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Sample records for aldo-keto reductase superfamily

  1. The aldo-keto reductase superfamily homepage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, David; Bauman, David R; Heredia, Vladi V; Penning, Trevor M

    2003-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are one of the three enzyme superfamilies that perform oxidoreduction on a wide variety of natural and foreign substrates. A systematic nomenclature for the AKR superfamily was adopted in 1996 and was updated in September 2000 (visit www.med.upenn.edu/akr). Investigators have been diligent in submitting sequences of functional proteins to the Web site. With the new additions, the superfamily contains 114 proteins expressed in prokaryotes and eukaryotes that are distributed over 14 families (AKR1-AKR14). The AKR1 family contains the aldose reductases, the aldehyde reductases, the hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases and steroid 5beta-reductases, and is the largest. Other families of interest include AKR6, which includes potassium channel beta-subunits, and AKR7 the aflatoxin aldehyde reductases. Two new families include AKR13 (yeast aldose reductase) and AKR14 (Escherichia coli aldehyde reductase). Crystal structures of many AKRs and their complexes with ligands are available in the PDB and accessible through the Web site. Each structure has the characteristic (alpha/beta)(8)-barrel motif of the superfamily, a conserved cofactor binding site and a catalytic tetrad, and variable loop structures that define substrate specificity. Although the majority of AKRs are monomeric proteins of about 320 amino acids in length, the AKR2, AKR6 and AKR7 family may form multimers. To expand the nomenclature to accommodate multimers, we recommend that the composition and stoichiometry be listed. For example, AKR7A1:AKR7A4 (1:3) would designate a tetramer of the composition indicated. The current nomenclature is recognized by the Human Genome Project (HUGO) and the Web site provides a link to genomic information including chromosomal localization, gene boundaries, human ESTs and SNPs and much more.

  2. Production and characterization of a thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Machielsen, M.P.; Uria, A.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2006-01-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily has been identified in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The gene, referred to as adhD, was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and subsequently purified to homogeneity. The

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Cindy [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Mueller, Uwe [Berliner Elektronenspeicherring-Gesellschaft für Synchrotronstrahlung mbH, Albert-Einstein-Strasse 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Panjikar, Santosh [European Molecular Biology Laboratory Hamburg, Outstation Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sun, Lianli [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Ruppert, Martin [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Zhao, Yu [Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China); Stöckigt, Joachim [Department of Pharmaceutical Biology, Institute of Pharmacy, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Staudinger Weg 5, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Department of TCM and Natural Drug Research, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 513 Zijingang Campus, Zhejiang University, 310058 Hangzhou (China)

    2006-12-01

    Perakine reductase, a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily of higher plants, is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina. The enzyme has been crystallized in C-centered orthorhombic space group and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution. Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å.

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, Cindy; Mueller, Uwe; Panjikar, Santosh; Sun, Lianli; Ruppert, Martin; Zhao, Yu; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Perakine reductase, a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily of higher plants, is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids in the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina. The enzyme has been crystallized in C-centered orthorhombic space group and diffracts to 2.0 Å resolution. Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C222 1 and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of perakine reductase, a new member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Cindy; Mueller, Uwe; Panjikar, Santosh; Sun, Lianli; Ruppert, Martin; Zhao, Yu; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Perakine reductase (PR) is a novel member of the aldo-keto reductase enzyme superfamily from higher plants. PR from the plant Rauvolfia serpentina is involved in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids by performing NADPH-dependent reduction of perakine, yielding raucaffrinoline. However, PR can also reduce cinnamic aldehyde and some of its derivatives. After heterologous expression of a triple mutant of PR in Escherichia coli, crystals of the purified and methylated enzyme were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique at 293 K with 100 mM sodium citrate pH 5.6 and 27% PEG 4000 as precipitant. Crystals belong to space group C2221 and diffract to 2.0 Å, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.9, b = 93.0, c = 143.4 Å. PMID:17142919

  6. The structure of apo and holo forms of xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase from Candida tenuis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Kathryn L; Klimacek, Mario; Nidetzky, Bernd; Wilson, David K

    2002-07-16

    Xylose reductase is a homodimeric oxidoreductase dependent on NADPH or NADH and belongs to the largely monomeric aldo-keto reductase superfamily of proteins. It catalyzes the first step in the assimilation of xylose, an aldose found to be a major constituent monosaccharide of renewable plant hemicellulosic material, into yeast metabolic pathways. It does this by reducing open chain xylose to xylitol, which is reoxidized to xylulose by xylitol dehydrogenase and metabolically integrated via the pentose phosphate pathway. No structure has yet been determined for a xylose reductase, a dimeric aldo-keto reductase or a family 2 aldo-keto reductase. The structures of the Candida tenuis xylose reductase apo- and holoenzyme, which crystallize in spacegroup C2 with different unit cells, have been determined to 2.2 A resolution and an R-factor of 17.9 and 20.8%, respectively. Residues responsible for mediating the novel dimeric interface include Asp-178, Arg-181, Lys-202, Phe-206, Trp-313, and Pro-319. Alignments with other superfamily members indicate that these interactions are conserved in other dimeric xylose reductases but not throughout the remainder of the oligomeric aldo-keto reductases, predicting alternate modes of oligomerization for other families. An arrangement of side chains in a catalytic triad shows that Tyr-52 has a conserved function as a general acid. The loop that folds over the NAD(P)H cosubstrate is disordered in the apo form but becomes ordered upon cosubstrate binding. A slow conformational isomerization of this loop probably accounts for the observed rate-limiting step involving release of cosubstrate. Xylose binding (K(m) = 87 mM) is mediated by interactions with a binding pocket that is more polar than a typical aldo-keto reductase. Modeling of xylose into the active site of the holoenzyme using ordered waters as a guide for sugar hydroxyls suggests a convincing mode of substrate binding.

  7. Gene cloning and overexpression of two conjugated polyketone reductases, novel aldo-keto reductase family enzymes, of Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, M; Delacruz-Hidalgo, A-R G; Akond, M A; Sakuradani, E; Kita, K; Shimizu, S

    2004-04-01

    The genes encoding two conjugated polyketone reductases (CPR-C1, CPR-C2) of Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 were cloned and sequenced. The genes encoded a total of 304 and 307 amino acid residues for CPR-C1 and CPR-C2, respectively. The deduced amino acid sequences of the two enzymes showed high similarity to each other and to several proteins of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily. However, several amino acid residues in putative active sites of AKRs were not conserved in CPR-C1 and CPR-C2. The two CPR genes were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The E. coli transformant bearing the CPR-C2 gene almost stoichiometrically reduced 30 mg ketopantoyl lactone/ml to D-pantoyl lactone.

  8. Effect of thermal stability on protein adsorption to silica using homologous aldo-keto reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsovalyi, Flora; Patel, Tushar; Mangiagalli, Paolo; Kumar, Sanat K; Banta, Scott

    2012-08-01

    Gaining more insight into the mechanisms governing the behavior of proteins at solid/liquid interfaces is particularly relevant in the interaction of high-value biologics with storage and delivery device surfaces, where adsorption-induced conformational changes may dramatically affect biocompatibility. The impact of structural stability on interfacial behavior has been previously investigated by engineering nonwild-type stability mutants. Potential shortcomings of such approaches include only modest changes in thermostability, and the introduction of changes in the topology of the proteins when disulfide bonds are incorporated. Here we employ two members of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily (alcohol dehydrogenase, AdhD and human aldose reductase, hAR) to gain a new perspective on the role of naturally occurring thermostability on adsorbed protein arrangement and its subsequent impact on desorption. Unexpectedly, we find that during initial adsorption events, both proteins have similar affinity to the substrate and undergo nearly identical levels of structural perturbation. Interesting differences between AdhD and hAR occur during desorption and both proteins exhibit some level of activity loss and irreversible conformational change upon desorption. Although such surface-induced denaturation is expected for the less stable hAR, it is remarkable that the extremely thermostable AdhD is similarly affected by adsorption-induced events. These results question the role of thermal stability as a predictor of protein adsorption/desorption behavior. Copyright © 2012 The Protein Society.

  9. Thermophilic enzymes and their applications in biocatalysis: a robust aldo-keto reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willies, Simon; Isupov, Misha; Littlechild, Jennifer

    2010-09-01

    Extremophiles are providing a good source of novel robust enzymes for use in biocatalysis for the synthesis of new drugs. This is particularly true for the enzymes from thermophilic organisms which are more robust than their mesophilic counterparts to the conditions required for industrial bio-processes. This paper describes a new aldo-keto reductase enzyme from a thermophilic eubacteria, Thermotoga maritima which can be used for the production of primary alcohols. The enzyme has been cloned and over-expressed in Escherichia coli and has been purified and subjected to full biochemical characterization. The aldo-keto reductase can be used for production of primary alcohols using substrates including benzaldehyde, 1,2,3,6-tetrahydrobenzaldehyde and para-anisaldehyde. It is stable up to 80 degrees C, retaining over 60% activity for 5 hours at this temperature. The enzyme at pH 6.5 showed a preference for the forward, carbonyl reduction. The enzyme showed moderate stability with organic solvents, and retained 70% activity in 20% (v/v) isopropanol or DMSO. These properties are favourable for its potential industrial applications.

  10. Lignases and aldo-keto reductases for conversion of lignin-containing materials to fermentable products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Michael; Sethi, Amit

    2016-09-13

    Termites have specialized digestive systems that overcome the lignin barrier in wood to release fermentable simple sugars. Using the termite Reticulitermes flavipes and its gut symbionts, high-throughput titanium pyrosequencing and proteomics approaches experimentally compared the effects of lignin-containing diets on host-symbiont digestome composition. Proteomic investigations and functional digestive studies with recombinant lignocellulases conducted in parallel provided strong evidence of congruence at the transcription and translational levels and provide enzymatic strategies for overcoming recalcitrant lignin barriers in biofuel feedstocks. Briefly described, therefore, the disclosure provides a system for generating a fermentable product from a lignified plant material, the system comprising a cooperating series of at least two catalytically active polypeptides, where said catalytically active polypeptides are selected from the group consisting of: cellulase Cell-1, .beta.-glu cellulase, an aldo-keto-reductase, a catalase, a laccase, and an endo-xylanase.

  11. Pharmacogenetics of aldo-keto reductase 1C (AKR1C) enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshogran, Osama Y

    2017-10-01

    Genetic variation in metabolizing enzymes contributes to variable drug response and disease risk. Aldo-keto reductase type 1C (AKR1C) comprises a sub-family of reductase enzymes that play critical roles in the biotransformation of various drug substrates and endogenous compounds such as steroids. Several single nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported among AKR1C encoding genes, which may affect the functional expression of the enzymes. Areas covered: This review highlights and comprehensively discusses previous pharmacogenetic reports that have examined genetic variations in AKR1C and their association with disease development, drug disposition, and therapeutic outcomes. The article also provides information about the effect of AKR1C genetic variants on enzyme function in vitro. Expert opinion: The current evidence that links the effect of AKR1C gene polymorphisms to disease progression and development is inconsistent and needs further validation, despite of the tremendous knowledge available. Information about association of AKR1C genetic variants and drug efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetics is limited, thus, future studies that advance our understanding about these relationships and their clinical relevance are needed. It is imperative to achieve consistent findings before the potential translation and adoption of AKR1C genetic variants in clinical practice.

  12. BIOLOGICAL ROLE OF ALDO-KETO REDUCTASES IN RETINOIC ACID BIOSYNTHESIS AND SIGNALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier eRuiz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Several aldo-keto reductase (AKR enzymes from subfamilies 1B and 1C show retinaldehyde reductase activity, having low Km and kcat values. Only AKR1B10 and 1B12, with all-trans-retinaldehyde, and AKR1C3, with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, display high catalytic efficiency. Major structural determinants for retinaldehyde isomer specificity are located in the external loops (A and C for AKR1B10, and B for AKR1C3, as assessed by site-directed mutagenesis and molecular dynamics. Cellular models have shown that AKR1B and 1C enzymes are well suited to work in vivo as retinaldehyde reductases and to regulate retinoic acid (RA biosynthesis at hormone pre-receptor level. An additional physiological role for the retinaldehyde reductase activity of these enzymes, consistent with their tissue localization, is their participation in β-carotene absorption. Retinaldehyde metabolism may be subjected to subcellular compartmentalization, based on enzyme localization. While retinaldehyde oxidation to RA takes place in the cytosol, reduction to retinol could take place in the cytosol by AKRs or in the membranes of endoplasmic reticulum by microsomal retinaldehyde reductases. Upregulation of some AKR1 enzymes in different cancer types may be linked to their induction by oxidative stress and to their participation in different signaling pathways related to cell proliferation. AKR1B10 and AKR1C3, through their retinaldehyde reductase activity, trigger a decrease in the RA biosynthesis flow, resulting in RA deprivation and consequently lower differentiation, with an increased cancer risk in target tissues. Rational design of selective AKR inhibitors could lead to development of novel drugs for cancer treatment as well as reduction of chemotherapeutic drug resistance.

  13. Aldo-keto reductase enzymes detoxify glyphosate and improve herbicide resistance in plants.

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    Vemanna, Ramu S; Vennapusa, Amaranatha Reddy; Easwaran, Murugesh; Chandrashekar, Babitha K; Rao, Hanumantha; Ghanti, Kirankumar; Sudhakar, Chinta; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Makarla, Udayakumar

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, concerns about the use of glyphosate-resistant crops have increased because of glyphosate residual levels in plants and development of herbicide-resistant weeds. In spite of identifying glyphosate-detoxifying genes from microorganisms, the plant mechanism to detoxify glyphosate has not been studied. We characterized an aldo-keto reductase gene from Pseudomonas (PsAKR1) and rice (OsAKR1) and showed, by docking studies, both PsAKR1 and OsAKR1 can efficiently bind to glyphosate. Silencing AKR1 homologues in rice and Nicotiana benthamiana or mutation of AKR1 in yeast and Arabidopsis showed increased sensitivity to glyphosate. External application of AKR proteins rescued glyphosate-mediated cucumber seedling growth inhibition. Regeneration of tobacco transgenic lines expressing PsAKR1 or OsAKRI on glyphosate suggests that AKR can be used as selectable marker to develop transgenic crops. PsAKR1- or OsAKRI-expressing tobacco and rice transgenic plants showed improved tolerance to glyphosate with reduced accumulation of shikimic acid without affecting the normal photosynthetic rates. These results suggested that AKR1 when overexpressed detoxifies glyphosate in planta. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Aldo-keto reductase and alcohol dehydrogenase contribute to benznidazole natural resistance in Trypanosoma cruzi.

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    González, Laura; García-Huertas, Paola; Triana-Chávez, Omar; García, Gabriela Andrea; Murta, Silvane Maria Fonseca; Mejía-Jaramillo, Ana M

    2017-12-01

    The improvement of Chagas disease treatment is focused not only on the development of new drugs but also in understanding mechanisms of action and resistance to drugs conventionally used. Thus, some strategies aim to detect specific changes in proteins between sensitive and resistant parasites and to evaluate the role played in these processes by functional genomics. In this work, we used a natural Trypanosoma cruzi population resistant to benznidazole, which has clones with different susceptibilities to this drug without alterations in the NTR I gene. Using 2DE-gel electrophoresis, the aldo-keto reductase and the alcohol dehydrogenase proteins were found up regulated in the natural resistant clone and therefore their possible role in the resistance to benznidazole and glyoxal was investigated. Both genes were overexpressed in a drug sensitive T. cruzi clone and the biological changes in response to these compounds were evaluated. The results showed that the overexpression of these proteins enhances resistance to benznidazole and glyoxal in T. cruzi. Moreover, a decrease in mitochondrial and cell membrane damage was observed, accompanied by a drop in the intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species after treatment. Our results suggest that these proteins are involved in the mechanism of action of benznidazole. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Molecular characterization of an aldo-keto reductase from Marivirga tractuosa that converts retinal to retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung-Hye; Nam, Hyun-Koo; Kim, Kyoung-Rok; Kim, Seon-Won; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2014-01-01

    A recombinant aldo-keto reductase (AKR) from Marivirga tractuosa was purified with a specific activity of 0.32unitml(-1) for all-trans-retinal with a 72kDa dimer. The enzyme had substrate specificity for aldehydes but not for alcohols, carbonyls, or monosaccharides. The enzyme turnover was the highest for benzaldehyde (kcat=446min(-1)), whereas the affinity and catalytic efficiency were the highest for all-trans-retinal (Km=48μM, kcat/Km=427mM(-1)min(-1)) among the tested substrates. The optimal reaction conditions for the production of all-trans-retinol from all-trans-retinal by M. tractuosa AKR were pH 7.5, 30°C, 5% (v/v) methanol, 1% (w/v) hydroquinone, 10mM NADPH, 1710mgl(-1) all-trans-retinal, and 3unitml(-1) enzyme. Under these optimized conditions, the enzyme produced 1090mgml(-1) all-trans-retinol, with a conversion yield of 64% (w/w) and a volumetric productivity of 818mgl(-1)h(-1). AKR from M. tractuosa showed no activity for all-trans-retinol using NADP(+) as a cofactor, whereas human AKR exhibited activity. When the cofactor-binding residues (Ala158, Lys212, and Gln270) of M. tractuosa AKR were changed to the corresponding residues of human AKR (Ser160, Pro212, and Glu272), the A158S and Q270E variants exhibited activity for all-trans-retinol. Thus, amino acids at positions 158 and 270 of M. tractuosa AKR are determinant residues of the activity for all-trans-retinol. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 coexpresses with renin without influencing renin production and secretion.

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    Machura, Katharina; Iankilevitch, Elina; Neubauer, Björn; Theuring, Franz; Kurtz, Armin

    2013-03-01

    On the basis of evidence that within the adult kidney, the aldo-keto reductase AKR1B7 (aldo-keto reductase family 1, member 7, also known as mouse vas deferens protein, MVDP) is selectively expressed in renin-producing cells, we aimed to define a possible role of AKR1B7 for the regulation and function of renin cells in the kidney. We could confirm colocalization and corecruitment of renin and of AKR1B7 in wild-type kidneys. Renin cells in AKR1B7-deficient kidneys showed normal morphology, numbers, and intrarenal distribution. Plasma renin concentration (PRC) and renin mRNA levels of AKR1B7-deficient mice were normal at standard chow and were lowered by a high-salt diet directly comparable to wild-type mice. Treatment with a low-salt diet in combination with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor strongly increased PRC and renin mRNA in a similar fashion both in AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. Under this condition, we also observed a strong retrograde recruitment of renin-expressing cell along the preglomerular vessels, however, without a difference between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type mice. The isolated perfused mouse kidney model was used to study the acute regulation of renin secretion by ANG II and by perfusion pressure. Regarding these parameters, no differences were observed between AKR1B7-deficient and wild-type kidneys. In summary, our data suggest that AKR1B7 is not of major relevance for the regulation of renin production and secretion in spite of its striking coregulation with renin expression.

  17. An aldo-keto reductase, Bbakr1, is involved in stress response and detoxification of heavy metal chromium but not required for virulence in the insect fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huifang; He, Zhangjiang; Luo, Linli; Zhao, Xin; Lu, Zhuoyue; Luo, Tingying; Li, Min; Zhang, Yongjun

    2018-02-01

    The aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) belong to the NADP-dependent oxidoreductase superfamily, which play important roles in various physiological functions in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. However, many AKR superfamily members remain uncharacterized. Here, a downstream target gene of the HOG1 MAPK pathways coding for an aldo-keto reductase, named Bbakr1, was characterized in the insect fungal pathogen, Beauveria bassiana. Bbakr1 expression increased in response to osmotic and salt stressors, and oxidative and heavy metal (chromium) stress. Deletion of Bbakr1 caused a reduction in conidiation, as well as delayed conidial germination. ΔBbakr1 displayed increased sensitivity to osmotic/high-salt stress with decreased compatible solute accumulation. In addition, the mutant was more sensitive to high concentrations of the heavy metal, chromium, and to oxidative stress than the wild type cells, with impaired ability to detoxify active aldehyde that might accumulate due to lipid peroxidation. However, over-expressing Bbakr1 in either the wild type strain or a ΔBbhog1 background did not cause any obvious changes in phenotypes as compared to their controls. Little effect on virulence was seen for either the ΔBbakr1 or overexpression strains in insect bioassays via cuticle infection or intrahemocoel injection assays, suggesting that Bbakr1 is not required for virulence. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Overexpression of Aldo-Keto-Reductase in Azole-resistant Clinical Isolates of Candida Glabrata Determined by cDNA-AFLP

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    Mansour Heidari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida glabrata causes significant medical problems in immunocompromised patients. Many strains of this yeast are intrinsically resistant to azole antifungal agents, and treatment is problematic, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates in immunosuppressed individuals. The primary goal of this study was to investigate the genes involved in the drug resistance of clinical isolates of C. glabrata.Methods: The clinical isolates of C. glabrata were collected in an epidemiological survey of candidal infection inimmunocompromised patients and consisted of four fluconazole and itraconazole resistant isolates, two fluconazoleand itraconazole sensitive isolates, and C. glabrata CBS 138 as reference strain. Antifungal susceptibility patterns ofthe organisms were determined beforehand by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. The potentialgene(s implicated in antifungal resistance were investigated using complementary DNA- Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was carried out to evaluate the expression of gene(s in resistant isolates as compared to sensitive and reference strains.Results and conclusions: The aldo-keto-reductase superfamily (AKR gene was upregulated in the resistant clinicalisolates as assessed by cDNA-AFLP. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR revealed AKR mRNA expression approximately twice that seen in the sensitive isolates. Overexpression of the AKR gene was associated with increased fluconazole and itraconazole resistance in C. glabrata. The data suggest that upregulation of the AKR gene might give a new insight into the mechanism of azole resistance.

  19. Role of aldo-keto reductases and other doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes in doxorubicin resistance, DNA binding, and subcellular localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heibein, Allan D; Guo, Baoqing; Sprowl, Jason A; MacLean, David A; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2012-01-01

    Since proteins involved in chemotherapy drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics have a strong impact on the uptake, metabolism, and efflux of such drugs, they likely play critical roles in resistance to chemotherapy drugs in cancer patients. To investigate this hypothesis, we conducted a whole genome microarray study to identify difference in the expression of genes between isogenic doxorubicin-sensitive and doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 breast tumour cells. We then assessed the degree of over-representation of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic genes in the dataset of doxorubicin resistance genes. Of 27,958 Entrez genes on the array, 7.4 per cent or 2,063 genes were differentially expressed by ≥ 2-fold between wildtype and doxorubicin-resistant cells. The false discovery rate was set at 0.01 and the minimum p value for significance for any gene within the “hit list” was 0.01. Seventeen and 43 per cent of doxorubicin pharmacokinetic genes were over-represented in the hit list, depending upon whether the gene name was identical or within the same gene family, respectively. The most over-represented genes were within the 1C and 1B families of aldo-keto reductases (AKRs), which convert doxorubicin to doxorubicinol. Other genes convert doxorubicin to other metabolites or affect the influx, efflux, or cytotoxicity of the drug. In further support of the role of AKRs in doxorubicin resistance, we observed that, in comparison to doxorubicin, doxorubincol exhibited dramatically reduced cytotoxicity, reduced DNA-binding activity, and strong localization to extra nuclear lysosomes. Pharmacologic inhibition of the above AKRs in doxorubicin-resistant cells increased cellular doxorubicin levels, restored doxorubicin cytotoxicity and re-established doxorubicin localization to the nucleus. The properties of doxorubicinol were unaffected. These findings demonstrate the utility of using curated pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic knowledge bases to identify

  20. Anthracycline resistance mediated by reductive metabolism in cancer cells: The role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, Jakub; Malcekova, Beata; Skarka, Adam; Novotna, Eva; Wsol, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug resistance is a serious obstacle that emerges during cancer chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the possible role of aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3) in the resistance of cancer cells to anthracyclines. First, the reducing activity of AKR1C3 toward anthracyclines was tested using incubations with a purified recombinant enzyme. Furthermore, the intracellular reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin was examined by employing the transfection of A549, HeLa, MCF7 and HCT 116 cancer cells with an AKR1C3 encoding vector. To investigate the participation of AKR1C3 in anthracycline resistance, we conducted MTT cytotoxicity assays with these cells, and observed that AKR1C3 significantly contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to daunorubicin and idarubicin, whereas this resistance was reversible by the simultaneous administration of 2′-hydroxyflavanone, a specific AKR1C3 inhibitor. In the final part of our work, we tracked the changes in AKR1C3 expression after anthracycline exposure. Interestingly, a reciprocal correlation between the extent of induction and endogenous levels of AKR1C3 was recorded in particular cell lines. Therefore, we suggest that the induction of AKR1C3 following exposure to daunorubicin and idarubicin, which seems to be dependent on endogenous AKR1C3 expression, eventually might potentiate an intrinsic resistance given by the normal expression of AKR1C3. In conclusion, our data suggest a substantial impact of AKR1C3 on the metabolism of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which affects their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior. In addition, we demonstrate that the reduction of daunorubicin and idarubicin, which is catalyzed by AKR1C3, contributes to the resistance of cancer cells to anthracycline treatment. - Highlights: • Metabolism of anthracyclines by AKR1C3 was studied at enzyme and cellular levels. • Anthracycline resistance mediated by AKR1C3 was demonstrated in cancer cells. • Induction of AKR1C3

  1. Novel Aldo-Keto Reductases for the Biocatalytic Conversion of 3-Hydroxybutanal to 1,3-Butanediol: Structural and Biochemical Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taeho; Flick, Robert; Brunzelle, Joseph; Singer, Alex; Evdokimova, Elena; Brown, Greg; Joo, Jeong Chan; Minasov, George A.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Savchenko, Alexei; Yakunin, Alexander F. (KRICT); (Toronto); (NWU)

    2017-01-27

    The nonnatural alcohol 1,3-butanediol (1,3-BDO) is a valuable building block for the synthesis of various polymers. One of the potential pathways for the biosynthesis of 1,3-BDO includes the biotransformation of acetaldehyde to 1,3-BDO via 3-hydroxybutanal (3-HB) using aldolases and aldo-keto reductases (AKRs). This pathway requires an AKR selective for 3-HB, but inactive toward acetaldehyde, so it can be used for one-pot synthesis. In this work, we screened more than 20 purified uncharacterized AKRs for 3-HB reduction and identified 10 enzymes with significant activity and nine proteins with detectable activity. PA1127 fromPseudomonas aeruginosashowed the highest activity and was selected for comparative studies with STM2406 fromSalmonella entericaserovar Typhimurium, for which we have determined the crystal structure. Both AKRs used NADPH as a cofactor, reduced a broad range of aldehydes, and showed low activities toward acetaldehyde. The crystal structures of STM2406 in complex with cacodylate or NADPH revealed the active site with bound molecules of a substrate mimic or cofactor. Site-directed mutagenesis of STM2406 and PA1127 identified the key residues important for the activity against 3-HB and aromatic aldehydes, which include the residues of the substrate-binding pocket and C-terminal loop. Our results revealed that the replacement of the STM2406 Asn65 by Met enhanced the activity and the affinity of this protein toward 3-HB, resulting in a 7-fold increase inkcat/Km. Our work provides further insights into the molecular mechanisms of the substrate selectivity of AKRs and for the rational design of these enzymes toward new substrates.

    IMPORTANCEIn this study, we identified several aldo-keto reductases with significant activity in reducing 3

  2. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH Catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Yi; Huang, Meng; Penning, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR) catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quinones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox-cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis. PMID:23162467

  3. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase, HdRed, from the Pacific Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Which Reduces Alginate-derived 4-Deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid to 2-Keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shogo; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2015-12-25

    Abalone feeds on brown seaweeds and digests seaweeds' alginate with alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3). However, it has been unclear whether the end product of alginate lyases (i.e. unsaturated monouronate-derived 4-deoxy-L-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH)) is assimilated by abalone itself, because DEH cannot be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway of animals. Under these circumstances, we recently noticed the occurrence of an NADPH-dependent reductase, which reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate, in hepatopancreas extract of the pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. In the present study, we characterized this enzyme to some extent. The DEH reductase, named HdRed in the present study, could be purified from the acetone-dried powder of hepatopancreas by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by conventional column chromatographies. HdRed showed a single band of ∼ 40 kDa on SDS-PAGE and reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-gluconate with an optimal temperature and pH at around 50 °C and 7.0, respectively. HdRed exhibited no appreciable activity toward 28 authentic compounds, including aldehyde, aldose, ketose, α-keto-acid, uronic acid, deoxy sugar, sugar alcohol, carboxylic acid, ketone, and ester. The amino acid sequence of 371 residues of HdRed deduced from the cDNA showed 18-60% identities to those of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily enzymes, such as human aldose reductase, halophilic bacterium reductase, and sea hare norsolorinic acid (a polyketide derivative) reductase-like protein. Catalytic residues and cofactor binding residues known in AKR superfamily enzymes were fairly well conserved in HdRed. Phylogenetic analysis for HdRed and AKR superfamily enzymes indicated that HdRed is an AKR belonging to a novel family. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase, HdRed, from the Pacific Abalone Haliotis discus hannai, Which Reduces Alginate-derived 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid to 2-Keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Shogo; Nishiyama, Ryuji; Inoue, Akira; Ojima, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Abalone feeds on brown seaweeds and digests seaweeds' alginate with alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3). However, it has been unclear whether the end product of alginate lyases (i.e. unsaturated monouronate-derived 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH)) is assimilated by abalone itself, because DEH cannot be metabolized via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway of animals. Under these circumstances, we recently noticed the occurrence of an NADPH-dependent reductase, which reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate, in hepatopancreas extract of the pacific abalone Haliotis discus hannai. In the present study, we characterized this enzyme to some extent. The DEH reductase, named HdRed in the present study, could be purified from the acetone-dried powder of hepatopancreas by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by conventional column chromatographies. HdRed showed a single band of ∼40 kDa on SDS-PAGE and reduced DEH to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate with an optimal temperature and pH at around 50 °C and 7.0, respectively. HdRed exhibited no appreciable activity toward 28 authentic compounds, including aldehyde, aldose, ketose, α-keto-acid, uronic acid, deoxy sugar, sugar alcohol, carboxylic acid, ketone, and ester. The amino acid sequence of 371 residues of HdRed deduced from the cDNA showed 18–60% identities to those of aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily enzymes, such as human aldose reductase, halophilic bacterium reductase, and sea hare norsolorinic acid (a polyketide derivative) reductase-like protein. Catalytic residues and cofactor binding residues known in AKR superfamily enzymes were fairly well conserved in HdRed. Phylogenetic analysis for HdRed and AKR superfamily enzymes indicated that HdRed is an AKR belonging to a novel family. PMID:26555267

  5. A novel aldo-keto reductase from Jatropha curcas L. (JcAKR) plays a crucial role in the detoxification of methylglyoxal, a potent electrophile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalkar, Shalini; Sreeharsha, Rachapudi Venkata; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2016-05-20

    Abiotic stress leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which further results in the production of reactive carbonyls (RCs) including methylglyoxal (MG). MG, an α, β-dicarbonyl aldehyde, is highly toxic to plants and the mechanism behind its detoxification is not well understood. Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) play a role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes and ketones. In the present study, we cloned and characterised a putative AKR from Jatropha curcas (JcAKR). Phylogenetically, it forms a small clade with AKRs of Glycine max and Rauwolfia serpentina. JcAKR was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL-21(DE3) cells and the identity of the purified protein was confirmed through MALDI-TOF analysis. The recombinant protein had high enzyme activity and catalytic efficiency in assays containing MG as the substrate. Protein modelling and docking studies revealed MG was efficiently bound to JcAKR. Under progressive drought and salinity stress, the enzyme and transcript levels of JcAKR were higher in leaves compared to roots. Further, the bacterial and yeast cells expressing JcAKR showed more tolerance towards PEG (5%), NaCl (200mM) and MG (5mM) treatments compared to controls. In conclusion, our results project JcAKR as a possible and potential target in crop improvement for abiotic stress tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 B10 protein detoxifies dietary and lipid-derived alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls at physiological levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong, Linlin; Liu, Ziwen; Yan, Ruilan; Johnson, Stephen; Zhao, Yupei; Fang, Xiubin; Cao, Deliang

    2009-01-01

    Alpha, beta-unsaturated carbonyls are highly reactive mutagens and carcinogens to which humans are exposed on a daily basis. This study demonstrates that aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10) is a critical protein in detoxifying dietary and lipid-derived unsaturated carbonyls. Purified AKR1B10 recombinant protein efficiently catalyzed the reduction to less toxic alcohol forms of crotonaldehyde at 0.90 μM, 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) at 0.10 μM, trans-2-hexanal at 0.10 μM, and trans-2,4-hexadienal at 0.05 μM, the concentrations at or lower than physiological exposures. Ectopically expressed AKR1B10 in 293T cells eliminated immediately HNE at 1 (subtoxic) or 5 μM (toxic) by converting to 1,4-dihydroxynonene, protecting the cells from HNE toxicity. AKR1B10 protein also showed strong enzymatic activity toward glutathione-conjugated carbonyls. Taken together, our study results suggest that AKR1B10 specifically expressed in the intestine is physiologically important in protecting the host cell against dietary and lipid-derived cytotoxic carbonyls.

  7. Expression of human aldo-keto reductase 1C2 in cell lines of peritoneal endometriosis: potential implications in metabolism of progesterone and dydrogesterone and inhibition by progestins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beranič, Nataša; Brožič, Petra; Brus, Boris; Sosič, Izidor; Gobec, Stanislav; Lanišnik Rižner, Tea

    2012-05-01

    The human aldo-keto reductase AKR1C2 converts 5α-dihydrotestosterone to the less active 3α-androstanediol and has a minor 20-ketosteroid reductase activity that metabolises progesterone to 20α-hydroxyprogesterone. AKR1C2 is expressed in different peripheral tissues, but its role in uterine diseases like endometriosis has not been studied in detail. Some progestins used for treatment of endometriosis inhibit AKR1C1 and AKR1C3, with unknown effects on AKR1C2. In this study we investigated expression of AKR1C2 in the model cell lines of peritoneal endometriosis, and examined the ability of recombinant AKR1C2 to metabolise progesterone and progestin dydrogesterone, as well as its potential inhibition by progestins. AKR1C2 is expressed in epithelial and stromal endometriotic cell lines at the mRNA level. The recombinant enzyme catalyses reduction of progesterone to 20α-hydroxyprogesterone with a 10-fold lower catalytic efficiency than the major 20-ketosteroid reductase, AKR1C1. AKR1C2 also metabolises progestin dydrogesterone to its 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone, with 8.6-fold higher catalytic efficiency than 5α-dihydrotestosterone. Among the progestins that are currently used for treatment of endometriosis, dydrogesterone, medroxyprogesterone acetate and 20α-dihydrodydrogesterone act as AKR1C2 inhibitors with low μM K(i) values in vitro. Their potential in vivo effects should be further studied. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Isoenzyme-specific up-regulation of glutathione transferase and aldo-keto reductase mRNA expression by dietary quercetin in rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odbayar, Tseye-Oidov; Kimura, Toshinori; Tsushida, Tojiro; Ide, Takashi

    2009-05-01

    The impact of quercetin on the mRNA expression of hepatic enzymes involved in drug metabolism was evaluated with a DNA microarray and real-time PCR. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed an experimental diet containing either 0, 2.5, 5, 10, or 20 g/kg of quercetin for 15 days. The DNA microarray analysis of the gene expression profile in pooled RNA samples from rats fed diets containing 0, 5, and 20 g/kg of quercetin revealed genes of some isoenzymes of glutathione transferase (Gst) and aldo-keto reductase (Akr) to be activated by this flavonoid. Real-time PCR conducted with RNA samples from individual rats fed varying amounts of quercetin together with the microarray analysis showed that quercetin caused marked dose-dependent increases in the mRNA expression of Gsta3, Gstp1, and Gstt3. Some moderate increases were also noted in the mRNA expression of isoenzymes belonging to the Gstm class. Quercetin also dose-dependently increased the mRNA expression of Akr1b8 and Akr7a3. However, it did not affect the parameters of the other Gst and Akr isoenzymes. It is apparent that quercetin increases the mRNA expression of Gst and Akr involved in drug metabolism in an isoenzyme-specific manner. Inasmuch as Gst and Akr isoenzymes up-regulated in their gene expression are involved in the prevention and attenuation of cancer development, this consequence may account for the chemopreventive propensity of quercetin.

  9. Exposure to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone accelerates malignant progression of lung cancer cells through up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase 1B10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki, E-mail: matsunagat@gifu-pu.ac.jp [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Haga, Mariko; Endo, Satoshi [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Soda, Midori; Yamamura, Keiko [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacy, School of Pharmacy, Aichi Gakuin University, Nagoya 464-8650 (Japan); El-Kabbani, Ossama [Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Tajima, Kazuo [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokuriku University, Kanazawa 920-1181 (Japan); Ikari, Akira [Laboratory of Biochemistry, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, Gifu 501-1196 (Japan); Hara, Akira [Faculty of Engineering, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Inhalation of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust, exerts fatal damage against a variety of cells involved in respiratory function. Here, we show that treatment with high concentrations of 9,10-PQ evokes apoptosis of lung cancer A549 cells through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, 9,10-PQ at its concentrations of 2 and 5 μM elevated the potentials for proliferation, invasion, metastasis and tumorigenesis, all of which were almost completely inhibited by addition of an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, inferring a crucial role of ROS in the overgrowth and malignant progression of lung cancer cells. Comparison of mRNA expression levels of six aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells advocated up-regulation of AKR1B10 as a major cause contributing to the lung cancer malignancy. In support of this, the elevation of invasive, metastatic and tumorigenic activities in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells was significantly abolished by the addition of a selective AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid. Intriguingly, zymographic and real-time PCR analyses revealed remarkable increases in secretion and expression, respectively, of matrix metalloproteinase 2 during the 9,10-PQ treatment, and suggested that the AKR1B10 up-regulation and resultant activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are predominant mechanisms underlying the metalloproteinase induction. In addition, HPLC analysis and cytochrome c reduction assay in in vitro 9,10-PQ reduction by AKR1B10 demonstrated that the enzyme catalyzes redox-cycling of this quinone, by which ROS are produced. Collectively, these results suggest that AKR1B10 is a key regulator involved in overgrowth and malignant progression of the lung cancer cells through ROS production due to 9,10-PQ redox-cycling. - Highlights: • 9,10-PQ promotes invasion, metastasis and tumorigenicity in lung cancer cells. • The 9,10-PQ-elicited promotion is possibly due to AKR1B10 up

  10. Exposure to 9,10-phenanthrenequinone accelerates malignant progression of lung cancer cells through up-regulation of aldo-keto reductase 1B10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Morikawa, Yoshifumi; Haga, Mariko; Endo, Satoshi; Soda, Midori; Yamamura, Keiko; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Tajima, Kazuo; Ikari, Akira; Hara, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation of 9,10-phenanthrenequinone (9,10-PQ), a major quinone in diesel exhaust, exerts fatal damage against a variety of cells involved in respiratory function. Here, we show that treatment with high concentrations of 9,10-PQ evokes apoptosis of lung cancer A549 cells through production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In contrast, 9,10-PQ at its concentrations of 2 and 5 μM elevated the potentials for proliferation, invasion, metastasis and tumorigenesis, all of which were almost completely inhibited by addition of an antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, inferring a crucial role of ROS in the overgrowth and malignant progression of lung cancer cells. Comparison of mRNA expression levels of six aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells advocated up-regulation of AKR1B10 as a major cause contributing to the lung cancer malignancy. In support of this, the elevation of invasive, metastatic and tumorigenic activities in the 9,10-PQ-treated cells was significantly abolished by the addition of a selective AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid. Intriguingly, zymographic and real-time PCR analyses revealed remarkable increases in secretion and expression, respectively, of matrix metalloproteinase 2 during the 9,10-PQ treatment, and suggested that the AKR1B10 up-regulation and resultant activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade are predominant mechanisms underlying the metalloproteinase induction. In addition, HPLC analysis and cytochrome c reduction assay in in vitro 9,10-PQ reduction by AKR1B10 demonstrated that the enzyme catalyzes redox-cycling of this quinone, by which ROS are produced. Collectively, these results suggest that AKR1B10 is a key regulator involved in overgrowth and malignant progression of the lung cancer cells through ROS production due to 9,10-PQ redox-cycling. - Highlights: • 9,10-PQ promotes invasion, metastasis and tumorigenicity in lung cancer cells. • The 9,10-PQ-elicited promotion is possibly due to AKR1B10 up

  11. Pathophysiological roles of aldo-keto reductases (AKR1C1 and AKR1C3) in development of cisplatin resistance in human colon cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Hojo, Aki; Yamane, Yumi; Endo, Satoshi; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira

    2013-02-25

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP) is widely used for treatment of patients with solid tumors formed in various organs including the lung, prostate and cervix, but is much less sensitive in colon and breast cancers. One major factor implicated in the ineffectiveness has been suggested to be acquisition of the CDDP resistance. Here, we established the CDDP-resistant phenotypes of human colon HCT15 cells by continuously exposing them to incremental concentrations of the drug, and monitored expressions of aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) 1A1, 1B1, 1B10, 1C1, 1C2 and 1C3. Among the six AKRs, AKR1C1 and AKR1C3 are highly induced with the CDDP resistance. The resistance lowered the sensitivity toward cellular damages evoked by oxidative stress-derived aldehydes, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and 4-oxo-2-nonenal that are detoxified by AKR1C1 and AKR1C3. Overexpression of AKR1C1 or AKR1C3 in the parental HCT15 cells mitigated the cytotoxicity of the aldehydes and CDDP. Knockdown of both AKR1C1 and AKR1C3 in the resistant cells or treatment of the cells with specific inhibitors of the AKRs increased the sensitivity to CDDP toxicity. Thus, the two AKRs participate in the mechanism underlying the CDDP resistance probably via detoxification of the aldehydes resulting from enhanced oxidative stress. The resistant cells also showed an enhancement in proteolytic activity of proteasome accompanied by overexpression of its catalytic subunits (PSMβ9 and PSMβ10). Pretreatment of the resistant cells with a potent proteasome inhibitor Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al augmented the CDDP sensitization elicited by the AKR inhibitors. Additionally, the treatment of the cells with Z-Leu-Leu-Leu-al and the AKR inhibitors induced the expressions of the two AKRs and proteasome subunits. Collectively, these results suggest the involvement of up-regulated AKR1C1, AKR1C3 and proteasome in CDDP resistance of colon cancers and support a chemotherapeutic role for their inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland

  12. Crystal structures of three classes of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in complex with aldo-keto reductase 1C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack U Flanagan

    Full Text Available Aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3 catalyses the NADPH dependent reduction of carbonyl groups in a number of important steroid and prostanoid molecules. The enzyme is also over-expressed in prostate and breast cancer and its expression is correlated with the aggressiveness of the disease. The steroid products of AKR1C3 catalysis are important in proliferative signalling of hormone-responsive cells, while the prostanoid products promote prostaglandin-dependent proliferative pathways. In these ways, AKR1C3 contributes to tumour development and maintenance, and suggest that inhibition of AKR1C3 activity is an attractive target for the development of new anti-cancer therapies. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are one well-known class of compounds that inhibits AKR1C3, yet crystal structures have only been determined for this enzyme with flufenamic acid, indomethacin, and closely related analogues bound. While the flufenamic acid and indomethacin structures have been used to design novel inhibitors, they provide only limited coverage of the NSAIDs that inhibit AKR1C3 and that may be used for the development of new AKR1C3 targeted drugs. To understand how other NSAIDs bind to AKR1C3, we have determined ten crystal structures of AKR1C3 complexes that cover three different classes of NSAID, N-phenylanthranilic acids (meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, arylpropionic acids (flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, naproxen, and indomethacin analogues (indomethacin, sulindac, zomepirac. The N-phenylanthranilic and arylpropionic acids bind to common sites including the enzyme catalytic centre and a constitutive active site pocket, with the arylpropionic acids probing the constitutive pocket more effectively. By contrast, indomethacin and the indomethacin analogues sulindac and zomepirac, display three distinctly different binding modes that explain their relative inhibition of the AKR1C family members. This new data from ten crystal structures greatly broadens

  13. The Role of Human Aldo-Keto Reductases (AKRs in the Metabolic Activation and Detoxication of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons: Interconversion of PAH-catechols and PAH o-Quinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li eZhang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. They are procarcinogens requiring metabolic activation to elicit their deleterious effects. Aldo-keto reductases (AKR catalyze the oxidation of proximate carcinogenic PAH trans-dihydrodiols to yield electrophilic and redox-active PAH o-quiniones. AKRs are also found to be capable of reducing PAH o-quinones to form PAH catechols. The interconversion of o-quinones and catechols results in the redox cycling of PAH o-quinones to give rise to the generation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, PAH catechols can be intercepted through phase II metabolism by which PAH o-quinones could be detoxified and eliminated. The aim of the present review is to summarize the role of human AKRs in the metabolic activation/detoxication of PAH and the relevance of phase II conjugation reactions to human lung carcinogenesis.

  14. Sex hormones reduce NNK detoxification through inhibition of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases and aldo-keto reductases in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelfeld, Claudia; Maser, Edmund

    2017-10-01

    Carbonyl reduction is an important metabolic pathway for endogenous and xenobiotic substances. The tobacco specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK, nicotine-derived nitrosamine ketone) is classified as carcinogenic to humans (IARC, Group 1) and considered to play the most important role in tobacco-related lung carcinogenesis. Detoxification of NNK through carbonyl reduction is catalyzed by members of the AKR- and the SDR-superfamilies which include AKR1B10, AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C4, 11β-HSD1 and CBR1. Because some reductases are also involved in steroid metabolism, five different hormones were tested for their inhibitory effect on NNK carbonyl reduction. Two of those hormones were estrogens (estradiol and ethinylestradiol), another two hormones belong to the gestagen group (progesterone and drospirenone) and the last tested hormone was an androgen (testosterone). Furthermore, one of the estrogens (ethinylestradiol) and one of the gestagens (drospirenone) are synthetic hormones, used as hormonal contraceptives. Five of six NNK reducing enzymes (AKR1B10, AKR1C1, AKR1C2, AKR1C4 and 11β-HSD1) were significantly inhibited by the tested sex hormones. Only NNK reduction catalyzed by CBR1 was not significantly impaired. In the case of the other five reductases, gestagens had remarkably stronger inhibitory effects at a concentration of 25 μM (progesterone: 66-88% inhibition; drospirenone: 26-87% inhibition) in comparison to estrogens (estradiol: 17-51% inhibition; ethinylestradiol: 14-79% inhibition) and androgens (14-78% inhibition). Moreover, in most cases the synthetic hormones showed a greater ability to inhibit NNK reduction than the physiologic derivatives. These results demonstrate that male and female sex hormones have different inhibitory potentials, thus indicating that there is a varying detoxification capacity of NNK in men and women which could result in a different risk for developing lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  15. Crystal Structure of Perakine Reductase, Founding Member of a Novel Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR) Subfamily That Undergoes Unique Conformational Changes during NADPH Binding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianli; Chen, Yixin; Rajendran, Chitra; Mueller, Uwe; Panjikar, Santosh; Wang, Meitian; Mindnich, Rebekka; Rosenthal, Cindy; Penning, Trevor M.; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Perakine reductase (PR) catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the aldehyde perakine to yield the alcohol raucaffrinoline in the biosynthetic pathway of ajmaline in Rauvolfia, a key step in indole alkaloid biosynthesis. Sequence alignment shows that PR is the founder of the new AKR13D subfamily and is designated AKR13D1. The x-ray structure of methylated His6-PR was solved to 2.31 Å. However, the active site of PR was blocked by the connected parts of the neighbor symmetric molecule in the crystal. To break the interactions and obtain the enzyme-ligand complexes, the A213W mutant was generated. The atomic structure of His6-PR-A213W complex with NADPH was determined at 1.77 Å. Overall, PR folds in an unusual α8/β6 barrel that has not been observed in any other AKR protein to date. NADPH binds in an extended pocket, but the nicotinamide riboside moiety is disordered. Upon NADPH binding, dramatic conformational changes and movements were observed: two additional β-strands in the C terminus become ordered to form one α-helix, and a movement of up to 24 Å occurs. This conformational change creates a large space that allows the binding of substrates of variable size for PR and enhances the enzyme activity; as a result cooperative kinetics are observed as NADPH is varied. As the founding member of the new AKR13D subfamily, PR also provides a structural template and model of cofactor binding for the AKR13 family. PMID:22334702

  16. Sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis in LSL-KrasG12D-LSL-Trp53R172H-Pdx-1-Cre mice via suppressing aldo-keto reductase family 1B10 (AKR1B10).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haonan; Yang, Allison L; Chung, Yeon Tae; Zhang, Wanying; Liao, Jie; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2013-09-01

    Sulindac has been identified as a competitive inhibitor of aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10), an enzyme that plays a key role in carcinogenesis. AKR1B10 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and exhibits lipid substrate specificity, especially for farnesyl and geranylgeranyl. There have been no studies though showing that the inhibition of PDAC by sulindac is via inhibition of AKR1B10, particularly the metabolism of farnesyl/geranylgeranyl and Kras protein prenylation. To determine the chemopreventive effects of sulindac on pancreatic carcinogenesis, 5-week-old LSL-Kras(G12D)-LSL-Trp53(R172H)-Pdx-1-Cre mice (Pan(kras/p53) mice) were fed an AIN93M diet with or without 200 p.p.m. sulindac (n = 20/group). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that average animal survival in Pan(kras/p53) mice was 143.7 ± 8.8 days, and average survival with sulindac was increased to 168.0 ± 8.8 days (P < 0.005). Histopathological analyses revealed that 90% of mice developed PDAC, 10% with metastasis to the liver and lymph nodes. With sulindac, the incidence of PDAC was reduced to 56% (P < 0.01) and only one mouse had lymph node metastasis. Immunochemical analysis showed that sulindac significantly decreased Ki-67-labeled cell proliferation and markedly reduced the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), c-Raf and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2. In in vitro experiments with PDAC cells from Pan(kras/p53) mice, sulindac exhibited dose-dependent inhibition of AKR1B10 activity. By silencing AKR1B10 expression through small interfering RNA or by sulindac treatment, these in vitro models showed a reduction in Kras and human DNA-J homolog 2 protein prenylation, and downregulation of phosphorylated C-raf, ERK1/2 and MEK1/2 expression. Our results demonstrate that sulindac inhibits pancreatic carcinogenesis by the inhibition of Kras protein prenylation by targeting AKR1B10.

  17. Aldo-keto reductase 1B10 promotes development of cisplatin resistance in gastrointestinal cancer cells through down-regulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ayaka; Kezuka, Chihiro; Okumura, Naoko; Iguchi, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Ikuo; Soda, Midori; Endo, Satoshi; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Hara, Akira; Ikari, Akira

    2016-08-25

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum, CDDP) is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs that are used for treatment of patients with gastrointestinal cancer cells, but its continuous administration often evokes the development of chemoresistance. In this study, we investigated alterations in antioxidant molecules and functions using a newly established CDDP-resistant variant of gastric cancer MKN45 cells, and found that aldo-keto reductase 1B10 (AKR1B10) is significantly up-regulated with acquisition of the CDDP resistance. In the nonresistant MKN45 cells, the sensitivity to cytotoxic effect of CDDP was decreased and increased by overexpression and silencing of AKR1B10, respectively. In addition, the AKR1B10 overexpression markedly suppressed accumulation and cytotoxicity of 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal that is produced during lipid peroxidation by CDDP treatment, suggesting that the enzyme acts as a crucial factor for facilitation of the CDDP resistance through inhibiting induction of oxidative stress by the drug. Transient exposure to CDDP and induction of the CDDP resistance decreased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) in MKN45 and colon cancer LoVo cells. Additionally, overexpression of PPARγ in the cells elevated the sensitivity to the CDDP toxicity, which was further augmented by concomitant treatment with a PPARγ ligand rosiglitazone. Intriguingly, overexpression of AKR1B10 in the cells resulted in a decrease in PPARγ expression, which was recovered by addition of an AKR1B10 inhibitor oleanolic acid, inferring that PPARγ is a downstream target of AKR1B10-dependent mechanism underlying the CDDP resistance. Combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand elevated the CDDP sensitivity, which was almost the same level as that in the parental cells. These results suggest that combined treatment with the AKR1B10 inhibitor and PPARγ ligand is an effective adjuvant therapy for overcoming CDDP resistance of

  18. Isolation and primary structural analysis of two conjugated polyketone reductases from Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, A R; Akond, M A; Kita, K; Kataoka, M; Shimizu, S

    2001-12-01

    Two conjugated polyketone reductases (CPRs) were isolated from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708. The primary structures of CPRs (C1 and C2) were analyzed by amino acid sequencing. The amino acid sequences of both enzymes had high similarity to those of several proteins of the aldo-keto-reductase (AKR) superfamily. However, several amino acid residues in the putative active sites of AKRs were not conserved in CPRs-C1 and -C2.

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR

  1. Crystal structure of conjugated polyketone reductase (CPR-C1) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 complexed with NADPH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui-Min; Yamamura, Akihiro; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2013-11-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase (CPR-C1) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 is a member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily and reduces ketopantoyl lactone to d-pantoyl lactone in a NADPH-dependent and stereospecific manner. We determined the crystal structure of CPR-C1.NADPH complex at 2.20 Å resolution. CPR-C1 adopted a triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel fold at the core of the structure in which Thr25 and Lys26 of the GXGTX motif bind uniquely to the adenosine 2'-phosphate group of NADPH. This finding provides a novel structural basis for NADPH binding of the AKR superfamily. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Aldo-keto Reductase Family 1 B10 as a Novel Target for Breast Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    overexpressed in tested human breast cancer tissues and mediates acetyl-CoA carboxylase-α ( ACCA ) stability, affecting fatty acid de novo synthesis and...9703; Fax. 217-545-3227; E-mail: dcao@siumed.edu Running title: AKR1B10 as a new risk factor for breast cancer Abbreviations used: ACCA , acetyl...The effect of AKR1B10 expression in cancer tissue on patient survival was evaluated with Kaplan - Meier plots, and results showed that AKR1B10

  3. Effect of thermal stability on protein adsorption to silica using homologous aldo-keto reductases

    OpenAIRE

    Felsovalyi, Flora; Patel, Tushar; Mangiagalli, Paolo; Kumar, Sanat K; Banta, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Gaining more insight into the mechanisms governing the behavior of proteins at solid/liquid interfaces is particularly relevant in the interaction of high-value biologics with storage and delivery device surfaces, where adsorption-induced conformational changes may dramatically affect biocompatibility. The impact of structural stability on interfacial behavior has been previously investigated by engineering nonwild-type stability mutants. Potential shortcomings of such approaches include only...

  4. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Akihiro; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Miyakawa, Takuya; Nagata, Koji; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-11-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 is a member of the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily and catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of ketopantoyl lactone to d-pantoyl lactone. A diffraction-quality crystal of recombinant CPR-C2 was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.7 angstrom resolution on beamline NW12A of the Photon Factory-Advanced Ring (Tsukuba, Japan). The crystal belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 55.02, b = 68.30, c = 68.93 angstrom. The Matthews coefficient (V(M) = 1.76 angstrom(3) Da(-1)) indicated that the crystal contained one CPR-C2 molecule per asymmetric unit.

  5. Structure of conjugated polyketone reductase from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 reveals conformational changes for substrate recognition upon NADPH binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Hui-Min; Yamamura, Akihiro; Miyakawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Michihiko; Nagai, Takahiro; Kitamura, Nahoko; Urano, Nobuyuki; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nagata, Koji; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708, identified as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ketopantoyl lactone reductase, belongs to the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. This enzyme reduces ketopantoyl lactone to D-pantoyl lactone in a strictly stereospecific manner. To elucidate the structural basis of the substrate specificity, we determined the crystal structures of the apo CPR-C2 and CPR-C2/NADPH complex at 1.70 and 1.80 Å resolutions, respectively. CPR-C2 adopted a triose-phosphate isomerase barrel fold at the core of the structure. Binding with the cofactor NADPH induced conformational changes in which Thr27 and Lys28 moved 15 and 5.0 Å, respectively, in the close vicinity of the adenosine 2'-phosphate group of NADPH to form hydrogen bonds. Based on the comparison of the CPR-C2/NADPH structure with 3-α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and mutation analyses, we constructed substrate binding models with ketopantoyl lactone, which provided insight into the substrate specificity by the cofactor-induced structure. The results will be useful for the rational design of CPR-C2 mutants targeted for use in the industrial manufacture of ketopantoyl lactone.

  6. Reductive detoxification of acrolein as a potential role for aldehyde reductase (AKR1A) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kwon, Myoungsu; Homma, Takujiro; Saito, Yuka; Lee, Jaeyong; Takahashi, Motoko; Yamada, Ken-Ichi; Miyata, Satoshi; Fujii, Junichi

    2014-09-12

    Aldehyde reductase (AKR1A), a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily, suppresses diabetic complications via a reduction in metabolic intermediates; it also plays a role in ascorbic acid biosynthesis in mice. Because primates cannot synthesize ascorbic acid, a principle role of AKR1A appears to be the reductive detoxification of aldehydes. In this study, we isolated and immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from wild-type (WT) and human Akr1a-transgenic (Tg) mice and used them to investigate the potential roles of AKR1A under culture conditions. Tg MEFs showed higher methylglyoxal- and acrolein-reducing activities than WT MEFs and also were more resistant to cytotoxicity. Enzymatic analyses of purified rat AKR1A showed that the efficiency of the acrolein reduction was about 20% that of glyceraldehyde. Ascorbic acid levels were quite low in the MEFs, and while the administration of ascorbic acid to the cells increased the intracellular levels of ascorbic acid, it had no affect on the resistance to acrolein. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and protein carbonylation induced by acrolein treatment were less evident in Tg MEFs than in WT MEFs. These data collectively indicate that one of the principle roles of AKR1A in primates is the reductive detoxification of aldehydes, notably acrolein, and protection from its detrimental effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Akihiro; Maruoka, Shintaro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Miyakawa, Takuya; Nagata, Koji; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kitamura, Nahoko; Shimizu, Sakayu; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 from C. parapsilosis IFO 0708 was expressed, purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 and diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution. Conjugated polyketone reductase C2 (CPR-C2) from Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708 is a member of the NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily and catalyzes the stereospecific reduction of ketopantoyl lactone to d-pantoyl lactone. A diffraction-quality crystal of recombinant CPR-C2 was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 3350 as the precipitant. The crystal diffracted X-rays to 1.7 Å resolution on beamline NW12A of the Photon Factory-Advanced Ring (Tsukuba, Japan). The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 55.02, b = 68.30, c = 68.93 Å. The Matthews coefficient (V M = 1.76 Å 3 Da −1 ) indicated that the crystal contained one CPR-C2 molecule per asymmetric unit

  8. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giménez-Dejoz, J.; Kolář, Michal H.; Ruiz, F. X.; Crespo, I.; Cousido-Siah, A.; Podjarny, A.; Barski, O. A.; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Parés, X.; Farrés, J.; Porté, S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 7 (2015), e0134506/1-e0134506/19 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : retinoic acid biosynthesis * site-directed mutagenesis * tumor marker AKR1B15 Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015 http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0134506

  9. Subdivision of the MDR superfamily of medium-chain dehydrogenases/reductases through iterative hidden Markov model refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Medium-chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases (MDR form a protein superfamily whose size and complexity defeats traditional means of subclassification; it currently has over 15000 members in the databases, the pairwise sequence identity is typically around 25%, there are members from all kingdoms of life, the chain-lengths vary as does the oligomericity, and the members are partaking in a multitude of biological processes. There are profile hidden Markov models (HMMs available for detecting MDR superfamily members, but none for determining which MDR family each protein belongs to. The current torrential influx of new sequence data enables elucidation of more and more protein families, and at an increasingly fine granularity. However, gathering good quality training data usually requires manual attention by experts and has therefore been the rate limiting step for expanding the number of available models. Results We have developed an automated algorithm for HMM refinement that produces stable and reliable models for protein families. This algorithm uses relationships found in data to generate confident seed sets. Using this algorithm we have produced HMMs for 86 distinct MDR families and 34 of their subfamilies which can be used in automated annotation of new sequences. We find that MDR forms with 2 Zn2+ ions in general are dehydrogenases, while MDR forms with no Zn2+ in general are reductases. Furthermore, in Bacteria MDRs without Zn2+ are more frequent than those with Zn2+, while the opposite is true for eukaryotic MDRs, indicating that Zn2+ has been recruited into the MDR superfamily after the initial life kingdom separations. We have also developed a web site http://mdr-enzymes.org that provides textual and numeric search against various characterised MDR family properties, as well as sequence scan functions for reliable classification of novel MDR sequences. Conclusions Our method of refinement can be readily applied to

  10. Genetic variation of Aflatoxin B(1) aldehyde reductase genes (AFAR) in human tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Praml, Christian; Schulz, Wolfgang; Claas, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    AFAR genes play a key role in the detoxification of the carcinogen Aflatoxin B(1) (AFB(1)). In the rat, Afar1 induction can prevent AFB(1)-induced liver cancer. It has been proposed that AFAR enzymes can metabolise endogenous diketones and dialdehydes that may be cytotoxic and/or genotoxic. Furth...... many aldo-keto reductases. This polarity change may have an effect on the proposed substrate binding amino acids nearby (Met(47), Tyr(48), Asp(50)). Further population analyses and functional studies of the nine variants detected may show if these variants are disease-related....

  11. Detection of Dichlorvos Adducts in a Hepatocyte Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-30

    5453543 aldo -keto reductase family 1 member C1 aldo -keto reductase TRUE 3 156523970 alpha-2-HS-glycoprotein preproprotein 5 4503571 alpha-enolase...enolase, (YISPDQLADLYK), three variants were identified with adducts on the first, second, or both tyrosines (Figure 2), and for one peptide in aldo -keto...suggesting the possibility that DDVP adducts could alter biological activities. The modifications of aldo -keto reductase family 1 members at three

  12. Long-term In Vitro Treatment of Human Glioblastoma Cells with Temozolomide Increases Resistance In Vivo through Up-regulation of GLUT Transporter and Aldo-Keto Reductase Enzyme AKR1C Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Le Calvé

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most frequent malignant glioma. Treatment of GBM patients is multimodal with maximum surgical resection, followed by concurrent radiation and chemotherapy with the alkylating drug temozolomide (TMZ. The present study aims to identify genes implicated in the acquired resistance of two human GBM cells of astrocytic origin, T98G and U373, to TMZ. Resistance to TMZ was induced by culturing these cells in vitro for months with incremental TMZ concentrations up to 1 mM. Only partial resistance to TMZ has been achieved and was demonstrated in vivo in immunocompromised mice bearing orthotopic U373 and T98G xenografts. Our data show that long-term treatment of human astroglioma cells with TMZ induces increased expression of facilitative glucose transporter/solute carrier GLUT/SLC2A family members, mainly GLUT-3, and of the AKR1C family of proteins. The latter proteins are phase 1 drug-metabolizing enzymes involved in the maintenance of steroid homeostasis, prostaglandin metabolism, and metabolic activation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. GLUT-3 has been previously suggested to exert roles in GBM neovascularization processes, and TMZ was found to exert antiangiogenic effects in experimental gliomas. AKR1C1 was previously shown to be associated with oncogenic potential, with proproliferative effects similar to AKR1C3 in the latter case. Both AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 proteins are involved in cancer pro-proliferative cell chemoresistance. Selective targeting of GLUT-3 in GBM and/or AKR1C proteins (by means of jasmonates, for example could thus delay the acquisition of resistance to TMZ of astroglioma cells in the context of prolonged treatment with this drug.

  13. Overview of Catalytic Properties of Fungal Xylose Reductases and Molecular Engineering Approaches for Improved Xylose Utilisation in Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sk Amir Hossain

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Xylose reductases belong to the aldo-keto reductase family of enzymes, which catalyse the conversion of xylose to xylitol. Yeast xylose reductases have been intensively studied in the last two decades due to their significance in biotechnological production of ethanol and xylitol from xylose. Due to its GRAS status and pronounced tolerance to harsh conditions, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the ideal organism for industrial production of both xylitol and ethanol. However, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to use xylose as the sole carbon source due to the lack of xylose specific transporters and insufficient activity of metabolic pathways for xylose utilisation. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of attempts in increasing biotechnological potential of xylose reductases and to highlight the prospective of this application. Results and Conclusion: In order to create strains with improved xylose utilization, different approaches were attempted including simultaneous overexpression of xylitol dehydrogenase, xylose reductase and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes, heterologous expression of putative xylose transporters or heterologous expression of genes coding for enzymes included in the xylose metabolism, respectively. Furthermore, number of attempts to genetically modify different xylose reductases is increasing. This review presents current knowledge about yeast xylose reductases and the different approaches applied in order to improve xylose metabolism in yeast.Conflict of interest: The authors declare no conflict of interest.

  14. Structural and Biochemical Investigation of PglF from Campylobacter jejuni Reveals a New Mechanism for a Member of the Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riegert, Alexander S. [Department; Thoden, James B. [Department; Schoenhofen, Ian C. [National; Watson, David C. [National; Young, N. Martin [National; Tipton, Peter A. [Department; Holden, Hazel M. [Department

    2017-11-03

    Within recent years it has become apparent that protein glycosylation is not limited to eukaryotes. Indeed, in Campylobacter jejuni, a Gram-negative bacterium, more than 60 of its proteins are known to be glycosylated. One of the sugars found in such glycosylated proteins is 2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-α-d-glucopyranose, hereafter referred to as QuiNAc4NAc. The pathway for its biosynthesis, initiating with UDP-GlcNAc, requires three enzymes referred to as PglF, PglE, and PlgD. The focus of this investigation is on PglF, an NAD+-dependent sugar 4,6-dehydratase known to belong to the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Specifically, PglF catalyzes the first step in the pathway, namely, the dehydration of UDP-GlcNAc to UDP-2-acetamido-2,6-dideoxy-α-d-xylo-hexos-4-ulose. Most members of the SDR superfamily contain a characteristic signature sequence of YXXXK where the conserved tyrosine functions as a catalytic acid or a base. Strikingly, in PglF, this residue is a methionine. Here we describe a detailed structural and functional investigation of PglF from C. jejuni. For this investigation five X-ray structures were determined to resolutions of 2.0 Å or better. In addition, kinetic analyses of the wild-type and site-directed variants were performed. On the basis of the data reported herein, a new catalytic mechanism for a SDR superfamily member is proposed that does not require the typically conserved tyrosine residue.

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CINT-01-0121 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CINT-01-0121 ref|ZP_01612781.1| Aldo/keto reductase [Alteromonadales bacterium... TW-7] gb|EAW27959.1| Aldo/keto reductase [Alteromonadales bacterium TW-7] ZP_01612781.1 1.7 25% ...

  16. Purification, cloning, functional expression and characterization of perakine reductase: the first example from the AKR enzyme family, extending the alkaloidal network of the plant Rauvolfia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianli; Ruppert, Martin; Sheludko, Yuri; Warzecha, Heribert; Zhao, Yu; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2008-07-01

    Perakine reductase (PR) catalyzes an NADPH-dependent step in a side-branch of the 10-step biosynthetic pathway of the alkaloid ajmaline. The enzyme was cloned by a "reverse-genetic" approach from cell suspension cultures of the plant Rauvolfia serpentina (Apocynaceae) and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli as the N-terminal His(6)-tagged protein. PR displays a broad substrate acceptance, converting 16 out of 28 tested compounds with reducible carbonyl function which belong to three substrate groups: benzaldehyde, cinnamic aldehyde derivatives and monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. The enzyme has an extraordinary selectivity in the group of alkaloids. Sequence alignments define PR as a new member of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) super family, exhibiting the conserved catalytic tetrad Asp52, Tyr57, Lys84, His126. Site-directed mutagenesis of each of these functional residues to an alanine residue results in >97.8% loss of enzyme activity, in compounds of each substrate group. PR represents the first example of the large AKR-family which is involved in the biosynthesis of plant monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. In addition to a new esterase, PR significantly extends the Rauvolfia alkaloid network to the novel group of peraksine alkaloids.

  17. High-resolution neutron protein crystallography with radically small crystal volumes: Application of perdeuteration to human aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazemann, I.; Dauvergne, M.T.; Blakeley, M.P.; Meilleur, Flora; Haertlein, M.; Van Dorsselaer, A.; Mitschler, A.; Myles, Dean A.A.; Podjarny, A.

    2005-01-01

    Neutron diffraction data have been collected to 2.2 (angstrom) resolution from a small (0.15 mm 3 ) crystal of perdeuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR; MW = 36 kDa) in order to help to determine the protonation state of the enzyme. h-AR belongs to the aldo-keto reductase family and is implicated in diabetic complications. Its ternary complexes (h-AR-coenzyme NADPH-selected inhibitor) provide a good model to study both the enzymatic mechanism and inhibition. Here, the successful production of fully deuterated human aldose reductase (h-AR(D)), subsequent crystallization of the ternary complex h-AR(D)-NADPH-IDD594 and neutron Laue data collection at the LADI instrument at ILL using a crystal volume of just 0.15 mm 3 are reported. Neutron data were recorded to 2 (angstrom) resolution, with subsequent data analysis using data to 2.2 (angstrom). This is the first fully deuterated enzyme of this size (36 kDa) to be solved by neutron diffraction and represents a milestone in the field, as the crystal volume is at least one order of magnitude smaller than those usually required for other high-resolution neutron structures determined to date. This illustrates the significant increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of data collected from perdeuterated crystals and demonstrates that good-quality neutron data can now be collected from more typical protein crystal volumes. Indeed, the signal-to-noise ratio is then dominated by other sources of instrument background, the nature of which is under investigation. This is important for the design of future instruments, which should take maximum advantage of the reduction in the intrinsic diffraction pattern background from fully deuterated samples.

  18. Identification and functional evaluation of the reductases and dehydrogenases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae involved in vanillin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinning; Liang, Zhenzhen; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Vanillin, a type of phenolic released during the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic materials, is toxic to microorganisms and therefore its presence inhibits the fermentation. The vanillin can be reduced to vanillyl alcohol, which is much less toxic, by the ethanol producer Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reducing capacity of S. cerevisiae and its vanillin resistance are strongly correlated. However, the specific enzymes and their contribution to the vanillin reduction are not extensively studied. In our previous work, an evolved vanillin-resistant strain showed an increased vanillin reduction capacity compared with its parent strain. The transcriptome analysis suggested the reductases and dehydrogenases of this vanillin resistant strain were up-regulated. Using this as a starting point, 11 significantly regulated reductases and dehydrogenases were selected in the present work for further study. The roles of these reductases and dehydrogenases in the vanillin tolerance and detoxification abilities of S. cerevisiae are described. Among the candidate genes, the overexpression of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene ADH6, acetaldehyde dehydrogenase gene ALD6, glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase gene ZWF1, NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase gene YNL134C, and aldo-keto reductase gene YJR096W increased 177, 25, 6, 15, and 18 % of the strain μmax in the medium containing 1 g L(-1) vanillin. The in vitro detected vanillin reductase activities of strain overexpressing ADH6, YNL134C and YJR096W were notably higher than control. The vanillin specific reduction rate increased by 8 times in ADH6 overexpressed strain but not in YNL134C and YJR096W overexpressed strain. This suggested that the enzymes encoded by YNL134C and YJR096W might prefer other substrate and/or could not show their effects on vanillin on the high background of Adh6p in vivo. Overexpressing ALD6 and ZWF1 mainly increased the [NADPH]/[NADP(+)] and [GSH]/[GSSG] ratios but not the vanillin reductase activities. Their

  19. Hic-5’s Regulatory Role in TGFB Signaling in Prostate Stroma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    the androgen metabolites 3α-Adiol and 3β-Adiol, and their importance is underscored by high expression levels of the aldo keto reductase (AKR1C...known as aldo -keto reductases (AKR1C) [33]. DU145 cells express AKR1C enzymes and are capable of catalyzing redox reactions at the C17 position of...584-95. 37. Bauman, D.R., et al., Development of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug analogs and steroid carboxylates selective for human aldo -keto

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZO(A)PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzo[alpyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  1. LC/MSMS STUDY OF BENZO[A]PYRENE-7,8-QUINONE ADDUCTION TO GLOBIN TRYPTIC PEPTIDES AND N-ACETYLAMINO ACIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-quinone (BPQ) is regarded as a reactive genotoxic compound enzymatically formed from a xenobiotic precursor benzo[a]pyrene-7,8-diol by aldo-keto-reductase family of enzymes. Because BPQ, a Michael electrophile, was previously shown to react with oligonucleotide...

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF STABLE BENZOLALPYRENE-7,8-QUINONE-DNA ADDUCTS IN CALF THYMUS DNA AND POLYDEOXYNUCLEOTIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bcnzo[a]pyrene-7,8-dione (BPQ) is a reactive aldo-keto reductase-mediated product of B[a]P-7,8-diol, a major P450/epoxide hydrolase metabolite of the multi-species carcinogen, B[a]P. The role of BPQ in B[a]P's genotoxicity and carcinogenesis is evolving. Toxicity pathways involvi...

  3. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of intermediate subfamily under SDR (short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase) superfamily that revealed mechanisms of in situ detoxification of furfural and HMF for tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames ...

  4. Structure and mechanism of dimethylsulfoxide reductase, a molybdopterin-containing enzyme of DMSO reductase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwan, A.G.; Ridge, J.P.; McDevitt, C.A.; Hanson, G.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Apart from nitrogenase, enzymes containing molybdenum are members of a superfamily, the molybdopterin-containing enzymes. Most of these enzymes catalyse an oxygen atom transfer and two electron transfer reaction. During catalysis the Mo at the active site cycles between the Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states. The DMSO reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes all contain a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)Mo cofactor and over thirty examples have now been described. Over the last five years crystal structures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase and four other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family have revealed that enzymes of this family have a similar tertiary structure. The Mo atom at the active site is coordinated by four thiolate ligands provided by the dithiolene side chains of the two MGD molecules of the bis(MGD)Mo cofactor as well as a ligand provided by an amino acid side chain. In addition, an oxygen atom in the form of an oxo, hydroxo or aqua group is also coordinated to the Mo atom. In the case of dimethylsulfoxide reductase X-ray crystallography of the product-reduced species and Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated that the enzyme contains a single exchangeable oxo group that is H-bonded to W116

  5. Two differentially regulated Arabidopsis genes define a new branch of the DFR superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, L; Lauvergeat, V; Naested, H

    2001-01-01

    that, whereas high expression of AtCRL1 in mature seeds declines during subsequent vegetative growth, transcriptional activity from the AtCRL2 promoter increases during vegetative growth. Expression of both genes is restricted to vascular tissue. Based upon their homology to proteins involved in lignin......Two tandem genes were identified on Arabidopsis chromosome II (AtCRL1 and AtCRL2) encoding proteins with homology to members of the dihydroflavonol-4-reductase (DFR) superfamily. The encoded CRL1 and CRL2 proteins share 87% mutual amino acid sequence identity whereas their promoter regions...

  6. High-resolution structure of AKR1a4 in the apo form and its interaction with ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faucher, Frédérick; Jia, Zongchao

    2012-01-01

    Despite its high affinity for NADPH, AKR1a4 crystallized in the apo form, which is very rare for aldo-keto reductase enzymes. Aldo-keto reductase 1a4 (AKR1a4; EC 1.1.1.2) is the mouse orthologue of human aldehyde reductase (AKR1a1), the founding member of the AKR family. As an NADPH-dependent enzyme, AKR1a4 catalyses the conversion of d-glucuronate to l-gulonate. AKR1a4 is involved in ascorbate biosynthesis in mice, but has also recently been found to interact with SMAR1, providing a novel mechanism of ROS regulation by ATM. Here, the crystal structure of AKR1a4 in its apo form at 1.64 Å resolution as well as the characterization of the binding of AKR1a4 to NADPH and P44, a peptide derived from SMAR1, is presented

  7. Relationship between Apolipoprotein Superfamily and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: The Apo superfamily has been proved to be closely involved in the initiation, progression, and prognosis of PD. Apos and their genes are of great value in predicting the susceptibility of PD and hopeful to become the target of medical intervention to prevent the onset of PD or slow down the progress. Therefore, further large-scale studies are warranted to elucidate the precise mechanisms of Apos in PD.

  8. Designer TGFβ superfamily ligands with diversified functionality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George P Allendorph

    Full Text Available Transforming Growth Factor--beta (TGFβ superfamily ligands, including Activins, Growth and Differentiation Factors (GDFs, and Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs, are excellent targets for protein-based therapeutics because of their pervasiveness in numerous developmental and cellular processes. We developed a strategy termed RASCH (Random Assembly of Segmental Chimera and Heteromer, to engineer chemically-refoldable TGFβ superfamily ligands with unique signaling properties. One of these engineered ligands, AB208, created from Activin-βA and BMP-2 sequences, exhibits the refolding characteristics of BMP-2 while possessing Activin-like signaling attributes. Further, we find several additional ligands, AB204, AB211, and AB215, which initiate the intracellular Smad1-mediated signaling pathways more strongly than BMP-2 but show no sensitivity to the natural BMP antagonist Noggin unlike natural BMP-2. In another design, incorporation of a short N-terminal segment from BMP-2 was sufficient to enable chemical refolding of BMP-9, without which was never produced nor refolded. Our studies show that the RASCH strategy enables us to expand the functional repertoire of TGFβ superfamily ligands through development of novel chimeric TGFβ ligands with diverse biological and clinical values.

  9. Main trends of karyotype evolution in the superfamily Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available An overview of karyotype evolution in the superfamily Chalcidoidea is given. Structural types of chromosome sets in the superfamily are listed. Main pathways of karyotypic change in the Chalcidoidea are outlined. The chromosome set containing eleven subtelo- or acrocentrics is considered as an ancestral karyotype for the superfamily. Multiple independent reductions in n values through chromosomal fusions presumably occurred in various groups of chalcid families.

  10. Comparative analysis of cystatin superfamily in platyhelminths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aijiang Guo

    Full Text Available The cystatin superfamily is comprised of cysteine proteinase inhibitors and encompasses at least 3 subfamilies: stefins, cystatins and kininogens. In this study, the platyhelminth cystatin superfamily was identified and grouped into stefin and cystatin subfamilies. The conserved domain of stefins (G, QxVxG was observed in all members of platyhelminth stefins. The three characteristics of cystatins, the cystatin-like domain (G, QxVxG, PW, a signal peptide, and one or two conserved disulfide bonds, were observed in platyhelminths, with the exception of cestodes, which lacked the conserved disulfide bond. However, it is noteworthy that cestode cystatins had two tandem repeated domains, although the second tandem repeated domain did not contain a cystatin-like domain, which has not been previously reported. Tertiary structure analysis of Taenia solium cystatin, one of the cestode cystatins, demonstrated that the N-terminus of T. solium cystatin formed a five turn α-helix, a five stranded β-pleated sheet and a hydrophobic edge, similar to the structure of chicken cystatin. Although no conserved disulfide bond was found in T. solium cystatin, the models of T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin corresponded at the site of the first disulfide bridge of the chicken cystatin. However, the two models were not similar regarding the location of the second disulfide bridge of chicken cystatin. These results showed that T. solium cystatin and chicken cystatin had similarities and differences, suggesting that the biochemistry of T. solium cystatin could be similar to chicken cystatin in its inhibitory function and that it may have further functional roles. The same results were obtained for other cestode cystatins. Phylogenetic analysis showed that cestode cystatins constituted an independent clade and implied that cestode cystatins should be considered to have formed a new clade during evolution.

  11. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranyee A Chiang

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized

  12. Evolutionarily conserved substrate substructures for automated annotation of enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Ranyee A; Sali, Andrej; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2008-08-01

    The evolution of enzymes affects how well a species can adapt to new environmental conditions. During enzyme evolution, certain aspects of molecular function are conserved while other aspects can vary. Aspects of function that are more difficult to change or that need to be reused in multiple contexts are often conserved, while those that vary may indicate functions that are more easily changed or that are no longer required. In analogy to the study of conservation patterns in enzyme sequences and structures, we have examined the patterns of conservation and variation in enzyme function by analyzing graph isomorphisms among enzyme substrates of a large number of enzyme superfamilies. This systematic analysis of substrate substructures establishes the conservation patterns that typify individual superfamilies. Specifically, we determined the chemical substructures that are conserved among all known substrates of a superfamily and the substructures that are reacting in these substrates and then examined the relationship between the two. Across the 42 superfamilies that were analyzed, substantial variation was found in how much of the conserved substructure is reacting, suggesting that superfamilies may not be easily grouped into discrete and separable categories. Instead, our results suggest that many superfamilies may need to be treated individually for analyses of evolution, function prediction, and guiding enzyme engineering strategies. Annotating superfamilies with these conserved and reacting substructure patterns provides information that is orthogonal to information provided by studies of conservation in superfamily sequences and structures, thereby improving the precision with which we can predict the functions of enzymes of unknown function and direct studies in enzyme engineering. Because the method is automated, it is suitable for large-scale characterization and comparison of fundamental functional capabilities of both characterized and uncharacterized

  13. Purification and characterization of akr1b10 from human liver: role in carbonyl reduction of xenobiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Breyer-Pfaff, Ursula; Wsol, Vladimir; Venz, Simone; Block, Simone; Maser, Edmund

    2006-03-01

    Members of the aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily have a broad substrate specificity in catalyzing the reduction of carbonyl group-containing xenobiotics. In the present investigation, a member of the aldose reductase subfamily, AKR1B10, was purified from human liver cytosol. This is the first time AKR1B10 has been purified in its native form. AKR1B10 showed a molecular mass of 35 kDa upon gel filtration and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Kinetic parameters for the NADPH-dependent reduction of the antiemetic 5-HT3 receptor antagonist dolasetron, the antitumor drugs daunorubicin and oracin, and the carcinogen 4-methylnitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) to the corresponding alcohols have been determined by HPLC. Km values ranged between 0.06 mM for dolasetron and 1.1 mM for daunorubicin. Enzymatic efficiencies calculated as kcat/Km were more than 100 mM-1 min-1 for dolasetron and 1.3, 0.43, and 0.47 mM-1 min-1 for daunorubicin, oracin, and NNK, respectively. Thus, AKR1B10 is one of the most significant reductases in the activation of dolasetron. In addition to its reducing activity, AKR1B10 catalyzed the NADP+-dependent oxidation of the secondary alcohol (S)-1-indanol to 1-indanone with high enzymatic efficiency (kcat/Km=112 mM-1 min-1). The gene encoding AKR1B10 was cloned from a human liver cDNA library and the recombinant enzyme was purified. Kinetic studies revealed lower activity of the recombinant compared with the native form. Immunoblot studies indicated large interindividual variations in the expression of AKR1B10 in human liver. Since carbonyl reduction of xenobiotics often leads to their inactivation, AKR1B10 may play a role in the occurrence of chemoresistance of tumors toward carbonyl group-bearing cytostatic drugs.

  14. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase r...

  15. Ketopantoyl lactone reductase is a conjugated polyketone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, H; Shimizu, S; Hattori, S; Yamada, H

    1989-03-01

    Ketopantoyl lactone reductase (EC 1.1.1.168) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was found to catalyze the reduction of a variety of natural and unnatural conjugated polyketone compounds and quinones, such as isatin, ninhydrin, camphorquinone and beta-naphthoquinone in the presence of NADPH. 5-Bromoisatin is the best substrate for the enzyme (Km = 3.1 mM; Vmax = 650 mumol/min/mg). The enzyme is inhibited by quercetin, and several polyketones. These results suggest that ketopantoyl lactone reductase is a carbonyl reductase which specifically catalyzes the reduction of conjugated polyketones.

  16. The Drosophila carbonyl reductase sniffer is an efficient 4-oxonon-2-enal (4ONE) reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Hans-Jörg; Ziemba, Marta; Kisiela, Michael; Botella, José A; Schneuwly, Stephan; Maser, Edmund

    2011-05-30

    Studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that the enzyme sniffer prevented oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration. Mutant flies overexpressing sniffer had significantly extended life spans in a 99.5% oxygen atmosphere compared to wild-type flies. However, the molecular mechanism of this protection remained unclear. Sequence analysis and database searches identified sniffer as a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily with a 27.4% identity to the human enzyme carbonyl reductase type I (CBR1). As CBR1 catalyzes the reduction of the lipid peroxidation products 4HNE and 4ONE, we tested whether sniffer is able to metabolize these lipid derived aldehydes by carbonyl reduction. To produce recombinant enzyme, the coding sequence of sniffer was amplified from a cDNA-library, cloned into a bacterial expression vector and the His-tagged protein was purified by Ni-chelate chromatography. We found that sniffer catalyzed the NADPH-dependent carbonyl reduction of 4ONE (K(m)=24±2 μM, k(cat)=500±10 min(-1), k(cat)/K(m)=350 s(-1) mM(-1)) but not that of 4HNE. The reaction product of 4ONE reduction by sniffer was mainly 4HNE as shown by HPLC- and GC/MS analysis. Since 4HNE, though still a potent electrophile, is less neurotoxic and protein reactive than 4ONE, one mechanism by which sniffer exerts its neuroprotective effects in Drosophila after oxidative stress may be enzymatic reduction of 4ONE. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phylogenomic analysis of the GIY-YIG nuclease superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujnicki Janusz M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The GIY-YIG domain was initially identified in homing endonucleases and later in other selfish mobile genetic elements (including restriction enzymes and non-LTR retrotransposons and in enzymes involved in DNA repair and recombination. However, to date no systematic search for novel members of the GIY-YIG superfamily or comparative analysis of these enzymes has been reported. Results We carried out database searches to identify all members of known GIY-YIG nuclease families. Multiple sequence alignments together with predicted secondary structures of identified families were represented as Hidden Markov Models (HMM and compared by the HHsearch method to the uncharacterized protein families gathered in the COG, KOG, and PFAM databases. This analysis allowed for extending the GIY-YIG superfamily to include members of COG3680 and a number of proteins not classified in COGs and to predict that these proteins may function as nucleases, potentially involved in DNA recombination and/or repair. Finally, all old and new members of the GIY-YIG superfamily were compared and analyzed to infer the phylogenetic tree. Conclusion An evolutionary classification of the GIY-YIG superfamily is presented for the very first time, along with the structural annotation of all (subfamilies. It provides a comprehensive picture of sequence-structure-function relationships in this superfamily of nucleases, which will help to design experiments to study the mechanism of action of known members (especially the uncharacterized ones and will facilitate the prediction of function for the newly discovered ones.

  18. Nuclear Receptors in atherosclerosis: a superfamily with many 'Goodfellas'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurakula, Kondababu; Hamers, Anouk A. J.; de Waard, Vivian; de Vries, Carlie J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Receptors form a superfamily of 48 transcription factors that exhibit a plethora of functions in steroid hormone signaling, regulation of metabolism, circadian rhythm and cellular differentiation. In this review, we describe our current knowledge on the role of Nuclear Receptors in

  19. Identification of the molecular switch that regulates access of 5alpha-DHT to the androgen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, Trevor M; Bauman, David R; Jin, Yi; Rizner, Tea Lanisik

    2007-02-01

    Pairs of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs) govern ligand access to steroid receptors in target tissues and act as molecular switches. By acting as reductases or oxidases, HSDs convert potent ligands into their cognate inactive metabolites or vice versa. This pre-receptor regulation of steroid hormone action may have profound effects on hormonal response. We have identified the HSDs responsible for regulating ligand access to the androgen receptor (AR) in human prostate. Type 3 3alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (aldo-keto reductase 1C2) acts solely as a reductase to convert 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), a potent ligand for the AR (K(d)=10(-11)M for the AR), to the inactive androgen 3alpha-androstanediol (K(d)=10(-6)M for the AR); while RoDH like 3alpha-HSD (a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR)) acts solely as an oxidase to convert 3alpha-androstanediol back to 5alpha-DHT. Our studies suggest that aldo-keto reductase (AKRs) and SDRs function as reductases and oxidases, respectively, to control ligand access to nuclear receptors.

  20. Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T gene polymorphism and risk of ischemic stroke in North Indian population: A hospital based case–control study. Amit Kumar, Shubham Misra, Anjali Hazarika, Pradeep Kumar, Ram Sagar, Abhishek Pathak, Kamalesh Chakravarty, Kameshwar ...

  1. CD147 Immunoglobulin Superfamily Receptor Function and Role in Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Iacono, Kathryn T.; Brown, Amy L.; Greene, Mark I.; Saouaf, Sandra J.

    2007-01-01

    The immunoglobulin superfamily member CD147 plays an important role in fetal, neuronal, lymphocyte and extracellular matrix development. Here we review the current understanding of CD147 expression and protein interactions with regard to CD147 function and its role in pathologic conditions including heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, stroke and cancer. A model linking hypoxic conditions found within the tumor microenvironment to up-regulation of CD147 expression and tumor progression is intr...

  2. Systematic classification of the His-Me finger superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Jagoda; Matelska, Dorota; Steczkiewicz, Kamil; Ginalski, Krzysztof

    2017-11-16

    The His-Me finger endonucleases, also known as HNH or ββα-metal endonucleases, form a large and diverse protein superfamily. The His-Me finger domain can be found in proteins that play an essential role in cells, including genome maintenance, intron homing, host defense and target offense. Its overall structural compactness and non-specificity make it a perfectly-tailored pathogenic module that participates on both sides of inter- and intra-organismal competition. An extremely low sequence similarity across the superfamily makes it difficult to identify and classify new His-Me fingers. Using state-of-the-art distant homology detection methods, we provide an updated and systematic classification of His-Me finger proteins. In this work, we identified over 100 000 proteins and clustered them into 38 groups, of which three groups are new and cannot be found in any existing public domain database of protein families. Based on an analysis of sequences, structures, domain architectures, and genomic contexts, we provide a careful functional annotation of the poorly characterized members of this superfamily. Our results may inspire further experimental investigations that should address the predicted activity and clarify the potential substrates, to provide more detailed insights into the fundamental biological roles of these proteins. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. The binding sites on human heme oxygenase-1 for cytochrome p450 reductase and biliverdin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinling; de Montellano, Paul R Ortiz

    2003-05-30

    Human heme oxygenase-1 (hHO-1) catalyzes the NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase-dependent oxidation of heme to biliverdin, CO, and free iron. The biliverdin is subsequently reduced to bilirubin by biliverdin reductase. Earlier kinetic studies suggested that biliverdin reductase facilitates the release of biliverdin from hHO-1 (Liu, Y., and Ortiz de Montellano, P. R. (2000) J. Biol. Chem. 275, 5297-5307). We have investigated the binding of P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase to truncated, soluble hHO-1 by fluorescence resonance energy transfer and site-specific mutagenesis. P450 reductase and biliverdin reductase bind to truncated hHO-1 with Kd = 0.4 +/- 0.1 and 0.2 +/- 0.1 microm, respectively. FRET experiments indicate that biliverdin reductase and P450 reductase compete for binding to truncated hHO-1. Mutation of surface ionic residues shows that hHO-1 residues Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, Arg198, Glu19, Glu127, and Glu190 contribute to the binding of cytochrome P450 reductase. The mutagenesis results and a computational analysis of the protein surfaces partially define the binding site for P450 reductase. An overlapping binding site including Lys18, Lys22, Lys179, Arg183, and Arg185 is similarly defined for biliverdin reductase. These results confirm the binding of biliverdin reductase to hHO-1 and define binding sites of the two reductases.

  4. Characterization of human warfarin reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolová, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Charles University in Prague Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Králové Department of Biochemical Sciences Candidate: Simona Sokolová Supervisor: PharmDr. Petra Malátková, Ph.D. Title of diploma thesis: Characterization of human warfarin reductase Warfarin is widely used anticoagulant drug. Considering the narrow therapeutic window of warfarin, it is important to fully understand its metabolism in human body. Oxidative, reductive and conjugation reactions are involved in warfarin metabolism. Howev...

  5. Modulation of cell metabolic pathways and oxidative stress signaling contribute to acquired melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zub, Kamila Anna; Sousa, Mirta Mittelstedt Leal de; Sarno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    of the AKR1C family involved in prostaglandin synthesis contribute to the resistant phenotype. Finally, selected metabolic and oxidative stress response enzymes were targeted by inhibitors, several of which displayed a selective cytotoxicity against the melphalan-resistant cells and should be further...... and pathways not previously associated with melphalan resistance in multiple myeloma cells, including a metabolic switch conforming to the Warburg effect (aerobic glycolysis), and an elevated oxidative stress response mediated by VEGF/IL8-signaling. In addition, up-regulated aldo-keto reductase levels...

  6. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of YqjH from Escherichia coli: a putative cytoplasmic ferri-siderophore reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Vicki A; Armour, Maria; Mitchell, Sue A; Cartron, Michaël; Andrews, Simon C; Watson, Kimberly A

    2008-09-01

    YqjH is a cytoplasmic FAD-containing protein from Escherichia coli; based on homology to ViuB of Vibrio cholerae, it potentially acts as a ferri-siderophore reductase. This work describes its overexpression, purification, crystallization and structure solution at 3.0 A resolution. YqjH shares high sequence similarity with a number of known siderophore-interacting proteins and its structure was solved by molecular replacement using the siderophore-interacting protein from Shewanella putrefaciens as the search model. The YqjH structure resembles those of other members of the NAD(P)H:flavin oxidoreductase superfamily.

  7. Immunocytochemical localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in three Desulfovibrio species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, D.R.; Veenhuis, M.; Fauque, G.; Peck Jr., H.D.; LeGall, J.; Lampreia, J.; Moura, J.J.G.; Hansen, T.A.

    1988-01-01

    The localization of APS reductase and bisulfite reductase in Desulfovibrio gigas, D. vulgaris Hildenborough and D. thermophilus was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against the purified enzymes from each strain. Cells fixed with formaldehyde/glutaraldehyde were

  8. Research progress on the roles of aldose reductase in diabetic retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Zhe Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aldose reductase(ARbelonging to nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate(NADPH-dependent aldehyde-keto reductase superfamily, is the key rate-limiting enzyme in the polyol pathway which plays an important role in the body's high-sugar metabolism. AR is widely present in the kidneys, blood vessels, lens, retina, heart, skeletal muscle and other tissues and organs, converts glucose to sorbitol which easy permeability of cell membranes, cause cell swelling, degeneration, necrosis, and have a close relationship with the development of chronic complications of diabetes mellitus. Diabetic retinopathy(DRis a multifactorial disease, the exact cause is currently unknown, but polyol pathway has been demonstrated to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DR. Clinical risk factors such as blood sugar control, blood pressure and other treatments for DR only play a part effect of remission or invalid, if we can find out DR genes associated with the disease, this will contribute to a better understanding of the pathological mechanisms and contribute to the development of new treatments and drugs. The current research progress of AR, AR gene polymorphism, Aldose reductase inhibitors to DR was reviewed in this article.

  9. MetaSINEs: Broad Distribution of a Novel SINE Superfamily in Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Plazzi, Federico; Passamonti, Marco; Okada, Norihiro

    2016-01-01

    SINEs (short interspersed elements) are transposable elements that typically originate independently in each taxonomic clade (order/family). However, some SINE families share a highly similar central sequence and are thus categorized as a SINE superfamily. Although only four SINE superfamilies (CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, DeuSINEs, and Ceph-SINEs) have been reported so far, it is expected that new SINE superfamilies would be discovered by deep exploration of new SINEs in metazoan genomes. Here we de...

  10. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Lenoir

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH and Tec homology (TH domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  11. Comparative analysis of cation/proton antiporter superfamily in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Chu-Yu; Yang, Xiaohan; Xia, Xinli; Yin, Weilun

    2013-06-01

    The cation/proton antiporter superfamily is associated with the transport of monovalent cations across membranes. This superfamily was annotated in the Arabidopsis genome and some members were functionally characterized. In the present study, a systematic analysis of the cation/proton antiporter genes in diverse plant species was reported. We identified 240 cation/proton antiporters in alga, moss, and angiosperm. A phylogenetic tree was constructed showing these 240 members are separated into three families, i.e., Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, K(+) efflux antiporters, and cation/H(+) exchangers. Our analysis revealed that tandem and/or segmental duplications contribute to the expansion of cation/H(+) exchangers in the examined angiosperm species. Sliding window analysis of the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratios showed some differences in the evolutionary fate of cation/proton antiporter paralogs. Furthermore, we identified over-represented motifs among these 240 proteins and found most motifs are family specific, demonstrating diverse evolution of the cation/proton antiporters among three families. In addition, we investigated the co-expressed genes of the cation/proton antiporters in Arabidopsis thaliana. The results showed some biological processes are enriched in the co-expressed genes, suggesting the cation/proton antiporters may be involved in these biological processes. Taken together, this study furthers our knowledge on cation/proton antiporters in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  13. Oxygen and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goeptar, A.R.; Scheerens, H.; Vermeulen, N.P.E.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen reductase and xenobiotic reductase activities of cytochrome P450 (P450) are reviewed. During the oxygen reductase activity of P450, molecular oxygen is reduced to superoxide anion radicals (O

  14. Short interspersed elements (SINEs) of the Geomyoidea superfamily rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogolevsky, Konstantin P; Kramerov, Dmitri A

    2006-05-24

    A new short interspersed element (SINE) was isolated from the genome of desert kangaroo rat (Dipodomys deserti) using single-primer PCR. This SINE consists of two monomers: the left monomer (IDL) resembles rodent ID element and other tRNAAla(CGC)-derived SINEs, whereas the right one (Geo) shows no similarity with known SINE sequences. PCR and hybridization analyses demonstrated that IDL-Geo SINE is restricted to the rodent superfamily Geomyoidea (families Geomyidea and Heteromyidea). Isolation and analysis of IDL-Geo from California pocket mouse (Chaetodipus californicus) and Botta's pocket gopher (Thomomys bottae) revealed some species-specific features of this SINE family. The structure and evolution of known dimeric SINEs are discussed.

  15. Intracellular Transport and Kinesin Superfamily Proteins: Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, N.; Takemura, R.

    Using various molecular cell biological and molecular genetic approaches, we identified kinesin superfamily proteins (KIFs) and characterized their significant functions in intracellular transport, which is fundamental for cellular morphogenesis, functioning, and survival. We showed that KIFs not only transport various membranous organelles, proteins complexes and mRNAs fundamental for cellular functions but also play significant roles in higher brain functions such as memory and learning, determination of important developmental processes such as left-right asymmetry formation and brain wiring. We also elucidated that KIFs recognize and bind to their specific cargoes using scaffolding or adaptor protein complexes. Concerning the mechanism of motility, we discovered the simplest unique monomeric motor KIF1A and determined by molecular biophysics, cryoelectron microscopy and X-ray crystallography that KIF1A can move on a microtubule processively as a monomer by biased Brownian motion and by hydolyzing ATP.

  16. Vitamin C. Biosynthesis, recycling and degradation in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linster, Carole L; Van Schaftingen, Emile

    2007-01-01

    Vitamin C, a reducing agent and antioxidant, is a cofactor in reactions catalyzed by Cu(+)-dependent monooxygenases and Fe(2+)-dependent dioxygenases. It is synthesized, in vertebrates having this capacity, from d-glucuronate. The latter is formed through direct hydrolysis of uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucuronate by enzyme(s) bound to the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, sharing many properties with, and most likely identical to, UDP-glucuronosyltransferases. Non-glucuronidable xenobiotics (aminopyrine, metyrapone, chloretone and others) stimulate the enzymatic hydrolysis of UDP-glucuronate, accounting for their effect to increase vitamin C formation in vivo. Glucuronate is converted to l-gulonate by aldehyde reductase, an enzyme of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. l-Gulonate is converted to l-gulonolactone by a lactonase identified as SMP30 or regucalcin, whose absence in mice leads to vitamin C deficiency. The last step in the pathway of vitamin C synthesis is the oxidation of l-gulonolactone to l-ascorbic acid by l-gulonolactone oxidase, an enzyme associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane and deficient in man, guinea pig and other species due to mutations in its gene. Another fate of glucuronate is its conversion to d-xylulose in a five-step pathway, the pentose pathway, involving identified oxidoreductases and an unknown decarboxylase. Semidehydroascorbate, a major oxidation product of vitamin C, is reconverted to ascorbate in the cytosol by cytochrome b(5) reductase and thioredoxin reductase in reactions involving NADH and NADPH, respectively. Transmembrane electron transfer systems using ascorbate or NADH as electron donors serve to reduce semidehydroascorbate present in neuroendocrine secretory vesicles and in the extracellular medium. Dehydroascorbate, the fully oxidized form of vitamin C, is reduced spontaneously by glutathione, as well as enzymatically in reactions using glutathione or NADPH. The degradation of vitamin C in mammals is

  17. Tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella thyphimurium: a molybdenum containing enzyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinojosa-Leon, M.; Dubourdieu, M.; Sanchez-Crispin, J.A.; Chippaux, M.

    1986-01-01

    Use of radioactive molybdenum demonstrates that the tetrathionate reductase of Salmonella typhimurium is a molydenum containing enzyme. It is proposed that this enzyme shares with other molybdo-proteins, such as nitrate reductase, a common molybdenum containing cofactor the defect of which leads to the loss of the tetrathionate reductase and nitrate reductase activities

  18. Depressed levels of prostaglandin F2α in mice lacking Akr1b7 increase basal adiposity and predispose to diet-induced obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volat, Fanny E; Pointud, Jean-Christophe; Pastel, Emilie; Morio, Béatrice; Sion, Benoit; Hamard, Ghislaine; Guichardant, Michel; Colas, Romain; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Martinez, Antoine

    2012-11-01

    Negative regulators of white adipose tissue (WAT) expansion are poorly documented in vivo. Prostaglandin F(2α) (PGF(2α)) is a potent antiadipogenic factor in cultured preadipocytes, but evidence for its involvement in physiological context is lacking. We previously reported that Akr1b7, an aldo-keto reductase enriched in adipose stromal vascular fraction but absent from mature adipocytes, has antiadipogenic properties possibly supported by PGF(2α) synthase activity. To test whether lack of Akr1b7 could influence WAT homeostasis in vivo, we generated Akr1b7(-/-) mice in 129/Sv background. Akr1b7(-/-) mice displayed excessive basal adiposity resulting from adipocyte hyperplasia/hypertrophy and exhibited greater sensitivity to diet-induced obesity. Following adipose enlargement and irrespective of the diet, they developed liver steatosis and progressive insulin resistance. Akr1b7 loss was associated with decreased PGF(2α) WAT contents. Cloprostenol (PGF(2α) agonist) administration to Akr1b7(-/-) mice normalized WAT expansion by affecting both de novo adipocyte differentiation and size. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Akr1b7(-/-) mice with cloprostenol suggested that decreased adipocyte size resulted from inhibition of lipogenic gene expression. Hence, Akr1b7 is a major regulator of WAT development through at least two PGF(2α)-dependent mechanisms: inhibition of adipogenesis and lipogenesis. These findings provide molecular rationale to explore the status of aldo-keto reductases in dysregulations of adipose tissue homeostasis.

  19. Kinetics of carbonyl reductase from human brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Bohren, K M; von Wartburg, J P; Wermuth, B

    1987-01-01

    Initial-rate analysis of the carbonyl reductase-catalysed reduction of menadione by NADPH gave families of straight lines in double-reciprocal plots consistent with a sequential mechanism being obeyed. The fluorescence of NADPH was increased up to 7-fold with a concomitant shift of the emission maximum towards lower wavelength in the presence of carbonyl reductase, and both NADPH and NADP+ caused quenching of the enzyme fluorescence, indicating formation of a binary enzyme-coenzyme complex. D...

  20. Two different groups of signal sequence in M-superfamily conotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Jiang, Hui; Han, Yu-Hong; Yuan, Duo-Duo; Chi, Cheng-Wu

    2008-04-01

    M-superfamily conotoxins can be divided into four branches (M-1, M-2, M-3 and M-4) according to the number of amino acid residues in the third Cys loop. In general, it is widely accepted that the conotoxin signal peptides of each superfamily are strictly conserved. Recently, we cloned six cDNAs of novel M-superfamily conotoxins from Conus leopardus, Conus marmoreus and Conus quercinus, belonging to either M-1 or M-3 branch. These conotoxins, judging from the putative peptide sequences deducted from cDNAs, are rich in acidic residues and share highly conserved signal and pro-peptide region. However, they are quite different from the reported conotoxins of M-2 and M-4 branches even in their signal peptides, which in general are considered highly conserved for each superfamily of conotoxins. The signal sequences of M-1 and M-3 conotoxins composed of 24 residues start with MLKMGVVL-, while those of M-2 and M-4 conotoxins composed of 25 residues start with MMSKLGVL-. It is another example that different types of signal peptides can exist within a superfamily besides the I-conotoxin superfamily. In addition to the different disulfide connectivity of M-1 conotoxins from that of M-4 or M-2 conotoxins, the sequence alignment, preferential Cys codon usage and phylogenetic tree analysis suggest that M-1 and M-3 conotoxins have much closer relationship, being different from the conotoxins of other two branches (M-4 and M-2) of M-superfamily.

  1. Characterization of the Tetraspan Junctional Complex (4JC) superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Amy; Lee, Andre; Hendargo, Kevin J; Reddy, Vamsee S; Shlykov, Maksim A; Kuppusamykrishnan, Harikrishnan; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Saier, Milton H

    2017-03-01

    Connexins or innexins form gap junctions, while claudins and occludins form tight junctions. In this study, statistical data, derived using novel software, indicate that these four junctional protein families and eleven other families of channel and channel auxiliary proteins are related by common descent and comprise the Tetraspan (4 TMS) Junctional Complex (4JC) Superfamily. These proteins all share similar 4 transmembrane α-helical (TMS) topologies. Evidence is presented that they arose via an intragenic duplication event, whereby a 2 TMS-encoding genetic element duplicated tandemly to give 4 TMS proteins. In cases where high resolution structural data were available, the conclusion of homology was supported by conducting structural comparisons. Phylogenetic trees reveal the probable relationships of these 15 families to each other. Long homologues containing fusions to other recognizable domains as well as internally duplicated or fused domains are reported. Large "fusion" proteins containing 4JC domains proved to fall predominantly into family-specific patterns as follows: (1) the 4JC domain was N-terminal; (2) the 4JC domain was C-terminal; (3) the 4JC domain was duplicated or occasionally triplicated and (4) mixed fusion types were present. Our observations provide insight into the evolutionary origins and subfunctions of these proteins as well as guides concerning their structural and functional relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. BRICHOS - a superfamily of multidomain proteins with diverse functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Jan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The BRICHOS domain has been found in 8 protein families with a wide range of functions and a variety of disease associations, such as respiratory distress syndrome, dementia and cancer. The domain itself is thought to have a chaperone function, and indeed three of the families are associated with amyloid formation, but its structure and many of its functional properties are still unknown. Findings The proteins in the BRICHOS superfamily have four regions with distinct properties. We have analysed the BRICHOS proteins focusing on sequence conservation, amino acid residue properties, native disorder and secondary structure predictions. Residue conservation shows large variations between the regions, and the spread of residue conservation between different families can vary greatly within the regions. The secondary structure predictions for the BRICHOS proteins show remarkable coherence even where sequence conservation is low, and there seems to be little native disorder. Conclusions The greatly variant rates of conservation indicates different functional constraints among the regions and among the families. We present three previously unknown BRICHOS families; group A, which may be ancestral to the ITM2 families; group B, which is a close relative to the gastrokine families, and group C, which appears to be a truly novel, disjoint BRICHOS family. The C-terminal region of group C has nearly identical sequences in all species ranging from fish to man and is seemingly unique to this family, indicating critical functional or structural properties.

  3. Inference of functional properties from large-scale analysis of enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2012-01-02

    As increasingly large amounts of data from genome and other sequencing projects become available, new approaches are needed to determine the functions of the proteins these genes encode. We show how large-scale computational analysis can help to address this challenge by linking functional information to sequence and structural similarities using protein similarity networks. Network analyses using three functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies illustrate the use of these approaches for facile updating and comparison of available structures for a large superfamily, for creation of functional hypotheses for metagenomic sequences, and to summarize the limits of our functional knowledge about even well studied superfamilies.

  4. Inference of Functional Properties from Large-scale Analysis of Enzyme Superfamilies*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shoshana D.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2012-01-01

    As increasingly large amounts of data from genome and other sequencing projects become available, new approaches are needed to determine the functions of the proteins these genes encode. We show how large-scale computational analysis can help to address this challenge by linking functional information to sequence and structural similarities using protein similarity networks. Network analyses using three functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies illustrate the use of these approaches for facile updating and comparison of available structures for a large superfamily, for creation of functional hypotheses for metagenomic sequences, and to summarize the limits of our functional knowledge about even well studied superfamilies. PMID:22069325

  5. Multiple Receptor Subtypes for the CGRP Super-Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Quirion

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular evidence for the existence of multiple receptors for CGRP has been rather difficult to obtain. Over 10 years after suggesting the existence of at least two classes (CGRP1 and CGRP2 of CGRP receptors on the basis of pharmacological data[1], molecular data on the CGRP2 receptor subtype are still lacking as well as potent and selective antagonists. The situation is somewhat different for the functional CGRP1 subtype which is likely composed of diverse subunits CRLR, RAMP1 and possibly RCP[2]. Moreover, BIBN 4096BS was recently reported as the first nonpeptide highly potent CGRP1 receptor antagonist[3]. However, in situ hybridization and receptor autoradiographic data have clearly shown the existence of major mismatches (e.g., cerebellum between the discrete localization of CRLR, RAMP1, and specific CGRP binding sites supporting the existence of CGRP receptor subtypes. Functional studies have also provided evidence in that regard (for a recent review: [4]. Accordingly, additional studies aiming at cloning additional CGRP receptors are certainly warranted. Similarly, recent evidence from various laboratories including ours suggests the existence of more than one class (CRLR and RAMP2 of adrenomedullin receptors at least in the rat brain. In contrast, most evidence suggests the existence of a single class of amylin receptors. In brief, it appears that multiple receptors or receptor complexes do exist for CGRP and related peptides but their composition is apparently unique among the GPCR super-family and additional data are needed to fully establish the molecular organization of each subtype. Supported by CIHR of Canada.

  6. MetaSINEs: Broad Distribution of a Novel SINE Superfamily in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, Hidenori; Plazzi, Federico; Passamonti, Marco; Okada, Norihiro

    2016-02-12

    SINEs (short interspersed elements) are transposable elements that typically originate independently in each taxonomic clade (order/family). However, some SINE families share a highly similar central sequence and are thus categorized as a SINE superfamily. Although only four SINE superfamilies (CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, DeuSINEs, and Ceph-SINEs) have been reported so far, it is expected that new SINE superfamilies would be discovered by deep exploration of new SINEs in metazoan genomes. Here we describe 15 SINEs, among which 13 are novel, that have a similar 66-bp central region and therefore constitute a new SINE superfamily, MetaSINEs. MetaSINEs are distributed from fish to cnidarians, suggesting their common evolutionary origin at least 640 Ma. Because the 3' tails of MetaSINEs are variable, these SINEs most likely survived by changing their partner long interspersed elements for retrotransposition during evolution. Furthermore, we examined the presence of members of other SINE superfamilies in bivalve genomes and characterized eight new SINEs belonging to the CORE-SINEs, V-SINEs, and DeuSINEs, in addition to the MetaSINEs. The broad distribution of bivalve SINEs suggests that at least three SINEs originated in the common ancestor of Bivalvia. Our comparative analysis of the central domains of the SINEs revealed that, in each superfamily, only a restricted region is shared among all of its members. Because the functions of the central domains of the SINE superfamilies remain unknown, such structural information of SINE superfamilies will be useful for future experimental and comparative analyses to reveal why they have been retained in metazoan genomes during evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  7. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  8. Light Sensitivity of Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas

    The thioredoxin system has evolved in all kingdoms of life acting as a key antioxidant system in the defense against oxidative stress. The thioredoxin system utilizes reducing equivalents from NADPH to reduce protein disulfide targets. The reducing equivalents are shuttled via a flavin and redox...... active dithiol motif in thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) to reduce the small ubiquitous thioredoxin (Trx). Trx in turn regulates the protein dithiol/disulfide balance by reduction of protein disulfide targets in e.g. ribonucleotide reductase, peroxiredoxins and methionine sulfoxide reductase. The glutathione......, thus expected to rely mainly on the Trx system for thiol-disulfide control. L. lactis is an important industrial microorganism used as starter culture in the dairy production of cheese, buttermilk etc. and known to be sensitive to oxidative stress. The L. lactis TrxR (LlTrxR) is a homodimeric...

  9. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jaewoong; Liu, Z Lewis

    2015-04-01

    The aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of an intermediate subfamily within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily that clarified mechanisms of in situ detoxification of 2-furaldehyde and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) are common among tolerant candidate genes identified for lignocellulose-to-advanced biofuels conversion. This study presents partially purified proteins of two ORFs, YDR541C and YGL039W, and direct enzyme assay evidence against aldehyde-inhibitory compounds commonly encountered during lignocellulosic biomass fermentation processes. Each of the partially purified proteins encoded by these ORFs showed a molecular mass of approximately 38 kDa, similar to Ari1p, a protein encoded by aldehyde reductase gene. Both proteins demonstrated strong aldehyde reduction activities toward 14 aldehyde substrates, with high levels of reduction activity for Ydr541cp toward both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. While Ydr541cp was observed to have a significantly higher specific enzyme activity at 20 U/mg using co-factor NADPH, Ygl039wp displayed a NADH preference at 25 U/mg in reduction of butylaldehyde. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a characteristic catalytic triad, Ser, Tyr and Lys; a conserved catalytic motif of Tyr-X-X-X-Lys; and a cofactor-binding sequence motif, Gly-X-X-Gly-X-X-Ala, near the N-terminus that are shared by Ydr541cp, Ygl039wp, Yol151wp/GRE2 and Ari1p. Findings of aldehyde reductase genes contribute to the yeast gene annotation and aids development of the next-generation biocatalyst for advanced biofuels production. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Large-Scale Analysis Exploring Evolution of Catalytic Machineries and Mechanisms in Enzyme Superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Nicholas; Dawson, Natalie L; Rahman, Syed A; Thornton, Janet M; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-29

    Enzymes, as biological catalysts, form the basis of all forms of life. How these proteins have evolved their functions remains a fundamental question in biology. Over 100 years of detailed biochemistry studies, combined with the large volumes of sequence and protein structural data now available, means that we are able to perform large-scale analyses to address this question. Using a range of computational tools and resources, we have compiled information on all experimentally annotated changes in enzyme function within 379 structurally defined protein domain superfamilies, linking the changes observed in functions during evolution to changes in reaction chemistry. Many superfamilies show changes in function at some level, although one function often dominates one superfamily. We use quantitative measures of changes in reaction chemistry to reveal the various types of chemical changes occurring during evolution and to exemplify these by detailed examples. Additionally, we use structural information of the enzymes active site to examine how different superfamilies have changed their catalytic machinery during evolution. Some superfamilies have changed the reactions they perform without changing catalytic machinery. In others, large changes of enzyme function, in terms of both overall chemistry and substrate specificity, have been brought about by significant changes in catalytic machinery. Interestingly, in some superfamilies, relatives perform similar functions but with different catalytic machineries. This analysis highlights characteristics of functional evolution across a wide range of superfamilies, providing insights that will be useful in predicting the function of uncharacterised sequences and the design of new synthetic enzymes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymes of the AKR1B and AKR1C subfamilies and uterine diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tea eLanisnik Rizner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial and cervical cancers, uterine myoma, and endometriosis are very common uterine diseases. Worldwide, more than 800,000 women are affected annually by gynecological cancers, as a result of which, more than 360,000 die. During their reproductive age, about 70% of women develop uterine myomas, 10% to 15% suffer from endometriosis, and 35% to 50% from infertility associated with endometriosis. Uterine diseases are associated with aberrant inflammatory responses and concomitant increased production of prostaglandins (PG. They are also related to decreased differentiation, due to low levels of protective progesterone and retinoic acid, and to enhanced proliferation, due to high local concentrations of estrogens. The pathogenesis of these diseases can thus be attributed to disturbed PG, estrogen and retinoid metabolism and actions. Five human members of the aldo-keto reductase 1B (AKR1B and 1C (AKR1C superfamilies, i.e., AKR1B1, AKR1B10, AKR1C1, AKR1C2 and AKR1C3, have roles in these processes and can thus be implicated in uterine diseases. AKR1B1 and AKR1C3 catalyze the formation of PGF2alpha which stimulates cell proliferation. AKR1C3 converts PGD2 to 9alpha,11beta-PGF2, and thus counteracts the formation of 15deoxy-PGJ2, which can activate pro-apoptotic peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor beta. AKR1B10 catalyzes the reduction of retinal to retinol, and in thus lessens the formation of retinoic acid, with potential pro-differentiating actions. The AKR1C1-AKR1C3 enzymes also act as 17-keto- and 20-ketosteroid reductases to varying extents, and are implicated in increased estradiol and decreased progesterone levels. This review comprises a short introduction to uterine diseases, followed by an overview of the current literature on the AKR1B and AKR1C expression in the uterus and in uterine diseases. The potential implications of the AKR1B and AKR1C enzymes and their pathophysiologies are then discussed, followed by conclusions and

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Peng; Tan, Xiaoqing; Wu, Ying; Bai, Qunhua; Jia, Yan; Xiao, Hong

    2015-03-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica , which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function.

  13. Cloning and sequence analysis demonstrate the chromate reduction ability of a novel chromate reductase gene from Serratia sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    DENG, PENG; TAN, XIAOQING; WU, YING; BAI, QUNHUA; JIA, YAN; XIAO, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The ChrT gene encodes a chromate reductase enzyme which catalyzes the reduction of Cr(VI). The chromate reductase is also known as flavin mononucleotide (FMN) reductase (FMN_red). The aim of the present study was to clone the full-length ChrT DNA from Serratia sp. CQMUS2 and analyze the deduced amino acid sequence and three-dimensional structure. The putative ChrT gene fragment of Serratia sp. CQMUS2 was isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), according to the known FMN_red gene sequence from Serratia sp. AS13. The flanking sequences of the ChrT gene were obtained by high efficiency TAIL-PCR, while the full-length gene of ChrT was cloned in Escherichia coli for subsequent sequencing. The nucleotide sequence of ChrT was submitted onto GenBank under the accession number, KF211434. Sequence analysis of the gene and amino acids was conducted using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, and open reading frame (ORF) analysis was performed using ORF Finder software. The ChrT gene was found to be an ORF of 567 bp that encodes a 188-amino acid enzyme with a calculated molecular weight of 20.4 kDa. In addition, the ChrT protein was hypothesized to be an NADPH-dependent FMN_red and a member of the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. The amino acid sequence of ChrT showed high sequence similarity to the FMN reductase genes of Klebsiella pneumonia and Raoultella ornithinolytica, which belong to the flavodoxin-2 superfamily. Furthermore, ChrT was shown to have a 85.6% similarity to the three-dimensional structure of Escherichia coli ChrR, sharing four common enzyme active sites for chromate reduction. Therefore, ChrT gene cloning and protein structure determination demonstrated the ability of the gene for chromate reduction. The results of the present study provide a basis for further studies on ChrT gene expression and protein function. PMID:25667630

  14. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphism in type 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In patients with type-I diabetes mellitus folate deficiency is associated with endothelial dysfunction. So, polymorphism in genes involved in folate metabolism may have a role in vascular disease. This study was designed to evaluate the relationship between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene polymorphism ...

  15. Prevalence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase ( MTHFR ) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and Cytosolic serine hydroxymethyltransferase (cSHMT) are enzymes involve in folate regulation in human. The C to T transition of the cSHMT and MTHFR genes at the 1420 as well as 677 nucleotides both carries TT genotype respectively. These enzymes have direct and ...

  16. Bacterial Multidrug Efflux Pumps of the Major Facilitator Superfamily as Targets for Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sanath; He, Guixin; Kakarla, Prathusha; Shrestha, Ugina; Ranjana, K C; Ranaweera, Indrika; Willmon, T Mark; Barr, Sharla R; Hernandez, Alberto J; Varela, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Causative agents of infectious disease that are multidrug resistant bacterial pathogens represent a serious public health concern due to the increasingly difficult nature of achieving efficacious clinical treatments. Of the various acquired and intrinsic antimicrobial agent resistance determinants, integral-membrane multidrug efflux pumps of the major facilitator superfamily constitute a major mechanism of bacterial resistance. The major facilitator superfamily (MFS) encompasses thousands of known related secondary active and passive solute transporters, including multidrug efflux pumps, from bacteria to humans. This review article addresses recent developments involving the targeting by various modulators of bacterial multidrug efflux pumps from the major facilitator superfamily. It is currently of tremendous interest to modulate bacterial multidrug efflux pumps in order to eventually restore the clinical efficacy of therapeutic agents against recalcitrant bacterial infections. Such MFS multidrug efflux pumps are good targets for modulation.

  17. Functional diversity of the superfamily of K⁺ transporters to meet various requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diskowski, Marina; Mikusevic, Vedrana; Stock, Charlott; Hänelt, Inga

    2015-09-01

    The superfamily of K+ transporters unites proteins from plants, fungi, bacteria, and archaea that translocate K+ and/or Na+ across membranes. These proteins are key components in osmotic regulation, pH homeostasis, and resistance to high salinity and dryness. The members of the superfamily are closely related to K+ channels such as KcsA but also show several striking differences that are attributed to their altered functions. This review highlights these functional differences, focusing on the bacterial superfamily members KtrB, TrkH, and KdpA. The functional variations within the family and comparison to MPM-type K+ channels are discussed in light of the recently solved structures of the Ktr and Trk systems.

  18. In silico identification, phylogeny and expression analysis of expansin superfamily in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expansins are important components of plant cell walls, which are involved in the process of cell wall loosening under low extracellular pH. By using a combinational method for homology search and protein domain analysis, a total of 42 expansin genes were identified from Medicago truncatula genome in this study. They were divided into four families, based on sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis. Gene duplication events were identified in the expansins superfamily, especially in the extension of α-expansin family. By analysis of RNA-sequencing data from National Center for Biotechnology Information, the expansin (EXP genes expressed during tissues development were characterized. Meanwhile, lots of cis-acting regulatory DNA elements in the EXP superfamily were identified, which were mainly related to plant growth and development processes. The results presented in this study are expected to facilitate further research works on this gene superfamily and provide new insights about the molecular mechanisms of expansins in M. truncatula.

  19. Transient receptor potential channel superfamily: Role in lower urinary tract function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Teruyuki; Imamura, Tetsuya; Nakazawa, Masaki; Hiragata, Shiro; Nagai, Takashi; Minagawa, Tomonori; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Ishikawa, Masakuni; Domen, Takahisa; Ishizuka, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Lower urinary tract symptoms associated with neurogenic bladder and overactive bladder syndrome are mediated in part by members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily. The best studied member of this superfamily is the vanilloid receptor. Other transient receptor potential channels, such as the melastatin receptor and the ankyrin receptor, are also active in the pathogenesis of lower urinary tract dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms by which the transient receptor potential channels contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms are still not clear, and the therapeutic benefits of modulating transient receptor potential channel activity have not been proved in the clinical setting. In the present review, to better understand the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential for lower urinary tract symptoms, we summarize the presence and role of different members of the transient receptor potential channel superfamily in the lower urinary tract. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Biochemical characterization of a recombinant short-chain NAD(H)-dependent dehydrogenase/reductase from Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchio, Angela; Giordano, Assunta; Pucci, Biagio; Rossi, Mosè; Raia, Carlo A

    2010-03-01

    The gene encoding a novel alcohol dehydrogenase that belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs) superfamily was identified in the aerobic thermoacidophilic crenarchaeon Sulfolobus acidocaldarius strain DSM 639. The saadh gene was heterologously overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein (SaADH) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. SaADH is a tetrameric enzyme consisting of identical 28,978-Da subunits, each composed of 264 amino acids. The enzyme has remarkable thermophilicity and thermal stability, displaying activity at temperatures up to 75 degrees C and a 30-min half-inactivation temperature of ~90 degrees C, and shows good tolerance to common organic solvents. SaADH has a strict requirement for NAD(H) as the coenzyme, and displays a preference for the reduction of alicyclic, bicyclic and aromatic ketones and alpha-keto esters, but is poorly active on aliphatic, cyclic and aromatic alcohols, and shows no activity on aldehydes. The enzyme catalyses the reduction of alpha-methyl and alpha-ethyl benzoylformate, and methyl o-chlorobenzoylformate with 100% conversion to methyl (S)-mandelate [17% enantiomeric excess (ee)], ethyl (R)-mandelate (50% ee), and methyl (R)-o-chloromandelate (72% ee), respectively, with an efficient in situ NADH-recycling system which involves glucose and a thermophilic glucose dehydrogenase. This study provides further evidence supporting the critical role of the D37 residue in discriminating NAD(H) from NAD(P)H in members of the SDR superfamily.

  1. New O-superfamily conotoxins from Conus striatus inhabited near Chinese Hainan Island

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Conotoxins are short peptide-toxins with specific targets and large diversity.They are useful in analgesia,neuroprotection,detection of some kinds of deseases,and receptor and ion channel study.In order to explore the conotoxin resourses of Chinese oceans,rapid amplification of 3' cDNA ends (RACE) method was utilized to systemically analyze the O-superfamily conotoxin content of Conus striatus inhabited near Chinese Hainan Island.Six new O-superfamily conopeptides were identified,one of which is highly homologous to MVIIA,an N-type calcium channel antagonist.

  2. Keanekaragaman Jenis Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidae di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Oqtafiana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupu-kupu turut memberi andil dalam mempertahankan keseimbangan ekosistem dan memperkaya keanekaragaman hayati. Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae di Dukuh Banyuwindu Desa Limbangan Kecamatan Limbangan Kabupaten Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, Daerah Aliran Sungai (DAS dan persawahan.Populasi dalam penelitian ini adalah semua jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang ada di Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. Sampel penelitian ini adalah jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang teramati di Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal khususnya di habitat hutan sekunder, permukiman, DAS dan persawahan. Penelitian dilakukan dengan metode Indeks Point Abudance (IPA atau metode titik hitung.Hasil penelitian ditemukan sebanyak 62 jenis kupu-kupu superfamili Papilionoidae yang terdiri dari 737 individu yang tergolong kedalam empat famili yaitu Papilionidae, Pieridae, Lycaenidae dan Nymphalidae. Hasil analisis indeks keanekaragaman jenis berkisar antara 2,74-3,09, indeks kemerataan jenis berkisar antara 0,86-0,87 dan memiliki dominansi berkisar antara 0,07-0,09. Indeks keanekaragaman jenis dan indeks kemerataan jenis tertinggi tercatat pada habitat permukiman yaitu 3,09 dan 0,87 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07 sedangkan terendah tercatat pada habitat persawahan yaitu 2,74 dan 0,86 dan memiliki dominansi 0,07.Butterfly also contribute in maintaining the ecological balance and enrich biodiversity. The aim of this research was to determine the diversity of butterflies’ superfamily Papilionoidae in Banyuwindu Hamlet Limbangan Sub district Kendal Regency, especially in the secondary forest habitat, settlements, river flow area (RFA and rice field. The population in this research were all kinds of butterflies’ Papilionoidae superfamily in Banyuwindu, Limbangan Kendal. The sample was kind of butterfly superfamily Papilionoidae that observed in Banyuwindu Limbangan Kendal

  3. Structural studies of cinnamoyl-CoA reductase and cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase, key enzymes of monolignol biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haiyun; Zhou, Rui; Louie, Gordon V; Mühlemann, Joëlle K; Bomati, Erin K; Bowman, Marianne E; Dudareva, Natalia; Dixon, Richard A; Noel, Joseph P; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2014-09-01

    The enzymes cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the two key reduction reactions in the conversion of cinnamic acid derivatives into monolignol building blocks for lignin polymers in plant cell walls. Here, we describe detailed functional and structural analyses of CCRs from Medicago truncatula and Petunia hybrida and of an atypical CAD (CAD2) from M. truncatula. These enzymes are closely related members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Our structural studies support a reaction mechanism involving a canonical SDR catalytic triad in both CCR and CAD2 and an important role for an auxiliary cysteine unique to CCR. Site-directed mutants of CAD2 (Phe226Ala and Tyr136Phe) that enlarge the phenolic binding site result in a 4- to 10-fold increase in activity with sinapaldehyde, which in comparison to the smaller coumaraldehyde and coniferaldehyde substrates is disfavored by wild-type CAD2. This finding demonstrates the potential exploitation of rationally engineered forms of CCR and CAD2 for the targeted modification of monolignol composition in transgenic plants. Thermal denaturation measurements and structural comparisons of various liganded and unliganded forms of CCR and CAD2 highlight substantial conformational flexibility of these SDR enzymes, which plays an important role in the establishment of catalytically productive complexes of the enzymes with their NADPH and phenolic substrates. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  4. Spatial and temporal expression of immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 in the rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joustra, Sjoerd D.; Meijer, Onno C.; Heinen, Charlotte A.; Mol, Isabel M.; Laghmani, El Houari; Sengers, Rozemarijn M. A.; Carreno, Gabriela; van Trotsenburg, A. S. Paul; Biermasz, Nienke R.; Bernard, Daniel J.; Wit, Jan M.; Oostdijk, Wilma; van Pelt, Ans M. M.; Hamer, Geert; Wagenaar, Gerry T. M.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the immunoglobulin superfamily member 1 (IGSF1) gene cause an X-linked syndrome of central hypothyroidism, macroorchidism, variable prolactin and GH deficiency, delayed pubertal testosterone rise, and obesity. To understand the pathophysiology of this syndrome,

  5. Building a Phylogenetic Tree of the Human and Ape Superfamily Using DNA-DNA Hybridization Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Caroline Alexander

    2004-01-01

    The study describes the process of DNA-DNA hybridization and the history of its use by Sibley and Alquist in simple, straightforward, and interesting language that students easily understand to create their own phylogenetic tree of the hominoid superfamily. They calibrate the DNA clock and use it to estimate the divergence dates of the various…

  6. Functional Diversity of Haloacid Dehalogenase Superfamily Phosphatases from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: BIOCHEMICAL, STRUCTURAL, AND EVOLUTIONARY INSIGHTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Nocek, Boguslaw; Brown, Greg; Makarova, Kira S; Flick, Robert; Wolf, Yuri I; Khusnutdinova, Anna; Evdokimova, Elena; Jin, Ke; Tan, Kemin; Hanson, Andrew D; Hasnain, Ghulam; Zallot, Rémi; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Babu, Mohan; Savchenko, Alexei; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Edwards, Aled M; Koonin, Eugene V; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-07-24

    The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD)-like enzymes comprise a large superfamily of phosphohydrolases present in all organisms. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes at least 19 soluble HADs, including 10 uncharacterized proteins. Here, we biochemically characterized 13 yeast phosphatases from the HAD superfamily, which includes both specific and promiscuous enzymes active against various phosphorylated metabolites and peptides with several HADs implicated in detoxification of phosphorylated compounds and pseudouridine. The crystal structures of four yeast HADs provided insight into their active sites, whereas the structure of the YKR070W dimer in complex with substrate revealed a composite substrate-binding site. Although the S. cerevisiae and Escherichia coli HADs share low sequence similarities, the comparison of their substrate profiles revealed seven phosphatases with common preferred substrates. The cluster of secondary substrates supporting significant activity of both S. cerevisiae and E. coli HADs includes 28 common metabolites that appear to represent the pool of potential activities for the evolution of novel HAD phosphatases. Evolution of novel substrate specificities of HAD phosphatases shows no strict correlation with sequence divergence. Thus, evolution of the HAD superfamily combines the conservation of the overall substrate pool and the substrate profiles of some enzymes with remarkable biochemical and structural flexibility of other superfamily members. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Evolutionary and molecular foundations of multiple contemporary functions of the nitroreductase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiva, Eyal; Copp, Janine N; Tokuriki, Nobuhiko; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2017-11-07

    Insight regarding how diverse enzymatic functions and reactions have evolved from ancestral scaffolds is fundamental to understanding chemical and evolutionary biology, and for the exploitation of enzymes for biotechnology. We undertook an extensive computational analysis using a unique and comprehensive combination of tools that include large-scale phylogenetic reconstruction to determine the sequence, structural, and functional relationships of the functionally diverse flavin mononucleotide-dependent nitroreductase (NTR) superfamily (>24,000 sequences from all domains of life, 54 structures, and >10 enzymatic functions). Our results suggest an evolutionary model in which contemporary subgroups of the superfamily have diverged in a radial manner from a minimal flavin-binding scaffold. We identified the structural design principle for this divergence: Insertions at key positions in the minimal scaffold that, combined with the fixation of key residues, have led to functional specialization. These results will aid future efforts to delineate the emergence of functional diversity in enzyme superfamilies, provide clues for functional inference for superfamily members of unknown function, and facilitate rational redesign of the NTR scaffold. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  8. Targeting of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily for cancer immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremer, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    The tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand and cognate TNF receptor superfamilies constitute an important regulatory axis that is pivotal for immune homeostasis and correct execution of immune responses. TNF ligands and receptors are involved in diverse biological processes ranging from the selective

  9. The UDP glucuronosyltransferase gene superfamily: suggested nomenclature based on evolutionary divergence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burchell, B.; Nebert, D. W.; Nelson, D. R.; Bock, K. W.; Iyanagi, T.; Jansen, P. L.; Lancet, D.; Mulder, G. J.; Chowdhury, J. R.; Siest, G.

    1991-01-01

    A nomenclature system for the UDP glucuronosyltransferase superfamily is proposed, based on divergent evolution of the genes. A total of 26 distinct cDNAs in five mammalian species have been sequenced to date. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences leads to the definition of two families and

  10. Ketopantoyl-lactone reductase from Candida parapsilosis: purification and characterization as a conjugated polyketone reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, H; Shimizu, S; Hattori, S; Yamada, H

    1989-02-24

    Ketopantoyl-lactone reductase (2-dehydropantoyl-lactone reductase, EC 1.1.1.168) was purified and crystallized from cells of Candida parapsilosis IFO 0708. The enzyme was found to be homogeneous on ultracentrifugation, high-performance gel-permeation liquid chromatography and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The relative molecular mass of the native and SDS-treated enzyme is approximately 40,000. The isoelectric point of the enzyme is 6.3. The enzyme was found to catalyze specifically the reduction of a variety of natural and unnatural polyketones and quinones other than ketopantoyl lactone in the presence of NADPH. Isatin and 5-methylisatin are rapidly reduced by the enzyme, the Km and Vmax values for isatin being 14 microM and 306 mumol/min per mg protein, respectively. Ketopantoyl lactone is also a good substrate (Km = 333 microM and Vmax = 481 mumol/min per mg protein). Reverse reaction was not detected with pantoyl lactone and NADP+. The enzyme is inhibited by quercetin, several polyketones and SH-reagents. 3,4-Dihydroxy-3-cyclobutene-1,2-dione, cyclohexenediol-1,2,3,4-tetraone and parabanic acid are uncompetitive inhibitors for the enzyme, the Ki values being 1.4, 0.2 and 3140 microM, respectively, with isatin as substrate. Comparison of the enzyme with the conjugated polyketone reductase of Mucor ambiguus (S. Shimizu, H. Hattori, H. Hata and H. Yamada (1988) Eur. J. Biochem. 174, 37-44) and ketopantoyl-lactone reductase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae suggested that ketopantoyl-lactone reductase is a kind of conjugated polyketone reductase.

  11. Cloning and nitrate induction of nitrate reductase mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Dewdney, Julia; Kleinhofs, Andris; Goodman, Howard M.

    1986-01-01

    Nitrate is the major source of nitrogen taken from the soil by higher plants but requires reduction to ammonia prior to incorporation into amino acids. The first enzyme in the reducing pathway is a nitrate-inducible enzyme, nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.1). A specific polyclonal antiserum raised against purified barley nitrate reductase has been used to immunoprecipitate in vivo labeled protein and in vitro translation products, demonstrating that nitrate induction increases nitrate reductase p...

  12. DNA damage induction of ribonucleotide reductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Elledge, S J; Davis, R W

    1989-01-01

    RNR2 encodes the small subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in the pathway for the production of deoxyribonucleotides needed for DNA synthesis. RNR2 is a member of a group of genes whose activities are cell cycle regulated and that are transcriptionally induced in response to the stress of DNA damage. An RNR2-lacZ fusion was used to further characterize the regulation of RNR2 and the pathway responsible for its response to DNA damage. beta-Galactosidas...

  13. Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein Interacts with Thioesterase Superfamily Member 2 to Attenuate Insulin Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Ersoy, Baran A.; Tarun, Akansha; D’Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J.; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F.; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D.; Cohen, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenc...

  14. Molecular evolution of the insect chemoreceptor gene superfamily in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Hugh M.; Warr, Coral G.; Carlson, John R.

    2003-01-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily in Drosophila melanogaster is predicted to consist of 62 odorant receptor (Or) and 68 gustatory receptor (Gr) proteins, encoded by families of 60 Or and 60 Gr genes through alternative splicing. We include two previously undescribed Or genes and two previously undescribed Gr genes; two previously predicted Or genes are shown to be alternative splice forms. Three polymorphic pseudogenes and one highly defective pseudogene are recognized. Phylogenetic analysis reveals deep branches connecting multiple highly divergent clades within the Gr family, and the Or family appears to be a single highly expanded lineage within the superfamily. The genes are spread throughout the Drosophila genome, with some relatively recently diverged genes still clustered in the genome. The Gr5a gene on the X chromosome, which encodes a receptor for the sugar trehalose, has transposed from one such tandem cluster of six genes at cytological location 64, as has Gr61a, and all eight of these receptors might bind sugars. Analysis of intron evolution suggests that the common ancestor consisted of a long N-terminal exon encoding transmembrane domains 1-5 followed by three exons encoding transmembrane domains 6-7. As many as 57 additional introns have been acquired idiosyncratically during the evolution of the superfamily, whereas the ancestral introns and some of the older idiosyncratic introns have been lost at least 48 times independently. Altogether, these patterns of molecular evolution suggest that this is an ancient superfamily of chemoreceptors, probably dating back at least to the origin of the arthropods. PMID:14608037

  15. Five Drosophila Genomes Reveal Nonneutral Evolution and the Signature of Host Specialization in the Chemoreceptor Superfamily

    OpenAIRE

    McBride, Carolyn S.; Arguello, J. Roman

    2007-01-01

    The insect chemoreceptor superfamily comprises the olfactory receptor (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) multigene families. These families give insects the ability to smell and taste chemicals in the environment and are thus rich resources for linking molecular evolutionary and ecological processes. Although dramatic differences in family size among distant species and high divergence among paralogs have led to the belief that the two families evolve rapidly, a lack of evolutionary data over s...

  16. Origination, expansion, evolutionary trajectory, and expression bias of AP2/ERF superfamily in Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoming Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The AP2/ERF superfamily, one of the most important transcription factor families, plays crucial roles in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far, a comprehensive evolutionary inference of its origination and expansion has not been available. Here, we identified 515 AP2/ERF genes in B. napus, a neo-tetraploid forming ~7500 years ago, and found that 82.14% of them were duplicated in the tetraploidization. A prominent subgenome bias was revealed in gene expression, tissue-specific, and gene conversion. Moreover, a large-scale analysis across plants and alga suggested that this superfamily could have been originated from AP2 family, expanding to form other families (ERF, and RAV. This process was accompanied by duplicating and/or alternative deleting AP2 domain, intragenic domain sequence conversion, and/or by acquiring other domains, resulting in copy number variations, alternatively contributing to functional innovation. We found that significant positive selection occurred at certain critical nodes during the evolution of land plants, possibly responding to changing environment. In conclusion, the present research revealed origination, functional innovation, and evolutionary trajectory of the AP2/ERF superfamily, contributing to understanding their roles in plant stress tolerance.

  17. Proteomics computational analyses suggest that baculovirus GP64 superfamily proteins are class III penetrenes

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    Garry Robert F

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Baculoviridae encode two types of proteins that mediate virus:cell membrane fusion and penetration into the host cell. Alignments of primary amino acid sequences indicate that baculovirus fusion proteins of group I nucleopolyhedroviruses (NPV form the GP64 superfamily. The structure of these viral penetrenes has not been determined. The GP64 superfamily includes the glycoprotein (GP encoded by members of the Thogotovirus genus of the Orthomyxoviridae. The entry proteins of other baculoviruses, group II NPV and granuloviruses, are class I penetrenes. Results Class III penetrenes encoded by members of the Rhabdoviridae and Herpesviridae have an internal fusion domain comprised of beta sheets, other beta sheet domains, an extended alpha helical domain, a membrane proximal stem domain and a carboxyl terminal anchor. Similar sequences and structural/functional motifs that characterize class III penetrenes are located collinearly in GP64 of group I baculoviruses and related glycoproteins encoded by thogotoviruses. Structural models based on a prototypic class III penetrene, vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV G, were established for Thogoto virus (THOV GP and Autographa california multiple NPV (AcMNPV GP64 demonstrating feasible cysteine linkages. Glycosylation sites in THOV GP and AcMNPV GP64 appear in similar model locations to the two glycosylation sites of VSV G. Conclusion These results suggest that proteins in the GP64 superfamily are class III penetrenes.

  18. Exploring and Expanding the Fatty-Acid-Binding Protein Superfamily in Fasciola Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M; Wilkinson, Toby J; Mackintosh, Neil; Jahndel, Veronika; Paterson, Steve; McVeigh, Paul; Abbas Abidi, Syed M; Saifullah, Khalid; Raman, Muthusamy; Ravikumar, Gopalakrishnan; LaCourse, James; Maule, Aaron; Brophy, Peter M

    2016-09-02

    The liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and F. gigantica infect livestock worldwide and threaten food security with climate change and problematic control measures spreading disease. Fascioliasis is also a foodborne disease with up to 17 million humans infected. In the absence of vaccines, treatment depends on triclabendazole (TCBZ), and overuse has led to widespread resistance, compromising future TCBZ control. Reductionist biology from many laboratories has predicted new therapeutic targets. To this end, the fatty-acid-binding protein (FABP) superfamily has proposed multifunctional roles, including functions intersecting vaccine and drug therapy, such as immune modulation and anthelmintic sequestration. Research is hindered by a lack of understanding of the full FABP superfamily complement. Although discovery studies predicted FABPs as promising vaccine candidates, it is unclear if uncharacterized FABPs are more relevant for vaccine formulations. We have coupled genome, transcriptome, and EST data mining with proteomics and phylogenetics to reveal a liver fluke FABP superfamily of seven clades: previously identified clades I-III and newly identified clades IV-VII. All new clade FABPs were analyzed using bioinformatics and cloned from both liver flukes. The extended FABP data set will provide new study tools to research the role of FABPs in parasite biology and as therapy targets.

  19. TNF and TNF Receptor Superfamily Members in HIV infection: New Cellular Targets for Therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF and TNF receptors (TNFR superfamily members are engaged in diverse cellular phenomena such as cellular proliferation, morphogenesis, apoptosis, inflammation, and immune regulation. Their role in regulating viral infections has been well documented. Viruses have evolved with numerous strategies to interfere with TNF-mediated signaling indicating the importance of TNF and TNFR superfamily in viral pathogenesis. Recent research reports suggest that TNF and TNFRs play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV. TNFR signaling modulates HIV replication and HIV proteins interfere with TNF/TNFR pathways. Since immune activation and inflammation are the hallmark of HIV infection, the use of TNF inhibitors can have significant impact on HIV disease progression. In this review, we will describe how HIV infection is modulated by signaling mediated through members of TNF and TNFR superfamily and in turn how these latter could be targeted by HIV proteins. Finally, we will discuss the emerging therapeutics options based on modulation of TNF activity that could ultimately lead to the cure of HIV-infected patients.

  20. Identification of a 4-Deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose Uronic Acid Reductase, FlRed, in an Alginolytic Bacterium Flavobacterium sp. Strain UMI-01

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Inoue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In alginate-assimilating bacteria, alginate is depolymerized to unsaturated monosaccharide by the actions of endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases (EC 4.2.2.3 and EC 4.2.2.11. The monosaccharide is non-enzymatically converted to 4-deoxy-l-ery thro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid (DEH, then reduced to 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate (KDG by a specific reductase, and metabolized through the Entner–Doudoroff pathway. Recently, the NADPH-dependent reductase A1-R that belongs to short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily was identified as the DEH-reductase in Sphingomonas sp. A1. We have subsequently noticed that an SDR-like enzyme gene, flred, occurred in the genome of an alginolytic bacterium Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01. In the present study, we report on the deduced amino-acid sequence of flred and DEH-reducing activity of recombinant FlRed. The deduced amino-acid sequence of flred comprised 254 residues and showed 34% amino-acid identities to that of A1-R from Sphingomonas sp. A1 and 80%–88% to those of SDR-like enzymes from several alginolytic bacteria. Common sequence motifs of SDR-superfamily enzymes, e.g., the catalytic tetrad Asn-Lys-Tyr-Ser and the cofactor-binding sequence Thr-Gly-x-x-x-Gly-x-Gly in Rossmann fold, were completely conserved in FlRed. On the other hand, an Arg residue that determined the NADPH-specificity of Sphingomonas A1-R was replaced by Glu in FlRed. Thus, we investigated cofactor-preference of FlRed using a recombinant enzyme. As a result, the recombinant FlRed (recFlRed was found to show high specificity to NADH. recFlRed exhibited practically no activity toward variety of aldehyde, ketone, keto ester, keto acid and aldose substrates except for DEH. On the basis of these results, we conclude that FlRed is the NADH-dependent DEH-specific SDR of Flavobacterium sp. strain UMI-01.

  1. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: D-Mannonate Dhydratase from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glasner, M.; Vick, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2007-01-01

    The d-mannonate dehydratase (ManD) function was assigned to a group of orthologous proteins in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily by screening a library of acid sugars. Structures of the wild type ManD from Novosphingobium aromaticivorans were determined at pH 7.5 in the presence of Mg2+ and also in the presence of Mg2+ and the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate dehydration product; the structure of the catalytically active K271E mutant was determined at pH 5.5 in the presence of the d-mannonate substrate. As previously observed in the structures of other members of the enolase superfamily, ManD contains two domains, an N-terminal a+{beta} capping domain and a ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel domain. The barrel domain contains the ligands for the essential Mg2+, Asp 210, Glu 236, and Glu 262, at the ends of the third, fourth, and fifth {beta}-strands of the barrel domain, respectively. However, the barrel domain lacks both the Lys acid/base catalyst at the end of the second {beta}-strand and the His-Asp dyad acid/base catalyst at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, that are found in many members of the superfamily. Instead, a hydrogen-bonded dyad of Tyr 159 in a loop following the second {beta}-strand and Arg 147 at the end of the second {beta}-strand are positioned to initiate the reaction by abstraction of the 2-proton. Both Tyr 159 and His 212, at the end of the third {beta}-strand, are positioned to facilitate both syn-dehydration and ketonization of the resulting enol intermediate to yield the 2-keto-3-keto-d-gluconate product with the observed retention of configuration. The identities and locations of these acid/base catalysts as well as of cationic amino acid residues that stabilize the enolate anion intermediate define a new structural strategy for catalysis (subgroup) in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily. With these differences, we provide additional evidence that the ligands for the essential Mg2+ are the only

  2. Functional mechanism of C-terminal tail in the enzymatic role of porcine testicular carbonyl reductase: a combined experiment and molecular dynamics simulation study of the C-terminal tail in the enzymatic role of PTCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minky Son

    Full Text Available Porcine testicular carbonyl reductase, PTCR which is one of the short chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDR superfamily catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of carbonyl compounds including steroids and prostaglandins. Previously we reported C-terminal tail of PTCR was deleted due to a nonsynonymous single nucleotide variation (nsSNV. Here we identified from kinetic studies that the enzymatic properties for 5α-dihydrotestosterone (5α-DHT were different between wild-type and C-terminal-deleted PTCRs. Compared to wild-type PTCR, C-terminal-deleted PTCR has much higher reduction rate. To investigate structural difference between wild-type and C-terminal-deleted PTCRs upon 5α-DHT binding, we performed molecular dynamics simulations for two complexes. Using trajectories, molecular interactions including hydrogen bonding patterns, distance between 5α-DHT and catalytic Tyr193, and interaction energies are analyzed and compared. During the MD simulation time, the dynamic behavior of C-terminal tail in wild-type PTCR is also examined using essential dynamics analysis. The results of our simulations reveal that the binding conformation of 5α-DHT in C-terminal-deleted PTCR is more favorable for reduction reaction in PTCR, which shows strong agreement with kinetic data. These structural findings provide valuable information to understand substrate specificity of PTCR and further kinetic properties of enzymes belonging to the SDR superfamily.

  3. Structure and expression of human dihydropteridine reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockyer, J.; Cook, R.G.; Milstien, S.; Kaufman, S.; Woo, S.L.C.; Ledley, F.D.

    1987-01-01

    Dihydropteridine reductase catalyzes the NADH-mediated reduction of quinonoid dihydrobiopterin and is an essential component of the pterindependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylating systems. A cDNA for human DHPR was isolated from a human liver cDNA library in the vector λgt11 using a monospecific antibody against sheep DHPR. The nucleic acid sequence and amino acid sequence of human DHPR were determined from a full-length clone. A 112 amino acid sequence of sheep DHPR was obtained by sequencing purified sheep DHPR. This sequence is highly homologous to the predicted amino acid sequence of the human protein. Gene transfer of the recombinant human DHPR into COS cells leads to expression of DHPR enzymatic activity. These results indicate that the cDNA clone identified by antibody screening is an authentic and full-length cDNA for human DHPR

  4. Monodehydroascorbate reductase mediates TNT toxicity in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Emily J; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Beynon, Emily; Lorenz, Astrid; Chechik, Victor; Bruce, Neil C

    2015-09-04

    The explosive 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) is a highly toxic and persistent environmental pollutant. Due to the scale of affected areas, one of the most cost-effective and environmentally friendly means of removing explosives pollution could be the use of plants. However, mechanisms of TNT phytotoxicity have been elusive. Here, we reveal that phytotoxicity is caused by reduction of TNT in the mitochondria, forming a nitro radical that reacts with atmospheric oxygen, generating reactive superoxide. The reaction is catalyzed by monodehydroascorbate reductase 6 (MDHAR6), with Arabidopsis deficient in MDHAR6 displaying enhanced TNT tolerance. This discovery will contribute toward the remediation of contaminated sites. Moreover, in an environment of increasing herbicide resistance, with a shortage in new herbicide classes, our findings reveal MDHAR6 as a valuable plant-specific target. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Human carbonyl reductase 1 participating in intestinal first-pass drug metabolism is inhibited by fatty acids and acyl-CoAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akira; Endo, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; El-Kabbani, Ossama; Miura, Takeshi; Nishinaka, Toru; Terada, Tomoyuki

    2017-08-15

    Human carbonyl reductase 1 (CBR1), a member of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily, reduces a variety of carbonyl compounds including endogenous isatin, prostaglandin E 2 and 4-oxo-2-nonenal. It is also a major non-cytochrome P450 enzyme in the phase I metabolism of carbonyl-containing drugs, and is highly expressed in the intestine. In this study, we found that long-chain fatty acids and their CoA ester derivatives inhibit CBR1. Among saturated fatty acids, myristic, palmitic and stearic acids were inhibitory, and stearic acid was the most potent (IC 50 9µM). Unsaturated fatty acids (oleic, elaidic, γ-linolenic and docosahexaenoic acids) and acyl-CoAs (palmitoyl-, stearoyl- and oleoyl-CoAs) were more potent inhibitors (IC 50 1.0-2.5µM), and showed high inhibitory selectivity to CBR1 over its isozyme CBR3 and other SDR superfamily enzymes (DCXR and DHRS4) with CBR activity. The inhibition by these fatty acids and acyl-CoAs was competitive with respect to the substrate, showing the K i values of 0.49-1.2µM. Site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate-binding residues of CBR1 suggested that the interactions between the fatty acyl chain and the enzyme's Met141 and Trp229 are important for the inhibitory selectivity. We also examined CBR1 inhibition by oleic acid in cellular levels: The fatty acid effectively inhibited CBR1-mediated 4-oxo-2-nonenal metabolism in colon cancer DLD1 cells and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin in the drug-resistant gastric cancer MKN45 cells that highly express CBR1. The results suggest a possible new food-drug interaction through inhibition of CBR1-mediated intestinal first-pass drug metabolism by dietary fatty acids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Structure of Human B12 Trafficking Protein CblD Reveals Molecular Mimicry and Identifies a New Subfamily of Nitro-FMN Reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Gherasim, Carmen; Banerjee, Ruma; Koutmos, Markos

    2015-12-04

    In mammals, B12 (or cobalamin) is an essential cofactor required by methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. A complex intracellular pathway supports the assimilation of cobalamin into its active cofactor forms and delivery to its target enzymes. MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type D protein), commonly referred to as CblD, is a key chaperone involved in intracellular cobalamin trafficking, and mutations in CblD cause methylmalonic aciduria and/or homocystinuria. Herein, we report the first crystal structure of the globular C-terminal domain of human CblD, which is sufficient for its interaction with MMADHC (the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C protein), or CblC, and for supporting the cytoplasmic cobalamin trafficking pathway. CblD contains an α+β fold that is structurally reminiscent of the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. Two of the closest structural relatives of CblD are CblC, a multifunctional enzyme important for cobalamin trafficking, and the activation domain of methionine synthase. CblD, CblC, and the activation domain of methionine synthase share several distinguishing features and, together with two recently described corrinoid-dependent reductive dehalogenases, constitute a new subclass within the nitro-FMN reductase superfamily. We demonstrate that CblD enhances oxidation of cob(II)alamin bound to CblC and that disease-causing mutations in CblD impair the kinetics of this reaction. The striking structural similarity of CblD to CblC, believed to be contiguous in the cobalamin trafficking pathway, suggests the co-option of molecular mimicry as a strategy for achieving its function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Crius: A Novel Fragment-Based Algorithm of De Novo Substrate Prediction for Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuiqin; Zhang, Lujia; Gao, Bei; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H; Wei, Dongzhi

    2018-05-03

    The study of enzyme substrate specificity is vital for developing potential applications of enzymes. However, the routine experimental procedures require lot of resources in the discovery of novel substrates. This article reports an in silico structure-based algorithm called Crius, which predicts substrates for enzyme. The results of this fragment-based algorithm show good agreements between the simulated and experimental substrate specificities, using a lipase from Candida antarctica (CALB), a nitrilase from Cyanobacterium syechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Nit6803), and an aldo-keto reductase from Gluconobacter oxydans (Gox0644). This opens new prospects of developing computer algorithms that can effectively predict substrates for an enzyme. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 The Protein Society.

  8. Fundamental roles of reactive oxygen species and protective mechanisms in the female reproductive system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okada Futoshi

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Controlled oxidation, such as disulfide bond formation in sperm nuclei and during ovulation, plays a fundamental role in mammalian reproduction. Excess oxidation, however, causes oxidative stress, resulting in the dysfunction of the reproductive process. Antioxidation reactions that reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species are of prime importance in reproductive systems in maintaining the quality of gametes and support reproduction. While anti-oxidative enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, play a central role in eliminating oxidative stress, reduction-oxidation (redox systems, comprised of mainly glutathione and thioredoxin, function to reduce the levels of oxidized molecules. Aldo-keto reductase, using NADPH as an electron donor, detoxifies carbonyl compounds resulting from the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Thus, many antioxidative and redox enzyme genes are expressed and aggressively protect gametes and embryos in reproductive systems.

  9. A comparative proteomic analysis of Bacillus coagulans in response to lactate stress during the production of L-lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuwen; Qin, Jiayang; Wang, Landong; Xu, Ping

    2014-12-01

    The growth rate and maximum biomass of Bacillus coagulans 2-6 were inhibited by lactate; inhibition by sodium lactate was stronger than by calcium lactate. The differences of protein expressions by B. coagulans 2-6 under the lactate stress were determined using two-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometric identification. Under the non-stress condition, calcium lactate stress and sodium lactate stress, the number of detected protein spots was 1,571 ± 117, 1,281 ± 231 and 904 ± 127, respectively. Four proteins with high expression under lactate stress were identified: lactate dehydrogenase, cysteine synthase A, aldo/keto reductase and ribosomal protein L7/L12. These proteins are thus potential targets for the reconstruction of B. coagulans to promote its resistance to lactate stress.

  10. Proteome screening of pleural effusions identifies galectin 1 as a diagnostic biomarker and highlights several prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundt, Filip; Johansson, Henrik J; Forshed, Jenny; Arslan, Sertaç; Metintas, Muzaffer; Dobra, Katalin; Lehtiö, Janne; Hjerpe, Anders

    2014-03-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive asbestos-induced cancer, and affected patients have a median survival of approximately one year after diagnosis. It is often difficult to reach a conclusive diagnosis, and ancillary measurements of soluble biomarkers could increase diagnostic accuracy. Unfortunately, few soluble mesothelioma biomarkers are suitable for clinical application. Here we screened the effusion proteomes of mesothelioma and lung adenocarcinoma patients to identify novel soluble mesothelioma biomarkers. We performed quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomics using isobaric tags for quantification and used narrow-range immobilized pH gradient/high-resolution isoelectric focusing (pH 4-4.25) prior to analysis by means of nano liquid chromatography coupled to MS/MS. More than 1,300 proteins were identified in pleural effusions from patients with malignant mesothelioma (n = 6), lung adenocarcinoma (n = 6), or benign mesotheliosis (n = 7). Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000531. The identified proteins included a set of known mesothelioma markers and proteins that regulate hallmarks of cancer such as invasion, angiogenesis, and immune evasion, plus several new candidate proteins. Seven candidates (aldo-keto reductase 1B10, apolipoprotein C-I, galectin 1, myosin-VIIb, superoxide dismutase 2, tenascin C, and thrombospondin 1) were validated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in a larger group of patients with mesothelioma (n = 37) or metastatic carcinomas (n = 25) and in effusions from patients with benign, reactive conditions (n = 16). Galectin 1 was identified as overexpressed in effusions from lung adenocarcinoma relative to mesothelioma and was validated as an excellent predictor for metastatic carcinomas against malignant mesothelioma. Galectin 1, aldo-keto reductase 1B10, and apolipoprotein C-I were all identified as potential prognostic biomarkers for malignant mesothelioma. This analysis of the effusion proteome

  11. Historical perspectives on tumor necrosis factor and its superfamily: 25 years later, a golden journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Bharat B; Gupta, Subash C; Kim, Ji Hye

    2012-01-19

    Although activity that induced tumor regression was observed and termed tumor necrosis factor (TNF) as early as the 1960s, the true identity of TNF was not clear until 1984, when Aggarwal and coworkers reported, for the first time, the isolation of 2 cytotoxic factors: one, derived from macrophages (molecular mass 17 kDa), was named TNF, and the second, derived from lymphocytes (20 kDa), was named lymphotoxin. Because the 2 cytotoxic factors exhibited 50% amino acid sequence homology and bound to the same receptor, they came to be called TNF-α and TNF-β. Identification of the protein sequences led to cloning of their cDNA. Based on sequence homology to TNF-α, now a total of 19 members of the TNF superfamily have been identified, along with 29 interacting receptors, and several molecules that interact with the cytoplasmic domain of these receptors. The roles of the TNF superfamily in inflammation, apoptosis, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, and morphogenesis have been documented. Their roles in immunologic, cardiovascular, neurologic, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases are becoming apparent. TNF superfamily members are active targets for drug development, as indicated by the recent approval and expanding market of TNF blockers used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Crohns disease, and osteoporosis, with a total market of more than US $20 billion. As we learn more about this family, more therapeutics will probably emerge. In this review, we summarize the initial discovery of TNF-α, and the insights gained regarding the roles of this molecule and its related family members in normal physiology and disease.

  12. Evolution and Diversity of the Ras Superfamily of Small GTPases in Prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuichet, Kristin; Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte

    2015-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of small GTPases are single domain nucleotide-dependent molecular switches that act as highly tuned regulators of complex signal transduction pathways. Originally identified in eukaryotes for their roles in fundamental cellular processes including proliferation, motility, polarity, nuclear transport, and vesicle transport, recent studies have revealed that single domain GTPases also control complex functions such as cell polarity, motility, predation, development and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Here, we used a computational genomics approach to understand the abundance, diversity, and evolution of small GTPases in prokaryotes. We collected 520 small GTPase sequences present in 17% of 1,611 prokaryotic genomes analyzed that cover diverse lineages. We identified two discrete families of small GTPases in prokaryotes that show evidence of three distinct catalytic mechanisms. The MglA family includes MglA homologs, which are typically associated with the MglB GTPase activating protein, whereas members of the Rup (Ras superfamily GTPase of unknown function in prokaryotes) family are not predicted to interact with MglB homologs. System classification and genome context analyses support the involvement of small GTPases in diverse prokaryotic signal transduction pathways including two component systems, laying the foundation for future experimental characterization of these proteins. Phylogenetic analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic GTPases supports that the last universal common ancestor contained ancestral MglA and Rup family members. We propose that the MglA family was lost from the ancestral eukaryote and that the Ras superfamily members in extant eukaryotes are the result of vertical and horizontal gene transfer events of ancestral Rup GTPases. PMID:25480683

  13. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  14. Using sequence similarity networks for visualization of relationships across diverse protein superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holly J Atkinson

    Full Text Available The dramatic increase in heterogeneous types of biological data--in particular, the abundance of new protein sequences--requires fast and user-friendly methods for organizing this information in a way that enables functional inference. The most widely used strategy to link sequence or structure to function, homology-based function prediction, relies on the fundamental assumption that sequence or structural similarity implies functional similarity. New tools that extend this approach are still urgently needed to associate sequence data with biological information in ways that accommodate the real complexity of the problem, while being accessible to experimental as well as computational biologists. To address this, we have examined the application of sequence similarity networks for visualizing functional trends across protein superfamilies from the context of sequence similarity. Using three large groups of homologous proteins of varying types of structural and functional diversity--GPCRs and kinases from humans, and the crotonase superfamily of enzymes--we show that overlaying networks with orthogonal information is a powerful approach for observing functional themes and revealing outliers. In comparison to other primary methods, networks provide both a good representation of group-wise sequence similarity relationships and a strong visual and quantitative correlation with phylogenetic trees, while enabling analysis and visualization of much larger sets of sequences than trees or multiple sequence alignments can easily accommodate. We also define important limitations and caveats in the application of these networks. As a broadly accessible and effective tool for the exploration of protein superfamilies, sequence similarity networks show great potential for generating testable hypotheses about protein structure-function relationships.

  15. A global view of structure-function relationships in the tautomerase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Rebecca; Baas, Bert-Jan; Akiva, Eyal; Holliday, Gemma L; Polacco, Benjamin J; LeVieux, Jake A; Pullara, Collin R; Zhang, Yan Jessie; Whitman, Christian P; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2018-02-16

    The tautomerase superfamily (TSF) consists of more than 11,000 nonredundant sequences present throughout the biosphere. Characterized members have attracted much attention because of the unusual and key catalytic role of an N-terminal proline. These few characterized members catalyze a diverse range of chemical reactions, but the full scale of their chemical capabilities and biological functions remains unknown. To gain new insight into TSF structure-function relationships, we performed a global analysis of similarities across the entire superfamily and computed a sequence similarity network to guide classification into distinct subgroups. Our results indicate that TSF members are found in all domains of life, with most being present in bacteria. The eukaryotic members of the cis -3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase subgroup are limited to fungal species, whereas the macrophage migration inhibitory factor subgroup has wide eukaryotic representation (including mammals). Unexpectedly, we found that 346 TSF sequences lack Pro-1, of which 85% are present in the malonate semialdehyde decarboxylase subgroup. The computed network also enabled the identification of similarity paths, namely sequences that link functionally diverse subgroups and exhibit transitional structural features that may help explain reaction divergence. A structure-guided comparison of these linker proteins identified conserved transitions between them, and kinetic analysis paralleled these observations. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the linker set was consistent with these findings. Our results also suggest that contemporary TSF members may have evolved from a short 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase-like ancestor followed by gene duplication and fusion. Our new linker-guided strategy can be used to enrich the discovery of sequence/structure/function transitions in other enzyme superfamilies. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Using sequence similarity networks for visualization of relationships across diverse protein superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Holly J; Morris, John H; Ferrin, Thomas E; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2009-01-01

    The dramatic increase in heterogeneous types of biological data--in particular, the abundance of new protein sequences--requires fast and user-friendly methods for organizing this information in a way that enables functional inference. The most widely used strategy to link sequence or structure to function, homology-based function prediction, relies on the fundamental assumption that sequence or structural similarity implies functional similarity. New tools that extend this approach are still urgently needed to associate sequence data with biological information in ways that accommodate the real complexity of the problem, while being accessible to experimental as well as computational biologists. To address this, we have examined the application of sequence similarity networks for visualizing functional trends across protein superfamilies from the context of sequence similarity. Using three large groups of homologous proteins of varying types of structural and functional diversity--GPCRs and kinases from humans, and the crotonase superfamily of enzymes--we show that overlaying networks with orthogonal information is a powerful approach for observing functional themes and revealing outliers. In comparison to other primary methods, networks provide both a good representation of group-wise sequence similarity relationships and a strong visual and quantitative correlation with phylogenetic trees, while enabling analysis and visualization of much larger sets of sequences than trees or multiple sequence alignments can easily accommodate. We also define important limitations and caveats in the application of these networks. As a broadly accessible and effective tool for the exploration of protein superfamilies, sequence similarity networks show great potential for generating testable hypotheses about protein structure-function relationships.

  17. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Feng-Xia; Zang, Jian-Lei; Wang, Tan; Xie, Yu-Li; Zhang, Jin; Hu, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) constitute a superfamily of NAD(P)+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  18. Nitrite-reductase and peroxynitrite isomerization activities of Methanosarcina acetivorans protoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Ascenzi

    Full Text Available Within the globin superfamily, protoglobins (Pgb belong phylogenetically to the same cluster of two-domain globin-coupled sensors and single-domain sensor globins. Multiple functional roles have been postulated for Methanosarcina acetivorans Pgb (Ma-Pgb, since the detoxification of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species might co-exist with enzymatic activity(ies to facilitate the conversion of CO to methane. Here, the nitrite-reductase and peroxynitrite isomerization activities of the CysE20Ser mutant of Ma-Pgb (Ma-Pgb* are reported and analyzed in parallel with those of related heme-proteins. Kinetics of nitrite-reductase activity of ferrous Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II is biphasic and values of the second-order rate constant for the reduction of NO2- to NO and the concomitant formation of nitrosylated Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(II-NO are k(app1= 9.6 ± 0.2 M(-1 s(-1 and k(app2 = 1.2 ± 0.1 M(-1 s(-1 (at pH 7.4 and 20 °C. The k(app1 and k(app2 values increase by about one order of magnitude for each pH unit decrease, between pH 8.3 and 6.2, indicating that the reaction requires one proton. On the other hand, kinetics of peroxynitrite isomerization catalyzed by ferric Ma-Pgb* (Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III is monophasic and values of the second order rate constant for peroxynitrite isomerization by Ma-Pgb*-Fe(III and of the first order rate constant for the spontaneous conversion of peroxynitrite to nitrate are h(app = 3.8 × 10(4 M(-1 s(-1 and h0 = 2.8 × 10(-1 s(-1 (at pH 7.4 and 20 °C. The pH-dependence of hon and h0 values reflects the acid-base equilibrium of peroxynitrite (pKa = 6.7 and 6.9, respectively; at 20 °C, indicating that HOONO is the species that reacts preferentially with the heme-Fe(III atom. These results highlight the potential role of Pgbs in the biosynthesis and scavenging of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species.

  19. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  20. Crystallization and diffraction analysis of thioredoxin reductase from Streptomyces coelicolor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koháryová, Michaela; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, Marta

    2011-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase from S. coelicolor was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. Thioredoxin reductases are homodimeric flavoenzymes that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADPH to oxidized thioredoxin substrate. Bacterial thioredoxin reductases represent a promising target for the development of new antibiotics. Recombinant thioredoxin reductase TrxB from Streptomyces coelicolor was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from cryocooled crystals to 2.4 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belonged to the primitive monoclinic space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 82.9, b = 60.6, c = 135.4 Å, α = γ = 90.0, β = 96.5°

  1. Cloning and characterization of a nitrite reductase gene related to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-03-01

    Mar 1, 2010 ... Alexander et al., 2005) and heme-type nitrite reductase gene (Smith and ... owing to a genotype-dependent response (Zhang et al.,. 1991; Sakhanokho et al., ..... Improvement of cell culture conditions for rice. Jpn. Agric. Res.

  2. Characterization of mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase from C. elegans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacey, Brian M.; Hondal, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    Thioredoxin reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of the catalytic disulfide bond of thioredoxin. In mammals and other higher eukaryotes, thioredoxin reductases contain the rare amino acid selenocysteine at the active site. The mitochondrial enzyme from Caenorhabditis elegans, however, contains a cysteine residue in place of selenocysteine. The mitochondrial C. elegans thioredoxin reductase was cloned from an expressed sequence tag and then produced in Escherichia coli as an intein-fusion protein. The purified recombinant enzyme has a k cat of 610 min -1 and a K m of 610 μM using E. coli thioredoxin as substrate. The reported k cat is 25% of the k cat of the mammalian enzyme and is 43-fold higher than a cysteine mutant of mammalian thioredoxin reductase. The enzyme would reduce selenocysteine, but not hydrogen peroxide or insulin. The flanking glycine residues of the GCCG motif were mutated to serine. The mutants improved substrate binding, but decreased the catalytic rate

  3. 5α-reductase activity in rat adipose tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zyirek, M.; Flood, C.; Longcope, C.

    1987-01-01

    We measured the 5 α-reductase activity in isolated cell preparations of rat adipose tissue using the formation of [ 3 H] dihydrotestosterone from [ 3 H] testosterone as an endpoint. Stromal cells were prepared from the epididymal fat pad, perinephric fat, and subcutaneous fat of male rats and from perinephric fat of female rats. Adipocytes were prepared from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat of male rats. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad and perinephric fat contained greater 5α-reductase activity than did the adipocytes from these depots. Stromal cells from the epididymal fat pad contained greater activity than those from perinephric and subcutaneous depots. Perinephric stromal cells from female rats were slightly more active than those from male rats. Estradiol (10 -8 M), when added to the medium, caused a 90% decrease in 5α-reductase activity. Aromatase activity was minimal, several orders of magnitude less than 5α-reductase activity in each tissue studied

  4. Intraethnic variation in steroid-5-alpha-reductase polymorphisms in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-06-01

    Jun 1, 2015 ... in prostate cancer patients: a potential factor implicated ... reductase alpha polypeptides 1 and 2 in a set of 601 prostate cancer patients from four ..... tion in the key androgen-regulating genes androgen receptor, cytochrome ...

  5. SVM-Fold: a tool for discriminative multi-class protein fold and superfamily recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Iain; Ie, Eugene; Kuang, Rui; Weston, Jason; Stafford, William Noble; Leslie, Christina

    2007-05-22

    Predicting a protein's structural class from its amino acid sequence is a fundamental problem in computational biology. Much recent work has focused on developing new representations for protein sequences, called string kernels, for use with support vector machine (SVM) classifiers. However, while some of these approaches exhibit state-of-the-art performance at the binary protein classification problem, i.e. discriminating between a particular protein class and all other classes, few of these studies have addressed the real problem of multi-class superfamily or fold recognition. Moreover, there are only limited software tools and systems for SVM-based protein classification available to the bioinformatics community. We present a new multi-class SVM-based protein fold and superfamily recognition system and web server called SVM-Fold, which can be found at http://svm-fold.c2b2.columbia.edu. Our system uses an efficient implementation of a state-of-the-art string kernel for sequence profiles, called the profile kernel, where the underlying feature representation is a histogram of inexact matching k-mer frequencies. We also employ a novel machine learning approach to solve the difficult multi-class problem of classifying a sequence of amino acids into one of many known protein structural classes. Binary one-vs-the-rest SVM classifiers that are trained to recognize individual structural classes yield prediction scores that are not comparable, so that standard "one-vs-all" classification fails to perform well. Moreover, SVMs for classes at different levels of the protein structural hierarchy may make useful predictions, but one-vs-all does not try to combine these multiple predictions. To deal with these problems, our method learns relative weights between one-vs-the-rest classifiers and encodes information about the protein structural hierarchy for multi-class prediction. In large-scale benchmark results based on the SCOP database, our code weighting approach

  6. Stability for Function Trade-Offs in the Enolase Superfamily 'Catalytic Module'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatani, R.A.; Gonzalez, A.; Shoichet, B.K.; Brinen, L.S.; Babbitt, P.C.; /UC, San Francisco /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-07-12

    Enzyme catalysis reflects a dynamic interplay between charged and polar active site residues that facilitate function, stabilize transition states, and maintain overall protein stability. Previous studies show that substituting neutral for charged residues in the active site often significantly stabilizes a protein, suggesting a stability trade-off for functionality. In the enolase superfamily, a set of conserved active site residues (the ''catalytic module'') has repeatedly been used in nature in the evolution of many different enzymes for the performance of unique overall reactions involving a chemically diverse set of substrates. This catalytic module provides a robust solution for catalysis that delivers the common underlying partial reaction that supports all of the different overall chemical reactions of the superfamily. As this module has been so broadly conserved in the evolution of new functions, we sought to investigate the extent to which it follows the stability-function trade-off. Alanine substitutions were made for individual residues, groups of residues, and the entire catalytic module of o-succinylbenzoate synthase (OSBS), a member of the enolase superfamily from Escherichia coli. Of six individual residue substitutions, four (K131A, D161A, E190A, and D213A) substantially increased protein stability (by 0.46-4.23 kcal/mol), broadly consistent with prediction of a stability-activity trade-off. The residue most conserved across the superfamily, E190, is by far the most destabilizing. When the individual substitutions were combined into groups (as they are structurally and functionally organized), nonadditive stability effects emerged, supporting previous observations that residues within the module interact as two functional groups within a larger catalytic system. Thus, whereas the multiple-mutant enzymes D161A/E190A/D213A and K131A/K133A/D161A/E190A/D213A/K235A (termed 3KDED) are stabilized relative to the wild-type enzyme (by 1

  7. Meeting report - TGF-β superfamily: signaling in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying E; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2013-11-01

    The latest advances on the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathways were reported at the July 2013 FASEB Summer Research Conference 'The TGF-β Superfamily: Development and Disease'. The meeting was held in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, USA at 6700 feet above sea level in the Rocky Mountains. This was the seventh biannual meeting in the series. In attendance were investigators from a broad range of disciplines with a common interest in the mechanics of TGF-β and BMP signaling pathways, their normal developmental and homeostatic functions, and the diseases associated with pathway misregulation.

  8. Streptococcus sanguinis Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlynets, Olga; Boal, Amie K.; Rhodes, DeLacy V.; Kitten, Todd; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus sanguinis is a causative agent of infective endocarditis. Deletion of SsaB, a manganese transporter, drastically reduces S. sanguinis virulence. Many pathogenic organisms require class Ib ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) to catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides under aerobic conditions, and recent studies demonstrate that this enzyme uses a dimanganese-tyrosyl radical (MnIII2-Y•) cofactor in vivo. The proteins required for S. sanguinis ribonucleotide reduction (NrdE and NrdF, α and β subunits of RNR; NrdH and TrxR, a glutaredoxin-like thioredoxin and a thioredoxin reductase; and NrdI, a flavodoxin essential for assembly of the RNR metallo-cofactor) have been identified and characterized. Apo-NrdF with FeII and O2 can self-assemble a diferric-tyrosyl radical (FeIII2-Y•) cofactor (1.2 Y•/β2) and with the help of NrdI can assemble a MnIII2-Y• cofactor (0.9 Y•/β2). The activity of RNR with its endogenous reductants, NrdH and TrxR, is 5,000 and 1,500 units/mg for the Mn- and Fe-NrdFs (Fe-loaded NrdF), respectively. X-ray structures of S. sanguinis NrdIox and MnII2-NrdF are reported and provide a possible rationale for the weak affinity (2.9 μm) between them. These streptococcal proteins form a structurally distinct subclass relative to other Ib proteins with unique features likely important in cluster assembly, including a long and negatively charged loop near the NrdI flavin and a bulky residue (Thr) at a constriction in the oxidant channel to the NrdI interface. These studies set the stage for identifying the active form of S. sanguinis class Ib RNR in an animal model for infective endocarditis and establishing whether the manganese requirement for pathogenesis is associated with RNR. PMID:24381172

  9. Staying green postharvest: how three mutations in the Arabidopsis chlorophyll b reductase gene NYC1 delay degreening by distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibran, Rubina; Sullivan, Kerry L; Crowhurst, Ross; Erridge, Zoe A; Chagné, David; McLachlan, Andrew R G; Brummell, David A; Dijkwel, Paul P; Hunter, Donald A

    2015-11-01

    Stresses such as energy deprivation, wounding and water-supply disruption often contribute to rapid deterioration of harvested tissues. To uncover the genetic regulation behind such stresses, a simple assessment system was used to detect senescence mutants in conjunction with two rapid mapping techniques to identify the causal mutations. To demonstrate the power of this approach, immature inflorescences of Arabidopsis plants that contained ethyl methanesulfonate-induced lesions were detached and screened for altered timing of dark-induced senescence. Numerous mutant lines displaying accelerated or delayed timing of senescence relative to wild type were discovered. The underlying mutations in three of these were identified using High Resolution Melting analysis to map to a chromosomal arm followed by a whole-genome sequencing-based mapping method, termed 'Needle in the K-Stack', to identify the causal lesions. All three mutations were single base pair changes and occurred in the same gene, NON-YELLOW COLORING1 (NYC1), a chlorophyll b reductase of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. This was consistent with the mutants preferentially retaining chlorophyll b, although substantial amounts of chlorophyll b were still lost. The single base pair mutations disrupted NYC1 function by three distinct mechanisms, one by producing a termination codon, the second by interfering with correct intron splicing and the third by replacing a highly conserved proline with a non-equivalent serine residue. This non-synonymous amino acid change, which occurred in the NADPH binding domain of NYC1, is the first example of such a mutation in an SDR protein inhibiting a physiological response in plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Cloning, functional expression and characterization of a bifunctional 3-hydroxybutanal dehydrogenase /reductase involved in acetone metabolism by Desulfococcus biacutus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jasmin; Rusche, Hendrik; Schink, Bernhard; Schleheck, David

    2016-11-25

    The strictly anaerobic, sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfococcus biacutus can utilize acetone as sole carbon and energy source for growth. Whereas in aerobic and nitrate-reducing bacteria acetone is activated by carboxylation with CO 2 to acetoacetate, D. biacutus involves CO as a cosubstrate for acetone activation through a different, so far unknown pathway. Proteomic studies indicated that, among others, a predicted medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (MDR) superfamily, zinc-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase (locus tag DebiaDRAFT_04514) is specifically and highly produced during growth with acetone. The MDR gene DebiaDRAFT_04514 was cloned and overexpressed in E. coli. The purified recombinant protein required zinc as cofactor, and accepted NADH/NAD + but not NADPH/NADP + as electron donor/acceptor. The pH optimum was at pH 8, and the temperature optimum at 45 °C. Highest specific activities were observed for reduction of C 3 - C 5 -aldehydes with NADH, such as propanal to propanol (380 ± 15 mU mg -1 protein), butanal to butanol (300 ± 24 mU mg -1 ), and 3-hydroxybutanal to 1,3-butanediol (248 ± 60 mU mg -1 ), however, the enzyme also oxidized 3-hydroxybutanal with NAD + to acetoacetaldehyde (83 ± 18 mU mg -1 ). The enzyme might play a key role in acetone degradation by D. biacutus, for example as a bifunctional 3-hydroxybutanal dehydrogenase/reductase. Its recombinant production may represent an important step in the elucidation of the complete degradation pathway.

  11. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress and diabetic mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiho eTang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance 1. DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR [ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21], a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes NADPH-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis and myocardium (heart failure leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in 2. In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications.

  12. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark

    2016-01-01

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1"G"F"P mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR"W"T background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  13. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications.

  14. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J. Mark, E-mail: mark.petrash@ucdenver.edu

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1{sup GFP} mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR{sup WT} background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. - Highlights: • AR inhibition prevents retinal microglial activation. • Endotoxin-induced ocular cytokine production is reduced in AR null mice. • Overexpression of AR spontaneously induces retinal microglial activation.

  15. Binding of Fidarestat Stereoisomers with Aldose Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The stereospecificity in binding to aldose reductase (ALR2 of two fidarestat {6-fluoro-2',5'-dioxospiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazolidine]-2-carboxamide} stereoisomers [(2S,4Sand (2R,4S] has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations using freeenergy integration techniques. The difference in the free energy of binding was found to be2.0 ± 1.7 kJ/mol in favour of the (2S,4S-form, in agreement with the experimentalinhibition data. The relative mobilities of the fidarestats complexed with ALR2 indicate alarger entropic penalty for hydrophobic binding of (2R,4S-fidarestat compared to (2S,4S-fidarestat, partially explaining its lower binding affinity. The two stereoisomers differmainly in the orientation of the carbamoyl moiety with respect to the active site and rotationof the bond joining the carbamoyl substituent to the ring. The detailed structural andenergetic insights obtained from out simulations allow for a better understanding of thefactors determining stereospecific inhibitor-ALR2 binding in the EPF charges model.

  16. Structural Studies of Cinnamoyl-CoA Reductase and Cinnamyl-Alcohol Dehydrogenase, Key Enzymes of Monolignol Biosynthesis[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Haiyun; Zhou, Rui; Louie, Gordon V.; Mühlemann, Joëlle K.; Bomati, Erin K.; Bowman, Marianne E.; Dudareva, Natalia; Dixon, Richard A.; Noel, Joseph P.; Wang, Xiaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    The enzymes cinnamoyl-CoA reductase (CCR) and cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD) catalyze the two key reduction reactions in the conversion of cinnamic acid derivatives into monolignol building blocks for lignin polymers in plant cell walls. Here, we describe detailed functional and structural analyses of CCRs from Medicago truncatula and Petunia hybrida and of an atypical CAD (CAD2) from M. truncatula. These enzymes are closely related members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Our structural studies support a reaction mechanism involving a canonical SDR catalytic triad in both CCR and CAD2 and an important role for an auxiliary cysteine unique to CCR. Site-directed mutants of CAD2 (Phe226Ala and Tyr136Phe) that enlarge the phenolic binding site result in a 4- to 10-fold increase in activity with sinapaldehyde, which in comparison to the smaller coumaraldehyde and coniferaldehyde substrates is disfavored by wild-type CAD2. This finding demonstrates the potential exploitation of rationally engineered forms of CCR and CAD2 for the targeted modification of monolignol composition in transgenic plants. Thermal denaturation measurements and structural comparisons of various liganded and unliganded forms of CCR and CAD2 highlight substantial conformational flexibility of these SDR enzymes, which plays an important role in the establishment of catalytically productive complexes of the enzymes with their NADPH and phenolic substrates. PMID:25217505

  17. GFP-like proteins as ubiquitous metazoan superfamily: evolution of functional features and structural complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagin, Dmitry A; Barsova, Ekaterina V; Yanushevich, Yurii G; Fradkov, Arkady F; Lukyanov, Konstantin A; Labas, Yulii A; Semenova, Tatiana N; Ugalde, Juan A; Meyers, Ann; Nunez, Jose M; Widder, Edith A; Lukyanov, Sergey A; Matz, Mikhail V

    2004-05-01

    Homologs of the green fluorescent protein (GFP), including the recently described GFP-like domains of certain extracellular matrix proteins in Bilaterian organisms, are remarkably similar at the protein structure level, yet they often perform totally unrelated functions, thereby warranting recognition as a superfamily. Here we describe diverse GFP-like proteins from previously undersampled and completely new sources, including hydromedusae and planktonic Copepoda. In hydromedusae, yellow and nonfluorescent purple proteins were found in addition to greens. Notably, the new yellow protein seems to follow exactly the same structural solution to achieving the yellow color of fluorescence as YFP, an engineered yellow-emitting mutant variant of GFP. The addition of these new sequences made it possible to resolve deep-level phylogenetic relationships within the superfamily. Fluorescence (most likely green) must have already existed in the common ancestor of Cnidaria and Bilateria, and therefore GFP-like proteins may be responsible for fluorescence and/or coloration in virtually any animal. At least 15 color diversification events can be inferred following the maximum parsimony principle in Cnidaria. Origination of red fluorescence and nonfluorescent purple-blue colors on several independent occasions provides a remarkable example of convergent evolution of complex features at the molecular level.

  18. Immunoglobulin superfamily members encoded by viruses and their multiple roles in immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, Domènec; Martínez-Vicente, Pablo; Engel, Pablo; Angulo, Ana

    2017-05-01

    Pathogens have developed a plethora of strategies to undermine host immune defenses in order to guarantee their survival. For large DNA viruses, these immune evasion mechanisms frequently rely on the expression of genes acquired from host genomes. Horizontally transferred genes include members of the immunoglobulin superfamily, whose products constitute the most diverse group of proteins of vertebrate genomes. Their promiscuous immunoglobulin domains, which comprise the building blocks of these molecules, are involved in a large variety of functions mediated by ligand-binding interactions. The flexible structural nature of the immunoglobulin domains makes them appealing targets for viral capture due to their capacity to generate high functional diversity. Here, we present an up-to-date review of immunoglobulin superfamily gene homologs encoded by herpesviruses, poxviruses, and adenoviruses, that include CD200, CD47, Fc receptors, interleukin-1 receptor 2, interleukin-18 binding protein, CD80, carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecules, and signaling lymphocyte activation molecules. We discuss their distinct structural attributes, binding properties, and functions, shaped by evolutionary pressures to disarm specific immune pathways. We include several novel genes identified from extensive genome database surveys. An understanding of the properties and modes of action of these viral proteins may guide the development of novel immune-modulatory therapeutic tools. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Isolation of a novel LPS-induced component of the ML superfamily in Ciona intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizzini, Aiti; Bonura, Angela; Longo, Valeria; Sanfratello, Maria Antonietta; Parrinello, Daniela; Cammarata, Matteo; Colombo, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    ML superfamily represents a group of proteins playing important roles in lipid metabolism and innate immune response. In this study, we report the identification of the first component of the ML superfamily in the invertebrate Ciona intestinalis by means of a subtractive hybridization strategy. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis showed that this protein forms a specific clade with vertebrate components of the Niemann-Pick type C2 protein and, for this reason, it has been named Ci-NPC2. The putative Ci-NPC2 is a 150 amino acids long protein with a short signal peptide, seven cysteine residues, three putative lipid binding site and a three-dimensional model showing a characteristic β-strand structure. Gene expression analysis demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is positively upregulated after LPS inoculum with a peak of expression 1 h after challenge. Finally, in-situ hybridization demonstrated that the Ci-NPC2 protein is preferentially expressed in hemocytes inside the vessel lumen. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Identification, immunolocalization, and characterization analyses of an exopeptidase of papain superfamily, (cathepsin C) from Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pei; He, Lei; Xu, Yanquan; Chen, Xueqing; Huang, Yan; Ren, Mengyu; Liang, Chi; Li, Xuerong; Xu, Jin; Lu, Gang; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-10-01

    Cathepsin C is an important exopeptidase of papain superfamily and plays a number of great important roles during the parasitic life cycle. The amino acid sequence of cathepsin C from Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) showed 54, 53, and 49% identities to that of Schistosoma japonicum, Schistosoma mansoni, and Homo sapiens, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis utilizing the sequences of papain superfamily of C. sinensis demonstrated that cathepsin C and cathepsin Bs came from a common ancestry. Cathepsin C of C. sinensis (Cscathepsin C) was identified as an excretory/secretory product by Western blot analysis. The results of transcriptional level and translational level of Cscathepsin C at metacercaria stage were higher than that at adult worms. Immunolocalization analysis indicated that Cscathepsin C was specifically distributed in the suckers (oral sucker and ventral sucker), eggs, vitellarium, intestines, and testis of adult worms. In the metacercaria, it was mainly detected on the cyst wall and excretory bladder. Combining with the results mentioned above, it implies that Cscathepsin C may be an essential proteolytic enzyme for proteins digestion of hosts, nutrition assimilation, and immune invasion of C. sinensis. Furthermore, it may be a potential diagnostic antigen and drug target against C. sinensis infection.

  1. Fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a circulating member of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte Harken; Krogh, T N; Støving, René Klinkby

    1997-01-01

    We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3.2% and an aver......We describe an ELISA technique for quantification of fetal antigen 1 (FA1), a glycoprotein belonging to the EGF-superfamily. The ELISA is based on immunospecifically purified polyclonal antibodies and has a dynamic range of 0.7-5.3 ng/ml, intra- and inter-assay C.V.s of less than 3.......2% and an average recovery of 105% in serum and 98% in urine. Comparison of FA1 in amniotic fluid, serum and urine revealed parallel titration curves, identical elution volumes following size chromatography, immunological identity and similar profiles when analysed by MALDI-MS. The reference interval for serum FA1...... was 12.3-46.6 ng/ml and the levels were 10 times higher in patients with renal failure. FA1 showed no diurnal variation, no variation during the menstrual cycle and was not influenced by the acute phase reaction. In humans (n = 10) the renal clearance of FA1 was 11 ml/min and an identical high renal...

  2. Homology models guide discovery of diverse enzyme specificities among dipeptide epimerases in the enolase superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukk, Tiit; Sakai, Ayano; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Brown, Shoshana D.; Imker, Heidi J.; Song, Ling; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Toro, Rafael; Hillerich, Brandan; Seidel, Ronald; Patskovsky, Yury; Vetting, Matthew W.; Nair, Satish K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advance in genome sequencing presents substantial challenges for protein functional assignment, with half or more of new protein sequences inferred from these genomes having uncertain assignments. The assignment of enzyme function in functionally diverse superfamilies represents a particular challenge, which we address through a combination of computational predictions, enzymology, and structural biology. Here we describe the results of a focused investigation of a group of enzymes in the enolase superfamily that are involved in epimerizing dipeptides. The first members of this group to be functionally characterized were Ala-Glu epimerases in Eschericiha coli and Bacillus subtilis, based on the operon context and enzymological studies; these enzymes are presumed to be involved in peptidoglycan recycling. We have subsequently studied more than 65 related enzymes by computational methods, including homology modeling and metabolite docking, which suggested that many would have divergent specificities;, i.e., they are likely to have different (unknown) biological roles. In addition to the Ala-Phe epimerase specificity reported previously, we describe the prediction and experimental verification of: (i) a new group of presumed Ala-Glu epimerases; (ii) several enzymes with specificity for hydrophobic dipeptides, including one from Cytophaga hutchinsonii that epimerizes D-Ala-D-Ala; and (iii) a small group of enzymes that epimerize cationic dipeptides. Crystal structures for certain of these enzymes further elucidate the structural basis of the specificities. The results highlight the potential of computational methods to guide experimental characterization of enzymes in an automated, large-scale fashion. PMID:22392983

  3. Self-Assembly in the Ferritin Nano-Cage Protein Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Protein self-assembly, through specific, high affinity, and geometrically constraining protein-protein interactions, can control and lead to complex cellular nano-structures. Establishing an understanding of the underlying principles that govern protein self-assembly is not only essential to appreciate the fundamental biological functions of these structures, but could also provide a basis for their enhancement for nano-material applications. The ferritins are a superfamily of well studied proteins that self-assemble into hollow cage-like structures which are ubiquitously found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Structural studies have revealed that many members of the ferritin family can self-assemble into nano-cages of two types. Maxi-ferritins form hollow spheres with octahedral symmetry composed of twenty-four monomers. Mini-ferritins, on the other hand, are tetrahedrally symmetric, hollow assemblies composed of twelve monomers. This review will focus on the structure of members of the ferritin superfamily, the mechanism of ferritin self-assembly and the structure-function relations of these proteins.

  4. Evolutionary Pattern of N-Glycosylation Sequon Numbers  in Eukaryotic ABC Protein Superfamilies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shyama Prasad Rao

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins contain a large number of NXS/T sequences (where X is any amino acid except proline which are the potential sites of asparagine (N linked glycosylation. However, the patterns of occurrence of these N-glycosylation sequons in related proteins or groups of proteins and their underlying causes have largely been unexplored. We computed the actual and probabilistic occurrence of NXS/T sequons in ABC protein superfamilies from eight diverse eukaryotic organisms. The ABC proteins contained significantly higher NXS/T sequon numbers compared to respective genome-wide average, but the sequon density was significantly lower owing to the increase in protein size and decrease in sequon specific amino acids. However, mammalian ABC proteins have significantly higher sequon density, and both serine and threonine containing sequons (NXS and NXT have been positively selected—against the recent findings of only threonine specific Darwinian selection of sequons in proteins. The occurrence of sequons was positively correlated with the frequency of sequon specific amino acids and negatively correlated with proline and the NPS/T sequences. Further, the NPS/T sequences were significantly higher than expected in plant ABC proteins which have the lowest number of NXS/T sequons. Accord- ingly, compared to overall proteins, N-glycosylation sequons in ABC protein superfamilies have a distinct pattern of occurrence, and the results are discussed in an evolutionary perspective.

  5. TGF-β superfamily signaling in testis formation and early male germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Julia C; Wakitani, Shoichi; Loveland, Kate L

    2015-09-01

    The TGF-β ligand superfamily contains at least 40 members, many of which are produced and act within the mammalian testis to facilitate formation of sperm. Their progressive expression at key stages and in specific cell types determines the fertility of adult males, influencing testis development and controlling germline differentiation. BMPs are essential for the interactive instructions between multiple cell types in the early embryo that drive initial specification of gamete precursors. In the nascent foetal testis, several ligands including Nodal, TGF-βs, Activins and BMPs, serve as key masculinizing switches by regulating male germline pluripotency, somatic and germline proliferation, and testicular vascularization and architecture. In postnatal life, local production of these factors determine adult testis size by regulating Sertoli cell multiplication and differentiation, in addition to specifying germline differentiation and multiplication. Because TGF-β superfamily signaling is integral to testis formation, it affects processes that underlie testicular pathologies, including testicular cancer, and its potential to contribute to subfertility is beginning to be understood. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer defines a novel superfamily of prokaryotic small-molecule binding domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Souza Robson F

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Anabaena sensory rhodopsin transducer (ASRT is a small protein that has been claimed to function as a signaling molecule downstream of the cyanobacterial sensory rhodopsin. However, orthologs of ASRT have been detected in several bacteria that lack rhodopsin, raising questions about the generality of this function. Using sequence profile searches we show that ASRT defines a novel superfamily of β-sandwich fold domains. Through contextual inference based on domain architectures and predicted operons and structural analysis we present strong evidence that these domains bind small molecules, most probably sugars. We propose that the intracellular versions like ASRT probably participate as sensors that regulate a diverse range of sugar metabolism operons or even the light sensory behavior in Anabaena by binding sugars or related metabolites. We also show that one of the extracellular versions define a predicted sugar-binding structure in a novel cell-surface lipoprotein found across actinobacteria, including several pathogens such as Tropheryma, Actinomyces and Thermobifida. The analysis of this superfamily also provides new data to investigate the evolution of carbohydrate binding modes in β-sandwich domains with very different topologies. Reviewers: This article was reviewed by M. Madan Babu and Mark A. Ragan.

  7. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs encoding leucoanthocyanidin reductase and anthocyanidin reductase from Populus trichocarpa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Wang

    Full Text Available Proanthocyanidins (PAs contribute to poplar defense mechanisms against biotic and abiotic stresses. Transcripts of PA biosynthetic genes accumulated rapidly in response to infection by the fungus Marssonina brunnea f.sp. multigermtubi, treatments of salicylic acid (SA and wounding, resulting in PA accumulation in poplar leaves. Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR are two key enzymes of the PA biosynthesis that produce the main subunits: (+-catechin and (--epicatechin required for formation of PA polymers. In Populus, ANR and LAR are encoded by at least two and three highly related genes, respectively. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized genes PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 from P. trichocarpa. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Populus ANR1 and LAR1 occurr in two distinct phylogenetic lineages, but both genes have little difference in their tissue distribution, preferentially expressed in roots. Overexpression of PtrANR1 in poplar resulted in a significant increase in PA levels but no impact on catechin levels. Antisense down-regulation of PtrANR1 showed reduced PA accumulation in transgenic lines, but increased levels of anthocyanin content. Ectopic expression of PtrLAR1 in poplar positively regulated the biosynthesis of PAs, whereas the accumulation of anthocyanin and flavonol was significantly reduced (P<0.05 in all transgenic plants compared to the control plants. These results suggest that both PtrANR1 and PtrLAR1 contribute to PA biosynthesis in Populus.

  8. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  9. The ATPase of the phi29 DNA packaging motor is a member of the hexameric AAA+ superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Chad; De Donatis, Gian Marco; Fang, Huaming; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-08-15

    The AAA+ superfamily of proteins is a class of motor ATPases performing a wide range of functions that typically exist as hexamers. The ATPase of phi29 DNA packaging motor has long been a subject of debate in terms of stoichiometry and mechanism of action. Here, we confirmed the stoichiometry of phi29 motor ATPase to be a hexamer and provide data suggesting that the phi29 motor ATPase is a member of the classical hexameric AAA+ superfamily. Native PAGE, EMSA, capillary electrophoresis, ATP titration, and binomial distribution assay show that the ATPase is a hexamer. Mutations in the known Walker motifs of the ATPase validated our previous assumptions that the protein exists as another member of this AAA+ superfamily. Our data also supports the finding that the phi29 DNA packaging motor uses a revolution mechanism without rotation or coiling (Schwartz et al., this issue). Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. 5α-reductases in human physiology: an unfolding story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traish, Abdulmaged M

    2012-01-01

    5α-reductases are a family of isozymes expressed in a wide host of tissues including the central nervous system (CNS) and play a pivotal role in male sexual differentiation, development and physiology. A comprehensive literature search from 1970 to 2011 was made through PubMed and the relevant information was summarized. 5α reductases convert testosterone, progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, aldosterone and corticosterone into their respective 5α-dihydro-derivatives, which serve as substrates for 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes. The latter transforms these 5α-reduced metabolites into a subclass of neuroactive steroid hormones with distinct physiological functions. The neuroactive steroid hormones modulate a multitude of functions in human physiology encompassing regulation of sexual differentiation, neuroprotection, memory enhancement, anxiety, sleep and stress, among others. In addition, 5α -reductase type 3 is also implicated in the N-glycosylation of proteins via formation of dolichol phosphate. The family of 5α-reductases was targeted for drug development to treat pathophysiological conditions, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical use of 5α-reductase inhibitors was well established, the scope and the magnitude of the adverse side effects of such drugs, especially on the CNS, is still unrecognized due to lack of knowledge of the various physiological functions of this family of enzymes, especially in the CNS. There is an urgent need to better understand the function of 5α-reductases and the role of neuroactive steroids in human physiology in order to minimize the potential adverse side effects of inhibitors targeting 5α-reductases to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and androgenic alopecia.

  11. Evolutionary history, structural features and biochemical diversity of the NlpC/P60 superfamily of enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Vivek; Aravind, L

    2003-01-01

    Peptidoglycan is hydrolyzed by a diverse set of enzymes during bacterial growth, development and cell division. The N1pC/P60 proteins define a family of cell-wall peptidases that are widely represented in various bacterial lineages. Currently characterized members are known to hydrolyze D-gamma-glutamyl-meso-diaminopimelate or N-acetylmuramate-L-alanine linkages. Detailed analysis of the N1pC/P60 peptidases showed that these proteins define a large superfamily encompassing several diverse groups of proteins. In addition to the well characterized P60-like proteins, this superfamily includes the AcmB/LytN and YaeF/YiiX families of bacterial proteins, the amidase domain of bacterial and kinetoplastid glutathionylspermidine synthases (GSPSs), and several proteins from eukaryotes, phages, poxviruses, positive-strand RNA viruses, and certain archaea. The eukaryotic members include lecithin retinol acyltransferase (LRAT), nematode developmental regulator Egl-26, and candidate tumor suppressor H-rev107. These eukaryotic proteins, along with the bacterial YaeF/poxviral G6R family, show a circular permutation of the catalytic domain. We identified three conserved residues, namely a cysteine, a histidine and a polar residue, that are involved in the catalytic activities of this superfamily. Evolutionary analysis of this superfamily shows that it comprises four major families, with diverse domain architectures in each of them. Several related, but distinct, catalytic activities, such as murein degradation, acyl transfer and amide hydrolysis, have emerged in the N1pC/P60 superfamily. The three conserved catalytic residues of this superfamily are shown to be equivalent to the catalytic triad of the papain-like thiol peptidases. The predicted structural features indicate that the N1pC/P60 enzymes contain a fold similar to the papain-like peptidases, transglutaminases and arylamine acetyltransferases.

  12. Short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase catalyzing the final step of noscapine biosynthesis is localized to laticifers in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xue; Facchini, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The final step in the biosynthesis of the phthalideisoquinoline alkaloid noscapine involves a purported dehydrogenation of the narcotinehemiacetal keto moiety. A short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR), designated noscapine synthase (NOS), that catalyzes dehydrogenation of narcotinehemiacetal to noscapine was identified in opium poppy and functionally characterized. The NOS gene was isolated using an integrated transcript and metabolite profiling strategy and subsequently expressed in Escherichia coli. Noscapine synthase is highly divergent from other characterized members of the NADPH-dependent SDR superfamily involved in benzylisoquinoline alkaloid metabolism, and it exhibits exclusive substrate specificity for narcotinehemiacetal. Kinetic analyses showed that NOS exhibits higher catalytic efficiency with NAD+ as the cofactor compared with NADP+. Suppression of NOS transcript levels in opium poppy plants subjected to virus-induced gene silencing resulted in a corresponding reduction in the accumulation of noscapine and an increase in narcotinehemiacetal levels in the latex. Noscapine and NOS transcripts were detected in all opium poppy organs, but both were most abundant in stems. Unlike other putative biosynthetic genes clustered in the opium poppy genome, and their corresponding proteins, NOS transcripts and the cognate enzyme were abundant in latex, indicating that noscapine metabolism is completed in a distinct cell type compared with the rest of the pathway.

  13. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Rhamnonate Dehydratase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakus,J.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Glaner, M.; Hubbard, B.; Delli, J.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    The l-rhamnonate dehydratase (RhamD) function was assigned to a previously uncharacterized family in the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily that is encoded by the genome of Escherichia coli K-12. We screened a library of acid sugars to discover that the enzyme displays a promiscuous substrate specificity: l-rhamnonate (6-deoxy-l-mannonate) has the 'best' kinetic constants, with l-mannonate, l-lyxonate, and d-gulonate dehydrated less efficiently. Crystal structures of the RhamDs from both E. coli K-12 and Salmonella typhimurium LT2 (95% sequence identity) were obtained in the presence of Mg2+; the structure of the RhamD from S. typhimurium was also obtained in the presence of 3-deoxy-l-rhamnonate (obtained by reduction of the product with NaBH4). Like other members of the enolase superfamily, RhamD contains an N-terminal a + {beta} capping domain and a C-terminal ({beta}/a)7{beta}-barrel (modified TIM-barrel) catalytic domain with the active site located at the interface between the two domains. In contrast to other members, the specificity-determining '20s loop' in the capping domain is extended in length and the '50s loop' is truncated. The ligands for the Mg2+ are Asp 226, Glu 252 and Glu 280 located at the ends of the third, fourth and fifth {beta}-strands, respectively. The active site of RhamD contains a His 329-Asp 302 dyad at the ends of the seventh and sixth {beta}-strands, respectively, with His 329 positioned to function as the general base responsible for abstraction of the C2 proton of l-rhamnonate to form a Mg2+-stabilized enediolate intermediate. However, the active site does not contain other acid/base catalysts that have been implicated in the reactions catalyzed by other members of the MR subgroup of the enolase superfamily. Based on the structure of the liganded complex, His 329 also is expected to function as the general acid that both facilitates departure of the 3-OH group in a syn-dehydration reaction and

  14. RASOnD - A comprehensive resource and search tool for RAS superfamily oncogenes from various species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Tej P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ras superfamily plays an important role in the control of cell signalling and division. Mutations in the Ras genes convert them into active oncogenes. The Ras oncogenes form a major thrust of global cancer research as they are involved in the development and progression of tumors. This has resulted in the exponential growth of data on Ras superfamily across different public databases and in literature. However, no dedicated public resource is currently available for data mining and analysis on this family. The present database was developed to facilitate straightforward accession, retrieval and analysis of information available on Ras oncogenes from one particular site. Description We have developed the RAS Oncogene Database (RASOnD as a comprehensive knowledgebase that provides integrated and curated information on a single platform for oncogenes of Ras superfamily. RASOnD encompasses exhaustive genomics and proteomics data existing across diverse publicly accessible databases. This resource presently includes overall 199,046 entries from 101 different species. It provides a search tool to generate information about their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, chromosome positions, orthologies, motifs, structures, related pathways and associated diseases. We have implemented a number of user-friendly search interfaces and sequence analysis tools. At present the user can (i browse the data (ii search any field through a simple or advance search interface and (iii perform a BLAST search and subsequently CLUSTALW multiple sequence alignment by selecting sequences of Ras oncogenes. The Generic gene browser, GBrowse, JMOL for structural visualization and TREEVIEW for phylograms have been integrated for clear perception of retrieved data. External links to related databases have been included in RASOnD. Conclusions This database is a resource and search tool dedicated to Ras oncogenes. It has

  15. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: L-Fuconate Dehydratase from Xanthomonas campestris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yew,W.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Rakus, J.; Pierce, R.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    Many members of the mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily have unknown functions. In this report the authors use both genome (operon) context and screening of a library of acid sugars to assign the L-fuconate dehydratase (FucD) function to a member of the mandelate racemase (MR) subgroup of the superfamily encoded by the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris str. ATCC 33913 genome (GI: 21233491). Orthologues of FucD are found in both bacteria and eukaryotes, the latter including the rTS beta protein in Homo sapiens that has been implicated in regulating thymidylate synthase activity. As suggested by sequence alignments and confirmed by high-resolution structures in the presence of active site ligands, FucD and MR share the same active site motif of functional groups: three carboxylate ligands for the essential Mg2+ located at the ends of th third, fourth, and fifth-strands in the (/)7-barrel domain (Asp 248, Glu 274, and Glu 301, respectively), a Lys-x-Lys motif at the end of the second-strand (Lys 218 and Lys 220), a His-Asp dyad at the end of the seventh and sixth-strands (His 351 and Asp 324, respectively), and a Glue at the end of the eighth-strand (Glu 382). The mechanism of the FucD reaction involves initial abstraction of the 2-proton by Lys 220, acid catalysis of the vinylogous-elimination of the 3-OH group by His 351, and stereospecific ketonization of the resulting 2-keto-3-deoxy-L-fuconate product. Screening of the library of acid sugars revealed substrate and functional promiscuity: In addition to L-fuconate, FucD also catalyzes the dehydration of L-galactonate, D-arabinonate, D-altronate, L-talonate, and D-ribonate. The dehydrations of L-fuconate, L-galactonate, and D-arabinonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by Lys 220. The dehydrations of L-talonate and D-ribonate are initiated by abstraction of the 2-protons by His 351; however, protonation of the enediolate intermediates by the conjugate acid of Lys 220 yields L

  16. Ensembler: Enabling High-Throughput Molecular Simulations at the Superfamily Scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L Parton

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding body of available genomic and protein structural data provides a rich resource for understanding protein dynamics with biomolecular simulation. While computational infrastructure has grown rapidly, simulations on an omics scale are not yet widespread, primarily because software infrastructure to enable simulations at this scale has not kept pace. It should now be possible to study protein dynamics across entire (superfamilies, exploiting both available structural biology data and conformational similarities across homologous proteins. Here, we present a new tool for enabling high-throughput simulation in the genomics era. Ensembler takes any set of sequences-from a single sequence to an entire superfamily-and shepherds them through various stages of modeling and refinement to produce simulation-ready structures. This includes comparative modeling to all relevant PDB structures (which may span multiple conformational states of interest, reconstruction of missing loops, addition of missing atoms, culling of nearly identical structures, assignment of appropriate protonation states, solvation in explicit solvent, and refinement and filtering with molecular simulation to ensure stable simulation. The output of this pipeline is an ensemble of structures ready for subsequent molecular simulations using computer clusters, supercomputers, or distributed computing projects like Folding@home. Ensembler thus automates much of the time-consuming process of preparing protein models suitable for simulation, while allowing scalability up to entire superfamilies. A particular advantage of this approach can be found in the construction of kinetic models of conformational dynamics-such as Markov state models (MSMs-which benefit from a diverse array of initial configurations that span the accessible conformational states to aid sampling. We demonstrate the power of this approach by constructing models for all catalytic domains in the human

  17. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author) [de

  18. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins mediating cell-cell or cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. CAMs are traditionally divided into four groups, the cadherins, the selectins, the integrins and CAMs belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF). The present chapter describes...... CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM......), myelinassociated glycoprotein (MAG), the neural cell adhesion molecules 1 and 2 (NCAM, NCAM2), Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) and Down Syndrome cell adhesion molecule-like-1 (DSCAML1), sidekick 1 and 2 (SDK1, SDK2), signal-regulatory proteins (SIRPs), nectins, nectin-like proteins (necls...

  19. Phi Class of Glutathione S-transferase Gene Superfamily Widely Exists in Nonplant Taxonomic Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyampundu, Jean-Pierre; Xu, You-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute a superfamily of enzymes involved in detoxification of noxious compounds and protection against oxidative damage. GST class Phi (GSTF), one of the important classes of plant GSTs, has long been considered as plant specific but was recently found in basidiomycete fungi. However, the range of nonplant taxonomic groups containing GSTFs remains unknown. In this study, the distribution and phylogenetic relationships of nonplant GSTFs were investigated. We identified GSTFs in ascomycete fungi, myxobacteria, and protists Naegleria gruberi and Aureococcus anophagefferens. GSTF occurrence in these bacteria and protists correlated with their genome sizes and habitats. While this link was missing across ascomycetes, the distribution and abundance of GSTFs among ascomycete genomes could be associated with their lifestyles to some extent. Sequence comparison, gene structure, and phylogenetic analyses indicated divergence among nonplant GSTFs, suggesting polyphyletic origins during evolution. Furthermore, in silico prediction of functional partners suggested functional diversification among nonplant GSTFs.

  20. Presence of Foraminifera of Superfamily Komokioidea (Order Astrorhizida) in Colombian deep Caribbean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavera-Martínez, Laura; Marchant, Margarita

    2017-10-20

    Research regarding deep-sea benthic foraminifera in the Colombian Caribbean requires further development given the complete lack of information related to the different groups that constitute associations and the ecological functions they fulfill. For this purpose, a taxonomic description of Superfamily Komokioidea was composed from macrofauna samples from between 1,215 m and 3,179 m depth, obtained during the research cruise ANH-COL 4 and COL 5 carried out in 2014. Results showed foraminifera belonging to the three families: Komokiidae, Baculellidae, and Normaninidae, inclu-ding five genera (Lana, Komokia, Ipoa, Normaninam, and Catena) and five species (Lana neglecta, Komokia multiramosa, Normanina conferta, Ipoa fragila, and Catena piriformis). This study presents knowledge regarding deep-sea Colombian Caribbean benthic foraminifera, which to date have not been recorded from this region. Their depth distribution when compared with other studies from the Atlantic and Pacific, allows the expansion of taxonomic inventories and the characterization of biodiversity within poorly explored regions.

  1. Topological variation in the evolution of new reactions in functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Elaine C; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2011-06-01

    In functionally diverse enzyme superfamilies (SFs), conserved structural and active site features reflect catalytic capabilities 'hard-wired' in each SF architecture. Overlaid on this foundation, evolutionary changes in active site machinery, structural topology and other aspects of structural organization and interactions support the emergence of new reactions, mechanisms, and substrate specificity. This review connects topological with functional variation in each of the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) and vicinal oxygen chelate fold (VOC) SFs and a set of redox-active thioredoxin (Trx)-fold SFs to illustrate a few of the varied themes nature has used to evolve new functions from a limited set of structural scaffolds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of putative multidrug resistance transporters of the major facilitator-superfamily expressed in Salmonella Typhi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaheen, Aqsa; Ismat, Fouzia; Iqbal, Mazhar

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance mediated by efflux pumps is a well-known phenomenon in infectious bacteria. Although much work has been carried out to characterize multidrug efflux pumps in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, such information is still lacking for many deadly pathogens. The aim...... of this study was to gain insight into the substrate specificity of previously uncharacterized transporters of Salmonella Typhi to identify their role in the development of multidrug resistance. S. Typhi genes encoding putative members of the major facilitator superfamily were cloned and expressed in the drug......-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain KAM42, and tested for transport of 25 antibacterial compounds, including representative antibiotics of various classes, antiseptics, dyes and detergents. Of the 15 tested putative transporters, STY0901, STY2458 and STY4874 exhibited a drug-resistance phenotype. Among these, STY4874...

  3. The Nox/Ferric reductase/Ferric reductase-like families of Eumycetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grissa, Ibtissem; Bidard, Frédérique; Grognet, Pierre; Grossetete, Sandrine; Silar, Philippe

    2010-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) are involved in plant biomass degradation by fungi and development of fungal structures. While the ROS-generating NADPH oxidases from filamentous fungi are under strong scrutiny, much less is known about the related integral Membrane (or Ferric) Reductases (IMRs). Here, we present a survey of these enzymes in 29 fungal genomes covering the entire available range of fungal diversity. IMRs are present in all fungal genomes. They can be classified into at least 24 families, underscoring the high diversity of these enzymes. Some are differentially regulated during colony or fruiting body development, as well as by the nature of the carbon source of the growth medium. Importantly, functional characterization of IMRs has been made on proteins belonging to only two families, while nothing or very little is known about the proteins of the other 22 families. Copyright © 2010 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pulmonary artery hypertension in childhood: The transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Min Yuan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH is very rare in childhood, and it can be divided into heritable, idiopathic drug- and toxin-induced and other disease (connective tissue disease, human immunodeficiency virus infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, or schistosomiasis-associated types. PAH could not be interpreted solely by pathophysiological theories. The impact of the transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes on the development of PAH in children remains to be clarified. Pertinent literature on the transforming growth factor-β superfamily-related genes in relation to PAH in children published after the year 2000 was reviewed and analyzed. Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene mutation promotes cell division or prevents cell death, resulting in an overgrowth of cells in small arteries throughout the lungs. About 20% of individuals with a bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II gene mutation develop symptomatic PAH. In heritable PAH, bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II mutations may be absent; while mutations of other genes, such as type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 and the type III receptor endoglin (both associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia, caveolin-1 and KCNK3, the gene encoding potassium channel subfamily K, member 3, can be detected, instead. Gene mutations, environmental changes and acquired adjustment, etc. may explain the development of PAH. The researches on PAH rat model and familial PAH members may facilitate the elucidations of the mechanisms and further provide theories for prophylaxis and treatment of PAH. Key Words: bone morphogenetic proteins, mutation, pulmonary hypertension

  5. Evolutionary history and stress regulation of the lectin superfamily in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Srinivasan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lectins are a class of carbohydrate-binding proteins. They play roles in various biological processes. However, little is known about their evolutionary history and their functions in plant stress regulation. The availability of full genome sequences from various plant species makes it possible to perform a whole-genome exploration for further understanding their biological functions. Results Higher plant genomes encode large numbers of lectin proteins. Based on their domain structures and phylogenetic analyses, a new classification system has been proposed. In this system, 12 different families have been classified and four of them consist of recently identified plant lectin members. Further analyses show that some of lectin families exhibit species-specific expansion and rapid birth-and-death evolution. Tandem and segmental duplications have been regarded as the major mechanisms to drive lectin expansion although retrogenes also significantly contributed to the birth of new lectin genes in soybean and rice. Evidence shows that lectin genes have been involved in biotic/abiotic stress regulations and tandem/segmental duplications may be regarded as drivers for plants to adapt various environmental stresses through duplication followed by expression divergence. Each member of this gene superfamily may play specialized roles in a specific stress condition and function as a regulator of various environmental factors such as cold, drought and high salinity as well as biotic stresses. Conclusions Our studies provide a new outline of the plant lectin gene superfamily and advance the understanding of plant lectin genes in lineage-specific expansion and their functions in biotic/abiotic stress-related developmental processes.

  6. Identification of the S-transferase like superfamily bacillithiol transferases encoded by Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Varahenage R.; Lapek, John D.; Newton, Gerald L.; Gonzalez, David J.; Pogliano, Kit

    2018-01-01

    Bacillithiol is a low molecular weight thiol found in Firmicutes that is analogous to glutathione, which is absent in these bacteria. Bacillithiol transferases catalyze the transfer of bacillithiol to various substrates. The S-transferase-like (STL) superfamily contains over 30,000 putative members, including bacillithiol transferases. Proteins in this family are extremely divergent and are related by structural rather than sequence similarity, leaving it unclear if all share the same biochemical activity. Bacillus subtilis encodes eight predicted STL superfamily members, only one of which has been shown to be a bacillithiol transferase. Here we find that the seven remaining proteins show varying levels of metal dependent bacillithiol transferase activity. We have renamed the eight enzymes BstA-H. Mass spectrometry and gene expression studies revealed that all of the enzymes are produced to varying levels during growth and sporulation, with BstB and BstE being the most abundant and BstF and BstH being the least abundant. Interestingly, several bacillithiol transferases are induced in the mother cell during sporulation. A strain lacking all eight bacillithiol transferases showed normal growth in the presence of stressors that adversely affect growth of bacillithiol-deficient strains, such as paraquat and CdCl2. Thus, the STL bacillithiol transferases represent a new group of proteins that play currently unknown, but potentially significant roles in bacillithiol-dependent reactions. We conclude that these enzymes are highly divergent, perhaps to cope with an equally diverse array of endogenous or exogenous toxic metabolites and oxidants. PMID:29451913

  7. Molecular cloning of a peroxisomal Ca2+-dependent member of the mitochondrial carrier superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Franz E.; Minestrini, Gianluca; Dyer, James H.; Werder, Moritz; Boffelli, Dario; Compassi, Sabina; Wehrli, Ernst; Thomas, Richard M.; Schulthess, Georg; Hauser, Helmut

    1997-01-01

    A cDNA from a novel Ca2+-dependent member of the mitochondrial solute carrier superfamily was isolated from a rabbit small intestinal cDNA library. The full-length cDNA clone was 3,298 nt long and coded for a protein of 475 amino acids, with four elongation factor-hand motifs located in the N-terminal half of the molecule. The 25-kDa N-terminal polypeptide was expressed in Escherichia coli, and it was demonstrated that it bound Ca2+, undergoing a reversible and specific conformational change as a result. The conformation of the polypeptide was sensitive to Ca2+ which was bound with high affinity (Kd ≈ 0.37 μM), the apparent Hill coefficient for Ca2+-induced changes being about 2.0. The deduced amino acid sequence of the C-terminal half of the molecule revealed 78% homology to Grave disease carrier protein and 67% homology to human ADP/ATP translocase; this sequence homology identified the protein as a new member of the mitochondrial transporter superfamily. Northern blot analysis revealed the presence of a single transcript of about 3,500 bases, and low expression of the transporter could be detected in the kidney but none in the liver. The main site of expression was the colon with smaller amounts found in the small intestine proximal to the ileum. Immunoelectron microscopy localized the transporter in the peroxisome, although a minor fraction was found in the mitochondria. The Ca2+ binding N-terminal half of the transporter faces the cytosol. PMID:9238007

  8. The structure of hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), a CAP superfamily member from Ancylostoma caninum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dongying; Francischetti, Ivo M B; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Andersen, John F

    2015-06-01

    Secreted protein components of hookworm species include a number of representatives of the cysteine-rich/antigen 5/pathogenesis-related 1 (CAP) protein family known as Ancylostoma-secreted proteins (ASPs). Some of these have been considered as candidate antigens for the development of vaccines against hookworms. The functions of most CAP superfamily members are poorly understood, but one form, the hookworm platelet inhibitor (HPI), has been isolated as a putative antagonist of the platelet integrins αIIbβ3 and α2β1. Here, the crystal structure of HPI is described and its structural features are examined in relation to its possible function. The HPI structure is similar to those of other ASPs and shows incomplete conservation of the sequence motifs CAP1 and CAP2 that are considered to be diagnostic of CAP superfamily members. The asymmetric unit of the HPI crystal contains a dimer with an extensive interaction interface, but chromatographic measurements indicate that it is primarily monomeric in solution. In the dimeric structure, the putative active-site cleft areas from both monomers are united into a single negatively charged depression. A potential Lys-Gly-Asp disintegrin-like motif was identified in the sequence of HPI, but is not positioned at the apex of a tight turn, making it unlikely that it interacts with the integrin. Recombinant HPI produced in Escherichia coli was found not to inhibit the adhesion of human platelets to collagen or fibrinogen, despite having a native structure as shown by X-ray diffraction. This result corroborates previous analyses of recombinant HPI and suggests that it might require post-translational modification or have a different biological function.

  9. Annotation error in public databases: misannotation of molecular function in enzyme superfamilies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M Schnoes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to the rapid release of new data from genome sequencing projects, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized; rather, sequences are annotated using computational analysis. The level of misannotation and the types of misannotation in large public databases are currently unknown and have not been analyzed in depth. We have investigated the misannotation levels for molecular function in four public protein sequence databases (UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, GenBank NR, UniProtKB/TrEMBL, and KEGG for a model set of 37 enzyme families for which extensive experimental information is available. The manually curated database Swiss-Prot shows the lowest annotation error levels (close to 0% for most families; the two other protein sequence databases (GenBank NR and TrEMBL and the protein sequences in the KEGG pathways database exhibit similar and surprisingly high levels of misannotation that average 5%-63% across the six superfamilies studied. For 10 of the 37 families examined, the level of misannotation in one or more of these databases is >80%. Examination of the NR database over time shows that misannotation has increased from 1993 to 2005. The types of misannotation that were found fall into several categories, most associated with "overprediction" of molecular function. These results suggest that misannotation in enzyme superfamilies containing multiple families that catalyze different reactions is a larger problem than has been recognized. Strategies are suggested for addressing some of the systematic problems contributing to these high levels of misannotation.

  10. Annotation error in public databases: misannotation of molecular function in enzyme superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnoes, Alexandra M; Brown, Shoshana D; Dodevski, Igor; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2009-12-01

    Due to the rapid release of new data from genome sequencing projects, the majority of protein sequences in public databases have not been experimentally characterized; rather, sequences are annotated using computational analysis. The level of misannotation and the types of misannotation in large public databases are currently unknown and have not been analyzed in depth. We have investigated the misannotation levels for molecular function in four public protein sequence databases (UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot, GenBank NR, UniProtKB/TrEMBL, and KEGG) for a model set of 37 enzyme families for which extensive experimental information is available. The manually curated database Swiss-Prot shows the lowest annotation error levels (close to 0% for most families); the two other protein sequence databases (GenBank NR and TrEMBL) and the protein sequences in the KEGG pathways database exhibit similar and surprisingly high levels of misannotation that average 5%-63% across the six superfamilies studied. For 10 of the 37 families examined, the level of misannotation in one or more of these databases is >80%. Examination of the NR database over time shows that misannotation has increased from 1993 to 2005. The types of misannotation that were found fall into several categories, most associated with "overprediction" of molecular function. These results suggest that misannotation in enzyme superfamilies containing multiple families that catalyze different reactions is a larger problem than has been recognized. Strategies are suggested for addressing some of the systematic problems contributing to these high levels of misannotation.

  11. Genome-wide identification of nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily genes in the copepod Tigriopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dae-Sik; Lee, Bo-Young; Kim, Hui-Su; Lee, Min Chul; Kyung, Do-Hyun; Om, Ae-Son; Rhee, Jae-Sung; Lee, Jae-Seong

    2014-11-18

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large superfamily of proteins defined by a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and a ligand-binding domain (LBD). They function as transcriptional regulators to control expression of genes involved in development, homeostasis, and metabolism. The number of NRs differs from species to species, because of gene duplications and/or lineage-specific gene losses during metazoan evolution. Many NRs in arthropods interact with the ecdysteroid hormone and are involved in ecdysone-mediated signaling in arthropods. The nuclear receptor superfamily complement has been reported in several arthropods, including crustaceans, but not in copepods. We identified the entire NR repertoire of the copepod Tigriopus japonicus, which is an important marine model species for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics. Using whole genome and transcriptome sequences, we identified a total of 31 nuclear receptors in the genome of T. japonicus. Nomenclature of the nuclear receptors was determined based on the sequence similarities of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and ligand-binding domain (LBD). The 7 subfamilies of NRs separate into five major clades (subfamilies NR1, NR2, NR3, NR4, and NR5/6). Although the repertoire of NR members in, T. japonicus was similar to that reported for other arthropods, there was an expansion of the NR1 subfamily in Tigriopus japonicus. The twelve unique nuclear receptors identified in T. japonicus are members of NR1L. This expansion may be a unique lineage-specific feature of crustaceans. Interestingly, E78 and HR83, which are present in other arthropods, were absent from the genomes of T. japonicus and two congeneric copepod species (T. japonicus and Tigriopus californicus), suggesting copepod lineage-specific gene loss. We identified all NR receptors present in the copepod, T. japonicus. Knowledge of the copepod nuclear receptor repertoire will contribute to a better understanding of copepod- and crustacean-specific NR evolution.

  12. An orphan viral TNF receptor superfamily member identified in lymphocystis disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontejo, Sergio M; Sánchez, Carolina; Martín, Rocío; Mulero, Victoriano; Alcami, Antonio; Alejo, Alí

    2013-06-07

    Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) is a large icosahedral dsDNA-containing virus of the Lymphocystivirus genus within the Iridoviridae family that can cause disease in more than 140 marine and freshwater fish species. While several isolates have been charcaterized and classified into distinct genotypes the complete genomic sequence is currently only available from two species, the LCDV-1, isolated from flounder (Platichtys flesus) in Europe and the LCDV-C, isolated from Japanese cultured flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in China. Analysis of the genome of LCDV-C showed it to encode a protein named LDVICp016 with similarities to the Tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily with immunomodulatory potential. We have expressed and purified the recombinant protein LDVICp016 and screened for potential interaction partners using surface plasmon resonance. Commercially available human and mouse members of the TNF superfamily (TNFSF), along with a representative set of fish-derived TNFSF were tested.We have found the LDVICp016 protein to be secreted and we have identified a second viral TNFR encoded by ORF 095 of the same virus. None of the 42 tested proteins were found to interact with LDVICp016. We show that LDVICp016 is a secreted protein belonging to the TNF receptor family that may be part of a larger gene family in Lymphocystiviruses. While the ligand of this protein remains unknown, possibly due to the species specific nature of this interaction, further investigations into the potential role of this protein in the blockade of immune responses in its fish host are required.

  13. Proanthocyanidin synthesis in Theobroma cacao: genes encoding anthocyanidin synthase, anthocyanidin reductase, and leucoanthocyanidin reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Shi, Zi; Maximova, Siela; Payne, Mark J; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-05

    The proanthocyanidins (PAs), a subgroup of flavonoids, accumulate to levels of approximately 10% total dry weight of cacao seeds. PAs have been associated with human health benefits and also play important roles in pest and disease defense throughout the plant. To dissect the genetic basis of PA biosynthetic pathway in cacao (Theobroma cacao), we have isolated three genes encoding key PA synthesis enzymes, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR). We measured the expression levels of TcANR, TcANS and TcLAR and PA content in cacao leaves, flowers, pod exocarp and seeds. In all tissues examined, all three genes were abundantly expressed and well correlated with PA accumulation levels, suggesting their active roles in PA synthesis. Overexpression of TcANR in an Arabidopsis ban mutant complemented the PA deficient phenotype in seeds and resulted in reduced anthocyanidin levels in hypocotyls. Overexpression of TcANS in tobacco resulted in increased content of both anthocyanidins and PAs in flower petals. Overexpression of TcANS in an Arabidopsis ldox mutant complemented its PA deficient phenotype in seeds. Recombinant TcLAR protein converted leucoanthocyanidin to catechin in vitro. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing TcLAR had decreased amounts of anthocyanidins and increased PAs. Overexpressing TcLAR in Arabidopsis ldox mutant also resulted in elevated synthesis of not only catechin but also epicatechin. Our results confirm the in vivo function of cacao ANS and ANR predicted based on sequence homology to previously characterized enzymes from other species. In addition, our results provide a clear functional analysis of a LAR gene in vivo.

  14. Effect of ammonium and nitrate on ferric chelate reductase and nitrate reductase in Vaccinium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poonnachit, U; Darnell, R

    2004-04-01

    Most Vaccinium species have strict soil requirements for optimal growth, requiring low pH, high iron availability and nitrogen primarily in the ammonium form. These soils are limited and are often located near wetlands. Vaccinium arboreum is a wild species adapted to a wide range of soils, including high pH, low iron, and nitrate-containing soils. This broader soil adaptation in V. arboreum may be related to increased efficiency of iron or nitrate uptake compared with the cultivated Vaccinium species. Nitrate, ammonium and iron uptake, and nitrate reductase (NR) and ferric chelate reductase (FCR) activities were compared in two Vaccinium species grown hydroponically in either nitrate or ammonia, with or without iron. The species studied were the wild V. arboreum and the cultivated V. corymbosum interspecific hybrid, which exhibits the strict soil requirements of most Vaccinium species. Ammonium uptake was significantly greater than nitrate uptake in both species, while nitrate uptake was greater in the wild species, V. arboreum, compared with the cultivated species, V. corymbosum. The increased nitrate uptake in V. arboreum was correlated with increased root NR activity compared with V. corymbosum. The lower nitrate uptake in V. corymbosum was reflected in decreased plant dry weight in this species compared with V. arboreum. Root FCR activity increased significantly in V. corymbosum grown under iron-deficient conditions, compared with the same species grown under iron-sufficient conditions or with V. arboreum grown under either iron condition. V. arboreum appears to be more efficient in acquiring nitrate compared with V. corymbosum, possibly due to increased NR activity and this may partially explain the wider soil adaptation of V. arboreum.

  15. Structural mutations of C-domains in members of the Ig superfamily. Consequences for the interactions between the T cell antigen receptor and the zeta 2 homodimer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, C; Rubin, B; Caspar-Bauguil, S

    1992-01-01

    Several molecules belonging to the Ig superfamily are expressed together with noncovalently associated subunits. This applies for membrane-bound IgM and IgD, some of the FcR, and the Ti dimers of the TCR. The interactions between members of the Ig superfamily and their associated subunits are sti...

  16. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-05-17

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 ..-->.. Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme.

  17. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prendergast, N.J.; Delcamp, T.J.; Smith, P.L.; Freisheim, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 → Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by α-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme

  18. Methemoglobin reductase activity in intact fish red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Frank B; Nielsen, Karsten

    2018-01-01

    RBCs in physiological saline at normal Pco2 and pH. After initial loading of oxygenated RBCs with nitrite (partly oxidizing Hb to metHb), the nitrite is removed by three washes of the RBCs in nitrite-free physiological saline to enable the detection of RBC metHb reductase activity in the absence......Hb reductase activity in fish offsets their higher Hb autoxidation and higher likelihood of encountering elevated nitrite. Deoxygenation significantly raised the rates of RBC metHb reduction, and more so in rainbow trout than in carp. The temperature sensitivity of metHb reduction in rainbow trout RBCs...

  19. External pH modulates EAG superfamily K+ channels through EAG-specific acidic residues in the voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Bihan; Mulkey, Daniel K.; Shi, Yingtang; Wagner, Paul G.; Pivaroff-Ward, Kendra; Sassic, Jessica K.; Bayliss, Douglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Ether-a-go-go (EAG) superfamily of voltage-gated K+ channels consists of three functionally distinct gene families (Eag, Elk, and Erg) encoding a diverse set of low-threshold K+ currents that regulate excitability in neurons and muscle. Previous studies indicate that external acidification inhibits activation of three EAG superfamily K+ channels, Kv10.1 (Eag1), Kv11.1 (Erg1), and Kv12.1 (Elk1). We show here that Kv10.2, Kv12.2, and Kv12.3 are similarly inhibited by external protons, suggesting that high sensitivity to physiological pH changes is a general property of EAG superfamily channels. External acidification depolarizes the conductance–voltage (GV) curves of these channels, reducing low threshold activation. We explored the mechanism of this high pH sensitivity in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. We first examined the role of acidic voltage sensor residues that mediate divalent cation block of voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels because protons reduce the sensitivity of Kv12.1 to Zn2+. Low pH similarly reduces Mg2+ sensitivity of Kv10.1, and we found that the pH sensitivity of Kv11.1 was greatly attenuated at 1 mM Ca2+. Individual neutralizations of a pair of EAG-specific acidic residues that have previously been implicated in divalent block of diverse EAG superfamily channels greatly reduced the pH response in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. Our results therefore suggest a common mechanism for pH-sensitive voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels. The EAG-specific acidic residues may form the proton-binding site or alternatively are required to hold the voltage sensor in a pH-sensitive conformation. The high pH sensitivity of EAG superfamily channels suggests that they could contribute to pH-sensitive K+ currents observed in vivo. PMID:23712551

  20. External pH modulates EAG superfamily K+ channels through EAG-specific acidic residues in the voltage sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Marcin; Zhang, Xiaofei; Chen, Bihan; Mulkey, Daniel K; Shi, Yingtang; Wagner, Paul G; Pivaroff-Ward, Kendra; Sassic, Jessica K; Bayliss, Douglas A; Jegla, Timothy

    2013-06-01

    The Ether-a-go-go (EAG) superfamily of voltage-gated K(+) channels consists of three functionally distinct gene families (Eag, Elk, and Erg) encoding a diverse set of low-threshold K(+) currents that regulate excitability in neurons and muscle. Previous studies indicate that external acidification inhibits activation of three EAG superfamily K(+) channels, Kv10.1 (Eag1), Kv11.1 (Erg1), and Kv12.1 (Elk1). We show here that Kv10.2, Kv12.2, and Kv12.3 are similarly inhibited by external protons, suggesting that high sensitivity to physiological pH changes is a general property of EAG superfamily channels. External acidification depolarizes the conductance-voltage (GV) curves of these channels, reducing low threshold activation. We explored the mechanism of this high pH sensitivity in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. We first examined the role of acidic voltage sensor residues that mediate divalent cation block of voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels because protons reduce the sensitivity of Kv12.1 to Zn(2+). Low pH similarly reduces Mg(2+) sensitivity of Kv10.1, and we found that the pH sensitivity of Kv11.1 was greatly attenuated at 1 mM Ca(2+). Individual neutralizations of a pair of EAG-specific acidic residues that have previously been implicated in divalent block of diverse EAG superfamily channels greatly reduced the pH response in Kv12.1, Kv10.2, and Kv11.1. Our results therefore suggest a common mechanism for pH-sensitive voltage activation in EAG superfamily channels. The EAG-specific acidic residues may form the proton-binding site or alternatively are required to hold the voltage sensor in a pH-sensitive conformation. The high pH sensitivity of EAG superfamily channels suggests that they could contribute to pH-sensitive K(+) currents observed in vivo.

  1. In-silico gene co-expression network analysis in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis with reference to haloacid dehalogenase superfamily hydrolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghunath Satpathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic fungus is the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, a disease globally affecting millions of people. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD superfamily hydrolases enzyme in the fungi, in particular, is known to be responsible in the pathogenesis by adhering to the tissue. Hence, identification of novel drug targets is essential. Aims: In-silico based identification of co-expressed genes along with HAD superfamily hydrolase in P. brasiliensis during the morphogenesis from mycelium to yeast to identify possible genes as drug targets. Materials and Methods: In total, four datasets were retrieved from the NCBI-gene expression omnibus (GEO database, each containing 4340 genes, followed by gene filtration expression of the data set. Further co-expression (CE study was performed individually and then a combination these genes were visualized in the Cytoscape 2. 8.3. Statistical Analysis Used: Mean and standard deviation value of the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene was obtained from the expression data and this value was subsequently used for the CE calculation purpose by selecting specific correlation power and filtering threshold. Results: The 23 genes that were thus obtained are common with respect to the HAD superfamily hydrolase gene. A significant network was selected from the Cytoscape network visualization that contains total 7 genes out of which 5 genes, which do not have significant protein hits, obtained from gene annotation of the expressed sequence tags by BLAST X. For all the protein PSI-BLAST was performed against human genome to find the homology. Conclusions: The gene co-expression network was obtained with respect to HAD superfamily dehalogenase gene in P. Brasiliensis.

  2. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  3. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca

    2009-01-01

    ) as the level of reduction increased in both the WT and the His mutant. Equilibrium standard enthalpy and entropy changes and activation parameters of this ET process were determined. We concluded that negative cooperativity is a common feature among the cd(1) nitrite reductases, and we discuss this control...

  4. Evaluation of the conserve flavin reductase gene from three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... means of PCR technique. The nucleic acid sequences of the PCR primers were designed using conserved nucleic acid sequences of the flavin reductase enzyme from. Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8. The oligonucleotide primers were as follows: 5'-GAA TTC ATG TCT GAC. AAG CCG AAT GCC-3' (forward) ...

  5. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-06-21

    Jun 21, 2010 ... In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr). Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and ...

  6. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aldose Reductase Inhibitory and Antiglycation Activities of Four Medicinal Plant Standardized Extracts and Their Main Constituents for the Prevention of ... levels in galactosemic condition by using reverse phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and gas liquid chromatography (GLC) was determined.

  7. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  8. Molecular Cloning and Expression of Bacterial Mercuric Reductase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to characterize the bacterial mercuric reductase (merA) gene, mercury resistant (Hgr) Escherichia coli strains have been isolated from various mercury contaminated sites of India. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for Hg and zone of inhibition for different antibiotics were measured, and finally mer operon ...

  9. Xylose reductase from the thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Xylose reductase is involved in the first step of the fungal pentose catabolic pathway. The gene .... proteins with reversed coenzyme preference from NADPH to NADH ..... 399–404. Hasper A A, Visser J and de Graaff L H 2000 The Aspergillus.

  10. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864.7375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7375 Glutathione...

  11. Plasmid-encoded diacetyl (acetoin) reductase in Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rattray, Fergal P; Myling-Petersen, Dorte; Larsen, Dianna

    2003-01-01

    A plasmid-borne diacetyl (acetoin) reductase (butA) from Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides CHCC2114 was sequenced and cloned. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed an open reading frame encoding a protein of 257 amino acids which had high identity at the amino acid level to diacetyl (acetoin...

  12. Identification of 5α-reductase isoenzymes in canine skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi de Souza, Lucilene; Paradis, Manon; Zamberlam, Gustavo; Benoit-Biancamano, Marie-Odile; Price, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Alopecia X in dogs is a noninflammatory alopecia that may be caused by a hormonal dysfunction. It may be similar to androgenic alopecia in men that is caused by the effect of dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The 5α-reductase isoenzymes, 5αR1 and 5αR2, and a recently described 5αR3, are responsible for the conversion of testosterone into DHT. However, which 5α-reductases are present in canine skin has not yet been described. The main objective of this study was to determine the pattern of expression of 5α-reductase genes in canine skin. Skin biopsies were obtained from healthy, intact young-mature beagles (three males, four females) at three anatomical sites normally affected by alopecia X (dorsal neck, back of thighs and base of tail) and two sites generally unaffected (dorsal head and ventral thorax). Prostate samples (n = 3) were collected as positive controls for 5α-reductase mRNA abundance measurement by real-time PCR. We detected mRNA encoding 5αR1 and 5αR3 but not 5αR2. There were no significant differences in 5αR1 and 5αR3 mRNA levels between the different anatomical sites, irrespective of gender (P > 0.05). Moreover, the mean mRNA abundance in each anatomical site did not differ between males and females (P > 0.05). To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating the expression of 5α-reductases in canine skin and the expression of 5αR3 in this tissue. These results may help to elucidate the pathogenesis of alopecia X and to determine more appropriate treatments for this disorder. © 2015 ESVD and ACVD.

  13. Identification of the GTPase superfamily in Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Luiz Borges

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycoplasmas are the smallest known prokaryotes with self-replication ability. They are obligate parasites, taking up many molecules of their hosts and acting as pathogens in men, animals, birds and plants. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is the infective agent of swine mycoplasmosis and Mycoplasma synoviae is responsible for subclinical upper respiratory infections that may result in airsacculitis and synovitis in chickens and turkeys. These highly infectious organisms present a worldwide distribution and are responsible for major economic problems. Proteins of the GTPase superfamily occur in all domains of life, regulating functions such as protein synthesis, cell cycle and differentiation. Despite their functional diversity, all GTPases are believed to have evolved from a single common ancestor. In this work we have identified mycoplasma GTPases by searching the complete genome databases of Mycoplasma synoviae and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, J (non-pathogenic and 7448 (pathogenic strains. Fifteen ORFs encoding predicted GTPases were found in M. synoviae and in the two strains of M. hyopneumoniae. Searches for conserved G domains in GTPases were performed and the sequences were classified into families. The GTPase phylogenetic analysis showed that the subfamilies were well resolved into clades. The presence of GTPases in the three strains suggests the importance of GTPases in 'minimalist' genomes.

  14. A unique uracil-DNA binding protein of the uracil DNA glycosylase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Pau Biak; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Patil, Aravind Goud; Woo, Eui-Jeon; Varshney, Umesh

    2015-09-30

    Uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) are an important group of DNA repair enzymes, which pioneer the base excision repair pathway by recognizing and excising uracil from DNA. Based on two short conserved sequences (motifs A and B), UDGs have been classified into six families. Here we report a novel UDG, UdgX, from Mycobacterium smegmatis and other organisms. UdgX specifically recognizes uracil in DNA, forms a tight complex stable to sodium dodecyl sulphate, 2-mercaptoethanol, urea and heat treatment, and shows no detectable uracil excision. UdgX shares highest homology to family 4 UDGs possessing Fe-S cluster. UdgX possesses a conserved sequence, KRRIH, which forms a flexible loop playing an important role in its activity. Mutations of H in the KRRIH sequence to S, G, A or Q lead to gain of uracil excision activity in MsmUdgX, establishing it as a novel member of the UDG superfamily. Our observations suggest that UdgX marks the uracil-DNA for its repair by a RecA dependent process. Finally, we observed that the tight binding activity of UdgX is useful in detecting uracils in the genomes. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Antibody against Microbial Neuraminidases Recognizes Human Sialidase 3 (NEU3: the Neuraminidase/Sialidase Superfamily Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiguang Feng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neuraminidases (NAs are critical virulence factors for several microbial pathogens. With a highly conserved catalytic domain, a microbial NA “superfamily” has been proposed. We previously reported that murine polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN sialidase activity was important in leukocyte trafficking to inflamed sites and that antibodies to Clostridium perfringens NA recognized a cell surface molecule(s, presumed to be a sialidase of eukaryotic origin on interleukin-8-stimulated human and murine PMNs. These antibodies also inhibited cell sialidase activity both in vitro and, in the latter instance, in vivo. We therefore hypothesized that mammalian sialidases share structural homology and epitopes with microbial NAs. We now report that antibodies to one of the isoforms of C. perfringens NA, as well as anti-influenza virus NA serum, recognize human NEU3 but not NEU1 and that antibodies to C. perfringens NA inhibit NEU3 enzymatic activity. We conclude that the previously described microbial NA superfamily extends to human sialidases. Strategies designed to therapeutically inhibit microbial NA may need to consider potential compromising effects on human sialidases, particularly those expressed in cells of the immune system.

  16. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  17. Relative Stabilities of Conserved and Non-Conserved Structures in the OB-Fold Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei T. Alexandrescu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The OB-fold is a diverse structure superfamily based on a β-barrel motif that is often supplemented with additional non-conserved secondary structures. Previous deletion mutagenesis and NMR hydrogen exchange studies of three OB-fold proteins showed that the structural stabilities of sites within the conserved β-barrels were larger than sites in non-conserved segments. In this work we examined a database of 80 representative domain structures currently classified as OB-folds, to establish the basis of this effect. Residue-specific values were obtained for the number of Cα-Cα distance contacts, sequence hydrophobicities, crystallographic B-factors, and theoretical B-factors calculated from a Gaussian Network Model. All four parameters point to a larger average flexibility for the non-conserved structures compared to the conserved β-barrels. The theoretical B-factors and contact densities show the highest sensitivity.Our results suggest a model of protein structure evolution in which novel structural features develop at the periphery of conserved motifs. Core residues are more resistant to structural changes during evolution since their substitution would disrupt a larger number of interactions. Similar factors are likely to account for the differences in stability to unfolding between conserved and non-conserved structures.

  18. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of Marshallagia marshalli and phylogenetic implications for the superfamily Trichostrongyloidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao-Miao; Han, Liang; Zhang, Fu-Kai; Zhou, Dong-Hui; Wang, Shu-Qing; Ma, Jun; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Liu, Guo-Hua

    2018-01-01

    Marshallagia marshalli (Nematoda: Trichostrongylidae) infection can lead to serious parasitic gastroenteritis in sheep, goat, and wild ruminant, causing significant socioeconomic losses worldwide. Up to now, the study concerning the molecular biology of M. marshalli is limited. Herein, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of M. marshalli and examined its phylogenetic relationship with selected members of the superfamily Trichostrongyloidea using Bayesian inference (BI) based on concatenated mt amino acid sequence datasets. The complete mt genome sequence of M. marshalli is 13,891 bp, including 12 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and 2 ribosomal RNA genes. All protein-coding genes are transcribed in the same direction. Phylogenetic analyses based on concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes supported the monophylies of the families Haemonchidae, Molineidae, and Dictyocaulidae with strong statistical support, but rejected the monophyly of the family Trichostrongylidae. The determination of the complete mt genome sequence of M. marshalli provides novel genetic markers for studying the systematics, population genetics, and molecular epidemiology of M. marshalli and its congeners.

  19. Glutathione Transferases Superfamily: Cold-Inducible Expression of Distinct GST Genes in Brassica oleracea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshavardhanan Vijayakumar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants, as sessile organisms, can suffer serious growth and developmental consequences under cold stress conditions. Glutathione transferases (GSTs, EC 2.5.1.18 are ubiquitous and multifunctional conjugating proteins, which play a major role in stress responses by preventing oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS. Currently, understanding of their function(s during different biochemical and signaling pathways under cold stress condition remain unclear. In this study, using combined computational strategy, we identified 65 Brassica oleracea glutathione transferases (BoGST and characterized them based on evolutionary analysis into 11 classes. Inter-species and intra-species duplication was evident between BoGSTs and Arabidopsis GSTs. Based on localization analyses, we propose possible pathways in which GST genes are involved during cold stress. Further, expression analysis of the predicted putative functions for GST genes were investigated in two cold contrasting genotypes (cold tolerance and susceptible under cold condition, most of these genes were highly expressed at 6 h and 1 h in the cold tolerant (CT and cold susceptible (CS lines, respectively. Overall, BoGSTU19, BoGSTU24, BoGSTF10 are candidate genes highly expressed in B. oleracea. Further investigation of GST superfamily in B. oleracea will aid in understanding complex mechanism underlying cold tolerance in plants.

  20. The major facilitator superfamily transporter Knq1p modulates boron homeostasis in Kluyveromyces lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svrbicka, Alexandra; Toth Hervay, Nora; Gbelska, Yvetta

    2016-03-01

    Boron is an essential micronutrient for living cells, yet its excess causes toxicity. To date, the mechanisms of boron toxicity are poorly understood. Recently, the ScATR1 gene has been identified encoding the main boron efflux pump in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we analyzed the ScATR1 ortholog in Kluyveromyces lactis--the KNQ1 gene, to understand whether it participates in boron stress tolerance. We found that the KNQ1 gene, encoding a permease belonging to the major facilitator superfamily, is required for K. lactis boron tolerance. Deletion of the KNQ1 gene led to boron sensitivity and its overexpression increased K. lactis boron tolerance. The KNQ1 expression was induced by boron and the intracellular boron concentration was controlled by Knq1p. The KNQ1 promoter contains two putative binding motifs for the AP-1-like transcription factor KlYap1p playing a central role in oxidative stress defense. Our results indicate that the induction of the KNQ1 expression requires the presence of KlYap1p and that Knq1p like its ortholog ScAtr1p in S. cerevisiae functions as a boron efflux pump providing boron resistance in K. lactis.

  1. New method to analyze super-family events observed with emulsion chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amenomori, M.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have developed a clustering method to analyze family events observed with emulsion chambers at high mountains. The main purpose of this analysis is to estimate the main production height of individual events, angular spread of gamma-rays in each event and so on. These enable them to investigate hadronic interactions at energies over 10 16 eV inaccessible by the present high-energy accelerators. they examined their clustering method using Monte Carlo events, and found that for the family events whose production height is low (within 2-3 km above the observation point in air), their production heights and lateral spreads are well reproduced. They further applied their method to the super-family events (ΣE γ > 1000 TeV) observed with emulsion chambers at Mt. Kanbala (5500 m above sea-level). The results seem to suggest that particle production with large transverse momentum occurs with considerable frequency even in the fragmentation region in the energy region over 10 16 eV

  2. Microbial biodegradation of biuret: defining biuret hydrolases within the isochorismatase superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Serina L; Badalamenti, Jonathan P; Dodge, Anthony G; Tassoulas, Lambros J; Wackett, Lawrence P

    2018-03-12

    Biuret is a minor component of urea fertilizer and an intermediate in s-triazine herbicide biodegradation. The microbial metabolism of biuret has never been comprehensively studied. Here, we enriched and isolated bacteria from a potato field that grew on biuret as a sole nitrogen source. We sequenced the genome of the fastest-growing isolate, Herbaspirillum sp. BH-1 and identified genes encoding putative biuret hydrolases (BHs). We purified and characterized a functional BH enzyme from Herbaspirillum sp. BH-1 and two other bacteria from divergent phyla. The BH enzymes reacted exclusively with biuret in the range of 2-11 µmol min -1 mg -1 protein. We then constructed a global protein superfamily network to map structure-function relationships in the BH subfamily and used this to mine > 7000 genomes. High-confidence BH sequences were detected in Actinobacteria, Alpha- and Beta-proteobacteria, and some fungi, archaea and green algae, but not animals or land plants. Unexpectedly, no cyanuric acid hydrolase homologs were detected in > 90% of genomes with BH homologs, suggesting BHs may have arisen independently of s-triazine ring metabolism. This work links genotype to phenotype by enabling accurate genome-mining to predict microbial utilization of biuret. Importantly, it advances understanding of the microbial capacity for biuret biodegradation in agricultural systems. © 2018 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Recominant Pinoresino-Lariciresinol Reductase, Recombinant Dirigent Protein And Methods Of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki , Gang; David R. , Sarkanen; Simo , Ford; Joshua D.

    2003-10-21

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided from source species Forsythia intermedia, Thuja plicata, Tsuga heterophylla, Eucommia ulmoides, Linum usitatissimum, and Schisandra chinensis, which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  4. Recombinant pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase, recombinant dirigent protein, and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Norman G.; Davin, Laurence B.; Dinkova-Kostova, Albena T.; Fujita, Masayuki; Gang, David R.; Sarkanen, Simo; Ford, Joshua D.

    2001-04-03

    Dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases have been isolated, together with cDNAs encoding dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences are provided which code for the expression of dirigent proteins and pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases. In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for dirigent proteins or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding dirigent protein or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of dirigent proteins and/or pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductases.

  5. Radical SAM, A Novel Protein Superfamily Linking Unresolved Steps in Familiar Biosynthetic Pathways with Radical Mechanisms: Functional Characterization Using New Analysis and Information Visualization Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofia, Heidi J.; Chen, Guang; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Reyes Spindola, Jorge F.; Miller, Nancy E.

    2001-03-01

    A large protein superfamily with over 500 members has been discovered and analyzed using powerful new bioinformatics and information visualization methods. Evidence exists that these proteins generate a 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical by reductive cleavage of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) through an unusual Fe-S center. Radical SAM superfamily proteins function in DNA precursor, vitamin, cofactor, antibiotic, and herbicide biosynthesis in a collection of basic and familiar pathways. One of the members is interferon-inducible and is considered a candidate drug target for osteoporosis. The identification of this superfamily suggests that radical-based catalysis is important in a number of previously well-studied but unresolved biochemical pathways.

  6. Evidence that steroid 5alpha-reductase isozyme genes are differentially methylated in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Dorantes, M; Lizano-Soberón, M; Camacho-Arroyo, I; Calzada-León, R; Morimoto, S; Téllez-Ascencio, N; Cerbón, M A

    2002-03-01

    The synthesis of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is catalyzed by steroid 5alpha-reductase isozymes 1 and 2, and this function determines the development of the male phenotype during embriogenesis and the growth of androgen sensitive tissues during puberty. The aim of this study was to determine the cytosine methylation status of 5alpha-reductase isozymes types 1 and 2 genes in normal and in 5alpha-reductase deficient men. Genomic DNA was obtained from lymphocytes of both normal subjects and patients with primary 5alpha-reductase deficiency due to point mutations in 5alpha-reductase 2 gene. Southern blot analysis of 5alpha-reductase types 1 and 2 genes from DNA samples digested with HpaII presented a different cytosine methylation pattern compared to that observed with its isoschizomer MspI, indicating that both genes are methylated in CCGG sequences. The analysis of 5alpha-reductase 1 gene from DNA samples digested with Sau3AI and its isoschizomer MboI which recognize methylation in GATC sequences showed an identical methylation pattern. In contrast, 5alpha-reductase 2 gene digested with Sau3AI presented a different methylation pattern to that of the samples digested with MboI, indicating that steroid 5alpha-reductase 2 gene possess methylated cytosines in GATC sequences. Analysis of exon 4 of 5alpha-reductase 2 gene after metabisulfite PCR showed that normal and deficient subjects present a different methylation pattern, being more methylated in patients with 5alpha-reductase 2 mutated gene. The overall results suggest that 5alpha-reductase genes 1 and 2 are differentially methylated in lymphocytes from normal and 5alpha-reductase deficient patients. Moreover, the extensive cytosine methylation pattern observed in exon 4 of 5alpha-reductase 2 gene in deficient patients, points out to an increased rate of mutations in this gene.

  7. Structure of TTHA1623, a novel metallo-β-lactamase superfamily protein from Thermus thermophilus HB8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Akihiro; Okada, Akitoshi; Kameda, Yasuhiro; Ohtsuka, Jun; Nakagawa, Noriko; Ebihara, Akio; Nagata, Koji; Tanokura, Masaru

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structures of TTHA1623 from T. thermophilus HB8 in an iron-bound and a zinc-bound form have been determined to 2.8 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. TTHA1623 is a metallo-β-lactamase superfamily protein from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB8. Homologues of TTHA1623 exist in a wide range of bacteria and archaea and one eukaryote, Giardia lamblia, but their function remains unknown. To analyze the structural properties of TTHA1623, the crystal structures of its iron-bound and zinc-bound forms have been determined to 2.8 and 2.2 Å resolution, respectively. TTHA1623 possesses an αββα-fold similar to that of other metallo-β-lactamase superfamily proteins with glyoxalase II-type metal coordination. However, TTHA1623 exhibits a putative substrate-binding pocket with a unique shape

  8. Diversification of a single ancestral gene into a successful toxin superfamily in highly venomous Australian funnel-web spiders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Sandy S; Sollod, Brianna L; Wilson, David; Darling, Aaron; Sunagar, Kartik; Undheim, Eivind A B; Kely, Laurence; Antunes, Agostinho; Fry, Bryan G; King, Glenn F

    2014-03-05

    Spiders have evolved pharmacologically complex venoms that serve to rapidly subdue prey and deter predators. The major toxic factors in most spider venoms are small, disulfide-rich peptides. While there is abundant evidence that snake venoms evolved by recruitment of genes encoding normal body proteins followed by extensive gene duplication accompanied by explosive structural and functional diversification, the evolutionary trajectory of spider-venom peptides is less clear. Here we present evidence of a spider-toxin superfamily encoding a high degree of sequence and functional diversity that has evolved via accelerated duplication and diversification of a single ancestral gene. The peptides within this toxin superfamily are translated as prepropeptides that are posttranslationally processed to yield the mature toxin. The N-terminal signal sequence, as well as the protease recognition site at the junction of the propeptide and mature toxin are conserved, whereas the remainder of the propeptide and mature toxin sequences are variable. All toxin transcripts within this superfamily exhibit a striking cysteine codon bias. We show that different pharmacological classes of toxins within this peptide superfamily evolved under different evolutionary selection pressures. Overall, this study reinforces the hypothesis that spiders use a combinatorial peptide library strategy to evolve a complex cocktail of peptide toxins that target neuronal receptors and ion channels in prey and predators. We show that the ω-hexatoxins that target insect voltage-gated calcium channels evolved under the influence of positive Darwinian selection in an episodic fashion, whereas the κ-hexatoxins that target insect calcium-activated potassium channels appear to be under negative selection. A majority of the diversifying sites in the ω-hexatoxins are concentrated on the molecular surface of the toxins, thereby facilitating neofunctionalisation leading to new toxin pharmacology.

  9. Galatheoidea are not monophyletic - molecular and morphological phylogeny of the squat lobsters (Decapoda: Anomura) with recognition of a new superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, K E; Ahyong, S T; Maas, E W

    2011-02-01

    The monophyletic status of the squat lobster superfamily Galatheoidea has come under increasing doubt by studies using evidence as diverse as larval and adult somatic morphology, sperm ultrastructure, and molecular data. Here we synthesize phylogenetic data from these diverse strands, with the addition of new molecular and morphological data to examine the phylogeny of the squat lobsters and assess the status of the Galatheoidea. A total of 64 species from 16 of the 17 currently recognised anomuran families are included. Results support previous work pointing towards polyphyly in the superfamily Galatheoidea and Paguroidea, specifically, suggesting independent origins of the Galatheidae+Porcellanidae and the Chirostylidae+Kiwaidae. Morphological characters are selected that support clades resolved in the combined analysis and the taxonomic status of Galatheoidea sensu lato is revised. Results indicate that Chirostylidae are more closely related to an assemblage including Aegloidea, Lomisoidea and Paguroidea than to the remaining Galatheoidea and are referred to the superfamily Chirostyloidea to include the Chirostylidae and Kiwaidae. A considerable amount of research highlighting morphological differences supporting this split is discussed. The Galatheoidea sensu stricto is restricted to the families Galatheidae and Porcellanidae, and diagnoses for both Chirostyloidea and Galatheoidea are provided. Present results highlight the need for a detailed revision of a number of taxa, challenge some currently used morphological synapomorphies, and emphasise the need for integrated studies with wide taxon sampling and multiple data sources to resolve complex phylogenetic questions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Structure of a Sugar Transporter of the Glucose EIIC Superfamily Provides Insight into the Elevator Mechanism of Membrane Transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Jason G; Ren, Zhenning; Stanevich, Vitali; Lee, Jumin; Mitra, Sharmistha; Levin, Elena J; Poget, Sebastien; Quick, Matthias; Im, Wonpil; Zhou, Ming

    2016-06-07

    The phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase systems are found in bacteria, where they play central roles in sugar uptake and regulation of cellular uptake processes. Little is known about how the membrane-embedded components (EIICs) selectively mediate the passage of carbohydrates across the membrane. Here we report the functional characterization and 2.55-Å resolution structure of a maltose transporter, bcMalT, belonging to the glucose superfamily of EIIC transporters. bcMalT crystallized in an outward-facing occluded conformation, in contrast to the structure of another glucose superfamily EIIC, bcChbC, which crystallized in an inward-facing occluded conformation. The structures differ in the position of a structurally conserved substrate-binding domain that is suggested to play a central role in sugar transport. In addition, molecular dynamics simulations suggest a potential pathway for substrate entry from the periplasm into the bcMalT substrate-binding site. These results provide a mechanistic framework for understanding substrate recognition and translocation for the glucose superfamily EIIC transporters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily in Gossypium: A focus on Gossypium hirsutum under salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Dong

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs are a superfamily of enzymes which play important role in the scavenging of active aldehydes molecules. In present work, a comprehensive whole-genomic study of ALDH gene superfamily was carried out for an allotetraploid cultivated cotton species, G. hirsutum, as well as in parallel relative to their diploid progenitors, G. arboreum and G. raimondii. Totally, 30 and 58 ALDH gene sequences belong to 10 families were identified from diploid and allotetraploid cotton species, respectively. The gene structures among the members from same families were highly conserved. Whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication might be the major driver for the expansion of ALDH gene superfamily in G. hirsutum. In addition, the expression patterns of GhALDH genes were diverse across tissues. Most GhALDH genes were induced or repressed by salt stress in upland cotton. Our observation shed lights on the molecular evolutionary properties of ALDH genes in diploid cottons and their alloallotetraploid derivatives. It may be useful to mine key genes for improvement of cotton response to salt stress.

  12. A comprehensive analysis of the Omp85/TpsB protein superfamily structural diversity, taxonomic occurrence, and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Eva; Lithgow, Trevor

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Omp85/TpsB protein superfamily are ubiquitously distributed in Gram-negative bacteria, and function in protein translocation (e.g., FhaC) or the assembly of outer membrane proteins (e.g., BamA). Several recent findings are suggestive of a further level of variation in the superfamily, including the identification of the novel membrane protein assembly factor TamA and protein translocase PlpD. To investigate the diversity and the causal evolutionary events, we undertook a comprehensive comparative sequence analysis of the Omp85/TpsB proteins. A total of 10 protein subfamilies were apparent, distinguished in their domain structure and sequence signatures. In addition to the proteins FhaC, BamA, and TamA, for which structural and functional information is available, are families of proteins with so far undescribed domain architectures linked to the Omp85 β-barrel domain. This study brings a classification structure to a dynamic protein superfamily of high interest given its essential function for Gram-negative bacteria as well as its diverse domain architecture, and we discuss several scenarios of putative functions of these so far undescribed proteins. PMID:25101071

  13. The Association between Gene-Environment Interactions and Diseases Involving the Human GST Superfamily with SNP Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoinesha L. Hollman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to environmental hazards has been associated with diseases in humans. The identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in human populations exposed to different environmental hazards, is vital for detecting the genetic risks of some important human diseases. Several studies in this field have been conducted on glutathione S-transferases (GSTs, a phase II detoxification superfamily, to investigate its role in the occurrence of diseases. Human GSTs consist of cytosolic and microsomal superfamilies that are further divided into subfamilies. Based on scientific search engines and a review of the literature, we have found a large amount of published articles on human GST super- and subfamilies that have greatly assisted in our efforts to examine their role in health and disease. Because of its polymorphic variations in relation to environmental hazards such as air pollutants, cigarette smoke, pesticides, heavy metals, carcinogens, pharmaceutical drugs, and xenobiotics, GST is considered as a significant biomarker. This review examines the studies on gene-environment interactions related to various diseases with respect to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs found in the GST superfamily. Overall, it can be concluded that interactions between GST genes and environmental factors play an important role in human diseases.

  14. Hydroxyurea-Mediated Cytotoxicity Without Inhibition of Ribonucleotide Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Li Phing; Lim, Zun Yi; Cohen, Matan; Kong, Ziqing; Marjavaara, Lisette; Chabes, Andrei; Bell, Stephen D

    2016-11-01

    In many organisms, hydroxyurea (HU) inhibits class I ribonucleotide reductase, leading to lowered cellular pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates. The reduced levels for DNA precursors is believed to cause replication fork stalling. Upon treatment of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus with HU, we observe dose-dependent cell cycle arrest, accumulation of DNA double-strand breaks, stalled replication forks, and elevated levels of recombination structures. However, Sulfolobus has a HU-insensitive class II ribonucleotide reductase, and we reveal that HU treatment does not significantly impact cellular DNA precursor pools. Profiling of protein and transcript levels reveals modulation of a specific subset of replication initiation and cell division genes. Notably, the selective loss of the regulatory subunit of the primase correlates with cessation of replication initiation and stalling of replication forks. Furthermore, we find evidence for a detoxification response induced by HU treatment. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Crystallization of purple nitrous oxide reductase from Pseudomonas stutzeri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomowski, Anja; Zumft, Walter G.; Kroneck, Peter M. H.; Einsle, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    The physiologically active form of nitrous oxide reductase was isolated and crystallized under strict exclusion of dioxygen and diffraction data were collected from crystals belonging to two different space groups. Nitrous oxide reductase (N 2 OR) from Pseudomonas stutzeri catalyzes the final step in denitrification: the two-electron reduction of nitrous oxide to molecular dinitrogen. Crystals of the enzyme were grown under strict exclusion of dioxygen by sitting-drop vapour diffusion using 2R,3R-butanediol as a cryoprotectant. N 2 OR crystallized in either space group P1 or P6 5 . Interestingly, the key determinant for the resulting space group was the crystallization temperature. Crystals belonging to space group P1 contained four 130 kDa dimers in the asymmetric unit, while crystals belonging to space group P6 5 contained a single dimer in the asymmetric unit. Diffraction data were collected to resolutions better than 2 Å

  16. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.K.; Vanoni, M.A.; Blanchard, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D 2 O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  17. Cyclopiazonic acid biosynthesis in Aspergillus sp.: characterization of a reductase-like R* domain in cyclopiazonate synthetase that forms and releases cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyu; Walsh, Christopher T

    2009-09-15

    The fungal neurotoxin alpha-cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), a nanomolar inhibitor of Ca2+-ATPase, has a pentacyclic indole tetramic acid scaffold that arises from one molecule of tryptophan, acetyl-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and dimethylallyl pyrophosphate by consecutive action of three enzymes, CpaS, CpaD, and CpaO. CpaS is a hybrid, two module polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) that makes and releases cyclo-acetoacetyl-L-tryptophan (cAATrp), the tetramic acid that serves as substrate for subsequent prenylation and oxidative cyclization to the five ring CPA scaffold. The NRPS module in CpaS has a predicted four-domain organization of condensation, adenylation, thiolation, and reductase* (C-A-T-R*), where R* lacks the critical Ser-Tyr-Lys catalytic triad of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. By heterologous overproduction in Escherichia coli of the 56 kDa Aspergillus flavus CpaS TR* didomain and the single T and R* domains, we demonstrate that CpaS catalyzes a Dieckmann-type cyclization on the N-acetoacetyl-Trp intermediate bound in thioester linkage to the phosphopantetheinyl arm of the T domain to form and release cAATrp. This occurs without any participation of NAD(P)H, so R* does not function as a canonical SDR family member. Use of the T and R* domains in in trans assays enabled multiple turnovers and evaluation of specific mutants. Mutation of the D3803 residue in the R* domain, conserved in other fungal tetramate synthetases, abolished activity both in in trans and in cis (TR*) activity assays. It is likely that cyclization of beta-ketoacylaminoacyl-S-pantetheinyl intermediates to released tetramates represents a default cyclization/release route for redox-incompetent R* domains embedded in NRPS assembly lines.

  18. Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 to attenuate insulin signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Baran A; Tarun, Akansha; D'Aquino, Katharine; Hancer, Nancy J; Ukomadu, Chinweike; White, Morris F; Michel, Thomas; Manning, Brendan D; Cohen, David E

    2013-07-30

    Phosphatidylcholine transfer protein (PC-TP) is a phospholipid-binding protein that is enriched in liver and that interacts with thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2). Mice lacking either protein exhibit improved hepatic glucose homeostasis and are resistant to diet-induced diabetes. Insulin receptor substrate 2 (IRS2) and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) are key effectors of insulin signaling, which is attenuated in diabetes. We found that PC-TP inhibited IRS2, as evidenced by insulin-independent IRS2 activation after knockdown, genetic ablation, or chemical inhibition of PC-TP. In addition, IRS2 was activated after knockdown of THEM2, providing support for a role for the interaction of PC-TP with THEM2 in suppressing insulin signaling. Additionally, we showed that PC-TP bound to tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) and stabilized the components of the TSC1-TSC2 complex, which functions to inhibit mTORC1. Preventing phosphatidylcholine from binding to PC-TP disrupted interactions of PC-TP with THEM2 and TSC2, and disruption of the PC-TP-THEM2 complex was associated with increased activation of both IRS2 and mTORC1. In livers of mice with genetic ablation of PC-TP or that had been treated with a PC-TP inhibitor, steady-state amounts of IRS2 were increased, whereas those of TSC2 were decreased. These findings reveal a phospholipid-dependent mechanism that suppresses insulin signaling downstream of its receptor.

  19. Pathogenic Leptospira species express surface-exposed proteins belonging to the bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, James; Barocchi, Michele A.; Croda, Julio; Young, Tracy A.; Sanchez, Yolanda; Siqueira, Isadora; Bolin, Carole A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Riley, Lee W.; Haake, David A.; Ko, Albert I.

    2005-01-01

    Summary Proteins with bacterial immunoglobulin-like (Big) domains, such as the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis invasin and Escherichia coli intimin, are surface-expressed proteins that mediate host mammalian cell invasion or attachment. Here, we report the identification and characterization of a new family of Big domain proteins, referred to as Lig (leptospiral Ig-like) proteins, in pathogenic Leptospira. Screening of L. interrogans and L. kirschneri expression libraries with sera from leptospirosis patients identified 13 lambda phage clones that encode tandem repeats of the 90 amino acid Big domain. Two lig genes, designated ligA and ligB, and one pseudo-gene, ligC, were identified. The ligA and ligB genes encode amino-terminal lipoprotein signal peptides followed by 10 or 11 Big domain repeats and, in the case of ligB, a unique carboxy-terminal non-repeat domain. The organization of ligC is similar to that of ligB but contains mutations that disrupt the reading frame. The lig sequences are present in pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species. LigA and LigB are expressed by a variety of virulent leptospiral strains. Loss of Lig protein and RNA transcript expression is correlated with the observed loss of virulence during culture attenuation of pathogenic strains. High-pressure freeze substitution followed by immunocytochemical electron microscopy confirmed that the Lig proteins were localized to the bacterial surface. Immunoblot studies with patient sera found that the Lig proteins are a major antigen recognized during the acute host infection. These observations demonstrate that the Lig proteins are a newly identified surface protein of pathogenic Leptospira, which by analogy to other bacterial immunoglobulin superfamily virulence factors, may play a role in host cell attachment and invasion during leptospiral pathogenesis. PMID:12890019

  20. Concerted and nonconcerted evolution of the Hsp70 gene superfamily in two sibling species of nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Nikolas; Nei, Masatoshi

    2004-03-01

    We have identified the Hsp70 gene superfamily of the nematode Caenorhabditis briggsae and investigated the evolution of these genes in comparison with Hsp70 genes from C. elegans, Drosophila, and yeast. The Hsp70 genes are classified into three monophyletic groups according to their subcellular localization, namely, cytoplasm (CYT), endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and mitochondria (MT). The Hsp110 genes can be classified into the polyphyletic CYT group and the monophyletic ER group. The different Hsp70 and Hsp110 groups appeared to evolve following the model of divergent evolution. This model can also explain the evolution of the ER and MT genes. On the other hand, the CYT genes are divided into heat-inducible and constitutively expressed genes. The constitutively expressed genes have evolved more or less following the birth-and-death process, and the rates of gene birth and gene death are different between the two nematode species. By contrast, some heat-inducible genes show an intraspecies phylogenetic clustering. This suggests that they are subject to sequence homogenization resulting from gene conversion-like events. In addition, the heat-inducible genes show high levels of sequence conservation in both intra-species and inter-species comparisons, and in most cases, amino acid sequence similarity is higher than nucleotide sequence similarity. This indicates that purifying selection also plays an important role in maintaining high sequence similarity among paralogous Hsp70 genes. Therefore, we suggest that the CYT heat-inducible genes have been subjected to a combination of purifying selection, birth-and-death process, and gene conversion-like events.

  1. Differential expression of disulfide reductase enzymes in a free-living platyhelminth (Dugesia dorotocephala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Guevara-Flores

    Full Text Available A search of the disulfide reductase activities expressed in the adult stage of the free-living platyhelminth Dugesia dorotocephala was carried out. Using GSSG or DTNB as substrates, it was possible to obtain a purified fraction containing both GSSG and DTNB reductase activities. Through the purification procedure, both disulfide reductase activities were obtained in the same chromatographic peak. By mass spectrometry analysis of peptide fragments obtained after tryptic digestion of the purified fraction, the presence of glutathione reductase (GR, thioredoxin-glutathione reductase (TGR, and a putative thioredoxin reductase (TrxR was detected. Using the gold compound auranofin to selectively inhibit the GSSG reductase activity of TGR, it was found that barely 5% of the total GR activity in the D. dorotocephala extract can be assigned to GR. Such strategy did allow us to determine the kinetic parameters for both GR and TGR. Although It was not possible to discriminate DTNB reductase activity due to TrxR from that of TGR, a chromatofocusing experiment with a D. dorotocephala extract resulted in the obtention of a minor protein fraction enriched in TrxR, strongly suggesting its presence as a functional protein. Thus, unlike its parasitic counterparts, in the free-living platyhelminth lineage the three disulfide reductases are present as functional proteins, albeit TGR is still the major disulfide reductase involved in the reduction of both Trx and GSSG. This fact suggests the development of TGR in parasitic flatworms was not linked to a parasitic mode of life.

  2. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Dong; Shi, Y.; Miller, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    Adrenodoxin reductase is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. The authors cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G+C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of housekeeping genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon

  3. Nitrate reductase gene involvement in hexachlorobiphenyl dechlorination by Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Supriyo; Perkins, Michael; Dutta, Sisir K.

    2006-01-01

    Polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) degradation usually occurs through reductive dechlorination under anaerobic conditions and phenolic ring cleavage under aerobic conditions. In this paper, we provide evidence of nitrate reductase (NaR) mediated dechlorination of hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB-153) in Phanerochaete chrysosporium under non-ligninolytic condition and the gene involved. The NaR enzyme and its cofactor, molybdenum (Mo), were found to mediate reductive dechlorination of PCBs even in aerobic condition. Tungsten (W), a competitive inhibitor of this enzyme, was found to suppress this dechlorination. Chlorine release assay provided further evidence of this nitrate reductase mediated dechlorination. Commercially available pure NaR enzyme from Aspergillus was used to confirm these results. Through homology search using TBLASTN program, NaR gene was identified, primers were designed and the RT-PCR product was sequenced. The NaR gene was then annotated in the P. chrysosporium genome (GenBank accession no. AY700576). This is the first report regarding the presence of nitrate reductase gene in this fungus with the explanation why this fungus can dechlorinate PCBs even in aerobic condition. These fungal inoculums are used commercially as pellets in sawdust for enhanced bioremediation of PCBs at the risk of depleting soil nitrates. Hence, the addition of nitrates to the pellets will reduce this risk as well as enhance its activity

  4. Hepatocyte Hyperproliferation upon Liver-Specific Co-disruption of Thioredoxin-1, Thioredoxin Reductase-1, and Glutathione Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R. Prigge

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Energetic nutrients are oxidized to sustain high intracellular NADPH/NADP+ ratios. NADPH-dependent reduction of thioredoxin-1 (Trx1 disulfide and glutathione disulfide by thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1 and glutathione reductase (Gsr, respectively, fuels antioxidant systems and deoxyribonucleotide synthesis. Mouse livers lacking both TrxR1 and Gsr sustain these essential activities using an NADPH-independent methionine-consuming pathway; however, it remains unclear how this reducing power is distributed. Here, we show that liver-specific co-disruption of the genes encoding Trx1, TrxR1, and Gsr (triple-null causes dramatic hepatocyte hyperproliferation. Thus, even in the absence of Trx1, methionine-fueled glutathione production supports hepatocyte S phase deoxyribonucleotide production. Also, Trx1 in the absence of TrxR1 provides a survival advantage to cells under hyperglycemic stress, suggesting that glutathione, likely via glutaredoxins, can reduce Trx1 disulfide in vivo. In triple-null livers like in many cancers, deoxyribonucleotide synthesis places a critical yet relatively low-volume demand on these reductase systems, thereby favoring high hepatocyte turnover over sustained hepatocyte integrity.

  5. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    can replace light in eliciting an increase of nitrate reductase mRNA accumulation in dark-adapted green Arabidopsis plants. We show further that sucrose alone is sufficient for the full expression of nitrate reductase genes in etiolated Arabidopsis plants. Finally, using a reporter gene, we show......Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression....... Located in the cytosol, nitrate reductase obtains its reductant not from photosynthesis but from carbohydrate catabolism. This relationship prompted us to investigate the indirect role that light might play, via photosynthesis, in the regulation of nitrate reductase gene expression. We show that sucrose...

  6. Gamma-irradiation activates biochemical systems: induction of nitrate reductase activity in plant callus.

    OpenAIRE

    Pandey, K N; Sabharwal, P S

    1982-01-01

    Gamma-irradiation induced high levels of nitrate reductase activity (NADH:nitrate oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.6.1) in callus of Haworthia mirabilis Haworth. Subcultures of gamma-irradiated tissues showed autonomous growth on minimal medium. We were able to mimic the effects of gamma-irradiation by inducing nitrate reductase activity in unirradiated callus with exogenous auxin and kinetin. These results revealed that induction of nitrate reductase activity by gamma-irradiation is mediated through i...

  7. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  8. Identification and characterization of trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline dehydratase and Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate reductase involved in trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline metabolism of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Watanabe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available trans-4-Hydroxy-l-proline (T4LHyp and trans-3-hydroxy-l-proline (T3LHyp occur mainly in collagen. A few bacteria can convert T4LHyp to α-ketoglutarate, and we previously revealed a hypothetical pathway consisting of four enzymes at the molecular level (J Biol Chem (2007 282, 6685–6695; J Biol Chem (2012 287, 32674–32688. Here, we first found that Azospirillum brasilense has the ability to grow not only on T4LHyp but also T3LHyp as a sole carbon source. In A. brasilense cells, T3LHyp dehydratase and NAD(PH-dependent Δ1-pyrroline-2-carboxylate (Pyr2C reductase activities were induced by T3LHyp (and d-proline and d-lysine but not T4LHyp, and no effect of T3LHyp was observed on the expression of T4LHyp metabolizing enzymes: a hypothetical pathway of T3LHyp → Pyr2C → l-proline was proposed. Bacterial T3LHyp dehydratase, encoded to LhpH gene, was homologous with the mammalian enzyme. On the other hand, Pyr2C reductase encoded to LhpI gene was a novel member of ornithine cyclodeaminase/μ-crystallin superfamily, differing from known bacterial protein. Furthermore, the LhpI enzymes of A. brasilense and another bacterium showed several different properties, including substrate and coenzyme specificities. T3LHyp was converted to proline by the purified LhpH and LhpI proteins. Furthermore, disruption of LhpI gene from A. brasilense led to loss of growth on T3LHyp, d-proline and d-lysine, indicating that this gene has dual metabolic functions as a reductase for Pyr2C and Δ1-piperidine-2-carboxylate in these pathways, and that the T3LHyp pathway is not linked to T4LHyp and l-proline metabolism.

  9. Oligomerisation status and evolutionary conservation of interfaces of protein structural domain superfamilies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhwal, Anshul; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2013-07-01

    and its remote homologue-interacting partner pair. We found that, in exceptional cases, homologous proteins belonging to the same superfamily, but with remote sequence similarity, can share similar interfaces.

  10. Discovery of a distinct superfamily of Kunitz-type toxin (KTT from tarantulas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hua Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kuntiz-type toxins (KTTs have been found in the venom of animals such as snake, cone snail and sea anemone. The main ancestral function of Kunitz-type proteins was the inhibition of a diverse array of serine proteases, while toxic activities (such as ion-channel blocking were developed under a variety of Darwinian selection pressures. How new functions were grafted onto an old protein scaffold and what effect Darwinian selection pressures had on KTT evolution remains a puzzle. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report the presence of a new superfamily of ktts in spiders (TARANTULAS: Ornithoctonus huwena and Ornithoctonus hainana, which share low sequence similarity to known KTTs and is clustered in a distinct clade in the phylogenetic tree of KTT evolution. The representative molecule of spider KTTs, HWTX-XI, purified from the venom of O. huwena, is a bi-functional protein which is a very potent trypsin inhibitor (about 30-fold more strong than BPTI as well as a weak Kv1.1 potassium channel blocker. Structural analysis of HWTX-XI in 3-D by NMR together with comparative function analysis of 18 expressed mutants of this toxin revealed two separate sites, corresponding to these two activities, located on the two ends of the cone-shape molecule of HWTX-XI. Comparison of non-synonymous/synonymous mutation ratios (omega for each site in spider and snake KTTs, as well as PBTI like body Kunitz proteins revealed high Darwinian selection pressure on the binding sites for Kv channels and serine proteases in snake, while only on the proteases in spider and none detected in body proteins, suggesting different rates and patterns of evolution among them. The results also revealed a series of key events in the history of spider KTT evolution, including the formation of a novel KTT family (named sub-Kuntiz-type toxins derived from the ancestral native KTTs with the loss of the second disulfide bridge accompanied by several dramatic sequence modifications

  11. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  12. In vivo photoinactivation of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside reductase by near-ultraviolet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, J.

    1977-01-01

    Some experimental work is described showing that near-U.V. irradiation of E.coli cells selectively destroys RDP-reductase (ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase) activity in vivo are providing evidence relating the loss of RDP-reductase to loss of cellular visibility and the inactivity of irrdiated cells to support the replication of DNA phages. The data are consistent with the interpretation that the principal cause in the killing of exponentially growing E.coli cells by near-U.V., and the loss of ability of irradiated host cells to support the replication of DNA phages, is the photoinactivation of the RDP-reductase complex. (U.K.)

  13. Identification of the 7-Hydroxymethyl Chlorophyll a Reductase of the Chlorophyll Cycle in Arabidopsis[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Miki; Ito, Hisashi; Takabayashi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Ryouichi; Tanaka, Ayumi

    2011-01-01

    The interconversion of chlorophyll a and chlorophyll b, referred to as the chlorophyll cycle, plays a crucial role in the processes of greening, acclimation to light intensity, and senescence. The chlorophyll cycle consists of three reactions: the conversions of chlorophyll a to chlorophyll b by chlorophyllide a oxygenase, chlorophyll b to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a by chlorophyll b reductase, and 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a by 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase. We identified 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase, which is the last remaining unidentified enzyme of the chlorophyll cycle, from Arabidopsis thaliana by genetic and biochemical methods. Recombinant 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase converted 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a to chlorophyll a using ferredoxin. Both sequence and biochemical analyses showed that 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase contains flavin adenine dinucleotide and an iron-sulfur center. In addition, a phylogenetic analysis elucidated the evolution of 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase from divinyl chlorophyllide vinyl reductase. A mutant lacking 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a reductase was found to accumulate 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a and pheophorbide a. Furthermore, this accumulation of pheophorbide a in the mutant was rescued by the inactivation of the chlorophyll b reductase gene. The downregulation of pheophorbide a oxygenase activity is discussed in relation to 7-hydroxymethyl chlorophyll a accumulation. PMID:21934147

  14. In vivo photoinactivation of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside reductase by near-ultraviolet light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, J [California Univ., Irvine (USA)

    1977-06-09

    Some experimental work is described showing that near-uv irradiation of E.coli cells selectively destroys RDP-reductase (ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase) activity in vivo are providing evidence relating the loss of RDP-reductase to loss of cellular visibility and the inactivity of irrdiated cells to support the replication of DNA phages. The data are consistent with the interpretation that the principal cause in the killing of exponentially growing E.coli cells by near-uv, and the loss of ability of irradiated host cells to support the replication of DNA phages, is the photoinactivation of the RDP-reductase complex.

  15. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Bhumika S., E-mail: bhumika.shah@mq.edu.au; Tetu, Sasha G. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia); Harrop, Stephen J. [University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. [Macquarie University, Research Park Drive, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2014-09-25

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access.

  16. Structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) within a genomic island from a clinical strain of Acinetobacter baumannii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Bhumika S.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Paulsen, Ian T.; Mabbutt, Bridget C.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of a short-chain dehydrogenase encoded within genomic islands of A. baumannii strains has been solved to 2.4 Å resolution. This classical SDR incorporates a flexible helical subdomain. The NADP-binding site and catalytic side chains are identified. Over 15% of the genome of an Australian clinical isolate of Acinetobacter baumannii occurs within genomic islands. An uncharacterized protein encoded within one island feature common to this and other International Clone II strains has been studied by X-ray crystallography. The 2.4 Å resolution structure of SDR-WM99c reveals it to be a new member of the classical short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. The enzyme contains a nucleotide-binding domain and, like many other SDRs, is tetrameric in form. The active site contains a catalytic tetrad (Asn117, Ser146, Tyr159 and Lys163) and water molecules occupying the presumed NADP cofactor-binding pocket. An adjacent cleft is capped by a relatively mobile helical subdomain, which is well positioned to control substrate access

  17. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  18. A Survey of the ATP-Binding Cassette (ABC) Gene Superfamily in the Salmon Louse (Lepeophtheirus salmonis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, Greta; Carmichael, Stephen N; Heumann, Jan; Taggart, John B; Gharbi, Karim; Bron, James E; Bekaert, Michaël; Sturm, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Salmon lice, Lepeophtheirus salmonis (Krøyer, 1837), are fish ectoparasites causing significant economic damage in the mariculture of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758. The control of L. salmonis at fish farms relies to a large extent on treatment with anti-parasitic drugs. A problem related to chemical control is the potential for development of resistance, which in L. salmonis is documented for a number of drug classes including organophosphates, pyrethroids and avermectins. The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) gene superfamily is found in all biota and includes a range of drug efflux transporters that can confer drug resistance to cancers and pathogens. Furthermore, some ABC transporters are recognised to be involved in conferral of insecticide resistance. While a number of studies have investigated ABC transporters in L. salmonis, no systematic analysis of the ABC gene family exists for this species. This study presents a genome-wide survey of ABC genes in L. salmonis for which, ABC superfamily members were identified through homology searching of the L. salmonis genome. In addition, ABC proteins were identified in a reference transcriptome of the parasite generated by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) of a multi-stage RNA library. Searches of both genome and transcriptome allowed the identification of a total of 33 genes / transcripts coding for ABC proteins, of which 3 were represented only in the genome and 4 only in the transcriptome. Eighteen sequences were assigned to ABC subfamilies known to contain drug transporters, i.e. subfamilies B (4 sequences), C (11) and G (2). The results suggest that the ABC gene family of L. salmonis possesses fewer members than recorded for other arthropods. The present survey of the L. salmonis ABC gene superfamily will provide the basis for further research into potential roles of ABC transporters in the toxicity of salmon delousing agents and as potential mechanisms of drug resistance.

  19. Identification of a Novel Epoxyqueuosine Reductase Family by Comparative Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallot, Rémi; Ross, Robert; Chen, Wei-Hung; Bruner, Steven D; Limbach, Patrick A; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2017-03-17

    The reduction of epoxyqueuosine (oQ) is the last step in the synthesis of the tRNA modification queuosine (Q). While the epoxyqueuosine reductase (EC 1.17.99.6) enzymatic activity was first described 30 years ago, the encoding gene queG was only identified in Escherichia coli in 2011. Interestingly, queG is absent from a large number of sequenced genomes that harbor Q synthesis or salvage genes, suggesting the existence of an alternative epoxyqueuosine reductase in these organisms. By analyzing phylogenetic distributions, physical gene clustering, and fusions, members of the Domain of Unknown Function 208 (DUF208) family were predicted to encode for an alternative epoxyqueuosine reductase. This prediction was validated with genetic methods. The Q modification is present in Lactobacillus salivarius, an organism missing queG but harboring the duf208 gene. Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 is one of the few organisms that harbor both QueG and DUF208, and deletion of both corresponding genes was required to observe the absence of Q and the accumulation of oQ in tRNA. Finally, the conversion oQ to Q was restored in an E. coli queG mutant by complementation with plasmids harboring duf208 genes from different bacteria. Members of the DUF208 family are not homologous to QueG enzymes, and thus, duf208 is a non-orthologous replacement of queG. We propose to name DUF208 encoding genes as queH. While QueH contains conserved cysteines that could be involved in the coordination of a Fe/S center in a similar fashion to what has been identified in QueG, no cobalamin was identified associated with recombinant QueH protein.

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  1. Aldose Reductase-Deficient Mice Develop Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Horace T. B.; Chung, Sookja K.; Law, Janice W. S.; Ko, Ben C. B.; Tam, Sidney C. F.; Brooks, Heddwen L.; Knepper, Mark A.; Chung, Stephen S. M.

    2000-01-01

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of various diseases associated with diabetes mellitus, such as cataract, retinopathy, neuropathy, and nephropathy. However, its physiological functions are not well understood. We developed mice deficient in this enzyme and found that they had no apparent developmental or reproductive abnormality except that they drank and urinated significantly more than their wild-type littermates. These ALR2-deficient mice exhibited a partially defective urine-concentrating ability, having a phenotype resembling that of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. PMID:10913167

  2. TED, an Autonomous and Rare Maize Transposon of the Mutator Superfamily with a High Gametophytic Excision Frequency[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K.

    2013-01-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor. PMID:24038653

  3. Evolutionary Expansion of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily in Bacteria in Response to the Synthetic Compounds Molinate and Diuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugrue, Elena; Fraser, Nicholas J.; Hopkins, Davis H.; Carr, Paul D.; Khurana, Jeevan L.; Oakeshott, John G.; Scott, Colin

    2015-01-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily has remarkable functional diversity, with considerable structural and functional annotation of known sequences. In microbes, the recent evolution of several members of this family to catalyze the breakdown of environmental xenobiotics is not well understood. An evolutionary transition from binuclear to mononuclear metal ion coordination at the active sites of these enzymes could produce large functional changes such as those observed in nature, but there are few clear examples available to support this hypothesis. To investigate the role of binuclear-mononuclear active-site transitions in the evolution of new function in this superfamily, we have characterized two recently evolved enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of the synthetic herbicides molinate (MolA) and phenylurea (PuhB). In this work, the crystal structures, mutagenesis, metal ion analysis, and enzyme kinetics of both MolA and PuhB establish that these enzymes utilize a mononuclear active site. However, bioinformatics and structural comparisons reveal that the closest putative ancestor of these enzymes had a binuclear active site, indicating that a binuclear-mononuclear transition has occurred. These proteins may represent examples of evolution modifying the characteristics of existing catalysts to satisfy new requirements, specifically, metal ion rearrangement leading to large leaps in activity that would not otherwise be possible. PMID:25636851

  4. Classification of Rhizomonas suberifaciens, an unnamed Rhizomonas species, and Sphingomonas spp. in rRNA superfamily IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruggen, A H; Jochimsen, K N; Steinberger, E M; Segers, P; Gillis, M

    1993-01-01

    Thermal melting profiles of hybrids between 3H-labeled rRNA of Rhizomonas suberifaciens, the causal agent of corky root of lettuce, and chromosomal DNAs from 27 species of gram-negative bacteria indicated that the genus Rhizomonas belongs to superfamily IV of De Ley. On the basis of the melting temperatures of DNA hybrids with rRNAs from the type strains of R. suberifaciens, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, and Sphingomonas capsulata, Rhizomonas strains constitute a separate branch in superfamily IV, which is closely related to but separate from branches containing Zymomonas mobilis, Sphingomonas spp., and S. capsulata. Sphingomonas yanoikuyae and Rhizomonas sp. strain WI4 are located toward the base of the Rhizomonas rRNA branch. DNA-DNA hybridization indicated that S. yanoikuyae is equidistant from Rhizomonas sp. strain WI4 and S. paucimobilis. Sequences of 270 bp of 16S ribosomal DNAs from eight strains of Rhizomonas spp., eight strains of Sphingomonas spp., and Agrobacterium tumefaciens indicated that S. yanoikuyae and Rhizomonas sp. strains WI4 and CA16 are genetically more closely related to R. suberifaciens than to Sphingomonas spp. Thus, S. yanoikuyae may need to be transferred to the genus Rhizomonas on the basis of the results of further study.

  5. Crystal structure and potential physiological role of zebra fish thioesterase superfamily member 2 (fTHEM2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Shanshan; Li, Han; Gao, Feng; Zhou, Ying, E-mail: zhouying@moon.ibp.ac.cn

    2015-08-07

    Thioesterase superfamily member 2 (THEM2) is an essential protein for mammalian cell proliferation. It belongs to the hotdog-fold thioesterase superfamily and catalyzes hydrolysis of thioester bonds of acyl-CoA in vitro, while its in vivo function remains unrevealed. In this study, Zebra fish was selected as a model organism to facilitate the investigations on THEM2. First, we solved the crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 at the resolution of 1.80 Å, which displayed a similar scaffolding as hTHEM2. Second, functional studies demonstrated that fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA in vitro. In addition, injection of morpholino against fTHEM2 at one-cell stage resulted in distorted early embryo development, including delayed cell division, retarded development and increased death rate. The above findings validated our hypothesis that fTHEM2 could serve as an ideal surrogate for studying the physiological functions of THEM2. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of recombinant fTHEM2 is presented. • fTHEM2 is capable of hydrolyzing palmitoyl-CoA. • The influence of fTHEM2 on early embryo development is demonstrated.

  6. Tracing the Evolutionary History of the CAP Superfamily of Proteins Using Amino Acid Sequence Homology and Conservation of Splice Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anup; Chandler, Douglas E

    2017-10-01

    Proteins of the CAP superfamily play numerous roles in reproduction, innate immune responses, cancer biology, and venom toxicology. Here we document the breadth of the CAP (Cysteine-RIch Secretory Protein (CRISP), Antigen 5, and Pathogenesis-Related) protein superfamily and trace the major events in its evolution using amino acid sequence homology and the positions of exon/intron borders within their genes. Seldom acknowledged in the literature, we find that many of the CAP subfamilies present in mammals, where they were originally characterized, have distinct homologues in the invertebrate phyla. Early eukaryotic CAP genes contained only one exon inherited from prokaryotic predecessors and as evolution progressed an increasing number of introns were inserted, reaching 2-5 in the invertebrate world and 5-15 in the vertebrate world. Focusing on the CRISP subfamily, we propose that these proteins evolved in three major steps: (1) origination of the CAP/PR/SCP domain in bacteria, (2) addition of a small Hinge domain to produce the two-domain SCP-like proteins found in roundworms and anthropoids, and (3) addition of an Ion Channel Regulatory domain, borrowed from invertebrate peptide toxins, to produce full length, three-domain CRISP proteins, first seen in insects and later to diversify into multiple subtypes in the vertebrate world.

  7. CD177: A member of the Ly-6 gene superfamily involved with neutrophil proliferation and polycythemia vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettinotti Maria

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genes in the Leukocyte Antigen 6 (Ly-6 superfamily encode glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored glycoproteins (gp with conserved domains of 70 to 100 amino acids and 8 to 10 cysteine residues. Murine Ly-6 genes encode important lymphocyte and hematopoietic stem cell antigens. Recently, a new member of the human Ly-6 gene superfamily has been described, CD177. CD177 is polymorphic and has at least two alleles, PRV-1 and NB1. CD177 was first described as PRV-1, a gene that is overexpressed in neutrophils from approximately 95% of patients with polycythemia vera and from about half of patients with essential thrombocythemia. CD177 encodes NB1 gp, a 58–64 kD GPI gp that is expressed by neutrophils and neutrophil precursors. NB1 gp carries Human Neutrophil Antigen (HNA-2a. Investigators working to identify the gene encoding NB1 gp called the CD177 allele they described NB1. NB1 gp is unusual in that neutrophils from some healthy people lack the NB1 gp completely and in most people NB1 gp is expressed by a subpopulation of neutrophils. The function of NB1 gp and the role of CD177 in the pathogenesis and clinical course of polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia are not yet known. However, measuring neutrophil CD177 mRNA levels has become an important marker for diagnosing the myeloproliferative disorders polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia.

  8. TED, an autonomous and rare maize transposon of the mutator superfamily with a high gametophytic excision frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yubin; Harris, Linda; Dooner, Hugo K

    2013-09-01

    Mutator (Mu) elements, one of the most diverse superfamilies of DNA transposons, are found in all eukaryotic kingdoms, but are particularly numerous in plants. Most of the present knowledge on the transposition behavior of this superfamily comes from studies of the maize (Zea mays) Mu elements, whose transposition is mediated by the autonomous Mutator-Don Robertson (MuDR) element. Here, we describe the maize element TED (for Transposon Ellen Dempsey), an autonomous cousin that differs significantly from MuDR. Element excision and reinsertion appear to require both proteins encoded by MuDR, but only the single protein encoded by TED. Germinal excisions, rare with MuDR, are common with TED, but arise in one of the mitotic divisions of the gametophyte, rather than at meiosis. Instead, transposition-deficient elements arise at meiosis, suggesting that the double-strand breaks produced by element excision are repaired differently in mitosis and meiosis. Unlike MuDR, TED is a very low-copy transposon whose number and activity do not undergo dramatic changes upon inbreeding or outcrossing. Like MuDR, TED transposes mostly to unlinked sites and can form circular transposition products. Sequences closer to TED than to MuDR were detected only in the grasses, suggesting a rather recent evolutionary split from a common ancestor.

  9. Combining protein sequence, structure, and dynamics: A novel approach for functional evolution analysis of PAS domain superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zheng; Zhou, Hongyu; Tao, Peng

    2018-02-01

    PAS domains are widespread in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, and play important roles in various functions. In this study, we aim to explore functional evolutionary relationship among proteins in the PAS domain superfamily in view of the sequence-structure-dynamics-function relationship. We collected protein sequences and crystal structure data from RCSB Protein Data Bank of the PAS domain superfamily belonging to three biological functions (nucleotide binding, photoreceptor activity, and transferase activity). Protein sequences were aligned and then used to select sequence-conserved residues and build phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional structure alignment was also applied to obtain structure-conserved residues. The protein dynamics were analyzed using elastic network model (ENM) and validated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The result showed that the proteins with same function could be grouped by sequence similarity, and proteins in different functional groups displayed statistically significant difference in their vibrational patterns. Interestingly, in all three functional groups, conserved amino acid residues identified by sequence and structure conservation analysis generally have a lower fluctuation than other residues. In addition, the fluctuation of conserved residues in each biological function group was strongly correlated with the corresponding biological function. This research suggested a direct connection in which the protein sequences were related to various functions through structural dynamics. This is a new attempt to delineate functional evolution of proteins using the integrated information of sequence, structure, and dynamics. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  10. Evolution of plant virus movement proteins from the 30K superfamily and of their homologs integrated in plant genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushegian, Arcady R., E-mail: mushegian2@gmail.com [Division of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States); Elena, Santiago F., E-mail: sfelena@ibmcp.upv.es [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, CSIC-UPV, 46022 València (Spain); The Santa Fe Institute, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Homologs of Tobacco mosaic virus 30K cell-to-cell movement protein are encoded by diverse plant viruses. Mechanisms of action and evolutionary origins of these proteins remain obscure. We expand the picture of conservation and evolution of the 30K proteins, producing sequence alignment of the 30K superfamily with the broadest phylogenetic coverage thus far and illuminating structural features of the core all-beta fold of these proteins. Integrated copies of pararetrovirus 30K movement genes are prevalent in euphyllophytes, with at least one copy intact in nearly every examined species, and mRNAs detected for most of them. Sequence analysis suggests repeated integrations, pseudogenizations, and positive selection in those provirus genes. An unannotated 30K-superfamily gene in Arabidopsis thaliana genome is likely expressed as a fusion with the At1g37113 transcript. This molecular background of endopararetrovirus gene products in plants may change our view of virus infection and pathogenesis, and perhaps of cellular homeostasis in the hosts. - Highlights: • Sequence region shared by plant virus “30K” movement proteins has an all-beta fold. • Most euphyllophyte genomes contain integrated copies of pararetroviruses. • These integrated virus genomes often include intact movement protein genes. • Molecular evidence suggests that these “30K” genes may be selected for function.

  11. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Dae Seok; Inoue, Shinya; Patterson, Larissa B; Gordon, Tiffany N; Slingwine, Rebecca; Kondo, Shigeru; Watanabe, Masakatsu; Parichy, David M

    2012-01-01

    The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11). We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  12. Melanophore migration and survival during zebrafish adult pigment stripe development require the immunoglobulin superfamily adhesion molecule Igsf11.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae Seok Eom

    Full Text Available The zebrafish adult pigment pattern has emerged as a useful model for understanding the development and evolution of adult form as well as pattern-forming mechanisms more generally. In this species, a series of horizontal melanophore stripes arises during the larval-to-adult transformation, but the genetic and cellular bases for stripe formation remain largely unknown. Here, we show that the seurat mutant phenotype, consisting of an irregular spotted pattern, arises from lesions in the gene encoding Immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (Igsf11. We find that Igsf11 is expressed by melanophores and their precursors, and we demonstrate by cell transplantation and genetic rescue that igsf11 functions autonomously to this lineage in promoting adult stripe development. Further analyses of cell behaviors in vitro, in vivo, and in explant cultures ex vivo demonstrate that Igsf11 mediates adhesive interactions and that mutants for igsf11 exhibit defects in both the migration and survival of melanophores and their precursors. These findings identify the first in vivo requirements for igsf11 as well as the first instance of an immunoglobulin superfamily member functioning in pigment cell development and patterning. Our results provide new insights into adult pigment pattern morphogenesis and how cellular interactions mediate pattern formation.

  13. Hydroxyurea-resistant vaccinia virus: overproduction of ribonucleotide reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slabaugh, M.B.; Mathews, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated passage of vaccinia virus in increasing concentrations of hydroxyurea followed by plaque purification resulted in the isolation of variants capable of growth in 5 mM hydroxyurea, a drug concentration which inhibited the reproduction of wild-type vaccinia virus 1000-fold. Analyses of viral protein synthesis by using [ 35 S]methionine pulse-labeling at intervals throughout the infection cycle revealed that all isolates overproduced a 34,000-molecular-weight (MW) early polypeptide. Measurement of ribonucleoside-diphosphate reductase activity after infection indicated that 4- to 10-fold more activity was induced by hydroxyurea-resistant viruses than by the wild-type virus. A two-step partial purification resulted in a substantial enrichment for the 34,000-MW protein from extracts of wild-type and hydroxyurea-resistant-virus-infected, but not mock-infected, cells. In the presence of the drug, the isolates incorporated [ 3 H]thymidine into DNA earlier and a rate substantially greater than that of the wild type, although the onset of DNA synthesis was delayed in both cases. The drug resistance trait was markedly unstable in all isolates. In the absence of selective pressure, plaque-purified isolated readily segregated progeny that displayed a wide range of resistance phenotypes. The results of this study indicate that vaccinia virus encodes a subunit of ribonucleotide reductase which is 34,000-MW early protein whose overproduction confers hydroxyurea resistance on reproducing viruses

  14. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by 31 P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase

  15. Crystallization and preliminary characterization of dihydropteridine reductase from Dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Cong; Seo, Kyung Hye; Kim, Hye Lim; Zhuang, Ningning; Park, Young Shik; Lee, Kon Ho

    2008-01-01

    The dihydropteridine reductase from D. discoideum has been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected from a rectangular-shaped crystal to 2.16 Å resolution. Dihydropteridine reductase from Dictyostelium discoideum (dicDHPR) can produce d-threo-BH 4 [6R-(1′R,2′R)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydrobiopterin], a stereoisomer of l-erythro-BH 4 , in the last step of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH 4 ) recycling. In this reaction, DHPR uses NADH as a cofactor to reduce quinonoid dihydrobiopterin back to BH 4 . To date, the enzyme has been purified to homogeneity from many sources. In this report, the dicDHPR–NAD complex has been crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 as a precipitant. Rectangular-shaped crystals were obtained. Crystals grew to maximum dimensions of 0.4 × 0.6 × 0.1 mm. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 49.81, b = 129.90, c = 78.76 Å, β = 100.00°, and contained four molecules in the asymmetric unit, forming two closely interacting dicDHPR–NAD dimers. Diffraction data were collected to 2.16 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal structure has been determined using the molecular-replacement method

  16. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from L...

  17. Bioinformatics approach of three partial polyprenol reductase genes in Kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.; Sagami, H.; Oku, H.; Baba, S.

    2018-03-01

    This present study describesthe bioinformatics approach to analyze three partial polyprenol reductase genes from mangrove plant, Kandeliaobovataas well aspredictedphysical and chemical properties, potential peptide, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The diversity was noted in the physical and chemical properties of three partial polyprenol reductase genes. The values of chloroplast were relatively high, showed that chloroplast transit peptide occurred in mangrove polyprenol reductase. The target peptide value of mitochondria varied from 0.088 to 0.198 indicated it was possible to be present. These results suggested the importance of understanding the diversity of physicochemical properties of the different amino acids in polyprenol reductase. The subcellular localization of two partial genes located in the plasma membrane. To confirm the homology among the polyprenol reductase in the database, a dendrogram was drawn. The phylogenetic tree depicts that there are three clusters, the partial genes of K. obovata joined the largest one: C23157 was close to Ricinus communis polyprenol reductase. Whereas, C23901 and C24171 were grouped with Ipomoea nil polyprenol reductase, suggested that these polyprenol reductase genes form distinct separation into tropical habitat plants.

  18. Substrate and cofactor binding to nitrile reductase : A mass spectrometry based study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gjonaj, L.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Hollmann, F.; Hanefeld, U.

    2016-01-01

    Nitrile reductases catalyse a two-step reduction of nitriles to amines. This requires the binding of two NADPH molecules during one catalytic cycle. For the nitrile reductase from E. coli (EcoNR) mass spectrometry studies of the catalytic mechanism were performed. EcoNR is dimeric and has no Rossman

  19. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent homodimeric flavoenzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) provides reducing equivalents to thioredoxin, a key regulator of various cellular redox processes. Crystal structures of photo-inactivated thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis have...

  20. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  1. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef Buczek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  2. Computation-Facilitated Assignment of Function in the Enolase Superfamily: A Regiochemically Distinct Galactarate Dehydratase from Oceanobacillus iheyensis†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakus, John F.; Kalyanaraman, Chakrapani; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Mills-Groninger, Fiona P.; Toro, Rafael; Bonanno, Jeffrey; Bain, Kevin; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Almo, Steven C.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of an uncharacterized member of the enolase superfamily from Oceanobacillus iheyensis (GI: 23100298; IMG locus tag Ob2843; PDB Code 2OQY) was determined by the New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC). The structure contained two Mg2+ ions located 10.4 Å from one another, with one located in the canonical position in the (β/α)7β-barrel domain (although the ligand at the end of the fifth β-strand is His, unprecedented in structurally characterized members of the superfamily); the second is located in a novel site within the capping domain. In silico docking of a library of mono- and diacid sugars to the active site predicted a diacid sugar as a likely substrate. Activity screening of a physical library of acid sugars identified galactarate as the substrate (kcat = 6.8 s−1, KM = 620 μM; kcat/KM = 1.1 × 104 M−1 s−1), allowing functional assignment of Ob2843 as galactarate dehydratase (GalrD-II) The structure of a complex of the catalytically impaired Y90F mutant with Mg2+ and galactarate allowed identification of a Tyr 164-Arg 162 dyad as the base that initiates the reaction by abstraction of the α-proton and Tyr 90 as the acid that facilitates departure of the β-OH leaving group. The enzyme product is 2-keto-3-deoxy-D-threo-4,5-dihydroxyadipate, the enantiomer of the product obtained in the GalrD reaction catalyzed by a previously characterized bifunctional L-talarate/galactarate dehydratase (TalrD/GalrD). On the basis of the different active site structures and different regiochemistries, we recognize that these functions represent an example of apparent, not actual, convergent evolution of function. The structure of GalrD-II and its active site architecture allow identification of the seventh functionally and structurally characterized subgroup in the enolase superfamily. This study provides an additional example that an integrated sequence/structure-based strategy employing computational approaches is a viable

  3. Computational Identification of the Paralogs and Orthologs of Human Cytochrome P450 Superfamily and the Implication in Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Ting Pan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The human cytochrome P450 (CYP superfamily consisting of 57 functional genes is the most important group of Phase I drug metabolizing enzymes that oxidize a large number of xenobiotics and endogenous compounds, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants. The CYP superfamily has been shown to expand itself through gene duplication, and some of them become pseudogenes due to gene mutations. Orthologs and paralogs are homologous genes resulting from speciation or duplication, respectively. To explore the evolutionary and functional relationships of human CYPs, we conducted this bioinformatic study to identify their corresponding paralogs, homologs, and orthologs. The functional implications and implications in drug discovery and evolutionary biology were then discussed. GeneCards and Ensembl were used to identify the paralogs of human CYPs. We have used a panel of online databases to identify the orthologs of human CYP genes: NCBI, Ensembl Compara, GeneCards, OMA (“Orthologous MAtrix” Browser, PATHER, TreeFam, EggNOG, and Roundup. The results show that each human CYP has various numbers of paralogs and orthologs using GeneCards and Ensembl. For example, the paralogs of CYP2A6 include CYP2A7, 2A13, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C18, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2F1, 2J2, 2R1, 2S1, 2U1, and 2W1; CYP11A1 has 6 paralogs including CYP11B1, 11B2, 24A1, 27A1, 27B1, and 27C1; CYP51A1 has only three paralogs: CYP26A1, 26B1, and 26C1; while CYP20A1 has no paralog. The majority of human CYPs are well conserved from plants, amphibians, fishes, or mammals to humans due to their important functions in physiology and xenobiotic disposition. The data from different approaches are also cross-validated and validated when experimental data are available. These findings facilitate our understanding of the evolutionary relationships and functional implications of the human CYP superfamily in drug discovery.

  4. The TULIP superfamily of eukaryotic lipid-binding proteins as a mediator of lipid sensing and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, Vikram; Lupas, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The tubular lipid-binding (TULIP) superfamily has emerged in recent years as a major mediator of lipid sensing and transport in eukaryotes. It currently encompasses three protein families, SMP-like, BPI-like, and Takeout-like, which share a common fold. This fold consists of a long helix wrapped in a highly curved anti-parallel β-sheet, enclosing a central, lipophilic cavity. The SMP-like proteins, which include subunits of the ERMES complex and the extended synaptotagmins (E-Syts), appear to be mainly located at membrane contacts sites (MCSs) between organelles, mediating inter-organelle lipid exchange. The BPI-like proteins, which include the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI), the LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-binding protein (LBP), the cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), and the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP), are either involved in innate immunity against bacteria through their ability to sense lipopolysaccharides, as is the case for BPI and LBP, or in lipid exchange between lipoprotein particles, as is the case for CETP and PLTP. The Takeout-like proteins, which are comprised of insect juvenile hormone-binding proteins and arthropod allergens, transport, where known, lipid hormones to target tissues during insect development. In all cases, the activity of these proteins is underpinned by their ability to bind large, hydrophobic ligands in their central cavity and segregate them away from the aqueous environment. Furthermore, where they are involved in lipid exchange, recent structural studies have highlighted their ability to establish lipophilic, tubular channels, either between organelles in the case of SMP domains or between lipoprotein particles in the case of CETP. Here, we review the current knowledge on the structure, versatile functions, and evolution of the TULIP superfamily. We propose a deep evolutionary split in this superfamily, predating the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor, between the SMP-like proteins, which act on

  5. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences....... The present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  6. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins.

  7. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  8. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba), domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus). Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis. PMID:22151413

  9. Increasing the effectiveness of hematopoiesis in myelodysplastic syndromes: erythropoiesis-stimulating agents and transforming growth factor-β superfamily inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mies, Anna; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2017-07-01

    Patients with lower-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are mainly affected by chronic anemia and fatigue. Treatment strategies aim to improve anemia and quality of life, as well as iron overload due to red blood cell transfusion support. To promote proliferation and differentiation of erythropoiesis, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) such as erythropoietin (EPO) and mimetics are applied as first-line therapy in a large fraction of lower-risk MDS patients. In general, ESAs yield favorable responses in about half of the patients, although responses are often short-lived. In fact, many ESA-refractory patients harbor defects in late-stage erythropoiesis downstream of EPO action. Novel transforming growth factor (TGF)-β superfamily inhibitors sotatercept and luspatercept represent a promising approach to alleviate anemia by stimulating erythroid differentiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Isolation and functional analysis of Thmfs1, the first major facilitator superfamily transporter from the biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mu; Liu, Jun; Wang, Wei Min

    2012-10-01

    A novel major facilitator superfamily (MFS) transporter gene, Thmfs1, was isolated from Trichoderma harzianum (T. harzianum). A Thmfs1 over-expressing mutant displayed enhanced antifungal activity and fungicide tolerance, while the Thmfs1 disruption mutant showed the opposite trend. Trichodermin production in Thmfs1 disruption group (185 mg l(-1)) was decreased by less than 17 % compared to the parental strain, suggesting that Thmfs1 is not mainly responsible for trichodermin secretion. Real-time PCR showed that Thmfs1 transcript level could be induced by a certain range of trichodermin concentrations, while expression of Tri5, encoding a trichodiene synthase, was strongly inhibited under these conditions. To our knowledge, Thmfs1 is the first MFS transporter gene identified in T. harzianum.

  11. RECEPTOR SUPERFAMILY OF TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR Α, AND HSP90 HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN: A MOLECULAR BASIS FOR INTERACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Ryazantseva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract.  A  study  was  performed  aiming  to  investigate  interactions  between  TNFα  receptor  (TNF1 superfamily and heat shock protein Hsp90, using a Jurkat tumor cell line. The tumor cells cultured in presence of Hsp90 inhibitor (17-AAG showed increased numbers of cells, presenting surface TNFR1 and FasR, which facilitate  triggering  of  programmed  cell  death.  It  was  also  revealed  that  Hsp90  blockage  under  the  in  vitro conditions causes a decrease in FasL, while not affecting TNFα and sTNFR1 production by the tumor cells. (Med. Immunol., 2011, vol. 13, N 2-3, pp 247-252 

  12. Analysis of the active site mechanism of Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I: a member of the phospholipase D superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajewski, Stefan; Comeaux, Evan Q.; Jafari, Nauzanene; Bharatham, Nagakumar; Bashford, Donald; White, Stephen W.; van Waardenburg, Robert C.A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a member of the phospholipase D superfamily and hydrolyzes 3′phospho-DNA adducts via two conserved catalytic histidines, one acting as the lead nucleophile and the second as a general acid/base. Substitution of the second histidine specifically to arginine contributes to the neurodegenerative disease SCAN1. We investigated the catalytic role of this histidine in the yeast protein (His432) using a combination of X-ray crystallography, biochemistry, yeast genetics and theoretical chemistry. The structures of wild type Tdp1 and His432Arg both show a phosphorylated form of the nucleophilic histidine that is not observed in the structure of His432Asn. The phosphohistidine is stabilized in the His432Arg structure by the guanidinium group that also restricts access of a nucleophilic water molecule to the Tdp1-DNA intermediate. Biochemical analyses confirm that His432Arg forms an observable and unique Tdp1-DNA adduct during catalysis. Substitution of His432 by Lys does not affect catalytic activity or yeast phenotype, but substitution with Asn, Gln, Leu, Ala, Ser and Thr all result in severely compromised enzymes and Top1-camptothecin dependent lethality. Surprisingly, His432Asn did not show a stable covalent Tdp1-DNA intermediate which suggests another catalytic defect. Theoretical calculations revealed that the defect resides in the nucleophilic histidine and that the pKa of this histidine is crucially dependent upon the second histidine and the incoming phosphate of the substrate. This represents a unique example of substrate-activated catalysis that applies to the entire phospholipase D superfamily. PMID:22155078

  13. A novel inhibitor of α9α10 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from Conus vexillum delineates a new conotoxin superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulan Luo

    Full Text Available Conotoxins (CTxs selectively target a range of ion channels and receptors, making them widely used tools for probing nervous system function. Conotoxins have been previously grouped into superfamilies according to signal sequence and into families based on their cysteine framework and biological target. Here we describe the cloning and characterization of a new conotoxin, from Conus vexillum, named αB-conotoxin VxXXIVA. The peptide does not belong to any previously described conotoxin superfamily and its arrangement of Cys residues is unique among conopeptides. Moreover, in contrast to previously characterized conopeptide toxins, which are expressed initially as prepropeptide precursors with a signal sequence, a ''pro'' region, and the toxin-encoding region, the precursor sequence of αB-VxXXIVA lacks a ''pro'' region. The predicted 40-residue mature peptide, which contains four Cys, was synthesized in each of the three possible disulfide arrangements. Investigation of the mechanism of action of αB-VxXXIVA revealed that the peptide is a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR antagonist with greatest potency against the α9α10 subtype. (1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectra indicated that all three αB-VxXXIVA isomers were poorly structured in aqueous solution. This was consistent with circular dichroism (CD results which showed that the peptides were unstructured in buffer, but adopted partially helical conformations in aqueous trifluoroethanol (TFE solution. The α9α10 nAChR is an important target for the development of analgesics and cancer chemotherapeutics, and αB-VxXXIVA represents a novel ligand with which to probe the structure and function of this protein.

  14. Two Major Facilitator Superfamily Sugar Transporters from Trichoderma reesei and Their Roles in Induction of Cellulase Biosynthesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weixin; Kou, Yanbo; Xu, Jintao; Cao, Yanli; Zhao, Guolei; Shao, Jing; Wang, Hai; Wang, Zhixing; Bao, Xiaoming; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2013-01-01

    Proper perception of the extracellular insoluble cellulose is key to initiating the rapid synthesis of cellulases by cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei. Uptake of soluble oligosaccharides derived from cellulose hydrolysis represents a potential point of control in the induced cascade. In this study, we identified a major facilitator superfamily sugar transporter Stp1 capable of transporting cellobiose by reconstructing a cellobiose assimilation system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The absence of Stp1 in T. reesei resulted in differential cellulolytic response to Avicel versus cellobiose. Transcriptional profiling revealed a different expression profile in the Δstp1 strain from that of wild-type strain in response to Avicel and demonstrated that Stp1 somehow repressed induction of the bulk of major cellulase and hemicellulose genes. Two other putative major facilitator superfamily sugar transporters were, however, up-regulated in the profiling. Deletion of one of them identified Crt1 that was required for growth and enzymatic activity on cellulose or lactose, but was not required for growth or hemicellulase activity on xylan. The essential role of Crt1 in cellulase induction did not seem to rely on its transporting activity because the overall uptake of cellobiose or sophorose by T. reesei was not compromised in the absence of Crt1. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologs of Crt1 exist in the genomes of many filamentous ascomycete fungi capable of degrading cellulose. These data thus shed new light on the mechanism by which T. reesei senses and transmits the cellulose signal and offers potential strategies for strain improvement. PMID:24085297

  15. Genetic polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily and arsenic metabolism in residents of the Red River Delta, Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusa, Tetsuro; Iwata, Hisato; Fujihara, Junko; Kunito, Takashi; Takeshita, Haruo; Tu Binh Minh; Pham Thi Kim Trang; Pham Hung Viet; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate the role of genetic factors in arsenic metabolism, we investigated associations of genetic polymorphisms in the members of glutathione S-transferase (GST) superfamily with the arsenic concentrations in hair and urine, and urinary arsenic profile in residents in the Red River Delta, Vietnam. Genotyping was conducted for GST ω1 (GSTO1) Ala140Asp, Glu155del, Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val, GST ω2 (GSTO2) Asn142Asp, GST π1 (GSTP1) Ile105Val, GST μ1 (GSTM1) wild/null, and GST θ1 (GSTT1) wild/null. There were no mutation alleles for GSTO1 Glu208Lys, Thr217Asn, and Ala236Val in this population. GSTO1 Glu155del hetero type showed higher urinary concentration of As V than the wild homo type. Higher percentage of DMA V in urine of GSTM1 wild type was observed compared with that of the null type. Strong correlations between GSTP1 Ile105Val and arsenic exposure level and profile were observed in this study. Especially, heterozygote of GSTP1 Ile105Val had a higher metabolic capacity from inorganic arsenic to monomethyl arsenic, while the opposite trend was observed for ability of metabolism from As V to As III . Furthermore, other factors including sex, age, body mass index, arsenic level in drinking water, and genotypes of As (+ 3 oxidation state) methyltransferase (AS3MT) were also significantly co-associated with arsenic level and profile in the Vietnamese. To our knowledge, this is the first study indicating the associations of genetic factors of GST superfamily with arsenic metabolism in a Vietnamese population.

  16. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the B3 superfamily of transcription factors in Brassicaceae and major crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fred Y; Weselake, Randall J

    2013-05-01

    The plant-specific B3 superfamily of transcription factors has diverse functions in plant growth and development. Using a genome-wide domain analysis, we identified 92, 187, 58, 90, 81, 55, and 77 B3 transcription factor genes in the sequenced genome of Arabidopsis, Brassica rapa, castor bean (Ricinus communis), cocoa (Theobroma cacao), soybean (Glycine max), maize (Zea mays), and rice (Oryza sativa), respectively. The B3 superfamily has substantially expanded during the evolution in eudicots particularly in Brassicaceae, as compared to monocots in the analysis. We observed domain duplication in some of these B3 proteins, forming more complex domain architectures than currently understood. We found that the length of B3 domains exhibits a large variation, which may affect their exact number of α-helices and β-sheets in the core structure of B3 domains, and possibly have functional implications. Analysis of the public microarray data indicated that most of the B3 gene pairs encoding Arabidopsis-rice orthologs are preferentially expressed in different tissues, suggesting their different roles in these two species. Using ESTs in crops, we identified many B3 genes preferentially expressed in reproductive tissues. In a sequence-based quantitative trait loci analysis in rice and maize, we have found many B3 genes associated with traits such as grain yield, seed weight and number, and protein content. Our results provide a framework for future studies into the function of B3 genes in different phases of plant development, especially the ones related to traits in major crops.

  17. Dietary sources of aldose reductase inhibitors: prospects for alleviating diabetic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Megha; Muthenna, P; Suryanarayana, P; Petrash, J Mark; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2008-01-01

    Activation of polyol pathway due to increased aldose reductase activity is one of the several mechanisms that have been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Though numerous synthetic aldose reductase inhibitors have been tested, these have not been very successful clinically. Therefore, a number of common plant/ natural products used in Indian culinary have been evaluated for their aldose reductase inhibitory potential in the present study. The aqueous extracts of 22 plant-derived materials were prepared and evaluated for the inhibitory property against rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Specificity of these extracts towards aldose reductase was established by testing their ability to inhibit a closely related enzyme viz, aldehyde reductase. The ex vivo incubation of erythrocytes in high glucose containing medium was used to underscore the significance in terms of prevention of intracellular sorbitol accumulation. Among the 22 dietary sources tested, 10 showed considerable inhibitory potential against both rat lens and human recombinant aldose reductase. Prominent inhibitory property was found in spinach, cumin, fennel, lemon, basil and black pepper with an approximate IC50 of 0.2 mg/mL with an excellent selectivity towards aldose reductase. As against this, 10 to 20 times higher concentrations were required for 50% inhibition of aldehyde reductase. Reduction in the accumulation of intracellular sorbitol by the dietary extracts further substantiated their in vivo efficacy. The findings reported here indicate the scope of adapting life-style modifications in the form of inclusion of certain common sources in the diet for the management of diabetic complications.

  18. Genetic polymorphisms of tumour necrosis factor receptor superfamily 1b and fas ligand are associated with clinical efficacy and/or acute severe infusion reactions to infliximab in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, C; Enevold, C; Ainsworth, M A

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) 1A and 1B, and Fas ligand (FASLG) genes, have been associated with responsiveness to infliximab (IFX) in Crohn's disease.......Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TNF receptor superfamily (TNFRSF) 1A and 1B, and Fas ligand (FASLG) genes, have been associated with responsiveness to infliximab (IFX) in Crohn's disease....

  19. Characterization of human short chain dehydrogenase/reductase SDR16C family members related to retinol dehydrogenase 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Mark K; Lee, Seung-Ah; Belyaeva, Olga V; Wu, Lizhi; Kedishvili, Natalia Y

    2017-10-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a bioactive derivative of vitamin A that serves as an activating ligand for nuclear transcription factors, retinoic acid receptors. RA biosynthesis is initiated by the enzymes that oxidize retinol to retinaldehyde. It is well established that retinol dehydrogenase 10 (RDH10, SDR16C4), which belongs to the 16C family of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily of proteins, is the major enzyme responsible for the oxidation of retinol to retinaldehyde for RA biosynthesis during embryogenesis. However, several lines of evidence point towards the existence of additional retinol dehydrogenases that contribute to RA biosynthesis in vivo. In close proximity to RDH10 gene on human chromosome 8 are located two genes that are phylogenetically related to RDH10. The predicted protein products of these genes, retinol dehydrogenase epidermal 2 (RDHE2, SDR16C5) and retinol dehydrogenase epidermal 2-similar (RDHE2S, SDR16C6), share 59% and 56% sequence similarity with RDH10, respectively. Previously, we showed that the single ortholog of the human RDHE2 and RDHE2S in frogs, Xenopus laevis rdhe2, oxidizes retinol to retinaldehyde and is essential for frog embryonic development. In this study, we explored the potential of each of the two human proteins to contribute to RA biosynthesis. The results of this study demonstrate that human RDHE2 exhibits a relatively low but reproducible activity when expressed in either HepG2 or HEK293 cells. Expression of the native RDHE2 is downregulated in the presence of elevated levels of RA. On the other hand, the protein encoded by the human RDHE2S gene is unstable when expressed in HEK293 cells. RDHE2S protein produced in Sf9 cells is stable but has no detectable catalytic activity towards retinol. We conclude that the human RDHE2S does not contribute to RA biosynthesis, whereas the low-activity RA-sensitive human RDHE2 may have a role in adjusting the cellular levels of RA in accord with

  20. Molecular identification and functional delineation of a glutathione reductase homolog from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): Insights as a potent player in host antioxidant defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M L P B; Wickramasinghe, P D S U; Bathige, S D N K; Jayasooriya, R G P T; Kim, Gi-Young; Park, Myoung Ae; Kim, Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2017-01-01

    Glutathione reductase (GSR) is an enzyme that catalyzes the biochemical conversion of oxidized glutathione (GSSG) into the reduced form (GSH). Since the ratio between the two forms of glutathione (GSH/GSSG) is important for the optimal function of GSH to act as an antioxidant against H 2 O 2 , the contribution of GSR as an enzymatic regulatory agent to maintain the proper ratio is essential. Abalones are marine mollusks that frequently encounter environmental factors that can trigger the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H 2 O 2 . Therefore, we conducted the current study to reveal the molecular and functional properties of a GSR homolog in the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus. The identified cDNA sequence (2325 bp) has a 1356 bp long open reading frame (ORF), coding for a 909 bp long amino acid sequence, which harbors a pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase domain (171-246 aa), a pyridine nucleotide-disulfide oxidoreductase dimerization domain, and a NAD(P)(+)-binding Rossmann fold superfamily signature domain. Four functional residues: the FAD binding site, glutathione binding site, NADPH binding motif, and assembly domain were identified to be conserved among the other species. The recombinant abalone GSR (rAbGSR) exhibited detectable activity in a standard glutathione reductase activity assay. The optimum pH and optimal temperature for the reaction were found to be 7.0 and 50 °C, respectively, while the ionic strength of the medium had no effect. The enzymatic reaction was vastly inhibited by Cu +2 and Cd +2 ions. A considerable effect of cellular protection was detected with a disk diffusion assay conducted with rAbGSR. Moreover, an MTT assay and flow cytometry confirmed the significance of the protective role of rAbGSR in cell function. Furthermore, AbGSR was found to be ubiquitously distributed in different types of abalone tissues. AbGSR mRNA expression was significantly upregulated in response to three immune challenges

  1. The role of Cercospora zeae-maydis homologs of Rhodobacter sphaeroides 1O2-resistance genes in resistance to the photoactivated toxin cercosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beseli, Aydin; Goulart da Silva, Marilia; Daub, Margaret E

    2015-01-01

    The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides and plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora nicotianae have been used as models for understanding resistance to singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)), a highly toxic reactive oxygen species. In Rhodobacter and Cercospora, (1)O(2) is derived, respectively, from photosynthesis and from the (1)O(2)-generating toxin cercosporin which the fungus produces to parasitize plants. We identified common genes recovered in transcriptome studies of putative (1)O(2)-resistance genes in these two systems, suggesting common (1)O(2)-resistance mechanisms. To determine if the Cercospora homologs of R. sphaeroides (1)O(2)-resistance genes are involved in resistance to cercosporin, we expressed the genes in the cercosporin-sensitive fungus Neurospora crassa and assayed for increases in cercosporin resistance. Neurospora crassa transformants expressing genes encoding aldo/keto reductase, succinyl-CoA ligase, O-acetylhomoserine (thiol) lyase, peptide methionine sulphoxide reductase and glutathione S-transferase did not have elevated levels of cercosporin resistance. Several transformants expressing aldehyde dehydrogenase were significantly more resistant to cercosporin. Expression of the transgene and enzyme activity did not correlate with resistance, however. We conclude that although the genes tested in this study are important in (1)O(2) resistance in R. sphaeroides, their Cercospora homologs are not involved in resistance to (1)O(2) generated from cercosporin. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Biotransformation and bioactivation reactions - 2015 literature highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillie, Thomas A; Dalvie, Deepak; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Cyrus Khojasteh, S

    2016-05-01

    Since 1972, Drug Metabolism Reviews has been recognized as one of the principal resources for researchers in pharmacological, pharmaceutical and toxicological fields to keep abreast of advances in drug metabolism science in academia and the pharmaceutical industry. With a distinguished list of authors and editors, the journal covers topics ranging from relatively mature fields, such as cytochrome P450 enzymes, to a variety of emerging fields. We hope to continue this tradition with the current compendium of mini-reviews that highlight novel biotransformation processes that were published during the past year. Each review begins with a summary of the article followed by our comments on novel aspects of the research and their biological implications. This collection of highlights is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather to be illustrative of recent research that provides new insights or approaches that advance the field of drug metabolism. Abbreviations NAPQI N-acetyl-p-benzoquinoneimine ALDH aldehyde dehydrogenase AO aldehyde oxidase AKR aldo-keto reductase CES carboxylesterase CSB cystathionine β-synthase CSE cystathionine γ-lyase P450 cytochrome P450 DHPO 2,3-dihydropyridin-4-one ESI electrospray FMO flavin monooxygenase GSH glutathione GSSG glutathione disulfide ICPMS inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry i.p. intraperitoneal MDR multidrug-resistant NNAL 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanol NNK 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone oaTOF orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight PBK physiologically based kinetic PCP pentachlorophenol SDR short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase SULT sulfotransferase TB tuberculosis.

  3. Genes and proteins of the alternative steroid backdoor pathway for dihydrotestosterone synthesis are expressed in the human ovary and seem enhanced in the polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marti, Nesa; Galván, José A; Pandey, Amit V; Trippel, Mafalda; Tapia, Coya; Müller, Michel; Perren, Aurel; Flück, Christa E

    2017-02-05

    Recently, dihydrotestosterone biosynthesis through the backdoor pathway has been implicated for the human testis in addition to the classic pathway for testosterone (T) synthesis. In the human ovary, androgen precursors are crucial for estrogen synthesis and hyperandrogenism in pathologies such as the polycystic ovary syndrome is partially due to ovarian overproduction. However, a role for the backdoor pathway is only established for the testis and the adrenal, but not for the human ovary. To investigate whether the backdoor pathway exists in normal and PCOS ovaries, we performed specific gene and protein expression studies on ovarian tissues. We found aldo-keto reductases (AKR1C1-1C4), 5α-reductases (SRD5A1/2) and retinol dehydrogenase (RoDH) expressed in the human ovary, indicating that the ovary might produce dihydrotestosterone via the backdoor pathway. Immunohistochemical studies showed specific localization of these proteins to the theca cells. PCOS ovaries show enhanced expression, what may account for the hyperandrogenism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioinformatics analysis of the predicted polyprenol reductase genes in higher plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Wati, R.

    2018-03-01

    The present study evaluates the bioinformatics methods to analyze twenty-four predicted polyprenol reductase genes from higher plants on GenBank as well as predicted the structure, composition, similarity, subcellular localization, and phylogenetic. The physicochemical properties of plant polyprenol showed diversity among the observed genes. The percentage of the secondary structure of plant polyprenol genes followed the ratio order of α helix > random coil > extended chain structure. The values of chloroplast but not signal peptide were too low, indicated that few chloroplast transit peptide in plant polyprenol reductase genes. The possibility of the potential transit peptide showed variation among the plant polyprenol reductase, suggested the importance of understanding the variety of peptide components of plant polyprenol genes. To clarify this finding, a phylogenetic tree was drawn. The phylogenetic tree shows several branches in the tree, suggested that plant polyprenol reductase genes grouped into divergent clusters in the tree.

  5. Survival and Psychomotor Development With Early Betaine Treatment in Patients With Severe Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, Eugene F.; de Koning, Tom J.; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M.; Rovers, Maroeska M.; van Hasselt, Peter M.

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  6. Survival and psychomotor development with early betaine treatment in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diekman, E.F.; Koning, T.J. de; Verhoeven-Duif, N.M.; Rovers, M.M.; Hasselt, P.M. van

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The impact of betaine treatment on outcome in patients with severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is presently unclear. OBJECTIVE To investigate the effect of betaine treatment on development and survival in patients with severe MTHFR deficiency. DATA SOURCES

  7. A case of severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency presenting as neonatal encephalopathy, seizures, microcephaly and central hypoventilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniam, S.; Salomons, G.S.; Blom, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) is a key regulatory enzyme in the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine. S-adenosylmethionine, formed from methionine and adenosine triphosphate, is the methyl donor in crucial reactions for brain development and function. MTHFR deficiency is the

  8. The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-butenyl 4-diphosphate reductase gene from Taxus media: Cloning, characterization and functional identification. Y Sun, M Chen, J Tang, W Liu, C Yang, Y Yang, X Lan, M Hsieh, Z Liao ...

  9. Genome sequence analysis of predicted polyprenol reductase gene from mangrove plant kandelia obovata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basyuni, M.; Sagami, H.; Baba, S.; Oku, H.

    2018-03-01

    It has been previously reported that dolichols but not polyprenols were predominated in mangrove leaves and roots. Therefore, the occurrence of larger amounts of dolichol in leaves of mangrove plants implies that polyprenol reductase is responsible for the conversion of polyprenol to dolichol may be active in mangrove leaves. Here we report the early assessment of probably polyprenol reductase gene from genome sequence of mangrove plant Kandelia obovata. The functional assignment of the gene was based on a homology search of the sequences against the non-redundant (nr) peptide database of NCBI using Blastx. The degree of sequence identity between DNA sequence and known polyprenol reductase was confirmed using the Blastx probability E-value, total score, and identity. The genome sequence data resulted in three partial sequences, termed c23157 (700 bp), c23901 (960 bp), and c24171 (531 bp). The c23157 gene showed the highest similarity (61%) to predicted polyprenol reductase 2- like from Gossypium raimondii with E-value 2e-100. The second gene was c23901 to exhibit high similarity (78%) to the steroid 5-alpha-reductase Det2 from J. curcas with E-value 2e-140. Furthermore, the c24171 gene depicted highest similarity (79%) to the polyprenol reductase 2 isoform X1 from Jatropha curcas with E- value 7e-21.The present study suggested that the c23157, c23901, and c24171, genes may encode predicted polyprenol reductase. The c23157, c23901, c24171 are therefore the new type of predicted polyprenol reductase from K. obovata.

  10. X-Ray crystal structure of GarR—tartronate semialdehyde reductase from Salmonella typhimurium

    OpenAIRE

    Osipiuk, J.; Zhou, M.; Moy, S.; Collart, F.; Joachimiak, A.

    2009-01-01

    Tartronate semialdehyde reductases (TSRs), also known as 2-hydroxy-3-oxopropionate reductases, catalyze the reduction of tartronate semialdehyde using NAD as cofactor in the final stage of D-glycerate biosynthesis. These enzymes belong to family of structurally and mechanically related β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases which differ in substrate specificity and catalyze reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Here, we present the crystal structure of GarR a TSR from Salmonella typhimurium determi...

  11. Nitrate reductase activity and its relationship with applied nitrogen in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge Wenting; Jin Xijun; Ma Chunmei; Dong Shoukun; Gong Zhenping; Zhang Lei

    2011-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted to study the nitrate reductase activity and its relationship to nitrogen by using frame tests (pot without bottom), sand culture and 15 N-urea at transplanting in soybean variety Suinong 14. Results showed that the activity of nitrate reductase in leaf changed as a signal peak curve with the soybean growth, lower in vegetative growth phase, higher in reproductive growth period and reached the peak in blooming period, then decreased gradually. Nitrogen application showed obvious effect on the nitrate reductase activity. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves followed the order of N 135 > N 90 > N 45 > N 0 in vegetative growth stage, no clear regularity was found during the whole reproductive growth period. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves were accorded with the order of upper leaves > mid leaves > lower leaves, and it was very significant differences (P 15 N labeling method during beginning seed stage and full seed stage shown that 15 N abundance in various organs at different node position also followed the same order, suggesting that high level of nitrate reductase activity at upper leaves of soybean promoted the assimilation of NO 3 - . (authors)

  12. Increased 5α-reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5α-reductase activity (5α-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5α-RA. In vitro 5α-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with 14 C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5α-androstane 3α-17β-estradiol (3α-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3α-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3α-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5α-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5α-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5α-RA

  13. Role of Helicobacter pylori methionine sulfoxide reductase in urease maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhns, Lisa G.; Mahawar, Manish; Sharp, Joshua S.; Benoit, Stéphane; Maier, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The persistence of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is due in part to urease and Msr (methionine sulfoxide reductase). Upon exposure to relatively mild (21% partial pressure of O2) oxidative stress, a Δmsr mutant showed both decreased urease specific activity in cell-free extracts and decreased nickel associated with the partially purified urease fraction as compared with the parent strain, yet urease apoprotein levels were the same for the Δmsr and wild-type extracts. Urease activity of the Δmsr mutant was not significantly different from the wild-type upon non-stress microaerobic incubation of strains. Urease maturation occurs through nickel mobilization via a suite of known accessory proteins, one being the GTPase UreG. Treatment of UreG with H2O2 resulted in oxidation of MS-identified methionine residues and loss of up to 70% of its GTPase activity. Incubation of pure H2O2-treated UreG with Msr led to reductive repair of nine methionine residues and recovery of up to full enzyme activity. Binding of Msr to both oxidized and non-oxidized UreG was observed by cross-linking. Therefore we conclude Msr aids the survival of H. pylori in part by ensuring continual UreG-mediated urease maturation under stress conditions. PMID:23181726

  14. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Kabbany, H.M.

    2012-01-01

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  15. Inhibition of aldose reductase by Gentiana lutea extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akileshwari, Chandrasekhar; Muthenna, Puppala; Nastasijević, Branislav; Joksić, Gordana; Petrash, J Mark; Reddy, Geereddy Bhanuprakash

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2) activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  16. Expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes in Petunia hybrida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Y X; Chen, H R; Wu, A Z; Cai, R; Pan, J S

    2015-05-12

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) genes from Rosa chinensis (Asn type) and Calibrachoa hybrida (Asp type), driven by a CaMV 35S promoter, were integrated into the petunia (Petunia hybrida) cultivar 9702. Exogenous DFR gene expression characteristics were similar to flower-color changes, and effects on anthocyanin concentration were observed in both types of DFR gene transformants. Expression analysis showed that exogenous DFR genes were expressed in all of the tissues, but the expression levels were significantly different. However, both of them exhibited a high expression level in petals that were starting to open. The introgression of DFR genes may significantly change DFR enzyme activity. Anthocyanin ultra-performance liquid chromatography results showed that anthocyanin concentrations changed according to DFR enzyme activity. Therefore, the change in flower color was probably the result of a DFR enzyme change. Pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside was found in two different transgenic petunias, indicating that both CaDFR and RoDFR could catalyze dihydrokaempferol. Our results also suggest that transgenic petunias with DFR gene of Asp type could biosynthesize pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside.

  17. 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors and prostatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, F H

    1994-08-01

    5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors are a new class of substances with very specific effects on type I and type II 5 alpha R which may be of use in the treatment of skin disease, such as male pattern baldness, male acne and hirsutism, as well as prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. At least two types of 5 alpha R inhibitors with a different pH optimum have been described. cDNA encoding for both the type I and the type II enzyme has been cloned. Most of the orally effective 5 alpha R inhibitors belong to the class of 4-azasteroids. The radical substituted in the 17 position of the steroid ring seems to be related to species specific variations and to the types of 5 alpha R enzymes in different species and organ systems. 5 alpha R inhibitors lead to a decrease of plasma DHT by about 65% while there is a slight rise in plasma testosterone. The decrease of tissue DHT in the ventral prostate of the intact rat, the dog and in humans is more pronounced and amounts to about 85%. There is a reciprocal rise of tissue T in these systems. The application of an inhibitor of 5 alpha R type II leads to a shrinkage of BPH in men by about 30%. In the rat a similar shrinkage accompanied by a significant decrease of total organ DNA occurs. This decrease, however, is not as pronounced as can be achieved with castration.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Direct electrochemistry of nitrate reductase from the fungus Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalimuthu, Palraj; Ringel, Phillip; Kruse, Tobias; Bernhardt, Paul V

    2016-09-01

    We report the first direct (unmediated) catalytic electrochemistry of a eukaryotic nitrate reductase (NR). NR from the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, is a member of the mononuclear molybdenum enzyme family and contains a Mo, heme and FAD cofactor which are involved in electron transfer from NAD(P)H to the (Mo) active site where reduction of nitrate to nitrite takes place. NR was adsorbed on an edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPG) working electrode. Non-turnover redox responses were observed in the absence of nitrate from holo NR and three variants lacking the FAD, heme or Mo cofactor. The FAD response is due to dissociated cofactor in all cases. In the presence of nitrate, NR shows a pronounced cathodic catalytic wave with an apparent Michaelis constant (KM) of 39μM (pH7). The catalytic cathodic current increases with temperature from 5 to 35°C and an activation enthalpy of 26kJmol(-1) was determined. In spite of dissociation of the FAD cofactor, catalytically activity is maintained. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Inhibition of Aldose Reductase by Gentiana lutea Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Akileshwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of intracellular sorbitol due to increased aldose reductase (ALR2 activity has been implicated in the development of various secondary complications of diabetes. Thus, ALR2 inhibition could be an effective strategy in the prevention or delay of certain diabetic complications. Gentiana lutea grows naturally in the central and southern areas of Europe. Its roots are commonly consumed as a beverage in some European countries and are also known to have medicinal properties. The water, ethanol, methanol, and ether extracts of the roots of G. lutea were subjected to in vitro bioassay to evaluate their inhibitory activity on the ALR2. While the ether and methanol extracts showed greater inhibitory activities against both rat lens and human ALR2, the water and ethanol extracts showed moderate inhibitory activities. Moreover, the ether and methanol extracts of G. lutea roots significantly and dose-dependently inhibited sorbitol accumulation in human erythrocytes under high glucose conditions. Molecular docking studies with the constituents commonly present in the roots of G. lutea indicate that a secoiridoid glycoside, amarogentin, may be a potential inhibitor of ALR2. This is the first paper that shows G. lutea extracts exhibit inhibitory activity towards ALR2 and these results suggest that Gentiana or its constituents might be useful to prevent or treat diabetic complications.

  20. CACTA-superfamily transposable element is inserted in MYB transcription factor gene of soybean line producing variegated seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fan; Di, Shaokang; Takahashi, Ryoji

    2015-08-01

    The R gene of soybean, presumably encoding a MYB transcription factor, controls seed coat color. The gene consists of multiple alleles, R (black), r-m (black spots and (or) concentric streaks on brown seed), and r (brown seed). This study was conducted to determine the structure of the MYB transcription factor gene in a near-isogenic line (NIL) having r-m allele. PCR amplification of a fragment of the candidate gene Glyma.09G235100 generated a fragment of about 1 kb in the soybean cultivar Clark, whereas a fragment of about 14 kb in addition to fragments of 1 and 1.4 kb were produced in L72-2040, a Clark 63 NIL with the r-m allele. Clark 63 is a NIL of Clark with the rxp and Rps1 alleles. A DNA fragment of 13 060 bp was inserted in the intron of Glyma.09G235100 in L72-2040. The fragment had the CACTA motif at both ends, imperfect terminal inverted repeats (TIR), inverse repetition of short sequence motifs close to the 5' and 3' ends, and a duplication of three nucleotides at the site of integration, indicating that it belongs to a CACTA-superfamily transposable element. We designated the element as Tgm11. Overall nucleotide sequence, motifs of TIR, and subterminal repeats were similar to those of Tgm1 and Tgs1, suggesting that these elements comprise a family.

  1. A super-family of transcriptional activators regulates bacteriophage packaging and lysis in Gram-positive bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Tormo-Más, María Ángeles; Campoy, Susana; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Monedero, Vicente; Lasa, Íñigo; Novick, Richard P.; Christie, Gail E.; Penadés, José R.

    2013-01-01

    The propagation of bacteriophages and other mobile genetic elements requires exploitation of the phage mechanisms involved in virion assembly and DNA packaging. Here, we identified and characterized four different families of phage-encoded proteins that function as activators required for transcription of the late operons (morphogenetic and lysis genes) in a large group of phages infecting Gram-positive bacteria. These regulators constitute a super-family of proteins, here named late transcriptional regulators (Ltr), which share common structural, biochemical and functional characteristics and are unique to this group of phages. They are all small basic proteins, encoded by genes present at the end of the early gene cluster in their respective phage genomes and expressed under cI repressor control. To control expression of the late operon, the Ltr proteins bind to a DNA repeat region situated upstream of the terS gene, activating its transcription. This involves the C-terminal part of the Ltr proteins, which control specificity for the DNA repeat region. Finally, we show that the Ltr proteins are the only phage-encoded proteins required for the activation of the packaging and lysis modules. In summary, we provide evidence that phage packaging and lysis is a conserved mechanism in Siphoviridae infecting a wide variety of Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:23771138

  2. GH97 is a new family of glycoside hydrolases, which is related to the α-galactosidase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naumoff Daniil G

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a rule, about 1% of genes in a given genome encode glycoside hydrolases and their homologues. On the basis of sequence similarity they have been grouped into more than ninety GH families during the last 15 years. The GH97 family has been established very recently and initially included only 18 bacterial proteins. However, the evolutionary relationship of the genes encoding proteins of this family remains unclear, as well as their distribution among main groups of the living organisms. Results The extensive search of the current databases allowed us to double the number of GH97 family proteins. Five subfamilies were distinguished on the basis of pairwise sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis. Iterative sequence analysis revealed the relationship of the GH97 family with the GH27, GH31, and GH36 families of glycosidases, which belong to the α-galactosidase superfamily, as well as a more distant relationship with some other glycosidase families (GH13 and GH20. Conclusion The results of this study show an unexpected sequence similarity of GH97 family proteins with glycoside hydrolases from several other families, that have (β/α8-barrel fold of the catalytic domain and a retaining mechanism of the glycoside bond hydrolysis. These data suggest a common evolutionary origin of glycosidases representing different families and clans.

  3. Superfamily of genes encoding G protein-coupled receptors in the diamondback moth Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S-F; Yu, H-Y; Jiang, T-T; Gao, C-F; Shen, J-L

    2015-08-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest and most versatile superfamily of cell membrane proteins, which mediate various physiological processes including reproduction, development and behaviour. The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (Lepidoptera: Plutellidae), is one of the most notorious insect pests, preferentially feeding on cruciferous plants. P. xylostella is not only one of the world's most widespread lepidopteran insects, but has also developed resistance to nearly all classes of insecticides. Although the mechanisms of insecticide resistance have been studied extensively in many insect species, few investigations have been carried out on GPCRs in P. xylostella. In the present study, we identified 95 putative GPCRs in the P. xylostella genome. The identified GPCRs were compared with their homologues in Bombyx mori and Drosophila melanogaster. Our results suggest that GPCRs in different insect species may have evolved by a birth-and-death process. One of the differences among compared insects is the duplication of short neuropeptide F receptor and adipokinetic hormone receptors in P. xylostella and B. mori. Another divergence is the decrease in quantity and diversity of the stress-tolerance gene, Mth, in P. xylostella. The evolution by the birth-and-death process is probably involved in adaptation to the feeding behaviour, reproduction and stress responses of P. xylostella. Some of the genes identified in the present study could be potential targets for the development of novel pesticides. © 2015 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. Extracellular Ribonuclease from Bacillus licheniformis (Balifase, a New Member of the N1/T1 RNase Superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Sokurenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The N1/T1 RNase superfamily comprises enzymes with well-established antitumor effects, such as ribotoxins secreted by fungi, primarily by Aspergillus and Penicillium species, and bacterial RNase secreted by B. pumilus (binase and B. amyloliquefaciens (barnase. RNase is regarded as an alternative to classical chemotherapeutic agents due to its selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells. New RNase with a high degree of structural similarity with binase (73% and barnase (74% was isolated and purified from Bacillus licheniformis (balifase, calculated molecular weight 12421.9 Da, pI 8.91. The protein sample with enzymatic activity of 1.5 × 106 units/A280 was obtained. The physicochemical properties of balifase are similar to those of barnase. However, in terms of its gene organization and promoter activity, balifase is closer to binase. The unique feature of balifase gene organization consists in the fact that genes of RNase and its inhibitor are located in one operon. Similarly to biosynthesis of binase, balifase synthesis is induced under phosphate starvation; however, in contrast to binase, balifase does not form dimers under natural conditions. We propose that the highest stability of balifase among analyzed RNase types allows the protein to retain its structure without oligomerization.

  5. A Novel Superfamily of Transporters for Allantoin and Other Oxo Derivatives of Nitrogen Heterocyclic Compounds in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desimone, Marcelo; Catoni, Elisabetta; Ludewig, Uwe; Hilpert, Melanie; Schneider, Anja; Kunze, Reinhard; Tegeder, Mechthild; Frommer, Wolf Bernd; Schumacher, Karin

    2002-01-01

    A wide spectrum of soil heterocyclic nitrogen compounds are potential nutrients for plants. Here, it is shown that Arabidopsis plants are able to use allantoin as sole nitrogen source. By functional complementation of a yeast mutant defective in allantoin uptake, an Arabidopsis transporter, AtUPS1 (Arabidopsis thaliana ureide permease 1), was identified. AtUPS1 belongs to a novel superfamily of plant membrane proteins with five open reading frames in Arabidopsis (identity, 64 to 82%). UPS proteins have 10 putative transmembrane domains with a large cytosolic central domain containing a “Walker A” motif. Transport of 14C-labeled allantoin by AtUPS1 in yeast exhibited saturation kinetics (Km ∼ 52 μM), was dependent on Glc and a proton gradient, and was stimulated by acidic pH. AtUPS1 transports uric acid and xanthine, besides allantoin, but not adenine. Protons are cosubstrates in allantoin transport by AtUPS1, as demonstrated by expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In plants, AtUPS1 gene expression was dependent on the nitrogen source. Therefore, AtUPS1 presumably is involved in the uptake of allantoin and other purine degradation products when primary sources are limiting. PMID:11971139

  6. The FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene codes for a novel member of the non-heme dioxygenase superfamily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade-Navarro Miguel A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic variants in the FTO (fat mass and obesity associated gene have been associated with an increased risk of obesity. However, the function of its protein product has not been experimentally studied and previously reported sequence similarity analyses suggested the absence of homologs in existing protein databases. Here, we present the first detailed computational analysis of the sequence and predicted structure of the protein encoded by FTO. Results We performed a sequence similarity search using the human FTO protein as query and then generated a profile using the multiple sequence alignment of the homologous sequences. Profile-to-sequence and profile-to-profile based comparisons identified remote homologs of the non-heme dioxygenase family. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that human FTO is a member of the non-heme dioxygenase (Fe(II- and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases superfamily. Amino acid conservation patterns support this hypothesis and indicate that both 2-oxoglutarate and iron should be important for FTO function. This computational prediction of the function of FTO should suggest further steps for its experimental characterization and help to formulate hypothesis about the mechanisms by which it relates to obesity in humans.

  7. Exploring the role of cellular homologous of the 30K-superfamily of plant virus movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, José L; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A; Elena, Santiago F

    2018-02-21

    Genes orthologous to the 30K-superfamily of movement proteins (MP) from plant viruses have been recently discovered by bioinformatics analyses as integrated elements in the genome of most vascular plants. However, their functional relevance for plants is still unclear. Here, we undertake some preliminary steps into the functional characterization of one of these putative MP genes found in Arabidopsis thaliana. We found that the AtMP gene is expressed at different stages of the plant development, with accumulation being highest in flowers but lowest in mature siliques. We also found down-regulation of the gene may result in a small delay in plant development and in an exacerbation of the negative effect of salinity in germination efficiency. We have also explored whether changes in expression of the endogenous AtMP have any effect on susceptibility to infection with several viruses, and found that the infectivity of tobacco rattle tobravirus was strongly dependent on the expression of the endogenous AtMP. Finally, we have cloned the endogenous MP from four different plant species into an expression vector that allows for specifically assessing their activity as cell-to-cell movement proteins and have shown that though some may still retain the ancestral activity, they do so in a quite inefficient manner, thus suggesting they have acquired a novel function during adaptation to the host genome. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Role of a new member of IGFBP superfamily, IGFBP-rP10, in proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Yasuaki; Tsukazaki, Tomoo; Hirata, Kazunari; Xin Cheng; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2004-01-01

    Bone regeneration is critically regulated by various molecules. To identify the new genes involved in bone regeneration, we performed microarray-based gene expression analysis using a mouse bone regeneration model. We identified a new member of the IGFBP superfamily, designated IGFBP-rP10, whose expression is up-regulated at the early phase of bone regeneration. IGFBP-rP10 consists of an IGFBP homologous domain followed by a Kazal-type protein inhibitor domain and an immunoglobulin G-like domain. A real-time-based RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that various tissues including bone expressed IGFBP-rP10 mRNA in various degrees, and confirmed an up-regulation at the early phase of bone regeneration. In situ hybridization revealed that osteoblastic cells expressed IGFPB-rP10 mRNA during bone regeneration. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 increased the expression level of IGFBP-rP10 mRNA in various cells including C3H10T1/2, MC3T3-E1, C2C12, and primary murine osteoblastic cells. The addition of recombinant mouse IGFBP-rP10 promoted the proliferation of these cells but failed to stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity. These results suggest that IGFBP-rP10 is involved in the proliferation of osteoblasts during bone formation and bone regeneration

  9. New insights into potential functions for the protein 4.1superfamily of proteins in kidney epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calinisan, Venice; Gravem, Dana; Chen, Ray Ping-Hsu; Brittin,Sachi; Mohandas, Narla; Lecomte, Marie-Christine; Gascard, Philippe

    2005-06-17

    Members of the protein 4.1 family of adapter proteins are expressed in a broad panel of tissues including various epithelia where they likely play an important role in maintenance of cell architecture and polarity and in control of cell proliferation. We have recently characterized the structure and distribution of three members of the protein 4.1 family, 4.1B, 4.1R and 4.1N, in mouse kidney. We describe here binding partners for renal 4.1 proteins, identified through the screening of a rat kidney yeast two-hybrid system cDNA library. The identification of putative protein 4.1-based complexes enables us to envision potential functions for 4.1 proteins in kidney: organization of signaling complexes, response to osmotic stress, protein trafficking, and control of cell proliferation. We discuss the relevance of these protein 4.1-based interactions in kidney physio-pathology in the context of their previously identified functions in other cells and tissues. Specifically, we will focus on renal 4.1 protein interactions with beta amyloid precursor protein (beta-APP), 14-3-3 proteins, and the cell swelling-activated chloride channel pICln. We also discuss the functional relevance of another member of the protein 4.1 superfamily, ezrin, in kidney physiopathology.

  10. Methylenetetrahy-drofolate Reductase Gene Polymorphism in Patients Receiving Hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermina Kiseljaković

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (MTHFR is key enzyme in metabolism of homocysteine. Homozygotes for mutation (TT genotype have hyperhomocysteinemia, risk factor for atherosclerosis development. The aim of the study was to find out distribution of genotype frequencies of C677T MTHFR among patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Possible association of alleles and genotypes of C677T polymorphism of the MTHFR gene with age of onset, duration of dialysis and cause of kidney failure was studied also. Cross-sectional study includes 80 patients from Clinic of Hemodialysis KUCS in Sarajevo. In order to perform genotyping, isolated DNA was analyzed by RFLP-PCR and gel-electrophoresis. From total of 80 patients, 42.5% (n=24 were female, 57.5% (n=46 were male, mean age 54.59±1.78 years and duration of dialysis 79.92±6.32 months. Genotype distribution was: CC 51.2% (n=41, CT 37.5% (n=30 and TT 11.2% (n=9. Patients with wild-type genotype have longer duration of dialysis in month (87.1 ± 63.93 comparing to TT genotype patients (67.06 ± 39.3, with no statistical significance. T allele frequency was significantly higher in group of vascular and congenital cause of kidney failure (Pearson X2 =6.049, P<0.05 comparing to inflammation etiology group. Genotype distribution results are within the results other studies in Europe. Obtained results indicate that C677T polymorphism is not associated with onset, duration and cause of kidney failure in our hemodialysis population. There is an association of T allele of the MTHFR gene and vascular and congenital cause kidney failure.

  11. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

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    Ji Hun Paek

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethyl acetate (EtOAc soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens inhibits aldose reductase (AR, the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MSn. The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MSn. A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5 : 5 : 1 : 5, v/v and 3 : 7 : 5 : 5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR. The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2 (IC50 = 3.16 μM, rosmarinic acid (4 (IC50 = 2.77 μM, luteolin (5 (IC50 = 6.34 μM, and methyl rosmarinic acid (6 (IC50 = 4.03 μM.

  12. Increased 5. cap alpha. -reductase activity in idiopathic hirsutism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serafini, P.; Lobo, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    In vitro, genital skin 5..cap alpha..-reductase activity (5..cap alpha..-RA) was measured in ten hirsute women with normal androgen levels (idiopathic hirsutism (IH)) and in ten hirsute women with elevated androgen levels (polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO)) in order to determine the influence of secreted androgens on 5..cap alpha..-RA. In vitro 5..cap alpha..-RA was assessed by incubations of skin with /sup 14/C-testosterone (T) for 2 hours, after which steroids were separated and the radioactivity of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and 5..cap alpha..-androstane 3..cap alpha..-17..beta..-estradiol (3..cap alpha..-diol) in specific eluates were determined. All androgens were normal in IH with the exception of higher levels of 3..cap alpha..-diol glucuronide which were similar to the levels of PCO. The conversion ratio (CR) of T to DHT in IH and PCO were similar, yet significantly greater than the CR of control subjects. The CR of T to 3..cap alpha..-diol in IH and PCO were similar, yet higher than in control subjects. Serum androgens showed no correlation with 5..cap alpha..-RA, while the CR of T to DHT showed a significant positive correlation with the Ferriman and Gallwey score. The increased 5..cap alpha..-RA in IH appears to be independent of serum androgen levels and is, therefore, an inherent abnormality. The term idiopathic is a misnomer, because hirsutism in these patients may be explained on the basis of increased skin 5..cap alpha..-RA.

  13. Pyranopterin Coordination Controls Molybdenum Electrochemistry in Escherichia coli Nitrate Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Rothery, Richard A; Weiner, Joel H

    2015-10-09

    We test the hypothesis that pyranopterin (PPT) coordination plays a critical role in defining molybdenum active site redox chemistry and reactivity in the mononuclear molybdoenzymes. The molybdenum atom of Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is coordinated by two PPT-dithiolene chelates that are defined as proximal and distal based on their proximity to a [4Fe-4S] cluster known as FS0. We examined variants of two sets of residues involved in PPT coordination: (i) those interacting directly or indirectly with the pyran oxygen of the bicyclic distal PPT (NarG-Ser(719), NarG-His(1163), and NarG-His(1184)); and (ii) those involved in bridging the two PPTs and stabilizing the oxidation state of the proximal PPT (NarG-His(1092) and NarG-His(1098)). A S719A variant has essentially no effect on the overall Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential, whereas the H1163A and H1184A variants elicit large effects (ΔEm values of -88 and -36 mV, respectively). Ala variants of His(1092) and His(1098) also elicit large ΔEm values of -143 and -101 mV, respectively. An Arg variant of His(1092) elicits a small ΔEm of +18 mV on the Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential. There is a linear correlation between the molybdenum Em value and both enzyme activity and the ability to support anaerobic respiratory growth on nitrate. These data support a non-innocent role for the PPT moieties in controlling active site metal redox chemistry and catalysis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Pyranopterin Coordination Controls Molybdenum Electrochemistry in Escherichia coli Nitrate Reductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sheng-Yi; Rothery, Richard A.; Weiner, Joel H.

    2015-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that pyranopterin (PPT) coordination plays a critical role in defining molybdenum active site redox chemistry and reactivity in the mononuclear molybdoenzymes. The molybdenum atom of Escherichia coli nitrate reductase A (NarGHI) is coordinated by two PPT-dithiolene chelates that are defined as proximal and distal based on their proximity to a [4Fe-4S] cluster known as FS0. We examined variants of two sets of residues involved in PPT coordination: (i) those interacting directly or indirectly with the pyran oxygen of the bicyclic distal PPT (NarG-Ser719, NarG-His1163, and NarG-His1184); and (ii) those involved in bridging the two PPTs and stabilizing the oxidation state of the proximal PPT (NarG-His1092 and NarG-His1098). A S719A variant has essentially no effect on the overall Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential, whereas the H1163A and H1184A variants elicit large effects (ΔEm values of −88 and −36 mV, respectively). Ala variants of His1092 and His1098 also elicit large ΔEm values of −143 and −101 mV, respectively. An Arg variant of His1092 elicits a small ΔEm of +18 mV on the Mo(VI/IV) reduction potential. There is a linear correlation between the molybdenum Em value and both enzyme activity and the ability to support anaerobic respiratory growth on nitrate. These data support a non-innocent role for the PPT moieties in controlling active site metal redox chemistry and catalysis. PMID:26297003

  15. Anatomo-pathological aspects of parasitism by nematodes of the superfamily Metastrongyloidea in wild crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous in Midwestern Brazil

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    Jair Alves Ferreira Júnior

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Nematodes of the superfamily Metastrongyloidea affect the respiratory, cardiovascular, and nervous systems of domestic carnivores and are uncommonly detected in wild animals. This report describes the lesions associated with pulmonary parasitism by nematodes of the superfamily Metastrongyloidea in a wild crab-eating fox ( Cerdocyon thous in the Federal District, Brazil. Grossly, there was pulmonary hyperemia, edema, and emphysema. Microscopically, there was granulomatous arteritis associated with intravascular metastrongylid. The anatomical location, characteristic lesion, and histological features of the parasite suggested that the nematode involved in this case is Angiostrongylus vasorum . This worm is frequently reported parasitizing pulmonary arteries of domestic canids but is uncommonly described in wild canids in Midwestern Brazil.

  16. Mycobacterium smegmatis SftH exemplifies a distinctive clade of superfamily II DNA-dependent ATPases with 3′ to 5′ translocase and helicase activities

    OpenAIRE

    Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Shuman, Stewart

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial DNA helicases are nucleic acid-dependent NTPases that play important roles in DNA replication, recombination and repair. We are interested in the DNA helicases of Mycobacteria, a genus of the phylum Actinobacteria, which includes the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis and its avirulent relative Mycobacterium smegmatis. Here, we identify and characterize M. smegmatis SftH, a superfamily II helicase with a distinctive domain structure, comprising an N-terminal NTPase domain and...

  17. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: Stereochemically Distinct Mechanisms in Two Families of cis,cis-Muconate Lactonizing Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, A.; Fedorov, A; Fedorov, E; Schnoes, A; Glasner, M; Burley, S; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Gerlt, J

    2009-01-01

    The mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily is a paradigm for elucidating Nature's strategies for divergent evolution of enzyme function. Each of the different reactions catalyzed by members of the superfamily is initiated by abstraction of the a-proton of a carboxylate substrate that is coordinated to an essential Mg2+. The muconate lactonizing enzyme (MLE) from Pseudomonas putida, a member of a family that catalyzes the syn-cycloisomerization of cis,cis-muconate to (4S)-muconolactone in the e-ketoadipate pathway, has provided critical insights into the structural bases for evolution of function within the superfamily. A second, divergent family of homologous MLEs that catalyzes anti-cycloisomerization has been identified. Structures of members of both families liganded with the common (4S)-muconolactone product (syn, Pseudomonas fluorescens, gi 70731221; anti, Mycobacterium smegmatis, gi 118470554) document that the conserved Lys at the end of the second e-strand in the (e/a)7e-barrel domain serves as the acid catalyst in both reactions. The different stereochemical courses (syn and anti) result from different structural strategies for determining substrate specificity: although the distal carboxylate group of the cis,cis-muconate substrate attacks the same face of the proximal double bond, opposite faces of the resulting enolate anion intermediate are presented to the conserved Lys acid catalyst. The discovery of two families of homologous, but stereochemically distinct, MLEs likely provides an example of 'pseudoconvergent' evolution of the same function from different homologous progenitors within the enolase superfamily, in which different spatial arrangements of active site functional groups and substrate specificity determinants support catalysis of the same reaction.

  18. Evolution of Enzymatic Activities in the Enolase Superfamily: Stereochemically Distinct Mechanisms in Two Families of cis,cis-Muconate Lactonizing Enzymes†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Ayano; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Schnoes, Alexandra M.; Glasner, Margaret E.; Brown, Shoshana; Rutter, Marc E.; Bain, Kevin; Chang, Shawn; Gheyi, Tarun; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanistically diverse enolase superfamily is a paradigm for elucidating Nature’s strategies for divergent evolution of enzyme function. Each of the different reactions catalyzed by members of the superfamily is initiated by abstraction of the α-proton of a carboxylate substrate that is coordinated to an essential Mg2+. The muconate lactonizing enzyme (MLE) from Pseudomonas putida, a member of a family that catalyzes the syn-cycloisomerization of cis,cis-muconate to (4S)-muconolactone in the β-ketoadipate pathway, has provided critical insights into the structural bases for evolution of function within the superfamily. A second, divergent family of homologues MLEs that catalyzes anti-cycloisomerization has been identified. Structures of members of both families liganded with the common (4S)-muconolactone product (syn, Pseudomonas fluorescens, GI:70731221; anti, Mycobacterium smegmatis, GI:118470554) document that the conserved Lys at the end of the second β-strand in the (β/α)7β-barrel domain serves as the acid catalyst in both reactions. The different stereochemical courses (syn and anti) result from different structural strategies for determining substrate specificity: although the distal carboxylate group of the cis,cis-muconate substrate attacks the same face of the proximal double bond, opposite faces of the resulting enolate anion intermediate are presented to the conserved Lys acid catalyst. The discovery of two families of homologous, but stereochemically distinct, MLEs likely provides an example of “pseudoconvergent” evolution of the same function from different homologous progenitors within the enolase superfamily, in which different spatial arrangements of active site functional groups and substrate specificity determinants support catalysis of the same reaction. PMID:19220063

  19. Interactive surface in the PapD chaperone cleft is conserved in pilus chaperone superfamily and essential in subunit recognition and assembly.

    OpenAIRE

    Slonim, L N; Pinkner, J S; Brändén, C I; Hultgren, S J

    1992-01-01

    The assembly of adhesive pili in Gram-negative bacteria is modulated by specialized periplasmic chaperone systems. PapD is the prototype member of the superfamily of periplasmic pilus chaperones. Previously, the alignment of chaperone sequences superimposed on the three dimensional structure of PapD revealed the presence of invariant, conserved and variable amino acids. Representative residues that protruded into the PapD cleft were targeted for site directed mutagenesis to investigate the pi...

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of TON-1713 from Thermococcus onnurineus NA1, a putative member of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Binh Van; Lee, Hyun Sook; Cho, Yona; Kang, Sung Gyun; Kim, Dong Young; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2007-01-01

    A putative member of the haloacid dehalogenase superfamily from T. onnurineus has been expressed, purified and crystallized using 1.6 M magnesium sulfate as a precipitant. The crystals belonged to the triclinic space group P1 and diffracted to 1.8 Å resolution. The haloacid dehalogenase (HAD) protein superfamily is one of the largest enzyme families and shows hydrolytic activity towards diverse substrates. Structural analyses of enzymes belonging to the HAD family are required to elucidate the molecular basis underlying their broad substrate specificity and reaction mechanism. For this purpose, TON-1713, a hypothetical protein from Thermococcus onnurineus that is a member of the HAD superfamily, was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized at 295 K using 1.6 M magnesium sulfate as a precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.8 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 52.5, b = 65.8, c = 203.4 Å, α = 71.1, β = 79.9, γ = 74.3°

  1. A histone-like protein of mycobacteria possesses ferritin superfamily protein-like activity and protects against DNA damage by Fenton reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Takatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential metal for living organisms but its level must be strictly controlled in cells, because ferrous ion induces toxicity by generating highly active reactive oxygen, hydroxyl radicals, through the Fenton reaction. In addition, ferric ion shows low solubility under physiological conditions. To overcome these obstacles living organisms possess Ferritin superfamily proteins that are distributed in all three domains of life: bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. These proteins minimize hydroxyl radical formation by ferroxidase activity that converts Fe(2+ into Fe(3+ and sequesters iron by storing it as a mineral inside a protein cage. In this study, we discovered that mycobacterial DNA-binding protein 1 (MDP1, a histone-like protein, has similar activity to ferritin superfamily proteins. MDP1 prevented the Fenton reaction and protects DNA by the ferroxidase activity. The K(m values of the ferroxidase activity by MDP1 of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG-3007c, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Rv2986c, and Mycobacterium leprae (ML1683; ML-LBP were 0.292, 0.252, and 0.129 mM, respectively. Furthermore, one MDP1 molecule directly captured 81.4±19.1 iron atoms, suggesting the role of this protein in iron storage. This study describes for the first time a ferroxidase-iron storage protein outside of the ferritin superfamily proteins and the protective role of this bacterial protein from DNA damage.

  2. Structural analysis of papain-like NlpC/P60 superfamily enzymes with a circularly permuted topology reveals potential lipid binding sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingping Xu

    Full Text Available NlpC/P60 superfamily papain-like enzymes play important roles in all kingdoms of life. Two members of this superfamily, LRAT-like and YaeF/YiiX-like families, were predicted to contain a catalytic domain that is circularly permuted such that the catalytic cysteine is located near the C-terminus, instead of at the N-terminus. These permuted enzymes are widespread in virus, pathogenic bacteria, and eukaryotes. We determined the crystal structure of a member of the YaeF/YiiX-like family from Bacillus cereus in complex with lysine. The structure, which adopts a ligand-induced, "closed" conformation, confirms the circular permutation of catalytic residues. A comparative analysis of other related protein structures within the NlpC/P60 superfamily is presented. Permutated NlpC/P60 enzymes contain a similar conserved core and arrangement of catalytic residues, including a Cys/His-containing triad and an additional conserved tyrosine. More surprisingly, permuted enzymes have a hydrophobic S1 binding pocket that is distinct from previously characterized enzymes in the family, indicative of novel substrate specificity. Further analysis of a structural homolog, YiiX (PDB 2if6 identified a fatty acid in the conserved hydrophobic pocket, thus providing additional insights into possible function of these novel enzymes.

  3. Comparative modelling and molecular docking of nitrate reductase from Bacillus weihenstephanensis (DS45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seenivasagan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reductase catalyses the oxidation of NAD(PH and the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. NR serves as a central point for the integration of metabolic pathways by governing the flux of reduced nitrogen through several regulatory mechanisms in plants, algae and fungi. Bacteria express nitrate reductases that convert nitrate to nitrite, but mammals lack these specific enzymes. The microbial nitrate reductase reduces toxic compounds to nontoxic compounds with the help of NAD(PH. In the present study, our results revealed that Bacillus weihenstephanensis expresses a nitrate reductase enzyme, which was made to generate the 3D structure of the enzyme. Six different modelling servers, namely Phyre2, RaptorX, M4T Server, HHpred, SWISS MODEL and Mod Web, were used for comparative modelling of the structure. The model was validated with standard parameters (PROCHECK and Verify 3D. This study will be useful in the functional characterization of the nitrate reductase enzyme and its docking with nitrate molecules, as well as for use with autodocking.

  4. Role of aldose reductase C-106T polymorphism among diabetic Egyptian patients with different microvascular complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermine Hossam Zakaria

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aldose reductase pathway proves that elevated blood glucose promotes cellular dysfunction. The polyol pathway converts excess intracellular glucose into alcohols via activity of the aldose reductase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of glucose to sorbitol which triggers variety of intracellular changes in the tissues. Among diabetes, activity is drastically increased in association with three main consequences inside the cells. The aim of this study was to detect the association of the C-106 T polymorphism of the aldose reductase gene and its frequency among a sample of 150 Egyptian adults with type 2 diabetic patients having diabetic microvascular. The detection of the aldose reductase C-106 T polymorphism gene was done by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP. The genotype distribution of the C-106 T polymorphism showed that CC genotype was statistically significantly higher among patients with retinopathy compared to nephropathy. Patients with nephropathy had significant association with the TT genotype when compared with diabetic retinopathy patients. Follow up study after the genotype detection among recently diagnosed diabetic patients in order to give a prophylactic aldose reductase inhibitors; studying the microvascular complications and its relation to the genotype polymorphisms. The study may include multiple gene polymorphisms to make the relation between the gene and the occurrence of these complications more evident.

  5. Structural and biochemical properties of cloned and expressed human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, S.; Russell, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The microsomal enzyme steroid 5α-reductase is responsible for the conversion of testosterone into the more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone. In man, this steroid acts on a variety of androgen-responsive target tissues to mediate such diverse endocrine processes as male sexual differentiation in the fetus and prostatic growth in men. Here we describe the isolation, structure, and expression of a cDNA encoding the human steroid 5α-reductase. A rat cDNA was used as a hybridization probe to screen a human prostate cDNA library. A 2.1-kilobase cDNA was identified and DNA sequence analysis indicated that the human steroid 5α-reductase was a hydrophobic protein of 259 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 29,462. A comparison of the human and rat protein sequences revealed a 60% identity. Transfection of expression vectors containing the human and rat cDNAs into simian COS cells resulted in the synthesis of high levels of steroid 5α-reductase enzyme activity. Both enzymes expressed in COS cells showed similar substrate specificities for naturally occurring steroid hormones. However, synthetic 4-azasteroids demonstrated marked differences in their abilities to inhibit the human and rat steroid 5α-reductases

  6. Overexpression of Nitrate Reductase in Tobacco Delays Drought-Induced Decreases in Nitrate Reductase Activity and mRNA1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario-Méry, Sylvie; Valadier, Marie-Hélène; Foyer, Christine H.

    1998-01-01

    Transformed (cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter [35S]) tobacco (Nicotiana plumbaginifolia L.) plants constitutively expressing nitrate reductase (NR) and untransformed controls were subjected to drought for 5 d. Drought-induced changes in biomass accumulation and photosynthesis were comparable in both lines of plants. After 4 d of water deprivation, a large increase in the ratio of shoot dry weight to fresh weight was observed, together with a decrease in the rate of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation. Foliar sucrose increased in both lines during water stress, but hexoses increased only in leaves from untransformed controls. Foliar NO3− decreased rapidly in both lines and was halved within 2 d of the onset of water deprivation. Total foliar amino acids decreased in leaves of both lines following water deprivation. After 4 d of water deprivation no NR activity could be detected in leaves of untransformed plants, whereas about 50% of the original activity remained in the leaves of the 35S-NR transformants. NR mRNA was much more stable than NR activity. NR mRNA abundance increased in the leaves of the 35S-NR plants and remained constant in controls for the first 3 d of drought. On the 4th d, however, NR mRNA suddenly decreased in both lines. Rehydration at d 3 caused rapid recovery (within 24 h) of 35S-NR transcripts, but no recovery was observed in the controls. The phosphorylation state of the protein was unchanged by long-term drought. There was a strong correlation between maximal extractable NR activity and ambient photosynthesis in both lines. We conclude that drought first causes increased NR protein turnover and then accelerates NR mRNA turnover. Constitutive NR expression temporarily delayed drought-induced losses in NR activity. 35S-NR expression may therefore allow more rapid recovery of N assimilation following short-term water deficit. PMID:9576799

  7. The substrate oxidation mechanism of pyranose 2-oxidase and other related enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongnate, Thanyaporn; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2013-07-01

    Enzymes in the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily catalyze the oxidation of an alcohol moiety to the corresponding aldehyde. In this review, the current understanding of the sugar oxidation mechanism in the reaction of pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O) is highlighted and compared with that of other enzymes in the GMC family for which structural and mechanistic information is available, including glucose oxidase, choline oxidase, cholesterol oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, aryl-alcohol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase. Other enzymes in the family that have been newly discovered or for which less information is available are also discussed. A large primary kinetic isotope effect was observed for the flavin reduction when 2-d-D-glucose was used as a substrate, but no solvent kinetic isotope effect was detected for the flavin reduction step. The reaction of P2O is consistent with a hydride transfer mechanism in which there is stepwise formation of d-glucose alkoxide prior to the hydride transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis of P2O and pH-dependence studies indicated that His548 is a catalytic base that facilitates the deprotonation of C2-OH in D-glucose. This finding agrees with the current mechanistic model for aryl-alcohol oxidase, glucose oxidase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, methanol oxidase, and pyridoxine 4-oxidase, but is different from that of cholesterol oxidase and choline oxidase. Although all of the GMC enzymes share similar structural folding and use the hydride transfer mechanism for flavin reduction, they appear to have subtle differences in the fine-tuned details of how they catalyze substrate oxidation. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  8. The short mRNA isoform of the immunoglobulin superfamily, member 1 gene encodes an intracellular glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    Full Text Available Mutations in the immunoglobulin superfamily, member 1 gene (IGSF1/Igsf1 cause an X-linked form of central hypothyroidism. The canonical form of IGSF1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein with 12 immunoglobulin (Ig loops. The protein is co-translationally cleaved into two sub-domains. The carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD, which contains the last 7 Ig loops, is trafficked to the plasma membrane. Most pathogenic mutations in IGSF1 map to the portion of the gene encoding the CTD. IGSF1/Igsf1 encodes a variety of transcripts. A little studied, but abundant splice variant encodes a truncated form of the protein, predicted to contain the first 2 Ig loops of the full-length IGSF1. The protein (hereafter referred to as IGSF1 isoform 2 or IGSF1-2 is likely retained in most individuals with IGSF1 mutations. Here, we characterized basic biochemical properties of the protein as a foray into understanding its potential function. IGSF1-2, like the IGSF1-CTD, is a glycoprotein. In both mouse and rat, the protein is N-glycosylated at a single asparagine residue in the first Ig loop. Contrary to earlier predictions, neither the murine nor rat IGSF1-2 is secreted from heterologous or homologous cells. In addition, neither protein associates with the plasma membrane. Rather, IGSF1-2 appears to be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Whether the protein plays intracellular functions or is trafficked through the secretory pathway under certain physiologic or pathophysiologic conditions has yet to be determined.

  9. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Rongrong; Li, Jun; Singer, Stacy D; Zhang, Yucheng; Yin, Xiangjing; Zheng, Yi; Fan, Chonghui; Wang, Xiping

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) represent a protein superfamily encoding NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes that oxidize a wide range of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes and play a role in the response to environmental stress. In this study, a total of 39 ALDH genes from ten families were identified in the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) genome. Synteny analysis of the apple ALDH (MdALDH) genes indicated that segmental and tandem duplications, as well as whole genome duplications, have likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of these gene families in apple. Moreover, synteny analysis between apple and Arabidopsis demonstrated that several MdALDH genes were found in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes appeared before the divergence of lineages that led to apple and Arabidopsis. In addition, phylogenetic analysis, as well as comparisons of exon-intron and protein structures, provided further insight into both their evolutionary relationships and their putative functions. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the MdALDH genes demonstrated diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns, while their expression profiles under abiotic stress and various hormone treatments indicated that many MdALDH genes were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as different plant hormones. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles, of the apple MdALDH genes will not only be useful for the further analysis of ALDH genes and their roles in stress response, but may also aid in the future improvement of apple stress tolerance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. NCX-DB: a unified resource for integrative analysis of the sodium calcium exchanger super-family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Katrin; O'Halloran, Damien M

    2018-04-13

    Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers are low-affinity high-capacity transporters that mediate Ca 2+ extrusion by coupling Ca 2+ efflux to the influx of Na + ions. The Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers form a super-family comprised of three branches each differing in ion-substrate selectivity: Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers (NCX), Na + /Ca 2+ /K + exchangers, and Ca 2+ /cation exchangers. Their primary function is to maintain Ca 2+ homeostasis and play a particularly important role in excitable cells that experience transient Ca 2+ fluxes. Research into the role and activity of Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers has focused extensively on the cardio-vascular system, however, growing evidence suggests that Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers play a key role in neuronal processes such as memory formation, learning, oligodendrocyte differentiation, neuroprotection during brain ischemia and axon guidance. They have also been implicated in pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, Multiple Sclerosis and Epilepsy, however, a clear understanding of their mechanism during disease is lacking. To date, there has never been a central resource or database for Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers. With clear disease relevance and ever-increasing research on Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers from both model and non-model species, a database that unifies the data on Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers is needed for future research. NCX-DB is a publicly available database with a web interface that enables users to explore various Na + /Ca 2+ exchangers, perform cross-species sequence comparison, identify new exchangers, and stay-up to date with recent literature. NCX-DB is available on the web via an interactive user interface with an intuitive design, which is applicable for the identification and comparison of Na + /Ca 2+ exchanger proteins across diverse species.

  11. Novel evolutionary lineages of the invertebrate oxytocin/vasopressin superfamily peptides and their receptors in the common octopus (Octopus vulgaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Atsuhiro; Satake, Honoo; Kawada, Tsuyoshi; Minakata, Hiroyuki

    2004-01-01

    The common octopus, Octopus vulgaris, is the first invertebrate species that was shown to possess two oxytocin/vasopressin (OT/VP) superfamily peptides, octopressin (OP) and cephalotocin (CT). Previously, we cloned a GPCR (G-protein-coupled receptor) specific to CT [CTR1 (CT receptor 1)]. In the present study, we have identified an additional CTR, CTR2, and a novel OP receptor, OPR. Both CTR2 and OPR include domains and motifs typical of GPCRs, and the intron– exon structures are in accord with those of OT/VP receptor genes. CTR2 and OPR expressed in Xenopus oocytes induced calcium-mediated inward chloride current in a CT- and OP-specific manner respectively. Several regions and residues, which are requisite for binding of the vertebrate OT/VP receptor family with their ligands, are highly conserved in CTRs, but not in OPR. These different sequences between CTRs and OPR, as well as the amino acid residues of OP and CT at positions 2–5, were presumed to play crucial roles in the binding selectivity to their receptors, whereas the difference in the polarity of OT/VP family peptide residues at position 8 confers OT and VP with the binding specificity in vertebrates. CTR2 mRNA was present in various peripheral tissues, and OPR mRNA was detected in both the nervous system and peripheral tissues. Our findings suggest that the CT and OP genes, similar to the OT/VP family, evolved through duplication, but the ligand–receptor selectivity were established through different evolutionary lineages from those of their vertebrate counterparts. PMID:15504101

  12. The viral transmembrane superfamily: possible divergence of Arenavirus and Filovirus glycoproteins from a common RNA virus ancestor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buchmeier Michael J

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of viral entry proteins from influenza, measles, human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1, and Ebola virus have shown, first with molecular modeling, and then X-ray crystallographic or other biophysical studies, that these disparate viruses share a coiled-coil type of entry protein. Results Structural models of the transmembrane glycoproteins (GP-2 of the Arenaviruses, lymphochoriomeningitis virus (LCMV and Lassa fever virus, are presented, based on consistent structural propensities despite variation in the amino acid sequence. The principal features of the model, a hydrophobic amino terminus, and two antiparallel helices separated by a glycosylated, antigenic apex, are common to a number of otherwise disparate families of enveloped RNA viruses. Within the first amphipathic helix, demonstrable by circular dichroism of a peptide fragment, there is a highly conserved heptad repeat pattern proposed to mediate multimerization by coiled-coil interactions. The amino terminal 18 amino acids are 28% identical and 50% highly similar to the corresponding region of Ebola, a member of the Filovirus family. Within the second, charged helix just prior to membrane insertion there is also high similarity over the central 18 amino acids in corresponding regions of Lassa and Ebola, which may be further related to the similar region of HIV-1 defining a potent antiviral peptide analogue. Conclusions These findings indicate a common pattern of structure and function among viral transmembrane fusion proteins from a number of virus families. Such a pattern may define a viral transmembrane superfamily that evolved from a common precursor eons ago.

  13. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida) reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA) and a nuclear (histone H3) and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I) protein-coding genes. Results Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Conclusions Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in which they maintain filter

  14. Mouse RC/BTB2, a Member of the RCC1 Superfamily, Localizes to Spermatid Acrosomal Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xuening; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R.; Hess, Rex A.; Henderson, Scott C.; Strauss, Jerome F.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2012-01-01

    Mouse RC/BTB2 is an unstudied protein of the RCC1 (Regulator of Chromosome Condensation) superfamily. Because of the significant remodeling of chromatin that occurs during spermiogenesis, we characterized the expression and localization of mouse RC/BTB2 in the testis and male germ cells. The Rc/btb2 gene yields two major transcripts: 2.3 kb Rc/btb2-s, present in most somatic tissues examined; and 2.5 kb Rc/btb2-t, which contains a unique non-translated exon in its 5′-UTR that is only detected in the testis. During the first wave of spermatogenesis, Rc/btb2-t mRNA is expressed from day 8 after birth, reaching highest levels of expression at day 30 after birth. The full-length protein contains three RCC1 domains in the N-terminus, and a BTB domain in the C-terminus. In the testis, the protein is detectable from day 12, but is progressively up-regulated to day 30 and day 42 after birth. In spermatids, some of the protein co-localizes with acrosomal markers sp56 and peanut lectin, indicating that it is an acrosomal protein. A GFP-tagged RCC1 domain is present throughout the cytoplasm of transfected CHO cells. However, both GFP-tagged, full-length RC/BTB2 and a GFP-tagged BTB domain localize to vesicles in close proximity to the nuclear membrane, suggesting that the BTB domain might play a role in mediating full-length RC/BTB2 localization. Since RCC1 domains associate with Ran, a small GTPase that regulates molecular trafficking, it is possible that RC/BTB2 plays a role in transporting proteins during acrosome formation. PMID:22768142

  15. Molecular phylogeny of the bivalve superfamily Galeommatoidea (Heterodonta, Veneroida reveals dynamic evolution of symbiotic lifestyle and interphylum host switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goto Ryutaro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galeommatoidea is a superfamily of bivalves that exhibits remarkably diverse lifestyles. Many members of this group live attached to the body surface or inside the burrows of other marine invertebrates, including crustaceans, holothurians, echinoids, cnidarians, sipunculans and echiurans. These symbiotic species exhibit high host specificity, commensal interactions with hosts, and extreme morphological and behavioral adaptations to symbiotic life. Host specialization to various animal groups has likely played an important role in the evolution and diversification of this bivalve group. However, the evolutionary pathway that led to their ecological diversity is not well understood, in part because of their reduced and/or highly modified morphologies that have confounded traditional taxonomy. This study elucidates the taxonomy of the Galeommatoidea and their evolutionary history of symbiotic lifestyle based on a molecular phylogenic analysis of 33 galeommatoidean and five putative galeommatoidean species belonging to 27 genera and three families using two nuclear ribosomal genes (18S and 28S ribosomal DNA and a nuclear (histone H3 and mitochondrial (cytochrome oxidase subunit I protein-coding genes. Results Molecular phylogeny recovered six well-supported major clades within Galeommatoidea. Symbiotic species were found in all major clades, whereas free-living species were grouped into two major clades. Species symbiotic with crustaceans, holothurians, sipunculans, and echiurans were each found in multiple major clades, suggesting that host specialization to these animal groups occurred repeatedly in Galeommatoidea. Conclusions Our results suggest that the evolutionary history of host association in Galeommatoidea has been remarkably dynamic, involving frequent host switches between different animal phyla. Such an unusual pattern of dynamic host switching is considered to have resulted from their commensalistic lifestyle, in

  16. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akana, J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common (β/α) 8 -barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn 2+ which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn 2+ and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn 2+ is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn 2+ ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn 2+ . The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn 2+ that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn 2+ and participate as acid/base catalysts are not conserved. We conclude that only the phosphate

  17. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase contributes to allergic airway disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth R Eyring

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures strongly influence the development and progression of asthma. We have previously demonstrated that mice exposed to a diet enriched with methyl donors during vulnerable periods of fetal development can enhance the heritable risk of allergic airway disease through epigenetic changes. There is conflicting evidence on the role of folate (one of the primary methyl donors in modifying allergic airway disease.We hypothesized that blocking folate metabolism through the loss of methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (Mthfr activity would reduce the allergic airway disease phenotype through epigenetic mechanisms.Allergic airway disease was induced in C57BL/6 and C57BL/6Mthfr-/- mice through house dust mite (HDM exposure. Airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR were measured between the two groups. Gene expression and methylation profiles were generated for whole lung tissue. Disease and molecular outcomes were evaluated in C57BL/6 and C57BL/6Mthfr-/- mice supplemented with betaine.Loss of Mthfr alters single carbon metabolite levels in the lung and serum including elevated homocysteine and cystathionine and reduced methionine. HDM-treated C57BL/6Mthfr-/- mice demonstrated significantly less airway hyperreactivity (AHR compared to HDM-treated C57BL/6 mice. Furthermore, HDM-treated C57BL/6Mthfr-/- mice compared to HDM-treated C57BL/6 mice have reduced whole lung lavage (WLL cellularity, eosinophilia, and Il-4/Il-5 cytokine concentrations. Betaine supplementation reversed parts of the HDM-induced allergic airway disease that are modified by Mthfr loss. 737 genes are differentially expressed and 146 regions are differentially methylated in lung tissue from HDM-treated C57BL/6Mthfr-/- mice and HDM-treated C57BL/6 mice. Additionally, analysis of methylation/expression relationships identified 503 significant correlations.Collectively, these findings indicate that the loss of folate as a methyl donor is a modifier of

  18. Resolution of oxidative stress by thioredoxin reductase: Cysteine versus selenocysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cunniff

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin reductase (TR catalyzes the reduction of thioredoxin (TRX, which in turn reduces mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (PRXs 1–4, thiol peroxidases implicated in redox homeostasis and cell signaling. Typical 2-Cys PRXs are inactivated by hyperoxidation of the peroxidatic cysteine to cysteine-sulfinic acid, and regenerated in a two-step process involving retro-reduction by sulfiredoxin (SRX and reduction by TRX. Here transient exposure to menadione and glucose oxidase was used to examine the dynamics of oxidative inactivation and reactivation of PRXs in mouse C10 cells expressing various isoforms of TR, including wild type cytoplasmic TR1 (Sec-TR1 and mitochondrial TR2 (Sec-TR2 that encode selenocysteine, as well as mutants of TR1 and TR2 in which the selenocysteine codon was changed to encode cysteine (Cys-TR1 or Cys-TR2. In C10 cells endogenous TR activity was insensitive to levels of hydrogen peroxide that hyperoxidize PRXs. Expression of Sec-TR1 increased TR activity, reduced the basal cytoplasmic redox state, and increased the rate of reduction of a redox-responsive cytoplasmic GFP probe (roGFP, but did not influence either the rate of inactivation or the rate of retro-reduction of PRXs. In comparison to roGFP, which was reduced within minutes once oxidants were removed reduction of 2-Cys PRXs occurred over many hours. Expression of wild type Sec-TR1 or Sec-TR2, but not Cys-TR1 or TR2, increased the rate of reduction of PRXs and improved cell survival after menadione exposure. These results indicate that expression levels of TR do not reduce the severity of initial oxidative insults, but rather govern the rate of reduction of cellular factors required for cell viability. Because Sec-TR is completely insensitive to cytotoxic levels of hydrogen peroxide, we suggest TR functions at the top of a redox pyramid that governs the oxidation state of peroxiredoxins and other protein factors, thereby dictating a hierarchy of phenotypic

  19. Relationship between nitrate reductase and nitrate uptake in phytoplankton in the Peru upwelling region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco, D.; MacIsaac, J.J.; Packard, T.T.; Dugdale, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and 15 NO 3 - uptake in phytoplankton were compared under different environmental conditions on two cruises in the upwelling region off Peru. The NR activity and NO 3 - uptake rates responded differently to light and nutrients and the differences led to variations in the uptake: reductase ratio. Analysis of these variations suggests that the re-equilibration time of the two processes in response to environmental perturbation is an important source of variability. The nitrate uptake system responds faster than the nitrate reductase system. Considering these differences in response time the basic differences in the two processes, and the differences in their measurement, the authors conclude that the Nr activity measures the current nitrate-reducing potential, which reflects NO 3 - assimilation before the sampling time, while 15 NO 3 - uptake measures NO 3 - assimilation in the 6-h period following sampling

  20. Inhibitory effect of rhetsinine isolated from Evodia rutaecarpa on aldose reductase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, A; Yasuko, H; Goto, H; Hollinshead, J; Nash, R J; Adachi, I

    2009-03-01

    Aldose reductase inhibitors have considerable potential for the treatment of diabetic complications, without increased risk of hypoglycemia. Search for components inhibiting aldose reductase led to the discovery of active compounds contained in Evodia rutaecarpa Bentham (Rutaceae), which is the one of the component of Kampo-herbal medicine. The hot water extract from the E. rutaecarpa was subjected to distribution or gel filtration chromatography to give an active compound, N2-(2-methylaminobenzoyl)tetrahydro-1H-pyrido[3,4-b]indol-1-one (rhetsinine). It inhibited aldose reductase with IC(50) values of 24.1 microM. Furthermore, rhetsinine inhibited sorbitol accumulation by 79.3% at 100 microM. These results suggested that the E. rutaecarpa derived component, rhetsinine, would be potentially useful in the treatment of diabetic complications.

  1. Alpha 1-blockers vs 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors in benign prostatic hyperplasia. A comparative review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J T

    1995-01-01

    During recent years, pharmacological treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has become the primary treatment choice for an increasing number of patients. The 2 principal drug classes employed are alpha 1-blockers and 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Current information from...... of patients who will respond well to alpha 1-blockers have yet to be identified, and data concerning the long term effects of these drugs are not yet available. 5 alpha-Reductase inhibitors have a slow onset of effect, but treatment leads to improvement in symptoms, reduction of the size of the prostate gland...... and improvement in objective parameters for bladder outflow obstruction. Approximately 30 to 50% of patients will respond to treatment with 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. The definitive role of pharmacological treatment in symptomatic BPH remains to be established, although it seems that patients unfit...

  2. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintzpeter, Jan, E-mail: hintzpeter@toxi.uni-kiel.de [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Seliger, Jan Moritz [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Hofman, Jakub [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Martin, Hans-Joerg [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany); Wsol, Vladimir [Department of Biochemical Sciences, Faculty of Pharmacy in Hradec Kralove, Charles University in Prague, Heyrovskeho 1203, 50005 Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Maser, Edmund [Institute of Toxicology and Pharmacology for Natural Scientists, University Medical School Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel, Brunswiker Str. 10, 24105 Kiel (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC{sub 50}- and K{sub i}-values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin

  3. Molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and tumor promotion involving mammalian ribonucleotide reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, B.B.K.

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian ribonucleotide reductase is a highly regulated, rate-limiting activity responsible for converting ribonucleoside diphosphates to the deoxyribonucleotide precursors of DNA. The enzyme consists of two nonidentical proteins called M1 and M2, both of which are required for activity. Hydroxyurea is an antitumor agent which inhibits ribonucleotide reductase by interacting with the M2 component specifically at a unique tyrosyl free radical. Studies were conducted on a series of drug resistant mouse cell lines, selected by a step-wise procedure for increasing levels of resistance to the cytotoxic effects of hydroxyurea. Each successive drug selection step leading to the isolation of highly resistant cells was accompanied by stable elevations in cellular resistance and ribonucleotide reductase activity. The drug resistant cell lines exhibited gene amplification of the M2 gene, elevated M2 mRNA, and M2 protein. In addition to M2 gene amplification, posttranscriptional modulation also occurred during the drug selection. Studies of the biosynthesis rates with exogenously added iron suggest a role for iron in regulating the level of M2 protein when cells are cultured in the presence of hydroxyurea. The hydroxyurea-inactivated ribonucleotide reductase protein M2 has a destabilized iron centre, which readily releases iron. Altered expression of ferritin appears to be required for the development of hydroxyurea resistance in nammalian cells. The results show an interesting relationship between the expressions of ribonucleotide reductase and ferritin. The phorbol ester tumor promoter, TPA, is also able to alter the expression of M2. TPA was able to induce M2 mRNA levels transiently up to 18-fold within 1/2 hour. This rapid and large elevation of ribonucleotide reductase suggests that the enzyme may play a role in tumor promotion. Studies of the M2 promoter region were undertaken to better understand the mechanism of TPA induction of M2.

  4. Characterisation of a desmosterol reductase involved in phytosterol dealkylation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonora F Ciufo

    Full Text Available Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C(29 and C(28 yielding cholesterol (C(27. The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735. Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD-dependent reaction.Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250 kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation.

  5. Molecular and phenotypic characterization of transgenic soybean expressing the Arabidopsis ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Marta; Eckert, Helene; Arahana, Venancio; Graef, George; Grusak, Michael A; Clemente, Tom

    2006-10-01

    Soybean (Glycine max Merr.) production is reduced under iron-limiting calcareous soils throughout the upper Midwest regions of the US. Like other dicotyledonous plants, soybean responds to iron-limiting environments by induction of an active proton pump, a ferric iron reductase and an iron transporter. Here we demonstrate that heterologous expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana ferric chelate reductase gene, FRO2, in transgenic soybean significantly enhances Fe(+3) reduction in roots and leaves. Root ferric reductase activity was up to tenfold higher in transgenic plants and was not subjected to post-transcriptional regulation. In leaves, reductase activity was threefold higher in the transgenic plants when compared to control. The enhanced ferric reductase activity led to reduced chlorosis, increased chlorophyll concentration and a lessening in biomass loss in the transgenic events between Fe treatments as compared to control plants grown under hydroponics that mimicked Fe-sufficient and Fe-deficient soil environments. However, the data indicate that constitutive FRO2 expression under non-iron stress conditions may lead to a decrease in plant productivity as reflected by reduced biomass accumulation in the transgenic events under non-iron stress conditions. When grown at Fe(III)-EDDHA levels greater than 10 microM, iron concentration in the shoots of transgenic plants was significantly higher than control. The same observation was found in the roots in plants grown at iron levels higher than 32 microM Fe(III)-EDDHA. These results suggest that heterologous expression of an iron chelate reductase in soybean can provide a route to alleviate iron deficiency chlorosis.

  6. Characterisation of a Desmosterol Reductase Involved in Phytosterol Dealkylation in the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufo, Leonora F.; Murray, Patricia A.; Thompson, Anu; Rigden, Daniel J.; Rees, Huw H.

    2011-01-01

    Most species of invertebrate animals cannot synthesise sterols de novo and many that feed on plants dealkylate phytosterols (mostly C29 and C28) yielding cholesterol (C27). The final step of this dealkylation pathway involves desmosterol reductase (DHCR24)-catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol. We now report the molecular characterisation in the silkworm, Bombyx mori, of such a desmosterol reductase involved in production of cholesterol from phytosterol, rather than in de novo synthesis of cholesterol. Phylogenomic analysis of putative desmosterol reductases revealed the occurrence of various clades that allowed for the identification of a strong reductase candidate gene in Bombyx mori (BGIBMGA 005735). Following PCR-based cloning of the cDNA (1.6 kb) and its heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisae, the recombinant protein catalysed reduction of desmosterol to cholesterol in an NADH- and FAD- dependent reaction. Conceptual translation of the cDNA, that encodes a 58.9 kDa protein, and database searching, revealed that the enzyme belongs to an FAD-dependent oxidoreductase family. Western blotting revealed reductase protein expression exclusively in the microsomal subcellular fraction and primarily in the gut. The protein is peripherally associated with microsomal membranes. 2D-native gel and PAGE analysis revealed that the reductase is part of a large complex with molecular weight approximately 250kDa. The protein occurs in midgut microsomes at a fairly constant level throughout development in the last two instars, but is drastically reduced during the wandering stage in preparation for metamorphosis. Putative Broad Complex transcription factor-binding sites detectable upstream of the DHCR24 gene may play a role in this down-regulation. PMID:21738635

  7. Inhibition of human anthracycline reductases by emodin — A possible remedy for anthracycline resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintzpeter, Jan; Seliger, Jan Moritz; Hofman, Jakub; Martin, Hans-Joerg; Wsol, Vladimir; Maser, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    The clinical application of anthracyclines, like daunorubicin and doxorubicin, is limited by two factors: dose-related cardiotoxicity and drug resistance. Both have been linked to reductive metabolism of the parent drug to their metabolites daunorubicinol and doxorubicinol, respectively. These metabolites show significantly less anti-neoplastic properties as their parent drugs and accumulate in cardiac tissue leading to chronic cardiotoxicity. Therefore, we aimed to identify novel and potent natural inhibitors for anthracycline reductases, which enhance the anticancer effect of anthracyclines by preventing the development of anthracycline resistance. Human enzymes responsible for the reductive metabolism of daunorubicin were tested for their sensitivity towards anthrachinones, in particular emodin and anthraflavic acid. Intense inhibition kinetic data for the most effective daunorubicin reductases, including IC 50 - and K i -values, the mode of inhibition, as well as molecular docking, were compiled. Subsequently, a cytotoxicity profile and the ability of emodin to reverse daunorubicin resistance were determined using multiresistant A549 lung cancer and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Emodin potently inhibited the four main human daunorubicin reductases in vitro. Further, we could demonstrate that emodin is able to synergistically sensitize human cancer cells towards daunorubicin at clinically relevant concentrations. Therefore, emodin may yield the potential to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of anthracyclines by preventing anthracycline resistance via inhibition of the anthracycline reductases. In symphony with its known pharmacological properties, emodin might be a compound of particular interest in the management of anthracycline chemotherapy efficacy and their adverse effects. - Highlights: • Natural and synthetic compounds were identified as inhibitors for human daunorubicin reductases. • Emodin is a potent inhibitor for human daunorubicin reductases.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP + reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP + reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  10. Purification and kinetic analysis of cytosolic and mitochondrial thioredoxin glutathione reductase extracted from Taenia solium cysticerci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plancarte, Agustin; Nava, Gabriela

    2015-02-01

    Thioredoxin glutathione reductases (TGRs) (EC 1.8.1.9) were purified to homogeneity from the cytosolic (cTsTGR) and mitochondrial (mTsTGR) fractions of Taenia solium, the agent responsible for neurocysticercosis, one of the major central nervous system parasitic diseases in humans. TsTGRs had a relative molecular weight of 132,000, while the corresponding value per subunit obtained under denaturing conditions, was of 62,000. Specific activities for thioredoxin reductase and glutathione reductase substrates for both TGRs explored were in the range or lower than values obtained for other platyhelminths and mammalian TGRs. cTsTGR and mTsTGR also showed hydroperoxide reductase activity using hydroperoxide as substrate. Km(DTNB) and Kcat(DTNB) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (88 µM and 1.9 s(-1); 45 µM and 12.6 s(-1), respectively) and Km(GSSG) and Kcat(GSSG) values for cTsTGR and mTsTGR (6.3 µM and 0.96 s(-1); 4 µM and 1.62 s(-1), respectively) were similar to or lower than those reported for mammalian TGRs. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that 12 peptides from cTsTGR and seven from mTsTGR were a match for gi|29825896 thioredoxin glutathione reductase [Echinococcus granulosus], confirming that both enzymes are TGRs. Both T. solium TGRs were inhibited by the gold compound auranofin, a selective inhibitor of thiol-dependent flavoreductases (I₅₀ = 3.25, 2.29 nM for DTNB and GSSG substrates, respectively for cTsTGR; I₅₀ = 5.6, 25.4 nM for mTsTGR toward the same substrates in the described order). Glutathione reductase activity of cTsTGR and mTsTGR exhibited hysteretic behavior with moderate to high concentrations of GSSG; this result was not observed either with thioredoxin, DTNB or NADPH. However, the observed hysteretic kinetics was suppressed with increasing amounts of both parasitic TGRs. These data suggest the existence of an effective substitute which may account for the lack of the detoxification enzymes glutathione reductase

  11. A New Type of YumC-Like Ferredoxin (Flavodoxin) Reductase Is Involved in Ribonucleotide Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    . subtilis but that the addition of deoxynucleosides cannot compensate for the lethal phenotype displayed by the B. subtilis yumC knockout mutant. Ferredoxin (flavodoxin) reductase (FdR) is involved in many important reactions in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, such as photosynthesis, nitrate reduction, etc. The recently...... ribonucleotide reductase, which represents the workhorse for the bioconversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in many prokaryotes and eukaryotic pathogens under aerobic conditions. As the partner of the flavodoxin (NrdI), the key FdR is missing in the current model describing the class Ib system...

  12. NADPH-Thioredoxin Reductase C Mediates the Response to Oxidative Stress and Thermotolerance in the Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp PCC7120

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Riego, Ana M.; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Galmozzi, CarlaV.; Florencio, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    NADPH-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a bimodular enzyme composed of an NADPH-thioredoxin reductase and a thiioredoxin domain extension in the same protein. In plants, NTRC has been described to be involved in the protection of the chloroplast against oxidative stress damage through reduction of

  13. JS-K, a Nitric Oxide Prodrug, Has Enhanced Cytotoxicity in Colon Cancer Cells with Knockdown of Thioredoxin Reductase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edes, Kornelia; Cassidy, Pamela; Shami, Paul J.; Moos, Philip J.

    2010-01-01

    Background The selenoenzyme thioredoxin reductase 1 has a complex role relating to cell growth. It is induced as a component of the cellular response to potentially mutagenic oxidants, but also appears to provide growth advantages to transformed cells by inhibiting apoptosis. In addition, selenocysteine-deficient or alkylated forms of thioredoxin reductase 1 have also demonstrated oxidative, pro-apoptotic activity. Therefore, a greater understanding of the role of thioredoxin reductase in redox initiated apoptotic processes is warranted. Methodology The role of thioredoxin reductase 1 in RKO cells was evaluated by attenuating endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1 expression with siRNA and then either inducing a selenium-deficient thioredoxin reductase or treatment with distinct redox challenges including, hydrogen peroxide, an oxidized lipid, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenol, and a nitric oxide donating prodrug. Thioredoxin redox status, cellular viability, and effector caspase activity were measured. Conclusions/Significance In cells with attenuated endogenous thioredoxin reductase 1, a stably integrated selenocysteine-deficient form of the enzyme was induced but did not alter either the thioredoxin redox status or the cellular growth kinetics. The oxidized lipid and the nitric oxide donor demonstrated enhanced cytotoxicity when thioredoxin reductase 1 was knocked-down; however, the effect was more pronounced with the nitric oxide prodrug. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that attenuation of the thioredoxin-system can promote apoptosis in a nitric oxide-dependent manner. PMID:20098717

  14. Constitutive non-inducible expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana Nia 2 gene in two nitrate reductase mutants of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, C; Crawford, N M; Malmberg, R L

    1997-04-01

    We have isolated a haploid cell line of N. plumbaginifolia, hNP 588, that is constitutive and not inducible for nitrate reductase. Nitrate reductase mutants were isolated from hNP 588 protoplasts upon UV irradiation. Two of these nitrate reductase-deficient cell lines, nia 3 and nia 25, neither of which contained any detectable nitrate reductase activity, were selected for complementation studies. A cloned Arabidopsis thaliana nitrate reductase gene Nia 2 was introduced into each of the two mutants resulting in 56 independent kanamycin-resistant cell lines. Thirty of the 56 kanamycin-resistant cell lines were able to grow on nitrate as the sole nitrogen source. Eight of these were further analyzed for nitrate reductase enzyme activity and nitrate reductase mRNA production. All eight lines had detectable nitrate reductase activity ranging from 7% to 150% of wild-type hNP 588 callus. The enzyme activity levels were not influenced by the nitrogen source in the medium. The eight lines examined expressed a constitutive, non-inducible 3.2 kb mRNA species that was not present in untransformed controls.

  15. De novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provides First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seema Meena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavour, fragrance, cosmetic and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step towards understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases (TPS, pyrophosphatases (PPase, alcohol dehydrogenases (ADH, aldo-keto reductases (AKR, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases (CCD, alcohol acetyltransferases (AAT and aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified enzymes in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats (SSRs were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition.

  16. Facile fabrication of CdSe/CdS quantum dots and their application on the screening of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongfeng; Dong, Quanjin; Hu, Li; Tu, Shiliang; Chai, Rui; Dai, Qiaoqiong

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, a facile aqueous route to water-soluble CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QDs) under mild conditions has been developed. The samples were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL property of the QDs can be controlled by adjusting the reaction time. The CdSe/CdS QDs after 48-h reaction with size of 5 nm have the strongest PL intensity located at 553 nm, and the highest quantum yield of 19.9 %. The obtained QDs were applied for the colorectal cancer screening. The QDs could be conjugated with antibody of aldo-keto reductase family 1, member B10 (AKR1B10) for the detection of AKR1B10. The AKR1B10 in PBS/5 % serum solution with concentration of 1 ng/mL could be well calibrated, and the limit of detection could be lower than 0.05 ng/mL.

  17. Facile fabrication of CdSe/CdS quantum dots and their application on the screening of colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Hongfeng; Dong, Quanjin, E-mail: qjdong1508@163.com [Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Department of Colorectal Surgery (China); Hu, Li [Nanjing University of Science and Technology, School of Environmental and Biological Engineering (China); Tu, Shiliang; Chai, Rui; Dai, Qiaoqiong [Zhejiang Provincial People’s Hospital, Department of Colorectal Surgery (China)

    2015-11-15

    In this paper, a facile aqueous route to water-soluble CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QDs) under mild conditions has been developed. The samples were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The PL property of the QDs can be controlled by adjusting the reaction time. The CdSe/CdS QDs after 48-h reaction with size of 5 nm have the strongest PL intensity located at 553 nm, and the highest quantum yield of 19.9 %. The obtained QDs were applied for the colorectal cancer screening. The QDs could be conjugated with antibody of aldo-keto reductase family 1, member B10 (AKR1B10) for the detection of AKR1B10. The AKR1B10 in PBS/5 % serum solution with concentration of 1 ng/mL could be well calibrated, and the limit of detection could be lower than 0.05 ng/mL.

  18. Methyl Jasmonate: Putative Mechanisms of Action on Cancer Cells Cycle, Metabolism, and Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Italo Mario Cesari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Methyl jasmonate (MJ, an oxylipid that induces defense-related mechanisms in plants, has been shown to be active against cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo, without affecting normal cells. Here we review most of the described MJ activities in an attempt to get an integrated view and better understanding of its multifaceted modes of action. MJ (1 arrests cell cycle, inhibiting cell growth and proliferation, (2 causes cell death through the intrinsic/extrinsic proapoptotic, p53-independent apoptotic, and nonapoptotic (necrosis pathways, (3 detaches hexokinase from the voltage-dependent anion channel, dissociating glycolytic and mitochondrial functions, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, favoring cytochrome c release and ATP depletion, activating pro-apoptotic, and inactivating antiapoptotic proteins, (4 induces reactive oxygen species mediated responses, (5 stimulates MAPK-stress signaling and redifferentiation in leukemia cells, (6 inhibits overexpressed proinflammatory enzymes in cancer cells such as aldo-keto reductase 1 and 5-lipoxygenase, and (7 inhibits cell migration and shows antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activities. Finally, MJ may act as a chemosensitizer to some chemotherapics helping to overcome drug resistant. The complete lack of toxicity to normal cells and the rapidity by which MJ causes damage to cancer cells turn MJ into a promising anticancer agent that can be used alone or in combination with other agents.

  19. AKR1C1 as a Biomarker for Differentiating the Biological Effects of Combustible from Non-Combustible Tobacco Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Sangsoon; Gao, Hong; Henderson, David; Zacharias, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang; Tran, Quynh T; Prasad, G L

    2017-05-03

    Smoking has been established as a major risk factor for developing oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), but less attention has been paid to the effects of smokeless tobacco products. Our objective is to identify potential biomarkers to distinguish the biological effects of combustible tobacco products from those of non-combustible ones using oral cell lines. Normal human gingival epithelial cells (HGEC), non-metastatic (101A) and metastatic (101B) OSCC cell lines were exposed to different tobacco product preparations (TPPs) including cigarette smoke total particulate matter (TPM), whole-smoke conditioned media (WS-CM), smokeless tobacco extract in complete artificial saliva (STE), or nicotine (NIC) alone. We performed microarray-based gene expression profiling and found 3456 probe sets from 101A, 1432 probe sets from 101B, and 2717 probe sets from HGEC to be differentially expressed. Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) revealed xenobiotic metabolism and steroid biosynthesis were the top two pathways that were upregulated by combustible but not by non-combustible TPPs. Notably, aldo-keto reductase genes, AKR1C1 and AKR1C2 , were the core genes in the top enriched pathways and were statistically upregulated more than eight-fold by combustible TPPs. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) results statistically support AKR1C1 as a potential biomarker for differentiating the biological effects of combustible from non-combustible tobacco products.

  20. Involvement of an octose ketoreductase and two acyltransferases in the biosynthesis of paulomycins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jine; Wang, Min; Ding, Yong; Tang, Yue; Zhang, Zhiguo; Chen, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    C-4 hydroxyethyl branched octoses have been observed in polysaccharides of several genera of gram negative bacteria and in various antibiotics produced by gram positive bacteria. The C-4 hydroxyethyl branch was proposed to be converted from C-4 acetyl branch by an uncharacterized ketoreduction step. Paulomycins (PAUs) are glycosylated antibiotics with potent inhibitory activity against gram positive bacteria and are structurally defined by its unique C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branched paulomycose moiety. A novel aldo-keto-reductase, Pau7 was characterized as the enzyme catalyzing the stereospecific ketoreduction of 7‧-keto of PAU E (1) to give the C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branched paulomycose moiety of PAU F (2). An acyltransferase Pau6 further decorates the C-4‧ hydroxyethyl branch of paulomycose moiety of 2 by attaching various fatty acyl chains to 7‧-OH to generate diverse PAUs. In addition, another acyltransferase Pau24 was proposed to be responsible for the 13-O-acetylation of PAUs.

  1. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R; Venkata Rao, D K; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H B; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition.

  2. De Novo Sequencing and Analysis of Lemongrass Transcriptome Provide First Insights into the Essential Oil Biosynthesis of Aromatic Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Kumar, Sarma R.; Venkata Rao, D. K.; Dwivedi, Varun; Shilpashree, H. B.; Rastogi, Shubhra; Shasany, Ajit K.; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.

    2016-01-01

    Aromatic grasses of the genus Cymbopogon (Poaceae family) represent unique group of plants that produce diverse composition of monoterpene rich essential oils, which have great value in flavor, fragrance, cosmetic, and aromatherapy industries. Despite the commercial importance of these natural aromatic oils, their biosynthesis at the molecular level remains unexplored. As the first step toward understanding the essential oil biosynthesis, we performed de novo transcriptome assembly and analysis of C. flexuosus (lemongrass) by employing Illumina sequencing. Mining of transcriptome data and subsequent phylogenetic analysis led to identification of terpene synthases, pyrophosphatases, alcohol dehydrogenases, aldo-keto reductases, carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases, alcohol acetyltransferases, and aldehyde dehydrogenases, which are potentially involved in essential oil biosynthesis. Comparative essential oil profiling and mRNA expression analysis in three Cymbopogon species (C. flexuosus, aldehyde type; C. martinii, alcohol type; and C. winterianus, intermediate type) with varying essential oil composition indicated the involvement of identified candidate genes in the formation of alcohols, aldehydes, and acetates. Molecular modeling and docking further supported the role of identified protein sequences in aroma formation in Cymbopogon. Also, simple sequence repeats were found in the transcriptome with many linked to terpene pathway genes including the genes potentially involved in aroma biosynthesis. This work provides the first insights into the essential oil biosynthesis of aromatic grasses, and the identified candidate genes and markers can be a great resource for biotechnological and molecular breeding approaches to modulate the essential oil composition. PMID:27516768

  3. Stereochemical inversion of (S)-reticuline by a cytochrome P450 fusion in opium poppy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Scott C; Hagel, Jillian M; Beaudoin, Guillaume A W; Burns, Darcy C; Facchini, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    The gateway to morphine biosynthesis in opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) is the stereochemical inversion of (S)-reticuline since the enzyme yielding the first committed intermediate salutaridine is specific for (R)-reticuline. A fusion between a cytochrome P450 (CYP) and an aldo-keto reductase (AKR) catalyzes the S-to-R epimerization of reticuline via 1,2-dehydroreticuline. The reticuline epimerase (REPI) fusion was detected in opium poppy and in Papaver bracteatum, which accumulates thebaine. In contrast, orthologs encoding independent CYP and AKR enzymes catalyzing the respective synthesis and reduction of 1,2-dehydroreticuline were isolated from Papaver rhoeas, which does not accumulate morphinan alkaloids. An ancestral relationship between these enzymes is supported by a conservation of introns in the gene fusions and independent orthologs. Suppression of REPI transcripts using virus-induced gene silencing in opium poppy reduced levels of (R)-reticuline and morphinan alkaloids and increased the overall abundance of (S)-reticuline and its O-methylated derivatives. Discovery of REPI completes the isolation of genes responsible for known steps of morphine biosynthesis.

  4. Thermostable Alcohol Dehydrogenase from Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 for Enantioselective Bioconversion of Aromatic Secondary Alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xi; Zhang, Chong; Orita, Izumi; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2013-01-01

    A novel thermostable alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) showing activity toward aromatic secondary alcohols was identified from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakarensis KOD1 (TkADH). The gene, tk0845, which encodes an aldo-keto reductase, was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme was found to be a monomer with a molecular mass of 31 kDa. It was highly thermostable with an optimal temperature of 90°C and a half-life of 4.5 h at 95°C. The apparent Km values for the cofactors NAD(P)+ and NADPH were similar within a range of 66 to 127 μM. TkADH preferred secondary alcohols and accepted various ketones and aldehydes as substrates. Interestingly, the enzyme could oxidize 1-phenylethanol and its derivatives having substituents at the meta and para positions with high enantioselectivity, yielding the corresponding (R)-alcohols with optical purities of greater than 99.8% enantiomeric excess (ee). TkADH could also reduce 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone to (R)-2,2,2-trifluoro-1-phenylethanol with high enantioselectivity (>99.6% ee). Furthermore, the enzyme showed high resistance to organic solvents and was particularly highly active in the presence of H2O–20% 2-propanol and H2O–50% n-hexane or n-octane. This ADH is expected to be a useful tool for the production of aromatic chiral alcohols. PMID:23354700

  5. Overexpression of chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase in Arabidopsis enhances leaf growth and elucidates in-vivo function of reductase and thioredoxin domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni eToivola

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant chloroplasts have versatile thioredoxin systems including two thioredoxin reductases and multiple types of thioredoxins. Plastid-localized NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTRC contains both reductase (NTRd and thioredoxin (TRXd domains in a single polypeptide and forms homodimers. To study the action of NTRC and NTRC domains in vivo, we have complemented the ntrc knockout line of Arabidopsis with the wild type and full-length NTRC genes, in which 2-Cys motifs either in NTRd, or in TRXd were inactivated. The ntrc line was also transformed either with the truncated NTRd or TRXd alone. Overexpression of wild-type NTRC promoted plant growth by increasing leaf size and biomass yield of the rosettes. Complementation of the ntrc line with the full-length NTRC gene containing an active reductase but an inactive thioredoxin domain, or vice versa, recovered wild-type chloroplast phenotype and, partly, rosette biomass production, indicating that the NTRC domains are capable of interacting with other chloroplast thioredoxin systems. Overexpression of truncated NTRd or TRXd in ntrc background did not restore wild-type phenotype. Modelling of the 3-dimensional structure of the NTRC dimer indicates extensive interactions between the NTR domains and the TRX domains further stabilize the dimeric structure. The long linker region between the NTRd and TRXd, however, allows flexibility for the position of the TRXd in the dimer. Supplementation of the TRXd in the NTRC homodimer model by free chloroplast thioredoxins indicated that TRXf is the most likely partner to interact with NTRC. We propose that overexpression of NTRC promotes plant biomass yield both directly by stimulation of chloroplast biosynthetic and protected pathways controlled by NTRC and indirectly via free chloroplast thioredoxins. Our data indicate that overexpression of chloroplast thiol redox-regulator has a potential to increase biofuel yield in plant and algal species suitable for

  6. Annotating Enzymes of Uncertain Function: The Deacylation of d-Amino Acids by Members of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, J.; Fedorov, A; Xu, C; Brown, S; Fedorov, E; Babbitt, P; Almo, S; Raushel, F

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic activities of three members of the amidohydrolase superfamily were discovered using amino acid substrate libraries. Bb3285 from Bordetella bronchiseptica, Gox1177 from Gluconobacter oxidans, and Sco4986 from Streptomyces coelicolor are currently annotated as d-aminoacylases or N-acetyl-d-glutamate deacetylases. These three enzymes are 22-34% identical to one another in amino acid sequence. Substrate libraries containing nearly all combinations of N-formyl-d-Xaa, N-acetyl-d-Xaa, N-succinyl-d-Xaa, and l-Xaa-d-Xaa were used to establish the substrate profiles for these enzymes. It was demonstrated that Bb3285 is restricted to the hydrolysis of N-acyl-substituted derivatives of d-glutamate. The best substrates for this enzyme are N-formyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.8 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), N-acetyl-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 5.2 x 10{sup 6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}), and l-methionine-d-glutamate (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.4 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). Gox1177 and Sco4986 preferentially hydrolyze N-acyl-substituted derivatives of hydrophobic d-amino acids. The best substrates for Gox1177 are N-acetyl-d-leucine (k{sub cat}/K{sub m} = 3.2 x 104 M{sup -1} s-1), N-acetyl-d-tryptophan (kcat/Km = 4.1 x 104 M-1 s-1), and l-tyrosine-d-leucine (kcat/Km = 1.5 x 104 M-1 s-1). A fourth protein, Bb2785 from B. bronchiseptica, did not have d-aminoacylase activity. The best substrates for Sco4986 are N-acetyl-d-phenylalanine and N-acetyl-d-tryptophan. The three-dimensional structures of Bb3285 in the presence of the product acetate or a potent mimic of the tetrahedral intermediate were determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The side chain of the d-glutamate moiety of the inhibitor is ion-paired to Arg-295, while the {alpha}-carboxylate is ion-paired with Lys-250 and Arg-376. These results have revealed the chemical and structural determinants for substrate specificity in this protein. Bioinformatic analyses of an additional {approx}250

  7. Characteristics and expression patterns of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH gene superfamily of foxtail millet (Setaria italica L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Chen

    Full Text Available Recent genomic sequencing of the foxtail millet, an abiotic, stress-tolerant crop, has provided a great opportunity for novel gene discovery and functional analysis of this popularly-grown grass. However, few stress-mediated gene families have been studied. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs comprise a gene superfamily encoding NAD (P +-dependent enzymes that play the role of "aldehyde scavengers", which indirectly detoxify cellular ROS and reduce the effect of lipid peroxidation meditated cellular toxicity under various environmental stresses. In the current paper, we identified a total of 20 ALDH genes in the foxtail millet genome using a homology search and a phylogenetic analysis and grouped them into ten distinct families based on their amino acid sequence identity. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of foxtail millet reveals that both tandem and segmental duplication contributed significantly to the expansion of its ALDH genes. The exon-intron structures of members of the same family in foxtail millet or the orthologous genes in rice display highly diverse distributions of their exonic and intronic regions. Also, synteny analysis shows that the majority of foxtail millet and rice ALDH gene homologs exist in the syntenic blocks between the two, implying that these ALDH genes arose before the divergence of cereals. Semi-quantitative and real-time quantitative PCR data reveals that a few SiALDH genes are expressed in an organ-specific manner and that the expression of a number of foxtail millet ALDH genes, such as, SiALDH7B1, SiALDH12A1 and SiALDH18B2 are up-regulated by osmotic stress, cold, H2O2, and phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA. Furthermore, the transformation of SiALDH2B2, SiALDH10A2, SiALDH5F1, SiALDH22A1, and SiALDH3E2 into Escherichia coli (E.coli was able to improve their salt tolerance. Taken together, our results show that genome-wide identification characteristics and expression analyses provide unique opportunities for assessing

  8. Characteristics and expression patterns of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily of foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu; Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhao-shi; Li, Lian-cheng; Chen, Xue-ping; Ma, You-zhi

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic sequencing of the foxtail millet, an abiotic, stress-tolerant crop, has provided a great opportunity for novel gene discovery and functional analysis of this popularly-grown grass. However, few stress-mediated gene families have been studied. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) comprise a gene superfamily encoding NAD (P) +-dependent enzymes that play the role of "aldehyde scavengers", which indirectly detoxify cellular ROS and reduce the effect of lipid peroxidation meditated cellular toxicity under various environmental stresses. In the current paper, we identified a total of 20 ALDH genes in the foxtail millet genome using a homology search and a phylogenetic analysis and grouped them into ten distinct families based on their amino acid sequence identity. Furthermore, evolutionary analysis of foxtail millet reveals that both tandem and segmental duplication contributed significantly to the expansion of its ALDH genes. The exon-intron structures of members of the same family in foxtail millet or the orthologous genes in rice display highly diverse distributions of their exonic and intronic regions. Also, synteny analysis shows that the majority of foxtail millet and rice ALDH gene homologs exist in the syntenic blocks between the two, implying that these ALDH genes arose before the divergence of cereals. Semi-quantitative and real-time quantitative PCR data reveals that a few SiALDH genes are expressed in an organ-specific manner and that the expression of a number of foxtail millet ALDH genes, such as, SiALDH7B1, SiALDH12A1 and SiALDH18B2 are up-regulated by osmotic stress, cold, H2O2, and phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA). Furthermore, the transformation of SiALDH2B2, SiALDH10A2, SiALDH5F1, SiALDH22A1, and SiALDH3E2 into Escherichia coli (E.coli) was able to improve their salt tolerance. Taken together, our results show that genome-wide identification characteristics and expression analyses provide unique opportunities for assessing the functional

  9. Proinflammatory response during Ebola virus infection of primate models: possible involvement of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Lisa E; Young, Howard A; Jahrling, Peter B; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2002-03-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) infections are characterized by dysregulation of normal host immune responses. Insight into the mechanism came from recent studies in nonhuman primates, which showed that EBOV infects cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS), resulting in apoptosis of bystander lymphocytes. In this study, we evaluated serum levels of cytokines/chemokines in EBOV-infected nonhuman primates, as possible correlates of this bystander apoptosis. Increased levels of interferon (IFN)-alpha, IFN-beta, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-18, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta were observed in all EBOV-infected monkeys, indicating the occurrence of a strong proinflammatory response. To investigate the mechanism(s) involved in lymphoid apoptosis, soluble Fas (sFas) and nitrate accumulation were measured. sFas was detected in 4/9 animals, while, elevations of nitrate accumulation occurred in 3/3 animals. To further evaluate the potential role of these factors in the observed bystander apoptosis and intact animals, in vitro cultures were prepared of adherent human monocytes/macrophages (PHM), and monocytes differentiated into immature dendritic cells (DC). These cultures were infected with EBOV and analyzed for cytokine/chemokine induction and expression of apoptosis-related genes. In addition, the in vitro EBOV infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) resulted in strong cytokine/chemokine induction, a marked increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and an increase in the number of apoptotic lymphocytes examined by electron microscopy. Increased levels of sFAS were detected in PHM cultures, although, 90% of EBOV-infected PHM were positive for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) by immunohistochemistry, RNA analysis, and flow cytometry. Inactivated EBOV also effected increased TRAIL expression in PHM, suggesting that the TNF receptor superfamily may be involved in apoptosis of the host lymphoid cells, and that induction may occur

  10. The tomato RLK superfamily: phylogeny and functional predictions about the role of the LRRII-RLK subfamily in antiviral defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Tetsu; Deguchi, Michihito; Brustolini, Otávio J B; Santos, Anésia A; Silva, Fabyano F; Fontes, Elizabeth P B

    2012-12-02

    Receptor-like kinases (RLKs) play key roles during development and in responses to the environment. Despite the relevance of the RLK family and the completion of the tomato genome sequencing, the tomato RLK family has not yet been characterized, and a framework for functional predictions of the members of the family is lacking. To generate a complete list of all the members of the tomato RLK family, we performed a phylogenetic analysis using the Arabidopsis family as a template. A total of 647 RLKs were identified in the tomato genome, which were organized into the same subfamily clades as Arabidopsis RLKs. Only eight of 58 RLK subfamilies exhibited specific expansion/reduction compared to their Arabidopsis counterparts. We also characterized the LRRII-RLK family by phylogeny, genomic analysis, expression profile and interaction with the virulence factor from begomoviruses, the nuclear shuttle protein (NSP). The LRRII subfamily members from tomato and Arabidopsis were highly conserved in both sequence and structure. Nevertheless, the majority of the orthologous pairs did not display similar conservation in the gene expression profile, indicating that these orthologs may have diverged in function after speciation. Based on the fact that members of the Arabidopsis LRRII subfamily (AtNIK1, AtNIK2 and AtNIK3) interact with the begomovirus nuclear shuttle protein (NSP), we examined whether the tomato orthologs of NIK, BAK1 and NsAK genes interact with NSP of Tomato Yellow Spot Virus (ToYSV). The tomato orthologs of NSP interactors, SlNIKs and SlNsAK, interacted specifically with NSP in yeast and displayed an expression pattern consistent with the pattern of geminivirus infection. In addition to suggesting a functional analogy between these phylogenetically classified orthologs, these results expand our previous observation that NSP-NIK interactions are neither virus-specific nor host-specific. The tomato RLK superfamily is made-up of 647 proteins that form a

  11. The tomato RLK superfamily: phylogeny and functional predictions about the role of the LRRII-RLK subfamily in antiviral defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakamoto Tetsu

    2012-12-01

    superfamily is made-up of 647 proteins that form a monophyletic tree with the Arabidopsis RLKs and is divided into 58 subfamilies. Few subfamilies have undergone expansion/reduction, and only six proteins were lineage-specific. Therefore, the tomato RLK family shares functional and structural conservation with Arabidopsis. For the LRRII-RLK members SlNIK1 and SlNIK3, we observed functions analogous to those of their Arabidopsis counterparts with respect to protein-protein interactions and similar expression profiles, which predominated in tissues that support high efficiency of begomovirus infection. Therefore, NIK-mediated antiviral signaling is also likely to operate in tomato, suggesting that tomato NIKs may be good targets for engineering resistance against tomato-infecting begomoviruses.

  12. Kinetic properties and inhibition of Trypanosoma cruzi 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado-Guerrrero, Ramón; Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    A detailed kinetic analysis of the recombinant soluble enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGR) from Trypanosoma cruzi has been performed. The enzyme catalyzes the normal anabolic reaction and the reductant is NADPH. It also catalyzes the oxidation of mevalonate but at a lower propo...

  13. Photoaffinity labeling of steroid 5 alpha-reductase of rat liver and prostate microsomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, T.; Cheung, A.H.; Reynolds, G.F.; Rasmusson, G.H.

    1985-01-01

    21-Diazo-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione (Diazo-MAPD) inhibits steroid 5 alpha-reductase in liver microsomes of female rats with a K/sub i/ value of 8.7 +/- 1.7 nM, and the inhibition is competitive with testosterone. It also inhibits the binding of a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, [ 3 H] 17 beta-N,N-diethylcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([ 3 H]4-MA), to the enzyme in liver microsomes. The inhibition of 5 alpha-reductase activity and of inhibitor binding activity by diazo-MAPD becomes irreversible upon UV irradiation. [1,2- 3 H]Diazo-MAPD binds to a single high affinity site in liver microsomes of female rats, and this binding requires NADPH. Without UV irradiation, this binding is reversible, and it becomes irreversible upon UV irradiation. Both the initial reversible binding and the subsequent irreversible conjugation after UV irradiation are inhibited by inhibitors (diazo-MAPD and 4-MA) and substrates (progesterone and testosterone) of 5 alpha-reductase, but they are not inhibited by 5 alpha-reduced steroids. Photoaffinity labeled liver microsomes of female rats were solubilized and fractionated by high performance gel filtration. The radioactive conjugate eluted in one major peak at Mr 50,000

  14. Caracemide, a site-specific irreversible inhibitor of protein R1 of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, I. K.; Cornett, Claus; Karlsson, M.

    1992-01-01

    The anticancer drug caracemide, N-acetyl-N,O-di(methylcarbamoyl)hydroxylamine, and one of its degradation products, N-acetyl-O-methylcarbamoyl-hydroxylamine, were found to inhibit the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli by specific interaction with its larger component protein R1....

  15. Differential stress-induced regulation of two quinone reductases in the brown rot Basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roni Cohen; Melissa R. Suzuki; Kenneth E. Hammel

    2004-01-01

    Quinone reductases (QRDs) have two important functions in the basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum, which causes brown rot of wood. First, a QRD is required to generate biodegradative hydroxyl radicals via redox cycling between two G. trabeum extracellular metabolites, 2,5-dimethoxyhydroquinone (2,5-DMHQ) and 2,5-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (2,5- DMBQ). Second, because 2,...

  16. NADPH-dependent D-aldose reductases and xylose fermentation in Fusarium oxysporum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagiotou, Gianni; Christakopoulos, P.

    2004-01-01

    Two aldose (xylose) reductases (ARI and ARII) from Fusarium oxysporum were purified and characterized. The native ARI was a monomer with M-r 41000, pI 5.2 and showed a 52-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, while ARII was homodimeric with a subunit of M-r 37000, pI 3.6 and a 60-fold preference...

  17. 1H, 15N and 13C NMR Assignments of Mouse Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Åshild S.; Aachmann, Finn L.; Sal, Lena S.; Kim, Hwa-Young; Del Conte, Rebecca; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Dikiy, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    A recombinant mouse methionine-r-sulfoxide reductase 2 (MsrB2ΔS) isotopically labeled with 15N and 15N/13C was generated. We report here the 1H, 15N and 13C NMR assignments of the reduced form of this protein. PMID:19636904

  18. Cloning, expression and antigenicity of the L. donovani reductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A T; Kemp, K; Theander, T G

    2001-01-01

    (K). Only 2 of 22 plasma samples from patients with visceral leishmaniasis were found to have detectable anti-reductase antibodies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from one of three individuals previously infected with visceral leishmaniasis proliferated in the presence of recombinant...

  19. Thioredoxin reductase is a key factor in the oxidative stress response of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, L.M.; Molenaar, D.; Wels, M.W.W.; Teusink, B.; Bron, P.A.; Vos, de W.M.; Smid, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Background - Thioredoxin (TRX) is a powerful disulfide oxido-reductase that catalyzes a wide spectrum of redox reactions in the cell. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of the TRX system in the oxidative stress response in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. Results - We have identified the

  20. The role of quinone reductase (NQO1) and quinone chemistry in quercetin cytotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gliszczynska-Swiglo, A.; Woude, van der H.; Haan, de L.H.J.; Tyrakowska, B.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of quercetin on viability and proliferation of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells and CHO cells overexpressing human quinone reductase (CHO+NQO1) were studied to investigate the involvement of the pro-oxidant quinone chemistry of quercetin. The toxicity of menadione was significantly

  1. Thioredoxin reductase is a key factor in the oxidative stress response of Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serrano, L.M.; Molenaar, D; Sanders, M.W.W.; Teusink, B.; Bron, P.A.; Vos, W.M. de; Smid, E.J.

    2007-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Thioredoxin (TRX) is a powerful disulfide oxido-reductase that catalyzes a wide spectrum of redox reactions in the cell. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of the TRX system in the oxidative stress response in Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1. RESULTS: We have

  2. A Rational Approach to Identify Inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Enoyl Acyl Carrier Protein Reductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chhabria, M. T.; Parmar, K. B.; Brahmkshatriya, Pathik

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 21 (2013), s. 3878-3883 ISSN 1381-6128 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : mycobacterium tuberculosis * enoyl acyl carrier protein reductase * pharmacophore modeling * molecular docking * binding interactions Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 3.288, year: 2013

  3. In silico docking studies of aldose reductase inhibitory activity of commercially available flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the aldose reductase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like biochanin, butein, esculatin, fisetin and herbacetin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2, based on the Lamarckian genetic algorithm principle. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -9.33 kcal/mol to -7.23 kcal/mol when compared with that of the standard (-8.73 kcal/mol. Inhibition constant (144.13 µM to 4.98 µM and intermolecular energy (-11.42 kcal/mol to -7.83 kcal/mol of the flavonoids also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed aldose reductase inhibitory activity because of its structural properties. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetes.

  4. A soluble 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Javier; Montalvetti, A; Camacho, A

    1997-01-01

    of the genes described from eukaryotic organisms and the deduced amino acid sequence could be aligned with the C-terminal half of animal and plant reductases exhibiting pronounced similarity to other eukaryotic counterparts. Further examination of the 5' flanking region by cDNA analysis and establishment...

  5. Low activity of superoxide dismutase and high activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes from centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Jeune, B; Nybo, H

    1998-01-01

    aged between 60 and 79 years. MEASUREMENTS: enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase (GR) in erythrocytes. Functional capacity among the centenarians was evaluated by Katz' index of activities of daily living, the Physical...

  6. Prevention of hemodynamic and vascular albumin filtration changes in diabetic rats by aldose reductase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilton, R.G.; Chang, K.; Pugliese, G.; Eades, D.M.; Province, M.A.; Sherman, W.R.; Kilo, C.; Williamson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    This study investigated hemodynamic changes in diabetic rats and their relationship to changes in vascular albumin permeation and increased metabolism of glucose to sorbitol. The effects of 6 wk of streptozocin-induced diabetes and three structurally different inhibitors of aldose reductase were examined on (1) regional blood flow (assessed with 15-microns 85Sr-labeled microspheres) and vascular permeation by 125I-labeled bovine serum albumin (BSA) and (2) glomerular filtration rate (assessed by plasma clearance of 57Co-labeled EDTA) and urinary albumin excretion (determined by radial immunodiffusion assay). In diabetic rats, blood flow was significantly increased in ocular tissues (anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, and optic nerve), sciatic nerve, kidney, new granulation tissue, cecum, and brain. 125I-BSA permeation was increased in all of these tissues except brain. Glomerular filtration rate and 24-h urinary albumin excretion were increased 2- and 29-fold, respectively, in diabetic rats. All three aldose reductase inhibitors completely prevented or markedly reduced these hemodynamic and vascular filtration changes and increases in tissue sorbitol levels in the anterior uvea, posterior uvea, retina, sciatic nerve, and granulation tissue. These observations indicate that early diabetes-induced hemodynamic changes and increased vascular albumin permeation and urinary albumin excretion are aldose reductase-linked phenomena. Discordant effects of aldose reductase inhibitors on blood flow and vascular albumin permeation in some tissues suggest that increased vascular albumin permeation is not entirely attributable to hemodynamic change

  7. At the Perphery of the Amidohydrolase Superfamily: Bh0493 from Bacillus halodurans Catalyzes the Isomerization of D-Galacturonate to D-Tagaturonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen,T.; Brown, S.; Fedorov, A.; Fedorov, E.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Raushel, F.

    2008-01-01

    The amidohydrolase superfamily is a functionally diverse set of enzymes that catalyzes predominantly hydrolysis reactions involving sugars, nucleic acids, amino acids, and organophosphate esters. One of the most divergent members of this superfamily, uronate isomerase from Escherichia coli, catalyzes the isomerization of d-glucuronate to d-fructuronate and d-galacturonate to d-tagaturonate and is the only uronate isomerase in this organism. A gene encoding a putative uronate isomerase in Bacillus halodurans (Bh0705) was identified based on sequence similarity to uronate isomerases from other organisms. Kinetic evidence indicates that Bh0705 is relatively specific for the isomerization of d-glucuronate to d-fructuronate, confirming this functional assignment. Despite a low sequence identity to all other characterized uronate isomerases, phylogenetic and network-based analysis suggests that a second gene in this organism, Bh0493, is also a uronate isomerase, although it is an outlier in the group, with <20% sequence identity to any other characterized uronate isomerase from another species. The elucidation of the X-ray structure at a resolution of 2.0 Angstroms confirms that Bh0493 is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily with conserved residues common to other members of the uronate isomerase family. Functional characterization of this protein shows that unlike Bh0705, Bh0493 can utilize both d-glucuronate and d-galacturonate as substrates. In B. halodurans, Bh0705 is found in an operon for the metabolism of d-glucuronate, whereas Bh0493 is in an operon for the metabolism of d-galacturonate. These results provide the first identification of a uronate isomerase that operates in a pathway distinct from that for d-glucuronate. While most organisms that contain this pathway have only one gene for a uronate isomerase, sequence analysis and operon context show that five other organisms also appear to have two genes and one organism appears to have three genes for

  8. Reduced bone mass and muscle strength in male 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara H Windahl

    Full Text Available Androgens are important regulators of bone mass but the relative importance of testosterone (T versus dihydrotestosterone (DHT for the activation of the androgen receptor (AR in bone is unknown. 5α-reductase is responsible for the irreversible conversion of T to the more potent AR activator DHT. There are two well established isoenzymes of 5α-reductase (type 1 and type 2, encoded by separate genes (Srd5a1 and Srd5a2. 5α-reductase type 2 is predominantly expressed in male reproductive tissues whereas 5α-reductase type 1 is highly expressed in liver and moderately expressed in several other tissues including bone. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of 5α-reductase type 1 for bone mass using Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Four-month-old male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had reduced trabecular bone mineral density (-36%, p<0.05 and cortical bone mineral content (-15%, p<0.05 but unchanged serum androgen levels compared with wild type (WT mice. The cortical bone dimensions were reduced in the male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice as a result of a reduced cortical periosteal circumference compared with WT mice. T treatment increased the cortical periosteal circumference (p<0.05 in orchidectomized WT mice but not in orchidectomized Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice. Male Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice demonstrated a reduced forelimb muscle grip strength compared with WT mice (p<0.05. Female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice had slightly increased cortical bone mass associated with elevated circulating levels of androgens. In conclusion, 5α-reductase type 1 inactivated male mice have reduced bone mass and forelimb muscle grip strength and we propose that these effects are due to lack of 5α-reductase type 1 expression in bone and muscle. In contrast, the increased cortical bone mass in female Srd5a1⁻/⁻ mice, is an indirect effect mediated by elevated circulating androgen levels.

  9. Molecular and Functional Characterization of Mouse S5D-SRCRB: A New Group B Member of the Scavenger Receptor Cysteine-Rich Superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró-Julià, Cristina; Roselló, Sandra; Martínez, Vanesa G

    2011-01-01

    The scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily (SRCR-SF) members are transmembrane and/or secreted receptors exhibiting one or several repeats of a cysteine-rich protein module of ∼100 aa, named scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR). Two types of SRCR domains (A or B) have been reported, which...... differ in the number of coding exons and intradomain cysteines. Although no unifying function has been reported for SRCR-SF members, recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) was recently shown for some of them. In this article, we report the structural and functional characterization...

  10. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-(2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy)androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy(/sup 3/H)anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  11. Mitochondrial fumarate reductase as a target of chemotherapy: from parasites to cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Chika; Tomitsuka, Eriko; Esumi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Shigeharu; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-01

    Recent research on respiratory chain of the parasitic helminth, Ascaris suum has shown that the mitochondrial NADH-fumarate reductase system (fumarate respiration), which is composed of complex I (NADH-rhodoquinone reductase), rhodoquinone and complex II (rhodoquinol-fumarate reductase) plays an important role in the anaerobic energy metabolism of adult parasites inhabiting hosts. The enzymes in these parasite-specific pathways are potential target for chemotherapy. We isolated a novel compound, nafuredin, from Aspergillus niger, which inhibits NADH-fumarate reductase in helminth mitochondria at nM order. It competes for the quinone-binding site in complex I and shows high selective toxicity to the helminth enzyme. Moreover, nafuredin exerts anthelmintic activity against Haemonchus contortus in in vivo trials with sheep indicating that mitochondrial complex I is a promising target for chemotherapy. In addition to complex I, complex II is a good target because its catalytic direction is reverse of succinate-ubiquionone reductase in the host complex II. Furthermore, we found atpenin and flutolanil strongly and specifically inhibit mitochondrial complex II. Interestingly, fumarate respiration was found not only in the parasites but also in some types of human cancer cells. Analysis of the mitochondria from the cancer cells identified an anthelminthic as a specific inhibitor of the fumarate respiration. Role of isoforms of human complex II in the hypoxic condition of cancer cells and fetal tissues is a challenge. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biochemistry of Mitochondria, Life and Intervention 2010. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Inhibition of steroid 5 alpha-reductase by specific aliphatic unsaturated fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Liao, S

    1992-01-01

    Human or rat microsomal 5 alpha-reductase activity, as measured by enzymic conversion of testosterone into 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone or by binding of a competitive inhibitor, [3H]17 beta-NN-diethulcarbamoyl-4-methyl-4-aza-5 alpha-androstan-3-one ([3H]4-MA) to the reductase, is inhibited by low concentrations (less than 10 microM) of certain polyunsaturated fatty acids. The relative inhibitory potencies of unsaturated fatty acids are, in decreasing order: gamma-linolenic acid greater than cis-4,7,10,13,16,19-docosahexaenoic acid = cis-6,9,12,15-octatetraenoic acid = arachidonic acid = alpha-linolenic acid greater than linoleic acid greater than palmitoleic acid greater than oleic acid greater than myristoleic acid. Other unsaturated fatty acids such as undecylenic acid, erucic acid and nervonic acid, are inactive. The methyl esters and alcohol analogues of these compounds, glycerols, phospholipids, saturated fatty acids, retinoids and carotenes were inactive even at 0.2 mM. The results of the binding assay and the enzymic assay correlated well except for elaidic acid and linolelaidic acid, the trans isomers of oleic acid and linoleic acid respectively, which were much less active than their cis isomers in the binding assay but were as potent in the enzymic assay. gamma-Linolenic acid had no effect on the activities of two other rat liver microsomal enzymes: NADH:menadione reductase and glucuronosyl transferase. gamma-Linolenic acid, the most potent inhibitor tested, decreased the Vmax. and increased Km values of substrates, NADPH and testosterone, and promoted dissociation of [3H]4-MA from the microsomal reductase. gamma-Linolenic acid, but not the corresponding saturated fatty acid (stearic acid), inhibited the 5 alpha-reductase activity, but not the 17 beta-dehydrogenase activity, of human prostate cancer cells in culture. These results suggest that unsaturated fatty acids may play an important role in regulating androgen action in target cells. PMID:1637346

  13. Regulation of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity and cholesterol biosynthesis by oxylanosterols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panini, S.R.; Sexton, R.C.; Gupta, A.K.; Parish, E.J.; Chitrakorn, S.; Rudney, H.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of rat intestinal epithelial cell cultures with the oxidosqualene cyclase inhibitor, 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)-ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one (U18666A), resulted in an accumulation of squalene 2,3:22,23-dioxide (SDO). When U18666A was withdrawn and the cells were treated with the sterol 14 alpha-demethylase inhibitor, ketoconazole, SDO was metabolized to a product identified as 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol. To test the biological effects and cellular metabolism of this compound, we prepared 24(RS),25-epoxylanosterol by chemical synthesis. The epimeric mixture of 24,25-epoxylanosterols could be resolved by high performance liquid chromatography on a wide-pore, non-endcapped, reverse phase column. Both epimers were effective suppressors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase activity of IEC-6 cells. The suppressive action of the natural epimer, 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol, but not that of 24(R),25-epoxylanosterol could be completely prevented by ketoconazole. IEC-6 cells could efficiently metabolize biosynthetic 24(S),25-epoxy[ 3 H]anosterol mainly to the known reductase-suppressor 24(S),25-epoxycholesterol. This metabolism was substantially reduced by ketoconazole. These data support the conclusion that 24(S),25-epoxylanosterol per se is not a suppressor of HMG-CoA reductase activity but is a precursor to a regulatory oxysterol(s). It has recently been reported that 25-hydroxycholesterol can occur naturally in cultured cells in amounts sufficient to effect regulation of HMG-CoA reductase. In order to investigate the biological effects of possible precursors of 25-hydroxycholesterol, we chemically synthesized 25-hydroxylanosterol and 25-hydroxylanostene-3-one. Both oxylanosterol derivatives suppressed cellular sterol synthesis at the level of HMG-CoA reductase. (Abstract Truncated)

  14. N-terminus determines activity and specificity of styrene monooxygenase reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Thomas; Scholtissek, Anika; Westphal, Adrie H; van Berkel, Willem J H; Tischler, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Styrene monooxygenases (SMOs) are two-enzyme systems that catalyze the enantioselective epoxidation of styrene to (S)-styrene oxide. The FADH 2 co-substrate of the epoxidase component (StyA) is supplied by an NADH-dependent flavin reductase (StyB). The genome of Rhodococcus opacus 1CP encodes two SMO systems. One system, which we define as E1-type, displays homology to the SMO from Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120. The other system, originally reported as a fused system (RoStyA2B), is defined as E2-type. Here we found that E1-type RoStyB is inhibited by FMN, while RoStyA2B is known to be active with FMN. To rationalize the observed specificity of RoStyB for FAD, we generated an artificial reductase, designated as RoStyBart, in which the first 22 amino acid residues of RoStyB were joined to the reductase part of RoStyA2B, while the oxygenase part (A2) was removed. RoStyBart mainly purified as apo-protein and mimicked RoStyB in being inhibited by FMN. Pre-incubation with FAD yielded a turnover number at 30°C of 133.9±3.5s -1 , one of the highest rates observed for StyB reductases. RoStyBart holo-enzyme switches to a ping-pong mechanism and fluorescence analysis indicated for unproductive binding of FMN to the second (co-substrate) binding site. In summary, it is shown for the first time that optimization of the N-termini of StyB reductases allows the evolution of their activity and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inhibition of aldose reductase activity by Cannabis sativa chemotypes extracts with high content of cannabidiol or cannabigerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeriglio, Antonella; Giofrè, Salvatore V; Galati, Enza M; Monforte, Maria T; Cicero, Nicola; D'Angelo, Valeria; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Circosta, Clara

    2018-02-07

    Aldose reductase (ALR2) is a key enzyme involved in diabetic complications and the search for new aldose reductase inhibitors (ARIs) is currently very important. The synthetic ARIs are often associated with deleterious side effects and medicinal and edible plants, containing compounds with aldose reductase inhibitory activity, could be useful for prevention and therapy of diabetic complications. Non-psychotropic phytocannabinoids exert multiple pharmacological effects with therapeutic potential in many diseases such as inflammation, cancer, diabetes. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effects of extracts and their fractions from two Cannabis sativa L. chemotypes with high content of cannabidiol (CBD)/cannabidiolic acid (CBDA) and cannabigerol (CBG)/cannabigerolic acid (CBGA), respectively, on human recombinant and pig kidney aldose reductase activity in vitro. A molecular docking study was performed to evaluate the interaction of these cannabinoids with the active site of ALR2 compared to known ARIs. The extracts showed significant dose-dependent aldose reductase inhibitory activity (>70%) and higher than fractions. The inhibitory activity of the fractions was greater for acidic cannabinoid-rich fractions. Comparative molecular docking results have shown a higher stability of the ALR2-cannabinoid acids complex than the other inhibitors. The extracts of Cannabis with high content of non-psychotropic cannabinoids CBD/CBDA or CBG/CBGA significantly inhibit aldose reductase activity. These results may have some relevance for the possible use of C. sativa chemotypes based preparations as aldose reductase inhibitors. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Multiple Soluble Fe(III Reductases in Gram-Positive Thermophilic Bacterium Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Pal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoanaerobacter indiensis BSB-33 has been earlier shown to reduce Fe(III and Cr(VI anaerobically at 60°C optimally. Further, the Gram-positive thermophilic bacterium contains Cr(VI reduction activity in both the membrane and cytoplasm. The soluble fraction prepared from T. indiensis cells grown at 60°C was found to contain the majority of Fe(III reduction activity of the microorganism and produced four distinct bands in nondenaturing Fe(III reductase activity gel. Proteins from each of these bands were partially purified by chromatography and identified by mass spectrometry (MS with the help of T. indiensis proteome sequences. Two paralogous dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenases (LPDs, thioredoxin reductase (Trx, NADP(H-nitrite reductase (Ntr, and thioredoxin disulfide reductase (Tdr were determined to be responsible for Fe(III reductase activity. Amino acid sequence and three-dimensional (3D structural similarity analyses of the T. indiensis Fe(III reductases were carried out with Cr(VI reducing proteins from other bacteria. The two LPDs and Tdr showed very significant sequence and structural identity, respectively, with Cr(VI reducing dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase from Thermus scotoductus and thioredoxin disulfide reductase from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. It appears that in addition to their iron reducing activity T. indiensis LPDs and Tdr are possibly involved in Cr(VI reduction as well.

  17. Synthesis and Activity of a New Series of(Z-3-Phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic Acid Derivatives as Aldose Reductase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Jie Wang

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available During the course of studies directed towards the discovery of novel aldose reductase inhibitors for the treatment of diabetic complications, we synthesized a series of new (Z-3-phenyl-2-benzoylpropenoic acid derivatives and tested their in vitro inhibitory activities on rat lens aldose reductase. Of these compounds, (Z-3-(3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-2-(4-methylbenzoylpropenoicacid(3k was identified as the most potent inhibitor, with an IC50 of 0.49μM. The theoretical binding mode of 3k was obtained by simulation of its docking into the active site of the human aldose reductase crystal structure.

  18. The 1.8-Å resolution crystal structure of YDR533Cp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A member of the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark A.; Amour, Courtney V. St.; Collins, Jennifer L.; Ringe, Dagmar; Petsko, Gregory A.

    2004-01-01

    The yeast gene YDR533C encodes a protein belonging to the DJ-1/ThiJ/PfpI superfamily. This family includes the human protein DJ-1, which is mutated in autosomal recessive early-onset Parkinson's disease. The function of DJ-1 and its yeast homologue YDR533Cp is unknown. We report here the crystal structure of YDR533Cp at 1.8-Å resolution. The structure indicates that the closest relative to YDR533Cp is the Escherichia coli heat shock protein Hsp31 (YedU), which has both chaperone and protease activity. As expected, the overall fold of the core domain of YDR533Cp is also similar to that of DJ-1 and the bacterial protease PfpI. YDR533Cp contains a possible catalytic triad analogous to that of Hsp31 and an additional domain that is present in Hsp31 but is not seen in DJ-1 and other members of the family. The cysteine in this triad (Cys-138) is oxidized in this crystal structure, similar to modifications seen in the corresponding cysteine in the crystal structure of DJ-1. YDR533Cp appears to be a dimer both in solution and the crystal, but this dimer is formed by a different interface than that found in Hsp31 or other members of the superfamily. PMID:14745011

  19. MP20, the second most abundant lens membrane protein and member of the tetraspanin superfamily, joins the list of ligands of galectin-3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donaldson Paul J

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although MP20 is the second most highly expressed membrane protein in the lens its function remains an enigma. Putative functions for MP20 have recently been inferred from its assignment to the tetraspanin superfamily of integral membrane proteins. Members of this family have been shown to be involved in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration, and adhesion. In this study, we show that MP20 associates with galectin-3, a known adhesion modulator. Results MP20 and galectin-3 co-localized in selected areas of the lens fiber cell plasma membrane. Individually, these proteins purified with apparent molecular masses of 60 kDa and 22 kDa, respectively. A 104 kDa complex was formed in vitro upon mixing the purified proteins. A 102 kDa complex of MP20 and galectin-3 could also be isolated from detergent-solubilized native fiber cell membranes. Binding between MP20 and galectin-3 was disrupted by lactose suggesting the lectin site was involved in the interaction. Conclusions MP20 adds to a growing list of ligands of galectin-3 and appears to be the first representative of the tetraspanin superfamily identified to possess this specificity.

  20. D-Ribulose 5-Phosphate 3-Epimerase: Functional and Structural Relationships to Members of the Ribulose-Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrel Superfamily

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akana,J.; Federov, A.; Federov, E.; Novak, W.; Babbitt, P.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2006-01-01

    The 'ribulose phosphate binding' superfamily defined by the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP) database is considered the result of divergent evolution from a common ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8}-barrel ancestor. The superfamily includes D-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), and 3-keto-L-gulonate 6-phosphate decarboxylase (KGPDC), members of the OMPDC suprafamily, as well as enzymes involved in histidine and tryptophan biosynthesis that utilize phosphorylated metabolites as substrates. We now report studies of the functional and structural relationships of RPE to the members of the superfamily. As suggested by the results of crystallographic studies of the RPEs from rice and Plasmodium falciparum, the RPE from Streptococcus pyogenes is activated by Zn{sup 2+} which binds with a stoichiometry of one ion per polypeptide. Although wild type RPE has a high affinity for Zn{sup 2+} and inactive apoenzyme cannot be prepared, the affinity for Zn{sup 2+} is decreased by alanine substitutions for the two histidine residues that coordinate the Zn{sup 2+} ion (H34A and H67A); these mutant proteins can be prepared in an inactive, metal-free form and activated by exogenous Zn{sup 2+}. The crystal structure of the RPE was solved at 1.8 Angstroms resolution in the presence of D-xylitol 5-phosphate, an inert analogue of the D-xylulose 5-phosphate substrate. This structure suggests that the 2,3-enediolate intermediate in the 1,1-proton transfer reaction is stabilized by bidentate coordination to the Zn{sup 2+} that also is liganded to His 34, Asp 36, His 67, and Asp 176; the carboxylate groups of the Asp residues are positioned also to function as the acid/base catalysts. Although the conformation of the bound analogue resembles those of ligands bound in the active sites of OMPDC and KGPDC, the identities of the active site residues that coordinate the essential Zn{sup 2+} and participate as acid/base catalysts

  1. Nitrite-dependent vasodilation is facilitated by hypoxia and is independent of known NO-generating nitrite reductase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fago, Angela; Dalsgaard, Thomas; Fago, Angela

    2007-01-01

    is largely intrinsic to the vessel and that under hypoxia physiological nitrite concentrations are sufficient to induce NO-mediated vasodilation independently of the nitrite reductase activities investigated here. Possible reaction mechanisms for nitrite vasoactivity, including formation of S...

  2. Clinical pattern, mutations and in vitro residual activity in 33 patients with severe 5, 10 methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huemer, Martina; Mulder-Bleile, Regina; Burda, Patricie; Froese, D. Sean; Suormala, Terttu; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Dobbelaere, Dries; Gokcay, Gulden; Demirkol, Muebeccel; Haeberle, Johannes; Lossos, Alexander; Mengel, Eugen; Morris, Andrew A.; Niezen-Koning, Klary E.; Plecko, Barbara; Parini, Rossella; Rokicki, Dariusz; Schiff, Manuel; Schimmel, Mareike; Sewell, Adrian C.; Sperl, Wolfgang; Spiekerkoetter, Ute; Steinmann, Beat; Taddeucci, Grazia; Trejo-Gabriel-Galan, Jose M.; Trefz, Friedrich; Tsuji, Megumi; Antonia Vilaseca, Maria; von Kleist-Retzow, Juergen-Christoph; Walker, Valerie; Zeman, Jiri; Baumgartner, Matthias R.; Fowler, Brian

    Background Severe methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency is a rare inborn defect disturbing the remethylation of homocysteine to methionine ( Methods Clinical, biochemical and treatment data was obtained from physicians by using a questionnaire. MTHFR activity was measured in primary

  3. Dihydrofolate reductase and dihydropteroate synthase genotypes associated with in vitro resistance of Plasmodium falciparum to pyrimethamine, trimethoprim, sulfadoxine, and sulfamethoxazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khalil, Insaf; Rønn, Anita M; Alifrangis, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A total of 70 Plasmodium falciparum isolates were tested in vitro against pyrimethamine (PYR), trimethoprim (TRM), sulfadoxine (SDX), and sulfamethoxazole (SMX), and their dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (dhps) genotypes were determined. dhfr genotypes correlated...

  4. Colour formation in fermented sausages by meat-associated staphylococci with different nitrite- and nitrate-reductase activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtterup, Jacob; Olsen, Karsten; Knøchel, Susanne

    2008-01-01

    nitrate depended on the specific Staphylococcus strain. Strains with high nitrate-reductase activity showed a significantly faster rate of pigment formation, but other factors were of influence as well. Product stability for the sliced, packaged sausage was evaluated as surface colour and oxidation......Three Staphylococcus strains, S. carnosus, S. simulans and S. saprophyticus, selected due to their varying nitrite and/or nitrate-reductase activities, were used to initiate colour formation during sausage fermentation. During fermentation of sausages with either nitrite or nitrate added, colour...... with hexanal content, and may be used as predictive tools. Overall, nitrite- and nitrate-reductase activities of Staphylococcus strains in nitrite-cured sausages were of limited importance regarding colour development, while in nitrate-cured sausages strains with higher nitrate reductase activity were crucial...

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Nidhi; Mandal, P. K.; Gautham, Namasivayam; Chadha, Anju

    2013-01-01

    The expression, purification, crystallization, preliminary X-ray diffraction and molecular-replacement studies on C. parapsilosis carbonyl reductase are reported. The NAD(P)H-dependent carbonyl reductase from Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330 catalyses the asymmetric reduction of ethyl 4-phenyl-2-oxobutanoate to ethyl (R)-4-phenyl-2-hydroxybutanoate, a precursor of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors such as Cilazapril and Benazepril. The carbonyl reductase was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by GST-affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Crystals were obtained by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method and diffracted to 1.86 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contained two molecules of carbonyl reductase, with a solvent content of 48%. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a search model

  6. Nitrate reductase and nitrous oxide production by Fusarium oxysporum 11dn1 under aerobic and anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakov, A V; Nosikov, A N; Skrynnikova, E V; L'vov, N P

    2000-08-01

    The fungus Fusarium oxysporum 11dn1 was found to be able to grow and produce nitrous oxide on nitrate-containing medium in anaerobic conditions. The rate of nitrous oxide formation was three to six orders of magnitude lower than the rates of molecular nitrogen production by common denitrifying bacteria. Acetylene and ammonia did not affect the release of nitrous oxide release. It was shown that under anaerobic conditions fast increase of nitrate reductase activity occurred, caused by the synthesis of enzyme de novo and protein dephosphorylation. Reverse transfer of the mycelium to aerobic conditions led to a decline in nitrate reductase activity and stopped nitrous oxide production. The presence of two nitrate reductases was shown, which differed in molecular mass, location, temperature optima, and activity in nitrate- and ammonium-containing media. Two enzymes represent assimilatory and dissimilatory nitrate reductases, which are active in aerobic and anaerobic conditions, respectively.

  7. Normal bone density in male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5a- reductase 2 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa Elaine Maria Frade

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone is an androgen-dependent tissue, but it is not clear whether the androgen action in bone depends on testosterone or on dihydrotestosterone. Patients with 5alpha-reductase 2 deficiency present normal levels of testosterone and low levels of dihydrotestosterone, providing an in vivo human model for the analysis of the effect of testosterone on bone. OBJECTIVE: To analyze bone mineral density in 4 adult patients with male pseudohermaphroditism due to 5alpha-reductase 2 deficiency. RESULTS: Three patients presented normal bone mineral density of the lumbar column (L1-L4 and femur neck, and the other patient presented a slight osteopenia in the lumbar column. CONCLUSION: Patients with dihydrotestosterone deficiency present normal bone mineral density, suggesting that dihydrotestosterone is not the main androgen acting in bone.

  8. The structure of Lactococcus lactis thioredoxin reductase reveals molecular features of photo-oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjoldager, Nicklas; Bang, Maria Blanner; Rykær, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent homodimeric flavoenzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) provides reducing equivalents to thioredoxin, a key regulator of various cellular redox processes. Crystal structures of photo-inactivated thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) from the Gram-positive bacterium Lactococcus lactis have...... been determined. These structures reveal novel molecular features that provide further insight into the mechanisms behind the sensitivity of this enzyme toward visible light. We propose that a pocket on the si-face of the isoalloxazine ring accommodates oxygen that reacts with photo-excited FAD...... thus be a widespread feature among bacterial TrxR with the described characteristics, which affords applications in clinical photo-therapy of drug-resistant bacteria....

  9. X-Ray crystal structure of GarR—tartronate semialdehyde reductase from Salmonella typhimurium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, J.; Zhou, M.; Moy, S.; Collart, F.

    2009-01-01

    Tartronate semialdehyde reductases (TSRs), also known as 2-hydroxy-3-oxopropionate reductases, catalyze the reduction of tartronate semialdehyde using NAD as cofactor in the final stage of D-glycerate biosynthesis. These enzymes belong to family of structurally and mechanically related β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases which differ in substrate specificity and catalyze reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Here, we present the crystal structure of GarR a TSR from Salmonella typhimurium determined by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method and refined to 1.65 Å resolution. The active site of the enzyme contains L-tartrate which most likely mimics a position of a glycerate which is a product of the enzyme reaction. The analysis of the TSR structure shows also a putative NADPH binding site in the enzyme. PMID:19184529

  10. X-ray crystal structure of GarR-tartronate semialdehyde reductase from Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipiuk, J; Zhou, M; Moy, S; Collart, F; Joachimiak, A

    2009-09-01

    Tartronate semialdehyde reductases (TSRs), also known as 2-hydroxy-3-oxopropionate reductases, catalyze the reduction of tartronate semialdehyde using NAD as cofactor in the final stage of D-glycerate biosynthesis. These enzymes belong to family of structurally and mechanically related beta-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases which differ in substrate specificity and catalyze reactions in specific metabolic pathways. Here, we present the crystal structure of GarR a TSR from Salmonella typhimurium determined by the single-wavelength anomalous diffraction method and refined to 1.65 A resolution. The active site of the enzyme contains L-tartrate which most likely mimics a position of a glycerate which is a product of the enzyme reaction. The analysis of the TSR structure shows also a putative NADPH binding site in the enzyme.

  11. Novel bacterial sulfur oxygenase reductases from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Z-W; Liu, Y-Y; Wu, J-F

    2007-01-01

    The microbial community and sulfur oxygenase reductases of metagenomic DNA from bioreactors treating gold-bearing concentrates were studied by 16S rRNA library, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), conventional cultivation, and molecular cloning. Results indicated that major bacterial......) of bacteria and archaea were 4.59 x 10(9) and 6.68 x 10(5), respectively. Bacterial strains representing Acidithiobacillus, Leptospirillum, and Sulfobacillus were isolated from the bioreactors. To study sulfur oxidation in the reactors, pairs of new PCR primers were designed for the detection of sulfur...... oxygenase reductase (SOR) genes. Three sor-like genes, namely, sor (Fx), sor (SA), and sor (SB) were identified from metagenomic DNAs of the bioreactors. The sor (Fx) is an inactivated SOR gene and is identical to the pseudo-SOR gene of Ferroplasma acidarmanus. The sor (SA) and sor (SB) showed...

  12. Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin Reductase Is Sensitive to Light Inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Viennet, Thibault; Skjoldager, Nicklas

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin, involved in numerous redox pathways, is maintained in the dithiol state by the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent flavoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR). Here, TrxR from Lactococcus lactis is compared with the well-characterized TrxR from Escherichia coli. The two...... enzymes belong to the same class of low-molecular weight thioredoxin reductases and display similar kcat values (∼25 s-1) with their cognate thioredoxin. Remarkably, however, the L. lactis enzyme is inactivated by visible light and furthermore reduces molecular oxygen 10 times faster than E. coli Trx......-resolution mass spectrometric analysis of heat-extracted FAD from light-damaged TrxR revealed a mass increment of 13.979 Da, relative to that of unmodified FAD, corresponding to the addition of one oxygen atom and the loss of two hydrogen atoms. Tandem mass spectrometry confined the increase in mass...

  13. Selective reduction of AKR1C2 in prostate cancer and its role in DHT metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Chang, Lilly; VanDenBerg, David; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Stolz, Andrew

    2003-03-01

    As androgens play an essential role in prostate cancer, we sought to develop a real-time PCR to characterize mRNA expression profiles of human members of the Aldo-Keto Reductase (AKR) 1C gene family, as well as of 5 alpha-steroid reductase Type II (SRD5A2) in prostate cancer samples. Functional activity and regulation of AKR1C2, a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type III, was also assessed in prostate cancer cell lines. Gene specific PCR primers were established and relative gene expression of human AKR1C family members was determined in paired samples of cancerous and surrounding unaffected prostate tissue. AKR1C2 preferentially reduces DHT to the weak metabolite 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol (3 alpha-diol) without conversion of 3 alpha-diol to DHT in the PC-3 cell line, and its expression was increased by DHT treatment in LNCaP cells. Selectively reduced expression of AKR1C2 mRNA, but not AKR1C1 (97% sequence identity), was found in approximately half of the pairs whereas AKR1C3 relative expression was not significantly altered. No aberrant expression of AKR1C4 expression or significant differences in SRD5A2 gene expression were found. AKR1C2 functions as a DHT reductase in prostate-derived cells lines and is regulated by DHT. Additional studies are needed to further define the significance of reduced AKR1C2 expression in prostate cancer and its potential role in modulating local availability of DHT. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Pre-clinical activity of PR-104 as monotherapy and in combination with sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbattista, Maria R; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Gu, Yongchuan; Nickel, Jennifer E; Pullen, Susan M; Patterson, Adam V; Wilson, William R; Guise, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    PR-104 is a clinical stage bioreductive prodrug that is converted in vivo to its cognate alcohol, PR-104A. This dinitrobenzamide mustard is reduced to activated DNA cross-linking metabolites (hydroxylamine PR-104H and amine PR-104M) under hypoxia by one-electron reductases and independently of hypoxia by the 2-electron reductase aldo-keto reductase 1C3 (AKR1C3). High expression of AKR1C3, along with extensive hypoxia, suggested the potential of PR-104 for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, a phase IB trial with sorafenib demonstrated significant toxicity that was ascribed in part to reduced PR-104A clearance, likely reflecting compromised glucuronidation in patients with advanced HCC. Here, we evaluate the activity of PR-104 in HCC xenografts (HepG2, PLC/PRF/5, SNU-398, Hep3B) in mice, which do not significantly glucuronidate PR-104A. Cell line differences in sensitivity to PR-104A in vitro under aerobic conditions could be accounted for by differences in both expression of AKR1C3 (high in HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5) and sensitivity to the major active metabolite PR-104H, to which PLC/PRF/5 was relatively resistant, while hypoxic selectivity of PR-104A cytotoxicity and reductive metabolism was greatest in the low-AKR1C3 SNU-398 and Hep3B lines. Expression of AKR1C3 in HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 xenografts was in the range seen in 21 human HCC specimens. PR-104 monotherapy elicited significant reductions in growth of Hep3B and HepG2 xenografts, and the combination with sorafenib was significantly active in all 4 xenograft models. The results suggest that better-tolerated analogs of PR-104, without a glucuronidation liability, may have the potential to exploit AKR1C3 and/or hypoxia in HCC in humans.

  15. Genetic and Biochemical Analysis of Intragenic Complementation Events among Nitrate Reductase Apoenzyme-Deficient Mutants of Nicotiana Plumbaginifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Pelsy, F.; Gonneau, M.

    1991-01-01

    Intragenic complementation has been observed between apoenzyme nitrate reductase-deficient mutants (nia) of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia. In vivo as in vitro, the NADH-nitrate reductase (NR) activity in plants heterozygous for two different nia alleles was lower than in the wild type plant, but the plants were able to grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source. NR activity, absent in extracts of homozygous nia mutants was restored by mixing extracts from two complementing nia mutants. These obser...

  16. Azospirillum Inoculation Alters Nitrate Reductase Activity and Nitrogen Uptake in Wheat Plant Under Water Deficit Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    N. Aliasgharzad, N. Aliasgharzad; Heydaryan, Zahra; Sarikhani, M.R

    2014-01-01

    Water deficit stress usually diminishes nitrogen uptake by plants. There are evidences that some nitrogen fixing bacteria can alleviate this stress by supplying nitrogen and improving its metabolism in plants. Four Azospirillum strains, A. lipoferum AC45-II, A. brasilense AC46-I, A. irakense AC49-VII and A. irakense AC51-VI were tested for nitrate reductase activity (NRA). In a pot culture experiment using a sandy loam soil, wheat plants (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Sardari) were inoculated with...

  17. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Forlani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2. In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  18. A QM/MM–Based Computational Investigation on the Catalytic Mechanism of Saccharopine Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Almasi, Joel N.; Bushnell, Eric A.C.; Gauld, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Saccharopine reductase from Magnaporthe grisea, an NADPH-containing enzyme in the α-aminoadipate pathway, catalyses the formation of saccharopine, a precursor to L-lysine, from the substrates glutamate and α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde. Its catalytic mechanism has been investigated using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) ONIOM-based approaches. In particular, the overall catalytic pathway has been elucidated and the effects of electron correlation and the anisotropic polar protein...

  19. Nitrate reductase activity of Staphylococcus carnosus affecting the color formation in cured raw ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse Née Danz, Ramona; Gibis, Monika; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The influence of the nitrate reductase activity of two Staphylococcus carnosus strains used as starter cultures on the formation of nitrate, nitrite and color pigments in cured raw ham was investigated. In this context, microbiological, chemical and multivariate image analyses were carried out on cured raw hams, which were injected with different brines containing either nitrite or nitrate, with or without the S. carnosus starter cultures. During processing and storage, the viable counts of staphylococci remained constant at 6.5logcfu/g in the hams inoculated with starter cultures, while the background microbiota of the hams processed without the starter cultures developed after 14days. Those cured hams inoculated with S. carnosus LTH 7036 (high nitrate reductase activity) showed the highest decrease in nitrate and high nitrite concentrations in the end product, but were still in the range of the legal European level. The hams cured with nitrate and without starter culture or with the other strain, S. carnosus LTH 3838 (low nitrate reductase activity) showed higher residual nitrate levels and a lower nitrite content in the end product. The multivariate image analysis identified spatial and temporal differences in the meat pigment profiles of the differently cured hams. The cured hams inoculated with S. carnosus LTH 3838 showed an uncured core due to a delay in pigment formation. Therefore, the selection of starter cultures based on their nitrate reductase activity is a key point in the formation of curing compounds and color pigments in cured raw ham manufacture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Systemic and ocular pharmacokinetics of N-4-benzoylaminophenylsulfonylglycine (BAPSG), a novel aldose reductase inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Sunkara, Gangadhar; Ayalasomayajula, Surya P.; Rao, Cheruku S.; Vennerstrom, Jonathan L.; DeRuiter, Jack; Kompella, Uday B.

    2004-01-01

    To better develop N-[4-(benzoylamino)phenylsulfonyl]glycine (BAPSG), a potent and selective aldose reductase inhibitor capable of delaying the progression of ocular diabetic complications, the objective of this study was to assess its pharmacokinetics. The plasma pharmacokinetics of BASPG was assessed in male Sprague-Dawley rats following intravenous, intraperitoneal and oral routes of administration and its distribution to various tissues including those of the eye was studied following intr...

  1. Isolation and characterization of dihydrofolate reductase from trimethoprim-susceptible and trimethoprim-resistant Pseudomonas cepacia.

    OpenAIRE

    Burns, J L; Lien, D M; Hedin, L A

    1989-01-01

    Trimethoprim resistance was investigated in cystic fibrosis isolates of Pseudomonas cepacia. Determination of the MIC of trimethoprim for 111 strains revealed at least two populations of resistant organisms, suggesting the presence of more than one mechanism of resistance. Investigation of the antibiotic target, dihydrofolate reductase, was undertaken in both a susceptible strain and a strain with high-level resistance (MIC, greater than 1,000 micrograms/ml). The enzyme was purified by using ...

  2. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF 5αα-REDUCTASE AND ANDROGEN RECEPTOR GENE POLYMORPHISMS IN PROSTATE CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. B. Loran

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of prostate cancer is inseparably linked with the effect of androgens on the fundamental prostatic intracellular processes,such as proliferation, apoptosis, which is realized through a number of second messengers. Major of them are the AR gene encoding androgenreceptors and the SRD5A2 gene encoding 5α-reductase enzyme. This paper deals with the study of the role of these genes in prostate cancer.  

  3. [Aldose reductase gene polymorphism and rate of appearance of retinopathy in non insulin dependent diabetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, P; Acosta, A M; Schiaffino, R; Díaz, R; Alvarado, D; O'Brien, A; Muñoz, X; Arriagada, P; Claro, J C; Vega, R; Vollrath, V; Velasco, S; Emmerich, M; Maiz, A

    1999-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that polymorphisms associated to the aldose reductase gene could be related to early retinopathy in noninsulin dependent diabetics (NIDDM). There is also new interest on the genetic modulation of coagulation factors in relation to this complication. To look for a possible relationship between the rate of appearance of retinopathy and the genotype of (AC)n polymorphic marker associated to aldose reductase gene. A random sample of 27 NIDDM, aged 68.1 +/- 10.6 years, with a mean diabetes duration of 20.7 +/- 4.8 years and a mean glycosilated hemoglobin of 10.6 +/- 1.6%, was studied. The genotype of the (AC)n, polymorphic marker associated to the 5' end of the aldose reductase (ALR2) gene was determined by 32P-PCR plus sequenciation. Mutations of the factor XIII-A gene were studied by single stranded conformational polymorphism, sequenciation and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Four patients lacked the (AC)24 and had a higher rate of appearance of retinopathy than patients with the (AC)24 allele (0.0167 and 0.0907 score points per year respectively, p = 0.047). Both groups had similar glycosilated hemoglobin (11.7 +/- 0.2 and 10.5 +/- 1.6% respectively). Factor XIII gene mutations were not related to the rate of appearance of retinopathy. Our data suggest that the absence of the (AC)24 allele of the (AC)n polymorphic marker associated to the 5' end of the aldose reductase gene, is associated to a five fold reduction of retinopathy appearance rate.

  4. Microbial production of branched-chain dicarboxylate 2-methylsuccinic acid via enoate reductase-mediated bioreduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Yang, Yaping; Zhang, Ruihua; Shen, Xiaolin; Chen, Zhenya; Wang, Jia; Yuan, Qipeng; Yan, Yajun

    2018-01-01

    2-Methylsuccinic acid (2-MSA) is a C5 branched-chain dicarboxylate that serves as an attractive synthon for the synthesis of polymers with extensive applications in coatings, cosmetic solvents and bioplastics. However, the lack of natural pathways for 2-MSA biosynthesis has limited its application as a promising bio-replacement. Herein, we conceived a non-natural three-step biosynthetic route for 2-MSA, via employing the citramalate pathway in combination with enoate reductase-mediated bioreduction of the pathway intermediate citraconate. First, over-expression of codon-optimized citramalate synthase variant CimA* from Methanococcus jannaschii, endogenous isopropylmalate isomerase EcLeuCD and enoate reductase YqjM from Bacillus subtilis allowed the production of 2-MSA in Escherichia coli for the first time, with a titer of 0.35g/L in shake flask experiments. Subsequent screening of YqjM-like enoate reductases of different bacterial origins enabled identification and characterization of a new NAD(P)H-dependent enoate reductase KpnER from Klebsiella pneumoniae, which exhibited higher activity towards citraconate than YqjM. Incorporation of KpnER into the 2-MSA biosynthetic pathway led to 2-MSA production improvement to a titer of 0.96g/L in aerobic condition. Subsequent optimizations including cofactor regeneration, microaerobic cultivation and host strain engineering, boosted 2-MSA titer to 3.61g/L with a molar yield of 0.36 in shake flask experiments. This work established a promising platform for 2-MSA bioproduction, which enabled the highest titer of 2-MSA production in microbial hosts so far. Copyright © 2017 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  6. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Nocek, Boguslaw; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2017-08-02

    In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2). In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER) that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  7. Functional Characterization of Four Putative δ1-Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Reductases from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forlani, Giuseppe; Nocek, Boguslaw; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2017-08-02

    In most living organisms, the amino acid proline is synthesized starting from both glutamate and ornithine. In prokaryotes, in the absence of an ornithine cyclodeaminase that has been identified to date only in a small number of soil and plant bacteria, these pathways share the last step, the reduction of delta(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) catalyzed by P5C reductase (EC 1.5.1.2). In several species, multiple forms of P5C reductase have been reported, possibly reflecting the dual function of proline. Aside from its common role as a building block of proteins, proline is indeed also involved in the cellular response to osmotic and oxidative stress conditions. Genome analysis of Bacillus subtilis identifies the presence of four genes (ProH, ProI, ProG, and ComER) that, based on bioinformatic and phylogenic studies, were defined as respectively coding a putative P5C reductase. Here we describe the cloning, heterologous expression, functional analysis and small-angle X-ray scattering studies of the four affinity-purified proteins. Results showed that two of them, namely ProI and ComER, lost their catalytic efficiency or underwent subfunctionalization. In the case of ComER, this could be likely explained by the loss of the ability to form a dimer, which has been previously shown to be an essential structural feature of the catalytically active P5C reductase. The properties of the two active enzymes are consistent with a constitutive role for ProG, and suggest that ProH expression may be beneficial to satisfy an increased need for proline.

  8. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of 14 C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production

  9. Cell death by SecTRAPs: thioredoxin reductase as a prooxidant killer of cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Anestål

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: SecTRAPs (selenium compromised thioredoxin reductase-derived apoptotic proteins can be formed from the selenoprotein thioredoxin reductase (TrxR by targeting of its selenocysteine (Sec residue with electrophiles, or by its removal through C-terminal truncation. SecTRAPs are devoid of thioredoxin reductase activity but can induce rapid cell death in cultured cancer cell lines by a gain of function. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Both human and rat SecTRAPs killed human A549 and HeLa cells. The cell death displayed both apoptotic and necrotic features. It did not require novel protein synthesis nor did it show extensive nuclear fragmentation, but it was attenuated by use of caspase inhibitors. The redox active disulfide/dithiol motif in the N-terminal domain of TrxR had to be maintained for manifestation of SecTRAP cytotoxicity. Stopped-flow kinetics showed that NADPH can reduce the FAD moiety in SecTRAPs at similar rates as in native TrxR and purified SecTRAPs could maintain NADPH oxidase activity, which was accelerated by low molecular weight substrates such as juglone. In a cellular context, SecTRAPs triggered extensive formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and consequently antioxidants could protect against the cell killing by SecTRAPs. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that formation of SecTRAPs could contribute to the cytotoxicity seen upon exposure of cells to electrophilic agents targeting TrxR. SecTRAPs are prooxidant killers of cells, triggering mechanisms beyond those of a mere loss of thioredoxin reductase activity.

  10. Characterization of a cultured human T-cell line with genetically altered ribonucleotide reductase activity. Model for immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, D; Ullman, B

    1983-04-10

    From human CCRF-CEM T-cells growing in continuous culture, we have selected, isolated, and characterized a clonal cell line, APHID-D2, with altered ribonucleotide reductase activity. In comparative growth rate experiments, the APHID-D2 cell line is less sensitive than the parental cell line to growth inhibition by deoxyadenosine in the presence of 10 microM erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine, an inhibitor of adenosine deaminase. The APHID-D2 cell line has elevated levels of all four dNTPs. The resistance of the APHID-D2 cell line to growth inhibition by deoxyadenosine and the abnormal dNTP levels can be explained by the fact that the APHID-D2 ribonucleotide reductase, unlike the parental ribonucleotide reductase, is not normally sensitive to inhibition by dATP. These results suggest that the allosteric site of ribonucleotide reductase which binds both dATP and ATP is altered in the APHID-D2 line. The isolation of a mutant clone of human T-cells which contains a ribonucleotide reductase that has lost its normal sensitivity to dATP and which is resistant to deoxyadenosine-mediated growth inhibition suggests that a primary pathogenic target of accumulated dATP in lymphocytes from patients with adenosine deaminase deficiency may be the cellular ribonucleotide reductase.

  11. Purification of nitrate reductase from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia by affinity chromatography using 5'AMP-sepharose and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureaux, T; Leydecker, M T; Meyer, C

    1989-02-15

    Nitrate reductase was purified from leaves of Nicotiana plumbaginifolia using either 5'AMP-Sepharose chromatography or two steps of immunoaffinity chromatography involving monoclonal antibodies directed against nitrate reductase from maize and against ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase from N. plumbaginifolia. Nitrate reductase obtained by the first method was purified 1000-fold to a specific activity of 9 units/mg protein. The second method produced an homogenous enzyme, purified 21,000-fold to a specific activity of 80 units/mg protein. SDS/PAGE of nitrate reductase always resulted in two bands of 107 and 99.5 kDa. The 107-kDa band was the nitrate reductase subunit of N. plumbaginifolia; the smaller one of 99.5 kDa is thought, as commonly reported, to result from proteolysis of the larger protein. The molecular mass of 107 kDa is close to the values calculated from the coding sequences of the two nitrate reductase genes recently cloned from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi).

  12. Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Activity of Compounds from  Zea mays L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyeon; Kim, Jin Kyu; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kang, Il Jun; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    Aldose reductase (AR) inhibitors have a considerable therapeutic potential against diabetes complications and do not increase the risk of hypoglycemia. Through bioassay-guided fractionation of an EtOH extract of the kernel from purple corn (Zea mays L.), 7 nonanthocyanin phenolic compounds (compound 1–7) and 5 anthocyanins (compound 8–12) were isolated. These compounds were investigated by rat lens aldose reductase (RLAR) inhibitory assays. Kinetic analyses of recombinant human aldose reductase (rhAR) were performed, and intracellular galactitol levels were measured. Hirsutrin, one of 12 isolated compounds, showed the most potent RLAR inhibitory activity (IC50, 4.78 μM). In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate concentration, hirsutrin showed competitive inhibition against rhAR. Furthermore, hirsutrin inhibited galactitol formation in rat lens and erythrocytes sample incubated with a high concentration of galactose; this finding indicates that hirsutrin may effectively prevent osmotic stress in hyperglycemia. Therefore, hirsutrin derived from Zea mays L. may be a potential therapeutic agent against diabetes complications. PMID:23586057

  13. Atomic Structure of Salutaridine Reductase from the Opium Poppy (Papaver somniferum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higashi, Yasuhiro; Kutchan, Toni M.; Smith, Thomas J. (Danforth)

    2011-11-18

    The opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L.) is one of the oldest known medicinal plants. In the biosynthetic pathway for morphine and codeine, salutaridine is reduced to salutaridinol by salutaridine reductase (SalR; EC 1.1.1.248) using NADPH as coenzyme. Here, we report the atomic structure of SalR to a resolution of {approx}1.9 {angstrom} in the presence of NADPH. The core structure is highly homologous to other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. The major difference is that the nicotinamide moiety and the substrate-binding pocket are covered by a loop (residues 265-279), on top of which lies a large 'flap'-like domain (residues 105-140). This configuration appears to be a combination of the two common structural themes found in other members of the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase family. Previous modeling studies suggested that substrate inhibition is due to mutually exclusive productive and nonproductive modes of substrate binding in the active site. This model was tested via site-directed mutagenesis, and a number of these mutations abrogated substrate inhibition. However, the atomic structure of SalR shows that these mutated residues are instead distributed over a wide area of the enzyme, and many are not in the active site. To explain how residues distal to the active site might affect catalysis, a model is presented whereby SalR may undergo significant conformational changes during catalytic turnover.

  14. A genetic screen reveals a periplasmic copper chaperone required for nitrite reductase activity in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Freda E-C; Djoko, Karrera Y; Bent, Stephen J; Day, Christopher J; McEwan, Alastair G; Jennings, Michael P

    2015-09-01

    Under conditions of low oxygen availability, Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are able to respire via a partial denitrification pathway in which nitrite is converted to nitrous oxide. In this process, nitrite reductase (AniA), a copper (Cu)-containing protein converts nitrite to NO, and this product is converted to nitrous oxide by nitric oxide reductase (NorB). NorB also confers protection against toxic NO, and so we devised a conditional lethal screen, using a norB mutant, to identify mutants that were resistant to nitrite-dependent killing. After random-deletion mutagenesis of N. meningitidis, this genetic screen identified a gene encoding a Cu chaperone that is essential for AniA function, AccA. Purified AccA binds one Cu (I) ion and also possesses a second binding site for Cu (II). This novel periplasmic Cu chaperone (AccA) appears to be essential for provision of Cu ions to AniA of pathogenic Neisseria to generate an active nitrite reductase. Apart from the Neisseria genus, AccA is distributed across a wide range of environmental Proteobacteria species. © FASEB.

  15. Relationship between nitrate reductase and nitrate uptake in phytoplankton in the Peru upwelling region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco, D.; MacIsaac, J.J.; Packard, T.T.; Dugdale, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) activity and 15 NO 3 - uptake in phytoplankton were compared under different environmental conditions on two cruises in the upwelling region off Peru. The NR activity and NO 3 - uptake rates responded differently to light and nutrients and the differences led to variations in the uptake:reductase ratio. Analysis of these variations suggests that the re-equilibration time of the two processes in response to environmental perturbation is an important source of variability. The nitrate uptake system responds faster than the nitrate reductase system. Considering these differences in response time, the basic differences in the two processes, and the differences in their measurement, the authors conclude that the NR activity measures the current nitrate-reducing potential, which relfects NO 3 - assimilation before the sampling time, while 15 NO 3 - uptake measures NO 3 - assimilation in the 6-h period following sampling. Thus, considering the sampling time as a point of reference, the former is a measure of the past and the latter is a measure of the future

  16. Effect of cystamine on rat tissue GSH level and glutathione reductase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovarova, H.; Pulpanova, J.

    1979-01-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) level and glutathione reductase activity were determined by means of the spectrophotometric method in various rat tissues after i.p. administration of cystamine (50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg). GSH amount dropped in the spleen and kidney at 10 and 20 min; following this interval, an increase of GSH level was observed in the liver at 20-30 min, in the spleen and kidney at 60 min after the treatment with a radioprotective cystamine dose (50 mg/kg). The changes in GSH level induced by a non-radioprotective cystamine dose (20 mg/kg) had an opposite tendency. The activity of glutathione reductase was decreased in all tissues studied. As to the mechanism of the radioprotective action, both the inactivation of glutathione reductase activity and the changes in GSH level seem to be the factors contributing to the radioprotective effect of cystamine by strengthening the cellular radioresistance. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RKD [de

  17. Structural insights into the neuroprotective-acting carbonyl reductase Sniffer of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgraja, Tanja; Ulschmid, Julia; Becker, Katja; Schneuwly, Stephan; Klebe, Gerhard; Reuter, Klaus; Heine, Andreas

    2004-10-01

    In vivo studies with the fruit-fly Drosophila melanogaster have shown that the Sniffer protein prevents age-dependent and oxidative stress-induced neurodegenerative processes. Sniffer is a NADPH-dependent carbonyl reductase belonging to the enzyme family of short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases (SDRs). The crystal structure of the homodimeric Sniffer protein from Drosophila melanogaster in complex with NADP+ has been determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion and refined to a resolution of 1.75 A. The observed fold represents a typical dinucleotide-binding domain as detected for other SDRs. With respect to the cofactor-binding site and the region referred to as substrate-binding loop, the Sniffer protein shows a striking similarity to the porcine carbonyl reductase (PTCR). This loop, in both Sniffer and PTCR, is substantially shortened compared to other SDRs. In most enzymes of the SDR family this loop adopts a well-defined conformation only after substrate binding and remains disordered in the absence of any bound ligands or even if only the dinucleotide cofactor is bound. In the structure of the Sniffer protein, however, the conformation of this loop is well defined, although no substrate is present. Molecular modeling studies provide an idea of how binding of substrate molecules to Sniffer could possibly occur.

  18. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatments, GmIFR was significantly induced by P. sojae, ethephon (ET), abscisic acid (placeCityABA), salicylic acid (SA). It is located in the cytoplasm when transiently expressed in soybean protoplasts. The daidzein levels reduced greatly for the seeds of transgenic plants, while the relative content of glyceollins in transgenic plants was significantly higher than that of non-transgenic plants. Furthermore, we found that the relative expression levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) of transgenic soybean plants were significantly lower than those of non-transgenic plants after incubation with P. sojae, suggesting an important role of GmIFR might function as an antioxidant to reduce ROS in soybean. The enzyme activity assay suggested that GmIFR has isoflavone reductase activity.

  19. Pichia stipitis xylose reductase helps detoxifying lignocellulosic hydrolysate by reducing 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural (HMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Röder Anja

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pichia stipitis xylose reductase (Ps-XR has been used to design Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that are able to ferment xylose. One example is the industrial S. cerevisiae xylose-consuming strain TMB3400, which was constructed by expression of P. stipitis xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase and overexpression of endogenous xylulose kinase in the industrial S. cerevisiae strain USM21. Results In this study, we demonstrate that strain TMB3400 not only converts xylose, but also displays higher tolerance to lignocellulosic hydrolysate during anaerobic batch fermentation as well as 3 times higher in vitro HMF and furfural reduction activity than the control strain USM21. Using laboratory strains producing various levels of Ps-XR, we confirm that Ps-XR is able to reduce HMF both in vitro and in vivo. Ps-XR overexpression increases the in vivo HMF conversion rate by approximately 20%, thereby improving yeast tolerance towards HMF. Further purification of Ps-XR shows that HMF is a substrate inhibitor of the enzyme. Conclusion We demonstrate for the first time that xylose reductase is also able to reduce the furaldehyde compounds that are present in undetoxified lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Possible implications of this newly characterized activity of Ps-XR on lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation are discussed.

  20. Protein 4.1, a component of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton and its related homologue proteins forming the protein 4.1/FERM superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander F Sikorski

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is focused on the domain structure and function of protein 4.1, one of the proteins belonging to the membrane skeleton. The protein 4.1 of the red blood cells (4.1R is a multifunctional protein that localizes to the membrane skeleton and stabilizes erythrocyte shape and membrane mechanical properties, such as deformability and stability, via lateral interactions with spectrin, actin, glycophorin C and protein p55. Protein 4.1 binding is modulated through the action of kinases and/or calmodulin-Ca2+. Non-erythroid cells express the 4.1R homologues: 4.1G (general type, 4.1B (brain type, and 4.1N (neuron type, and the whole group belongs to the protein 4.1 superfamily, which is characterized by the presence of a highly conserved FERM domain at the N-terminus of the molecule. Proteins 4.1R, 4.1G, 4.1N and 4.1B are encoded by different genes. Most of the 4.1 superfamily proteins also contain an actin-binding domain. To date, more than 40 members have been identified. They can be divided into five groups: protein 4.1 molecules, ERM proteins, talin-related molecules, protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTPH proteins and NBL4 proteins. We have focused our attention on the main, well known representatives of 4.1 superfamily and tried to choose the proteins which are close to 4.1R or which have distinct functions. 4.1 family proteins are not just linkers between the plasma membrane and membrane skeleton; they also play an important role in various processes. Some, such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK, non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells, play the role in cell adhesion. The other members control or take part in tumor suppression, regulation of cell cycle progression, inhibition of cell proliferation, downstream signaling of the glutamate receptors, and establishment of cell polarity; some are also involved in cell proliferation, cell motility, and/or cell-to-cell communication.

  1. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... containing exclusively SRCR and SID domains that binds to S. mutans. To define more closely the S. mutans-binding domain, consensus-based peptides of the SRCR domains and SIDs were designed and synthesized. Only one of the SRCR peptides, designated SRCRP2, and none of the SID peptides bound to S. mutans....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate...

  2. Vinorine synthase from Rauvolfia: the first example of crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of an enzyme of the BAHD superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xueyan; Koepke, Juergen; Bayer, Anja; Linhard, Verena; Fritzsch, Günter; Zhang, Bin; Michel, Hartmut; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2004-09-01

    Crystals of vinorine synthase (VS) from medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpentina expressed in Escherichia coli have been obtained by the hanging-drop technique at 305 K with ammonium sulfate and PEG 400 as precipitants. The enzyme is involved in the biosynthesis of the antiarrhythmic drug ajmaline and is a member of the BAHD superfamily of acyltransferases. So far, no three-dimensional structure of a member of this enzyme family is known. The crystals belong to the space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with cell dimensions of a=82.3 A, b=89.6 A and c=136.2 A. Under cryoconditions (120 K), a complete data set up to 2.8 A was collected at a synchrotron source.

  3. Solution structure and phylogenetics of Prod1, a member of the three-finger protein superfamily implicated in salamander limb regeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acely Garza-Garcia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following the amputation of a limb, newts and salamanders have the capability to regenerate the lost tissues via a complex process that takes place at the site of injury. Initially these cells undergo dedifferentiation to a state competent to regenerate the missing limb structures. Crucially, dedifferentiated cells have memory of their level of origin along the proximodistal (PD axis of the limb, a property known as positional identity. Notophthalmus viridescens Prod1 is a cell-surface molecule of the three-finger protein (TFP superfamily involved in the specification of newt limb PD identity. The TFP superfamily is a highly diverse group of metazoan proteins that includes snake venom toxins, mammalian transmembrane receptors and miscellaneous signaling molecules. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim of identifying potential orthologs of Prod1, we have solved its 3D structure and compared it to other known TFPs using phylogenetic techniques. The analysis shows that TFP 3D structures group in different categories according to function. Prod1 clusters with other cell surface protein TFP domains including the complement regulator CD59 and the C-terminal domain of urokinase-type plasminogen activator. To infer orthology, a structure-based multiple sequence alignment of representative TFP family members was built and analyzed by phylogenetic methods. Prod1 has been proposed to be the salamander CD59 but our analysis fails to support this association. Prod1 is not a good match for any of the TFP families present in mammals and this result was further supported by the identification of the putative orthologs of both CD59 and N. viridescens Prod1 in sequence data for the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The available data suggest that Prod1, and thereby its role in encoding PD identity, is restricted to salamanders. The lack of comparable limb-regenerative capability in other adult vertebrates could be

  4. Kinetic and Structural Characterization of a Heterohexamer 4-Oxalocrotonate Tautomerase from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl: Implications for Functional and Structural Diversity in the Tautomerase Superfamily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, Elizabeth A.; Fleming, Christopher D.; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Whitman, Christian P.; Pegan, Scott D.

    2010-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT) isozymes play prominent roles in the bacterial utilization of aromatic hydrocarbons as sole carbon sources. These enzymes catalyze the conversion of 2-hydroxy-2,4-hexadienedioate (or 2-hydroxymuconate) to 2-oxo-3-hexenedioate, where Pro-1 functions as a general base and shuttles a proton from the 2-hydroxyl group of the substrate to the C-5 position of the product. 4-OT, a homohexamer from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, is the most extensively studied 4-OT isozyme and the founding member of the tautomerase superfamily. A search of five thermophilic bacterial genomes identified a coded amino acid sequence in each that had been annotated as a tautomerase-like protein but lacked Pro-1. However, a nearby sequence has Pro-1, but the sequence is not annotated as a tautomerase-like protein. To characterize this group of proteins, two genes from Chloroflexus aurantiacus J-10-fl were cloned, and the corresponding proteins were expressed. Kinetic, biochemical, and X-ray structural analyses show that the two expressed proteins form a functional heterohexamer 4-OT (hh4-OT), composed of three αβ dimers. Like the P. putida enzyme, hh4-OT requires the amino-terminal proline and two arginines for the conversion of 2-hydroxymuconate to the product, implicating an analogous mechanism. In contrast to 4-OT, hh4-OT does not exhibit the low-level activity of another tautomerase superfamily member, the heterohexamer trans-3-chloroacrylic acid dehalogenase (CaaD). Characterization of hh4-OT enables functional assignment of the related enzymes, highlights the diverse ways the β-α-β building block can be assembled into an active enzyme, and provides further insight into the molecular basis of the low-level CaaD activity in 4-OT.

  5. Phylogenetic comparison of F-Box (FBX gene superfamily within the plant kingdom reveals divergent evolutionary histories indicative of genomic drift.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihua Hua

    Full Text Available The emergence of multigene families has been hypothesized as a major contributor to the evolution of complex traits and speciation. To help understand how such multigene families arose and diverged during plant evolution, we examined the phylogenetic relationships of F-Box (FBX genes, one of the largest and most polymorphic superfamilies known in the plant kingdom. FBX proteins comprise the target recognition subunit of SCF-type ubiquitin-protein ligases, where they individually recruit specific substrates for ubiquitylation. Through the extensive analysis of 10,811 FBX loci from 18 plant species, ranging from the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to numerous monocots and eudicots, we discovered strikingly diverse evolutionary histories. The number of FBX loci varies widely and appears independent of the growth habit and life cycle of land plants, with a little as 198 predicted for Carica papaya to as many as 1350 predicted for Arabidopsis lyrata. This number differs substantially even among closely related species, with evidence for extensive gains/losses. Despite this extraordinary inter-species variation, one subset of FBX genes was conserved among most species examined. Together with evidence of strong purifying selection and expression, the ligases synthesized from these conserved loci likely direct essential ubiquitylation events. Another subset was much more lineage specific, showed more relaxed purifying selection, and was enriched in loci with little or no evidence of expression, suggesting that they either control more limited, species-specific processes or arose from genomic drift and thus may provide reservoirs for evolutionary innovation. Numerous FBX loci were also predicted to be pseudogenes with their numbers tightly correlated with the total number of FBX genes in each species. Taken together, it appears that the FBX superfamily has independently undergone substantial birth/death in many plant lineages, with its size and rapid

  6. Sterol-induced Dislocation of 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl Coenzyme A Reductase from Endoplasmic Reticulum Membranes into the Cytosol through a Subcellular Compartment Resembling Lipid Droplets*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Isamu Z.; Liu, Pingsheng; Zehmer, John K.; Luby-Phelps, Katherine; Jo, Youngah; Anderson, Richard G. W.; DeBose-Boyd, Russell A.

    2010-01-01

    Sterol-induced binding to Insigs in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) allows for ubiquitination of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in cholesterol synthesis. This ubiquitination marks reductase for recognition by the ATPase VCP/p97, which mediates extraction and delivery of reductase from ER membranes to cytosolic 26 S proteasomes for degradation. Here, we report that reductase becomes dislocated from ER membranes into the cytosol of sterol-treated cells. This dislocation exhibits an absolute requirement for the actions of Insigs and VCP/p97. Reductase also appears in a buoyant fraction of sterol-treated cells that co-purifies with lipid droplets, cytosolic organelles traditionally regarded as storage depots for neutral lipids such as triglycerides and cholesteryl esters. Genetic, biochemical, and localization studies suggest a model in which reductase is dislodged into the cytosol from an ER subdomain closely associated with lipid droplets. PMID:20406816

  7. Expression of TGF-beta superfamily growth factors, their receptors, the associated SMADs and antagonists in five isolated size-matched populations of pre-antral follicles from normal human ovaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine Gry; Andersen, Kasper; Clement, Christian Alexandro

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily are known to have key roles in the regulation of follicular growth and development. The aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of TGF-β superfamily growth factors, their receptors, downstream SMAD signalling m...... growth. Moreover, the presence of multiple TGF-β/BMP antagonists imply that certain growth factors are subjected to local regulation on different levels which address another important level of intraovarian regulation of follicle development in humans.......In mammals, members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily are known to have key roles in the regulation of follicular growth and development. The aim of the study was to evaluate the expression of TGF-β superfamily growth factors, their receptors, downstream SMAD signalling...... molecules and TGF- β/BMP antagonists during early human folliculogenesis.Human preantral follicles were enzymatically isolated from surplus ovarian tissue obtained from women having ovarian cortical tissue frozen for fertility preservation. A total of 348 human preantral follicles, ranging from 40 to 200 µm...

  8. Inhibition of thioredoxin reductase but not of glutathione reductase by the major classes of alkylating and platinum-containing anticancer compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne-Barbara; Anestål, Karin; Jerremalm, Elin; Ehrsson, Hans; Arnér, Elias S J

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is important for cell proliferation, antioxidant defense, and redox signaling. Together with glutathione reductase (GR) it is the main enzyme providing reducing equivalents to many cellular processes. GR and TrxR are flavoproteins of the same enzyme family, but only the latter is a selenoprotein. With the active site containing selenocysteine, TrxR may catalyze reduction of a wide range of substrates, but can at the same time easily be targeted by electrophilic compounds due to the extraordinarily high reactivity of a selenolate moiety. Here we addressed the inhibition of the enzyme by major anticancer alkylating agents and platinum-containing compounds and we compared it to that of GR. We confirmed prior studies suggesting that the nitrosourea carmustine can inhibit both GR and TrxR. We next found, however, that nitrogen mustards (chlorambucil and melphalan) and alkyl sulfonates (busulfan) efficiently inhibited TrxR while these compounds, surprisingly, did not inhibit GR. Inhibitions were concentration and time dependent and apparently irreversible. Anticancer anthracyclines (daunorubicin and doxorubicin) were, in contrast to the alkylating agents, not inhibitors but poor substrates of TrxR. We also found that TrxR, but not GR, was efficiently inhibited by both cisplatin, its monohydrated complex, and oxaliplatin. Carboplatin, in contrast, could not inhibit any of the two enzymes. These findings lead us to conclude that representative compounds of the major classes of clinically used anticancer alkylating agents and most platinum compounds may easily target TrxR, but not GR. The TrxR inhibition should thereby be considered as a factor that may contribute to the cytotoxicity seen upon clinical use of these drugs.

  9. Comparing the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways in arabinose and xylose fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahn-Hägerdal Bärbel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable option for the production of bioethanol. This process would greatly benefit from recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains also able to ferment, besides the hexose sugar fraction, the pentose sugars, arabinose and xylose. Different pathways can be introduced in S. cerevisiae to provide arabinose and xylose utilisation. In this study, the bacterial arabinose isomerase pathway was combined with two different xylose utilisation pathways: the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase pathways, respectively, in genetically identical strains. The strains were compared with respect to aerobic growth in arabinose and xylose batch culture and in anaerobic batch fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose. Results The specific aerobic arabinose growth rate was identical, 0.03 h-1, for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase and xylose isomerase strain. The xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain displayed higher aerobic growth rate on xylose, 0.14 h-1, and higher specific xylose consumption rate in anaerobic batch fermentation, 0.09 g (g cells-1 h-1 than the xylose isomerase strain, which only reached 0.03 h-1 and 0.02 g (g cells-1h-1, respectively. Whereas the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain produced higher ethanol yield on total sugars, 0.23 g g-1 compared with 0.18 g g-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, the xylose isomerase strain achieved higher ethanol yield on consumed sugars, 0.41 g g-1 compared with 0.32 g g-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain. Anaerobic fermentation of a mixture of glucose, arabinose and xylose resulted in higher final ethanol concentration, 14.7 g l-1 for the xylose reductase/xylitol dehydrogenase strain compared with 11.8 g l-1 for the xylose isomerase strain, and in higher specific ethanol productivity, 0.024 g (g cells-1 h-1 compared with 0.01 g (g cells-1 h-1

  10. Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) electrochemistry at multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion modified glassy carbon electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelster, Lindsey N.; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The electron transport chain is important to the understanding of metabolism in the living cell. ► Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase is a membrane bound complex of the electron transport chain (Complex III). ► The paper details the first bioelectrochemical characterization of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase at an electrode. - Abstract: Electron transport chain complexes are critical to metabolism in living cells. Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase (Complex III) is responsible for carrying electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c, but the complex has not been evaluated electrochemically. This work details the bioelectrochemistry of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase of the electron transport chain of tuber mitochondria. The characterization of the electrochemistry of this enzyme is investigated in carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotube/tetrabutyl ammonium bromide-modified Nafion ® modified glassy carbon electrodes by cyclic voltammetry. Increasing concentrations of cytochrome c result in a catalytic response from the active enzyme in the nanotube sandwich. The experiments show that the enzyme followed Michaelis–Menten kinetics with a K m for the immobilized enzyme of 2.97 (±0.11) × 10 −6 M and a V max of 6.31 (±0.82) × 10 −3 μmol min −1 at the electrode, but the K m and V max values decreased compared to the free enzyme in solution, which is expected for immobilized redox proteins. This is the first evidence of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase bioelectrocatalysis.

  11. Ferric reductase genes involved in high-affinity iron uptake are differentially regulated in yeast and hyphae of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeeves, Rose E; Mason, Robert P; Woodacre, Alexandra; Cashmore, Annette M

    2011-09-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans possesses a reductive iron uptake system which is active in iron-restricted conditions. The sequestration of iron by this mechanism initially requires the reduction of free iron to the soluble ferrous form, which is catalysed by ferric reductase proteins. Reduced iron is then taken up into the cell by a complex of a multicopper oxidase protein and an iron transport protein. Multicopper oxidase proteins require copper to function and so reductive iron and copper uptake are inextricably linked. It has previously been established that Fre10 is the major cell surface ferric reductase in C. albicans and that transcription of FRE10 is regulated in response to iron levels. We demonstrate here that Fre10 is also a cupric reductase and that Fre7 also makes a significant contribution to cell surface ferric and cupric reductase activity. It is also shown, for the first time, that transcription of FRE10 and FRE7 is lower in hyphae compared to yeast and that this leads to a corresponding decrease in cell surface ferric, but not cupric, reductase activity. This demonstrates that the regulation of two virulence determinants, the reductive iron uptake system and the morphological form of C. albicans, are linked. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baskaran G

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gunasekaran Baskaran,1 Shamala Salvamani,1 Siti Aqlima Ahmad,1 Noor Azmi Shaharuddin,1 Parveen Devi Pattiram,2 Mohd Yunus Shukor1 1Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, 2Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Food Science and Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, Malaysia Abstract: The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl, 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and a-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. Keywords: HMG-CoA reductase, Basella alba, phytochemical, GC-MS/MS, RP-HPLC, hypercholesterolemia

  13. Cdna cloning and expression analyses of the isoflavone reductase-like gene of dendrobium officinale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, X.; Xu, S.Z.

    2015-01-01

    The full length of the isoflavone reductase-like gene (IRL) cDNA of Dendrobium officinale was cloned by using reverse transcription (RT) PCR combined with cDNA library, the IRL function was identified by Bioinformatics and prokaryotic expression analyses, and the IRL expression levels in the organs and tissues of D. officinale plants with different ages were determined by using real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The results indicated that the full length o