in stress response.

  3. Crystal structure of a crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) precursor suggests structural variety in the C-terminal regions of CHH superfamily members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Naoaki; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Arisaka, Fumio; Tanokura, Masaru; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Nagata, Koji

    2016-12-01

    The crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) is one of the major hormones in crustaceans, and peptides belonging to the CHH superfamily have been found in diverse ecdysozoans. Although the basic function of CHH is to control energy metabolism, it also plays various roles in crustacean species, such as in molting and vitellogenesis. Here, we present the crystal structure of Pej-SGP-I-Gly, a partially active precursor of CHH from the kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, which has an additional Gly residue in place of the C-terminal amide group of the mature Pej-SGP-I. The 1.6-angstrom crystal structure showed not only the common CHH superfamily scaffold comprising three α-helices, three disulfide bridges, and a hydrophobic core but also revealed that the C-terminal part has a variant backbone fold that is specific to Pej-SGP-I-Gly. The α-helix 4 of Pej-SGP-I-Gly was much longer than that of molt-inhibiting hormone (Pej-MIH) from the same species, and as a result, the following C-terminal helix, corresponding to α-helix 5 in MIH, was not formed. Unlike monomeric Pej-MIH, Pej-SGP-I-Gly forms a homodimer in the crystal structure via its unique α-helix 4. The unexpected dissimilar folds between Pej-SGP-I-Gly and Pej-MIH appear to be the result of their distinct C-terminal amino acid sequences. Variations in amino acid sequences and lengths and the resulting variety of backbone folds allow the C-terminal and sterically adjoining regions to confer different hormonal activities in diverse CHH superfamily members.

  4. At the Perphery of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily: Bh0493 from Bacillus halodurans Catalyzes the Isomerization of D-Galacturonate to D-Tagaturonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen,T.; Brown, S.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2008-01-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily is a functionally diverse set of enzymes that catalyzes predominantly hydrolysis reactions involving sugars, nucleic acids, amino acids, and organophosphate esters. One of the most divergent members of this superfamily, uronate isomerase from Escherichia coli, catalyzes the isomerization of d-glucuronate to d-fructuronate and d-galacturonate to d-tagaturonate and is the only uronate isomerase in this organism. A gene encoding a putative uronate isomerase in Bacillus halodurans (Bh0705) was identified based on sequence similarity to uronate isomerases from other organisms. Kinetic evidence indicates that Bh0705 is relatively specific for the isomerization of d-glucuronate to d-fructuronate, confirming this functional assignment. Despite a low sequence identity to all other characterized uronate isomerases, phylogenetic and network-based analysis suggests that a second gene in this organism, Bh0493, is also a uronate isomerase, although it is an outlier in the group, with <20% sequence identity to any other characterized uronate isomerase from another species. The elucidation of the X-ray structure at a resolution of 2.0 Angstroms confirms that Bh0493 is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily with conserved residues common to other members of the uronate isomerase family. Functional characterization of this protein shows that unlike Bh0705, Bh0493 can utilize both d-glucuronate and d-galacturonate as substrates. In B. halodurans, Bh0705 is found in an operon for the metabolism of d-glucuronate, whereas Bh0493 is in an operon for the metabolism of d-galacturonate. These results provide the first identification of a uronate isomerase that operates in a pathway distinct from that for d-glucuronate. While most organisms that contain this pathway have only one gene for a uronate isomerase, sequence analysis and operon context show that five other organisms also appear to have two genes and one organism appears to have three genes for

  5. Glutathione Reductase of Vacuole. Comparison of Glutathione Reductase Activity of Vacuole and Tissue Extract of Red Beet Root (Beta vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Pradedova

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione reductase (GR, EC 1.8.1.7 is the enzyme that reduces oxidized glutathione (GSSG and thus regulates the redox state of glutathione (GSH/GSSG. GR has been studied in most plants. This enzyme has been identified in chloroplasts and cytosol, so these cellular compartments are considered to be the main place of the enzyme localization. In the same time, just a little is known about GR vacuoles. There are no conclusive evidences to prove the presence or absence of this enzyme in the vacuoles. GR activity was found in the vacuoles of red beet root cells (Beta vulgaris L.. The level of activity, the optimum pH and isoenzyme composition of GR were compared in the vacuoles and tissue extract of beet root. Vacuolar GR activity was quite high, it was 1.5-2 times higher than the activity of the tissue extract. Enzyme pH optimum of all the objects were identical. pH-optimum depend on the pyridine nucleotide nature: pH 7.0-8.0 was an optimal range with NADPH; pH 5.0 – with NADH. GR activity of the vacuoles and tissue extracts decreased in the presence of a noncompetitive inhibitor 1-chloro-2.4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB, indicating the specificity of this enzymatic reaction. Two bands with glutathione reductase activity have been identified in the vacuoles and tissue extracts using zymography method to determine the enzymatic activity in PAAG after electrophoresis of proteins. Belonging to the GR isoforms of these bands was confirmed by enzyme immunoassay (Western blotting. The electric mobility of isoforms of the study objects did not differ significantly. It is concluded that the biochemical characteristics of vacuolar glutathione reductase were substantially identical to the biochemical characteristics of other localization GR.

  6. Positive pleiotropic effects of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor on vitiligo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobin Jean

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins are commonly used in medicine to control blood lipid disorder. Large clinical trials have demonstrated that statins greatly reduces cardiovascular-related morbidity and mortality in patients with and without coronary artery disease. Also, the use of HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors has been reported to have immunosuppressive effects. Case presentation We describe an unusual case of regression of vitiligo in a patient treated with high dose simvastatin. The relation between simvastatin and regression of vitiligo in this case report may be related to the autoimmune pathophysiology of the disease. Conclusion This unexpected beneficial impact provides another scientific credence to the hypothesis that immune mechanisms play a role in the development of vitiligo and that the use of statins as immuno-modulator could be of use not only for treatment relative to organ transplant but in other pathologies such as vitiligo.

  7. Induction of quinone reductase (QR) by withanolides isolated from Physalis pubescens L. (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Long; Yuan, Yonglei; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe; Gan, Lishe; Ma, Xiaoqiong; Huang, Dongsheng

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, it was demonstrated that the dichloromethane extract of Physalis pubescens L. (DEPP) had weak potential quinone reductase (QR) inducing activity, but an UPLC-ESI-MS method with glutathione (GSH) as the substrate revealed that the DEPP had electrophiles (with an α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety). These electrophiles could induce quinone reductase (QR) activity, which might be attributed to the modification of the highly reactive cysteine residues in Keap1. Herein, four withanolides, including three new compounds physapubescin B (2), physapubescin C (3), physapubescin D (4), together with one known steroidal compound physapubescin (1) were isolated. Structures of these compounds were determined by spectroscopic analysis and that of physapubescin C (3) was confirmed by a combination of molecular modeling and quantum chemical DFT-GIAO calculations. Evaluation of the QR inducing activities of all withanolides indicated potent activities of compounds 1 and 2, which had a common α,β-unsaturated ketone moiety.

  8. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    reductase, obtaining K(m) values for the overall reaction of 40.3+/-5.8 microM for (R,S)-HMG-CoA and 81.4+/-5.3 microM for NADPH; V(max) was 33.55+/-1.8 units x mg(-1). Gel-filtration experiments suggested an apparent molecular mass of 184 kDa with subunits of 46 kDa. Finally, in order to achieve a better...... Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan...

  9. Expression Analysis of Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase Genes Involved in Anthocyanin Biosynthesis in Purple Grains of Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mao-Sen LIU; Fang WANG; Yu-Xiu DONG; Xian-Sheng ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    The grain color of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is an important characteristic in crop production.Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes (DFR) encode the key enzyme dihydroflavonol 4-reductase, which is involved in the pigmentation of plant tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanism of anthocyanin deposition in grains of wheat, we determined the expression of the wheat DFR gene in purple grains of cultivar Heimai 76. The results showed that DFR transcripts were localized in the seed coat of purple grains rather than in the pericarp, whereas anthocyanins were accumulated in both tissues of purple grains,suggesting that anthocyanin deposition was mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Overexpression of the TaDFR-A gene in Arabidopsis showed that TaDFR-A was responsible for the pigmentation of Arabidopsis plant tissues, indicating TaDFR-A gene has the same role in Arabidopsis.

  10. Novel bacterial sulfur oxygenase reductases from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z-W; Liu, Y-Y; Wu, J-F;

    2007-01-01

    The microbial community and sulfur oxygenase reductases of metagenomic DNA from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates were studied by 16S rRNA library, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), conventional cultivation, and molecular cloning. Results indicated that major bacterial......) of bacteria and archaea were 4.59 x 10(9) and 6.68 x 10(5), respectively. Bacterial strains representing Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum, and Sulfobacillus were isolated from the bioreactors. To study sulfur oxidation in the reactors, pairs of new PCR primers were designed for the detection of sulfur...... oxygenase reductase (SOR) genes. Three sor-like genes, namely, sor (Fx), sor (SA), and sor (SB) were identified from metagenomic DNAs of the bioreactors. The sor (Fx) is an inactivated SOR gene and is identical to the pseudo-SOR gene of Ferroplasma acidarmanus. The sor (SA) and sor (SB) showed...

  11. Aldose reductases influence prostaglandin F2α levels and adipocyte differentiation in male mouse and human species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Emilie; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Loubeau, Gaëlle; Dani, Christian; Slim, Karem; Martin, Gwenaëlle; Volat, Fanny; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Val, Pierre; Martinez, Antoine; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie

    2015-05-01

    Aldose reductases (AKR1B) are widely expressed oxidoreductases whose physiological function remains elusive. Some isoforms are genuine prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) synthases, suggesting they might influence adipose homeostasis because PGF2α inhibits adipogenesis. This was shown by Akr1b7 gene ablation in the mouse, which resulted in increased adiposity related to a lower PGF2α content in fat. Yet humans have no ortholog gene for Akr1b7, so the role of aldose reductases in human adipose homeostasis remains to be explored. We analyzed expression of genes encoding human and mouse aldose reductase isoforms in adipose tissues and differentiating adipocytes to assess conserved mechanisms regulating PGF2α synthesis and adipogenesis. The Akr1b3 gene encoded the most abundant isoform in mouse adipose tissue, whereas Akr1b7 encoded the only isoform enriched in the stromal vascular fraction. Most mouse aldose reductase gene expression peaked in early adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and diminished with differentiation. In contrast with its mouse ortholog Akr1b3, AKR1B1 expression increased throughout differentiation of human multipotent adipose-derived stem cells, paralleling PGF2α release, whereas PGF2α receptor (FP) levels collapsed in early differentiation. Pharmacological inhibition of aldose reductase using Statil altered PGF2α production and enhanced human multipotent adipose-derived stem adipocyte differentiation. As expected, the adipogenic effects of Statil were counteracted by an FP agonist (cloprostenol). Thus, in both species aldose reductase-dependent PGF2α production could be important in early differentiation to restrict adipogenesis. PGF2α antiadipogenic signaling could then be toned down through the FP receptor or aldose reductases down-regulation in human and mouse cells, respectively. Our data suggest that aldose reductase inhibitors could have obesogenic potential.

  12. A conservative region of the mercuric reductase gene (mera) as a molecular marker of bacterial mercury resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotero-Martins, Adriana; de Jesus, Michele Silva; Lacerda, Michele; Moreira, Josino Costa; Filgueiras, Ana Luzia Lauria; Barrocas, Paulo Rubens Guimarães

    2008-01-01

    The most common bacterial mercury resistance mechanism is based on the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg0, which is dependent of the mercuric reductase enzyme (MerA) activity. The use of a 431 bp fragment of a conservative region of the mercuric reductase (merA) gene was applied as a molecular marker of this mechanism, allowing the identification of mercury resistant bacterial strains. PMID:24031221

  13. High dose androgen therapy in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5 alpha-reductase deficiency and disorders of the androgen receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Price, P; Wass, J. A.; Griffin, J E; Leshin, M; Savage, M O; Large, D. M.; Bu'Lock, D E; Anderson, D. C.; Wilson, J. D.; Besser, G M

    1984-01-01

    We describe the clinical and biochemical features of six men with male pseudohermaphroditism due to androgen resistance. Each of the subjects had male-gender behavior but incomplete virilization. The underlying defects in androgen metabolism were defined by studies of the 5 alpha-reductase enzyme and the androgen receptor in fibroblasts cultured from biopsies of genital skin. Four of the six have 5 alpha-reductase deficiency, and two have defects of the androgen receptor (the Reifenstein synd...

  14. Synthesis of 3-[(N-Carboalkoxy)ethylamino]-indazole-dione Derivatives and Their Biological Activities on Human Liver Carbonyl Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Berhe, Solomon; Slupe, Andrew; Luster, Choice; Charlier, Henry A.; Warner, Don L.; Zalkow, Leon H.; Burgess, Edward M.; Enwerem, Nkechi M.; Bakare, Oladapo

    2009-01-01

    A series of indazole-dione derivatives were synthesized by the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of appropriate substituted benzoquinones or naphthoquinones and N-carboalkoxyamino diazopropane derivatives. These compounds were evaluated for their effects on human carbonyl reductase. Several of the analogs were found to serve as substrates for carbonyl reductase with a wide range of catalytic efficiencies, while four analogs display inhibitory activities with IC50 values ranging from 3 – 5 μM...

  15. Nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase expression and activity in response to different nitrogen sources in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balotf, Sadegh; Kavoosi, Gholamreza; Kholdebarin, Bahman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the expression and activity of nitrate reductase (NR, EC 1.7.1.1), nitrite reductase (NiR, EC 1.7.2.2), glutamine synthetase (GS, EC 6.3.1.2), and glutamate synthase (GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) in response to potassium nitrate, ammonium chloride, and ammonium nitrate in nitrogen-starved wheat seedlings. Plants were grown in standard nutrient solution for 17 days and then subjected to nitrogen starvation for 7 days. The starved plants were supplied with potassium nitrate ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride (50 mM) for 4 days and the leaves were harvested. The relative expression of NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT as well as the enzyme activities were investigated. Nitrogen starvation caused a significant decrease both in transcript levels and in NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities. Potassium nitrate and ammonium nitrate treatments restored NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT expressions and activities. Ammonium chloride increased only the expressions and activities of GS and GOGAT in a dose-dependent manner. The results of our study highlight the differential effects between the type and the amount of nitrogen salts on NR, NiR, GS, and GOGAT activities in wheat seedlings while potassium nitrate being more effective.

  16. Gene expression of monodehydroascorbate reductase and dehydroascorbate reductase during fruit ripening and in response to environmental stresses in acerola (Malpighia glabra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltelib, Hani A; Badejo, Adebanjo A; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Esaka, Muneharu

    2011-04-15

    Acerola (Malpighia glabra) is an exotic fruit cultivated primarily for its abundant ascorbic acid (AsA) content. The molecular mechanisms that regulate the metabolism of AsA in acerola have yet to be defined. Monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR) are key enzymes of the ascorbate-glutathione cycle that maintain reduced pools of ascorbic acid and serve as important antioxidants. cDNAs encoding MDHAR and DHAR were isolated from acerola using RT-PCR and RACE. Phylogenetic trees associated acerola MDHAR and DHAR with other plant cytosolic MDHARs and DHARs. Expressions of the two genes correlated with their enzymatic activities and were differentially regulated during fruit ripening. Interestingly, MDHAR expression was only detected in overripe fruits, whereas the transcript level of DHAR was highest at the intermediate stage of fruit ripening. Under dark conditions, there was a sharp and significant decline in the total and reduced ascorbate contents, accompanied by a decrease in the level of transcripts and enzyme activities of the two genes in acerola leaves. MDHAR and DHAR transcripts and enzyme activities were significantly up-regulated in the leaves of acerola under cold and salt stress conditions, indicating that expression of both genes are transcriptionally regulated under these stresses.

  17. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Tea cDNA Encoding Dihydroflavonol 4-Reductase and Anthocyanidin Reductase Induces Early Flowering and Provides Biotic Stress Tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar

    Full Text Available Flavan-3-ols contribute significantly to flavonoid content of tea (Camellia sinensis L.. Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR and anthocyanidin reductase (ANR are known to be key regulatory enzymes of flavan-3-ols biosynthesis. In this study, we have generated the transgenic tobacco overexpressing individually tea cDNA CsDFR and CsANR encoding for DFR and ANR to evaluate their influence on developmental and protective abilities of plant against biotic stress. The transgenic lines of CsDFR and CsANR produced early flowering and better seed yield. Both types of transgenic tobacco showed higher content of flavonoids than control. Flavan-3-ols such as catechin, epicatechin and epicatechingallate were found to be increased in transgenic lines. The free radical scavenging activity of CsDFR and CsANR transgenic lines was improved. Oxidative stress was observed to induce lesser cell death in transgenic lines compared to control tobacco plants. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing CsDFR and CsANR also showed resistance against infestation by a tobacco leaf cutworm Spodoptera litura. Results suggested that the overexpression of CsDFR and CsANR cDNA in tobacco has improved flavonoids content and antioxidant potential. These attributes in transgenic tobacco have ultimately improved their growth and development, and biotic stress tolerance.

  18. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J H

    1983-11-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Cellex D, Sephadex G-150, and orange A dye-ligand affinity gels. Extracts prepared from cells cultured anaerobically with tetrathionate or aerobically with thiosulfate followed by oxygen deprivation showed an 11- to 30-fold increase in TTR activity, with no increase in TSO activity. The inducible TTR resided in both the ultracentrifuge pellet and supernatant fractions and was readily separated from constitutive TSO and TTR in the latter by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. Inducible TTR exhibited TSR activity, which was also located in both membrane and soluble extract fractions and which cochromatographed with inducible TTR. The results indicate that constitutive TSO and TTR in marine heterotroph 16B represent reverse activities of the same enzyme whose major physiological function is thiosulfate oxidation. Evidence is also presented which suggests a possible association of inducible TTR and TSR in strain 16B.

  19. 丹参肉桂酰辅酶A还原酶基因克隆与生物信息学分析%Bioinformatics and Expression Analysis of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase Gene from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈尘; 王政军; 曹鑫林; 王喆之

    2011-01-01

    One sequence which showed high homology with cinnamoyl-CoA reductase gene was found by analyzing the transcriptome database of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. The cDNA sequence of the gene was cloned and named as S/wCCR-2(GenBank accession number: JF784010). SmCCR-2 included a 966 bp opening reading frame encoding a 321 amino acid-peptide. SmCCR-2 belonged to the NADB_Rossmann super-family and contained the conserved NWYCY motif. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the predicted molecular weight of SmCCR-2 was 35. 80 kD, which was consistent with the result of SDS-PAGE. SmCCR-2 encoded a hydrophilic and stable neutral protein with trans-membrane domain. The Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that this gene expressed differently in different organs and the expression in stem was the highest. Besides,SmCCR-2 could be induced by pathogen,indicating that it may be involved in plant defenses.%分析丹参转录组数据库,获得一条新的肉桂酰辅酶A还原酶( cinnamoyl-CoA reductase,CCR)基因,命名为SmCCR-2(GenBank注册号为JF784010).该基因包含一个长为966 bp的完整开放读码框,编码321个氮基酸残基.生物信息学分析显示,SmCCR-2编码的蛋白具有NWYCY基序,属于NABD_Rossmann超家族,相对分子量为35.80 kD;预测SmCCR-2为中性亲水的稳定蛋白,存在跨膜结构域.实时荧光定量PCR结果表明,SmCCR-2基因在丹参各组织都有表达,茎中表达量最高.其表达受到病原菌的影响,表明SmCCR-2基因可能与植物防御反应有关.

  20. Herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants induce lesions in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, S R; Kik, N A; Birch, G M; Chiego, D J; Shipman, C

    1989-12-01

    Two herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase null mutants, hrR3 and ICP6 delta, produced cutaneous lesions in guinea pigs as severe as those of wild-type strains. The lesions induced by hrR3 resulted from in vivo replication of the mutant virus, suggesting that this virus-encoded enzyme is nonessential for virus replication in guinea pigs.

  1. Identification of ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase hinge (UQCRH) as a potential diagnostic biomarker for lung adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Feng; Liu, Qicai; Li, Guoping; Dong, Feng; Qiu, Minglian; Lv, Xiaoting; Zhang, Sheng; Guo, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquinol cytochrome c reductase hinge (UQCRH) is a novel protein that localizes in the mitochondrial membrane and induces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. It had a high expression rate of 87.10% (108/124) in lung adenocarcinoma. Moreover, serum UQCRH level in patients with lung adenocarcinoma was significantly increased compared with that of pneumonia patients (p < 0.0001) and normal control subjects (p < 0.0001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis using ...

  2. Lemierre's syndrome with double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mostafa Behpour-Oskooee; Abdollah Karimi; Shirin Sayyahfar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are some risk factors being more vulnerable to Lemierre's syndrome such as a hypercoagulable state. Methods: We report a rare case of Lemierre's syndrome with ethmoid and maxillary sinusitis, bilateral mastoiditis, and sigmoid sinus thrombosis. Results: Genetic study revealed a double heterozygote status in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene including C677T and A1298C. Conclusion: It is suggested to screen patients with Lemierre's syndrome for a hypercoagulable state to consider anticoagulant therapy.

  3. Aminoglycoside-Resistant Mutation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Defective in Cytochrome c552 and Nitrate Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, L E; Nicas, Thalia; Holloway, B W; Crowther, Carol

    1980-01-01

    A gentamicin-resistant mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO503 was selected after ethyl methane sulfonate mutagenesis. The strain, P. aeruginosa PAO2401 had increased resistance to all aminoglycosides tested but exhibited no change for other antibiotics. The mutation designated aglA (aminoglycoside resistance) was 50% cotransducible with the 8-min ilvB,C marker on the P. aeruginosa chromosome. It showed a marked reduction in cytochrome c552 and nitrate reductase (Nar) and a change in terminal...

  4. Purification of the Cytochrome c Reductase/Cytochrome c Oxidase Super Complex of Yeast Mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Hans-Peter; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Boekema, Egbert J.; Kouřil, Roman

    2009-01-01

    The protein complexes of the respiratory chain interact by forming large protein particles called respiratory supercomplexes or ‘‘respirasomes’’. Biochemical characterization of these particles proved to be difficult because of their instability. Here we describe a strategy to isolate and characterize the cytochrome c reductase/cytochrome c oxidase supercomplex of yeast, also termed the III + IV supercomplex, which is based on lactate cultivation of yeast, gentle isolation of mitochondria, me...

  5. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  6. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  7. Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is caused by mutations in the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Waterham, H. R.; Wijburg, F.A.; Hennekam, R. C.; Vreken, P; Poll-The, B T; Dorland, L.; Duran, M.; Jira, P.E.; Smeitink, J. A.; Wevers, R. A.; Wanders, R J

    1998-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is a frequently occurring autosomal recessive developmental disorder characterized by facial dysmorphisms, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Biochemically, the disorder is caused by deficient activity of 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase, which catalyzes the final step in the cholesterol-biosynthesis pathway-that is, the reduction of the Delta7 double bond of 7-dehydrocholesterol to produce cholesterol. We identified a partial transcript coding for...

  8. A Modified Method for Measuring Root Iron Reductase Activity Under Normal Laboratory Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Shao-Jian; HE Yun-Feng; TANG Cai-Xian; Y. MASAOKA

    2005-01-01

    Based on the strong chelating property of bathophenanthroline disulfonic acid (BPDS) with Fe(Ⅱ), root Fe(Ⅲ) chelate reductase activity is usually measured with a spectrophotometer using MES (2-morpholinoethanesulfonic acid) or HEPES (2-(4-(2-Hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethanesulfonic acid) buffer in the dark because of high autoreduction rate of Fe(Ⅲ)in the presence of light. However, the exclusion of light is inconvenient, especially when analyzing a large number of samples. The objective of this study was to develop a new method for determination of root reductase activity under normal laboratory conditions using a suitable buffer composition and Fe(Ⅲ) concentration to eliminate the autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ). A modified method using a Tris (2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol) buffer at pH 7.5 instead of MES or HEPES buffer and a decreased FeEDTA (Fe ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid) concentration of 50 μmol L-1 was developed. The autoreduction of Fe(Ⅲ) using the Tris buffer was undetectable for temperatures at 4 and 28 ℃ and was also much lower than that using the other buffers even with sunlight during measurement of Fe(Ⅲ) reduction.Furthermore, the differences in Fe(Ⅲ) reductase activity among 5 plant species and 14 red clover cultivars (Trifolium pratense L.) could be easily detected with the modified method. The method developed in this study to measure root Fe chelate reductase activity was not only effective and reliable but also easily managed under normal laboratory light conditions.

  9. Purification and characterization of a 15-ketoprostaglandin d-reductase from bovine lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Harald S.

    1979-01-01

    . The turnover number of the enzyme was determined to be either 60 or 42 min. The low value of the turnover number is compensated by a high concentration (96.4 mU/g tissue) of the enzyme in lung tissue, resulting in a high metabolic capacity. Thus, 15-ketoprostaglandin d-reductase together with 15......-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase ensures an irreversible catabolism of prostaglandins. © 1979....

  10. Molecular modeling toward selective inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacoppo, Juliana O S; Mancini, Daiana T; Guimarães, Ana P; Gonçalves, Arlan S; da Cunha, Elaine F F; França, Tanos C C; Ramalho, Teodorico C

    2015-02-16

    In the present work, we applied docking and molecular dynamics techniques to study 11 compounds inside the enzymes dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from the biological warfare agent Bacillus anthracis (BaDHFR) and Homo sapiens sapiens (HssDHFR). Six of these compounds were selected for a study with the mutant BaF96IDHFR. Our results corroborated with experimental data and allowed the proposition of a new molecule with potential activity and better selectivity for BaDHFR.

  11. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  12. Tetrahydrobiopterin non-responsiveness in dihydropteridine reductase deficiency is associated with the presence of mutant protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, R G; Jennings, I; Bracco, G; Ponzone, A; Guardamagna, O

    1986-01-01

    Correlation of the response to a load of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) in dihydropterin reductase (DHPR) deficient patients to the type of mutation in these patients has led to the conclusion that 4 patients without mutant DHPR molecules in their cells respond to the BH4 load, whereas 3 patients with mutant DHPR in their cells do not respond. Intravenous injection of BH4 in 1 of the cases not responding to BH4 again showed no response.

  13. HMG-CoA Reductase Inhibitors from Monascus-Fermented Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven compounds were isolated from Monascus-fermented rice by column chromatography with silica gel and semiprep HPLC. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic methods. All compounds displayed HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory potential, among them compound 7 exhibited strong inhibition with IC50 value comparable with lovastatin. In this study, two compounds (1 and 2 were obtained from natural source for the first time.

  14. The EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding protein super-family: a genome-wide analysis of gene expression patterns in the adult mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, F; Venail, J; Schwaller, B; Celio, M R

    2015-05-21

    In mice, 249 putative members of the superfamily of EF-hand domain Ca(2+)-binding proteins, manifesting great diversity in structure, cellular localization and functions have been identified. Three members in particular, namely, calbindin-D28K, calretinin and parvalbumin, are widely used as markers for specific neuronal subpopulations in different regions of the brain. The aim of the present study was to compile a comprehensive atlas of the gene-expression profiles of the entire EF-hand gene superfamily in the murine brain. This was achieved by a meticulous examination of the in-situ hybridization images in the Allen Brain Atlas database. Topographically, our analysis focused on the olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex (barrel cortex in the primary somatosensory area), basal ganglia, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, cerebellum, midbrain, pons and medulla, and on clearly identifiable sub-structures within each of these areas. The expression profiles of four family-members, namely hippocalcin-like 4, neurocalcin-δ, plastin 3 and tescalcin, that have not been hitherto reported, at either the mRNA (in-situ-hybridization) or the protein (immunohistochemical) levels, are now presented for the first time. The fruit of our analysis is a document in which the gene-expression profiles of all members of the EF-hand family genes are compared, and in which future possible neuronal markers for specific cells/brain areas are identified. The assembled information could afford functional clues to investigators, conducive to further experimental pursuit.

  15. Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily transporter from Botrytis cinerea, provides tolerance towards the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin and towards fungicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Keisuke; Schoonbeek, Henk-Jan; De Waard, Maarten A

    2002-10-01

    Bcmfs1, a novel major facilitator superfamily gene from Botrytis cinerea, was cloned, and replacement and overexpression mutants were constructed to study its function. Replacement mutants showed increased sensitivity to the natural toxic compounds camptothecin and cercosporin, produced by the plant Camptotheca acuminata and the plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora kikuchii, respectively. Overexpression mutants displayed decreased sensitivity to these compounds and to structurally unrelated fungicides, such as sterol demethylation inhibitors (DMIs). A double-replacement mutant of Bcmfs1 and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene BcatrD was more sensitive to DMI fungicides than a single-replacement mutant of BcatrD, known to encode an important ABC transporter of DMIs. The sensitivity of the wild-type strain and mutants to DMI fungicides correlated with Bcmfs1 expression levels and with the initial accumulation of oxpoconazole by germlings of these isolates. The results indicate that Bcmfs1 is a major facilitator superfamily multidrug transporter involved in protection against natural toxins and fungicides and has a substrate specificity that overlaps with the ABC transporter BcatrD. Bcmfs1 may be involved in protection of B. cinerea against plant defense compounds during the pathogenic phase of growth on host plants and against fungitoxic antimicrobial metabolites during its saprophytic phase of growth.

  16. The mammalian Rab family of small GTPases: definition of family and subfamily sequence motifs suggests a mechanism for functional specificity in the Ras superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira-Leal, J B; Seabra, M C

    2000-08-25

    The Rab/Ypt/Sec4 family forms the largest branch of the Ras superfamily of GTPases, acting as essential regulators of vesicular transport pathways. We used the large amount of information in the databases to analyse the mammalian Rab family. We defined Rab-conserved sequences that we designate Rab family (RabF) motifs using the conserved PM and G motifs as "landmarks". The Rab-specific regions were used to identify new Rab proteins in the databases and suggest rules for nomenclature. Surprisingly, we find that RabF regions cluster in and around switch I and switch II regions, i.e. the regions that change conformation upon GDP or GTP binding. This finding suggests that specificity of Rab-effector interaction cannot be conferred solely through the switch regions as is usually inferred. Instead, we propose a model whereby an effector binds to RabF (switch) regions to discriminate between nucleotide-bound states and simultaneously to other regions that confer specificity to the interaction, possibly Rab subfamily (RabSF) specific regions that we also define here. We discuss structural and functional data that support this model and its general applicability to the Ras superfamily of proteins.

  17. The UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) superfamily expressed in humans, insects and plants: Animal-plant arms-race and co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Karl Walter

    2016-01-01

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are major phase II enzymes of a detoxification system evolved in all kingdoms of life. Lipophilic endobiotics such as hormones and xenobiotics including phytoalexins and drugs are conjugated by vertebrates mainly with glucuronic acid, by invertebrates and plants mainly with glucose. Plant-herbivore arms-race has been the major driving force for evolution of large UGT and other enzyme superfamilies. The UGT superfamily is defined by a common protein structure and signature sequence of 44 amino acids responsible for binding the UDP moiety of the sugar donor. Plants developed toxic phytoalexins stored as glucosides. Upon herbivore attack these conjugates are converted to highly reactive compounds. In turn, animals developed large families of UGTs in their intestine and liver to detoxify these phytoalexins. Interestingly, phytoalexins, exemplified by quercetin glucuronides and glucosinolate-derived isocyanates, are known insect attractant pigments in plants, and antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive compounds of humans. It is to be anticipated that phytochemicals may provide a rich source in beneficial drugs.

  18. Inhibitory effects of Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott constituents on aldose reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong Mei; Hwang, Seung Hwan; Kang, Beom Goo; Hong, Jae Seung; Lim, Soon Sung

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the rat lens aldose reductase-inhibitory effects of 95% ethanol extracts from the leaves of C. esculenta and, its organic solvent soluble fractions, including the dichloromethane (CH2Cl2), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (BuOH) and water (H2O) layers, using dl-glyceraldehyde as a substrate. Ten compounds, namely tryptophan (1), orientin (2), isoorientin (3), vitexin (4), isovitexin (5), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (6), luteolin-7-O-rutinoside (7), rosmarinic acid (8), 1-O-feruloyl-d-glucoside (9) and 1-O-caffeoyl-d-glucoside (10) were isolated from the EtOAc and BuOH fractions of C. esculenta. The structures of compounds 1-10 were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and comparison with previous reports. All the isolates were subjected to an in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity against rat lens aldose reductase. Among tested compounds, compounds 2 and 3 significantly inhibited rat lens aldose reductase, with IC50 values of 1.65 and 1.92 μM, respectively. Notably, the inhibitory activity of orientin was 3.9 times greater than that of the positive control, quercetin (4.12 μM). However, the isolated compounds showed only moderate ABTS+ [2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)] activity. These results suggest that flavonoid derivatives from Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott represent potential compounds for the prevention and/or treatment of diabetic complications.

  19. Screening for inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase using pulsed ultrafiltration mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, D; van Breemen, R B

    1998-04-01

    A method of screening combinatorial libraries for inhibitors of eukaryotic dihydrofolate reductase has been developed using pulsed ultra-filtration electrospray mass spectrometry, which is a continuous-flow affinity separation system for extracting and identifying high affinity ligands in combinatorial libraries. In this application, pulsed ultrafiltration conditions were optimized for the isolation and identification of inhibitors of dihydrofolate reductase from a 22 compound library containing six known inhibitors of the enzyme including trimethoprim, aminopterin, methotrexate, pyrimethamine, folic acid, and folinic acid, and 16 compounds without known affinity. In order to optimize the screening method, sources of non-specific binding were identified and minimized. A significant source of non-specific binding for this set of library compounds was hydrophobic interaction with the surfaces of the ultrafiltration chamber. After affinity separation of bound (high affinity) versus free (low affinity) library compounds during pulsed ultrafiltration, receptor-bound ligands were released and eluted using either organic solvent or acidified mobile phase. Although 80% methanol easily disrupted the receptor-ligand complexes, organic solvent had the undesirable effect of releasing non-specifically bound compounds from the chamber and thereby increasing the background noise. Interference from non-specific binding was minimized by releasing bound ligands using a low pH mobile phase eluent instead of organic solvent. Under the conditions used, pulsed ultrafiltration mass spectrometry selectively identified the two library compounds with the highest affinity for dihydrofolate reductase, methotrexate and aminopterin.

  20. A preliminary study on estimating extra-cellular nitrate reductase activities in estuarine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant H. K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes catalyzing ammonium (NH4+/nitrate (NO3– into nitrous oxide (N2O/molecular nitrogen (N2, play critical roles in water quality management. The objective of this paper was to investigate the role of extra-cellular enzymes in cycling of nitrogen (N in aquatic systems. It appears that N in estuaries, salt marshes, etc., does not stay long enough to be available for uptake, thus, creating N limited conditions. This study showed that indigenous extra-cellular nitrate reductase along with others involved in N transformations in the waters/sediments of estuarine systems can cause complete removal of NH4+ and NO3– from the waters and available NH4+ and NO3– from the sediments. These results indicate that due to high extra-cellular nitrate reductase and other enzymes associated with N transformations in sediments/waters, substantial amounts of NH4+ and NO3– can be quickly lost from the systems as N2O and/or nitric oxide (NO, in turn, creating N limited conditions in estuarine systems. Such high activities of indigenous nitrate reductase and others are useful in removing readily bioavailable N from the systems, thereby avoidance of eutrophic conditions. However, they might contribute in increasing the N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential (GWP of 296, in the atmosphere.

  1. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  2. Purification and characterization of a novel carbonyl reductase with high stereo-selectivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ming; XU Yan; MU Xiaoqing; XIAO Rong

    2007-01-01

    A novel NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase was separated from Candida parapsilosis CCTCC 203011.The enzyme gave a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE),which was purified through ammonium sulfate,Diethylamino Ethanol (DEAE) sepharose Fast flow (FF),phenyl-sepharose FF and blue sepharose FF chromatography from cell-free extract.The molecular mass of the enzyme was about 30 kDa.The optimum pH and temperature for reduction were 4.5℃ and 35℃,respectively.The Cu2+ had strong restrictive effect on enzyme activity.In addition,the carbonyl reductase was an enzyme with high substrate specificity and stereo-selectivity,and showed high asymmetric reduction activity towards α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate.For the asymmetric reduction of α-hydroxyacetophenone and ethyl 4-chloro acetoacetate,(S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol and (R)-ethyl 4-chloro-3-hydroxybutanoate were produced by the purified enzyme,with the 100% and 94.3% e.e.value,respectively.Therefore,the enzyme could be one of the effective biocatalysts for asymmetric synthesis of chiral alcohols.The amino acid sequences of one peptide from the purified enzyme were analyzed by LC-MASS-MASS,and the carbonyl reductase showed some identity to the hypothetical protein CaO 19.10414 reported.

  3. Trichomonas vaginalis flavin reductase 1 and its role in metronidazole resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsch, David; Janssen, Brian D; Kolarich, Daniel; Johnson, Patricia J; Duchêne, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The enzyme flavin reductase 1 (FR1) from Trichomonas vaginalis, formerly known as NADPH oxidase, was isolated and identified. Flavin reductase is part of the antioxidative defence in T. vaginalis and indirectly reduces molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide via free flavins. Importantly, a reduced or absent flavin reductase activity has been reported in metronidazole-resistant T. vaginalis, resulting in elevated intracellular oxygen levels and futile cycling of metronidazole. Interestingly, FR1 has no close homologue in any other sequenced genome, but seven full-length and three truncated isoforms exist in the T. vaginalis genome. However, out of these, only FR1 has an affinity for flavins, i.e. FMN, FAD and riboflavin, which is high enough to be of physiological relevance. Although there are no relevant changes in the gene sequence or any alterations of the predicted FR1-mRNA structure in any of the strains studied, FR1 is not expressed in highly metronidazole-resistant strains. Transfection of a metronidazole-resistant clinical isolate (B7268), which does not express any detectable amounts of FR, with a plasmid bearing a functional FR1 gene nearly completely restored metronidazole sensitivity. Our results indicate that FR1 has a significant role in the emergence of metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis.

  4. Inhibition of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase (Ex Vivo by Morus indica (Mulberry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanitha Reddy Palvai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals are the bioactive components that contribute to the prevention of cardiovascular and other degenerative diseases. Inhibition of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA reductase would be an effective means of lowering plasma cholesterol in humans. The present study explores the HMG CoA reductase inhibitory effect of extracts from leaves of Morus indica varieties, M5, V1, and S36, compared with the statin, using an ex vivo method. The assay is based on the stoichiometric formation of coenzyme A during the reduction of microsomal HMG CoA to mevalonate. Dechlorophyllised extract of three varieties was studied at 300 µg. The coenzyme A released at the end of assay in control (100.31 nmoles and statins (94.46 nm was higher than the dechlorphyllised extracts of the samples. The coenzyme A released during the reduction of HMG CoA to mevalonate in dechlorophyllised extracts of the samples was as follows: S36 < M5 < V1. The results indicated that the samples were highly effective in inhibiting the enzyme compared to statins (standard drug. The results indicate the role of Morus varieties extracts in modulating the cholesterol metabolism by inhibiting the activity of HMG CoA reductase. These results provide scope for designing in vivo animal studies to confirm their effect.

  5. Comparative azo reductase activity of red azo dyes through caecal and hepatic microsomal fraction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Das, M; Khanna, S K

    1997-09-01

    In order to study the rate of formation of toxic aromatic amines, anaerobic reduction of four red azo dyes viz. amaranth, carmoisine, fast Red E and ponceau 4R was investigated by incubating caecal content and hepatic microsomal fraction of rats with 37.5 microM concentration of dyes in sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.4 using NADPH generating system, glucose oxidase system and nitrogen as the gaseous phase. Caecal suspension exhibited higher azo reductase activity than that of hepatic microsomal fraction using any of the 4 azo dyes. Caecal microbes showed maximal azo reductase activity when ponceau 4R was used as a substrate followed by fast Red E and carmoisine, while with amaranth the activity was minimum. Similarly ponceau 4 R exhibited maximum hepatic microsomal azo reductase activity followed by fast Red E and carmoisine whereas, amaranth had minimum activity. Caecal flora possessed almost 17 fold higher degradative capability of ponceau 4 R and fast Red E colourants than the hepatic microsomal fraction. The higher reductive ability through caecal flora for ponceau 4R and fast Red E signifies the formation of more aromatic amines which may be re-absorbed through the intestine to be either eliminated through urine as conjugates or retained in the target tissues to elicit toxic effects.

  6. Nitrosative Stress Response in Vibrio cholerae: Role of S-Nitrosoglutathione Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Sourav Kumar; Bag, Prasanta Kumar; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2016-12-20

    Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, poses serious threats to humans worldwide. V. cholerae faces host inflammatory response and encounters nitrosative stress before establishing successful colonization. It is not clear how V. cholerae combats nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen species. In the present study, we used three clinical strains of V. cholerae and tested their nitrosative stress response pattern towards sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and S-Nitrosoglutathione (GSNO). Among them, V. cholerae, belonging to both O1 and O139 serotypes, showed moderate resistance to SNP and GSNO. However, a V. cholerae strain belonging to non O1 and non O139 showed sensitivity to SNP but resistance towards GSNO. Reduced glutathione and glutathione reductase play a significant role to combat nitrosative stress in V. cholerae. This is the first report where we show the presence of GSNO reductase activity in V. cholerae and that it plays an important role to detoxify S-Nitrosoglutathione. GSNO reductase activity of V. cholerae was regulated by posttranslational modification through S-nitrosylation under in vitro conditions which could be reversed by dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, we show that biofilm formation remained unaffected under nitrosative stress in V. cholerae.

  7. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D.; Nelson, Ornella D.; Otwell, Anne E.; Richardson, Ruth E.; Callister, Stephen J.; Lin, Hening

    2015-01-01

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have. PMID:26454174

  8. Major Peptides from Amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus Protein Inhibit HMG-CoA Reductase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana Aparecida Manólio Soares

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to identify the major peptides generated by the in vitro hydrolysis of Amaranthus cruentus protein and to verify the effect of these peptides on the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase, a key enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis. A protein isolate was prepared, and an enzymatic hydrolysis that simulated the in vivo digestion of the protein was performed. After hydrolysis, the peptide mixture was filtered through a 3 kDa membrane. The peptide profile of this mixture was determined by reversed phase high performance chromatography (RP-HPLC, and the peptide identification was performed by LC-ESI MS/MS. Three major peptides under 3 kDa were detected, corresponding to more than 90% of the peptides of similar size produced by enzymatic hydrolysis. The sequences identified were GGV, IVG or LVG and VGVI or VGVL. These peptides had not yet been described for amaranth protein nor are they present in known sequences of amaranth grain protein, except LVG, which can be found in amaranth α‑amylase. Their ability to inhibit the activity of HMG-CoA reductase was determined, and we found that the sequences GGV, IVG, and VGVL, significantly inhibited this enzyme, suggesting a possible hypocholesterolemic effect.

  9. Stereospecific micellar electrokinetic chromatography assay of methionine sulfoxide reductase activity employing a multiple layer coated capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qingfu; El-Mergawy, Rabab G; Heinemann, Stefan H; Schönherr, Roland; Jáč, Pavel; Scriba, Gerhard K E

    2013-09-01

    A micellar electrokinetic chromatography method for the analysis of the l-methionine sulfoxide diastereomers employing a successive multiple ionic-polymer layer coated fused-silica capillary was developed and validated in order to investigate the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases. The capillary coating consisted of a first layer of hexadimethrine and a second layer of dextran sulfate providing a stable strong cathodic EOF and consequently highly repeatable analyte migration times. The methionine sulfoxide diastereomers, methionine as product as well as β-alanine as internal standard were derivatized by dabsyl chloride and separated using a 35 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 8.0, containing 25 mM SDS as BGE and a separation voltage of 25 kV. The method was validated in the range of 0.15-2.0 mM with respect to linearity and precision. The LODs of the analytes ranged between 0.04 and 0.10 mM. The assay was subsequently applied to determine the stereospecificity of methionine sulfoxide reductases as well as the enzyme kinetics of human methionine sulfoxide reductase A. Monitoring the decrease of the l-methionine-(S)-sulfoxide Km = 411.8 ± 33.8 μM and Vmax = 307.5 ± 10.8 μM/min were determined.

  10. Molecular dissection of a putative iron reductase from Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Kim, David D; Nelson, Ornella D; Otwell, Anne E; Richardson, Ruth E; Callister, Stephen J; Lin, Hening

    2015-11-20

    Desulfotomaculum reducens MI-1 is a Firmicute strain capable of reducing a variety of heavy metal ions and has a great potential in heavy metal bioremediation. We recently identified Dred_2421 as a potential iron reductase through proteomic study of D. reducens. The current study examines its iron-reduction mechanism. Dred_2421, like its close homolog from Escherichia coli (2, 4-dienoyl-CoA reductase), has an FMN-binding N-terminal domain (NTD), an FAD-binding C-terminal domain (CTD), and a 4Fe-4S cluster between the two domains. To understand the mechanism of the iron-reduction activity and the role of each domain, we generated a series of variants for each domain and investigated their iron-reduction activity. Our results suggest that CTD is the main contributor of the iron-reduction activity, and that NTD and the 4Fe-4S cluster are not directly involved in such activity. This study provides a mechanistic understanding of the iron-reductase activity of Dred_2421 and may also help to elucidate other physiological activities this enzyme may have.

  11. Molecular cloning and catalytic characterization of a recombinant tropine biosynthetic tropinone reductase from Withania coagulans leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Amit K; Sangwan, Neelam S; Tripathi, Sandhya; Sangwan, Rajender S

    2013-03-10

    Tropinone reductases (TRs) are small proteins belonging to the SDR (short chain dehydrogenase/reductase) family of enzymes. TR-I and TR-II catalyze the conversion of tropinone into tropane alcohols (tropine and pseudotropine, respectively). The steps are intermediary enroute to biosynthesis of tropane esters of medicinal importance, hyoscyamine/scopolamine, and calystegins, respectively. Biosynthesis of tropane alkaloids has been proposed to occur in roots. However, in the present report, a tropine forming tropinone reductase (TR-I) cDNA was isolated from the aerial tissue (leaf) of a medicinal plant, Withania coagulans. The ORF was deduced to encode a polypeptide of 29.34 kDa. The complete cDNA (WcTRI) was expressed in E. coli and the recombinant His-tagged protein was purified for functional characterization. The enzyme had a narrow pH range of substantial activity with maxima at 6.6. Relatively superior thermostability of the enzyme (30% retention of activity at 60 °C) was catalytic novelty in consonance with the desert area restricted habitat of the plant. The in vitro reaction kinetics predominantly favoured the forward reaction. The enzyme had wide substrate specificity but did not cover the substrates of other well-known plant SDR related to menthol metabolism. To our knowledge, this pertains to be the first report on any gene and enzyme of secondary metabolism from the commercially and medicinally important vegetable rennet species.

  12. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akana,J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn{sup 2+} which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn{sup 2+} and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn{sup 2+} is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn{sup 2+} ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn{sup 2+} that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn{sup 2+} and participate as acid/base catalysts

  13. Reductive metabolism of nabumetone by human liver microsomal and cytosolic fractions: exploratory prediction using inhibitors and substrates as marker probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Kaori; Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Koyanagi, Junichi; Takahashi, Tamiko; Akimoto, Masayuki; Sugibayashi, Kenji

    2015-06-01

    The metabolic reduction of nabumetone was examined by inhibition and correlation studies using human liver microsomes and cytosol. This reduction was observed in both fractions, with the V(max) values for reduction activity being approximately fourfold higher, and the V(max)/K(m) values approximately three-fold higher, in the microsomes than in the cytosol. The reduction of nabumetone was inhibited by 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, an 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) inhibitor, in the microsomal fraction. The reduction activity was also inhibited by quercetin and menadione [carbonyl reductase (CBR) inhibitors], and by phenolphthalein and medroxyprogesterone acetate [potent inhibitors of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) 1C1, 1C2 and 1C4] in the cytosol. A good correlation (r² = 0.93) was observed between the reduction of nabumetone and of cortisone, as a marker of 11β-HSD activity, in the microsomal fractions. There was also an excellent relationship between reduction of nabumetone and of the AKR1C substrates, acetohexamide, and ethacrynic acid (r 2 = 0.92 and 0.93, respectively), in the cytosol fractions. However, a poor correlation was observed between the formation of 4-(6-methoxy-2-na