WorldWideScience

Sample records for aldehyde-terminated amorphous carbon

  1. Amorphous iron (II) carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sel, Ozlem; Radha, A.V.; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2012-01-01

    exothermic than that of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). This suggests that enthalpy of crystallization in carbonate systems is ionic-size controlled, which may have significant implications in a wide variety of conditions, including geological sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide.......Abstract The synthesis, characterization and crystallization energetics of amorphous iron (II) carbonate (AFC) are reported. AFC may form as a precursor for siderite (FeCO3). The enthalpy of crystallization (DHcrys) of AFC is similar to that of amorphous magnesium carbonate (AMC) and more...

  2. Properties of amorphous carbon

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    Amorphous carbon has a wide range of properties that are primarily controlled by the different bond hydridisations possible in such materials. This allows for the growth of an extensive range of thin films that can be tailored for specific applications. Films can range from those with high transparency and are hard diamond-like, through to those which are opaque, soft and graphitic-like. Films with a high degree of sp3 bonding giving the diamond-like properties are used widely by industry for hard coatings. Application areas including field emission cathodes, MEMS, electronic devices, medical and optical coatings are now close to market. Experts in amorphous carbon have been drawn together to produce this comprehensive commentary on the current state and future prospects of this highly functional material.

  3. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  4. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization.

  5. Deposition of amorphous carbon-silver composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Zarco, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Rodil, S.E., E-mail: ser42@iim.unam.m [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria. 04510, Mexico D. F. Mexico (Mexico); Camacho-Lopez, M.A. [Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Tollocan s/n, esq. Paseo Colon, Toluca, Estado de Mexico, 50110 (Mexico)

    2009-12-31

    Composites of amorphous carbon films and silver were deposited by co-sputtering, where the target (10 cm diameter) was of pure graphite with small inclusion of pure silver (less than 1 cm{sup 2}). The films were deposited under different powers, from 40 to 250 W, and different target-substrate distances. The substrate was earthed and rotated in order to obtain a uniform distribution of the silver content. The addition of the Ag piece into the target increased the deposition rate of the carbon films, which could be related to the higher sputter yield of the silver, but there seems to be also a contribution from a larger emission of secondary electrons from the Ag that enhances the plasma and therefore the sputtering process becomes more efficient. Scanning electron micrographs acquired using backscattered electrons showed that the silver was segregated from the carbon matrix, forming nanoparticles or larger clusters as the power was increased. The X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the silver was crystalline and the carbon matrix remained amorphous, although for certain conditions a peak attributed to fullerene-like structures was obtained. Finally, we used Raman spectroscopy to understand the bonding characteristics of the carbon-silver composites, finding that there are variations in the D/G ratio, which can be correlated to the observed structure and X-ray diffraction results.

  6. Microstructural analyses of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collins, C. B.; Davanloo, F.; Jander, D.R.;

    1992-01-01

    Recent experiments have identified the microstructure of amorphic diamond with a model of packed nodules of amorphous diamond expected theoretically. However, this success has left in doubt the relationship of amorphic diamond to other noncrystalline forms of carbon. This work reports...... the comparative examinations of the microstructures of samples of amorphic diamond, i-C, and amorphous carbon. Four distinct morphologies were found that correlated closely with the energy densities used in preparing the different materials. Journal of Applied Physics is copyrighted by The American Institute...

  7. Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.; BARBOUR,J. CHARLES; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.

    2000-01-27

    Nanostructural characterization of amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-C) films grown on silicon using pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) is correlated to both growth energetic and film thickness. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray reflectivity probe both the topological nature of 3- and 4-fold coordinated carbon atom bonding and the topographical clustering of their distributions within a given film. In general, increasing the energetic of PLD growth results in films becoming more ``diamondlike'', i.e. increasing mass density and decreasing optical absorbance. However, these same properties decrease appreciably with thickness. The topology of carbon atom bonding is different for material near the substrate interface compared to material within the bulk portion of an a-C film. A simple model balancing the energy of residual stress and the free energies of resulting carbon topologies is proposed to provide an explanation of the evolution of topographical bonding clusters in a growing a-C film.

  8. Structural morphology of amorphous conducting carbon film

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Vishwakarma; V Prasad; S V Subramanyam; V Ganesan

    2005-10-01

    Amorphous conducting carbon films deposited over quartz substrates were analysed using X-ray diffraction and AFM technique. X-ray diffraction data reveal disorder and roughness in the plane of graphene sheet as compared to that of graphite. This roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. The AFM data shows surface roughness of carbon films depending on preparation temperatures. The surface roughness increases with decrease in preparation temperature. Also some nucleating islands were seen on the samples prepared at 900°C, which are not present on the films prepared at 700°C. Detailed analysis of these islands reveals distorted graphitic lattice arrangement. So we believe these islands to be nucleating graphitic. Power spectrum density (PSD) analysis of the carbon surface indicates a transition from the nonlinear growth mode to linear surface-diffusion dominated growth mode resulting in a relatively smoother surface as one moves from low preparation temperature to high preparation temperature. The amorphous carbon films deposited over a rough quartz substrate reveal nucleating diamond like structures. The density of these nucleating diamond like structures was found to be independent of substrate temperature (700–900°C).

  9. Coaxial carbon plasma gun deposition of amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sater, D. M.; Gulino, D. A.; Rutledge, S. K.

    1984-01-01

    A unique plasma gun employing coaxial carbon electrodes was used in an attempt to deposit thin films of amorphous diamond-like carbon. A number of different structural, compositional, and electrical characterization techniques were used to characterize these films. These included scanning electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction and absorption, spectrographic analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Optical absorption and electrical resistivity measurements were also performed. The films were determined to be primarily amorphous, with poor adhesion to fused silica substrates. Many inclusions of particulates were found to be present as well. Analysis of these particulates revealed the presence of trace impurities, such as Fe and Cu, which were also found in the graphite electrode material. The electrodes were the source of these impurities. No evidence of diamond-like crystallite structure was found in any of the film samples. Details of the apparatus, experimental procedure, and film characteristics are presented.

  10. Buckling instability in amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X. D.; Narumi, K.; Naramoto, H.

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, we report the buckling instability in amorphous carbon films on mirror-polished sapphire (0001) wafers deposited by ion beam assisted deposition at various growth temperatures. For the films deposited at 150 °C, many interesting stress relief patterns are found, which include networks, blisters, sinusoidal patterns with π-shape, and highly ordered sinusoidal waves on a large scale. Starting at irregular buckling in the centre, the latter propagate towards the outer buckling region. The maximum length of these ordered patterns reaches 396 µm with a height of ~500 nm and a wavelength of ~8.2 µm. However, the length decreases dramatically to 70 µm as the deposition temperature is increased to 550 °C. The delamination of the film appears instead of sinusoidal waves with a further increase of the deposition temperature. This experimental observation is correlated with the theoretic work of Crosby (1999 Phys. Rev. E 59 R2542).

  11. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Yuqing; Lin Yi; Wang Xiaoyan; Wang Yanwu; Wei Xinyu

    2005-01-01

    Objective The high energy ion bombardment technique is applied to enhancing the adhesion of the tetrahedral amorphous carbon (TAC) films deposited by the filtered cathode vacuum arc (FCVA). Methods The abrasion method, scratch method, heating and shaking method as well as boiling salt solution method is used to test the adhesion of the TAC films on various material substrates. Results The test results show that the adhesion is increased as the ion bombardment energy increases. However, if the bombardment energy were over the corresponding optimum value, the adhesion would be enhanced very slowly for the harder material substrates and drops quickly, for the softer ones. Conclusion The optimum values of the ion bombardment energy are larger for the harder materials than that for the softer ones.

  12. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  13. Angular magnetoresistance in semiconducting undoped amorphous carbon thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Rizwan Ur Rehman; Saleemi, Awais Siddique; Zhang, Xiaozhong, E-mail: xzzhang@tsinghua.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, People' s Republic of China and Beijing National Center for Electron Microscopy, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-05-07

    Thin films of undoped amorphous carbon thin film were fabricated by using Chemical Vapor Deposition and their structure was investigated by using High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Raman Spectroscopy. Angular magnetoresistance (MR) has been observed for the first time in these undoped amorphous carbon thin films in temperature range of 2 ∼ 40 K. The maximum magnitude of angular MR was in the range of 9.5% ∼ 1.5% in 2 ∼ 40 K. The origin of this angular MR was also discussed.

  14. Thermally reduced graphenes exhibiting a close relationship to amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Wong, Colin Hong; Ambrosi, Adriano; Pumera, Martin

    2012-07-01

    Graphene is an important material for sensing and energy storage applications. Since the vast majority of sensing and energy storage chemical and electrochemical systems require bulk quantities of graphene, thermally reduced graphene oxide (TRGO) is commonly employed instead of pristine graphene. The sp2 planar structure of TRGO is heavily damaged, consisting of a very short sp2 crystallite size of nanometre length and with areas of sp3 hybridized carbon. Such a structure of TRGO is reminiscent of the key characteristic of the structure of amorphous carbon, which is defined as a material without long-range crystalline order consisting of both sp2 and sp3 hybridized carbons. Herein, we describe the characterization of TRGO, its parent graphite material and carbon black (a form of amorphous carbon) via transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and cyclic voltammetry experiments. We used the data obtained as well as consideration of practical factors to perform a comparative assessment of the relative electrochemical performances of TRGO against amorphous carbon. We found out that TRGO and amorphous carbon exhibit almost identical characteristics in terms of density of defects in the sp2 lattice and a similar crystallite size as determined by Raman spectroscopy. These two materials also exhibit similar amounts of oxygen containing groups as determined by XPS and nearly indistinguishable cyclic voltammetric response providing almost identical heterogeneous electron transfer constants. This leads us to conclude that for some sensing and energy storage electrochemical applications, the use of amorphous carbon might be a much more economical solution than the one requiring digestion of highly crystalline graphite with strong oxidants to graphite oxide and then thermally exfoliating it to thermally reduced graphene oxide.

  15. Modeling of amorphous carbon structures with arbitrary structural constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornada, F H; Gava, V; Martinotto, A L; Cassol, L A; Perottoni, C A

    2010-10-06

    In this paper we describe a method to generate amorphous structures with arbitrary structural constraints. This method employs the simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a simple yet carefully tailored cost function (CF). The cost function is composed of two parts: a simple harmonic approximation for the energy-related terms and a cost that penalizes configurations that do not have atoms in the desired coordinations. Using this approach, we generated a set of amorphous carbon structures spawning nearly all the possible combinations of sp, sp(2) and sp(3) hybridizations. The bulk moduli of this set of amorphous carbons structures was calculated using Brenner's potential. The bulk modulus strongly depends on the mean coordination, following a power-law behavior with an exponent ν = 1.51 ± 0.17. A modified cost function that segregates carbon with different hybridizations is also presented, and another set of structures was generated. With this new set of amorphous materials, the correlation between the bulk modulus and the mean coordination weakens. The method proposed can be easily modified to explore the effects on the physical properties of the presence of hydrogen, dangling bonds, and structural features such as carbon rings.

  16. Machine learning based interatomic potential for amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deringer, Volker L.; Csányi, Gábor

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a Gaussian approximation potential (GAP) for atomistic simulations of liquid and amorphous elemental carbon. Based on a machine learning representation of the density-functional theory (DFT) potential-energy surface, such interatomic potentials enable materials simulations with close-to DFT accuracy but at much lower computational cost. We first determine the maximum accuracy that any finite-range potential can achieve in carbon structures; then, using a hierarchical set of two-, three-, and many-body structural descriptors, we construct a GAP model that can indeed reach the target accuracy. The potential yields accurate energetic and structural properties over a wide range of densities; it also correctly captures the structure of the liquid phases, at variance with a state-of-the-art empirical potential. Exemplary applications of the GAP model to surfaces of "diamondlike" tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta -C) are presented, including an estimate of the amorphous material's surface energy and simulations of high-temperature surface reconstructions ("graphitization"). The presented interatomic potential appears to be promising for realistic and accurate simulations of nanoscale amorphous carbon structures.

  17. Growth, characterisation and electronic applications of amorphous hydrogenated carbon

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    temperature on GaAs, has been studied and concluded to be satisfactory on the basis of good adherence and low leakage currents. Such a structure was motivated by the applicability in Metal Insulator Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MISFET). My thesis proposes solutions to a number of riddles associated with the material, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, (a-C:H). This material has lately generated interest in the electronic engineering community, owing to some remarkable properties. The characterisation of amorphous carbon films, grown by radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition has been reported. The coexistence of multiple phases in the same a-C:H film manifests itself in the inconsistent electrical behaviour of different parts of the film, thus rendering it difficult to predict the nature of films. For the first time, in this thesis, a reliable prediction of Schottky contact formation on a-C:H films is reported. A novel and simple development on a Scanning Electron Microscope, configu...

  18. Simulation of swift boron clusters traversing amorphous carbon foils

    OpenAIRE

    Heredia Ávalos, Santiago; Abril Sánchez, Isabel; Denton Zanello, Cristian D.; García Molina, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We use a simulation code to study the interaction of swift boron clusters (Bn+, n=2–6, 14) with amorphous carbon foils. We analyze different aspects of this interaction, such as the evolution of the cluster structure inside the target, the energy and angle distributions at the detector or the stopping power ratio. Our simulation code follows in detail the motion of the cluster fragments through the target and in the vacuum until reaching a detector, taking into account the following interacti...

  19. HRTEM study of Popigai impact diamond: heterogeneous diamond nanostructures in native amorphous carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, Viktoria K.; Shumilova, Tatyana; Masaitis, Victor

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy was applied for the detailed nanostructural investigation of Popigai impact diamonds with the aim of revealing the nature of the amorphous carbon of the matrix. The successful application of two complementary specimen preparation methods, focused ion beam (FIB) milling and mechanical cleavage, allowed direct imaging of nanotwinned nanodiamond crystals embedded in a native amorphous carbon matrix for the first time. Based on its stability under the electron beam, native amorphous carbon can be easily distinguished from the amorphous carbon layer produced by FIB milling during specimen preparation. Electron energy loss spectroscopy of the native amorphous carbon revealed the dominance of sp 2-bonded carbon and the presence of a small amount of oxygen. The heterogeneous size distribution and twin density of the nanodiamond crystals and the structural properties of the native amorphous carbon are presumably related to non-graphitic (organic) carbon precursor material.

  20. Raman spectra of amorphous carbon films deposited by SWP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqi; Liu, Weiguo; Hang, Lingxia; Su, Junhong; Fan, Huiqing

    2010-10-01

    Amorphous carbon film is one of the most important anti-reflection protective films coated on infrared optical components. In this paper, hydrogen-free amorphous carbon films were deposited by new type surface-wave-sustained plasma (SWP) source with a graphite target at various experiment parameters. The laser Raman spectroscopy at wavelength of 514 nm was used to investigate the structure and bonding of these carbon films. The results showed consanguineous correlations between the intensity ratio ID/IG and the experiment parameters such as microwave power, target voltage and gas pressure applied to the SWP source. Raman spectra proved the structure of these carbon films prepared by SWP technique is typical diamond-like carbon (DLC). The analysis on G peak position and intensity ratio ID/IG indicated that Raman shifts moves to low wavenumber and ID/IG decreases with the increasing of microwave power from 150 W to 330 W. These results means the formation of sp3 bond prefers higher microwave power. DLC films prepared at target voltage of -200 V have higher sp3 content than that of -350 V, moreover, an increase of gas pressure during experiments yields higher sp3 content at the microwave power below 270 W, whereas the change of sp3 content is slight with the various conditions when microwave power exceeds 270 W.

  1. Catalytic acceleration of graphitisation of amorphous carbon during synthesis of tungsten carbide from tungsten and excess amorphous carbon in a solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shohoji, N. [Inst. Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, Lisbon (Portugal); Guerra Rosa, L.; Cruz Fernandes, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001, Lisbon (Portugal); Martinez, D.; Rodriguez, J. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, Centro Europeo de Ensayos de Energia Solar, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, P.O. Box 22, 04200, Tabernas (Spain)

    1999-03-25

    Amorphous carbon is one of the allotropes of carbon possessing carbon activity a(C) higher than that of graphite (standard state with a(C) = 1). Amorphous carbon is in a metastable state but, under normal circumstances, it takes several hours to be graphitised to an extent detectable by X-ray diffraction even at temperature higher than 1500 C. In the present work, we report the accelerated graphitisation of amorphous carbon induced apparently by the catalytic action of tungsten (W) or tungsten carbide (WC) during synthesis of WC started from W and active carbon in solar furnace under controlled atmosphere (Ar or N{sub 2}). This degree of graphitisation of amorphous carbon did not proceed by the similar reaction undertaken in the traditional laboratory furnace under the comparable conditions. (orig.) 14 refs.

  2. Synthesis of amorphous carbon nitride by ion implantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChenZ.; OlofinjanaA.; BellJ

    2001-01-01

    N2+ were implanted into diamondlike carbon (DLC) films in an attempt to synthesizeamorphous carbon nitride. The DLC films were previously deposited on steel substrate by using anion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD) where a single Kaufman type ion gun with argon sourcewas used to sputter a graphite target and simultaneously bombard the growing film. Parallel to theion implantation route, amorphous carbon nitride films were also synthesized by directly using thereactive ion beam sputtering deposition (RIBSD) with nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen intothe film. The structure and properties of the films were determined by using Raman spectroscopy,XPS and nano-indentation. The implantation of N2+ into a-C films offers a higher hardness thanthat directly synthesized by RIBSD, probably through an increase in sp3/sp2 ratio and in the pro-portion of nitrogen atoms chemically bonding to carbon atoms. The results show that althoughthere are differences in film composition, structure and properties between these two processes,both methods can be used for synthesis of nitrogen-containing amorphous DLC thin films whichsignificantly modify the substrate surface.

  3. sp³ -linked amorphous carbon with sulfonic acid groups as a heterogeneous acid catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suganuma, Satoshi; Nakajima, Kiyotaka; Kitano, Masaaki; Hayashi, Shigenobu; Hara, Michikazu

    2012-09-01

    SO₃H-bearing amorphous carbon prepared from polyvinyl chloride (PVC) is studied as a heterogeneous Brønsted acid catalyst. Sulfonation of partially carbonized PVC produces amorphous carbon consisting of small SO₃H-bearing carbon sheets linked by sp³ -based aliphatic hydrocarbons. This carbon material exhibits much higher catalytic performance in the hydrolysis of cellobiose than conventional heterogeneous Brønsted acid catalysts with SO₃H groups, including SO₃H-bearing amorphous carbon derived from cellulose. This can be attributed to a high density of SO₃H groups and the fast diffusion of reactants and products enabled by a flexible carbon network.

  4. Transport properties of low-dimensional amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: s.bhattacharyya@surrey.ac.uk; Silva, S.R.P. [Nano-Electronics Centre, Advanced Technology Institute, School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2005-06-22

    Research on amorphous carbon (a-C) to date has focused on the distinction between the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} phases and understanding the properties on the basis of the sp{sup 2}-C bonded component. Recently, sufficient information on the sp{sup 2}-bonded clusters and nanoforms of carbon has helped to identify the importance of sp{sup 2}-C over sp{sup 3}-C, especially in transport properties and encouraged many groups to exploit this knowledge for device design. However, at present, few studies dedicated purely to understanding the transport properties and electronic structure of the family of a-C films as a whole is available. In this paper, we try to identify the key issues in using a-C as an unconventional semiconducting material and try to elaborate on how to overcome these hurdles in order to utilize this extremely versatile material for active device fabrication.

  5. Surface bioactivity of plasma implanted silicon and amorphous carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul K CHU

    2004-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation and deposition (PⅢ&D) has been shown to be an effective technique to enhance the surface bioactivity of materials. In this paper, recent progress made in our laboratory on plasma surface modification single-crystal silicon and amorphous carbon is reviewed. Silicon is the most important material in the integrated circuit industry but its surface biocompatibility has not been investigated in details. We have recently performed hydrogen PⅢ into silicon and observed the biomimetic growth of apatite on its surface in simulated body fluid. Diamond-like carbon (DLC) is widely used in the industry due to its excellent mechanical properties and chemical inertness. The use of this material in biomedical engineering has also attracted much attention. It has been observed in our laboratory that doping DLC with nitrogen by means of PⅢ can improve the surface blood compatibility. The properties as well as in vitro biological test results will be discussed in this article.

  6. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Matrix-isolated Amorphous Carbon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaiter, M.; Mutschke, H.; Henning, Th.; Lindackers, D.; Strecker, M.; Roth, P.

    1996-06-01

    In view of the interstellar 217.5 nm and the circumstellar 230--250 nm extinction features, the UV extinction behavior of small matrix-isolated amorphous carbon grains is investigated experimentally. The particles were produced in a flame by burning acetylene with oxygen at low pressure. To prevent coagulation, the condensing primary soot grains (average diameter ~6 nm) were extracted by a molecular beam technique into a high-vacuum chamber. There they were deposited into a layer of solid argon, isolated from each other. The particle mass and size were controlled using a particle mass spectrometer. The measured UV extinction of the matrix-isolated particles is compared with measurements on samples produced in the conventional way by collecting carbon smoke on substrate as well as with scattering calculations for small spheres and ellipsoides. The laboratory data give a good representation of the circumstellar extinction feature observed in the spectrum of V348 Sgr.

  7. Revealing the 1 nm/s Extensibility of Nanoscale Amorphous Carbon in a Scanning Electron Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In an ultra-high vacuum scanning electron microscope, the edged branches of amorphous carbon film (∼10 nm thickness) can be continuously extended with an eye-identifying speed (on the order of ∼1 nm/s) under electron beam. Such unusual mobility of amorphous carbon may be associated with deformation...

  8. Structure-property relations in amorphous carbon for photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Risplendi, Francesca; Cicero, Giancarlo [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, 10129 Torino (Italy); Bernardi, Marco [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grossman, Jeffrey C., E-mail: jcg@mit.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    Carbon is emerging as a material with great potential for photovoltaics (PV). However, the amorphous form (a-C) has not been studied in detail as a PV material, even though it holds similarities with amorphous Silicon (a-Si) that is widely employed in efficient solar cells. In this work, we correlate the structure, bonding, stoichiometry, and hydrogen content of a-C with properties linked to PV performance such as the electronic structure and optical absorption. We employ first-principles molecular dynamics and density functional theory calculations to generate and analyze a set of a-C structures with a range of densities and hydrogen concentrations. We demonstrate that optical and electronic properties of interest in PV can be widely tuned by varying the density and hydrogen content. For example, sunlight absorption in a-C films can significantly exceed that of a same thickness of a-Si for a range of densities and H contents in a-C. Our results highlight promising features of a-C as the active layer material of thin-film solar cells.

  9. Infrared analysis of thin films amorphous, hydrogenated carbon on silicon

    CERN Document Server

    Jacob, W; Schwarz-Selinger, T

    2000-01-01

    The infrared analysis of thin films on a thick substrate is discussed using the example of plasma-deposited, amorphous, hydrogenated carbon layers (a-C:H) on silicon substrates. The framework for the optical analysis of thin films is presented. The main characteristic of thin film optics is the occurrence of interference effects due to the coherent superposition of light multiply reflected at the various internal and external interfaces of the optical system. These interference effects lead to a sinusoidal variation of the transmitted and reflected intensity. As a consequence, the Lambert-Beer law is not applicable for the determination of the absorption coefficient of thin films. Furthermore, observable changes of the transmission and reflection spectra occur in the vicinity of strong absorption bands due to the Kramers-Kronig relation. For a sound data evaluation these effects have to be included in the analysis. To be able to extract the full information contained in a measured optical thin film spectrum, ...

  10. Amorphous carbon buffer layers for separating free gallium nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altakhov, A. S.; Gorbunov, R. I.; Kasharina, L. A.; Latyshev, F. E.; Tarala, V. A.; Shreter, Yu. G.

    2016-11-01

    The possibility of using amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films for self-separation of gallium nitride (GaN) layers grown by hydride vapor-phase epitaxy has been analyzed. DLC films have been synthesized by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition under low pressure on sapphire (Al2O3) substrates with a (0001) crystallographic orientation. The samples have been studied by the methods of Raman scattering and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that thin DLC films affect only slightly the processes of nucleation and growth of gallium nitride films. Notably, the strength of the "GaN film-Al2O3" substrate interface decreases, which facilitates separation of the GaN layers.

  11. Mechanical dissipation at elevated temperatures in tetrahedral amorphous carbon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Czaplewski, David A.; Wendt, Joel Robert

    2005-05-01

    We have measured the temperature dependence of mechanical dissipation in tetrahedral amorphous carbon flexural and torsional resonators over the temperature range from 300 to 1023 K. The mechanical dissipation was found to be controlled by defects within the material, and the magnitude and temperature dependence of the dissipation were found to depend on whether flexural or torsional vibrational modes were excited. The defects that were active under flexural stresses have a relatively flat concentration from 0.4 to 0.7 eV with an ever increasing defect concentration up to 1.9 eV. Under shear stresses (torsion), the defect activation energies increase immediately beginning at 0.4 eV, with increasing defect concentration at higher energies.

  12. Low-temperature graphitization of amorphous carbon nanospheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Katia Barbera; Leone Frusteri; Giuseppe Italiano; Lorenzo Spadaro; Francesco Frusteri; Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

    2014-01-01

    The investigation by SEM/TEM, porosity, and X-ray diffraction measurements of the graphitization process starting from amorphous carbon nanospheres, prepared by glucose carbonization, is re-ported. Aspects studied are the annealing temperature in the 750-1000 °C range, the type of inert carrier gas, and time of treatment in the 2-6 h range. It is investigated how these parameters influ-ence the structural and morphological characteristics of the carbon materials obtained as well as their nanostructure. It is shown that it is possible to maintain after graphitization the round-shaped macro morphology, a high surface area and porosity, and especially a large structural disorder in the graphitic layers stacking, with the presence of rather small ordered domains. These are charac-teristics interesting for various catalytic applications. The key in obtaining these characteristics is the thermal treatment in a flow of N2. It was demonstrated that the use of He rather than N2 does not allow obtaining the same results. The effect is attributed to the presence of traces of oxygen, enough to create the presence of oxygen functional groups on the surface temperatures higher than 750 °C, when graphitization occurs. These oxygen functional groups favor the graphitization pro-cess.

  13. Oxidation of fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-CF(x)) films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yang; Broitman, Esteban; Gellman, Andrew J

    2010-01-19

    Amorphous fluorinated carbon (a-CF(x)) films have a variety of potential technological applications. In most such applications these films are exposed to air and undergo partial surface oxidation. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to study the oxidation of fresh a-CF(x) films deposited by magnetron sputtering. The oxygen sticking coefficient measured by exposure to low pressures (<10(-3) Torr) of oxygen at room temperature is on the order of S approximately 10(-6), indicating that the surfaces of these films are relatively inert to oxidation when compared with most metals. The X-ray photoemission spectra indicate that the initial stages of oxygen exposure (<10(7) langmuirs) result in the preferential oxidation of the carbon atoms with zero or one fluorine atom, perhaps because these carbon atoms are more likely to be found in configurations with unsaturated double bonds and radicals than carbon atoms with two or three fluorine atoms. Exposure of the a-CF(x) film to atmospheric pressures of air (effective exposure of 10(12) langmuirs to O(2)) results in lower levels of oxygen uptake than the low pressure exposures (<10(7) langmuirs). It is suggested that this is the result of oxidative etching of the most reactive carbon atoms, leaving a relatively inert surface. Finally, low pressure exposures to air result in the adsorption of both nitrogen and oxygen onto the surface. Some of the nitrogen adsorbed on the surface at low pressures is in a reversibly adsorbed state in the sense that subsequent exposure to low pressures of O(2) results in the displacement of nitrogen by oxygen. Similarly, when an a-CF(x) film oxidized in pure O(2) is exposed to low pressures of air, some of the adsorbed oxygen is displaced by nitrogen. It is suggested that these forms of nitrogen and oxygen are bound to free radical sites in the film.

  14. Sputtering deposition and characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations of ultrathin, ultrasmooth amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si(100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) sputtering and characterization of the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties and thermal stability of the films. Ultrathin a-C films of thickness 5--100 nm and typical root-mean-square roughness of 0.15--1 nm were deposited on ultrasmooth Si(100) substrates using pure argon as the sputtering gas. A low-pressure RF argon discharge model was used to analyze the plasma parameters in the film growth environment. These plasma parameters correlate the deposition conditions with the film growth processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface force microscopy (SFM) were used to characterize the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of the a-C films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the compositions and microstructures of the films. Sputter-etching measurements of the a-C films by energetic argon ion bombardment were used to study the surface binding energy of carbon atoms in a-C films deposited under different conditions. The dependence of film properties on deposition conditions was studied, and relations between nanomechanical and nanotribological properties were discussed in terms of a modified deformation index. The deformation and nanotribology mechanisms of the a-C films were compared with those of other films, such as TiC and Cr films (both 100 nm thick), and bulk Si(100). Reactive RF sputtering of nitrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CNx) films was investigated by introducing nitrogen into the a-C films during film growth by using an argon-nitrogen gas mixture as the sputtering gas. The alloying effect of nitrogen on the film growth and properties, such as hardness and surface energy, was studied and interpreted in terms of the changes in the plasma environment induced due to differences in the composition of the sputtering gas mixture. The thermal

  15. Amorphous carbon interlayers for gold on elastomer stretchable conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, M. U.; Tuinea-Bobe, C. L.; McKavanagh, F.; Byrne, C. P.; Dixon, D.; Maguire, P. D.; Lemoine, P.

    2011-06-01

    Gold on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stretchable conductors were prepared using a novel approach by interlacing an hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C : H) layer between the deposited metal layer and the elastomer. AFM analysis of the a-C : H film surface before gold deposition shows nanoscale buckling, the corresponding increase in specific surface area corresponds to a strain compensation for the first 4-6% of bi-axial tensile loading. Without this interlayer, the deposited gold films show much smaller and uni-directional ripples as well as more cracks and delaminations. With a-C : H interlayer, the initial electrical resistivity of the metal film decreases markedly (280-fold decrease to 8 × 10-6 Ω cm). This is not due to conduction within the carbon interlayer; both a-C : H/PDMS and PDMS substrates are electrically insulating. Upon cyclic tensile loading, both films become more resistive, but return to their initial state after 20 tensile cycles up to 60% strain. Profiling experiments using secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicate that the a-C : H layer intermixes with the PDMS, resulting in a graded layer of decreasing stiffness. We believe that both this graded layer and the surface buckling contribute to the observed improvement in the electrical performance of these stretchable conductors.

  16. Gas and pressure effects on the synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Tingkai; LIU Yongning; ZHU Jiewu

    2004-01-01

    The effects of gas, pressure and temperature on the production of amorphous carbon nanotubes were investigated using an arc discharging furnace at controlled temperature. Co/Ni alloy powder was used as catalyst.The discharge current was 80 A and voltage was 32 V. The optimal parameters were obtained: 600℃ temperature, hydrogen gas and 500 torr pressure. The productivity and purity of amorphous carbon nanotubes are 6.5 gram per hour and 80%, respectively. The diameter of the amorphous carbon nanotubes is about 7-20 nm.

  17. Wake potential of swift ion in amorphous carbon target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bahnam, Nabil janan; Ahmad, Khalid A.; Aboo Al-Numan, Abdullah Ibrahim

    2017-02-01

    The wake potential and wake phenomena for swift proton in an amorphous carbon target were studied by utilising various dielectric function formalisms, including the Drude dielectric function, the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function. The Drude model results exhibited a damped oscillatory behaviour in the longitudinal direction behind the projectile; the pattern of these oscillations decreases exponentially in the transverse direction. In addition, the wake potential extends slightly ahead of the projectile which also depends on the proton coordinate and velocity. The effect of electron binding on the wake potential, characterised by the ratio ωp2 / ω02 = 10 to 0.1, has been studied alongside the Drude-Lorentz dielectric function and quantum dielectric function formalisms; the results evidently show that the wake potential dip depth decreases with more oscillations when the electron density ratio ωp2 / ω02 decreases from 10 to 0.1. One of the primary objectives of the present work is to construct a reasonably realistic procedure for simulating the response of target to swift ions by combining an expression for the induced wake potential along with several important dielectric function models; the aim of this research is to reduce computational complexity without sacrificing accuracy. This is regarded as being an efficient strategy in that it creates suitable computer simulation procedures which are relevant to actual solids. After comparing this method with other models, the main differences and similarities have been noted while the end results have proved encouraging.

  18. Simulation of swift boron clusters traversing amorphous carbon foils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    We use a simulation code to study the interaction of swift boron clusters ( Bn+ , n=2-6 , 14) with amorphous carbon foils. We analyze different aspects of this interaction, such as the evolution of the cluster structure inside the target, the energy and angle distributions at the detector or the stopping power ratio. Our simulation code follows in detail the motion of the cluster fragments through the target and in the vacuum until reaching a detector, taking into account the following interactions: (i) wake force, (ii) Coulomb repulsion among cluster fragments, (iii) stopping force, and (iv) elastic scattering with the target nuclei. Electron capture and loss by each fragment is also included in the code, affecting the above-mentioned interactions. The clusters size grows inside the foil due mainly to the Coulomb explosion but this increase is less pronounced in the plane transversal to the beam direction because of the alignment effect of the wake forces. We obtain an enhancement of the stopping power ratio that increases with the projectile energy and with the number of molecular constituents. Our results agree very well with the available experimental data for the thicker foils (≳10μg/cm2) and are compatible (within the experimental error bars) for the thinner foils.

  19. Thermal decomposition of fullerene nanowhiskers protected by amorphous carbon mask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Hongxuan; Wang, Chengxiang; Miyazawa, Kun’Ichi; Wang, Hongxin; Masuda, Hideki; Fujita, Daisuke

    2016-12-01

    Fullerene nanostructures are well known for their unique morphology, physical and mechanical properties. The thermal stability of fullerene nanostructures, such as their sublimation at high temperature is also very important for studying their structures and applications. In this work, We observed fullerene nanowhiskers (FNWs) in situ with scanning helium ion microscopy (HIM) at elevated temperatures. The FNWs exhibited different stabilities with different thermal histories during the observation. The pristine FNWs were decomposed at the temperatures higher than 300 °C in a vacuum environment. Other FNWs were protected from decomposition with an amorphous carbon (aC) film deposited on the surface. Based on high spacial resolution, aC film with periodic structure was deposited by helium ion beam induced deposition (IBID) on the surface of FNWs. Annealed at the high temperature, the fullerene molecules were selectively sublimated from the FNWs. The periodic structure was formed on the surface of FNWs and observed by HIM. Monte Carlo simulation and Raman characterization proved that the morphology of the FNWs was changed by helium IBID at high temperature. This work provides a new method of fabricating artificial structure on the surface of FNWs with periodic aC film as a mask.

  20. Energy-level density of amorphous carbon and its modification by the annealing

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov-Omskij, V I; Tagliaferro, A; Fanchini, G

    2002-01-01

    Annealing influence on the modification of electron density states of amorphous carbon a-C and amorphous hydrogenated carbon a-C:H has been studied. Optical transmission spectra were studied in 1.5-5.6 eV range and ellipsometric angles were measured for He-Ne laser wavelength. The model was suggested of the optical response of amorphous carbon. This model was based on the hypothesis of size fluctuations of sp sup 2 -components of amorphous carbon. The size of the optical gap E sub g for both types of materials was explained in terms of availability of fluctuations of their allotropic content having critical values. The dependence of the density of states of electrons both in fundamental and excited bands on the energy experimental data using model parameters

  1. Convective heat transfer enhancement using Carbon nanofibers (CNFs): influence of amorphous carbon layer on heat transfer performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, L.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nano structures was achieved using catalytic

  2. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Longqiu, E-mail: longqiuli@gmail.com [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Xu, Ming; Song, Wenping [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Ovcharenko, Andrey [Western Digital Corporation, San Jose, CA (United States); Zhang, Guangyu; Jia, Ding [School of Mechatronics Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm{sup 3} was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm{sup 3} and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm{sup 3} and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  3. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EijiIwamura; MasanoriYamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process, graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  4. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiji Iwamura; Masanori Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process,graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  5. Silicon and aluminum doping effects on the microstructure and properties of polymeric amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: lxq_suse@sina.com [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China); Hao, Junying, E-mail: jyhao@licp.cas.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Xie, Yuntao [Material Corrosion and Protection Key Laboratory of Sichuan province, Sichuan University of Science and Engineering, Zigong 643000 (China)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Evolution of nanostructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were firstly studied. • Si doping enhanced polymerization of the hydrocarbon chains and Al doping resulted in increase in the ordered carbon clusters of polymeric amorphous carbon films. • Soft polymeric amorphous carbon films exhibited an unconventional frictional behaviors with a superior wear resistance. • The mechanical and vacuum tribological properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films were significantly improved by Si and Al co-doping. - Abstract: Polymeric amorphous carbon films were prepared by radio frequency (R.F. 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering deposition. The microstructure evolution of the deposited polymeric films induced by silicon (Si) and aluminum(Al) doping were scrutinized through infrared spectroscopy, multi-wavelength Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The comparative results show that Si doping can enhance polymerization and Al doping results in an increase in the ordered carbon clusters. Si and Al co-doping into polymeric films leads to the formation of an unusual dual nanostructure consisting of cross-linked polymer-like hydrocarbon chains and fullerene-like carbon clusters. The super-high elasticity and super-low friction coefficients (<0.002) under a high vacuum were obtained through Si and Al co-doping into the films. Unconventionally, the co-doped polymeric films exhibited a superior wear resistance even though they were very soft. The relationship between the microstructure and properties of the polymeric amorphous carbon films with different elements doping are also discussed in detail.

  6. Recent progress in the synthesis and characterization of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Widlow, I

    2000-01-01

    This review summarizes our most recent findings in the structure and properties of amorphous and crystalline carbon nitride coatings, synthesized by reactive magnetron sputtering. By careful control of the plasma conditions via proper choice of process parameters such as substrate bias, target power and gas pressure, one can precisely control film structure and properties. With this approach, we were able to produce amorphous carbon nitride films with controlled hardness and surface roughness. In particular, we can synthesize ultrathin (1 nm thick) amorphous carbon nitride films to be sufficiently dense and uniform that they provide adequate corrosion protection for hard disk applications. We demonstrated the strong correlation between ZrN (111) texture and hardness in CN sub x /ZrN superlattice coatings. Raman spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption show the predominance of sp sup 3 -bonded carbon in these superlattice coatings.

  7. Fabrication of barium/strontium carbonate coated amorphous carbon nanotubes as an improved field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, S.; Jha, A.; Das, N. S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2013-02-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature ˜250 ∘C in an air furnace. As-synthesized aCNTs were coated with the barium/strontium carbonate through a simple chemical process. The coating of barium/strontium carbonate was confirmed by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Morphology of the as-prepared samples was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Thermal gravimetric analysis showed that barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs are more stable than the pristine aCNTs. As-prepared barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs showed significantly improved field emission properties with a turn-on field as low as 2.5 V/μm. The variation of field emission characteristics of the barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs with interelectrode distances was also studied.

  8. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO...

  9. Synthesis of novel amorphous calcium carbonate by sono atomization for reactive mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kanai, Makoto; Nishimiya, Nobuyuki

    2012-03-01

    Droplets of several micrometers in size can be formed in aqueous solution by atomization under ultrasonic irradiation at 2 MHz. This phenomenon, known as atomization, is capable of forming fine droplets for use as a reaction field. This synthetic method is called SARM (sono atomization for reactive mixing). This paper reports on the synthesis of a novel amorphous calcium carbonate formed by SARM. The amorphous calcium carbonate, obtained at a solution concentration of 0.8 mol/dm(3), had a specific surface area of 65 m(2)/g and a composition of CaCO(3)•0.5H(2)O as determined using thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG-DTA). Because the ACC had a lower hydrate composition than conventional amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), the ACC synthesized in this paper was very stable at room temperature.

  10. Self-lubricated Array Film of Amorphous Carbon Nanorods on an Aluminum Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGChun-xi; TUJiang-ping; GUOShao-yi; FUMing-fu; ZHAOXin-bing

    2004-01-01

    A self-lubricated array film of amorphous carbon nanorods was prepared by chemical catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene on the anodic aluminum oxide membrane fabricated by two-step anodization of aluminum. The tribological properties of the array film of amorphous carbon nanorods in ambient air were investigated using a ball-on-disk tester at applied loads range from 245 mN to 1960 mN at a sliding velocity of 0.2 m/s. The self-lubricated array film exhibited a small value of the friction coefficient as well as good wear resistance. The friction coefficient of array film of amorphous carbon nanorods decreased gradually with increasing the applied load. The approach proposed demonstrated a new efficient route towards enhanced the friction and wear performances of aluminum.

  11. Hardness and stress of amorphous carbon film deposited by glow discharge and ion beam assisting deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, F C

    2000-01-01

    The hardness and stress of amorphous carbon films prepared by glow discharge and by ion beam assisting deposition are investigated. Relatively hard and almost stress free amorphous carbon films were deposited by the glow discharge technique. On the other hand, by using the ion beam assisting deposition, hard films were also obtained with a stress of the same order of those found in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films. A structural analysis indicates that all films are composed of a sp sup 2 -rich network. These results contradict the currently accepted concept that both stress and hardness are only related to the concentration of sp sup 3 sites. Furthermore, the same results also indicate that the sp sup 2 sites may also contribute to the hardness of the films.

  12. Porous tablets of crystalline calcium carbonate via sintering of amorphous nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Liu, Xing-Min; Aziz, Baroz; Hedin, Niklas; Zhao, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Porous tablets of crystalline calcium carbonate were formed upon sintering of a precursor powder of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) under compressive stress (20 MPa) at relatively low temperatures (120–400 °C), induced by pulsed direct currents. Infrared spectroscopy ascertained the amorphous nature of the precursor powders. At temperatures of 120–350 °C and rates of temperature increase of 20–100 °C min−1, the nanoparticles of ACC transformed into crystallites of mainly aragonite, which is...

  13. Carbon-Incorporated Amorphous Indium Zinc Oxide Thin-Film Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthiban, S.; Park, K.; Kim, H.-J.; Yang, S.; Kwon, J.-Y.

    2014-11-01

    We propose the use of amorphous-carbon indium zinc oxide (a-CIZO) as a channel material for thin-film transistor (TFT) fabrication. This study chose a carbon dopant as a carrier suppressor and strong oxygen binder in amorphous-indium zinc oxide (a-IZO) channel material. a-CIZO thin films were deposited using radiofrequency (RF) sputtering and postannealed at 150°C. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that the film remained amorphous even after postannealing. The a-CIZO TFT postannealed at 150°C exhibited saturation field-effect mobility of 16.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 and on-off current ratio of ˜4.3 × 107.

  14. Dehydration and crystallization of amorphous calcium carbonate in solution and in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihli, Johannes; Wong, Wai Ching; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alexander N; Christenson, Hugo K; Duer, Melinda J; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are poorly understood. Currently, attracting enormous interest is the crystallization of amorphous calcium carbonate, a key intermediary in synthetic, biological and environmental systems. Here we attempt to unify many contrasting and apparently contradictory studies by investigating this process in detail. We show that amorphous calcium carbonate can dehydrate before crystallizing, both in solution and in air, while thermal analyses and solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance measurements reveal that its water is present in distinct environments. Loss of the final water fraction--comprising less than 15% of the total--then triggers crystallization. The high activation energy of this step suggests that it occurs by partial dissolution/recrystallization, mediated by surface water, and the majority of the particle then crystallizes by a solid-state transformation. Such mechanisms are likely to be widespread in solid-state reactions and their characterization will facilitate greater control over these processes.

  15. Effect of Substrate Bias on Microstructure and Properties of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiaqi ZHU; Jiecai HAN; Songhe MENG; Qiang LI; Manlin TAN

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and properties of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films deposited by the filtered cathodic vacuum arc technology has been investigated by visible Raman spectroscopy, AFM and Nano-indentor. The Raman spectra have been fitted with a s

  16. Low-energy electron irradiation induced top-surface nanocrystallization of amorphous carbon film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Cheng [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education and Guangdong Province, College of Optoelectronic Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Fan, Xue, E-mail: fanx@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Diao, Dongfeng, E-mail: dfdiao@szu.edu.cn [Institute of Nanosurface Science and Engineering (INSE), Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2016-10-30

    Graphical abstract: Low-energy electron irradiation was proposed to nanocrystallize the top-surface of the as-deposited amorphous carbon film, and sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites formed in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. Display Omitted - Abstract: We report a low-energy electron irradiation method to nanocrystallize the top-surface of amorphous carbon film in electron cyclotron resonance plasma system. The nanostructure evolution of the carbon film as a function of electron irradiation density and time was examined by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. The results showed that the electron irradiation gave rise to the formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallites in the film top-surface within 4 nm thickness. The formation of sp{sup 2} nanocrystallite was ascribed to the inelastic electron scattering in the top-surface of carbon film. The frictional property of low-energy electron irradiated film was measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer. The sp{sup 2} nanocrystallized top-surface induced a lower friction coefficient than that of the original pure amorphous film. This method enables a convenient nanocrystallization of amorphous surface.

  17. Hard graphitelike hydrogenated amorphous carbon grown at high rates by a remote plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Zaharia, T.; Creatore, M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) deposited from an Ar-C 2H2 expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition (ETP-CVD) is reported. The downstream plasma region of an ETP is characterized by a low electron temperature (∼0.3 eV), which leads to an ion driven chemistry and negligible physical...

  18. Understanding the catalyst-free transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene by current-induced annealing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreiro, A.; Börrnert, F.; Avdoshenko, S.M.; Rellinghaus, B.; Cunibert, G.; Rümmeli, M.H.; Vandersypen, L.M.K.

    2013-01-01

    We shed light on the catalyst-free growth of graphene from amorphous carbon (a–C) by current induced annealing by witnessing the mechanism both with in-situ transmission electron microscopy and with molecular dynamics simulations. Both in experiment and in simulation, we observe that small a–C clust

  19. Citrate effects on amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) structure, stability, and crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Dideriksen, Knud;

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the role of citrate in the crystallization kinetics of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is essential to explain the formation mechanisms, stabilities, surface properties, and morphologies of CaCO3 biominerals. It also contributes to deeper insight into fluid-mineral inte...

  20. Damage threshold of amorphous carbon mirror for 177 eV FEL radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farahani, S. D.; Chalupsky, J.; Burian, T.; Chapman, H.; Gleeson, A. J.; Hajkoya, V.; Juha, L.; Jurek, M.; Klinger, D.; Sinn, H.; Sobierajski, R.; Stormer, M.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Wabnitz, H.; Gaudin, J.

    2011-01-01

    We present results of damage studies performed at the Free-Electron LASer in Hamburg (FLASH) on amorphous carbon (a-C). The experiment was performed in the total external reflection geometry representing the working configuration of X-ray mirrors. The 177 eV photon laser beam was focused on a 40 nm

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of benzene in graphite and amorphous carbon slit pores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Yu D

    2013-11-15

    It is well known that confining a liquid into a pore strongly alters the liquid behavior. Investigations of the effect of confinement are of great importance for many scientific and technological applications. Here, we present a study of the behavior of benzene confined in carbon slit pores. Two types of pores are considered-graphite and amorphous carbon ones. We show that the effect of different pore structure is of crucial importance for the benzene behavior.

  2. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates.

  3. Effects of Atomic-Scale Structure on the Fracture Properties of Amorphous Carbon - Carbon Nanotube Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    The fracture of carbon materials is a complex process, the understanding of which is critical to the development of next generation high performance materials. While quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are the most accurate way to model fracture, the fracture behavior of many carbon-based composite engineering materials, such as carbon nanotube (CNT) composites, is a multi-scale process that occurs on time and length scales beyond the practical limitations of QM methods. The Reax Force Field (ReaxFF) is capable of predicting mechanical properties involving strong deformation, bond breaking and bond formation in the classical molecular dynamics framework. This has been achieved by adding to the potential energy function a bond-order term that varies continuously with distance. The use of an empirical bond order potential, such as ReaxFF, enables the simulation of failure in molecular systems that are several orders of magnitude larger than would be possible in QM techniques. In this work, the fracture behavior of an amorphous carbon (AC) matrix reinforced with CNTs was modeled using molecular dynamics with the ReaxFF reactive forcefield. Care was taken to select the appropriate simulation parameters, which can be different from those required when using traditional fixed-bond force fields. The effect of CNT arrangement was investigated with three systems: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. For each arrangement, covalent bonds are added between the CNTs and AC, with crosslink fractions ranging from 0-25% of the interfacial CNT atoms. The SWNT and MWNT array systems represent ideal cases with evenly spaced CNTs; the SWNT bundle system represents a more realistic case because, in practice, van der Waals interactions lead to the agglomeration of CNTs into bundles. The simulation results will serve as guidance in setting experimental processing conditions to optimize the mechanical properties of CNT

  4. New Method of Depositing the Nanostructured Amorphous Carbon for Carbon Based Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Fadzilah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured amorphous carbon (a-C solar cells were successfully deposited via a self-designed aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD. The fabricated solar cell with the configuration of Au/p-C/n-Si/Au achieved efficiency ( of % for device deposited at 500°C, % for 450°C, and % for 400°C. Photoresponse characteristic was highlighted under illumination (AM 1.5 illuminations: 100 mW/cm2, 25°C, where conductivity increased when the sample was being hit by light. Transmittance spectrum exhibits a large transmittance value (85% and absorption coefficient value of  cm−1 at the visible range from 390 to 790 nm. The nanostructured a-C thin film deposited at higher temperature possesses lower transmittance due to higher absorption as a result of the higher content of sp2-bonded carbon atoms. From Tauc’s plot, optical band gap ( was determined, and decreased as deposition temperature increased (1.2 eV, 1.0 eV, 0.7 eV. On the other hand, FESEM images exhibited a nanostructured sized a-C with the particle size less than 100 nm. To the best of our knowledge, the presence of nanostructured particle of a-C by a self-prepared AACVD has not frequently been reported.

  5. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  6. Amorphous carbon film deposition on inner surface of tubes using atmospheric pressure pulsed filamentary plasma source

    CERN Document Server

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Uniform amorphous carbon film is deposited on the inner surface of quartz tube having the inner diameter of 6 mm and the outer diameter of 8 mm. A pulsed filamentary plasma source is used for the deposition. Long plasma filaments (~ 140 mm) as a positive discharge are generated inside the tube in argon with methane admixture. FTIR-ATR, XRD, SEM, LSM and XPS analyses give the conclusion that deposited film is amorphous composed of non-hydrogenated sp2 carbon and hydrogenated sp3 carbon. Plasma is characterized using optical emission spectroscopy, voltage-current measurement, microphotography and numerical simulation. On the basis of observed plasma parameters, the kinetics of the film deposition process is discussed.

  7. Modelling the structure factors and pair distribution functions of amorphous germanium, silicon and carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgic, Seyfettin; Gonzalez, Luis Enrique; Baer, Shalom; Silbert, Moises

    2002-12-01

    We present the results of calculations of the static structure factor S(k) and the pair distribution function g(r) of the tetrahedral amorphous semiconductors germanium, silicon and carbon using the structural diffusion model (SDM). The results obtained with the SDM for S(k) and g(r) are of comparable quality with those obtained by the unconstrained Reverse Monte Carlo simulations and existing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for these systems. We have found that g(r) exhibits a small peak, or shoulder, a weak remnant of the prominent third neighbour peak present in the crystalline phase of these systems. This feature has been experimentally found to be present in recently reported high energy X-ray experiments of amorphous silicon (Phys. Rev. B 60 (1999) 13520), as well as in the previous X-ray diffraction of as-evaporated amorphous germanium (Phys. Rev. B 50 (1994) 539)

  8. Reactive Infiltration of Silicon Melt Through Microporous Amorphous Carbon Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangsuwan, P.; Tewari, S. N.; Gatica, J. E.; Singh, M.; Dickerson, R.

    1999-01-01

    The kinetics of unidirectional capillary infiltration of silicon melt into microporous carbon preforms have been investigated as a function of the pore morphology and melt temperature. The infiltrated specimens showed alternating bands of dark and bright regions, which corresponded to the unreacted free carbon and free silicon regions, respectively. The decrease in the infiltration front velocity for increasing infiltration distances, is in qualitative agreement with the closed-form solution of capillarity driven fluid flow through constant cross section cylindrical pores. However, drastic changes in the thermal response and infiltration front morphologies were observed for minute differences in the preforms microstructure. This suggests the need for a dynamic percolation model that would account for the exothermic nature of the silicon-carbon chemical reaction and the associated pore closing phenomenon.

  9. Microtribology of Nitrogen-doped Amorphous Carbon Coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong F. Wang

    2004-01-01

    The friction, wear and lubrication of carbon nitride coatings on silicon substrates are studied using a spherical diamond counter-face with nano-scale asperities. The first part of this paper clarifies the coating thickness effect on frictional behavior of carbon nitride coatings. The second part of this paper reports empirical data on wear properties in repeated sliding contacts through in situ examination and post-sliding observation. The third part will concentrate on wear mechanisms for the transition from "No observable wear particles" to "Wear particle generation." In light of the above tribological study, the application of carbon nitride coatings to MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) is therefore discussed from view points of both microtribology and micromachining.

  10. Irradiation of the amorphous carbon films by picosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcinauskas, L., E-mail: liutauras.marcinauskas@ktu.lt [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania); Grigonis, A. [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania); Račiukaitis, G.; Gedvilas, M. [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, LT-02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Vinciūnaitė, V. [Kaunas University of Technology, Studentu 50, LT-51368 Kaunas (Lithuania)

    2015-10-30

    The effect of a picosecond laser irradiation on structure modification of diamond-like carbon (DLC) and graphite-like carbon (GLC) films was analyzed in this work. The DLC films were irradiated by Nd:YVO{sub 4} laser operating at the 532 nm wavelength with the picosecond (10 ps) pulse duration at the fluence in the range of (0.08–0.76) J/cm{sup 2}. The GLC films were irradiated only at the fluence of 0.76 J/cm{sup 2}. The different pulse number (1, 10, and 100) was used for irradiation the films. The micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements indicated that the laser irradiation led to rearrangement of the sp{sup 3} C–C bonds to the sp{sup 2} C=C bonds in the DLC films. The formation of silicon carbide (SiC) was found in the irradiated spot after 10 and 100 pulses. Modifications in the structure of the DLC film took place even in the areas with low intensity of the Gaussian beam wings (heat affected areas). The increase in the oxygen concentration up to ten times was detected in the heat affected areas after 100 pulses. Opposite to that, the laser irradiation decreased the oxygen concentration and smoothened the surface microrelief of the GLC films. The bonding type remained unchanged in the GLC films even after irradiation with 100 pulses per spot. - Highlights: • The picosecond laser irradiation led to the rearrangement of sp{sup 3} C-C to the sp{sup 2} C = C bonds in the diamond-like carbon film. • The ps-laser irradiation of the DLC films stipulates appearance of the aromatic carbon structures. • The bonding type of the graphite-like carbon films remained unchanged even after ps laser irradiation with 100 pulses.

  11. Inprovement of Field Emission Properties of PBS Thin Films by Amorphous Carbon Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead sulfide (PbS nanocrystalline thin films were synthesized at room temperature via chemical bath deposition on both silicon and glass substrates and coated with amorphous carbon of different thickness by varying deposition time in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. The as prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and atomic force microscope (AFM. XRD study reveals that coating of amorphous carbon does not change the crystal structure of PbS. From FESEM images it is seen that the average size of PbS nanoparticle does not exceed 100 nm, though sometomes small cubic particles agglomerated to form bigger particles. The coating of amorphous carbon can be clearly visible by the FESEM as well as from AFM micrographs. Field emission study show a significant betterment for the carbon coated sample as compared to the pure PbS. The effect of inter-electrode distance on the field emission characteristics of best field emitting sample has been studied for three different inter-electrode distances.

  12. Amorphous Carbon Gold Nanocomposite Thin Films: Structural and Spectro-ellipsometric Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montiel-Gonzalez, Z., E-mail: zeuzmontiel@hotmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Rodil, S.E.; Muhl, S. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan 04510, Mexico D.F (Mexico); Mendoza-Galvan, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Queretaro, 76010 Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico); Rodriguez-Fernandez, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito de la Investigacion Cientifica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510, Mexico D.F (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    Spectroscopic Ellipsometry was used to determine the optical and structural properties of amorphous carbon:gold nanocomposite thin films deposited by dc magnetron co-sputtering at different deposition power. The incorporation of gold as small particles distributed in the amorphous carbon matrix was confirmed by X-ray Diffraction, Rutherford Backscattering measurements and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy. Based on these results, an optical model for the films was developed using the Maxwell-Garnett effective medium with the Drude-Lorentz model representing the optical response of gold and the Tauc-Lorentz model for the amorphous carbon. The gold volume fraction and particle size obtained from the fitting processes were comparable to those from the physical characterization. The analysis of the ellipsometric spectra for all the samples showed strong changes in the optical properties of the carbon films as a consequence of the gold incorporation. These changes were correlated to the structural modification observed by Raman Spectroscopy, which indicated a clustering of the sp{sup 2} phase with a subsequent decrease in the optical gap. Finally, measurements of Reflection and Transmission Spectroscopy were carried out and Transmission Electron Microscopy images were obtained in order to support the ellipsometric model results.

  13. In Situ Mechanical Property Measurements of Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Lin, Yi; Nunez, Jennifer Carpena; Siochi, Emilie J.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Connell, John W.; Smith, Michael W.

    2011-01-01

    To understand the mechanical properties of amorphous carbon (a-C)/boron nitride nanotube (BNNT) nanostructures, in situ mechanical tests are conducted inside a transmission electron microscope equipped with an integrated atomic force microscope system. The nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation. We demonstrate multiple in situ tensile, compressive, and lap shear tests with a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructures. The tensile strength of the a-C/BNNT hybrid nanostructure is 5.29 GPa with about 90 vol% of a-C. The tensile strength and strain of the end-to-end joint structure with a-C welding is 0.8 GPa and 5.2% whereas the lap shear strength of the side-by-side joint structure with a-C is 0.25 GPa.

  14. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lyle M; Joester, Derk

    2015-01-01

    Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP) as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis.

  15. Electron emission degradation of nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Zhan-Ling; Wang Chang-Qing; Jia Yu; Zhang Bing-Lin; Yao Ning

    2007-01-01

    The initial field electron emission degradation behaviour of original nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon films has been observed.which can be attributed to the increase of the work function of the film in the field emission process analysed using a Fowler-Nordheim plot.The possible re.on for the change of work function is suggested to be the desorption of hydrogen from the original hydrogen termination film surface due to field emission current-induced local heating.For the explanation of the emission degradation behaviour of the nano-structured sp2-bonded amorphous carbon film,a cluster model with a series of graphite(0001) basal surfaces has been presented,and the theoretical calculations have been performed to investigate work functions of graphite(0001) surfaces with different hydrogen atom and ion chemisorption sites by using first principles method based on density functional theory-local density approximation.

  16. Capillarity creates single-crystal calcite nanowires from amorphous calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Hetherington, Nicola B J; Noel, Elizabeth H; Kröger, Roland; Charnock, John M; Christenson, Hugo K; Meldrum, Fiona C

    2011-12-23

    Single-crystal calcite nanowires are formed by crystallization of morphologically equivalent amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles within the pores of track etch membranes. The polyaspartic acid stabilized ACC is drawn into the membrane pores by capillary action, and the single-crystal nature of the nanowires is attributed to the limited contact of the intramembrane ACC particle with the bulk solution. The reaction environment then supports transformation to a single-crystal product.

  17. Facile fabrication of boron nitride nanosheets-amorphous carbon hybrid film for optoelectronic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wan, Shanhong

    2015-01-01

    A novel boron nitride nanosheets (BNNSs)-amorphous carbon (a-C) hybrid film has been deposited successfully on silicon substrates by simultaneous electrochemical deposition, and showed a good integrity of this B-C-N composite film by the interfacial bonding. This synthesis can potentially provide the facile control of the B-C-N composite film for the potential optoelectronic devices. This journal is

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. II. Small hydrocarbons production in Photon Dominated Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alata, I.; Jallat, A.; Gavilan, L.; Chabot, M.; Cruz-Diaz, G. A.; Munoz Caro, G. M.; Béroff, K.; Dartois, E.

    2015-12-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H) are a major component of the carbonaceous solids present in the interstellar medium. The production and existence of these grains is connected in particular with the balance between their photolysis, radiolysis, and hydrogenation. During grain processing, H2 and other small organic molecules, radicals, and fragments are released into the gas phase. Aims: We perform photolytic experiments on laboratory produced interstellar a-C:H analogues to monitor and quantify the release of species and compare to relevant observations in the interstellar medium. Methods: Hydrogenated amorphous carbon analogues at low temperature are exposed to ultraviolet (UV) photons, under ultra-high vacuum conditions. The species produced are monitored using mass spectrometry and post irradiation temperature-programmed desorption. Additional experiments are performed using deuterated analogues and the species produced are unambiguously separated from background contributions. We implement the laboratory measured yields for the released species in a time dependent model to investigate the effect of the UV photon irradiation of hydrogenated amorphous carbons in a photon dominated region, and estimate the associated time scale. Results: The UV photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons leads to the production of H2 molecules and small hydrocarbons. The model shows that the photolytic evolution of a-C:Hs in photon dominated regions, such as the Horsehead Nebula, can raise the abundance of carbonaceous molecules by several orders of magnitude at intermediate visual extinctions, i.e., after the C+ maximum and before the dense cloud conditions prevail where models generally show a minimum abundance for such carbonaceous species. The injection time peak ranges from a thousand to ten thousand years in the models, considering only the destruction of such grains and no re-hydrogenation. This time scale is consistent with the estimated advection front of

  19. Characterization and Electrochemical Properties of Oxygenated Amorphous Carbon (a-C) Films

    OpenAIRE

    Palomäki, Tommi; Wester, Niklas; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Laitinen, Mikko; Jiang, Hua; Arstila, Kai; Sajavaara, Timo; Han, Jeon G.; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films with varying oxygen content were deposited by closed-field unbalanced magnetron sputtering with the aim to understand the effect of oxygen on the structural and physical properties of the films and subsequently correlate these changes with electrochemical properties. The a-C films were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, helium-ion microscopy, atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight elastic re...

  20. First-principles studies of the vibrational properties of amorphous carbon nitrides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Niu Li; Wang Xuan-Zhang; Zhu Jia-Qi; Gao Wei

    2013-01-01

    Raman spectra of amorphous carbon nitride films (a-C:N) resemble those of typical amorphous carbon (a-C),and no specific features in the spectra are shown due to N doping.The present work provides a correlation between the microstructure and vibrational properties of a-C:N films from first principles.The six periodic model structures of 64 atoms with various mass densities and nitrogen contents are generated by the liquid-quench method using Car-Parinello molecular dynamics.By using Raman coupling tensors calculated with the finite electric field method,Raman spectra are obtained.The calculated results show that the vibrations of C=N could directly contribute to the Raman spectrum.The similarity of the Raman line shapes of N-doped and N-free amorphous carbons is due to the overlapping of C=N and C=C vibration bands.In addition,the origin of characteristic Raman peaks is also given.

  1. Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon from first principles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Li; ZHU JiaQi; GAO Wei; HAN Xiao; DU ShanYi

    2009-01-01

    The non-resonant vibrational Raman spectra of nitrogen-doped tetrahedral amorphous carbon have been calculated from first principles, including the generation of s structural model, and the calculation of vibrational frequencies, vibrational eigenmodes and Raman coupling tensors. The calculated Raman spectra are in good agreement with the experimental results. The broad band at around 500 cm~(-1) arises from mixed bonds. The T peak originates from the vibrations of sp~3 carbon and the G peak comes from the stretching vibrations of sp~2-type bonding of C=C and C=N. The simulation results indicate the direct contribution of N vibrations to Raman spectra.

  2. Electron field emission from 2-induced insulating to metallic behaviour of amorphous carbon (-C) films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pitamber Mahanandia; P N Viswakarma; Prasad Vishnu Bhotla; S V Subramanyam; Karuna Kar Nanda

    2010-06-01

    The influence of concentration and size of 2 cluster on the transport properties and electron field emissions of amorphous carbon films have been investigated. The observed insulating to metallic behaviour from reduced activation energy derived from transport measurement and threshold field for electron emission of -C films can be explained in terms of improvements in the connectivity between 2 clusters. The connectivity is resulted by the cluster concentration and size. The concentration and size of 2 content cluster is regulated by the coalescence of carbon globules into clusters, which evolves with deposition conditions.

  3. Composition and Microstructure of Magnetron Sputtering Deposited Ti-containing Amorphous Carbon Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ti-containing carbon films were deposited by using magnetron sputtering deposition. The composition and microstructure of the carbon films were characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is found that carbon films contain Ti 18 at pct; after Ti incorporation, the films consist of titanium carbide; C1s peak appears at 283.4 eV and it could be divided into 283.29 and 284.55 eV, representing sp2 and sp3, respectively, and sp2 is superior to sp3. This Ti-containing film with dominating sp2 bonds is nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, which could be proved by XRD and TEM.

  4. Microstructural study of oxidation of carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin ZENG; Zu-de FENG; Si-wei LI; Yong-sheng LIU

    2008-01-01

    Carbon-rich amorphous boron carbide (BxC) coatings were annealed at 400℃, 700℃, 1000℃ and 1200℃ for 2 h in air atmosphere. The microstructure and composition of the as-deposited and annealed coat-ings were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), micro-Raman spectro-scopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). All of the post-anneal characterizations demonstrated the ability of carbon-rich BxC coatings to protect the graphite substrate against oxidation. Different oxidation modes of the coatings were found at low temperature (400℃), moderate temperature (700℃) and high temper-ature (1000℃ and 1200℃). Finally, the feasibility of the application of carbon-rich BxC instead of pyrolytic car-bon (PyC) as a fiber/matrix interlayer in ceramics-matrix composites (CMCs) is discussed here.

  5. Effective Route to Graphitic carbon Nitride from Ball-Milled Amorphous carbon in NH3 Atmosphere Under Annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费振义; 刘玉先

    2003-01-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) powders were successfully synthesized from ball-milled amorphous carbon under NHs atmosphere at high temperature, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The combined characteristic data obtained by x-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission-electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopic analysis, and Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy provide substantial evidence for the graphite-like sp2-bonded structure with C3N4 stoichiometry.

  6. A Novel Carbon Nanotube-Supported NiP Amorphous Alloy Catalyst and Its Hydrogenation Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ju; Fengyi Li

    2006-01-01

    A carbon nanotube-supported NiP amorphous catalyst (NiP/CNT) was prepared by induced reduction. Benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction for the study of catalytic activity. The effects of the support on the activity and thermal stability of the supported catalyst were discussed based on various characterizations, including XRD, TEM, ICP, XPS, H2-TPD, and DTA. In comparison with the NiP amorphous alloy, the benzene conversion on NiP/CNT catalyst was lower, but the specific activity of NiP/CNT was higher, which is attributed to the dispersion produced by the support, an electron-donating effect, and the hydrogen-storage ability of CNT. The NiP/CNT thermal stability was improved because of the dispersion and electronic effects and the good heat-conduction ability of the CNT support.

  7. Crystalline and Amorphous Phosphorus – Carbon Nanotube Composites as Promising Anodes for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    KAUST Repository

    Smajic, Jasmin

    2016-05-04

    Battery research has been going full steam and with that the search for alternative anodes. Among many proposed electrode materials, little attention has been given to phosphorus. Phosphorus boasts the third highest gravimetric charge capacity and the highest volumetric charge capacity of all elements. Because of that, it would be an attractive battery anode material were it not for its poor cyclability with significant capacity loss immediately after the first cycle. This is known to be the consequence of considerable volume changes of phosphorus during charge/discharge cycles. In this work, we propose circumventing this issue by mixing amorphous red phosphorus with carbon nanotubes. By employing a non-destructive sublimation-deposition method, we have synthesized composites where the synergetic effect between phosphorus and carbon nanotubes allow for an improvement in the electrochemical performance of battery anodes. In fact, it has been shown that carbon nanotubes can act as an effective buffer to phosphorus volumetric expansions and contractions during charging and discharging of the half-cells [1]. By modifying the synthesis parameters, we have also been able to change the degree of crystallinity of the phosphorus matrix in the composites. In fact, the less common phase of red phosphorus, named fibrous phosphorus, was obtained, and that explains some of the varying electrochemical performances observed in the composites. Overall, it is found that a higher surface area of amorphous phosphorus allows for a better anode material when using single-walled carbon nanotubes as fillers.

  8. Amorphous calcium carbonate precipitation by cellular biomineralization in mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Xiang

    Full Text Available The growth of molluscan shell crystals is generally thought to be initiated from the extrapallial fluid by matrix proteins, however, the cellular mechanisms of shell formation pathway remain unknown. Here, we first report amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC precipitation by cellular biomineralization in primary mantle cell cultures of Pinctada fucata. Through real-time PCR and western blot analyses, we demonstrate that mantle cells retain the ability to synthesize and secrete ACCBP, Pif80 and nacrein in vitro. In addition, the cells also maintained high levels of alkaline phosphatase and carbonic anhydrase activity, enzymes responsible for shell formation. On the basis of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, we observed intracellular crystals production by mantle cells in vitro. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses revealed the crystals to be ACC, and de novo biomineralization was confirmed by following the incorporation of Sr into calcium carbonate. Our results demonstrate the ability of mantle cells to perform fundamental biomineralization processes via amorphous calcium carbonate, and these cells may be directly involved in pearl oyster shell formation.

  9. Amorphous and crystalline calcium carbonate distribution in the tergite cuticle of moulting Porcellio scaber (Isopoda, Crustacea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neues, Frank; Hild, Sabine; Epple, Matthias; Marti, Othmar; Ziegler, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The main mineral components of the isopod cuticle consists of crystalline magnesium calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate. During moulting isopods moult first the posterior and then the anterior half of the body. In terrestrial species calcium carbonate is subject to resorption, storage and recycling in order to retain significant fractions of the mineral during the moulting cycle. We used synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis and Raman spectroscopy to quantify the ACC/calcite ratio, the mineral phase distribution and the composition within the anterior and posterior tergite cuticle during eight different stages of the moulting cycle of Porcellio scaber. The results show that most of the amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is resorbed from the cuticle, whereas calcite remains in the old cuticle and is shed during moulting. During premoult resorption of ACC from the posterior cuticle is accompanied by an increase within the anterior tergites, and mineralization of the new posterior cuticle by resorption of mineral from the anterior cuticle. This suggests that one reason for using ACC in cuticle mineralization is to facilitate resorption and recycling of cuticular calcium carbonate. Furthermore we show that ACC precedes the formation of calcite in distal layers of the tergite cuticle.

  10. Resonant tunnelling assisted electrical switching in amorphous-carbon multilayer-superlattice structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Silva, S. R. P.

    2007-03-01

    Negative differential resistance (NDR) in an amorphous carbon (a-C) double barrier resonant tunnel diode (DB-RTD) with an estimated cut-off frequency well into the gigahertz regime is reported [1]. Presently we extend this work in carbon multi-layer superlattice structures by showing room temperature resonant tunnelling and establish a high value of the phase coherence length of ˜10 nm for low-dimensional amorphous materials. By applying a high bias, these structures are modified with reversible current switching of up to four orders of magnitude with a NDR signature and multiple peaks representative of resonant tunnelling in the ON state. In addition to the formation of filamentary channels by applying high bias, all these features are also explained using concepts based on tunnelling through the interface of the carbon layers, quantum-dot heterostructures and the presence of a confined two dimensional electron gas. This switching behavior and its tunability have been tested by applying a microwave signal up to 100 GHz which suggest the potential for novel high-speed memory devices. [1] S. Bhattacharyya, S.J. Henley, E. Mendoza, L.G-Rojas, J. Allam and S.R.P. Silva, Nature Mater. 5, 19 (2006).

  11. Substrate temperature influence on the trombogenicity in amorphous carbon nitride thin coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeano-Osorio, D.S.; Vargas, S.; Lopez-Cordoba, L.M.; Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 via al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2010-10-01

    Carbon nitride thin films were obtained through plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique by pulsed arc, varying the substrate temperature and investigating the influence of this parameter on the films hemocompatibility. For obtaining approaches of blood compatibility, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was used in order to study the platelets adherence and their morphology. Moreover, the elemental chemical composition was determined by using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), finding C, N and O. The coatings hemocompatibility was evaluated by in vitro thrombogenicity test, whose results were correlated with the microstructure and roughness of the films obtained. During the films growth process, the substrate temperature was varied, obtaining coatings under different temperatures, room temperature (T{sub room}), 100 deg. C, 150 deg. C and 200 deg. C. Parameters as interelectrodic distance, voltage, work pressure and number of discharges, were remained constant. By EDS, carbon and nitrogen were found in the films. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used, and it revealed an amorphous lattice, with graphitic process as the substrate temperature was increased. However, at a critical temperature of 150 deg. C, this tendency was broken, and the film became more amorphous. This film showed the lowest roughness, 2 {+-} 1 nm. This last characteristic favored the films hemocompatibility. Also, it was demonstrated that the blood compatibility of carbon nitride films obtained were affected by the I{sub D}/I{sub G} or sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio and not by the absolute sp{sup 3} or sp{sup 2} concentration.

  12. THE EFFECT OF DIAMETER ON THE MECHANICAL-PROPERTIES OF AMORPHOUS-CARBON FIBERS FROM LINEAR LOW-DENSITY POLYETHYLENE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    PENNING, JP; LAGCHER, R; PENNINGS, AJ

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical properties of amorphous carbon fibers, derived from linear low density polyethylene strongly depend on the fibre diameter, which may be attributed to the presence of a skin/core structure in these fibres. High strength carbon fibres could thus be prepared by using thin precursor filam

  13. Distinct Short-Range Order Is Inherent to Small Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Clusters (<2 nm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Shengtong [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany; School of Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Multiphase Materials Chemical Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road Shanghai 200237 P.R. China; Chevrier, Daniel M. [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 Canada; Zhang, Peng [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Research in Materials, Dalhousie University, Halifax Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 Canada; Gebauer, Denis [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany; Cölfen, Helmut [Physical Chemistry, University of Konstanz, Universitätsstrasse 10 78457 Konstanz Germany

    2016-09-09

    Amorphous intermediate phases are vital precursors in the crystallization of many biogenic minerals. While inherent short-range orders have been found in amorphous calcium carbonates (ACCs) relating to different crystalline forms, it has never been clarified experimentally whether such orders already exist in very small clusters less than 2 nm in size. Here, we studied the stability and structure of 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) protected ACC clusters with a core size of ca. 1.4 nm consisting of only seven CaCO3 units. Ligand concentration and structure are shown to be key factors in stabilizing the ACC clusters. More importantly, even in such small CaCO3 entities, a proto-calcite short-range order can be identified but with a relatively high degree of disorder that arises from the very small size of the CaCO3 core. Our findings support the notion of a structural link between prenucleation clusters, amorphous intermediates, and final crystalline polymorphs, which appears central to the understanding of polymorph selection.

  14. Influence of dc bias on amorphous carbon deposited by pulse laser ablation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films were deposited on single-crystalline silicon and K9 glass by pulse laser ablation using different negative substrate bias. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe morphology of the surface. Thickness and refractive index of the film deposited on K9 glass were measured by ellipsometry. Micro-hardness of films was measured relatively to single crystal silicon. All films deposited on silicon were analyzed by Raman spectra. All spectra were deconvoluted to three peaks. Line-width ratios varied similarly with bias voltage when the laser energy was kept invariant.

  15. Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon-Nitrogen Alloy Thin Films for Solar Cell Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Zhi-Bin; DING Zheng-Ming; PANG Qian-Jun; CUI Rong-Qiang

    2001-01-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen alloy (a-CNx :H) thin films have been deposited on silicon substratesby improved dc magnetron sputtering from a graphite target in nitrogen and hydrogen gas discharging. Thefilms are investigated by using Raman spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectral ellipsometer and electron spin resonance techniques. The optimized process condition for solar cell application is discussed. Thephotovoltaic property of a-CNx:H/silicon heterojunctions can be improved by the adjustment of the pressureratio of hydrogen to nitrogen and unbalanced magnetic field intensity. Open-circuit voltage and short-circuitcurrent reach 300mV and 5.52 Ma/cm2, respectively.

  16. Photoluminescence of amorphous carbon films fabricated by layer-by-layer hydrogen plasma chemical annealing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐骏; 黄晓辉; 李伟; 王立; 陈坤基

    2002-01-01

    A method in which nanometre-thick film deposition was alternated with hydrogen plasma annealing (layer-by-layermethod) was applied to fabricate hydrogenated amorphous carbon films in a conventional plasma-enhanced chemicalvapour deposition system. It was found that the hydrogen plasma treatment could decrease the hydrogen concentrationin the films and change the sp2/sp3 ratio to some extent by chemical etching. Blue photoluminescence was observed atroom temperature, as a result of the reduction of sp2 clusters in the films.

  17. Precipitation of Co(2+) carbonates from aqueous solution: insights on the amorphous to crystalline transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Jorge; Fernández-González, Ángeles; Jiménez, Amalia

    2016-04-01

    Cobalt is toxic metal that is present only as a trace in the Earth crust. However, Co might concentrate on specific areas due to both natural and anthropogenic factors and thus, soils and groundwater can be contaminated. It is from this perspective that we are interested in the precipitation of cobalt carbonates, since co-precipitation with minerals phases is a well-known method for metal immobilization in the environment. In particular, the carbonates are widely used due to its reactivity and natural abundance. In order to evaluate the cobalt carbonate precipitation at room temperature, a simple experimental work was carried out in this work. The precipitation occurred via reaction of two common salts: 0.05M of CoCl2 and 0.05M of Na2CO3 in aqueous solution. After reaction, the precipitated solid was kept in the remaining water at 25 oC and under constant stirring for different aging times of 5 min, 1 and 5 hours, 1, 2, 4, 7, 30 and 60 days. In addition to the aging and precipitation experiments, we carried out experiments to determine the solubility of the solids. In these experiments each precipitate was dissolved in Milli-Q water until equilibrium was reached and then the aqueous solution was analyzed regarding Co2+ and total alkalinity. Furthermore, acid solution calorimetry of the products were attained. Finally, we modeled the results using the PHREEQC code. Solid and aqueous phase identification and characterization have been extensively reported in a previous work (González-López et al., 2015). The main results of our investigation were the initial precipitation of an amorphous cobalt carbonate that evolve towards a poorly crystalline cobalt hydroxide carbonate with aging treatment. Solubility of both phases have been calculated under two different approaches: precipitation and dissolution. Values of solubility from each approach were obtained with a general error due to differences in experiment conditions, for instance, ionic strength, temperature and

  18. Vertical electric field stimulated neural cell functionality on porous amorphous carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to support neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation in electric field mediated culture conditions. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon substrate electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm(2)) and low impedance (3.3 kΩ at 1 kHz). The optimal window of electric field stimulation for better cell viability and neurite outgrowth is established. When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (≤ 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). While the cell viability was assessed by two complementary biochemical assays (MTT and LDH), the differentiation was studied by indirect immunostaining. Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to either enhance or to restrict neurite outgrowth respectively at lower or higher field strengths, when neuroblastoma cells are cultured on porous glassy carbon electrodes having a desired combination of electrochemical properties.

  19. Transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate to rod-like single crystal calcite via "copying" collagen template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Zhonghui; Hu, Binbin; Dai, Shuxi; Du, Zuliang

    2015-10-01

    Collagen Langmuir films were prepared by spreading the solution of collagen over deionized water, CaCl2 solution and Ca(HCO3)2 solution. Resultant collagen Langmuir monolayers were then compressed to a lateral pressure of 10 mN/m and held there for different duration, allowing the crystallization of CaCO3. The effect of crystallization time on the phase composition and microstructure of CaCO3 was investigated. It was found that amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) was obtained at a crystallization time of 6 h. The amorphous CaCO3 was transformed to rod-like single crystal calcite crystals at an extended crystallization time of 12 h and 24 h, via "copying" the symmetry and dimensionalities of collagen fibers. Resultant calcite crystallites were well oriented along the longitudinal axis of collagen fibers. The ordered surface structure of collagen fibers and electrostatic interactions played key roles in tuning the oriented nucleation and growth of the calcite crystallites. The mineralized collagen possessing both desired mechanical properties of collagen fiber and good biocompatibility of calcium carbonate may be assembled into an ideal biomaterial for bone implants.

  20. Effect of metal doping on structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaowei; Zhang, Dong [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Lee, Kwang-Ryeol, E-mail: krlee@kist.re.kr [Computational Science Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Aiying, E-mail: aywang@nimte.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies of Zhejiang Province, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-05-31

    First-principles calculation was performed to investigate the effect of metal doping on the structural characteristics of amorphous carbon system, and the 3d transition metals (TM) were particularly selected as representative case. Results showed that the total energy in TM–C systems caused by distorting the bond angles was reduced distinctly for comparison with that in C–C system. Further electronic structure revealed that as the 3d electrons of doped TM increased, the bond characteristic of highest occupied molecular orbital changed from bonding (Sc, Ti) to nonbonding (V, Cr, Mn, Fe) and finally to antibonding (Co, Ni, Cu) between the TM and C atoms. Meanwhile, the TM–C bond presented a mixture of the covalent and ionic characters. The decrease of strength and directionality of TM–C bonds resulted in the total energy change upon bond angle distortion, which demonstrated that the bond characteristics played an important role in reducing residual stress of TM-doped amorphous carbon systems. - Highlights: • The bond characteristics as 3d electrons changed from bonding, nonbonding to antibonding. • The TM–C bond was a mixture of covalent and ionic characters. • Reduced strength and directionality of TM–C bond led to small distortion energy change. • The weak TM–C bond accounted for the reduced compressive stress caused by TM.

  1. Formation of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Vacuum Using Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, You; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite films were grown in vacuum using a coaxial arc plasma gun. From the X-ray diffraction measurement, the UNCD crystallite size was estimated to be 1.6 nm. This size is dramatically reduced from that (2.3 nm) of UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite films grown in a hydrogen atmosphere. The sp3/(sp3 + sp2) value, which was estimated from the X-ray photoemission spectrum, was also reduced to be 41%. A reason for it might be the reduction in the UNCD crystallite size. From the near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectrum, it was found that the π*C=C and π*C≡C bonds are preferentially formed instead of the σ*C-H bonds in the UNCD/a-C:H films. Since the extremely small UNCD crystallites (1.6 nm) correspond to the nuclei of diamond, we consider that UNCD crystallite formation should be due predominantly to nucleation. The supersaturated condition required for nucleation is expected to be realized in the deposition using the coaxial arc plasma gun.

  2. Optical properties of plasma deposited amorphous carbon nitride films on polymer substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, S.H., E-mail: abo_95@yahoo.co [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); El-Hossary, F.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Sohag University, 82524 Sohag (Egypt); Gamal, G.A.; Kahlid, M.M. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, 83523 Qena (Egypt)

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbon nitride thin films were deposited on polymer substrates using radio frequency (rf) plasma in a mixture of nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and acetylene (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}) gasses. The samples were prepared at different rf plasma power (350, 400, 450, 500, and 550 W), at constant plasma exposure time of 10 min, and constant N{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratio of 50%. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the prepared samples were examined using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy analysis, respectively. The absence of the carbon nitride diffraction peaks confirms the amorphous nature of these films. The root mean square roughness of the films increased from 3.77 to 25.22 nm as the power increased from 350 to 550 W. The thickness and the deposition rate were found to increase with increasing plasma power. Over the whole studied wavelength range, from 200 to 2500 nm, the transmittance decreased with increasing plasma power. A shift in the onset of absorption towards higher wavelengths with increasing plasma power, indicating a decrease in the optical band gap, has been observed. The refractive index values were found to decrease while the extinction coefficient increased with increasing plasma power.

  3. Controlled fluoridation of amorphous carbon films deposited at reactive plasma conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoffe Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A study of the correlations between plasma parameters, gas ratios, and deposited amorphous carbon film properties is presented. The injection of a C4F8/Ar/N2 mixture of gases was successfully used in an inductively coupled plasma system for the preparation of amorphous carbon films with different fluoride doping at room-temperature, using silicon as a substrate. This coating was formed at low-pressure and low-energy using an inductively coupled plasma process. A strong dependence between the ratios of gases during deposition and the composition of the substrate compounds was shown. The values of ratios between Ar (or Ar+N2 and C4F8 - 1:1 and between N2 and Ar - 1:2 in the N2/Ar/C4F8 mixture were found as the best for low fluoridated coatings. In addition, an example of improving the etch-passivation in the Bosch procedure was described. Scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy options, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray reflectivity were used for quantitative analysis of the deposited films.

  4. Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films treated by SF{sub 6} plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marins, N M S; Mota, R P; Santos, D C R; Honda, R Y; Kayama, M E; Kostov, K G; Algatti, M A [Laboratorio de Plasma, Faculdade de Engenharia, UNESP, Av. Dr. Ariberto Pereira da Cunha-333, 12516-410, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil); Cruz, N C; Rangel, E C, E-mail: nazir@feg.unesp.b [Laboratorio de Plasmas Tecnologicos, Unidade Diferenciada Sorocaba/Ipero, UNESP, Av. Tres de Marco-511, 18085-180, Sorocaba, SP (Brazil)

    2009-05-01

    This work was performed to verify the chemical structure, mechanical and hydrophilic properties of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films prepared by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, using acetylene/argon mixture as monomer. Films were prepared in a cylindrical quartz reactor, fed by 13.56 MHz radiofrequency. The films were grown during 5 min, for power varying from 25 to 125 W at a fixed pressure of 9.5 Pa. After deposition, all samples were treated by SF{sub 6} plasma with the aim of changing their hydrophilic character. Film chemical structure investigated by Raman spectroscopy, revealed the increase of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon bonds as the plasma power increases. Hardness measurements performed by the nanoindentation technique showed an improvement from 5 GPa to 14 GPa following the increase discharge power. The untreated films presented a hydrophilic character, which slightly diminished after SF{sub 6} plasma treatment.

  5. Structural and mechanical properties of amorphous carbon films deposited by the dual plasma technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaohui Wang; Xu Zhang; Xianying Wu; Huixing Zhang; Xiaoji Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Direct current metal filtered cathodic vacuum are (FCVA) and acetylene gas (C2H2) were wielded to synthesize Ti-containing amorphous carbon films on Si (100). The influence of substrate bias voltage and acetylene gas on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the films were investigated. The results show that the phase of TiC in the (111) preferential crystallo-graphic orientation exists in the film, and rite main existing pattern of carbon is sp2. With increasing the acetylene flow rate, the con-tents of Ti and TiC phase of the film gradually reduce; however, the thickness of the film increases. When the substrate bias voltage reaches -600 V, the internal stress of the film reaches 1.6 GPa. The micro-hardness and elastic modulus of the film can reach 33.9 and 237.6 GPa, respectively, and the friction coefficient of the film is 0.25.

  6. Spectroscopic studies of low dielectric constant fluorinated amorphous carbon films for ULSI integrated circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Y.; Yang, H. [Sharp Microelectronics Technology, Camas, WA (United States); Guo, J.; Sathe, C.; Agui, A.; Nordgren, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Physics Dept.

    1998-12-31

    Performance of future generations of integrated circuits will be limited by the RC delay caused by on-chip interconnections. Overcoming this limitation requires the deployment of new high conductivity metals such as copper and low dielectric constant intermetal dielectrics (IMD). Fluorinated amorphous carbon (a-CFx) is a promising candidate for replacing SiO{sub 2} as the IMD. In this paper the authors investigated the structure and electronic properties of a-CFx thin films using high-resolution x-ray absorption, emission, and photoelectron spectroscopy. The composition and local bonding information were obtained and correlated with deposition conditions. The data suggest that the structure of the a-CFx is mostly of carbon rings and CF{sub 2} chains cross-linked with C atoms. The effects of growth temperature on the structure and the thermal stability of the film are discussed.

  7. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  8. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  9. Genesis of amorphous calcium carbonate containing alveolar plates in the ciliate Coleps hirtus (Ciliophora, Prostomatea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemloh, Marie-Louise; Marin, Frédéric; Herbst, Frédéric; Plasseraud, Laurent; Schweikert, Michael; Baier, Johannes; Bill, Joachim; Brümmer, Franz

    2013-02-01

    In the protist world, the ciliate Coleps hirtus (phylum Ciliophora, class Prostomatea) synthesizes a peculiar biomineralized test made of alveolar plates, structures located within alveolar vesicles at the cell cortex. Alveolar plates are arranged by overlapping like an armor and they are thought to protect and/or stiffen the cell. Although their morphology is species-specific and of complex architecture, so far almost nothing is known about their genesis, their structure and their elemental and mineral composition. We investigated the genesis of new alveolar plates after cell division and examined cells and isolated alveolar plates by electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, FTIR and X-ray diffraction. Our investigations revealed an organic mesh-like structure that guides the formation of new alveolar plates like a template and the role of vesicles transporting inorganic material. We further demonstrated that the inorganic part of the alveolar plates is composed out of amorphous calcium carbonate. For stabilization of the amorphous phase, the alveolar vesicles, the organic fraction and the element phosphorus may play a role.

  10. Highly ordered amorphous silicon-carbon alloys obtained by RF PECVD

    CERN Document Server

    Pereyra, I; Carreno, M N P; Prado, R J; Fantini, M C A

    2000-01-01

    We have shown that close to stoichiometry RF PECVD amorphous silicon carbon alloys deposited under silane starving plasma conditions exhibit a tendency towards c-Si C chemical order. Motivated by this trend, we further explore the effect of increasing RF power and H sub 2 dilution of the gaseous mixtures, aiming to obtain the amorphous counterpart of c-Si C by the RF-PECVD technique. Doping experiments were also performed on ordered material using phosphorus and nitrogen as donor impurities and boron and aluminum as acceptor ones. For nitrogen a doping efficiency close to device quality a-Si:H was obtained, the lower activation energy being 0,12 eV with room temperature dark conductivity of 2.10 sup - sup 3 (OMEGA.cm). Nitrogen doping efficiency was higher than phosphorous for all studied samples. For p-type doping, results indicate that, even though the attained conductivity values are not device levels, aluminum doping conducted to a promising shift in the Fermi level. Also, aluminum resulted a more efficie...

  11. Pd clusters supported on amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres for hydrogen production from formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulushev, Dmitri A; Bulusheva, Lyubov G; Beloshapkin, Sergey; O'Connor, Thomas; Okotrub, Alexander V; Ryan, Kevin M

    2015-04-29

    Amorphous, low-porosity carbon spheres on the order of a few micrometers in size were prepared by carbonization of squalane (C30H62) in supercritical CO2 at 823 K. The spheres were characterized and used as catalysts' supports for Pd. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the spheres revealed sp(2) and sp(3) hybridized carbon. To activate carbons for interaction with a metal precursor, often oxidative treatment of a support is needed. We showed that boiling of the obtained spheres in 28 wt % HNO3 did not affect the shape and bulk structure of the spheres, but led to creation of a considerable amount of surface oxygen-containing functional groups and increase of the content of sp(2) hybridized carbon on the surface. This carbon was seen by scanning transmission electron microscopy in the form of waving graphene flakes. The H/C atomic ratio in the spheres was relatively high (0.4) and did not change with the HNO3 treatment. Palladium was deposited by impregnation with Pd acetate followed by reduction in H2. This gave uniform Pd clusters with a size of 2-4 nm. The Pd supported on the original C spheres showed 2-3 times higher catalytic activity in vapor phase formic acid decomposition and higher selectivity for H2 formation (98-99%) than those for the catalyst based on the HNO3 treated spheres. Using of such low-porosity spheres as a catalyst support should prevent mass transfer limitations for fast catalytic reactions.

  12. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.

    distribution models, and gamma response models was developed. This software can be used for direct numerical comparison between the models, submodels and their parameters and experimental data. In the present paper, we look at 10%-survival data from cell lines irradiated in vitro with carbon and proton beams......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... by Tsuruoka et al. [4] . Results and conclusion: Preliminary results show a good agreement of models predictions and the experimental data for clinical doses. When investigating the influence of radial dose distributions on inactivation cross section in the Katz model, we found that one of the most important...

  13. Field Emission and Radial Distribution Function Studies of Fractal-like Amorphous Carbon Nanotips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solá, F.; Biaggi-Labiosa, A.; Fonseca, L. F.; Resto, O.; Lebrón-Colón, M.; Meador, M. A.

    2009-05-01

    The short-range order of individual fractal-like amorphous carbon nanotips was investigated by means of energy-filtered electron diffraction in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The nanostructures were grown in porous silicon substrates in situ within the TEM by the electron beam-induced deposition method. The structure factor S( k) and the reduced radial distribution function G( r) were calculated. From these calculations a bond angle of 124° was obtained which suggests a distorted graphitic structure. Field emission was obtained from individual nanostructures using two micromanipulators with sub-nanometer positioning resolution. A theoretical three-stage model that accounts for the geometry of the nanostructures provides a value for the field enhancement factor close to the one obtained experimentally from the Fowler-Nordheim law.

  14. Field electron emission enhancement of amorphous carbon through a niobium carbide buffer layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.; Wang, C.; Hu, C. Q.; Zhao, Z. D.; Yu, W. X.; Zheng, W. T.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the field electron emission for amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si (100) substrates through a niobium carbide buffer layer with different structures and find that the niobium carbide buffer layer can substantially improve the electron field emission properties of a-C films, which can be attributed to an increase in the enhancement factor β on the surface of a-C films after the insertion of the niobium carbide layer in between a-C film and substrate. Moreover, a phase transition for niobium carbide layer from hexagonal (Nb2C) to cubic (NbC) structure, revealed by x-ray diffraction, further enhances the electron field emission. The first-principles calculated results show that the work function of NbC is lower than that of Nb2C, which is the reason why the electron emission of a-C is further enhanced.

  15. Platinum containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films as selective solar absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Yung-Hsiang; Brahma, Sanjaya [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Tzeng, Y.H. [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Ting, Jyh-Ming, E-mail: jting@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Energy Technology and Strategy, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    We have investigated a double-cermet structured thin film in which an a-C:H thin film was used as an anti-reflective (AR) layer and two platinum-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H/Pt) thin films were used as the double cermet layers. A reactive co-sputter deposition method was used to prepare both the anti-reflective and cermet layers. Effects of the target power and heat treatment were studied. The obtained films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The optical absorptance and emittance of the as deposited and annealed films were determined using UV–vis-NIR spectroscopy. We show that the optical absorptance of the resulting double-cermet structured thin film is as high as 96% and remains to be 91% after heat treatment at 400 °C, indicating the thermal stability of the film.

  16. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels

    be seriously hampered by variations in detector efficiency (light output per energy imparted) due to high-LET effects and gradients along the physical size (~mm) of the detector crystals. Amorphous track models (ATMs) such as the Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach by Katz and co-workers or the ECLaT code by Geiß et...... assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  17. Structural and Electrical Properties of Amorphous Hydrogen Carbon-Nitrogen Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Da-Cheng; LIU Yi-Chun; LIU Yan; QI Xiu-Ying; ZHONG Dian-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ Amorphous hydrogenated carbon-nitrogen (a-C:H:(N)) films with different nitrogen contents have been deposited by using rf-sputtering of a high purity graphite target in an Ar-H2-N2 atmosphere. Transmittance and reflectance spectra are used to characterize the Tauc gap and absorption coefficients in the wavelength range 0.185-3.2μm.The temperature dependence of conductivity demonstrates a hopping mechanism of the Fermi level in the temperature range of 77-300K. The density of state at the Fermi level is derived from the direct current conductivity.The photoluminescence properties of a-C:H:N films were investigated. The photoluminescence peak has a blue shift with increasing excitation energy. These results are discussed on the basis of a model in which the different sp2 clusters dispersed in sp3 matrices.

  18. A Selective Metasurface Absorber with An Amorphous Carbon Interlayer for Solar Thermal Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wan, Chenglong; Nunez-Sanchez, S; Chen, Lifeng; Lopez-Garcia, M; Pugh, J; Zhu, Bofeng; Selvaraj, P; Mallick, T; Senthilarasu, S; Cryan, M J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents fabrication, measurement and modelling results for a metal-dielectric-metal metasurface absorber for solar thermal applications. The structure uses amorphous carbon as an inter-layer between thin gold films with the upper film patterned with a 2D periodic array using focused ion beam etching. The patterned has been optimised to give high absorptance from 400-1200nm and low absorptance above this wavelength range to minimise thermal radiation and hence obtain higher temperature performance. Wide angle absorptance results are shown and detailed modelling of a realistic nanostructured upper layer results in excellent agreement between measured and modelled results. The use of gold in this paper is a first step towards a high temperature metasurface where gold can be replaced by other refractory metals such as tungsten or chrome.

  19. A Low-Stress, Elastic, and Improved Hardness Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with fullerene-like microstructure was investigated with a different proportion of hydrogen supply in deposition. The results showed at hydrogen flow rate of 50 sccm, the deposited films showed a lower compressive stress (lower 48.6%, higher elastic recovery (higher 19.6%, near elastic recovery rate 90%, and higher hardness (higher 7.4% compared with the films deposited without hydrogen introduction. Structural analysis showed that the films with relatively high sp2 content and low bonded hydrogen content possessed high hardness, elastic recovery rate, and low compressive stress. It was attributed to the curved graphite microstructure, which can form three-dimensional covalently bonded network.

  20. Tailoring the Mechanical Properties of High-Aspect-Ratio Carbon Nanotube Arrays using Amorphous Silicon Carbide Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelma, R.H.; Morana, B.; Vollebregt, S.; Schlangen, H.E.J.G.; Van Zeijl, H.W.; Fan, X.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2014-01-01

    The porous nature of carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays allows for the unique opportunity to tailor their mechanical response by the infiltration and deposition of nanoscale conformal coatings. Here, we fabricate novel photo-lithographically defined CNT pillars that are conformally coated with amorphous s

  1. Multiscale simulation of thermal disruption in resistance switching process in amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, A. M.; Shumkin, G. N.; Nikishin, N. G.

    2015-09-01

    The switching of material atomic structure and electric conductivity is used in novel technologies of making memory on the base of phase change. The possibility of making memory on the base of amorphous carbon is shown in experiment [1]. Present work is directed to simulation of experimentally observed effects. Ab initio quantum calculations were used for simulation of atomic structure changes in amorphous carbon [2]. These simulations showed that the resistance change is connected with thermally induced effects. The temperature was supposed to be the function of time. In present paper we propose a new multiscale, self-consistent model which combines three levels of simulation scales and takes into account the space and time dependencies of the temperature. On the first level of quantum molecular dynamic we provide the calculations of phase change in atomic structure with space and time dependence of the temperature. Nose-Hover thermostats are used for MD simulations to reproduce space dependency of the temperature. It is shown that atomic structure is localized near graphitic layers in conducting dot. Structure parameter is used then on the next levels of the modeling. Modified Ehrenfest Molecular Dynamics is used on the second level. Switching evolution of electronic subsystem is obtained. In macroscopic scale level the heat conductivity equation for continuous media is used for calculation space-time dependence of the temperature. Joule heat source depends on structure parameter and electric conductivity profiles obtained on previous levels of modeling. Iterative procedure is self-consistently repeated combining three levels of simulation. Space localization of Joule heat source leads to the thermal disruption. Obtained results allow us to explain S-form of the Volt-Ampere characteristic observed in experiment. Simulations were performed on IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer at Moscow State University.

  2. Characterization of microstructure and mechanical behavior of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon coatings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, B.; Cao, D. M.; Meng, W. J.; Xu, J.; Tittsworth, R. C.; Rehn, L. E.; Baldo, P. M.; Doll, G. L.; Materials Science Division; Louisiana State Univ.; The Timken Company

    2001-12-03

    We report on the characterization of microstructure and mechanical properties of sputter deposited Ti-containing amorphous carbon (Ti-aC) coatings as a function of Ti composition. Ti-aC coatings have been deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputter deposition, in an industrial-scale four-target coating deposition system. The composition and microstructure of the Ti-aC coatings have been characterized in detail by combining the techniques of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and hydrogen elastic recoil detection (ERD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. At Ti compositions <4at.%, Ti atoms dissolve in an amorphous carbon (a-C) matrix. The dissolution limit of Ti atoms in an a-C matrix is determined to be between 4 and 8 at.%. At Ti compositions >8 at.%, XANES and EXAFS data indicate that the average Ti atomic bonding environment in Ti-aC coatings resembles that in cubic B1-TiC, consistent with TEM observation of precipitation of TiC nanocrystallites in the a-C matrix. Beyond the Ti dissolution limit, the Ti-aC coatings are nanocomposites with nanocrystalline TiC clusters embedded in an a-C matrix. A large scale, quasi one-dimensional composition modulation in the Ti-aC coatings was observed due to the particular coating deposition geometry. Elastic stiffness and hardness of the Ti-aC coatings were measured by instrumented nanoindentation and found to vary systematically as a function of Ti composition. Unlubricated friction coefficient of Ti-aC coatings against WC-Co balls was found to increase as the Ti composition increases. As Ti composition increases, the overall mechanical behavior of the Ti-aC coatings becomes more TiC-like.

  3. Formation of amorphous calcium carbonate in caves and its implications for speleothem research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demény, Attila; Németh, Péter; Czuppon, György; Leél-Őssy, Szabolcs; Szabó, Máté; Judik, Katalin; Németh, Tibor; Stieber, József

    2016-12-01

    Speleothem deposits are among the most valuable continental formations in paleoclimate research, as they can be dated using absolute dating methods, and they also provide valuable climate proxies. However, alteration processes such as post-depositional mineralogical transformations can significantly influence the paleoclimatic application of their geochemical data. An innovative sampling and measurement protocol combined with scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is presented, demonstrating that carbonate precipitating from drip water in caves at ~10 °C contains amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) that later transforms to nanocrystalline calcite. Stable oxygen isotope fractionations among calcite, ACC and water were also determined, proving that ACC is 18O-depleted (by >2.4 ± 0.8‰) relative to calcite. This, in turn, has serious consequences for speleothem-based fluid inclusion research as closed system transformation of ACC to calcite may induce a negative oxygen isotope shift in fluid inclusion water, resulting in deterioration of the original compositions. ACC formation increases the speleothems’ sensitivity to alteration as its interaction with external solutions may result in the partial loss of original proxy signals. Mineralogical analysis of freshly precipitating carbonate at the studied speleothem site is suggested in order to determine the potential influence of ACC formation.

  4. Characterization and antibacterial performance of ZrCN/amorphous carbon coatings deposited on titanium implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Chih-Ho [School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, 404 Taiwan (China); Chang, Yin-Yu, E-mail: yinyu@mail2000.com.tw [Department of Mechanical and Computer-Aided Engineering, National Formosa University, Yunlin, Taiwan (China); Huang, Heng-Li [School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Kao, Ho-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Mingdao University, Changhua, Taiwan (China)

    2011-12-30

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials have been used for dental/orthopedic implants due to their excellent biological compatibility, superior mechanical strength and high corrosion resistance. The osseointegration of Ti implants is related to their composition and surface treatment. Better biocompatibility and anti-bacterial performances of Ti implant are beneficial for the osseointegration and for avoiding the infection after implantation surgery. In this study, nanocomposite ZrCN/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents were deposited on a bio-grade pure Ti implant material. A cathodic-arc evaporation system with plasma enhanced duct equipment was used for the deposition of ZrCN/a-C coatings. Reactive gas (N{sub 2}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} activated by the zirconium plasma in the evaporation process were used to deposit the ZrCN/a-C coatings. To verify the susceptibility of implant surface to bacterial adhesion, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans (A. actinomycetemcomitans), one of the major pathogen frequently found in the dental implant-associated infections, was chosen for in vitro anti-bacterial analyses. In addition, the biocompatibility of human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells on coatings was also evaluated by a cell proliferation assay. The results suggested that the ZrCN/a-C coatings with carbon content higher than 12.7 at.% can improve antibacterial performance with excellent HGF cell compatibility as well.

  5. A mixed flow reactor method to synthesize amorphous calcium carbonate under controlled chemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Christina R; Rimstidt, J Donald; Dove, Patricia M

    2013-01-01

    This study describes a new procedure to synthesize amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) from well-characterized solutions that maintain a constant supersaturation. The method uses a mixed flow reactor to prepare ACC in significant quantities with consistent compositions. The experimental design utilizes a high-precision solution pump that enables the reactant solution to continuously flow through the reactor under constant mixing and allows the precipitation of ACC to reach steady state. As a proof of concept, we produced ACC with controlled Mg contents by regulating the Mg/Ca ratio of the input solution and the carbonate concentration and pH. Our findings show that the Mg/Ca ratio of the reactant solution is the primary control for the Mg content in ACC, as shown in previous studies, but ACC composition is further regulated by the carbonate concentration and pH of the reactant solution. The method offers promise for quantitative studies of ACC composition and properties and for investigating the role of this phase as a reactive precursor to biogenic minerals.

  6. Electrical and Electrochemical Properties of Nitrogen-Containing Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon (ta-C) Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xingyi

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) is a diamond-like carbon (DLC) material comprised of a mixture of sp2 (˜40%) and sp3-bonded (˜60%) carbon domains. The physicochemical structure and electrochemical properties depend strongly on the sp2/sp3 bonding ratio as well as the incorporation of impurities, such as hydrogen or nitrogen. The ability to grow ta-C films at lower temperatures (25-100 °C) on a wider variety of substrates is a potential advantage of these materials as compared with diamond films. In this project, the basic structural and electrochemical properties of nitrogen-incorporated ta-C thin films will be discussed. The major goal of this work was to determine if the ta-C:N films exhibit electrochemical properties more closely aligned with those of boron-doped diamond (sp 3 carbon) or glassy carbon (amorphous sp2 carbon). Much like diamond, ta-C:N thin-film electrodes are characterized by a low background voltammetric current, a wide working potential window, relatively rapid electron-transfer kinetics for aqueous redox systems, such as Fe(CN) 6-3/-4 and Ru(NH3)6+3/+2 , and weak adsorption of polar molecules from solution. For example, negligible adsorption of methylene blue was found on the ta-C:N films in contrast to glassy carbon; a surface on which this molecule strongly adsorbs. The film microstructure was studied with x-ray photoelectron microscopy (XPS), visible Raman spectroscopy and electron-energy loss spectroscopy (EELS); all of which revealed the sp2-bonded carbon content increased with increasing nitrogen. The electrical properties of ta-C:N films were studied by four-point probe resistance measurement and conductive-probe AFM (CP-AFM). The incorporation of nitrogen into ta-C films increased the electrical conductivity primarily by increasing the sp2-bonded carbon content. CP-AFM showed the distribution of the conductive sp2-carbon on the film surface was not uniform. These films have potential to be used in field emission area. The

  7. Development of spin-on carbon hardmasks with comparable etch resistance to Amorphous Carbon Layer (ACL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Hwan-Sung; Yoon, Kyong-Ho; Kim, Min-Soo; Oh, Seung Bae; Song, Jee-Yun; Tokareva, Nataliya; Kim, Jong-Seob; Chang, Tuwon

    2008-11-01

    In recent microlithography of semiconductor fabrication, spin-on hardmask (SOH) process continue to gain popularity as it replaces the traditional SiON/ACL hardmask scheme which suffers from high CoO, low productivity, particle contamination, and layer alignment issues. In the SOH process, organic polymer with high carbon content is spin-cast to form a carbon hardmask film. In the previous papers, we reported the development of organic SOH materials and their application in sub-70 nm lithography. In this paper, we describe the synthesis of organic polymers with very high carbon contents (>92 wt.%) and the evaluation of the spin-coated films for the hardmask application. The high carbon content of the polymer ensures improved etch resistance which amounts to >90% of ACL's resistance. However, as the carbon content of the polymers increases, the solubility in common organic solvents becomes lower. Here we report the strategies to improve the solubility of the high carbon content resins and optimization of the film properties for the SOH application.

  8. No-flash-point electrolytes applied to amorphous carbon/Li 1+ xMn 2O 4 cells for EV use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Juichi

    Use of no-flash-point electrolytes (NFEs) containing non-flammable solvent for an amorphous carbon/Li 1+ xMn 2O 4 cell has been studied. We prepared three NFEs: NFE1 was composed of 1 M (mol dm -3) of LiN[SO 2C 2F 5] 2 as supporting electrolyte, and 80 vol.% of methyl nonafluorobutyl ether (MFE) and 20 vol.% of ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) as solvents; NFE2 was prepared by adding 0.5 M of EC (ethylene carbonate) to NFE1; and NFE3 was prepared by adding 0.1 M of LiPF 6 to NFE2. Charge-discharge performance of Li 1+ xMn 2O 4/Li cells and amorphous carbon/Li cells with NFEs were investigated. The amorphous carbon/Li 1+ xMn 2O 4 18650 cells were fabricated and investigated in terms of rate capability and cycle life. NFE2 showed good rate performance. NFE3 showed the best cycle life among the NFE electrolyte cells, though it had only fair rate performance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were measured to study the effect of EC and LiPF 6.

  9. Nanodiamonds on tetrahedral amorphous carbon significantly enhance dopamine detection and cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltola, Emilia; Wester, Niklas; Holt, Katherine B; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Koskinen, Jari; Myllymäki, Vesa; Laurila, Tomi

    2017-02-15

    We hypothesize that by using integrated carbon nanostructures on tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), it is possible to take the performance and characteristics of these bioelectrodes to a completely new level. The integrated carbon electrodes were realized by combining nanodiamonds (NDs) with ta-C thin films coated on Ti-coated Si-substrates. NDs were functionalized with mixture of carboxyl and amine groups NDandante or amine NDamine, carboxyl NDvox or hydroxyl groups NDH and drop-casted or spray-coated onto substrate. By utilizing these novel structures we show that (i) the detection limit for dopamine can be improved by two orders of magnitude [from 10µM to 50nM] in comparison to ta-C thin film electrodes and (ii) the coating method significantly affects electrochemical properties of NDs and (iii) the ND coatings selectively promote cell viability. NDandante and NDH showed most promising electrochemical properties. The viability of human mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblastic SaOS-2 cells was increased on all ND surfaces, whereas the viability of mouse neural stem cells and rat neuroblastic cells was improved on NDandante and NDH and reduced on NDamine and NDvox. The viability of C6 cells remained unchanged, indicating that these surfaces will not cause excess gliosis. In summary, we demonstrated here that by using functionalized NDs on ta-C thin films we can significantly improve sensitivity towards dopamine as well as selectively promote cell viability. Thus, these novel carbon nanostructures provide an interesting concept for development of various in vivo targeted sensor solutions.

  10. Density and localized states' impact on amorphous carbon electron transport mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo-Dávila, S.; Lopez-Acevedo, O.; Velasco-Medina, J.; Avila, A.

    2016-12-01

    This work discusses the electron transport mechanisms that we obtained as a function of the density of amorphous carbon (a-C) ultra-thin films. We calculated the density of states (total and projected), degree of electronic states' localization, and transmission function using the density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. We generated 25 sample a-C structures using ab-initio molecular dynamics within the isothermal-isobaric ensemble. We identified three transport regimes as a function of the density, varying from semimetallic in low-density samples ( ≤2.4 g/cm3) to thermally activated in high-density ( ≥2.9 g/cm3) tetrahedral a-C. The middle-range densities (2.4 g/cm3 ≤ρ≤ 2.9 g/cm3) are characterized by resonant tunneling and hopping transport. Our findings offer a different perspective from the tight-binding model proposed by Katkov and Bhattacharyya [J. Appl. Phys. 113, 183712 (2013)], and agree with experimental observations in low-dimensional carbon systems [see S. Bhattacharyya, Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 21 (2007)]. Identifying transport regimes is crucial to the process of understanding and applying a-C thin film in electronic devices and electrode coating in biosensors.

  11. Amorphous carbon-silicon heterojunctions by pulsed Nd:YAG laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Seong-Shan; Yow, Ho-Kwang [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia); Tou, Teck-Yong, E-mail: tytou@mmu.edu.m [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Cyberjaya, Selangor 63100 (Malaysia)

    2009-07-31

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were deposited at 10{sup -4} Pa on n-Si (Si-111) and p-Si (Si-100) substrates using a pulsed Nd:YAG laser with fundamental, second- and third-harmonic outputs. These unhydrogenated and undoped a-C films were characterized by visible and UV Raman spectroscopy which indicated the presence of substantial amount of sp{sup 3} hybridized carbon network depending on the laser wavelength. The bulk resistivity in the Au/a-C/indium tin oxide structure varied between (10{sup 9}-10{sup 13}) {Omega} cm - the lowest resistivity was obtained for films deposited by the fundamental laser output at 1064 nm while the highest value was by the third-harmonic laser output at 355 nm. All the a-C/Si heterostructures exhibited a nonlinear current density-voltage characteristic. Under light illumination, by taking into consideration the fill factor of {approx} 0.2 for a-C/n-Si, the conversion efficiency at the highest photovoltage and photocurrent, at an illumination density of 0.175 mW/cm{sup 2} was estimated to be {approx} 0.28%.

  12. Dependence of Structure and Haemocompatibility of Amorphous Carbon Films on Substrate Bias Voltage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Yang-Ming; MO Dang; LI Zhe-Yi; LIU Yi; HE Zhen-Hui; CHEN Di-Hu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Tetrahedral amorphous hydrogenated carbon (ta-C:H) films on Si(100) substrates were prepared by using a magnetic-field-filter plasma stream deposition system. Samples with different ratios of spa-bond to sp2-bond were obtained by changing the bias voltage applied to the substrates. The ellipsometric spectra of various carbon films in the photon energy range of 1.9-5.4eV were measured. The refractive index n and the relative sp3 C ratio of these films were obtained by simulating their ellipsometric spectra using the Forouhi-Bloomer model and by using the Bruggeman effective medium approximation, respectively. The haemocompatibility of these ta-C:H films was analysed by observation of platelet adhesion and measurement of kinetic clotting time. The results show that the sp3 C fraction is dependent on the substrate bias voltage, and the haemocompatibility is dependent on the ratio of sp3-bond to sp2-bond. A good haemocompatibility material of ta-C:H films with a suitable sp3 C fraction can be prepared by changing the substrate bias voltage.

  13. Electronic structure and conductivity of nanocomposite metal (Au,Ag,Cu,Mo)-containing amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrino, Jose L.; Horwat, David; Gago, Raul; Andersson, Joakim; Liu, Y.S.; Guo, Jinghua; Anders, Andre

    2008-05-14

    In this work, we study the influence of the incorporation of different metals (Me = Au, Ag, Cu, Mo) on the electronic structure of amorphous carbon (a-C:Me) films. The films were produced at room temperature using a novel pulsed dual-cathode arc deposition technique. Compositional analysis was performed with secondary neutral mass spectroscopy whereas X-ray diffraction was used to identify the formation of metal nanoclusters in the carbon matrix. The metal content incorporated in the nanocomposite films induces a drastic increase in the conductivity, in parallel with a decrease in the band gap corrected from Urbach energy. The electronic structure as a function of the Me content has been monitored by x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the C K-edge. XANES showed that the C host matrix has a dominant graphitic character and that it is not affected significantly by the incorporation of metal impurities, except for the case of Mo, where the modifications in the lineshape spectra indicated the formation of a carbide phase. Subtle modifications of the spectral lineshape are discussed in terms of nanocomposite formation.

  14. Hydrogen pumping in amorphous deutered carbon films irradiated by swift heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, F.; Balanzat, E.; Dufour, Ch.; Laurent, A.; Paumier, E.; Perriere, J.; Stoquert, J. P.; Toulemonde, M.

    1997-02-01

    Deutered amorphous carbon films have been irradiated at GANIL using 5 to 10 MeV/u sulfur beam with an electronic stopping power from 1 to 1.4 keV/nm. Such films have been deposited on silicon substrates by decomposition of CD 4 gas containing 10% of CH 4 in a dc multipolar plasma. After irradiation, they were analyzed firstly using absorption infrared spectroscopy to determine the number of CD and CH bonds. Secondly, deuterium, hydroge and carbon areal density were determined by ERDA and RBS. The results analysis shows a decrease of the atomic ratio ( {D}/{C}) as well as CD bonds down to a minimum value versus the fluence without a threshold fluence and in the same time an increase of the atomic ratio ( {H}/{C}) as well as CH bonds to a maximum value. So we may conclude that the hydrogen pumped after the irradiation is stabilized on broken (or unpaired) bonds.

  15. Transformation of Graphitic and Amorphous Carbon Dust to Complex Organic Molecules in a Massive Carbon Cycle in Protostellar Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, Joseph A., III; Johnson, Natasha M.

    2012-01-01

    More than 95% of silicate minerals and other oxides found in meteorites were melted, or vaporized and recondensed in the Solar Nebula prior to their incorporation into meteorite parent bodies. Gravitational accretion energy and heating via radioactive decay further transformed oxide minerals accreted into planetesimals. In such an oxygen-rich environment the carbonaceous dust that fell into the nebula as an intimate mixture with oxide grains should have been almost completely converted to CO. While some pre-collapse, molecular-cloud carbonaceous dust does survive, much in the same manner as do pre-solar oxide grains, such materials constitute only a few percent of meteoritic carbon and are clearly distinguished by elevated D/H, N-15/N-16, C-13/C-12 ratios or noble gas patterns. Carbonaceous Dust in Meteorites: We argue that nearly all of the carbon in meteorites was synthesized in the Solar Nebula from CO and that this CO was generated by the reaction of carbonaceous dust with solid oxides, water or OH. It is probable that some fraction of carbonaceous dust that is newly synthesized in the Solar Nebula is also converted back into CO by additional thermal processing. CO processing might occur on grains in the outer nebula through irradiation of CO-containing ice coatings or in the inner nebula via Fischer-Tropsch type (FTT) reactions on grain surfaces. Large-scale transport of both gaseous reaction products and dust from the inner nebula out to regions where comets formed would spread newly formed carbonaceous materials throughout the solar nebula. Formation of Organic Carbon: Carbon dust in the ISM might easily be described as inorganic graphite or amorphous carbon, with relatively low structural abundances of H, N, O and S . Products of FTT reactions or organics produced via irradiation of icy grains contain abundant aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. aldehydes, keytones, acids, amines and amides.. The net result of the massive nebular carbon cycle is to convert

  16. carbon Nitride Compounds Synthesized by Thermal Annealing Amorphous Nanostructured Graphite under the Flow of NH3 Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    公志光; 李木森

    2003-01-01

    Graphitic-C3N4 (g-C3N4) and pseudocubic-C3N4 (p-C3N4) have been synthesized by thermally annealing highenergy ball milled amorphous nanostructured graphite powders under NH3 atmosphere. The experimental results by x-ray, transmission-electron microscopy, selected electron area diffraction and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated that g-C3N4 grew from the milled graphite powders in the presence of NH3 gas at a temperature of 1050 ℃. After treatment at a temperature of 1350 ℃, the pseudocubic-C3N4 phase forms. It was believed that the high-energy ball milling generates nanosized amorphous graphite structures, under subsequent isothermal annealing in a flow of NH3 gas, the carbon nitride compound can easily form through reaction of nanostructured carbon with nitrogen of NH3.

  17. The effect of substrate bias on titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xu, E-mail: zhangxu@bnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Liang, Hong [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Zhenglong [Analytical and Testing Center, Beijing Normal University (China); Wu, Xiangying; Zhang, Huixing [Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Material Modification of Ministry of Education, College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University (China)

    2013-07-15

    The titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite films have been deposited on silicon substrate by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology, the effects of substrate bias on composition, structures and mechanical properties of the films are studied by scanning electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nano-indentation. The results show that the Ti content, deposition rate and hardness at first increase and then decrease with increasing the substrate bias. Maximum hardness of the titanium carbide/amorphous carbon nanocomposite film is 51 Gpa prepared at −400 V. The hardness enhancement may be attributed to the compressive stress and the fraction of crystalline TiC phase due to ion bombardment.

  18. Mapping residual organics and carbonate at grain boundaries and in the amorphous interphase in mouse incisor enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyle M Gordon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Dental enamel has evolved to resist the most grueling conditions of mechanical stress, fatigue, and wear. Adding insult to injury, it is exposed to the frequently corrosive environment of the oral cavity. While its hierarchical structure is unrivaled in its mechanical resilience, heterogeneity in the distribution of magnesium ions and the presence of Mg-substituted amorphous calcium phosphate (Mg-ACP as an intergranular phase have recently been shown to increase the susceptibility of mouse enamel to acid attack. Herein we investigate the distribution of two important constituents of enamel, residual organic matter and inorganic carbonate. We find that organics, carbonate, and possibly water show distinct distribution patterns in the mouse enamel crystallites, at simple grain boundaries, and in the amorphous interphase at multiple grain boundaries. This has implications for the resistance to acid corrosion, mechanical properties, and the mechanism by which enamel crystals grow during amelogenesis.

  19. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon films deposited by MFPUMST at different ratios of mixed gases

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Haiyang Dai; Changyong Zhan; Hui Jiang; Ningkang Huang

    2012-12-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (-C:H) on -type (100) silicon wafers were prepared with a middle frequency pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering technique (MFPUMST) at different ratios of methane–argon gases. The band characteristics, mechanical properties as well as refractive index were measured by Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), nano-indentation tests and spectroscopic ellipsometry. It is found that the 3 fraction increases with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, and then decreases when Ar concentration exceeds 50%. The nano-indentation tests reveal that nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the films increase with increasing Ar concentration in the range of 17–50%, while decreases with increasing Ar concentration from 50% to 86%. The variations in the nano-hardness and the elastic modulus could be interpreted due to different 3 fractions in the prepared -C:H films. The variation of refractive index with wavelength have the same tendency for the -C:H films prepared at different Ar concentrations, they decrease with increasing wavelength from 600 to 1700 nm. For certain wavelengths within 600–1700 nm, refractive index has the highest value at the Ar concentration of 50%, and it is smaller at the Ar concentration of 86% than at 17%. The results given above indicate that ratio of mixed gases has a strong influence on bonding configuration and properties of -C:H films during deposition. The related mechanism is discussed in this paper.

  20. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Shaw, Samuel; Benning, Liane G

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of nanoparticulate amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range of environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-25 °C) using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (ED-XRD) in conjunction with high-resolution electron microscopy, ex situ X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallization process occurs in two stages; firstly, the particles of ACC rapidly dehydrate and crystallize to form individual particles of vaterite; secondly, the vaterite transforms to calcite via a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism with the reaction rate controlled by the surface area of calcite. The second stage of the reaction is approximately 10 times slower than the first. Activation energies of calcite nucleation and crystallization are 73±10 and 66±2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. A model to calculate the degree of calcite crystallization from ACC at environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-40 °C) is also presented.

  1. Energy band alignment and electronic states of amorphous carbon surfaces in vacuo and in aqueous environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caro, Miguel A., E-mail: mcaroba@gmail.com [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Department of Applied Physics, COMP Centre of Excellence in Computational Nanoscience, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Määttä, Jukka [Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Lopez-Acevedo, Olga [Department of Applied Physics, COMP Centre of Excellence in Computational Nanoscience, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Laurila, Tomi [Department of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Aalto University, Espoo (Finland)

    2015-01-21

    In this paper, we obtain the energy band positions of amorphous carbon (a–C) surfaces in vacuum and in aqueous environment. The calculations are performed using a combination of (i) classical molecular dynamics (MD), (ii) Kohn-Sham density functional theory with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional, and (iii) the screened-exchange hybrid functional of Heyd, Scuseria, and Ernzerhof (HSE). PBE allows an accurate generation of a-C and the evaluation of the local electrostatic potential in the a-C/water system, HSE yields an improved description of energetic positions which is critical in this case, and classical MD enables a computationally affordable description of water. Our explicit calculation shows that, both in vacuo and in aqueous environment, the a-C electronic states available in the region comprised between the H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O levels of water correspond to both occupied and unoccupied states within the a-C pseudogap region. These are localized states associated to sp{sup 2} sites in a-C. The band realignment induces a shift of approximately 300 meV of the a-C energy band positions with respect to the redox levels of water.

  2. XMCD study of CoPt nanoparticles embedded in MgO and amorphous carbon matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournus, F. [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France and Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)], E-mail: ftournus@lpmcn.univ-lyon1.fr; Blanc, N.; Tamion, A. [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France and Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ohresser, P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, BP 48, 91192 Gif sur Yvette (France); Perez, A.; Dupuis, V. [Universite de Lyon, F-69000, France and Univ. Lyon 1, Laboratoire PMCN, CNRS, UMR 5586, F69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2008-11-15

    We report the synthesis and characterization of CoPt nanoparticles, using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at the Co L{sub 2,3} edges. Clusters are produced in ultra-high vacuum conditions, following a physical route, and embedded in non-metallic matrices: MgO and amorphous carbon (a-C). In MgO, Co atoms are partially oxidized, which goes with a {mu}{sub L}/{mu}{sub S} enhancement. On the contrary, a-C appears as a very suitable matrix. In particular, annealing of CoPt cluster embedded in a-C is able to promote L 1{sub 0} chemical order, without alteration of the sample. This transformation, which has been directly evidenced by transmission electron microscopy observations, is accompanied by a striking augmentation of {mu}{sub S}, {mu}{sub L} and the {mu}{sub L}/{mu}{sub S} ratio of Co. The presence of Pt leads to an enhanced Co magnetic moment, as compared to Co bulk, even for the chemically disordered alloy. Moreover, the high value of 1.91{mu}{sub B}/at. measured for {mu}{sub S} is unusual for Co and must be a signature of chemical order in CoPt alloy nanoparticles.

  3. Improved Tribological Performance of Amorphous Carbon (a-C Coating by ZrO2 Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhu Tang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials, such as Graphene, h-BN nanoparticles and MoS2 nanotubes, have shown their ability in improving the tribological performance of amorphous carbon (a-C coatings. In the current study, the effectiveness of ZrO2 nanoparticles (ZrO2-NPs in lubricating the self-mated nonhydrogenated a-C contacts was investigated in boundary lubrication regime. The results showed that 13% less friction and 50% less wear compared to the base oil were achieved by employing ZrO2-NPs in the base oil in self-mated a-C contacts. Via analyzing the ZrO2-NPs and the worn a-C surface after tests, it was found that the improved lubrication by ZrO2-NPs was based on “polishing effects”, which is a new phenomenon observed between a-C and nanoparticles. Under the “polishing effect”, micro-plateaus with extremely smooth surface and uniform height were produced on the analyzed a-C surface. The resulting topography of the a-C coating is suitable for ZrO2-NPs to act as nano-bearings between rubbing surfaces. Especially, the ZrO2-NPs exhibited excellent mechanical and chemical stability, even under the severe service condition, suggesting that the combination of nonhydrogenated a-C coating with ZrO2-NPs is an effective, long lasting and environment-friendly lubrication solution.

  4. Pseudo first ordered adsorption of noxious textile dyes by low-temperature synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D.; Bhowmick, P.; Pahari, D.; Santra, S.; Sarkar, S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2017-03-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized by solid state reaction. The as prepared a-CNTs were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning and high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy. As-synthesized a-CNTs were used for, the first time, for removing different organic dyes from water. The dyes mainly include Rhodamine B and Methyl Orange and systematic batch mode studies of a-CNTs assisted adsorption have been executed in detail. The removing efficiency of a-CNTs has also been investigated for various sorption parameters like contact time, dosage, pH, initial dye concentration, contact time etc. It is seen that a-CNTs can be material of potential for removal of dyes. In case of Rhodamine B, the maximum time for removal was 45 min whereas for Methyl orange rapid removal was plausible in about 30 min even in ambient condition. The experimental data have been well correlated with classical Langmuir-Freundlich and Temkin adsorption models.

  5. The multilayered structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Na

    2013-08-01

    The structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) deposition was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Results of the plasmon excitation energy shift and through-thickness elemental concentration show a multilayered a-C film structure comprising an interface layer consisting of C, Si, and, possibly, SiC, a buffer layer with continuously increasing sp 3 fraction, a relatively thicker layer (bulk film) of constant sp 3 content, and an ultrathin surface layer rich in sp 2 hybridization. A detailed study of the C K-edge spectrum indicates that the buffer layer between the interface layer and the bulk film is due to the partial backscattering of C+ ions interacting with the heavy atoms of the silicon substrate. The results of this study provide insight into the minimum thickness of a-C films deposited by FCVA under optimum substrate bias conditions. Copyright © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  6. Surface Functionalization of Plasma Treated Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Hermann; Popov, Cyril; Kulisch, Wilhelm; Spassov, G.; Reithmaier, Johann Peter

    Diamond possesses a number of outstanding properties which make it a perspective material as platform for preparation of biosensors. The diamond surface needs to be activated before the chemical attachment of crosslinkers with which biomolecules can interact. In the current work we have investigated the modification of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C) films by oxygen and ammonia plasmas. Afterwards the layers were functionalized in a further step to obtain thiol-active maleimide groups on the surface. We studied the possibility for direct binding of maleimide to terminal OH-groups on the UNCD surface and for silanization with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to obtain NH2-groups for the following attachment of sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl)-cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (SSMCC). The thiol-bearing fluorescein-related dye 5-((2-(and-3)-S-(acetylmercapto) succinoyl) amino) fluorescein (SAMSA) was immobilized as an model biomolecule to evaluate the achieved thiol-activity by fluorescence microscopy. The results of the above mentioned surface modification and functionalization steps were investigated by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and contact angle measurements.

  7. Superior tribological properties of an amorphous carbon film with a graphite-like structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yong-Jun; Li Hong-Xuan; Ji Li; Liu Xiao-Hong; Wu Yan-Xia; Zhou Hui-Di; Chen Jian-Min

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous carbon films with high sp2 concentrations are deposited by unbalanced magnetron sputtering with a narrow range of substrate bias voltage. Field emission scanning electron microscopes (FESEMs),high resolution transmission electron microscopes (HRTEMs),atomic force microscopes (AFMs),the Raman spectrometers,nanoindentation,and tribometers are subsequently used to characterize the microstructures and the properties of the resulting films.It is found that the present films are dominated by the sp2 sites.However,the films demonstrate a moderate hardness together with a low internal stress.The high hardness of the deposited film originates from the crosslinking of the sp2 clusters by the sp3 sites.The presence of the graphite-like clusters in the film structure may be responsible for the low internal stress.What is more important is that the resulting films show excellent tribological properties with high load capacity and excellent wear resistance in humid atmospheres.The relationship between the microstructure determined by the deposition condition and the film characteristic is discussed in detail.

  8. Strength and Fracture Resistance of Amorphous Diamond-Like Carbon Films for MEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. N. Jonnalagadda

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical strength and mixed mode I/II fracture toughness of hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous diamond-like carbon (ta-C films, grown by pulsed laser deposition, are discussed in connection to material flaws and its microstructure. The failure properties of ta-C were obtained from films with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm and specimen widths 10–20 μm. The smallest test samples with 10 μm gage section averaged a strength of 7.3 ± 1.2 GPa, while the strength of 20-μm specimens with thicknesses 0.5–3 μm varied between 2.2–5.7 GPa. The scaling of the mechanical strength with specimen thickness and dimensions was owed to deposition-induced surface flaws, and, only in the smallest specimens, RIE patterning generated specimen sidewall flaws. The mode I fracture toughness of ta-C films is KIc=4.4±0.4 MPam, while the results from mixed mode I/II fracture experiments with cracks arbitrarily oriented in the plane of the film compared very well with theoretical predictions.

  9. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar; Subbiah, Ramesh; Thangavel, Elangovan; Arumugam, Madhankumar; Park, Kwideok; Gasem, Zuhair M.; Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp2 bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  10. Application of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films for ultraviolet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zkria, Abdelrahman; Gima, Hiroki; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (UNCD/a-C:H) films were grown by coaxial arc plasma deposition in the ambient of nitrogen and hydrogen mixed gases. Synthesized films were structurally investigated by X-ray photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies. A heterojunction with p-type Si substrate was fabricated to study the ultraviolet photodetection properties of the film. Capacitance-voltage measurements assure the expansion of a depletion region into the film side. Current-voltage curves in the dark showed a good rectifying behaviour in the bias voltages range between ±5 V. Under 254 nm monochromatic light, the heterojunction shows a capability of deep ultraviolet light detection, which can be attribute to the existence of UNCD grains. As the diode was cooled from 300 K down to 150 K, the detectivity has a notable enhancement from 1.94 × 105 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 300 K to 5.11 × 1010 cm Hz1/2 W-1 at 150 K, which is mainly due to a remarkable reduction in the leakage current at low temperatures. It was experimentally demonstrated that nitrogen-doped UNCD/a-C:H film works as ultraviolet-range photovoltaic material.

  11. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  12. Novel nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating for boron powders by direct pyrolysis of coronene without solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, ShuJun; Song, MingHui; Kumakura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-30

    A 3 nm coronene coating and a 4 nm amorphous carbon coating with a uniform shell-core encapsulation structure for nanosized boron (B) powders are formed by a simple process in which coronene is directly mixed with boron particles without a solvent and heated at 520 °C for 1 h or at 630 °C for 3 h in a vacuum-sealed silica tube. Coronene has a melting point lower than its decomposition temperature, which enables liquid coronene to cover B particles by liquid diffusion and penetration without the need for a solvent. The diffusion and penetration of coronene can extend to the boundaries of particles and to inside the agglomerated nanoparticles to form a complete shell-core encapsulated structure. As the temperature is increased, thermal decomposition of coronene on the B particles results in the formation of a uniform amorphous carbon coating layer. This novel and simple nanometer-level uniform amorphous carbon coating method can possibly be applied to many other powders; thus, it has potential applications in many fields at low cost.

  13. Rational design of coaxial mesoporous birnessite manganese dioxide/amorphous-carbon nanotubes arrays for advanced asymmetric supercapacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Shijin

    2015-03-01

    Coaxial mesoporous MnO2/amorphous-carbon nanotubes have been synthesized via a facile and cost-effective strategy at room temperature. The coaxial double nanotubes of inner (outer) MnO2 and outer (inner) amorphous carbon can be obtained via fine tuning the preparative factors (e.g., deposition order and processing temperature). Furthermore, the electrochemical properties of the coaxial nanotubes were evaluated by cycle voltammetric (CV) and galvanostatic charge-discharge (GC) measurements. The as-prepared coaxial double nanotubes of outer MnO2 and inner amorphous carbon exhibit the optimized pseudocapacitance performance (362 F g-1) with good cycling stability, and ideal rate capability owning to the unique nanostructures. When assembled into two-electrode asymmetric supercapacitor, an energy density of 22.56 W h kg-1 at a power density of 224.9 W kg-1 is obtained. These findings provide a new and facile approach to fabricate high-performance electrode for supercapacitors.

  14. Direct synthesis of multilayer graphene on an insulator by Ni-induced layer exchange growth of amorphous carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, H.; Toko, K.; Saitoh, N.; Yoshizawa, N.; Suemasu, T.

    2017-01-01

    Multilayer graphene (MLG) growth on arbitrary substrates is desired for incorporating carbon wiring and heat spreaders into electronic devices. We investigated the metal-induced layer exchange growth of a sputtered amorphous C layer using Ni as a catalyst. A MLG layer uniformly formed on a SiO2 substrate at 600 °C by layer exchange between the C and Ni layers. Raman spectroscopy and electron microscopy showed that the resulting MLG layer was highly oriented and contained relatively few defects. The present investigation will pave the way for advanced electronic devices integrated with carbon materials.

  15. Dispersing SnO2 nanocrystals in amorphous carbon as a cyclic durable anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Renzong Hu; Wei Sun; Meiqin Zeng; Min Zhu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a facile route for the massive production of SnO2/carbon nanocomposite used as high-capacity anode materials of next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The nanocomposite had a unique structure of ultrafine SnO2 nanocrystals (∼5 nm, 80 wt%) homogeneously dispersed in amorphous carbon matrix. This structure design can well accommodate the volume change of Li+insertion/desertion in SnO2, and prevent the aggregation of the nanosized active materials during cycling, leading to superior cycle performance with stable reversible capacity of 400 mAh/g at a high current rate of 3.3 A/g.

  16. Plasma deposition of diamond-like carbon and fluorinated amorphous carbon and the resultant properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glew, Alexander David

    Researchers first created diamondlike carbon (DLC) 50 years ago, but it has only been the subject of intense research for the last decade. DLC is a highly stressed thin film that exists as a mixture of diamond like sp 3 and graphite like sp2 bonded carbon, with 0--50% H. Many believe that high intrinsic stress states are necessary to stabilize the carbon spa content responsible for the high hardness of DLC. This author's goals include fabricating high quality fluorinated amorphous carbon (FLAC) films by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), exploring the relationships between the processing parameters and the dielectric value, as well as the related material properties which limit the useful application of FLAC. An improved understanding of the fundamentals behind FLAC processing may allow workers to improve upon the properties limiting its use, such as intrinsic stress, thermal stability, and thermal conductivity. DLC and FLAC film hardness ranged from 14--16 GP and 16--18 GPa respectively. Their film stress ranged from 800 MPa to a 10 GPa. A study of the thickness dependent properties showed that only films thicker than 200 nm were able to achieve stresses greater than approximately 1.6 GPa, the room temperature transition pressure of graphite to diamond. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements also yielded different C sp3 contents for films of varying thickness deposited under the same conditions, helping to confirm a thickness dependence of film properties greater than 200 nm. Observation of the stress in real time during annealing of the films on Si wafers yielded activation energy values for the stress relief of DLC and FLAC as 0.11 and 0.24 eV respectively, and the CTE of DLC as 10.6 x 10-6 C-1. The stress relief mechanism consists of kinetically limited network arrangements that occur in highly stressed zones due heating, which are also the cause of the reduction in dielectric constant that occurs during rapid thermal annealing. Thermal

  17. Reduction of Photoluminescence Quenching by Deuteration of Ytterbium-Doped Amorphous Carbon-Based Photonic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Lin Hsu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In situ Yb-doped amorphous carbon thin films were grown on Si substrates at low temperatures (<200 °C by a simple one-step RF-PEMOCVD system as a potential photonic material for direct integration with Si CMOS back end-of-line processing. Room temperature photoluminescence around 1 µm was observed via direct incorporation of optically active Yb3+ ions from the selected Yb(fod3 metal-organic compound. The partially fluorinated Yb(fod3 compound assists the suppression of photoluminescence quenching by substitution of C–H with C–F bonds. A four-fold enhancement of Yb photoluminescence was demonstrated via deuteration of the a-C host. The substrate temperature greatly influences the relative deposition rate of the plasma dissociated metal-organic species, and hence the concentration of the various elements. Yb and F incorporation are promoted at lower substrate temperatures, and suppressed at higher substrate temperatures. O concentration is slightly elevated at higher substrate temperatures. Photoluminescence was limited by the concentration of Yb within the film, the concentration of Yb ions in the +3 state, and the relative amount of quenching due to the various de-excitation pathways associated with the vibrational modes of the host a-C network. The observed wide full-width-at-half-maximum photoluminescence signal is a result of the variety of local bonding environments due to the a-C matrix, and the bonding of the Yb3+ ions to O and/or F ions as observed in the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses.

  18. A study of the chemical, mechanical, and surface properties of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandentop, G.J.

    1990-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were studied with the objective of elucidating the nucleation and growth mechanisms, and the origin of their unique physical properties. The films were deposited onto Si(100) substrates both on the powered (negatively self-biased) and on the grounded electrodes from methane in an rf plasma (13.56 MHz) at 65 mTorr and 300 to 370 K. The films produced at the powered electrode exhibited superior mechanical properties, such as high hardness. A mass spectrometer was used to identify neutral species and positive ions incident on the electrodes from the plasma, and also to measure ion energies. The effect of varying ion energy flux on the properties of a-C:H films was investigated using a novel pulsed biasing technique. It was demonstrated that ions were not the dominant deposition species as the total ion flux measured was insufficient to account for the observed deposition rate. The interface between thin films of a-C:H and silicon substrates was investigated using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A silicon carbide layer was detected at the interface of a hard a-C:H film formed at the powered electrode. At the grounded electrode, where the kinetic energy is low, no interfacial carbide layer was observed. Scanning tunneling microscopy and high energy electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to investigate the initial stages of growth of a-C:H films. On graphite substrates, films formed at the powered electrode were observed to nucleate in clusters approximately 50 {Angstrom} in diameter, while at the grounded electrode no cluster formation was observed. 58 figs.

  19. Impact of sodium polyacrylate on the amorphous calcium carbonate formation from supersaturated solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J; Pancera, S; Boyko, V; Gummel, J; Nayuk, R; Huber, K

    2012-02-21

    A detailed in situ scattering study has been carried out on the formation of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles modulated by the presence of small amounts of sodium polyacrylate chains. The work is aiming at an insight into the modulation of ACC formation by means of two polyacrylate samples differing in their molecular weight by a factor of 50. The ACC formation process was initiated by an in situ generation of CO(3)(2-) ions via hydrolysis of 10 mM dimethylcarbonate in the presence of 10 mM CaCl(2). Analysis of the formation process by means of time-resolved small-angle X-ray and light scattering in the absence of any additives provided evidence for a monomer addition mechanism for the growth of ACC particles. ACC formation under these conditions sets in after a lag-period of some 350 s. In the presence of sodium polyacrylate chains, calcium polyacrylate aggregates are formed during the lag-period, succeeded by a modulated ACC growth in a second step. The presence of anionic polyacrylate chains changed the shape of the growing particles toward loose and less homogeneous entities. In the case of low amounts (1.5-7.5 mg/L) of the long chain additive with 97 kDa, the size of the aggregates is comparable to the size of the successively formed hybrid particles. No variation of the lag-period has been observed in this case. Use of the short chain additive with 2 kDa enabled increase of the additive concentration up to 100 mg/L and resulted in a significant increase of the lag-period. This fact, together with the finding that the resulting hybrid particles remained stable in the latter case, identified short chain sodium polyacrylates as more efficient modulators than long chain polyacrylates.

  20. Tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnetron sputtered titanium-amorphous carbon coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhandapani, Vishnu Shankar [PG & Research Department of Physics, PSG College of Arts & Science, Coimbatore 641 014, Tamil Nadu (India); Center for Nano-Wear, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Subbiah, Ramesh [Center for Biomaterials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Thangavel, Elangovan [PG & Research Department of Physics, PSG College of Arts & Science, Coimbatore 641 014, Tamil Nadu (India); Center for Nano-Wear, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Arumugam, Madhankumar [Center of Research Excellence in Corrosion, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Park, Kwideok [Center for Biomaterials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST), Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Korea University of Science and Technology (UST), Daejon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Gasem, Zuhair M. [Center of Research Excellence in Corrosion, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Veeraragavan, Veeravazhuthi, E-mail: vv.vazhuthi@gmail.com [PG & Research Department of Physics, PSG College of Arts & Science, Coimbatore 641 014, Tamil Nadu (India); Kim, Dae-Eun, E-mail: kimde@yonsei.ac.kr [Center for Nano-Wear, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • a-C:Ti nanocomposite coatings were prepared on 316L stainless steel by using R.F. magnetron sputtering method. • Properties of the nanocomposite coatings were analyzed with respect to titanium content. • Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility and hydrophobicity of nanocomposite coating were enhanced with increasing titanium content. • Coating with 2.33 at.% titanium showed superior tribological properties compared to other coatings. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon incorporated with titanium (a-C:Ti) was coated on 316L stainless steel (SS) by magnetron sputtering technique to attain superior tribological properties, corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. The morphology, topography and functional groups of the nanostructured a-C:Ti coatings in various concentrations were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman, X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Raman and XPS analyses confirmed the increase in sp{sup 2} bonds with increasing titanium content in the a-C matrix. TEM analysis confirmed the composite nature of the coating and the presence of nanostructured TiC for Ti content of 2.33 at.%. This coating showed superior tribological properties compared to the other a-C:Ti coatings. Furthermore, electrochemical corrosion studies were performed against stimulated body fluid medium in which all the a-C:Ti coatings showed improved corrosion resistance than the pure a-C coating. Preosteoblasts proliferation and viability on the specimens were tested and the results showed that a-C:Ti coatings with relatively high Ti (3.77 at.%) content had better biocompatibility. Based on the results of this work, highly durable coatings with good biocompatibility could be achieved by incorporation of optimum amount of Ti in a-C coatings deposited on SS by magnetron sputtering technique.

  1. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  2. Antibacterial efficacy of advanced silver-amorphous carbon coatings deposited using the pulsed dual cathodic arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endrino, J L; Anders, A; Albella, J M; Horton, J A; Horton, T H; Ayyalasomayajula, P R; Allen, M, E-mail: jlendrino@icmm.csic.es

    2010-11-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) also referred as diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are well known to be a biocompatible material with good chemical in ertness; this makes it a strong candidate to be used as a matrix that embeds metallic elements with an antimicrobial effect. We have deposited as et of a-C:Ag films using a dual-cathode pulsed filtered cathodic arc source, the arc pulse frequency of the silver and graphite cathodes was controlled in order to obtain samples with various silver contents. In this study, we show the deposition of silver and carbon ions using this technique and analyze the advantages of incorporating silver into a-C by studying the antimicrobial properties against staphylococcus of samples deposited on Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V coupons and evaluated using 24-well tissue culture plates.

  3. Preparation of ZrC nano-particles reinforced amorphous carbon composite coating by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Xiong, X.; Huang, B. Y.; Li, G. D.; Zhang, H. B.; Xiao, P.; Chen, Z. K.; Zheng, X. L.

    2009-05-01

    To eliminate cracks caused by thermal expansion mismatch between ZrC coating and carbon-carbon composites, a kind of ZrC/C composite coating was designed as an interlayer. The atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition was used as a method to achieve co-deposition of ZrC and C from ZrCl 4-C 3H 6-H 2-Ar source. Zirconium tetrachloride (ZrCl 4) powder carrier was especially made to control accurately the flow rate. The microstructure of ZrC/C composite coating was studied using analytical techniques. ZrC/C coating shows same morphology as pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows ZrC grains with size of 10-50 nm embed in turbostratic carbon. The formation mechanism is that the growth of ZrC crystals was inhibited by surrounding pyrolytic carbon and kept as nano-particles. Fracture morphologies imply good combination between coating and substrate. The ZrC crystals have stoichiometric proportion near 1, with good crystalline but no clear preferred orientation while pyrolytic carbon is amorphous. The heating-up oxidation of ZrC/C coating shows 11.58 wt.% loss. It can be calculated that the coating consists of 74.04 wt.% ZrC and 25.96 wt.% pyrolytic carbon. The average density of the composite coating is 5.892 g/cm 3 by Archimedes' principle.

  4. Spatial distribution of calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate in the cuticle of the terrestrial crustaceans Porcellio scaber and Armadillidium vulgare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hild, Sabine; Marti, Othmar; Ziegler, Andreas

    2008-07-01

    The crustacean cuticle is an interesting model to study the properties of mineralized bio-composites. The cuticle consists of an organic matrix composed of chitin-protein fibres associated with various amounts of crystalline and amorphous calcium carbonate. It is thought that in isopods the relative amounts of these mineral polymorphs depend on its function and the habitat of the animal. In addition to the composition, the distribution of the various components should affect the properties of the cuticle. However, the spatial distribution of calcium carbonate polymorphs within the crustacean cuticle is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the mineralized cuticles of the terrestrial isopods Armadillidium vulgare and Porcellio scaber using scanning electron-microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and confocal mu-Raman spectroscopic imaging. We show for the first time that the mineral phases are arranged in distinct layers. Calcite is restricted to the outer layer of the cuticle that corresponds to the exocuticle. Amorphous calcium carbonate is located within the endocuticle that lies below the exocuticle. Within both layers mineral is arranged in rows of granules with diameters of about 20 nm. The results suggest functional implications of mineral distribution that accord to the moulting and escape behaviour of the animals.

  5. Dangling bond energetics in carbon nitride and phosphorus carbide thin films with fullerene-like and amorphous structure

    OpenAIRE

    Kostov Gueorguiev, Gueorgui; Broitman, E; Furlan, Andrej; Stafström, Sven; Hultman, Lars

    2009-01-01

    The energy cost for dangling bond formation in Fullerene-like Carbon Nitride (FL-CNx) and Phosphorus carbide (FL-CPx) as well as their amorphous counterparts: a-CNx, a-CPx, and a-C has been calculated within the framework of Density Functional Theory and compared with surface water adsorption measurements. The highest energy cost is found in the FL-CNx ( about 1.37 eV) followed by FL-CPx compounds (0.62-1.04 eV). (C) 2009 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved. Original Publication:Gueorgui K...

  6. Loading amorphous Asarone in mesoporous silica SBA-15 through supercritical carbon dioxide technology to enhance dissolution and bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengzan; Quan, Guilan; Wu, Qiaoli; Zhou, Chan; Li, Feng; Bai, Xuequn; Li, Ge; Pan, Xin; Wu, Chuanbin

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to load amorphous hydrophobic drug into ordered mesoporous silica (SBA-15) by supercritical carbon dioxide technology in order to improve the dissolution and bioavailability of the drug. Asarone was selected as a model drug due to its lipophilic character and poor bioavailability. In vitro dissolution and in vivo bioavailability of the obtained Asarone-SBA-15 were significantly improved as compared to the micronized crystalline drug. This study offers an effective, safe, and environmentally benign means of solving the problems relating to the solubility and bioavailability of hydrophobic molecules.

  7. Ab Initio Investigation on Cu/Cr Codoped Amorphous Carbon Nanocomposite Films with Giant Residual Stress Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Peng; Sun, Lili; Wang, Aiying; Ke, Peiling

    2015-12-23

    Amorphous carbon films (a-C) codoped by two metal elements exhibit the desirable combination of tribological and mechanical properties for widely potential applications, but are also prone to catastrophic failure due to the inevitable residual compressive stress. Thus far, the residual stress reduction mechanism remains unclear due to the insufficient understanding of the structure from the atomic and electronic scale. In this paper, using ab initio calculations, we first designed a novel Cu/Cr codoped a-C film and demonstrated that compared with pure and Cu/Cr monodoped cases, the residual stress in Cu/Cr codoped a-C films could be reduced by 93.6% remarkably. Atomic bond structure analysis revealed that the addition of Cu and Cr impurities in amorphous carbon structure resulted in the critical and significant relaxation of distorted C-C bond lengths. On the other hand, electronic structure calculation indicated a weak bonding interaction between the Cr and C atoms, while the antibonding interaction was observed for the Cu-C bonds, which would play a pivot site for the release of strain energy. Those interactions combined with the structural evolution could account for the drastic residual stress reduction caused by Cu/Cr codoping. Our results provide the theoretical guidance and desirable strategy to design and fabricate a new nanocomposite a-C films with combined properties for renewed applications.

  8. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A. [School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); Chattopadhyay, K.K., E-mail: kalyan_chattopadhyay@yahoo.com [Thin Film & Nanoscience Laboratory, Department of Physics, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India); School of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata 700 032 (India)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  9. Formation of amorphous carbon on the surface of poly(ethylene terephthalate) by helium plasma based ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth, A., E-mail: totha@chemres.hu [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 17 (Hungary); Veres, M. [Research Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Kereszturi, K.; Mohai, M.; Bertoti, I.; Szepvoelgyi, J. [Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Chemical Research Center, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 17 (Hungary)

    2011-08-15

    The surface modification of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) by helium plasma based ion implantation (He PBII) was studied. The effect of the main process parameters (acceleration voltage, fluence and fluence rate) on the alterations of the surface chemical composition and structure were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. According to SRIM calculations, at ion energies above 2 keV the stopping power of PET for He{sup +} ions is dominated by the electronic component and the contribution of the nuclear component is relatively small. Degradation of the ester group and carbonisation were observed by XPS due to elimination of O-rich fragments. The total C-content of the modified layer increased with the increase of fluence rate and acceleration voltage of particles, enabling the purposeful alteration of the surface composition. A strong broadening was detected in the Raman spectrum between 1000 and 1700 cm{sup -1}, testifying to the intense formation of amorphous carbon. The area ratio of the D ({approx}1410 cm{sup -1}) to G ({approx}1570 cm{sup -1}) band increased with the increase of particle fluence and the increase of acceleration voltage, offering the possibility of tailoring the chemical structure of the amorphous carbon layer created by the He PBII treatment.

  10. Experimental 25Mg and 13C NMR and Computational Modeling Studies of Amorphous Mg-Ca Carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Saharay, M.; Bowers, G. M.

    2012-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of synthetic Mg-Ca amorphous carbonates (AMC-ACC) provides direct, element specific structural information about these complicated phases. The 13C, 25Mg, and 43Ca resonances are typically broad and span the chemical shift ranges of all the crystalline polymorphs in the Ca-Mg-CO3-H2O system. In a fashion similar to our previous analysis of 43Ca NMR results for ACC,1 here we integrate new experimental 13C and 25Mg spectra obtained at 20T for samples with Mg/(Ca+Mg) ratios from x=0 to x=1 with quantum chemical calculations of the NMR parameters of the crystalline phases using CASTEP calculations, simulations of the spectra using the SIMPSON software, and classical molecular dynamics calculations. XRD and 13C NMR results are in general agreement with the one-phase/two-phase model of ACC-AMC derived from thermochemical work by others.2 13C-NMR spectra of amorphous materials having intermediate compositions can not be completely fit by mechanical mixing of ACC and AMC end members—requiring a degree of Ca/Mg solid solution. Amorphous samples in two-phase region crystallize to assemblages of dolomite-like (x~0.5) and hydromagnesite-like (x~1) defective structures, but we also observe aragonite co-nucleation in the presence of excess water, indicative of a more complex evolution. While 43Ca NMR of X-ray amorphous materials shows featureless, symmetric, Gaussian line shapes, the large quadrupole moment of 25Mg gives rise to superposition of several quadrupolar line shapes representing different local structural environments. Singularities of static Mg spectra are best explained by local environments similar to nequehonite, hydromagnesite, and landsfordite. The spectra can not exclude minor contributions from anhydrous phases dolomite, huntite, and magnesite. Additional sites having very large quadrupolar coupling and/or site asymmetry are not explained by any known reference phases. CITATIONS (1) Singer, J. W.; Yazaydin, A. O

  11. Effect of substrate bias in nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon films with embedded nanoparticles deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal,; Srivastava, A.K.; Chouksey, Abhilasha; Tripathi, R.K.; Basu, A. [Amorphous and Microcrystalline Silicon Solar Cell Group, Physics of Energy Harvesting Division, National Physical Laboratory (C.S.I.R.), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110012 (India)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer a-C: N films having nanoparticles were deposited by filtered cathodic jet carbon arc (FCJCA) technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of negative substrate bias on the properties of a-C: N films embedded with nanoparticles have been studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of a-C: N films deposited by FCJCA technique have been compared with ta-C: N films deposited by FCVA process. - Abstract: The properties of nitrogen incorporated amorphous carbon (a-C: N) films with embedded nanoparticles, deposited using a filtered cathodic jet carbon arc technique, are reported. X-ray diffraction, high resolution transmission electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy measurements reveal an amorphous structure, but on closer examination the presence of clusters of nanocarbon single crystals with d-spacing close to diamond cubic-phase have also been identified. The effect of substrate bias on the microstructure, conductivity, activation energy, optical band gap, optical constants, residual stress, hardness, elastic modulus, plastic index parameter, percentage elastic recovery and density of states of a-C: N films have been studied and the properties obtained are found to depend on the substrate bias.

  12. Immobilization of sericin molecules via amorphous carbon plasma modified-polystyrene dish for serum-free culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunma, Somruthai [The Graduate School, Chiang Mai University, 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Song, Doo-Hoon [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Si-Eun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam [Research Center for Orofacial Hard Tissue Regeneration, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Department and Research Institute of Dental Biomaterials and Bioengineering, College of Dentistry, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jeon-Geon [Center for Advanced Plasma Surface Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, 300 Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Boonyawan, Dheerawan, E-mail: dheerawan.b@cmu.ac.th [Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics (ThEP), 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, 239 Huay Kaew Road, Muang District, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, we focused on sericin hydrolysates, originating from silkworm used in serum-free human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) culture. We reported the effect of a covalent linkage between a bioactive protein molecule and polystyrene dish surface via a carbon intermediate layer which can slow down the release rate of protein compounds into the phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution. Films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and functionalized-carbon were deposited on PS culture dish surfaces by using a DC magnetron sputtering system and RF PECVD system. We found that a-C based-films can increase the hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of polystyrene (PS) dishes, especially a-C films and a-C:N{sub 2} films showed good attachment of hBM-MSCs at 24 h. However, in the case of silica surface (a-C:SiO{sub x} films), the cells showed a ragged and unattached boundary resulting from the presence of surface silanol groups. For the UV–vis absorbance, all carbon modified-PS dishes showed a lower release rate of sericin molecules into PBS solution than PS control. This revealed that the functionalized carbon could be enhanced by specific binding properties with given molecules. The carbon-coated PS dishes grafting with sericin protein were used in a serum-free condition. We also found that hBM-MSCs have higher percentage of proliferated cells at day 7 for the modified dishes with carbon films and coated with sericin than the PS control coated with sericin. The physical film properties were measured by atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and contact angle measurement. The presence of -NH{sub 2} groups of sericin compounds on the PS dish was revealed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The stability of covalent bonds of sericin molecules after washing out ungrafted sericin was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS).

  13. Nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon-silicon core-shell structures for high-power supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, S. A. Safiabadi; Soleimani-Amiri, S.; Sanaee, Z.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2017-02-01

    We report successful deposition of nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon films to realize high-power core-shell supercapacitor electrodes. A catalyst-free method is proposed to deposit large-area stable, highly conformal and highly conductive nitrogen-doped amorphous carbon (a-C:N) films by means of a direct-current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (DC-PECVD). This approach exploits C2H2 and N2 gases as the sources of carbon and nitrogen constituents and can be applied to various micro and nanostructures. Although as-deposited a-C:N films have a porous surface, their porosity can be significantly improved through a modification process consisting of Ni-assisted annealing and etching steps. The electrochemical analyses demonstrated the superior performance of the modified a-C:N as a supercapacitor active material, where specific capacitance densities as high as 42 F/g and 8.5 mF/cm2 (45 F/cm3) on silicon microrod arrays were achieved. Furthermore, this supercapacitor electrode showed less than 6% degradation of capacitance over 5000 cycles of a galvanostatic charge-discharge test. It also exhibited a relatively high energy density of 2.3 × 103 Wh/m3 (8.3 × 106 J/m3) and ultra-high power density of 2.6 × 108 W/m3 which is among the highest reported values.

  14. Novel supercritical carbon dioxide impregnation technique for the production of amorphous solid drug dispersions: a comparison to hot melt extrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Catherine; Tian, Yiwei; Walker, Gavin; McCoy, Colin; Hornsby, Peter; Donnelly, Conor; Jones, David S; Andrews, Gavin P

    2015-05-04

    The formulation of BCS Class II drugs as amorphous solid dispersions has been shown to provide advantages with respect to improving the aqueous solubility of these compounds. While hot melt extrusion (HME) and spray drying (SD) are among the most common methods for the production of amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs), the high temperatures often required for HME can restrict the processing of thermally labile drugs, while the use of toxic organic solvents during SD can impact on end-product toxicity. In this study, we investigated the potential of supercritical fluid impregnation (SFI) using carbon dioxide as an alternative process for ASD production of a model poorly water-soluble drug, indomethacin (INM). In doing so, we produced ASDs without the use of organic solvents and at temperatures considerably lower than those required for HME. Previous studies have concentrated on the characterization of ASDs produced using HME or SFI but have not considered both processes together. Dispersions were manufactured using two different polymers, Soluplus and polyvinylpyrrolidone K15 using both SFI and HME and characterized for drug morphology, homogeneity, presence of drug-polymer interactions, glass transition temperature, amorphous stability of the drug within the formulation, and nonsink drug release to measure the ability of each formulation to create a supersaturated drug solution. Fully amorphous dispersions were successfully produced at 50% w/w drug loading using HME and 30% w/w drug loading using SFI. For both polymers, formulations containing 50% w/w INM, manufactured via SFI, contained the drug in the γ-crystalline form. Interestingly, there were lower levels of crystallinity in PVP dispersions relative to SOL. FTIR was used to probe for the presence of drug-polymer interactions within both polymer systems. For PVP systems, the nature of these interactions depended upon processing method; however, for Soluplus formulations this was not the case. The area under

  15. Stress relief patterns of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Wang, Chengbing; Wang, Zhou; Zhang, Junyan; He, Deyan

    2008-12-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films were prepared on Si (1 0 0) substrates by dc-pulse plasma chemical vapor deposition. The nature of the deposited films was characterized by Raman spectra and the stress relief patterns were observed by scanning electron microscope. Besides the well-known sinusoidal type and flower type patterns, etc., two different stress relief patterns, ring type and peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top, were observed. The ring type in this paper was a clear ridge-cracked buckle and unusual. Two competing buckle delamination morphologies ring and sinusoidal buckling coexist. The ridge-cracked buckle in ring type was narrower than the sinusoidal buckling. Meanwhile peg-top shape with exiguous tine on the top in this paper was unusual. These different patterns supported the approach in which the stress relief forms have been analyzed using the theory of plate buckling.

  16. Removal of a hydrogenated amorphous carbon film from the tip of a micropipette electrode using direct current corona discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Naoto; Okuyama, Naoki; Yamada, Yukio

    2010-02-01

    Micropipette electrodes are fabricated by coating glass micropipettes first with metal and then with hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) as an electrical insulator. Furthermore, at the tip of the micropipette electrode, the deposited a-C:H film needs to be removed to expose the metal-coated surface and hollow for the purposes of electrical measurement and injection. This paper describes a convenient and reliable method for removing the a-C:H film using direct current corona discharge in atmospheric air. The initial film removal occurred at an applied voltage of 1.5-2.0 kV, accompanied by an abrupt increase in the discharge current. The discharge current then became stable at a microampere level in the glow corona mode, and the removed area gradually extended.

  17. Structural and Physical Characteristics of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films Deposited Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nakagawa, You; Nagano, Akira; Ohtani, Ryota; Setoyama, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Eiichi; Sumitani, Kazushi; Agawa, Yoshiaki; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-01-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films were formed without initial nucleation using a coaxial arc plasma gun. The UNCD crystallite diameters estimated from the X-ray diffraction peaks were approximately 2 nm. The Fourier transform infrared absorption spectrum exhibited an intense sp3-CH peak that might originate from the grain boundaries between UNCD crystallites whose dangling bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms. A narrow sp3 peak in the photoemission spectrum implied that the film comprises a large number of UNCD crystallites. Large optical absorption coefficients at photon energies larger than 3 eV that might be due to the grain boundaries are specific to the UNCD/a-C:H films.

  18. Structural stability of hydrogenated amorphous carbon overcoats used in heat-assisted magnetic recording investigated by rapid thermal annealing

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2013-01-01

    Ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films are extensively used as protective overcoats of magnetic recording media. Increasing demands for even higher storage densities have necessitated the development of new storage technologies, such as heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR), which uses laser-assisted heating to record data on high-stability media that can store single bits in extremely small areas (∼1 Tbit/in.2). Because HAMR relies on locally changing the coercivity of the magnetic medium by raising the temperature above the Curie temperature for data to be stored by the magnetic write field, it raises a concern about the structural stability of the ultrathin a-C film. In this study, rapid thermal annealing (RTA) experiments were performed to examine the thermal stability of ultrathin hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) films deposited by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Structural changes in the a-C:H films caused by RTA were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray reflectivity, and conductive atomic force microscopy. The results show that the films exhibit thermal stability up to a maximum temperature in the range of 400-450 °C. Heating above this critical temperature leads to hydrogen depletion and sp 2 clustering. The critical temperature determined by the results of this study represents an upper bound of the temperature rise due to laser heating in HAMR hard-disk drives and the Curie temperature of magnetic materials used in HAMR hard disks. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Tantalum (Ta is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C, was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  20. Surface morphology and grain analysis of successively industrially grown amorphous hydrogenated carbon films (a-C:H) on silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Alberto [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); McJunkin, Thomas [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 43210 Columbus, Ohio (United States); Agnello, Simonpietro; Gelardi, Franco M. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, University of Palermo, 90100 Palermo (Italy); Wehner, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany); Fischer, Christian B., E-mail: chrbfischer@uni-koblenz.de [Department of Physics, University of Koblenz-Landau, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two different a-C:H coatings in various thicknesses on Si (1 0 0) have been studied. • For both types no significant difference in surface morphology is detectable. • The grain number with respect to their height appears randomly distributed. • In average no grain higher than 14 nm and larger than 0.05 μm{sup 2} was observed. • A height to area correlation confines all detected grains to a limited region. - Abstract: Silicon (1 0 0) has been gradually covered by amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films via an industrial process. Two types of these diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, one more flexible (f-DLC) and one more robust (r-DLC), have been investigated. Both types have been grown by a radio frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF-PECVD) technique with acetylene plasma. Surface morphologies have been studied in detail by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Raman spectroscopy has been used to investigate the DLC structure. Both types appeared to have very similar morphology and sp{sup 2} carbon arrangement. The average height and area for single grains have been analyzed for all depositions. A random distribution of grain heights was found for both types. The individual grain structures between the f- and r-type revealed differences: the shape for the f-DLC grains is steeper than for the r-DLC grains. By correlating the average grain heights to the average grain areas for all depositions a limited region is identified, suggesting a certain regularity during the DLC deposition mechanisms that confines both values. A growth of the sp{sup 2} carbon entities for high r-DLC depositions is revealed and connected to a structural rearrangement of carbon atom hybridizations and hydrogen content in the DLC structure.

  1. Microcellular Foaming of Amorphous High-Tg Polymers Using Carbon Dioxyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, B.; Mettinkhof, R.; Vegt, van der N.F.A.; Wessling, M.

    2001-01-01

    The foaming of thin (~100 m) polysulfone (PSU), poly(ether sulfone) (PES), and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC) films using carbon dioxide as a physical blowing agent has been studied. Microcellular foam morphologies were obtained by saturating the polymer with carbon dioxide and heating the sample abo

  2. Formation, Structure and Properties of Amorphous Carbon Char from Polymer Materials in Extreme Atmospheric Reentry Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous carbonaceous char produced from the pyrolysis of polymer solids has many desirable properties for ablative heat shields for space vehicles. Molecular dynamics simulations are presented to study the transformation of the local atomic structure from virgin polymer to a dense, disordered char [1]. Release of polymer hydrogen is found to be critical to allow the system to collapse into a highly coordinated char structure. Mechanisms of the char formation process and the morphology of the resulting structures are elucidated. Thermal conductivity and mechanical response of the resulting char are evaluated [2]. During reenty, the optical response and oxidative reactivity of char are also important properties. Results of ab initio computations of char optical functions [3] and char reactivity [4] are also presented.

  3. An ab initio study of the nickel-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene in rapid thermal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Lu, Yong Feng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk Ni). It is found that the a-C-to-graphene transformation entails the metal-induced crystallization and layer exchange mechanism, rather than the conventional dissolution/precipitation mechanism typically involved in Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. The multi-layer graphene can be tuned by changing the relative thicknesses of deposited a-C and Ni thin films. Our AIMD simulations suggest that the easy evaporation of surplus Ni with excess C is likely attributed to the formation of a viscous-liquid-like Ni-C solution within the temperature range of 900-1800 K and to the faster diffusion of C atoms than that of Ni atoms above 600 K. Even at room temperature, sp3-C atoms in a-C are quickly converted to sp2-C atoms in the course of the simulation, and the graphitic C formation can occur at low temperature. When the temperature is as high as 1200 K, the grown graphitic structures reversely dissolve into Ni. Because the rate of temperature increase is considerably faster in the AIMD simulations than in realistic experiments, defects in the grown graphitic structures are kinetically trapped. In this kinetic growth stage, the carbon structures grown from sp3-carbon or from sp2-carbon exhibit marked differences.Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk

  4. Incidence Angle Effect of Energetic Carbon Ions on Deposition Rate, Topography, and Structure of Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films Deposited by Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N.

    2012-07-01

    The effect of the incidence angle of energetic carbon ions on the thickness, topography, and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon (a-C) films synthesized by filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) was examined in the context of numerical and experimental results. The thickness of a-C films deposited at different incidence angles was investigated in the light of Monte Carlo simulations, and the calculated depth profiles were compared with those obtained from high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The topography and structure of the a-C films were studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. The film thickness decreased with the increase of the incidence angle, while the surface roughness increased and the content of tetrahedral carbon hybridization (sp 3) decreased significantly with the increase of the incidence angle above 45° , measured from the surface normal. TEM, AFM, and XPS results indicate that the smoothest and thinnest a-C films with the highest content of sp 3 carbon bonding were produced for an incidence angle of 45°. The findings of this study have direct implications in ultrahigh-density magnetic recording, where ultrathin and smooth a-C films with high sp 3 contents are of critical importance. © 2012 IEEE.

  5. An ab initio study of the nickel-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon into graphene in rapid thermal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuang; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yun Shen; Lu, Yong Feng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-05-14

    Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are employed to investigate the chemical mechanism underlying the Ni-catalyzed transformation of amorphous carbon (a-C) into graphene in the rapid thermal processing (RTP) experiment to directly grow graphene on various dielectric surfaces via the evaporation of surplus Ni and C at 1100 °C (below the melting point of bulk Ni). It is found that the a-C-to-graphene transformation entails the metal-induced crystallization and layer exchange mechanism, rather than the conventional dissolution/precipitation mechanism typically involved in Ni-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene. The multi-layer graphene can be tuned by changing the relative thicknesses of deposited a-C and Ni thin films. Our AIMD simulations suggest that the easy evaporation of surplus Ni with excess C is likely attributed to the formation of a viscous-liquid-like Ni-C solution within the temperature range of 900-1800 K and to the faster diffusion of C atoms than that of Ni atoms above 600 K. Even at room temperature, sp(3)-C atoms in a-C are quickly converted to sp(2)-C atoms in the course of the simulation, and the graphitic C formation can occur at low temperature. When the temperature is as high as 1200 K, the grown graphitic structures reversely dissolve into Ni. Because the rate of temperature increase is considerably faster in the AIMD simulations than in realistic experiments, defects in the grown graphitic structures are kinetically trapped. In this kinetic growth stage, the carbon structures grown from sp(3)-carbon or from sp(2)-carbon exhibit marked differences.

  6. Molecular-scale tribology of amorphous carbon coatings: effects of film thickness, adhesion, and long-range interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, G T; Mikulski, Paul T; Harrison, Judith A

    2002-06-19

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been conducted to investigate the atomic-scale friction and wear when hydrogen-terminated diamond (111) counterfaces are in sliding contact with diamond (111) surfaces coated with amorphous, hydrogen-free carbon films. Two films, with approximately the same ratio of sp(3)-to-sp(2) carbon, but different thicknesses, have been examined. Both systems give a similar average friction in the load range examined. Above a critical load, a series of tribochemical reactions occur resulting in a significant restructuring of the film. This restructuring is analogous to the "run-in" observed in macroscopic friction experiments and reduces the friction. The contribution of adhesion between the probe (counterface) and the sample to friction was examined by varying the saturation of the counterface. Decreasing the degree of counterface saturation, by reducing the hydrogen termination, increases the friction. Finally, the contribution of long-range interactions to friction was examined by using two potential energy functions that differ only in their long-range forces to examine friction in the same system.

  7. Atomic-scale wear of amorphous hydrogenated carbon during intermittent contact: a combined study using experiment, simulation, and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahdat, Vahid; Ryan, Kathleen E; Keating, Pamela L; Jiang, Yijie; Adiga, Shashishekar P; Schall, J David; Turner, Kevin T; Harrison, Judith A; Carpick, Robert W

    2014-07-22

    In this study, we explore the wear behavior of amplitude modulation atomic force microscopy (AM-AFM, an intermittent-contact AFM mode) tips coated with a common type of diamond-like carbon, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H), when scanned against an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) sample both experimentally and through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Finite element analysis is utilized in a unique way to create a representative geometry of the tip to be simulated in MD. To conduct consistent and quantitative experiments, we apply a protocol that involves determining the tip-sample interaction geometry, calculating the tip-sample force and normal contact stress over the course of the wear test, and precisely quantifying the wear volume using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy imaging. The results reveal gradual wear of a-C:H with no sign of fracture or plastic deformation. The wear rate of a-C:H is consistent with a reaction-rate-based wear theory, which predicts an exponential dependence of the rate of atom removal on the average normal contact stress. From this, kinetic parameters governing the wear process are estimated. MD simulations of an a-C:H tip, whose radius is comparable to the tip radii used in experiments, making contact with a UNCD sample multiple times exhibit an atomic-level removal process. The atomistic wear events observed in the simulations are correlated with under-coordinated atomic species at the contacting surfaces.

  8. Controllable Electrochemical Activities by Oxidative Treatment toward Inner-Sphere Redox Systems at N-Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoriko Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical activity of the surface of Nitrogen-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin films (a-CNH, N-doped DLC toward the inner sphere redox species is controllable by modifying the surface termination. At the oxygen plasma treated N-doped DLC surface (O-DLC, the surface functional groups containing carbon doubly bonded to oxygen (C=O, which improves adsorption of polar molecules, were generated. By oxidative treatment, the electron-transfer rate for dopamine (DA positively charged inner-sphere redox analyte could be improved at the N-doped DLC surface. For redox reaction of 2,4-dichlorophenol, which induces an inevitable fouling of the anode surface by forming passivating films, the DLC surfaces exhibited remarkably higher stability and reproducibility of the electrode performance. This is due to the electrochemical decomposition of the passive films without the interference of oxygen evolution by applying higher potential. The N-doped DLC film can offer benefits as the polarizable electrode surface with the higher reactivity and higher stability toward inner-sphere redox species. By making use of these controllable electrochemical reactivity at the O-DLC surface, the selective detection of DA in the mixed solution of DA and uric acid could be achieved.

  9. Designed synthesis of tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) by a novel route and their oxidation resistance properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Longlong Xu; Yifu Zhang; Xiongzhi Zhang; Yu Huang; Xiaoyu Tan; Chi Huang; Xiao Mei; Fei Niu; Changgong Meng; Gongzhen Cheng

    2014-10-01

    Tunable amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were successfully synthesized using V3O7.H2O and glucose solution as the starting materials by a novel route for the first time. The as-obtained samples were separately characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), elemental analysis (EA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT–IR) and Raman spectrum. The results showed that the as-obtained a-CNTs had uniform diameters with outer diameter ranging from 140 to 250 nm and inner diameter about 28 nm on an average, and their length was up to several micrometres. No VO residues remaining in a-CNTs showed the as-obtained a-CNTs with high purity. The as-prepared a-CNTs were a kind of hydrogenated a-CNTs containing both the 3- and 2-type carbons. Furthermore, the thermal stability of the as-obtained a-CNTs in the air atmosphere were investigated by thermo-gravimetric/differential thermal analyser (TG-DTA), revealing that the as-obtained a-CNTs had good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 300 °C in air.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and microwave absorption properties of dendrite-like Fe3O4 embedded within amorphous sugar carbon matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Wang, Liuding; Wu, Hongjing

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite dendrites/sugar carbon (MDs/SC) nanocomposites, embedding MDs within amorphous SC matrix, were prepared by simple carbonization-reduction method using α-Fe2O3 dendrites (HDs) as precursor of MDs and sucrose as SC source, while still maintain the dendritic shape of the precursor. The morphology, composition, structure and static magnetic properties of the as-prepared MDs/SC nanocomposites were characterized by various techniques thoroughly. Particularly, the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of the MDs/SC and MDs paraffin composites (40 wt.%) were compared over 2-14 GHz. The results show that the microwave absorption performance of MDs/SC samples is comparable or even superior to that of MDs case. The absorption band with reflection loss (RL) below -20 dB for one of the MDs/SC samples can cover the whole X-band (8-12 GHz) with thickness of 1.8-2.4 mm when the content of MDs in the MDs/SC nanocomposite is 25.8 wt.%, and the minimum RL can reach -49.9 dB at 12.1 GHz when the layer thickness is only 1.9 mm. The excellent microwave absorption properties of the MDs/SC paraffin composites are attributed to the proper match between the complex permittivity and permeability, and the unique fractal structures of MDs.

  11. Time-Resolved Observation of Deposition Process of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Composite Films in Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Hanada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere wherein ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H composite films were grown on heated substrates. Time-resolved photographs of a plume that expanded from a laser-irradiation spot toward a substrate were taken using a high-speed ICCD camera equipped with narrow-bandpass filters. While the emissions from C atoms and C2 dimers lasted above the laser-irradiation spot on the target, the emission from C+ ions lasted above the substrate surface for approximately 7 microseconds, although the emission lifetime of species is generally approximately 10 nanoseconds. This implies that C+ ions actively collided with each other above the substrate surface for such a long time. We believe that the keys to UNCD growth in PLD are the supply of highly energetic carbon species at a high density to the substrate and existence of atomic hydrogen during the growth.

  12. Amorphous silicon carbon films prepared by hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor/sputtering deposition system: Effects of r.f. power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Nur Maisarah Abdul, E-mail: nurmaisarahrashid@gmail.com [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ritikos, Richard; Othman, Maisara; Khanis, Noor Hamizah; Gani, Siti Meriam Ab. [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Muhamad, Muhamad Rasat [Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia); Rahman, Saadah Abdul, E-mail: saadah@um.edu.my [Low Dimensional Materials Research Centre, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Chancellery Office, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, 63100 Cyberjaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-02-01

    Silicon carbon films were deposited using a hybrid radio frequency (r.f.) plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD)/sputtering deposition system at different r.f. powers. This deposition system combines the advantages of r.f. PECVD and sputtering techniques for the deposition of silicon carbon films with the added advantage of eliminating the use of highly toxic silane gas in the deposition process. Silicon (Si) atoms were sputtered from a pure amorphous silicon (a-Si) target by argon (Ar) ions and carbon (C) atoms were incorporated into the film from C based growth radicals generated through the discharge of methane (CH{sub 4}) gas. The effects of r.f. powers of 60, 80, 100, 120 and 150 W applied during the deposition process on the structural and optical properties of the films were investigated. Raman spectroscopic studies showed that the silicon carbon films contain amorphous silicon carbide (SiC) and amorphous carbon (a-C) phases. The r.f. power showed significant influence on the C incorporation in the film structure. The a-C phases became more ordered in films with high C incorporation in the film structure. These films also produced high photoluminescence emission intensity at around 600 nm wavelength as a result of quantum confinement effects from the presence of sp{sup 2} C clusters embedded in the a-SiC and a-C phases in the films. - Highlights: ► Effects of radio frequency (r.f.) power on silicon carbon (SiC) films were studied. ► Hybrid plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition/sputtering technique was used. ► r.f. power influences C incorporation in the film structure. ► High C incorporation results in higher ordering of the amorphous C phase. ► These films produced high photoluminescence emission intensity.

  13. Diffusion and Clustering of Carbon Dioxide on non-porous Amorphous Solid Water

    CERN Document Server

    He, Jiao; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Observations by ISO and Spitzer towards young stellar objects (YSOs) showed that CO$_2$ segregates in the icy mantles covering dust grains. Thermal processing of ice mixture was proposed as responsible for the segregation. Although several laboratory studied thermally induced segregation, a satisfying quantification is still missing. We propose that the diffusion of CO$_2$ along pores inside water ice is the key to quantify segregation. We combined Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) and Reflection Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) to study how CO$_2$ molecules interact on a non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) surface. We found that CO$_2$ diffuses significantly on a np-ASW surface above 65~K and clusters are formed at well below one monolayer. A simple rate equation simulation finds that the diffusion energy barrier of CO$_2$ on np-ASW is 2150$\\pm$50 K, assuming a diffusion pre-exponential factor of 10$^{12}$ s$^{-1}$. This energy should also apply to the diffusion of CO$_2$ on wall of pores...

  14. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaseov, P. A.; Protopopova, V. S.; Karabeshkin, K. V.; Shubina, E. N.; Mishin, M. V.; Koskinen, J.; Mohapatra, S.; Tripathi, A.; Avasthi, D. K.; Titov, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag7+ ions to fluences in the range 1 × 1010-3 × 1011 cm-2. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  15. Fabrication of periodical surface structures by picosecond laser irradiation of carbon thin films: transformation of amorphous carbon in nanographite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, C.; Dorcioman, G.; Bita, B.; Besleaga, C.; Zgura, I.; Himcinschi, C.; Popescu, A. C.

    2016-12-01

    Thin films of carbon were synthesized by ns pulsed laser deposition in vacuum on silicon substrates, starting from graphite targets. Further on, the films were irradiated with a picosecond laser source emitting in visible at 532 nm. After tuning of laser parameters, we obtained a film surface covered by laser induced periodical surface structures (LIPSS). They were investigated by optical, scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. It was observed that changing the irradiation angle influences the LIPSS covered area. At high magnification it was revealed that the LIPSS pattern was quite complex, being composed of other small LIPSS islands, interconnected by bridges of nanoparticles. Raman spectra for the non-irradiated carbon films were typical for a-C type of diamond-like carbon, while the LIPSS spectra were characteristic to nano-graphite. The pristine carbon film was hydrophilic, while the LIPSS covered film surface was hydrophobic.

  16. Swift heavy ion irradiation of metal containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaseov, P.A., E-mail: platon.karaseov@spbstu.ru [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Protopopova, V.S. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Karabeshkin, K.V.; Shubina, E.N.; Mishin, M.V. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Koskinen, J. [Aalto University, Espoo (Finland); Mohapatra, S. [Guru Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, New Delhi (India); Tripathi, A. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Avasthi, D.K. [Amity University, Noida 201313, Uttar Pradesh (India); Titov, A.I. [Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • ta-C films with Ni and Cu doping were grown using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition. • Conductive channels were found in the films by C-AFM after irradiation with 100 MeV Ag ions. • SEM contrast found after irradiation strongly depends on kind of metal impurity in the film. • Different chemical effect of Ni and Cu on transformation of carbon matrix under irradiation was revealed. - Abstract: Thin carbon films were grown at room temperature on (0 0 1) n-Si substrate using dual cathode filtered vacuum arc deposition system. Graphite was used as a source of carbon atoms and separate metallic electrode was simultaneously utilized to introduce Ni or Cu atoms. Films were irradiated by 100 MeV Ag{sup 7+} ions to fluences in the range 1 × 10{sup 10}–3 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2}. Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, Raman scattering, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy in conductive mode were used to investigate film properties and structure change under irradiation. Some conductive channels having metallic conductivity type were found in the films. Number of such channels is less than number of impinged ions. Presence of Ni and Cu atoms increases conductivity of those conductive channels. Fluence dependence of all properties studied suggests different mechanisms of swift heavy ion irradiation-induced transformation of carbon matrix due to different chemical effect of nickel and copper atoms.

  17. Chemical and physical controls on the transformation of amorphous calcium carbonate into crystalline CaCO3 polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, C. R.; Giuffre, A.; Mergelsberg, S.; Han, N.; De Yoreo, J. J.; Dove, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite and other crystalline polymorphs of CaCO3 can form by pathways involving amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Apparent inconsistencies in the literature indicate the relationships between ACC composition, local conditions, and the subsequent crystalline polymorphs are not yet established. This experimental study quantifies the control of solution composition on the transformation of ACC into crystalline polymorphs in the presence of magnesium. Using a mixed flow reactor to control solution chemistry, ACC was synthesized with variable Mg contents by tuning input pH, Mg/Ca, and total carbonate concentration. ACC products were allowed to transform within the output suspension under stirred or quiescent conditions while characterizing the evolving solutions and solids. As the ACC transforms into a crystalline phase, the solutions record a polymorph-specific evolution of pH and Mg/Ca. The data provide a quantitative framework for predicting the initial polymorph that forms from ACC based upon the solution aMg2+/aCa2+ and aCO32-/aCa2+ and stirring versus quiescent conditions. This model reconciles discrepancies among previous studies that report on the nature of the polymorphs produced from ACC and supports the previous claim that monohydrocalcite may be an important, but overlooked, transient phase on the way to forming some aragonite and calcite deposits. By this construct, organic additives and extreme pH are not required to tune the composition and nature of the polymorph that forms. Our measurements show that the Mg content of ACC is recorded in the resulting calcite with a ≈1:1 dependence. By correlating composition of these calcite products with the Mgtot/Catot of the initial solutions, we find a ≈3:1 dependence that is approximately linear and general to whether calcite is formed via an ACC pathway or by the classical step-propagation process. Comparisons to calcite grown in synthetic seawater show a ≈1:1 dependence. The relationships suggest that the

  18. Diffusion and Clustering of Carbon Dioxide on Non-porous Amorphous Solid Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiao; Emtiaz, Shahnewaj M.; Vidali, Gianfranco

    2017-03-01

    Observations by ISO and Spitzer toward young stellar objects showed that CO2 segregates in the icy mantles covering dust grains. Thermal processing of the ice mixture was proposed as being responsible for the segregation. Although several laboratories studied thermally induced segregation, a satisfying quantification is still missing. We propose that the diffusion of CO2 along pores inside water ice is the key to quantify segregation. We combined Temperature Programmed Desorption and Reflection Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy to study how CO2 molecules interact on a non-porous amorphous solid water (np-ASW) surface. We found that CO2 diffuses significantly on an np-ASW surface above 65 K and clusters are formed at well below one monolayer. A simple rate equation simulation finds that the diffusion energy barrier of CO2 on np-ASW is 2150 ± 50 K, assuming a diffusion pre-exponential factor of 1012 s‑1. This energy should also apply to the diffusion of CO2 on the wall of pores. The binding energy of CO2 from CO2 clusters and CO2 from H2O ice has been found to be 2415 ± 20 K and 2250 ± 20 K, respectively, assuming the same prefactor for desorption. CO2–CO2 interaction is stronger than CO2–H2O interaction, in agreement with the experimental finding that CO2 does not wet the np-ASW surface. For comparison, we carried out similar experiments with CO on np-ASW, and found that the CO–CO interaction is always weaker than CO–H2O. As a result, CO wets the np-ASW surface. This study should be of help to uncover the thermal history of CO2 on the icy mantles of dust grains.

  19. Endothelialization of TiO2 Nanorods Coated with Ultrathin Amorphous Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongpeng; Tang, Nan; Chen, Min; Chen, Dihu

    2016-03-01

    Carbon plasma nanocoatings with controlled fraction of sp3-C bonding were deposited on TiO2 nanorod arrays (TNAs) by DC magnetic-filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition (FCVAD). The cytocompatibility of TNA/carbon nanocomposites was systematically investigated. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured on the nanocomposites for 4, 24, and 72 h in vitro. It was found that plasma-treated TNAs exhibited excellent cell viability as compared to the untreated. Importantly, our results show that cellular responses positively correlate with the sp3-C content. The cells cultured on high sp3-C-contented substrates exhibit better attachment, shape configuration, and proliferation. These findings indicate that the nanocomposites with high sp3-C content possessed superior cytocompatibility. Notably, the nanocomposites drastically reduced platelet adhesion and activation in our previous studies. Taken together, these findings suggest the TNA/carbon scaffold may serve as a guide for the design of multi-functionality devices that promotes endothelialization and improves hemocompatibility.

  20. Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a 3D electrode for long cycle life symmetric supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasingam, Suresh Kannan; Thirumurugan, Arun; Lee, Jae Sung; Jun, Yongseok

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles.Amorphous MoSx thin-film-coated carbon fiber paper as a binder-free 3D electrode was synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. The maximum specific capacitance of a single electrode was 83.9 mF cm-2, while it was 41.9 mF cm-2 for the symmetric device. Up to 600% capacitance retention was observed for 4750 cycles. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6NR01200K

  1. Experimental study on friction and wear behaviour of amorphous carbon coatings for mechanical seals in cryogenic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianlei; Jia, Qian; Yuan, Xiaoyang; Wang, Shaopeng

    2012-10-01

    The service life and the reliability of contact mechanical seal are directly affected by the wear of seal pairs (rotor vs. stator), especially under the cryogenic environment in liquid rocket engine turbopumps. Because of the lower friction and wear rate, amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings are the promising protective coatings of the seal pairs for contact mechanical seal. In this paper, a-C coatings were deposited on 9Cr18 by pulsed DC magnetron sputtering. The tribological performances of the specimen were tested under three sealed fluid conditions (air, water and liquid nitrogen). The results show that the coatings could endure the cryogenic temperature while the friction coefficients decrease with the increased contact load. Under the same contact condition, the friction coefficient of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen is higher than that in water and that they are in air. The friction coefficients of the a-C coatings in liquid nitrogen range from 0.10 to 0.15. In the cryogenic environment, the coatings remain their low specific wear rates (0.9 × 10-6 to 1.8 × 10-6 mm3 N-1 m-1). The results provide an important reference for designing a water lubricated bearing or a contact mechanical seal under the cryogenic environment that is both reliable and has longevity.

  2. Properties of boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon films grown using filtered cathodic vacuum arc process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S., E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Khan, Mohd Alim [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Satyanarayana, B.S. [40, Sreeniketan, NDSE 24, New Delhi 110096 (India); Kumar, Sushil; Ishpal [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2010-04-15

    This paper reports the electrical, mechanical, structural and field emission properties of as grown and also boron and phosphorous incorporated tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films, deposited using a filtered cathodic vacuum arc process. The effect of varying boron and phosphorous content (up to 2.0 at.% in to ta-C) on the conductivity ({sigma}{sub D}), activation energy ({Delta}E{sub 1}), hardness, microstructure, emission threshold (E{sub turn-ON}) and emission current density (J) at 12.5 V/{mu}m of ta-C: B and ta-C: P films deposited at a high negative substrate bias of -300 V are reported. It is observed that both boron and phosphorous incorporation leads to a nearly an order increase in {sigma}{sub D} and corresponding decrease in {Delta}E{sub 1} and a slight increase in hardness as compared to as grown ta-C films. In the case of field assisted electron emission, it is observed that E{sub turn-ON} increases and J decreases. The changes are attributed to the changes in the sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio of the films due to boron and phosphorous incorporation. The effect of boron on ta-C is to give a p-type effect whereas the effect of phosphorous gives n-type doping effect.

  3. Light emission in forward and reverse bias operation in OLED with amorphous silicon carbon nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, R [Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica y Textil, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru SN, Lima (Peru); Cremona, M [Departamento de Fisica, PontifIcia Universidade Catolica de Rio de Janeiro, PUC-Rio, Cx. Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22453-970 (Brazil); Achete, C A, E-mail: rreyes@uni.edu.pe [Departamento de Engenheria Metalurgica e de Materiais, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cx. Postal 68505, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2011-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbon nitride (a-SiC:N) thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were used in the structure of an organic light emitting diode (OLED), obtaining an OLED operating in forward and reverse bias mode. The device consist of the heterojunction structure ITO/a-SiC:N/Hole Transport Layer (HTL)/ Electron Transport Layer (ETL)/a-SiC:N/Al. As hole transporting layer was used a thin film of 1-(3-methylphenyl)-1,2,3,4 tetrahydroquinoline - 6 - carboxyaldehyde - 1,1'- diphenylhydrazone (MTCD), while the tris(8-hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq{sub 3}) is used as electron transport and emitting layer. A significant increase in the voltage operation compared to the conventional ITO/MTCD/Alq{sub 3}/Al structure was observed, so the onset of electroluminescence occurs at about 22 V in the forward and reverse bias mode of operation. The electroluminescence spectra is similar in both cases, only slightly shifted 0.14 eV to lower energies in relation to the conventional device.

  4. Vacuum ultraviolet photolysis of hydrogenated amorphous carbons. III. Diffusion of photo-produced H2 as a function of temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Martín-Doménech, Rafael; Caro, Guillermo M Muñoz

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been proposed as one of the carbonaceous solids detected in the interstellar medium. Energetic processing of the a-C:H particles leads to the dissociation of the C-H bonds and the formation of hydrogen molecules and small hydrocarbons. Photo-produced H2 molecules in the bulk of the dust particles can diffuse out to the gas phase and contribute to the total H2 abundance. We have simulated this process in the laboratory with plasma-produced a-C:H and a-C:D analogs under astrophysically relevant conditions to investigate the dependence of the diffusion as a function of temperature. Plasma-produced a-C:H analogs were UV-irradiated using a microwave-discharged hydrogen flow lamp. Molecules diffusing to the gas-phase were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer, providing a measurement of the outgoing H2 or D2 flux. By comparing the experimental measurements with the expected flux from a one-dimensional diffusion model, a diffusion coefficient D could be derived for expe...

  5. Neutron and X-ray diffraction and empirical potential structure refinement modelling of magnesium stabilised amorphous calcium carbonate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cobourne, G.; Mountjoy, G.; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego

    2014-01-01

    from CO3 molecules and 0.6 oxygen atoms from H2O molecules. The average CaO bond length is 2.40 Å. The distribution of Ca in the model is homogeneous with a uniformly distributed Ca-rich network and no evidence of the Ca-poor channels as previously reported for a reverse Monte Carlo model of ACC......Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) plays a key role in biomineralisation processes in sea organisms. Neutron and X-ray diffraction have been performed for a sample of magnesium-stabilised ACC, which was prepared with a Mg:Ca ratio of 0.05:1 and 0.25 H2O molecules per molecule of CO3. The empirical...... potential structure refinement method has been used to make a model of magnesium-stabilised ACC and the results revealed a fair agreement with the experimental diffraction data. The model has well-defined CO3 and H2O molecules. The average coordination number of Ca is 7.4 and is composed of 6.8 oxygen atoms...

  6. Correlation of photothermal conversion on the photo-induced deformation of amorphous carbon nitride films prepared by reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harata, T.; Aono, M., E-mail: aono@nda.ac.jp; Kitazawa, N.; Watanabe, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Defense Academy, 1-10-20 Hashirimizu, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 239-8686 (Japan)

    2014-08-04

    The photo-induced deformation of hydrogen-free amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) films was investigated under visible-light illumination. The films gave rise to photothermal conversion by irradiation. In this study, we investigated the effects of thermal energy generated by irradiation on the deformation of a-CN{sub x}/ultrathin substrate bimorph specimens. The films were prepared on both ultrathin Si and SiO{sub 2} substrates by reactive radio-frequency magnetron sputtering from a graphite target in the presence of pure nitrogen gas. The temperature of the film on the SiO{sub 2} substrate increased as the optical band-gap of the a-CN{sub x} was decreased. For the film on Si, the temperature remained constant. The deformation degree of the films on Si and SiO{sub 2} substrates were approximately the same. Thus, the deformation of a-CN{sub x} films primarily induced by photon energy directly.

  7. A simple chemical synthesis of amorphous carbon nanotubes-MnO2 flake hybrids for cold cathode application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sourav; Banerjee, Diptonil; Das, Nirmalya Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2015-08-01

    A simple approach has been implemented to synthesize amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) and manganese oxide (MnO2) hybrid nanostructure at temperature as low as ∼250 °C in open atmosphere. Microscopic studies of the samples revealed that the walls of the a-CNTs were coated uniformly by MnO2 nanoflakes. The composition of the as prepared sample was studied with the help of energy dispersive X-ray and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Electron field emission study was done in a custom built high vacuum field emission setup for the prepared a-CNT and manganese oxide (MnO2) hybrid nanostructure. It is seen that the performance of the a-CNTs as cold cathode emitter has been enhanced greatly when MnO2 nanoflakes were coated uniformly over it. The turn on field has been reduced from 7.17 to value as low as 3.82 V/mm with enhancement factor increases from 2428 to 6965. Finite element based simulation study theoretically confirms the enhancement of field emission properties of as prepared MnO2 nanoflake coated a-CNTs. The results have been explained due to enhanced surface roughness leading to higher enhancement factor and overall increase of emission sites.

  8. Genotoxicity evaluation of nanosized titanium dioxide, synthetic amorphous silica and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in human lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Ana M; Louro, Henriqueta; Antunes, Susana; Quarré, Stephanie; Simar, Sophie; De Temmerman, Pieter-Jan; Verleysen, Eveline; Mast, Jan; Jensen, Keld A; Norppa, Hannu; Nesslany, Fabrice; Silva, Maria João

    2014-02-01

    Toxicological characterization of manufactured nanomaterials (NMs) is essential for safety assessment, while keeping pace with innovation from their development and application in consumer products. The specific physicochemical properties of NMs, including size and morphology, might influence their toxicity and have impact on human health. The present work aimed to evaluate the genotoxicity of nanosized titanium dioxide (TiO2), synthetic amorphous silica (SAS) and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), in human lymphocytes. The morphology and size of those NMs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, while the hydrodynamic particle size-distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering. Using a standardized procedure to ensure the dispersion of the NMs and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (without metabolic activation), we observed significant increases in the frequencies of micronucleated binucleated cells (MNBCs) for some TiO2 NMs and for two MWCNTs, although no clear dose-response relationships could be disclosed. In contrast, all forms of SAS analyzed in this study were unable to induce micronuclei. The present findings increase the weight of evidence towards a genotoxic effect of some forms of TiO2 and some MWCNTs. Regarding safety assessment, the differential genotoxicity observed for closely related NMs highlights the importance of investigating the toxic potential of each NM individually, instead of assuming a common mechanism and equal genotoxic effects for a set of similar NMs.

  9. Effect of high substrate bias and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporation on filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposited tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panwar, O.S. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India)], E-mail: ospanwar@mail.nplindia.ernet.in; Khan, Mohd. Alim [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Kumar, Mahesh; Shivaprasad, S.M. [Surface Physics and Nanostructures Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Satyanarayana, B.S. [MIT Innovation Centre and Electronics and Communication Department, Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal-579104 (India); Dixit, P.N. [Plasma Processed Materials Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi-110 012 (India); Bhattacharyya, R. [Emeritus Scientist, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110012 (India); Khan, M.Y. [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, Central University, New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2008-02-29

    The application of a sufficiently high negative substrate bias, during the growth of tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C), is usually associated with low sp{sup 3} bonding configuration and stressed films. However, in an effort to understand and utilize the higher pseudo thermo dynamical conditions during the film growth, at high negative substrate bias (- 300 V), reported here is a study on ta-C films grown under different hydrogen and nitrogen concentration. As grown ta-C films were studied under different negative substrate bias conditions. The variation of the sp{sup 3} content and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} ratio in the ta-C films exhibits a trend similar to those reported in literature, with a subtle variation in this report being the substrate bias voltage, which was observed to be around - 200 V, for obtaining the highest sp{sup 3} (80%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (3.95) ratio. The hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films studied, at a bias of - 300 V, show an increase in sp{sup 3} (87-91%) bonding and sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} (7-10) ratio in the range of studies reported. The inference is drawn on the basis of the set of data obtained from measurements carried out using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray induced Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy of as grown and hydrogen and nitrogen incorporated ta-C films deposited using an S bend filtered cathodic vacuum arc system. The study indicates the possibility of further tailoring ta-C film properties and also extending capabilities of the cathodic arc system for developing carbon based films for electronics and tribological applications.

  10. Physico-chemical studies of cuprous oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) nanoparticles coated on amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johan, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: mrafiej@um.edu.my; Meriam Suhaimy, Syazwan Hanani; Yusof, Yusliza, E-mail: yus_liza@siswa.um.edu.my

    2014-01-15

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature (∼250 °C) in an air furnace. As- synthesized α-CNTs were purified with deionized water and hydrochloric acid. A purified α-CNTs were hybridized with cuprous oxide nanoparticles (Cu{sub 2}O) through a simple chemical process. Morphology of the samples was analyzed with field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra showed the attachment of acidic functional groups onto the surface of α-CNTs and the formation of hybridized α-CNTs-Cu{sub 2}O. Raman spectra reveal the amorphous nature of the carbon. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern confirmed the amorphous phase of the carbon and the formation of Cu{sub 2}O crystalline phase. The coating of Cu{sub 2}O was confirmed by FESEM, TEM, and XRD. Optical absorption of the samples has also been investigated and the quantum confinement effect was illustrated in the absorption spectra.

  11. Thermal conductivity of carbon doped GeTe thin films in amorphous and crystalline state measured by modulated photo thermal radiometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusiak, Andrzej; Battaglia, Jean-Luc; Noé, Pierre; Sousa, Véronique; Fillot, F.

    2016-09-01

    The thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of GeTe and carbon doped GeTe thin films, designed for phase change memory (PCM) applications, were investigated by modulated photo thermal radiometry. It was found that C doping has no significant effect on the thermal conductivity of these chalcogenides in amorphous state. The thermal boundary resistance between the amorphous films and SiO2 substrate is also not affected by C doping. The films were then crystallized by an annealing at 450°C as confirmed by optical reflectivity analysis. The thermal conductivity of non-doped GeTe significantly increases after crystallization annealing. But, surprisingly the thermal conductivity of the crystallized C doped GeTe was found to be similar from that of the amorphous state and independent of C concentration. As for the amorphous phase, C doping does not affect the thermal boundary resistance between the crystalline GeTe films and SiO2 substrate. This behaviour is discussed thanks to XRD and FTIR analysis. In particular, XRD shows a decrease of crystalline grain size in crystalline films as C concentration is increased. FTIR analysis of the film before and after crystallization evidenced that this evolution could be attributed to the disappearing of Ge-C bonds and migration of C atoms out of the GeTe phase upon crystallization, limiting then the growth of GeTe crystallites in C-doped films.

  12. High performance amorphous-Si@SiOx/C composite anode materials for Li-ion batteries derived from ball-milling and in situ carbonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dingsheng; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Wang, Junhua; Liu, Yongfeng

    2014-06-01

    Amorphous-Si@SiOx/C composites with amorphous Si particles as core and coated with a double layer of SiOx and carbon are prepared by ball-milling crystal micron-sized silicon powders and carbonization of the citric acid intruded in the ball-milled Si. Different ratios of Si to citric acid are used in order to optimize the electrochemical performance. It is found that SiOx exists naturally at the surfaces of raw Si particles and its content increases to ca. 24 wt.% after ball-milling. With an optimized Si to citric acid weight ratio of 1/2.5, corresponding to 8.4 wt.% C in the composite, a thin carbon layer is coated on the surfaces of a-Si@SiOx particles, moreover, floc-like carbon also forms and connects the carbon coated a-Si@SiOx particles. The composite provides a capacity of 1450 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at a current density of 100 mA g1, and a capacity of 1230 mA h g-1 after 100 cycles at 500 mA g1 as anode material for lithium-ion batteries. Effects of ball-milling and the addition of citric acid on the microstructure and electrochemical properties of the composites are revealed and the mechanism of the improvement in electrochemical properties is discussed.

  13. 3D amorphous carbon and graphene co-modified LiFePO4 composite derived from polyol process as electrode for high power lithium-ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan Wu; Ran Ran; Bote Zhao; Yujing Sha; Chao Su; Yingke Zhou; Zongping Shao

    2014-01-01

    Amorphous carbon and graphene co-modified LiFePO4 nanocomposite has been synthesized via a facile polyol process in connection with a following thermal treatment. Various characterization techniques, including XRD, M ¨ossbauer spectra, Raman spectra, SEM, TEM, BET, O2-TPO, galvano charge-discharge, CV and EIS were applied to investigate the phase composition, carbon content, morphological structure and electrochemical performance of the synthesized samples. The effect of introducing way of carbon sources on the properties and performance of LiFePO4/C/graphene composite was paid special attention. Under optimized synthetic conditions, highly crystalized olivine-type LiFePO4 was successfully obtained with electron conductive Fe2P and FeP as the main impurity phases. SEM and TEM analyses demonstrated the graphene sheets were randomly distributed inside the sample to create an open structured LiFePO4 with respect to graphene, while the glucose-derived carbon mainly coated over LiFePO4 particles which effectively connected the graphene sheets and LiFePO4 particles to result in a more efficient charge transfer process. As a result, favorable electrochemical performance was achieved. The performance of the amorphous carbon-graphene co-modified LiFePO4 was further progressively improved upon cycling in the first 200 cycles to reach a reversible specific capacity as high as 97 mAh·g-1 at 10 C rate.

  14. Molecular dynamics simulations of the tribological behaviour of a water-lubricated amorphous carbon-fluorine PECVD coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullich, Markus; Weiss, Volker C.; Frauenheim, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Hybrid bearings comprising ceramic balls and steel rings exhibit increased wear-resistance and a reduced coefficient of friction (COF) compared with standard steel bearings. Using plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) coatings to modify the surface properties, the performance of these bearings can be further improved. Fluorine-containing amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C : F : H) films are well suited to this purpose. To study the influence of such coatings on the friction characteristics of key parts of hybrid bearings, a model of an a-C : F : H film was constructed and employed in molecular dynamics simulations of two slabs sliding past each other, lubricated by water. With one slab being pulled by a virtual spring, the perpendicular force (load) was kept constant using a barostat. For comparison, a system of two silicon dioxide (cristobalite) slabs and a mixed system consisting of a cristobalite slab and an a-C : F : H slab were investigated. Our results indicate a linear dependence of the friction force on the perpendicular force. With an increasing amount of water between the slabs, the COFs decrease. A decrease in temperature leads to an increased COF, while a decrease in the relative velocity of the slabs does not influence the COF between two a-C : F : H slabs, but reduces the COF for the other two systems. Our results for the COF and its dependence on temperature and relative sliding velocity generally agree well both with experiments and with simulations for similar systems reported in the literature.

  15. Amorphous carbon nitride as an alternative electrode material in electroanalysis: simultaneous determination of dopamine and ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Roberta A; Matos, Roberto; Benchikh, Abdelkader; Saidani, Boualem; Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine; Deslouis, Claude; Rocha-Filho, Romeu C; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2013-10-03

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) films are excellent electrode materials, whose electrochemical activity for some analytes can be tuned by controlling their surface termination, most commonly either to predominantly hydrogen or oxygen. This tuning can be accomplished by e.g. suitable cathodic or anodic electrochemical pretreatments. Recently, it has been shown that amorphous carbon nitride (a-CNx) films may present electrochemical characteristics similar to those of BDD, including the influence of surface termination on their electrochemical activity toward some analytes. In this work, we report for the first time a complete electroanalytical method using an a-CNx electrode. Thus, an a-CNx film deposited on a stainless steel foil by DC magnetron sputtering is proposed as an alternative electrode for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in synthetic biological samples by square-wave voltammetry. The obtained results are compared with those attained using a BDD electrode. For both electrodes, a same anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L(-1) KOH was necessary to attain an adequate and equivalent separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks of about 330 mV. The detection limits obtained for the simultaneous determination of these analytes using the a-CNx electrode were 0.0656 μmol L(-1) for DA and 1.05 μmol L(-1) for AA, whereas with the BDD electrode these values were 0.283 μmol L(-1) and 0.968 μmol L(-1), respectively. Furthermore, the results obtained in the analysis of the analytes in synthetic biological samples were satisfactory, attesting the potential application of the a-CNx electrode in electroanalysis.

  16. Methane Flow Rate Effects On The Optical Properties of Amorphous Silicon Carbon (a-SiC:H Films Deposited By DC Sputtering Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosari Saleh

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the refractive index (n and the optical absorption coeffi cient (α from refl ection and transmission measurements on hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon (a-SiC:H fi lms. The a-SiC:H fi lms were prepared by dc sputtering method using silicon target in argon and methane gas mixtures. The refractive index (n decreases as the methane fl ow rate increase. The optical absorption coeffi cient (α shifts to higher energy with increasing methane fl ow rate. At higher methane fl ow rate, the fi lms tend to be more disorder and have wider optical gap. The relation of the optical properties and the disorder amorphous network with the compositional properties will be discussed.

  17. Amorphous carbon nitride as an alternative electrode material in electroanalysis: Simultaneous determination of dopamine and ascorbic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medeiros, Roberta A., E-mail: roantigo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Matos, Roberto [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil); Benchikh, Abdelkader [LECVE, Faculté de la Technologie, Département de Génie des Procédés, Université Abderrahmane MIRA, Béjaïa (Algeria); LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Saidani, Boualem [LECVE, Faculté de la Technologie, Département de Génie des Procédés, Université Abderrahmane MIRA, Béjaïa (Algeria); Debiemme-Chouvy, Catherine [LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Deslouis, Claude, E-mail: claude.deslouis@upmc.fr [LISE UPR 15 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 4, Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Rocha-Filho, Romeu C.; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de São Carlos, C.P. 676, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-03

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •a-CN{sub x} films are a new class of electrodic carbon materials that present several properties similar to those of BDD films. •a-CN{sub x} and BDD were used as working electrodes for simultaneous determination of DA and AA. •Electrochemical pretreatments on a-CN{sub x} or BDD modified the nature of the surface terminations. •An anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L{sup −1} KOH was necessary to attain an adequate separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks. •For the first time in the literature, the use of an a-CN{sub x} electrode in a complete electroanalytical procedure is reported. -- Abstract: Boron-doped diamond (BDD) films are excellent electrode materials, whose electrochemical activity for some analytes can be tuned by controlling their surface termination, most commonly either to predominantly hydrogen or oxygen. This tuning can be accomplished by e.g. suitable cathodic or anodic electrochemical pretreatments. Recently, it has been shown that amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) films may present electrochemical characteristics similar to those of BDD, including the influence of surface termination on their electrochemical activity toward some analytes. In this work, we report for the first time a complete electroanalytical method using an a-CN{sub x} electrode. Thus, an a-CN{sub x} film deposited on a stainless steel foil by DC magnetron sputtering is proposed as an alternative electrode for the simultaneous determination of dopamine (DA) and ascorbic acid (AA) in synthetic biological samples by square-wave voltammetry. The obtained results are compared with those attained using a BDD electrode. For both electrodes, a same anodic pretreatment in 0.1 mol L{sup −1} KOH was necessary to attain an adequate and equivalent separation of the DA and AA oxidation potential peaks of about 330 mV. The detection limits obtained for the simultaneous determination of these analytes using the a-CN{sub x

  18. Deposit of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon using the laser ablation technique; Deposito de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado utilizando la tecnica de ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo, P.B.; Escobar A, L.; Camps C, E. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, C.P. 52045 Salazar, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Haro P, E.; Camacho L, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana Iztapalapa (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [Instituto de Investigacion en Materiales, UNAM (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    It is reported the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) nitrided, deposited by laser ablation in a nitrogen atmosphere at pressures which are from 4.5 x 10 {sup -4} Torr until 7.5 x 10 {sup -2} Torr. The structural properties of the films are studied by Raman spectroscopy obtaining similar spectra at the reported for carbon films type diamond. The study of behavior of the energy gap and the ratio nitrogen/carbon (N/C) in the films, shows that the energy gap is reduced when the nitrogen incorporation is increased. It is showed that the refraction index of the thin films diminish as nitrogen pressure is increased, indicating the formation of graphitic material. (Author)

  19. Heavy-ion induced desorption yields of amorphous carbon films bombarded with 4.2 MeV/u lead ions

    CERN Document Server

    Mahner, E; Küchler, D; Scrivens, R; Costa Pinto, P; Yin Vallgren, C; Bender, M

    2011-01-01

    During the past decade, intense experimental studies on the heavy-ion induced molecular desorption were performed in several particle accelerator laboratories worldwide in order to understand and overcome large dynamic pressure rises caused by lost beam ions. Different target materials and various coatings were studied for desorption and mitigation techniques were applied to heavy-ion accelerators. For the upgrade of the CERN injector complex, a coating of the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) vacuum system with a thin film of amorphous carbon is under study to mitigate the electron cloud effect observed during SPS operation with the nominal proton beam for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Since the SPS is also part of the heavy-ion injector chain for LHC, dynamic vacuum studies of amorphous carbon films are important to determine their ion induced desorption yields. At the CERN Heavy Ion Accelerator (LINAC 3), carbon-coated accelerator-type stainless steel vacuum chambers were tested for desorption using 4.2 Me...

  20. Understanding API-polymer proximities in amorphous stabilized composite drug products using fluorine-carbon 2D HETCOR solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Anuji; Crull, George

    2014-10-06

    A simple and robust method for obtaining fluorine-carbon proximities was established using a (19)F-(13)C heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) two-dimensional (2D) solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) experiment under magic-angle spinning (MAS). The method was applied to study a crystalline active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), avagacestat, containing two types of fluorine atoms and its API-polymer composite drug product. These results provide insight into the molecular structure, aid with assigning the carbon resonances, and probe API-polymer proximities in amorphous spray dried dispersions (SDD). This method has an advantage over the commonly used (1)H-(13)C HETCOR because of the large chemical shift dispersion in the fluorine dimension. In the present study, fluorine-carbon distances up to 8 Å were probed, giving insight into the API structure, crystal packing, and assignments. Most importantly, the study demonstrates a method for probing an intimate molecular level contact between an amorphous API and a polymer in an SDD, giving insights into molecular association and understanding of the role of the polymer in API stability (such as recrystallization, degradation, etc.) in such novel composite drug products.

  1. Physical properties of ultrafast deposited micro- and nanothickness amorphous hydrogenated carbon films for medical devices and prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharia, T; Sullivan, I L; Saied, S O; Bosch, R C; Bijker, M D

    2007-02-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous carbon films with diamond-like structures have been formed on different substrates at very low energies and temperatures by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process employing acetylene as the precursor gas. The plasma source was of a cascaded arc type with argon as the carrier gas. The films grown at very high deposition rates were found to have a practical thickness limit of approximately 1.5 microm, above which delamination from the substrate occurred. Deposition on silicon (100), glass, and plastic substrates has been studied and the films characterized in terms of sp3 content, roughness, hardness, adhesion, and optical properties. Deposition rates of up to 20 nm/s have been achieved at substrate temperatures below 100 degrees C. A typical sp3 content of 60-75 per cent in the films was determined by X-ray-generated Auger electron spectroscopy (XAES). The hardness, reduced modulus, and adhesion of the films were measured using a MicroMaterials NanoTest indenter/scratch tester. Hardness was found to vary from 4 to 13 GPa depending on the admixed acetylene flow and substrate temperature. The adhesion of the film to the substrate was significantly influenced by the substrate temperature and whether an in situ d.c. cleaning was employed prior to the deposition process. The hydrogen content in the film was measured by a combination of the Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) techniques. From the results it is concluded that the films formed by the process described here are ideal for the coating of long-term implantable medical devices, such as prostheses, stents, invasive probes, catheters, biosensors, etc. The properties reported in this publication are comparable with good-quality films deposited by other PECVD methods. The advantages of these films are the low ion energy and temperature of deposition, ensuring that no damage is done to sensitive substrates, very high

  2. Derivation of dielectric function and inelastic mean free path from photoelectron energy-loss spectra of amorphous carbon surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Denis; Godet, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Photoelectron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS) is a highly valuable non destructive tool in applied surface science because it gives access to both chemical composition and electronic properties of surfaces, including the near-surface dielectric function. An algorithm is proposed for real materials to make full use of experimental X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). To illustrate the capabilities and limitations of this algorithm, the near-surface dielectric function ε(ℏω) of a wide range of amorphous carbon (a-C) thin films is derived from energy losses measured in XPS, using a dielectric response theory which relates ε(ℏω) and the bulk plasmon (BP) loss distribution. Self-consistent separation of bulk vs surface plasmon excitations, deconvolution of multiple BP losses and evaluation of Bethe-Born sensitivity factors for bulk and surface loss distributions are crucial to obtain several material parameters: (1) energy loss function for BP excitation, (2) dielectric function of the near-surface material (3-5 nm depth sensitivity), (3) inelastic mean free path, λP (E0), for plasmon excitation, (4) surface excitation parameter, (5) effective number NEFF of valence electrons participating in the plasma oscillation. This photoelectron energy loss spectra analysis has been applied to a-C and a-C:H films grown by physical and chemical methods with a wide range of (sp3/sp2 + sp3) hybridization, optical gap and average plasmon energy values. Different methods are assessed to accurately remove the photoemission peak tail at low loss energy (0-10 eV) due to many-body interactions during the photo-ionization process. The σ + π plasmon excitation represents the main energy-loss channel in a-C; as the C atom density decreases, λP (970 eV) increases from 1.22 nm to 1.6 nm, assuming a cutoff plasmon wavenumber given by a free electron model. The π-π* and σ-σ* transitions observed in the retrieved dielectric function are discussed as a function of the average (sp3/sp

  3. Amorphous nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Scharf, Toralf

    2013-01-01

    This book represents the first comprehensive overview over amorphous nano-optical and nano-photonic systems. Nanophotonics is a burgeoning branch of optics that enables many applications by steering the mould of light on length scales smaller than the wavelength with devoted nanostructures. Amorphous nanophotonics exploits self-organization mechanisms based on bottom-up approaches to fabricate nanooptical systems. The resulting structures presented in the book are characterized by a deterministic unit cell with tailored geometries; but their spatial arrangement is not controlled. Instead of periodic, the structures appear either amorphous or random. The aim of this book is to discuss all aspects related to observable effects in amorphous nanophotonic material and aspects related to their design, fabrication, characterization and integration into applications. The book has an interdisciplinary nature with contributions from scientists in physics, chemistry and materials sciences and sheds light on the topic fr...

  4. Synthesis and characterization of thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon deposited by laser ablation; Sintesis y caracterizacion de peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo nitrurado, depositadas por ablacion laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P, B

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this work is the synthesis and characterization of thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) and thin films of nitrided amorphous carbon (a-C-N) using the laser ablation technique for their deposit. For this purpose, the physical properties of the obtained films were studied as function of diverse parameters of deposit such as: nitrogen pressure, power density, substrate temperature and substrate-target distance. For the characterization of the properties of the deposited thin films the following techniques were used: a) Raman spectroscopy which has demonstrated being a sensitive technique to the sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} bonds content, b) Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy which allows to know semi-quantitatively way the presence of the elements which make up the deposited films, c) Spectrophotometry, for obtaining the absorption spectra and subsequently the optical energy gap of the deposited material, d) Ellipsometry for determining the refraction index, e) Scanning Electron Microscopy for studying the surface morphology of thin films and, f) Profilemetry, which allows the determination the thickness of the deposited thin films. (Author)

  5. Study of barrier properties and chemical resistance of recycled PET coated with amorphous carbon through a plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, S A; Zanin, M; Nerin, C; De Moraes, M A B

    2006-01-01

    Many studies have been carried out in order to make bottle-to-bottle recycling feasible. The problem is that residual contaminants in recycled plastic intended for food packaging could be a risk to public health. One option is to use a layer of virgin material, named functional barrier, which prevents the contaminants migration process. This paper shows the feasibility of using polyethylene terephthalate (PET) recycled for food packaging employing a functional barrier made from hydrogen amorphous carbon film deposited by Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapour Deposition (PECVD) process. PET samples were deliberately contaminated with a series of surrogates using a FDA protocol. After that, PET samples were coated with approximately 600 and 1200 Angstrons thickness of amorphous carbon film. Then, the migration tests using as food simulants: water, 10% ethanol, 3% acetic acid, and isooctane were applied to the sample in order to check the chemical resistance of the new coated material. After the tests, the liquid extracts were analysed using a solid-phase microextraction device (SPME) coupled to GC-MS.

  6. Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Films Prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Ohmagari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic bonding configuration of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H films prepared by pulsed laser ablation of graphite in a hydrogen atmosphere was examined by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. The measured spectra were decomposed with simple component spectra, and they were analyzed in detail. As compared to the a-C:H films deposited at room substrate-temperature, the UNCD/a-C:H and nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C films deposited at a substrate-temperature of 550∘C exhibited enhanced ∗ and ∗C≡C peaks. At the elevated substrate-temperature, the ∗ and ∗C≡C bonds formation is enhanced while the ∗C–H and ∗C–C bonds formation is suppressed. The UNCD/a-C:H film showed a larger ∗C–C peak than the a-C film deposited at the same elevated substrate-temperature in vacuum. We believe that the intense ∗C–C peak is evidently responsible for UNCD crystallites existence in the film.

  7. Study of Synchrotron Radiation Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine-Structure of Amorphous Hydrogenated Carbon Films at Various Thicknesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarayut Tunmee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The compositions and bonding states of the amorphous hydrogenated carbon films at various thicknesses were evaluated via near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS and elastic recoil detection analysis combined with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The absolute carbon sp2 contents were determined to decrease to 65% from 73%, while the hydrogen contents increase from 26 to 33 at.% as the film thickness increases. In addition, as the film thickness increases, the π⁎ (C=C, σ⁎ (C–H, σ⁎ (C=C, and σ⁎ (C≡C bonding states were found to increase, whereas the π⁎ (C≡C and σ⁎ (C–C bonding states were observed to decrease in the NEXAFS spectra. Consequently, the film thickness is a key factor to evaluate the composition and bonding state of the films.

  8. A potentially new type of nonchondritic interplanetary dust particle with hematite, organic carbon, amorphous Na,Ca-aluminosilicate, and FeO-spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Caro, Guillermo M.; Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Souza-Egipsy, Virginia; Valles-González, Maria Pilar

    2012-02-01

    We used a combination of different analytical techniques to study particle W7190-D12 using microinfrared spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The particle consists mainly of hematite (α-Fe2O3) with considerable variations in structural disorder. It further contains amorphous (Na,K)-bearing Ca,Al-silicate and organic carbon. Iron-bearing spherules (cloud. Atmospheric entry flash-heating caused (1) the formation of microenvironments of reduced iron oxide when indigenous carbon materials reacted with hematite covering its surface resulting in the formation of FeO-spheres and (2) Na-loss from Na,Al-plagioclase. The particle of this study, and other similar particles on this collector, may represent a potentially new type of nonchondritic IDPs associated with Jupiter family comets, although an origin in the asteroid belt cannot be ignored.

  9. Time-Resolved Spectroscopic Observation of Deposition Processes of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond/Amorphous Carbon Composite Films by Using a Coaxial Arc Plasma Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Kenji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Nagayama, Kunihito

    2010-08-01

    The deposition of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/amorphous carbon composite films using a coaxial arc plasma gun in vacuum and, for comparison, in a 53.3 Pa hydrogen atmosphere was spectroscopically observed using a high-speed camera equipped with narrow-band-pass filters. UNCD crystallites with diameters of approximately 1.6 nm were formed even in vacuum. These extremely small crystallites imply that the formation is predominantly due to nucleation without the subsequent growth. Even in vacuum, emissions from C+ ions, C atoms, and C2 dimers lasted for approximately 100 µs, although the emission lifetimes of these species are generally 10 ns. We consider that the nucleation is due to the supersaturated environment containing excited carbon species with large number densities.

  10. sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio in amorphous carbon from C 1s core-level shifts: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerle, Rainer; Riedo, Elisa; Pasquarello, Alfredo; Baldereschi, Alfonso

    2002-01-01

    Using a combined experimental and theoretical approach, we address C 1s core-level shifts in amorphous carbon. Experimental results are obtained by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) on thin-film samples of different atomic density, obtained by a pulsed-laser deposition growth process. The XPS spectra are deconvoluted into two contributions, which are attributed to sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms, respectively, separated by 0.9 eV, independent of atomic density. The sp3 hybridization content extracted from XPS is consistent with the atomic density derived from the plasmon energy in the EELS spectrum. In our theoretical study, we generate several periodic model structures of amorphous carbon of different densities applying two schemes of increasing accuracy in sequence. We first use a molecular-dynamics approach, based on an environmental-dependent tight-binding Hamiltonian to quench the systems from the liquid phase. The final model structures are then obtained by further atomic relaxation using a first-principles pseudopotential plane-wave approach within density-functional theory. Within the latter framework, we also calculate carbon 1s core-level shifts for our disordered model structures. We find that the shifts associated to threefold- and fourfold- coordinated carbon atoms give rise to two distinct peaks separated by about 1.0 eV, independent of density, in close agreement with experimental observations. This provides strong support for decomposing the XPS spectra into two peaks resulting from sp2- and sp3-hybridized atoms. Core-hole relaxations effects account for about 30% of the calculated shifts.

  11. Edge effect enhanced electron field emission in top assembled reduced graphene oxide assisted by amorphous CNT-coated carbon cloth substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajarshi Roy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work a hybrid structure assembly of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs -reduced graphene oxide (RGO has been fabricated on carbon cloth/PET substrates for enhanced edge effect assisted flexible field emission device application. The carbon nanostructures prepared by chemical processes were finally deposited one over the other by a simple electrophoretic deposition (EPD method on carbon cloth (CC fabric. The thin films were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. Field assisted electron emission measurement was performed on this hybrid structure. It was observed that the hybrid carbon nanostructure showed exceptional field emission properties with outstanding low turn-on and threshold field (Eto∼ 0.26 Vμm−1, Eth ∼ 0.55 Vμm1. These observed results are far better compared to standalone and plasma etched edge enhanced RGO systems due to the bottom layer a-CNTs bed which assisted in significant enhancement of edge effect in RGO sheets.

  12. The effect of deposition energy of energetic atoms on the growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films studied by molecular dynamics simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, N

    2014-05-16

    The growth and structure of ultrathin amorphous carbon films was investigated by molecular dynamics simulations. The second-generation reactive-empirical-bond-order potential was used to model atomic interactions. Films with different structures were simulated by varying the deposition energy of carbon atoms in the range of 1-120 eV. Intrinsic film characteristics (e.g. density and internal stress) were determined after the system reached equilibrium. Short- and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering is examined in the context of atomic hybridization and ring connectivity simulation results. It is shown that relatively high deposition energy (i.e., 80 eV) yields a multilayer film structure consisting of an intermixing layer, bulk film and surface layer, consistent with the classical subplantation model. The highest film density (3.3 g cm-3), sp3 fraction (∼43%), and intermediate-range carbon atom ordering correspond to a deposition energy of ∼80 eV, which is in good agreement with experimental findings. © 2014 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. In situ X-ray Diffraction Study of Graphitic Carbon Formed During Heating and Cooling of Amorphous-C/Ni bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenger, K.; Tsang, J; Bol, A; Chu, J; Grill, A; Lavoie, C

    2010-01-01

    We examine graphitization of amorphous carbon (a-C) in a-C/Ni bilayer samples having the structure Si/SiO{sub 2}/a-C(3-30 nm)/Ni(100 nm). In situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements during heating in He at 3 C/s to 1000 C showed graphitic C formation beginning at temperatures T of 640-730 C, suggesting graphitization by direct metal-induced crystallization, rather than by a dissolution/precipitation mechanism in which C is dissolved during heating and expelled from solution upon cooling. We also find that graphitic C, once formed, can be reversibly dissolved by heating to T > 950 C, and that nongraphitic C can be volatilized by annealing in H{sub 2}-containing ambients.

  14. Chemical bonding structural analysis of nitrogen-doped ultrananocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gima, Hiroki; Zkria, Abdelrahman; Katamune, Yūki; Ohtani, Ryota; Koizumi, Satoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped ultra-nanocrystalline diamond/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared in hydrogen and nitrogen mixed-gas atmospheres by coaxial arc plasma deposition with graphite targets were studied electrically and chemical-bonding-structurally. The electrical conductivity was increased by nitrogen doping, accompanied by the production of n-type conduction. From X-ray photoemission, near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure, hydrogen forward-scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectral results, it is expected that hydrogen atoms that terminate diamond grain boundaries will be partially replaced by nitrogen atoms and, consequently, π C–N and C=N bonds that easily generate free electrons will be formed at grain boundaries.

  15. Identification and comparison of amorphous calcium carbonate-binding protein and acetylcholine-binding protein in the abalone, Haliotis discus hannai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Wang, Hongzhong; Cui, Yu; Zhang, Guiyou; Zheng, Guilan; Liu, Shiting; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2009-01-01

    Nacre has two different microarchitectures: columnar nacre and sheet nacre. We previously identified an important regulator of the morphology of sheet nacre tablets, which was named amorphous calcium carbonate-binding protein (pf-ACCBP). However, little is known about its counterpart in columnar nacre. Moreover, pf-ACCBP shares significant sequence similarity with a group of acetylcholine-binding proteins (AChBP) that participate in neuronal synapses transmission, but the relationships between the two proteins, which are homologous in sequences but disparate in function, have not been studied yet. Here, we identified an amorphous calcium carbonate-binding protein and an acetylcholine-binding protein in the abalone, Haliotis discus hannai, named hdh-ACCBP and hdh-AChBP, respectively. Studies of hdh-ACCBP indicated that it was a counterpart of pf-ACCBP in gastropods that might function similarly in columnar nacre formation and supersaturated extrapallial fluid. Analysis of hdh-AChBP showed that unlike previously identified AChBP, hdh-AChBP was not only expressed in the nervous system but could also be detected in non-nervous system cells, such as the goblet cells of the mantle pallial. Additionally, its expression patterns during embryo and larval development did not accord with ganglion development. These phenomena indicated that AChBP might play more general roles than just in neuronal synapses transmission. Comparison of hdh-ACCBP and hdh-AChBP revealed that they were quite different in their post-translational modification and oligomerization and that they were controlled under different transcriptional regulation systems, consequently obtaining disparate expression profiles. Our results also implied that ACCBP and AChBP might come from a common ancestor through gene duplication and divergence.

  16. PHOTO- AND ELECTRO-LUMINESCENCE FROM HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS SILICON CARBIDE FILMS PREPARED BY USING ORGANIC CARBON SOURCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jun; Ma Tian-fu; Li Wei; Chen Kun-ji; Li Zhi-feng; Lu Wei

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films were grown byusing an organic source, xylene (C8H{10), instead of methane(CH4) in a conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapor depositionsystem. The optical band gap of these samples was increased gradually bychanging the gas ratio of C8H10 to SiH4. The film with highoptical band gap was soft and polymer-like and intense photoluminescencewere obtained. Room temperature electro-luminescence was also achievedwith peak energy at 2.05 eV (600 nm) for the a-SiC:H film withoptical band gap of 3.2 eV.1.8mm

  17. Preparation of hardened body in calcium carbonate-aspartic acid-chitosan system by using amorphous calcium carbonate; Hishoshitsu tansan calcium wo genryo to suru tansan calcium-asuparaginsan-kitosankei kokatai no sakusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasue, T.; Aigami, H.; Arai, Y. [Nihon University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering

    1998-11-01

    Notice was given on chitosan to discuss fabrication of hardened body in calcium carbonate-aspartic acid-chitosan system. First, aspartic acid (Asp) was adsorbed into surface of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). Then, discussions were given on effects of water-solid mass ratio and chitosan amount on compressive strength of the hardened body in the calcium carbonate-chitosan system made by using a flow-in molding process. As a result, approximately the same compressive strength as that of calcium carbonate (calcite type) was obtained when anhydrous ACC as a product of ACC heated at 250 deg C is used as the raw material. Thus, the hardened body in calcium carbonate-aspartic acid-chitosan system was fabricated by using the Asp adsorbed anhydrous ACC as the starting material. The compressive strength decreased with increasing Asp adsorption amount. Therefore, a hardened body was fabricated by using compression molding at 10 MPa, rather than using the flow-in molding process. It was revealed from the results of infrared absorption spectroscopy that the compression molding strengthens the compounding of Asp chemically adsorbed on the ACC surface with chtosan, and improves the compression strength. 23 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Biomimetic mineralization of CaCO3 on a phospholipid monolayer: from an amorphous calcium carbonate precursor to calcite via vaterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Junwu; Wang, Zhining; Tang, Yecang; Yang, Shihe

    2010-04-06

    A phospholipid monolayer, approximately half the bilayer structure of a biological membrane, can be regarded as an ideal model for investigating biomineralization on biological membranes. In this work on the biomimetic mineralization of CaCO(3) under a phospholipid monolayer, we show the initial heterogeneous nucleation of amorphous calcium carbonate precursor (ACC) nanoparticles at the air-water interface, their subsequent transformation into the metastable vaterite phase instead of the most thermodynamically stable calcite phase, and the ultimate phase transformation to calcite. Furthermore, the spontaneity of the transformation from vaterite to calcite was found to be closely related to the surface tension; high surface pressure could inhibit the process, highlighting the determinant of surface energy. To understand better the mechanisms for ACC formation and the transformation from ACC to vaterite and to calcite, in situ Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), ex situ scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed. This work has clarified the crystallization process of calcium carbonate under phospholipid monolayers and therefore may further our understanding of the biomineralization processes induced by cellular membranes.

  19. Large-scale and patternable graphene: direct transformation of amorphous carbon film into graphene/graphite on insulators via Cu mediation engineering and its application to all-carbon based devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ze; Medina, Henry; Lin, Hung-Chiao; Tsai, Hung-Wei; Su, Teng-Yu; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2015-02-07

    Chemical vapour deposition of graphene was the preferred way to synthesize graphene for multiple applications. However, several problems related to transfer processes, such as wrinkles, cleanness and scratches, have limited its application at the industrial scale. Intense research was triggered into developing alternative synthesis methods to directly deposit graphene on insulators at low cost with high uniformity and large area. In this work, we demonstrate a new concept to directly achieve growth of graphene on non-metal substrates. By exposing an amorphous carbon (a-C) film in Cu gaseous molecules after annealing at 850 °C, the carbon (a-C) film surprisingly undergoes a noticeable transformation to crystalline graphene. Furthermore, the thickness of graphene could be controlled, depending on the thickness of the pre-deposited a-C film. The transformation mechanism was investigated and explained in detail. This approach enables development of a one-step process to fabricate electrical devices made of all carbon material, highlighting the uniqueness of the novel approach for developing graphene electronic devices. Interestingly, the carbon electrodes made directly on the graphene layer by our approach offer a good ohmic contact compared with the Schottky barriers usually observed on graphene devices using metals as electrodes.

  20. Structural characteristics of copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by microwave plasma-assisted deposition processes from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiery, F.; Pauleau, Y.; Grob, J.J.; Babonneau, D

    2004-11-01

    Copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu/a-C:H) composite films have been deposited on silicon substrates by a hybrid technique combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and sputter-deposition from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures. The major objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the carbon gas precursor on the structural characteristics of Cu/a-C:H composite films deposited at ambient temperature. The major characteristics of CH{sub 4}-argon and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-argon plasmas were analyzed by Langmuir probe measurements. The composition of films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, energy recoil detection analyses and nuclear reaction analyses. The carbon content in the films was observed to vary in the range 20-77 at.% and 7.5-99 at.% as the CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} concentrations in the gas phase increased from 10 to 100%, respectively. The atom number ratio H/C in the films was scattered approximately 0.4 whatever the carbon gas precursor used. The crystallographic structure and the size of copper crystallites incorporated in the a-C were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The copper crystallite size decreased from 20 nm in pure copper films to less than 5 nm in Cu/a-C:H films containing more than 40 at.% of carbon. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate the size distribution and distance of copper crystallites as functions of the deposition parameters. The structural characteristics of copper crystallites were dependent on the hydrocarbon gas precursor used. The crystallite size and the width of the size distribution were homogeneous in films deposited from CH{sub 4}. Copper crystallites with an anisotropic shape were found in films deposited from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The major radicals formed in the plasma and condensed on the surface of growing films, namely CH and C{sub 2}H radicals for films produced from CH{sub 4} and C

  1. Upgrading the rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis for the production of amorphous silica and high quality activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Jon; Lopez, Gartzen; Amutio, Maider; Bilbao, Javier; Olazar, Martin

    2014-10-01

    The overall valorization of rice husk char obtained by flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor (CSBR) has been studied in a two-step process. Thus, silica has been recovered in a first step and the remaining carbon material has been subjected to steam activation. The char samples used in this study have been obtained by continuous flash pyrolysis in a conical spouted bed reactor at 500°C. Extraction with Na2CO3 allows recovering 88% of the silica contained in the rice husk char. Activation of the silica-free rice husk char has been carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 800°C using steam as activating agent. The porous structure of the activated carbons produced includes a combination of micropores and mesopores, with a BET surface area of up to 1365m(2)g(-1) at the end of 15min.

  2. Tritiated amorphous silicon for micropower applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kherani, N.P. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]|[Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kosteski, T.; Zukotynski, S. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Shmayda, W.T. [Ontario Hydro Technologies, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    The application of tritiated amorphous silicon as an intrinsic energy conversion semiconductor for radioluminescent structures and betavoltaic devices is presented. Theoretical analysis of the betavoltaic application shows an overall efficiency of 18% for tritiated amorphous silicon. This is equivalent to a 330 Ci intrinsic betavoltaic device producing 1 mW of power for 12 years. Photoluminescence studies of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, a-Si:H, show emission in the infra-red with a maximum quantum efficiency of 7.2% at 50 K; this value drops by 3 orders of magnitude at a temperature of 300 K. Similar studies of hydrogenated amorphous carbon show emission in the visible with an estimated quantum efficiency of 1% at 300 K. These results suggest that tritiated amorphous carbon may be the more promising candidate for room temperature radioluminescence in the visible. 18 refs., 5 figs.

  3. Damage-free back channel wet-etch process in amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors using a carbon-nanofilm barrier layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongxiang; Zhao, Mingjie; Xu, Miao; Li, Min; Chen, Zikai; Wang, Lang; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2014-07-23

    Amorphous indium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (IZO-TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were investigated. A carbon (C) nanofilm was inserted into the interface between IZO layer and source/drain (S/D) electrodes as a barrier layer. Transmittance electron microscope images revealed that the 3 nm-thick C nanofilm exhibited a good corrosion resistance to a commonly used H3PO4-based etchant and could be easily eliminated. The TFT device with a 3 nm-thick C barrier layer showed a saturated field effect mobility of 14.4 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing of 0.21 V/decade, an on-to-off current ratio of 8.3 × 10(10), and a threshold voltage of 2.0 V. The favorable electrical performance of this kind of IZO-TFTs was due to the protection of the inserted C to IZO layer in the back-channel-etch process. Moreover, the low contact resistance of the devices was proved to be due to the graphitization of the C nanofilms after annealing. In addition, the hysteresis and thermal stress testing confirmed that the usage of C barrier nanofilms is an effective method to fabricate the damage-free BCE-type devices with high reliability.

  4. Corrosion resistant amorphous metals and methods of forming corrosion resistant amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Yang, Nancy; Lavernia, Enrique J.; Blue, Craig A.; Graeve, Olivia A.; Bayles, Robert; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Schoenung, Julie; Ajdelsztajn, Leo

    2014-07-15

    A system for coating a surface comprises providing a source of amorphous metal, providing ceramic particles, and applying the amorphous metal and the ceramic particles to the surface by a spray. The coating comprises a composite material made of amorphous metal that contains one or more of the following elements in the specified range of composition: yttrium (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), chromium (14 to 18 atomic %), molybdenum (.gtoreq.7 atomic %), tungsten (.gtoreq.1 atomic %), boron (.ltoreq.5 atomic %), or carbon (.gtoreq.4 atomic %).

  5. Sn/石墨/无定形碳材料的合成及性能研究%Research of Sn/graphite/amorphous carbon composite for lithium-ion batteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖彩英; 刘红光; 叶学海; 张晓波; 夏继平

    2012-01-01

    采用水热法引入无定形碳,并通过碳热还原合成了Sn/石墨/无定形碳样品.通过X射线衍射法(XRD)和扫描电子显微镜法(SEM)以及充放电测试等方法对形貌、结构和电化学性能进行表征,研究结果表明:无定形碳材料的引入对改善Sn材科的循环性能效果显著,所制备的复合材料样品具有以Sn为中心、无定形碳包围、石墨填充的类核壳的结构,首次可逆比容量为533.2 mAh/g,50次循环之后仍然保持有81.4%的容量.%The modffied Sn/graphite/amorphous carbon compound materials were obtained by hydrothermal process.The SEM,XRO and electrochemical test results indicate that the Sn/graphite/amorphous carbon sample has a kind of nuclear sheH structure in which Sn is the center,amorphous carbon surrounding and the graphite filling.The compound materials have good cycle life,and after 50 cycles,the capacity retention is 81.1%.

  6. Transient liquid phase bonding of carbon steel tubes using a Cu interlayer: Characterization and comparison with amorphous Fe–B–Si interlayer bonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Luozzo, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolasdiluozzo@gmail.com [Laboratorio de Sólidos Amorfos, INTECIN, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires – CONICET, Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina); Laboratoire des Matériaux et du Génie Physique (CNRS UMR 5628), Grenoble Institute of Technology, MINATEC, Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Boudard, Michel; Doisneau, Béatrice [Laboratoire des Matériaux et du Génie Physique (CNRS UMR 5628), Grenoble Institute of Technology, MINATEC, Grenoble Cedex 1 (France); Fontana, Marcelo; Arcondo, Bibiana [Laboratorio de Sólidos Amorfos, INTECIN, Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad de Buenos Aires – CONICET, Paseo Colón 850, C1063ACV Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Cu and Fe–B–Si foils were used as interlayers to bond steel tubes by TLPB process. • The microstructure and mechanical properties were characterized. • In Cu bonded samples, the solidification process was not systematically completed. • When using Cu foils, evidences of epitaxial solidification were observed. • Tensile tests show that Cu and Fe–B–Si bonded samples failed away from the joint. - Abstract: In the present work the transient liquid phase bonding process was performed to join seamless carbon steel tubes using commercially pure Cu interlayers. The structural and mechanical characteristics of the resulting bonds are compared with those achieved using amorphous Fe–B–Si interlayers, under the same process parameters: a holding temperature of 1300 °C, a holding time of 7 min and an applied pressure of 5 MPa. The joined tubes microstructures were characterized by direct observations – scanning electron microscopy – and diffraction techniques – electron backscatter diffraction. Chemical analysis was performed using electron probe microanalysis. Whereas the amorphous Fe-B-Si interlayer leads to a completion of the bonding process over the whole bonding area, the bond performed using a Cu interlayer achieved the completion of the bonding process only partially. As the Cu is a cementite promoter, the amount of cementite coexisting with ferrite grains is higher in the joint region (JR) – corresponding to the higher concentration of Cu – as compared with the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the base metal (BM). An opposite effect is observed when using Fe-B-Si interlayers due to the fact that the cementite is unable to form in Si enriched zones – the microstructure at the JR presents only ferrite grains. Tensile tests show that the joined tubes using Cu or Fe–B–Si interlayers failed away from the bond, at the HAZ, attaining almost the same ultimate tensile strength of the BM, in the as-received condition. Hardness

  7. Dynamic optical properties of amorphous diamond-like carbon nanocomposite films doped with Cu and Ag nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas; Peckus, Domantas; Tamulevičiene, Asta; Vasiliauskas, Andrius; Čiegis, Arvydas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas

    2014-09-01

    The investigation of relaxation processes in noble metal nanoparticles upon ultrafast excitations by femtosecond laser pulses is useful to understand the origin and the enhancement mechanism of the nonlinear optical properties for metaldielectric nanocomposites. In the current work we analyze diamond like carbon (DLC) film based copper and silver nanocomposites with different metal content synthesized employing unbalanced magnetron sputtering of metal targets with argon ions in acetylene gas atmosphere. Surface morphology and nanoparticle sizes were analyzed employing scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. Optical properties of the nanocomposite films were analyzed employing UV-VIS-NIR spectrometry. Transient absorption measurements were obtained employing Yb:KGW femtosecond laser spectroscopic system (HARPIA, Light Conversion Ltd.). Energy relaxation dynamics in Cu nanoparticles showed some significant differences from Ag nanoparticles. The increase of excitation intensity hasn't show additional nonlinear effects for the excited state relaxation dynamics for both kinds of samples.

  8. The influence of methane/argon plasma composition on the formation of the hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Hung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Der, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Weng, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Jui-Fu; Chang, Chia-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chao-Hsien; Cho, Ting-Pin [Metal Industries Development and Research Centre, 1001 Kaonan Highway, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-03

    The quality of the a-C:H films was particularly correlated with the mixed ratio of methane/argon plasma. For a constant supply of energy and flowing rate, the optical emission from H{sub {alpha}} intensity linearly increased with the addition of methane in argon plasma, while that from intensities of radiation of diatmoic radicals (CH*and C{sub 2}*) exponentially decreased. For the a-C:H films, the added methane in argon plasma tended to raise the quantity of hydrogenated carbon or sp{sup 3} C-H structure, which exponentially decreased the nano-hardness and friction coefficient of the films. In contrast, the electric resistance of the films enlarged dramatically with the increase of the methane content in argon plasma. It is therefore advantageous to balance the mechanical properties and electrical resistance of the a-C:H film by adjusting plasma composition in the course of the film-growing process.

  9. Properties of Erbium Doped Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon Layers Fabricated by Sputtering and Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Prajzler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We report about properties of carbon layers doped with Er3+ ions fabricated by Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD and by sputtering on silicon or glass substrates. The structure of the samples was characterized by X-ray diffraction and their composition was determined by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The Absorbance spectrum was taken in the spectral range from 400 nm to 600 nm. Photoluminescence spectra were obtained using two types of Ar laser (λex=514.5 nm, lex=488 nm and also using a semiconductor laser (λex=980 nm. Samples fabricated by magnetron sputtering exhibited typical emission at 1530 nm when pumped at 514.5 nm. 

  10. Electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide on platinum-containing tetrahedral amorphous carbon sensors and evaluation of their biofouling properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tujunen, Noora; Kaivosoja, Emilia; Protopopova, Vera; Valle-Delgado, Juan José; Österberg, Monika; Koskinen, Jari; Laurila, Tomi

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is the product of various enzymatic reactions, and is thus typically utilized as the analyte in biosensors. However, its detection with conventional materials, such as noble metals or glassy carbon, is often hindered by slow kinetics and biofouling of the electrode. In this study electrochemical properties and suitability to peroxide detection as well as ability to resist biofouling of Pt-doped ta-C samples were evaluated. Pure ta-C and pure Pt were used as references. According to the results presented here it is proposed that combining ta-C with Pt results in good electrocatalytic activity towards H2O2 oxidation with better tolerance towards aqueous environment mimicking physiological conditions compared to pure Pt. In biofouling experiments, however, both the hybrid material and Pt were almost completely blocked after immersion in protein-containing solutions and did not produce any peaks for ferrocenemethanol oxidation or reduction. On the contrary, it was still possible to obtain clear peaks for H2O2 oxidation with them after similar treatment. Moreover, quartz crystal microbalance experiment showed less protein adsorption on the hybrid sample compared to Pt which is also supported by the electrochemical biofouling experiments for H2O2 detection.

  11. Tribological Performance of Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (a-C: H DLC Coating when Lubricated with Biodegradable Vegetal Canola Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. Mobarak

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing environmental awareness and demands for lowering energy consumptions are strong driving forces behind the development of the vehicles of tomorrow. Without the advances of lubricant chemistry and adequate lubricant formulation, expansion of modern engines would not have been possible. Considering environmental awareness factors as compared to mineral oils, vegetal oil based biolubricants are renewable, biodegradable, non-toxic and have a least amount of greenhouse gases. Furthermore, improvement in engine performance and transmission components, which were impossible to achieve by applying only lubricants design, is now possible through diamond like carbon (DLC coatings. DLC coatings exhibit brilliant tribological properties, such as good wear resistance and low friction. In this regard, tribological performance of a-C: H DLC coating when lubricated with Canola vegetal oil has been investigated by the help of a ball-on-flat geometry. Experimental results demonstrated that the a-C: H DLC coating exhibited better performance with Canola oil in terms of friction and wear as compared to the uncoated materials. Large amount of polar components in the Canola oil significantly improved the tribological properties of the a-C:H coating. Thus, usage of a-C: H DLC coating with Canola oil in the long run may have a positive impact on engine life.

  12. Low-temperature growth of low friction wear-resistant amorphous carbon nitride thin films by mid-frequency, high power impulse, and direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakoglidis, Konstantinos D., E-mail: konba@ifm.liu.se; Schmidt, Susann; Garbrecht, Magnus; Ivanov, Ivan G.; Jensen, Jens; Greczynski, Grzegorz; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-09-15

    The potential of different magnetron sputtering techniques for the synthesis of low friction and wear resistant amorphous carbon nitride (a-CN{sub x}) thin films onto temperature-sensitive AISI52100 bearing steel, but also Si(001) substrates was studied. Hence, a substrate temperature of 150 °C was chosen for the film synthesis. The a-CN{sub x} films were deposited using mid-frequency magnetron sputtering (MFMS) with an MF bias voltage, high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) with a synchronized HiPIMS bias voltage, and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) with a DC bias voltage. The films were deposited using a N{sub 2}/Ar flow ratio of 0.16 at the total pressure of 400 mPa. The negative bias voltage, V{sub s}, was varied from 20 to 120 V in each of the three deposition modes. The microstructure of the films was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction, while the film morphology was investigated by scanning electron microscopy. All films possessed an amorphous microstructure, while the film morphology changed with the bias voltage. Layers grown applying the lowest substrate bias of 20 V exhibited pronounced intercolumnar porosity, independent of the sputter technique. Voids closed and dense films are formed at V{sub s} ≥ 60 V, V{sub s} ≥ 100 V, and V{sub s} = 120 V for MFMS, DCMS, and HiPIMS, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the nitrogen-to-carbon ratio, N/C, of the films ranged between 0.2 and 0.24. Elastic recoil detection analysis showed that Ar content varied between 0 and 0.8 at. % and increased as a function of V{sub s} for all deposition techniques. All films exhibited compressive residual stress, σ, which depends on the growth method; HiPIMS produces the least stressed films with values ranging between −0.4 and −1.2 GPa for all V{sub s}, while CN{sub x} films deposited by MFMS showed residual stresses up to −4.2

  13. Influence of source and drain contacts on the properties of indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin-film transistors based on amorphous carbon nanofilm as barrier layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Dongxiang; Xu, Hua; Zhao, Mingjie; Li, Min; Xu, Miao; Zou, Jianhua; Tao, Hong; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2015-02-18

    Amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide thin film transistors (α-IGZO TFTs) with damage-free back channel wet-etch (BCE) process were achieved by introducing a carbon nanofilm as a barrier layer. We investigate the effects of different source-and-drain (S/D) materials on TFT performance. We find the TFT with Ti/C S/D electrodes exhibits a superior performance with higher output current, lower threshold voltage, and higher effective electron mobility compared to that of Mo/C S/D electrodes. Transmittance electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are employed to analysis the interfacial interaction between S/D metal/C/α-IGZO layers. The results indicate that the better performance of TFTs with Ti/C electrodes should be attributed to the formations of Ti-C and Ti-O at the Ti/C-contact regions, which lead to a lower contact resistance, whereas Mo film is relatively stable and does not react easily with C nanofilm, resulting in a nonohmic contact behavior between Mo/C and α-IGZO layer. However, both kinds of α-IGZO TFTs show good stability under thermal bias stress, indicating that the inserted C nanofilms could avoid the impact on the α-IGZO channel regions during S/D electrodes formation. Finally, we successfully fabricated a high-definition active-matrix organic lighting emitting diode prototype driven by α-IGZO TFTs with Ti/C electrodes in a pilot line.

  14. Characterization of amorphous hydrogenated carbon formed by low-pressure inductively coupled plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using multiple low-inductance antenna units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Osamu; Ishihara, Masatou; Koga, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Shuzo; Setsuhara, Yuichi; Sato, Naoyuki

    2005-03-24

    Three-dimensional plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) has been demonstrated using a new type high-density volumetric plasma source with multiple low-inductance antenna system. The plasma density in the volume of phi 200 mm x 100 mm is 5.1 x 10(10) cm(-3) within +/-5% in the lateral directions and 5.2 x 10(10)cm(-3) within +/-10% in the axial direction for argon plasma under the pressure of 0.1 Pa and the total power as low as 400 W. The uniformity of the thickness and refractive index is within +/-3.5% and +/-1%, respectively, for the a-C:H films deposited on the substrates placed on the six side walls, the top of the phi 60 mm x 80 mm hexagonal substrate holder in the pure toluene plasma under the pressure is as low as 0.04 Pa, and the total power is as low as 300 W. It is also found that precisely controlled ion bombardment by pulse biasing led to the explicit observation in Raman and IR spectra of the transition from polymer-like structure to diamond-like structure accompanied by dehydrogenation due to ion bombardment. Moreover, it is also concluded that the pulse biasing technique is effective for stress reduction without a significant degradation of hardness. The stress of 0.6 GPa and the hardness of 15 GPa have been obtained for 2.0 microm thick films deposited with the optimized deposition conditions. The films are durable for the tribology test with a high load of 20 N up to more than 20,000 cycles, showing the specific wear rate and the friction coefficient were 1.2 x 10(-7) mm3/Nm and 0.04, respectively.

  15. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  16. A comparison of mechanical properties of three MEMS materials - silicon carbide, ultrananocrystalline diamond, and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon (Ta-C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlisle, John A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Moldovan, N. (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL); Xiao, Xingcheng (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Zorman, C. A. (Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH); Mancini, D. C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Peng, B. (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL); Espinosa, H. D. (Northwestern University, Evanston, IL); Friedmann, Thomas Aquinas; Auciello, Orlando, (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

    2004-06-01

    Many MEMS devices are based on polysilicon because of the current availability of surface micromachining technology. However, polysilicon is not the best choice for devices where extensive sliding and/or thermal fields are applied due to its chemical, mechanical and tribological properties. In this work, we investigated the mechanical properties of three new materials for MEMS/NEMS devices: silicon carbide (SiC) from Case Western Reserve University (CWRU), ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) from Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and hydrogen-free tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Young's modulus, characteristic strength, fracture toughness, and theoretical strength were measured for these three materials using only one testing methodology - the Membrane Deflection Experiment (MDE) developed at Northwestern University. The measured values of Young's modulus were 430GPa, 960GPa, and 800GPa for SiC, UNCD, and ta-C, repectively. Fracture toughness measurments resulted in values of 3.2, 4.5, and 6.2 MPa x m{sup 1/2}, respectively. The strengths were found to follow a Weibull distribution but their scaling was found to be controlled by different specimen size parameters. Therefore, a cross comparison of the strengths is not fully meaningful. We instead propose to compare their theoretical strengths as determined by employing Novozhilov fracture criterion. The estimated theoretical strength for SiC is 10.6GPa at a characteristic length of 58nm, for UNCD is 18.6GPa at a characteristic length of 37nm, and for ta-C is 25.4GPa at a characteristic length of 38nm. The techniques used to obtained these results as well as microscopic fractographic analyses are summarized in the article. We also highlight the importance of characterizing mechanical properties of MEMS materials by means of only one simple and accurate experimental technique.

  17. Heteroatom-doped hydrogenated amorphous carbons, a-C:H:X 'Volatile' silicon, sulphur and nitrogen depletion, blue photoluminescence, diffuse interstellar bands and ferro-magnetic carbon grain connections (Research Note)

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, A P

    2014-01-01

    Context. Hydrogenated amorphous carbons, a-C:H, can incorporate a variety of heteroatoms, which can lead to interesting effects. Aims. To investigate the doping of interstellar a-C:H grains with, principally, Si, O, N and S atoms within the astrophysical context. Methods. A search of the literature on doped a-C:H reveals a number of interesting phenomena of relevance to astrophysics. Results. X dopants in a-C:H:X materials can affect the sp3/sp2 ratio (X = Si, O and N), lead to blue photoluminescence (undoped or X = N), induce ferromagnetic-like behaviour (X = N and S) or simply be incorporated (depleted) into the structure (X = Si, O, N and S). Si and N atoms could also incorporate into fullerenes, possibly forming colour-centres that could mimic diffuse interstellar bands. Conclusions. Doped a-C:H grains could explain several dust-related conundrums, such as: 'volatile' Si in photo-dissociation regions, S and N depletion in molecular clouds, blue luminescence, some diffuse interstellar bands and ferromagnet...

  18. Resilient Amorphous Networks Prepared by Photo-Crosslinking High-Molecular-Weight D,L-Lactide and Trimethylene Carbonate Macromers : Mechanical Properties and Shape-Memory Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, Shahriar; Grijpma, Dirk W.

    2012-01-01

    Tough networks are prepared by photo-crosslinking high-molecular-weight DLLA and TMC macromers. These amorphous networks exhibit tunable thermal and mechanical properties and have excellent shape-memory features. Variation of the monomer ratio allows adjustment of Tg between approximately -13 and +5

  19. Resilient Amorphous Networks Prepared by Photo-Crosslinking High-Molecular-Weight D,L-Lactide and Trimethylene Carbonate Macromers: Mechanical Properties and Shape-Memory Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharifi, S.; Grijpma, D.W.

    2012-01-01

    Tough networks are prepared by photo-crosslinking high-molecular-weight DLLA and TMC macromers. These amorphous networks exhibit tunable thermal and mechanical properties and have excellent shape-memory features. Variation of the monomer ratio allows adjustment of Tg between approximately −13 and +5

  20. [Amorphization in pharmaceutical technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Piroska; Laczkovich, Orsolya; Eros, István

    2004-01-01

    The amorphization of crystalline active ingredients may be necessary because of the polymorphism of the active substance, the poor water-solubility of the drug material, difficult processing in the crystalline form and the taking out of a patent for a new (amorphous) form. This article introduces protocols for amorphization, which use methods traditionally applied in pharmaceutical technology. The protocols involve three possible routes: solvent methods, hot-melt technologies and milling procedures. With this presentation, the authors suggest help for practising experts to find the correct amorphization method.

  1. Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) obtained through chemical vapor deposition assisted by plasma; Peliculas delgadas de carbono amorfo hidrogenado (a-C:H) obtenidas mediante deposito quimico de vapores asistido por plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia H, J.A.; Camps C, E.E.; Escobar A, L.; Romero H, S.; Chirino O, S. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Muhl S, S. [IIM-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    Films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) were deposited using one source of microwave plasma with magnetic field (type ECR), using mixtures of H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} in relationship of 80/20 and 95/05 as precursory gases, with work pressures of 4X10{sup -4} to 6x10{sup -4} Torr and an incident power of the discharge of microwaves with a constant value of 400 W. It was analyzed the influence among the properties of the films, as the deposit rate, the composition and the bonding types, and the deposit conditions, such as the flow rates of the precursory gases and the polarization voltage of the sample holders. (Author)

  2. Trehalose amorphization and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussich, Fabiana; Cesàro, Attilio

    2008-10-13

    The stability of the amorphous trehalose prepared by using several procedures is presented and discussed. Amorphization is shown to occur by melting (T(m)=215 degrees C) or milling (room temperature) the crystalline anhydrous form TRE-beta. Fast dehydration of the di-hydrate crystalline polymorph, TRE-h, also produces an amorphous phase. Other dehydration procedures of TRE-h, such as microwave treatment, supercritical extraction or gentle heating at low scan rates, give variable fractions of the polymorph TRE-alpha, that undergo amorphization upon melting (at lower temperature, T(m)=130 degrees C). Additional procedures for amorphization, such as freeze-drying, spray-drying or evaporation of trehalose solutions, are discussed. All these procedures are classified depending on the capability of the undercooled liquid phase to undergo cold crystallization upon heating the glassy state at temperatures above the glass transition temperature (T(g)=120 degrees C). The recrystallizable amorphous phase is invariably obtained by the melt of the polymorph TRE-alpha, while other procedures always give an amorphous phase that is unable to crystallize above T(g). The existence of two different categories is analyzed in terms of the transformation paths and the hypothesis that the systems may exhibit different molecular mobilities.

  3. Amorphous Solid Water:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Jack; Linderstrøm-Lang, C. U.; Rice, Stuart A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure factor of amorphous solid D2O deposited from the vapor at 10°K has been obtained by measuring the neutron diffraction spectrum in the wave vector transfer from 0.8 to 12.3 reciprocal angstroms. The results indicate that the phase investigated is amorphous and has a liquiid-like stru......The structure factor of amorphous solid D2O deposited from the vapor at 10°K has been obtained by measuring the neutron diffraction spectrum in the wave vector transfer from 0.8 to 12.3 reciprocal angstroms. The results indicate that the phase investigated is amorphous and has a liquiid...

  4. Amorphous pharmaceutical solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranić, Edina

    2004-07-01

    Amorphous forms are, by definition, non-crystalline materials which possess no long-range order. Their structure can be thought of as being similar to that of a frozen liquid with the thermal fluctuations present in a liquid frozen out, leaving only "static" structural disorder. The amorphous solids have always been an essential part of pharmaceutical research, but the current interest has been raised by two developments: a growing attention to pharmaceutical solids in general, especially polymorphs and solvates and a revived interest in the science of glasses and the glass transition. Amorphous substances may be formed both intentionally and unintentionally during normal pharmaceutical manufacturing operations. The properties of amorphous materials can be exploited to improve the performance of pharmaceutical dosage forms, but these properties can also give rise to unwanted effects that need to be understood and managed in order for the systems to perform as required.

  5. In vitro synthesis of amorphous Mg-, Ca-, Sr- and Ba-carbonates: What do we learn about intracellular calcification by cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, N.; Georgelin, T.; Jaber, M.; Lambert, J.-F.; Benzerara, K.

    2015-07-01

    Some cyanobacteria, including Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, which was isolated from Lake Alchichica (Mexico), can form intracellular carbonates. This contradicts the common paradigm that cyanobacterial calcification is always extracellular and suggests that calcification might be controlled by these cyanobacterial species. Intracellular carbonates have several peculiar characteristics: they are relatively small (between 60 and 500 nm), they are poorly crystalline, and they have Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios much higher than the solution in which the cells grow. It is therefore crucial to understand whether these unique features may indicate the involvement of specific biological processes. Here, in vitro abiotic syntheses were performed to synthesize Mg-, Ca-, Sr- and Ba-containing carbonates with compositions, crystallinities and sizes close to those observed in intracellularly calcifying cyanobacteria. Precipitates were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopies coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction. The size and the poor crystallinity of cyanobacterial intracellular carbonates could be mimicked under these abiotic conditions. It was shown that similarly to Mg, elements such as Sr and Ba can favor stabilization of poorly crystalline carbonates. In contrast, the differential partitioning of Sr, Ba and Ca between the solution and the solids as observed in cyanobacteria could not be mimicked in vitro. This provides keys to a better understanding of biological processes involved in the formation of intracellular carbonates by some cyanobacteria, including the involvement of membrane transporters.

  6. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  7. Carbon as amorphous shell and interstitial dopant in mesoporous rutile TiO2: Bio-template assisted sol-gel synthesis and photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mohamad Azuwa; Wan Salleh, Wan Norharyati; Jaafar, Juhana; Rosmi, Mohamad Saufi; Mohd. Hir, Zul Adlan; Abd Mutalib, Muhazri; Ismail, Ahmad Fauzi; Tanemura, Masaki

    2017-01-01

    Regenerated cellulose membrane was used as bio-template nanoreactor for the formation of rutile TiO2 mesoporous, as well as in-situ carbon dopant in acidified sol-gel system. The effects of calcination temperature on the physicochemical characteristic of core-shell nanostructured of bio-templated C-doped mesoporous TiO2 are highlighted in this study. By varying the calcination temperature, the thickness of the carbon shell coating on TiO2, crystallinity, surface area, and optical properties could be tuned as confirmed by HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption/desorption measurement, XRD and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The results suggested that increment in the calcination temperature would lead to the band gap narrowing from 2.95 to 2.80 eV and the thickness of carbon shell increased from 0.40 to 1.20 nm. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the visible light absorption capability was mainly due to the incorporation of carbon dopant at interstitial position in the TiO2 to form Osbnd Tisbnd C or Tisbnd Osbnd C bond. In addition, the formation of the carbon core-shell nanostructured was due to carbonaceous layer grafted onto the surface of TiO2 via Tisbnd Osbnd C and Tisbnd OCO bonds. The result indicated that bio-templated C-doped core-shell mesoporous TiO2 prepared at 300 °C exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity. It is worthy to note that, the calcination temperature provided a huge impact towards improving the physicochemical and photocatalytic properties of the prepared bio-templated C-doped core-shell mesoporous TiO2.

  8. Magnetic Properties of Nanometer-sized Crystalline and Amorphous Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Steen; Bødker, Franz; Hansen, Mikkel Fougt;

    1997-01-01

    Amorphous transition metal-metalloid alloy particles can be prepared by chemical preparation techniques. We discuss the preparation of transition metal-boron and iron-carbon particles and their magnetic properties. Nanometer-sized particles of both crystalline and amorphous magnetic materials...... are superparamagnetic at finite temperatures. The temperature dependence of the superparamagnetic relaxation time and the influence of inter-particle interactions is discussed. Finally, some examples of studies of surface magnetization of alpha-Fe particles are presented....

  9. Influence of gas environment on synthesis of silicon carbide and some carbides and carbonitrides of d-group transition metals through reaction between metal powders and amorphous carbon powders in a solar furnace at P.S.A. (plataforma solar de Almeria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, D.; Rodriguez, J. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria, PSA, Centro Europeo de Ensayos de Energia Solar, Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas, Tabernas (Spain); Guerra Rosa, L.; Cruz Fernandes, J. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IST, Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais, Lisboa (Portugal); Shohoji, N. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia Industrial, INETI, Instituto de Materiais e Tecnologias de Producao, Dept. de Tecnologias de Producao, Lisboa (Portugal)

    1999-03-01

    Refractory carbides and carbonitrides including silicon carbide SiC, tungsten carbide WC, titanium carbide TiC{sub x} (0.5amorphous carbon powders through heating in a solar furnace under controlled atmosphere (Ar or N{sub 2}). Under irradiation of the solar energy flux 1,350 kW/m{sup 2} (ca. 1650 deg C in terms of measured temperature) for 30 min in Ar atmosphere, Si, W and Ti were converted to SiC, WC and TiC{sub x}, respectively. By the similar reaction undertaken in N{sub 2} atmosphere, Si and W were converted to SiC and WC, respectively, but carbonitride TiC{sub x}N{sub y} formed from Ti. No special influence of atmosphere was detected on the WC formation, but conversion to SiC from Si was somewhat retarded in N{sub 2} atmosphere. In either Ar or N{sub 2} atmosphere, progress of graphitization of amorphous carbon was not detectable by X-ray diffraction analysis in the reaction with Si and Ti but graphitization of amorphous carbon appeared to be significantly accelerated in the reaction with W. (authors)

  10. Study on the substrate-induced crystallisation of amorphous SiC-precursor ceramics. TIB/A; Untersuchungen zur substratinduzierten Kristallisation amorpher SiC-Precursorkeramiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, C.

    2000-12-01

    In the present thesis the crystallization behaviour of amorphous silicon-carbon materials (SiC{sub x}) was studied. The main topic of the experimental studies formed thereby the epitactical crystallization of thin silicon carbide layers on monocrystalline substrates of silicon carbides or silicon. Furthermore by thermolysis of the polymer amorphous SiC{sub x}-powder was obtained.

  11. Magnetostrictive amorphous bimetal sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Mehnen, L; Kaniusas, E

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the application of a magnetostrictive amorphous ribbon (AR) for the detection of bending. In order to increase sensitivity, a bimetal structure is used which consists of AR and a nonmagnetic carrier ribbon. Several methods for the preparation of the bimetal are discussed. Results of the bending sensitivities are given for various combinations of the material types indicating crucial problems of bimetal preparation.

  12. Production of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural from Inulin Catalyzed by Sulfonated Amorphous Carbon in an Ionic Liquid%离子液体中磺化无定形炭催化菊糖制备5-羟甲基糠醛

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    公艳艳; 刘民; 贾松岩; 冯建萍; 宋春山; 郭新闻

    2012-01-01

    The production of 5-hydroxylmethylfurfural (HMF) from inulin over sulfonated amorphous carbon was studied in an ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Bmim]CI). The effects of reaction solvent, water content, reaction temperature, reaction time, and catalyst dosage on the yield of HMF were investigated. Experimental results indicated that optimum reaction conditions required a reaction temperature of 100℃, a reaction time of 60 min, an R value of 5 (R represents the molar ratio of added water to fructose units in inulin), and a mass ratio of catalyst to inulin of 1:3, affording HMF in yields of up to 50%.%研究了以1-丁基-3-甲基咪唑氯盐([Bmim]CI)离子液体作溶剂,磺化无定形炭为催化剂催化菊糖脱水制5-羟甲基糠醛(HMF)的反应.考察了溶剂、水量、反应温度、反应时间和催化剂用量对HMF收率的影响.实验结果表明,反应温度为100℃,反应时间60 min,R=5(R为水的物质的量与菊糖中所含果糖单位的物质的量的比值),m(催化剂)∶m(菊糖)=1∶3时,HMF的收率可达50%.

  13. Blood-compatibility of La2O3 Doped Amorphous Carbon Film%氧化镧掺杂非晶碳薄膜的血液相容性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张麟; 陈弟虎; 于凤梅; 黄展云; 潘仕荣

    2009-01-01

    La2O3doped amorphous carbon(a-C) films were deposited on silicon substrates using a Radio-Frequency magnetron sputtering. The effect of doped rare earth on the microstructure,composition, surface morphology and hydrophilicity of a-C films were studied using Raman spectra and XPS, respectively. Results show that rare earth addition has a suppressive effect on the ratio of sp3-bond to sp2- bond in the a-C films and the hydrophobicity of rare earth doped a-C films is increased. The observation of platelet adhesion shows that the anti-cruor of a-C films can be improved by rare earth doped and the sample added appropriate rare earth shows the best blood compatibility. The mechanism of haemocompatibility of a-C films doped rare earth is discussed.%采用射频磁控溅射方法制备了氧化镧掺杂的非晶碳薄膜.利用拉曼光谱,光电子能谱等方法, 研究了氧化镧掺杂对非晶碳薄膜的微结构、成分、形貌及亲水性的影响.结果表明:在非晶碳薄膜中掺入氧化镧后,薄膜中sp3/sp2的比率发生显著变化,薄膜的疏水性明显提高.血小板粘附实验表明,掺杂氧化镧有利于提高非晶碳薄膜的抗凝血性能,适当的掺杂量能使薄膜的血液相容性得到优化.并分析了氧化镧对材料的血液相容性能的影响机制.

  14. Computer model of tetrahedral amorphous diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, B. R.; Thorpe, M. F.; Wooten, F.

    1995-08-01

    We computer generate a model of amorphous diamond using the Wooten-Weaire method, with fourfold coordination everywhere. We investigate two models: one where four-membered rings are allowed and the other where the four-membered rings are forbidden; each model consisting of 4096 atoms. Starting from the perfect diamond crystalline structure, we first randomize the structure by introducing disorder through random bond switches at a sufficiently high temperature. Subsequently, the temperature is reduced in stages, and the topological and geometrical relaxation of the structure takes place using the Keating potential. After a long annealing process, a random network of comparatively low energy is obtained. We calculate the pair distribution function, mean bond angle, rms angular deviation, rms bond length, rms bond-length deviation, and ring statistics for the final relaxed structures. We minimize the total strain energy by adjusting the density of the sample. We compare our results with similar computer-generated models for amorphous silicon, and with experimental measurement of the structure factor for (predominantly tetrahedral) amorphous carbon.

  15. Evolution of clusters in energetic heavy ion bombarded amorphous graphite

    CERN Document Server

    Akhtar, M N; Ahmad, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    Carbon clusters have been generated by a novel technique of energetic heavy ion bombardment of amorphous graphite. The evolution of clusters and their subsequent fragmentation under continuing ion bombardment is revealed by detecting various clusters in the energy spectra of the direct recoils emitted as a result of collision between ions and the surface constituents.

  16. Beyond amorphous organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jun-ichi

    2003-07-01

    Recently it has been discovered that some types of liquid crystals, which believed to be governed by ionic conduction, exhibit a very fast electronic conduction. Their charge carrier transport is characterized by high mobility over 10-2 cm2/Vs independent of electric field and temperature. Now, the liquid crystals are being recognized as a new class of organic semiconductors. In this article, a new aspect of liquid crystals as a self-organizing molecular semiconductor are reviewed, focused on their basic charge carrier transport properties and discussed in comparison with those of molecular crystals and amorphous materials. And it is concluded that the liquid crystal is promising as a quality organic semiconductor for the devices that require a high mobility.

  17. ENHANCING ADHESION OF TETRAHEDRAL AMORPHOUS CARBON FILMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵玉清; 林毅; 王晓艳; 王炎武; 魏新宇

    2005-01-01

    TheperformanceoftheTACfilmsdeposited bytheFCVAisbetterthanthatofthediamond like carbonfilms[1,2],becausetheformerisofhigher hardnessandtransparency,smallerfriction coefficientandabsorbingtheultravioletraymore easily,etc.[3].Thesecharacteristicsaresimilarto thoseofthenaturaldiamond.Therefore,theTAC filmdepositedonawindowmaterialcanraisethe operatinglifegreatly.TheTACfilmisanideal protectivematerialforvariouskindsofwatch glassesandcameralenses. Metalandpotteryareoftenusedasthe substratesfordepositingtheTACfil...

  18. Tribological properties of amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) diamond-like carbon coatings under jatropha biodegradable lubricating oil at different temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mobarak, H.M., E-mail: mobarak.ho31@yahoo.com; Masjuki, H.H.; Mohamad, E. Niza, E-mail: edzrol@um.edu.my; Kalam, M.A.; Rashedul, H.K.; Rashed, M.M.; Habibullah, M.

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • We tested a-C:H and ta-C DLC coatings as a function of temperature. • Jatropha oil contains large amounts of polar components that enhanced the lubricity of coatings. • CoF decreases with increasing temperature for both contacts. • Wear rate increases with increasing temperature in a-C:H and decreases in ta-C DLC. • At high temperature, ta-C coatings confer more protection than a-C:H coatings. - Abstract: The application of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on automotive components is emerging as a favorable strategy to address the recent challenges in the industry. DLC coatings can effectively lower the coefficient of friction (CoF) and wear rate of engine components, thereby improving their fuel efficiency and durability. The lubrication of ferrous materials can be enhanced by a large amount of unsaturated and polar components of oils. Therefore, the interaction between nonferrous coatings (e.g., DLC) and vegetable oil should be investigated. A ball-on-plate tribotester was used to run the experiments. Stainless steel plates coated with amorphous hydrogenated (a-C:H) DLC and hydrogen-free tetrahedral (ta-C) DLC that slide against 440C stainless steel ball were used to create a ball-on-plate tribotester. The wear track was investigated through scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to analyze the tribofilm inside the wear track. Raman analysis was performed to investigate the structural changes in the coatings. At high temperatures, the CoF in both coatings decreased. The wear rate, however, increased in the a-C:H but decreased in the ta-C DLC-coated plates. The CoF and the wear rate (coated layer and counter surface) were primarily influenced by the graphitization of the coating. Tribochemical films, such as polyphosphate glass, were formed in ta-C and acted as protective layers. Therefore, the wear rate of the ta-C DLC was lower than that of the-C:H DLC.

  19. Containerless processing of amorphous ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. K. Richard; Krishnan, Shankar; Schiffman, Robert A.; Nordine, Paul C.

    1990-01-01

    The absence of gravity allows containerless processing of materials which could not otherwise be processed. High melting point, hard materials such as borides, nitrides, and refractory metals are usually brittle in their crystalline form. The absence of dislocations in amorphous materials frequently endows them with flexibility and toughness. Systematic studies of the properties of many amorphous materials have not been carried out. The requirements for their production is that they can be processed in a controlled way without container interaction. Containerless processing in microgravity could permit the control necessary to produce amorphous forms of hard materials.

  20. Determination of Chemical Bond of Tetrahedral Amorphous Carbon Films by Ellipsometry Approach%椭偏法表征四面体非晶碳薄膜的化学键结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓伟; 周毅; 孙丽丽; 汪爱英

    2012-01-01

    Tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films under different substrate negative bias are prepared by a home developed filtered cathodic vacuum arc (FCVA) technology with double bend shape. The film thickness is measured by a combined spectrophotometry and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) approach; the chemical bonds including sp2C and sp3C are gained by the fitted ellipsometry method. Furthermore,the accuracy of ellipsometry results is evaluated by comparing with those of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectra. The results indicate that the minimum thickness of ta-C film of 33. 9 nm is obtained when the bias voltage is -100 V; with the increase of bias voltage,the optical gaps and the content of sp3C atomic bond decrease,while the sp2C content increases correspondingly. By comparison with the results of XPS and Raman spectra,it is found that when the optical constants of sp2C model are represented by the glassy carbon and the fitting wavelength ranges are chosen from 250 to 1700 nm,the best fitting result of atomic bonds of ta-C films can be deduced by the ellipsometry method. Therefore,it could be said that the elliposometry method is a quite promising method to characterize the atomic bonds of ta-C films including sp2C and sp3C,as a new nondestructive,fast,quantitative and easy way.%采用自主研制的双弯曲磁过滤阴极真空电弧(FCVA)技术,在不同衬底负偏压下制备了四面体非晶碳(ta-C)薄膜.通过分光光度计和椭偏(SE)联用技术精确测量了薄膜厚度,重点采用椭偏法对不同偏压下制备的ta-C薄膜sp3C键和sp2C键结构进行了拟合表征,并与X射线光电子能谱(XPS)和拉曼光谱的实验结果相对比,分析了非晶碳结构的椭偏拟合新方法可靠性.结果表明,在-100 V偏压时薄膜厚度最小,为33.9 nm;随着偏压的增加,薄膜中的sp2C含量增加,sp3C含量减小,光学带隙下降.对比结果发现,椭偏法作为一种无损、简易、快速的表征

  1. Amorphous drugs and dosage forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, K.; Priemel, P.;

    2013-01-01

    formulation principles are needed to ensure the stability of amorphous drug forms. The formation of solid dispersions is still the most investigated approach, but additional approaches are desirable to overcome the shortcomings of solid dispersions. Spatial separation by either coating or the use of micro......The transformation to an amorphous form is one of the most promising approaches to address the low solubility of drug compounds, the latter being an increasing challenge in the development of new drug candidates. However, amorphous forms are high energy solids and tend to recry stallize. New......-containers has shown potential to prevent or delay recrystallization. Another recent approach is the formation of co-amorphous mixtures between either two drugs or one drug and one low molecular weight excipient. Molecular interactions between the two molecules provide an energy barrier that has to be overcome...

  2. Amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers for crystalline-silicon-based heterojunction solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary C. [School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-5706 (United States)

    2015-08-14

    Amorphous silicon enables the fabrication of very high-efficiency crystalline-silicon-based solar cells due to its combination of excellent passivation of the crystalline silicon surface and permeability to electrical charges. Yet, amongst other limitations, the passivation it provides degrades upon high-temperature processes, limiting possible post-deposition fabrication possibilities (e.g., forcing the use of low-temperature silver pastes). We investigate the potential use of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide passivating layers to sidestep this issue. The passivation obtained using device-relevant stacks of intrinsic amorphous silicon carbide with various carbon contents and doped amorphous silicon are evaluated, and their stability upon annealing assessed, amorphous silicon carbide being shown to surpass amorphous silicon for temperatures above 300 °C. We demonstrate open-circuit voltage values over 700 mV for complete cells, and an improved temperature stability for the open-circuit voltage. Transport of electrons and holes across the hetero-interface is studied with complete cells having amorphous silicon carbide either on the hole-extracting side or on the electron-extracting side, and a better transport of holes than of electrons is shown. Also, due to slightly improved transparency, complete solar cells using an amorphous silicon carbide passivation layer on the hole-collecting side are demonstrated to show slightly better performances even prior to annealing than obtained with a standard amorphous silicon layer.

  3. Anomalous hopping conduction in nanocrystalline/amorphous composites and amorphous semiconductor thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalios, James; Bodurtha, Kent

    Composite nanostructured materials consisting of nanocrystals (nc) embedded within a thin film amorphous matrix can exhibit novel opto-electronic properties. Composite films are synthesized in a dual-chamber co-deposition PECVD system capable of producing nanocrystals of material A and embedding then within a thin film matrix of material B. Electronic conduction in composite thin films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) containing nc-germanium or nc-silicon inclusions, as well as in undoped a-Si:H, does not follow an Arrhenius temperature dependence, but rather is better described by an anomalous hopping expression (exp[-(To/T)3/4) , as determined from the ``reduced activation energy'' proposed by Zabrodskii and Shlimak. This temperature dependence has been observed in other thin film resistive materials, such as ultra-thin disordered films of Ag, Bi, Pb and Pd; carbon-black polymer composites; and weakly coupled Au and ZnO quantum dot arrays. There is presently no accepted theoretical understanding of this expression. The concept of a mobility edge, accepted for over four decades, appears to not be necessary to account for charge transport in amorphous semiconductors. Supported by NSF-DMR and the Minnesota Nano Center.

  4. Synthesis of the Carbon Nanomaterials Based on Renewable Bioresources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.A. Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and feasibility of producing nanoscale carbon materials from renewable bioresources were shown as an example marsh mass. The mechanisms of synthesis of amorphous organic carbon from sphagnum moss species modified by a liquid peat phase of humic nature are discussed. A fundamentally new way of producing carbon nanotubes by mechanical activation of amorphous organic carbon is described.

  5. Fundamentals of amorphous solids structure and properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2014-01-01

    Long awaited, this textbook fills the gap for convincing concepts to describe amorphous solids. Adopting a unique approach, the author develops a framework that lays the foundations for a theory of amorphousness. He unravels the scientific mysteries surrounding the topic, replacing rather vague notions of amorphous materials as disordered crystalline solids with the well-founded concept of ideal amorphous solids. A classification of amorphous materials into inorganic glasses, organic glasses, glassy metallic alloys, and thin films sets the scene for the development of the model of ideal amorph

  6. Nanostructures having crystalline and amorphous phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Chen, Xiaobo

    2015-04-28

    The present invention includes a nanostructure, a method of making thereof, and a method of photocatalysis. In one embodiment, the nanostructure includes a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase in contact with the crystalline phase. Each of the crystalline and amorphous phases has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes a nanoparticle comprising a crystalline phase and an amorphous phase. The amorphous phase is in a selected amount. In another embodiment, the nanostructure includes crystalline titanium dioxide and amorphous titanium dioxide in contact with the crystalline titanium dioxide. Each of the crystalline and amorphous titanium dioxide has at least one dimension on a nanometer scale.

  7. Amorphization of Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Weijun; Kaiser, Ralf I

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline ice by irradiation in the 10-50 K temperature range with 5 keV electrons at a dose of ~140 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. Our experiments showed that some of the 1.65-micrometer band survived the irradiation, to a degree that depends on the temperature, demonstrating that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. At 50 K, recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most known objects in the solar system, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites, and Kuiper belt objects, are equal to or above 50 K, this might explain why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

  8. Overview of the amorphous precursor phase strategy in biomineralization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steve WEINER; Julia MAHAMID; Yael POLITI; Yurong MA; Lia ADDADI

    2009-01-01

    It was assumed for a long time that organisms produce minerals directly from a saturated solution. A few exceptions were known,including the well documented mineralized teeth of the chiton. In 1997 it was demon-stratedthat sea urchin larvae form their calcitic spicules by first depositing a highly unstable mineral phase called amorphous cualcium carbonate.This other phgyla has since been shown to be used by anlmals from other phyla and for both aragonita and calcite Recent evidence shows that vertebrate bone mineral may also be formed via a precursor phase of amorphous calcium carbonate. This strategy thus appears to be widespread The challenge now is to understand the mechanisms by which these unstable phases are initially formed,how they are temporarily stabilized and how they are destabilized and trans form into a crystalline mature product.

  9. Evolution of structure and infrared radiation properties for ferrite-based amorphous coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Fan, Xi’an, E-mail: groupfxa@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Zhang, Jianyi [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Hu, Xiaoming [Suzhou Sagreon New Materials Co., Ltd, Zhangjiagang 215625 (China); Li, Guangqiang; Zhang, Zhan [State Key Laboratory of Refractories and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Key Laboratory for Ferrous Metallurgy and Resources Utilization of Ministry of Education, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The ferrite-based amorphous infrared radiation coating was prepared by plasma spraying. • The coating could keep amorphous structure when the temperature was below 700 °C. • The amorphous structure can improve the emissivity of ferrite-based coatings. • The amorphous coating exhibited a higher emissivity than that by brushing process. • The coating has an excellent thermal shock resistance and can work at 1000 °C. - Abstract: The ferrite-based amorphous coatings with high infrared radiation properties have been successfully prepared on the surface of carbon steel substrate by plasma spraying process. The phase, morphology, microstructure, thermal behavior and infrared emissivity were determined by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and infrared spectroscopy. The prepared coating could keep amorphous structure when the ambient temperature was below 700 °C and it would crystallize gradually with further increasing the temperature. The amorphous structure is confirmed to be constructive for improving the emissivity of ferrite-based coatings, especially in the 3–8 μm band. The emissivity of the amorphous coating obtained by plasma spraying was over 0.8 in 3–8 μm band at 800 °C, which was higher than that of the coating with same composition prepared by conventional brushing method. The excellent thermal shock resistance of the coatings makes them to be good candidates for sensible energy-saving materials, which could work for long term at 1000 °C.

  10. Fluctuation Electron Microscopy of Amorphous and Polycrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezikyan, Aram

    Fluctuation Electron Microscopy (FEM) has become an effective materials' structure characterization technique, capable of probing medium-range order (MRO) that may be present in amorphous materials. Although its sensitivity to MRO has been exercised in numerous studies, FEM is not yet a quantitative technique. The holdup has been the discrepancy between the computed kinematical variance and the experimental variance, which previously was attributed to source incoherence. Although high-brightness, high coherence, electron guns are now routinely available in modern electron microscopes, they have not eliminated this discrepancy between theory and experiment. The main objective of this thesis was to explore, and to reveal, the reasons behind this conundrum. The study was started with an analysis of the speckle statistics of tilted dark-field TEM images obtained from an amorphous carbon sample, which confirmed that the structural ordering is sensitively detected by FEM. This analysis also revealed the inconsistency between predictions of the source incoherence model and the experimentally observed variance. FEM of amorphous carbon, amorphous silicon and ultra nanocrystalline diamond samples was carried out in an attempt to explore the conundrum. Electron probe and sample parameters were varied to observe the scattering intensity variance behavior. Results were compared to models of probe incoherence, diffuse scattering, atom displacement damage, energy loss events and multiple scattering. Models of displacement decoherence matched the experimental results best. Decoherence was also explored by an interferometric diffraction method using bilayer amorphous samples, and results are consistent with strong displacement decoherence in addition to temporal decoherence arising from the electron source energy spread and energy loss events in thick samples. It is clear that decoherence plays an important role in the long-standing discrepancy between experimental FEM and its

  11. Amorphous titanium-oxide supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Mikio; Kuroda, Tomoyuki; Hasegawa, Fumihiko

    2016-10-01

    The electric capacitance of an amorphous TiO2-x surface increases proportionally to the negative sixth power of the convex diameter d. This occurs because of the van der Waals attraction on the amorphous surface of up to 7 mF/cm2, accompanied by extreme enhanced electron trapping resulting from both the quantum-size effect and an offset effect from positive charges at oxygen-vacancy sites. Here we show that a supercapacitor, constructed with a distributed constant-equipment circuit of large resistance and small capacitance on the amorphous TiO2-x surface, illuminated a red LED for 37 ms after it was charged with 1 mA at 10 V. The fabricated device showed no dielectric breakdown up to 1,100 V. Based on this approach, further advances in the development of amorphous titanium-dioxide supercapacitors might be attained by integrating oxide ribbons with a micro-electro mechanical system.

  12. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Gao, Fei; Liu, Bo

    2015-11-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C interstitials, as either C-Si or C-C dumbbells. The concentration of defect clusters increases with increasing dose, and their distributions are mainly observed along the GBs. Especially these small clusters can subsequently coalesce and form amorphous domains at the GBs during the accumulation of carbon defects. A comparison between displacement amorphized nc-SiC and melt-quenched single crystal SiC shows the similar topological features. At a dose of 0.55 displacements per atom (dpa), the pair correlation function lacks long range order, demonstrating that the nc-SiC is fully amorphilized.

  13. Flexible amorphous metal films with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, M.; Cao, C. R.; Lu, Y. M.; Wang, W. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2017-01-01

    We report the formation of amorphous Cu50Zr50 films with a large-area of more than 100 cm2. The films were fabricated by ion beam assisted deposition with a slow deposition rate at moderate temperature. The amorphous films have markedly enhanced thermal stability, excellent flexibility, and high reflectivity with atomic level smoothness. The multifunctional properties of the amorphous films are favorites in the promising applications of smart skin or wearable devices. The method of preparing highly stable amorphous metal films by tuning the deposition rate instead of deposition temperature could pave a way for exploring amorphous metal films with unique properties.

  14. A new carbon structure in annealed film coatings of the carbon-lead system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volodin, V. N.; Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Zhakanbaev, E. A.; Tsai, K. V.; Rofman, O. V.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-lead solid solutions coexisting with amorphous carbon have been obtained for the first time in a film coating deposited by ion-plasma sputtering. During subsequent vacuum annealing of carbon-lead films containing more than 68.5 at % Pb, this element almost completely evaporates to leave an amorphous carbon coating on a substrate. During annealing at 1100°C, this amorphous carbon crystallizes into a new hexagonal lattice with unit cell parameters a = 0.7603 nm and c = 0.8168 nm. Characteristic X-ray diffraction data for the identification of this phase are determined.

  15. Amorphous metal based nanoelectromechanical switch

    KAUST Repository

    Mayet, Abdulilah M.

    2013-04-01

    Nanoelectromechanical (NEM) switch is an interesting ultra-low power option which can operate in the harsh environment and can be a complementary element in complex digital circuitry. Although significant advancement is happening in this field, report on ultra-low voltage (pull-in) switch which offers high switching speed and area efficiency is yet to be made. One key challenge to achieve such characteristics is to fabricate nano-scale switches with amorphous metal so the shape and dimensional integrity are maintained to achieve the desired performance. Therefore, we report a tungsten alloy based amorphous metal with fabrication process development of laterally actuated dual gated NEM switches with 100 nm width and 200 nm air-gap to result in <5 volts of actuation voltage (Vpull-in). © 2013 IEEE.

  16. Amorphous diffusion bonding of steel pipe and its impact toughness

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xuegang; YAN Fengjie; YAN Qian; LI Xingeng

    2007-01-01

    An iron-based amorphous foil (FeNiCrSiB) was used as an interlayer for the amorphous diffusion bonding of low carbon steel pipes under argon flux. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint were analyzed using an electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA), tensile test, bending test and impact test. The results show that the joint micro-structure resembles that of the base metal and no precipitates form at the joint. Melting point depressants 03, Si) diffuse far away from the joint and the base metal element is homoge-nous across the joint. The joint impact toughness is greater than the base metal toughness and the mechanical properties of the joint are similar around the pipe.

  17. 应用于氧还原反应的石墨烯-无定形碳核壳结构复合材料载铂催化剂%Core-shell graphene@amorphous carbon composites supported platinum catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴惠; 彭焘; 寇宗魁; 张建; 程坤; 何大平; 潘牧; 木士春

    2015-01-01

    采用氯化法制备石墨烯-无定型碳复合材料(GNS@a-C),并用作质子交换膜燃料电池(PEMFC)氧还原反应Pt催化剂的载体.结果显示,所制Pt/GNS@a-C催化剂与传统商业催化剂Pt/C相比,有较好的活性和较高的稳定性:质量活性(0.121 A/mg)几乎是Pt/C (0.064 A/mg)的两倍.更重要的是,该新型催化剂加速4000圈后其电化学活性面积保留了最初的51%,与Pt/C的33%相比,前者有更好的电化学稳定性,显示它在PEMFC中将具有较好的应用潜力.%A core‐shell graphene nanosheets (GNS) and amorphous carbon composite (GNS@a‐C) was pre‐pared by a chlorination method and used as a highly efficient catalyst support for oxygen reduction reaction. Herein, GNS as a shell, with excellent conductivity, high surface area, and corrosion re‐sistance, served as a protecting coating to alleviate the degradation of amorphous carbon core. Platinum nanoparticles were homogeneously deposited on the carbon support (Pt/GNS@a‐C) and showed a good catalytic activity and a higher electrochemical stability when compared with a commercial Pt/C catalyst. The mass activity of Pt/GNS@a‐C catalyst was 0.121 A/mg, which was almost twice as high as that of Pt/C (0.064 A/mg). Moreover, Pt/GNS@a‐C retained 51%of its initial electrochemical specific area after 4000 operating cycles when compared with Pt/C (33%). Thus, the prepared catalyst featured excellent electrochemical stability, showing promise for application in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  18. Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, Methods Of Making Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon, And Methods Of Using Colloidal Photoluminescent Amorphous Porous Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Chaieb, Sahraoui

    2015-04-09

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of making a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, methods of using a colloidal photoluminescent amorphous porous silicon particle suspension, and the like.

  19. On Structure and Properties of Amorphous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew H. Stachurski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical, optical, magnetic and electronic properties of amorphous materials hold great promise towards current and emergent technologies. We distinguish at least four categories of amorphous (glassy materials: (i metallic; (ii thin films; (iii organic and inorganic thermoplastics; and (iv amorphous permanent networks. Some fundamental questions about the atomic arrangements remain unresolved. This paper focuses on the models of atomic arrangements in amorphous materials. The earliest ideas of Bernal on the structure of liquids were followed by experiments and computer models for the packing of spheres. Modern approach is to carry out computer simulations with prediction that can be tested by experiments. A geometrical concept of an ideal amorphous solid is presented as a novel contribution to the understanding of atomic arrangements in amorphous solids.

  20. The physics and applications of amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Madan, Arun

    1988-01-01

    This comprehensive, detailed treatise on the physics and applications of the new emerging technology of amorphous semiconductors focuses on specific device research problems such as the optimization of device performance. The first part of the book presents hydrogenated amorphous silicon type alloys, whose applications include inexpensive solar cells, thin film transistors, image scanners, electrophotography, optical recording and gas sensors. The second part of the book discusses amorphous chalcogenides, whose applications include electrophotography, switching, and memory elements. This boo

  1. Structural study of amorphous polyaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laridjani, M.; Pouget, J. P.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Epstein, A. J.

    1992-06-01

    Many materials, especially polymers, have a substantial volume fraction with no long range crystalline order. Through these regions are often termed amorphous, they frequently have a specific local order. We describe and use here a method, base on a non-energy dispersive X-ray diffraction technique, to obtain good quality interference functions and, by Fourier transform, radial distribution functions of the amorphous structure of polymers. We apply this approach to members of a family of electronic polymers of current interest : polyaniline emeraldine bases. We show that the local order exhibits significant differences in type I and type II materials, precipitated as salt and base respectively. These studies demonstrate the importance of sample preparation in evaluating the physical properties of polyaniline, and provide a structural origin for memory effects observed in the doping-dedoping processes. Beaucoup de matériaux, spécialement les polymères, ont une importante fraction de leur volume sans ordre cristallin à longue portée. Bien que ces régions soient souvent appelées amorphes, elles présentent fréquemment un ordre local caractéristique. Nous décrivons et utilisons dans ce papier une méthode, basée sur une technique de diffraction de rayons X non dispersive en énergie, pour obtenir des fonctions d'interférence de bonne qualité et, par transformée de Fourier, la fonction de distribution radiale des polymères amorphes. Nous appliquons cette technique à plusieurs éléments d'une même famille de polymères électroniques d'intérêt actuel : les polyanilines éméraldine bases. Nous montrons que l'ordre local présente d'appréciables différences dans les matériaux de type I et II, préparés respectivement sous forme de sel et de base. Cette étude démontre l'importance des conditions de préparation sur les propriétés physiques du polyaniline et donne une base structurale aux effets observés dans les processus de dopage-dédopage de

  2. Fracture Phenomena in Amorphous Selenium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard-Andersen, Asger; Dahle, Birgit

    1966-01-01

    the velocities of ultrasonic longitudinal and shear waves were measured to 1820 m/sec and 930 m/sec, respectively. Based on these results the two line systems in the transition zone can be interpreted as ``Wallner lines'' with sources within the zone. ©1966 The American Institute of Physics......Fracture surfaces of amorphous selenium broken in flexure at room temperature have been studied. The fracture velocity was found to vary in different regions of the fracture surface. Peculiar features were observed in a transition zone between fast and slower fracture. In this zone cleavage steps...

  3. Neutron diffraction and thermal studies of amorphous CS{sub 2} realised by low-temperature vapour deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamuro, O.; Matsuo, T. [Osaka Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate School of Sciences (Japan); Onoda-Yamamuro, N. [Tokyo Denki Univ., College of Sciences and Technology (Japan); Takeda, K. [Naruto Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Tokushima (Japan); Munemura, H.; Tanaka, S.; Misawa, M. [Niigata Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Science

    2003-08-01

    We have succeeded in preparing amorphous carbon disulphide (CS{sub 2}) by depositing its vapour on a cold substrate at 10 K. Complete formation of the amorphous state has been confirmed by neutron diffraction and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The amorphous sample crystallized at ca. 70 K, which is lower than the hypothetical glass transition temperature (92 K) estimated from the DTA data of the (CS{sub 2}){sub x}(S{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}){sub 1-x} binary mixture. CS{sub 2}, a symmetric linear tri-atomic molecule, is the simplest of the amorphized molecular substances whose structural and thermal information has been reported so far. Comparison of the static structure factors S(Q) has shown that the orientational correlation of CS{sub 2} molecules may be much stronger in the amorphous state than in the liquid state at higher temperature. (authors)

  4. Structural transformations in wear resistance of iron- and cobalt-based amorphous alloys during abrasive wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Shabashov, V. A.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2010-04-01

    The wear resistance and structural changes in a number of amorphous alloys based on iron and cobalt and in high-carbon tool steels are studied during wear by a fixed abrasive (crondum, Carborundum) at room temperature and -196°C. The abrasive wear resistance of the amorphous alloys is shown to be 1.6-3.1 lower than that of the high-carbon tool steels having a similar hardness. The relatively low level of the abrasive wear resistance of the amorphous alloys is assumed to be caused by strain softening of their surface during wear. A nanocrystalline structure is found to form in local microvolumes in a thin deformed surface layer of the alloys.

  5. Laser surface treatment of amorphous metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Shravana K.

    Amorphous materials are used as soft magnetic materials and also as surface coatings to improve the surface properties. Furthermore, the nanocrystalline materials derived from their amorphous precursors show superior soft magnetic properties than amorphous counter parts for transformer core applications. In the present work, laser based processing of amorphous materials will be presented. Conventionally, the nanocrystalline materials are synthesized by furnace heat treatment of amorphous precursors. Fe-based amorphous/nanocrystalline materials due to their low cost and superior magnetic properties are the most widely used soft magnetic materials. However, achieving nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B ternary system becomes very difficult owing its rapid growth rate at higher temperatures and sluggish diffusion at low temperature annealing. Hence, nanocrystallization in this system is achieved by using alloying additions (Cu and Nb) in the ternary Fe-Si-B system. Thus, increasing the cost and also resulting in reduction of saturation magnetization. laser processing technique is used to achieve extremely fine nanocrystalline microstructure in Fe-Si-B amorphous precursor. Microstructure-magnetic Property-laser processing co-relationship has been established for Fe-Si-B ternary system using analytical techniques. Laser processing improved the magnetic properties with significant increase in saturation magnetization and near zero coercivity values. Amorphous materials exhibit excellent corrosion resistance by virtue of their atomic structure. Fe-based amorphous materials are economical and due to their ease of processing are of potential interest to synthesize as coatings materials for wear and corrosion resistance applications. Fe-Cr-Mo-Y-C-B amorphous system was used to develop thick coatings on 4130 Steel substrate and the corrosion resistance of the amorphous coatings was improved. It is also shown that the mode of corrosion depends on the laser processing

  6. Bulk amorphous Mg-based alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2004-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation and properties of bulk amorphous quarternary Mg-based alloys and the influence of additional elements on the ability of the alloy to form bulk amorphous. The main goal is to find a Mg-based alloy system which shows both high strength to weight ratio and...

  7. Photoexcitation-induced processes in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-07-30

    Theories for the mechanism of photo-induced processes of photodarkening (PD), volume expansion (VE) in amorphous chalcogenides are presented. Rates of spontaneous emission of photons by radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors are also calculated and applied to study the excitonic photoluminescence in a-Si:H. Results are compared with previous theories.

  8. Band Gaps of an Amorphous Photonic Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yi-Quan; FENG Zhi-Fang; HU Xiao-Yong; CHENG Bing-Ying; ZHANG Dao-Zhong

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new kind of amorphous photonic materials is presented. Both the simulated and experimental results show that although the disorder of the whole dielectric structure is strong, the amorphous photonic materials have two photonic gaps. This confirms that the short-range order is an essential factor for the formation of the photonic gaps.

  9. Co amorphous systems: A product development perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Rahul B; Thipparaboina, Rajesh; Kumar, Dinesh; Shastri, Nalini R

    2016-12-30

    Solubility is one of the major problems associated with most of the new chemical entities that can be reasonably addressed by drug amorphization. However, being a high-energy form, it usually tends to re-crystallize, necessitating new formulation strategies to stabilize amorphous drugs. Polymeric amorphous solid dispersion (PASD) is one of the widely investigated strategies to stabilize amorphous drug, with major limitations like limited polymer solubility and hygroscopicity. Co amorphous system (CAM), a new entrant in amorphous arena is a promising alternative to PASD. CAMs are multi component single phase amorphous solid systems made up of two or more small molecules that may be a combination of drugs or drug and excipients. Excipients explored for CAM preparation include amino acids, carboxylic acids, nicotinamide and saccharine. Advantages offered by CAM include improved aqueous solubility and physical stability of amorphous drug, with a potential to improve therapeutic efficacy. This review attempts to address different aspects in the development of CAM as drug products. Criterion for co-former selection, various methods involved in CAM preparation, characterization tools, stability, scale up and regulatory requirements for the CAM product development are discussed.

  10. Electron beam recrystallization of amorphous semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, J. C., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Nucleation and growth of crystalline films of silicon, germanium, and cadmium sulfide on substrates of plastic and glass were investigated. Amorphous films of germanium, silicon, and cadmium sulfide on amorphous substrates of glass and plastic were converted to the crystalline condition by electron bombardment.

  11. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  12. Amorphous metals for radial airgap electric machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Ning; Kokernak, J.M. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Dept. of Electric Poer Engineering, Troy, NY (United States)

    2000-08-01

    Amorphous steel teas been in use for some time in the transformer industry. The difficulty associated with handling such a hard material paired with the extremely thin nature of the casting has prevented amorphous steel from being seriously considered for radial airgap electric motors. In light of recent advances in manufacturing and handling of the amorphous materials, this paper presents an investigation into the performance advantages of an amorphous brushless dc motor. A two-dimensional, time-stepped, finite element model is used to analyze the electromagnetic field and motor performance for an amorphous brushless dc (BLDC) motor and a M-l9 BLDC motor. Each is modeled with identical structure geometries. Magnetic core losses are also estimated for the two motors operating over a frequency range of 50 to 200 Hz. (orig.)

  13. EXAFS characterization of amorphous GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Glover, C.J. [Australia National Univ., Canberra (Australia); Foran, G.J. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia); Yu, K.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

    1998-12-31

    The structural parameters of stoichiometric, amorphous GaAs have been determined with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements performed in transmission mode at 10 K. Amorphous GaAs samples were fabricated with a combination of epitaxial growth, ion implantation and selective chemical etching. Relative to a crystalline sample, the nearest-neighbor bond length and Debye-Waller factor both increased for amorphous material. In contrast, the coordination numbers about both Ga and As atoms in the amorphous phase decreased to {approximately} 3.85 atoms from the crystalline value of four. All structural parameters were independent of implantation conditions and as a consequence, were considered representative of intrinsic, amorphous GaAs as opposed to an implantation-induced extrinsic structure.

  14. Solid-state diffusion in amorphous zirconolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, C.; Dove, M. T.; Trachenko, K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Zarkadoula, E. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Road, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6138 (United States); Todorov, I. T. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 1EP (United Kingdom); Geisler, T. [Steinmann-Institut für Geologie, Mineralogie und Paläontologie, University of Bonn, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Brazhkin, V. V. [Institute for High Pressure Physics, RAS, 142190 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    We discuss how structural disorder and amorphization affect solid-state diffusion, and consider zirconolite as a currently important case study. By performing extensive molecular dynamics simulations, we disentangle the effects of amorphization and density, and show that a profound increase of solid-state diffusion takes place as a result of amorphization. Importantly, this can take place at the same density as in the crystal, representing an interesting general insight regarding solid-state diffusion. We find that decreasing the density in the amorphous system increases pre-factors of diffusion constants, but does not change the activation energy in the density range considered. We also find that atomic species in zirconolite are affected differently by amorphization and density change. Our microscopic insights are relevant for understanding how solid-state diffusion changes due to disorder and for building predictive models of operation of materials to be used to encapsulate nuclear waste.

  15. Drug-excipient behavior in polymeric amorphous solid dispersions.

    OpenAIRE

    Surikutchi Bhanu Teja; Shashank Pralhad Patil; Ganesh Shete; Sarsvatkumar Patel; Arvind Kumar Bansal

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous drug delivery systems are increasingly utilized to enhance aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability. However, they lack physical and/or chemical stability. One of the most common ways of stabilizing an amorphous form is by formulating it as an amorphous solid dispersion. This review focuses on polymeric amorphous solid dispersions wherein polymers are used as excipients to stabilize the amorphous form. A brief introduction to the basic concepts of amorphous systems such as glass ...

  16. Drug excipient behavior in polymeric amorphous solid dispersions

    OpenAIRE

    Bhanu Teja Surikutchi; Shashank Pralhad Patil; Ganesh Shete; Sarsvatkumar Patel; Arvind Kumar Bansal

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous drug delivery system is being increasingly utilized for enhancing aqueous solubility and oral bioavailability. However it suffers from lack of physical/chemical stability. One of the most common ways of stabilizing an amorphous form is by formulating it as amorphous solid dispersion. This review focuses on the polymeric amorphous solid dispersion wherein polymers are used as excipients to stabilize the amorphous form. We present a brief introduction of basic concepts of amorphous sy...

  17. Porous carbons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satish M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon in dense as well as porous solid form is used in a variety of applications. Activated porous carbons are made through pyrolysis and activation of carbonaceous natural as well as synthetic precursors. Pyrolysed woods replicate the structure of original wood but as such possess very low surface areas and poor adsorption capacities. On activation, these exhibit increased adsorption volumes of 0.5–0.8 cm3 /gm and surface areas of 700–1800 m2 /gm depending on activation conditions, whether physical or chemical. Former carbons possess mixed pore size distribution while chemically activated carbons predominantly possess micropores. Thus, these carbons can be used for adsorption of wide distributions of molecules from gas to liquid. The molecular adsorption within the pores is due to single layer or multilayer molecule deposition at the pore walls and hence results in different types of adsorption isotherm. On the other hand, activated carbon fibres with controlled microporous structure and surface area in the range of 2500 m2 /gm can be developed by controlled pyrolysis and physical activation of amorphous carbon fibres. Active carbon fibres with unmatchable pore structure and surface characteristics are present and futuristic porous materials for a number of applications from pollution control to energy storage.

  18. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Joseph C.; Wong, Frank M. G.; Haslam, Jeffery J.; Ji, Xiaoyan (Jane); Day, Sumner D.; Blue, Craig A.; Rivard, John D. K.; Aprigliano, Louis F.; Kohler, Leslie K.; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J.; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H.; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2013-07-09

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  19. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  20. Tracer Diffusion Mechanism in Amorphous Solids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Hung

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracer diffusion in amorphous solid is studied by mean of nB-bubble statistic. The nB-bubble is defined as a group of atoms around a spherical void and large bubble that represents a structural defect which could be eliminated under thermal annealing. It was found that amorphous alloys such as CoxB100−x (x=90, 81.5 and 70 and Fe80P20 suffer from a large number of vacancy bubbles which function like diffusion vehicle. The concentration of vacancy bubble weakly depends on temperature, but essentially on the relaxation degree of considered sample. The diffusion coefficient estimated for proposed mechanism via vacancy bubbles is in a reasonable agreement with experiment for actual amorphous alloys. The relaxation effect for tracer diffusion in amorphous alloys is interpreted by the elimination of vacancy bubbles under thermal annealing.

  1. Theoretical Considerations in Developing Amorphous Solid Dispersions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Surwase, Sachin;

    2014-01-01

    Before pursuing the laborious route of amorphous solid dispersion formulation and development, which is the topic of many of the subsequent chapters in this book, the formulation scientist would benefit from a priori knowledge whether the amorphous route is a viable one for a given drug and how...... to their glass-forming ability and glass stability. In the main parts of this chapter, we review theoretical approaches to determine amorphous drug polymer miscibility and crystalline drug polymer solubility, as a prerequisite to develop amorphous solid dispersions (glass solutions)....... much solubility improvement, and hence increase in bioavailability, can be expected, and what forms of solid dispersion have been developed in the past. In this chapter, we therefore initially define the various forms of solid dispersions, and then go on to discuss properties of pure drugs with respect...

  2. Surface Acidity of Amorphous Aluminum Hydroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. FUKUSHI; K. TSUKIMURA; H. YAMADA

    2006-01-01

    The surface acidity of synthetic amorphous Al hydroxide was determined by acid/base titration with several complementary methods including solution analyses of the reacted solutions and XRD characterization of the reacted solids. The synthetic specimen was characterized to be the amorphous material showing four broad peaks in XRD pattern. XRD analyses of reacted solids after the titration experiments showed that amorphous Al hydroxide rapidly transformed to crystalline bayerite at the alkaline condition (pH>10). The solution analyses after and during the titration experiments showed that the solubility of amorphous aluminum hydroxide, Ksp =aAl3+/a3H+,was 1010.3,The amount of consumption of added acid or base during the titration experiment was attributed to both the protonation/deprotonation of dissolved Al species and surface hydroxyl group. The surface acidity constants, surface hydroxyl density and specific surface area were estimated by FITEQL 4.0.

  3. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongfeng He

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  4. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    OpenAIRE

    Dongfeng He; Mitsuharu Shiwa

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/ÖHz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor.

  5. Emerging trends in the stabilization of amorphous drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laitinen, Riikka; Löbmann, Korbinian; Strachan, Clare J.;

    2013-01-01

    water-soluble drugs can be increased by the formation of stabilized amorphous forms. Currently, formulation as solid polymer dispersions is the preferred method to enhance drug dissolution and to stabilize the amorphous form of a drug. The purpose of this review is to highlight emerging alternative...... methods to amorphous polymer dispersions for stabilizing the amorphous form of drugs. First, an overview of the properties and stabilization mechanisms of amorphous forms is provided. Subsequently, formulation approaches such as the preparation of co-amorphous small-molecule mixtures and the use...... of mesoporous silicon and silica-based carriers are presented as potential means to increase the stability of amorphous pharmaceuticals....

  6. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  7. FTIR Spectroscopy for Carbon Family Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ţucureanu, Vasilica; Matei, Alina; Avram, Andrei Marius

    2016-11-01

    Fourier transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a versatile technique for the characterization of materials belonging to the carbon family. Based on the interaction of the IR radiation with matter this technique may be used for the identification and characterization of chemical structures. Most important features of this method are: non-destructive, real-time measurement and relatively easy to use. Carbon basis for all living systems has found numerous industrial applications from carbon coatings (i.e. amorphous and nanocrystalline carbon films: diamond-like carbon (DLC) films) to nanostructured materials (fullerenes, nanotubes, graphene) and carbon materials at nanoscale or carbon dots (CDots). In this paper, we present the FTIR vibrational spectroscopy for the characterization of diamond, amorphous carbon, graphite, graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), fullerene and carbon quantum dots (CQDs), without claiming to cover entire field.

  8. Amorphous metallic alloys for oxygen reduction reaction in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Huerta, R.; Guerra-Martinez, I.; Lopez, J.S. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, ESIQIE, Mexico City (Mexico). Lab. de Electroquimica; Pierna, A.R. [Basque Country Univ., San Sebastian (Spain). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Environment; Solorza-Feria, O. [Inst. Politenico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-15

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) represent an important, environmentally clean energy source. This has motivated extensive research on the synthesis, characterization and evaluation of novel and stable oxygen reduction electrocatalysts for the direct four-electron transfer process to water formation. Studies have shown that amorphous alloyed compounds can be used as electrode materials in electrochemical energy conversion devices. Their use in PEMFCs can optimize the electrocatalyst loading in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA). In this study, amorphous metallic PtSn, PtRu and PtRuSn alloys were synthesized by mechanical milling and used as cathodes for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulphuric acid and in a single PEM fuel cell. Two different powder morphologies were observed before and after the chemical activation in a hydrofluoric acid (HF) solution at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the ORR on the amorphous catalysts were investigated. The study showed that the amorphous metallic PtSn electrocatalyst was the most active of the 3 electrodes for the cathodic reaction. Fuel cell experiments were conducted at various temperatures at 30 psi for hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and at 34 psi for oxygen (O{sub 2}). MEAs made of Nafion 115 and amorphous metallic PtSn dispersed on carbon powder in a PEMFC had a power density of 156 mW per cm{sup 2} at 0.43V and 80 degrees C. 12 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  9. 石墨表层对四面体非晶炭膜中受激电子的石墨建序化作用%The role of a graphitic surface layer in electron-stimulated ordering in tetrahedral amorphous carbon films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁士金; Tatsuya Banno; Yutaka Mera; Masahiro Kitajima; Kunie Ishioka; Yoshihisa Harada; Yoshinori Kitajima; Shik Shin; Koji Maeda

    2008-01-01

    对渗气阴极真空电弧法制备的四而体非晶炭(ta-c)膜实施氧等离子体刻蚀,消除其表面石墨层后,发现:原沉积膜中ta-C石墨表层的消除会影响其受激电子的石墨建序化.应用发射电子能耗谱,表面增强拉曼光谱和表面敏化X光吸收光谱等测量方法,测定了其表层的淌除(程度).样品的氧等离子体刻蚀阻迟了受激电子的石墨化作用,可能归因于多相成核过程中石墨晶核的缺失之故.%Electron-stimulated graphitic ordering in tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) films was found to be affected by the removal of the graphitic surface layer present in as-deposited films. To remove the graphitic layer on ta-C films fabricated by the filtered cathodic vacuum are method, the sample was etched with oxygen plasma. The removal of the surface layer was examined by transmission electron energy loss spectroscopy, surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy,and surface-sensitive X-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements. The electron-stimulated graphitization was retarded in oxygen plasma etched samples presumably owing to the lack of graphitic nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation.

  10. Electrons and phonons in amorphous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Kiran; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    The coupling between lattice vibrations and electrons is one of the central concepts of condensed matter physics. The subject has been deeply studied for crystalline materials, but far less so for amorphous and glassy materials, which are among the most important for applications. In this paper, we explore the electron-lattice coupling using current tools of a first-principles computer simulation. We choose three materials to illustrate the phenomena: amorphous silicon (a-Si), amorphous selenium (a-Se) and amorphous gallium nitride (a-GaN). In each case, we show that there is a strong correlation between the localization of electron states and the magnitude of thermally induced fluctuations in energy eigenvalues obtained from the density-functional theory (i.e. Kohn-Sham eigenvalues). We provide a heuristic theory to explain these observations. The case of a-GaN, a topologically disordered partly ionic insulator, is distinctive compared to the covalent amorphous examples. Next, we explore the consequences of changing the charge state of a system as a proxy for tracking photo-induced structural changes in the materials. Where transport is concerned, we lend insight into the Meyer-Neldel compensation rule and discuss a thermally averaged Kubo-Greenwood formula as a means to estimate electrical conductivity and especially its temperature dependence. We close by showing how the optical gap of an amorphous semiconductor can be computationally engineered with the judicious use of Hellmann-Feynman forces (associated with a few defect states) using molecular dynamics simulations. These forces can be used to close or open an optical gap, and identify a structure with a prescribed gap. We use the approach with plane-wave density functional methods to identify a low-energy amorphous phase of silicon including several coordination defects, yet with a gap close to that of good quality a-Si models.

  11. Iron-based amorphous alloys and methods of synthesizing iron-based amorphous alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Cheng Kiong; Bauer, William A.; Choi, Jor-Shan; Day, Dan; Farmer, Joseph C.

    2016-05-03

    A method according to one embodiment includes combining an amorphous iron-based alloy and at least one metal selected from a group consisting of molybdenum, chromium, tungsten, boron, gadolinium, nickel phosphorous, yttrium, and alloys thereof to form a mixture, wherein the at least one metal is present in the mixture from about 5 atomic percent (at %) to about 55 at %; and ball milling the mixture at least until an amorphous alloy of the iron-based alloy and the at least one metal is formed. Several amorphous iron-based metal alloys are also presented, including corrosion-resistant amorphous iron-based metal alloys and radiation-shielding amorphous iron-based metal alloys.

  12. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater

  13. The Infrared Spectra and Absorption Intensities of Amorphous Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.; Loeffler, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Our research group is carrying out new IR measurements of icy solids relevant to the outer solar system and to the interstellar medium, with an emphasis on amorphous and crystalline ices below ~ 120 K. Our goal is to update and add to the relatively meager literature on this subject and to provide electronic versions of state-of-the-art data, since the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate reference spectra and IR band strengths. In the past year, we have focused on three of the simplest and most abundant components of interstellar and solar-system ices: methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methanol (CH3OH). Infrared spectra from ˜ 4500 to 500 cm-1 have been measured for each of these molecules in μm-thick films at temperatures from 10 to 120 K. All known amorphous and crystalline phases have been reproduced and, for some, presented for the first time. We also report measurements of the index of refraction at 670 nm and the mass densities for each ice phase. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible. Electronic versions of our new results are available at http://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/691/cosmicice/ constants.html.

  14. The effects of cluster carbon implantation at low temperature on damage recovery after annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoda, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro

    2012-11-01

    Amorphous Si layer formation with cluster carbon ion implantations at low substrate temperature and its effects on damage recovery and diffusion suppression have been discussed. Cluster carbon molecule species (C3Hx˜C7Hx), implantation temperature (RT ˜ -60°C), implantation dose and energy were used as parameters. Amorphous Si formation by cluster carbon implantation is more effective compared with monomer carbon implantation. Low temperature cluster carbon implantations increase amorphous Si thickness far beyond monomer carbon implantation even at very low temperature. Amorphous-crystal interface smoothness was characterized by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, and is improved by lower temperature implantations. The smoothness improvement affects the residual damage, End of Range Defects, after annealing. Thicker amorphous Si over 100 nm depth can be formed with light Cn+ molecule implantations. That makes it possible to suppress wide distributed phosphorus diffusion.

  15. Influence of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raijada, Dhara K; Singh, Saranjit; Bansal, Arvind K

    2010-01-01

    The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline pH, respectiv......The effect of microenvironment pH, humidity, and temperature was evaluated on the stability of polymorphic and amorphous forms of clopidogrel bisulfate, when present alone or in combinations. Oxalic acid and sodium carbonate were used as solid stressors to create acidic and alkaline p...... salt to free base. Thermal studies indicated that polymorphic forms of clopidogrel bisulfate and also its glassy amorphous form were highly resistant to temperature, whereas the rubbery state of the drug degraded significantly at temperatures of > or =80 degrees C....

  16. Indirect involvement of armorphous carbon layer on convective heat transfer enhancement using carbon nanofibers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taha, T.J.; Lefferts, L.; Meer, van der T.H.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an experimental heat transfer investigation was carried out to investigate the combined influence of both amorphous carbon (a-C) layer thickness and carbon nanofibers (CNFs) on the convective heat transfer behavior. Synthesis of these carbon nanostructures was achieved using catalytic

  17. Structural Evolution of Compressing Amorphous Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan; DONG Shun-Le

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to study structural evolution during compressing low density amorphous ice from one atmosphere to 2.5 GPa.The calculated results show that high density amorphous ice is formed under intermediate pressure of about 1.0 GPa and O-O-O angle ranges from about 83°to 113°and O-H……O is bent from 112°to 160°.The very high density amorphous ice is also formed under the pressure larger than 1.4 GPa and interstitial molecules are found in 0.3-0.4 (A) just beyond the nearest O-O distance.Low angle O-H……O disappears and it is believed that these hydrogen bonds are broken or re-bonded under high pressures.

  18. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, J.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Condensed Matter and Interfaces, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR-vis upconverter {beta}-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}(18%) Er{sup 3+}(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in combination with a white back reflector and its response to infrared irradiation. Current-voltage measurements and spectral response measurements were done on experimental solar cells. An enhancement of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} was measured under illumination with a 980 nm diode laser (10 mW). A part of this was due to defect absorption in localized states of the amorphous silicon. (author)

  19. Atomistic explanation of shear-induced amorphous band formation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Cheng, Tao

    2014-08-29

    Boron carbide (B4C) is very hard, but its applications are hindered by stress-induced amorphous band formation. To explain this behavior, we used density function theory (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor) to examine the response to shear along 11 plausible slip systems. We found that the (0111)/ slip system has the lowest shear strength (consistent with previous experimental studies) and that this slip leads to a unique plastic deformation before failure in which a boron-carbon bond between neighboring icosahedral clusters breaks to form a carbon lone pair (Lewis base) on the C within the icosahedron. Further shear then leads this Lewis base C to form a new bond with the Lewis acidic B in the middle of a CBC chain. This then initiates destruction of this icosahedron. The result is the amorphous structure observed experimentally. We suggest how this insight could be used to strengthen B4C.

  20. Dynamics of CO in Amorphous Water Ice Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Karssemeijer, L J; van Hemert, M C; van der Avoird, A; Allodi, M A; Blake, G A; Cuppen, H M

    2013-01-01

    The long-timescale behavior of adsorbed carbon monoxide on the surface of amorphous water ice is studied under dense cloud conditions by means of off-lattice, on-the-fly, kinetic Monte Carlo simula- tions. It is found that the CO mobility is strongly influenced by the morphology of the ice substrate. Nanopores on the surface provide strong binding sites which can effectively immobilize the adsorbates at low coverage. As the coverage increases, these strong binding sites are gradually occupied leav- ing a number of admolecules with the ability to diffuse over the surface. Binding energies, and the energy barrier for diffusion are extracted for various coverages. Additionally, the mobility of CO is determined from isothermal desorption experiments. Reasonable agreement on the diffusivity of CO is found with the simulations. Analysis of the 2152 cm$^{-1}$, polar CO band supports the computational findings that the pores in the water ice provide the strongest binding sites and dominate diffusion at low temperatur...

  1. Raman Amplifier Based on Amorphous Silicon Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Ferrara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The observation of stimulated Raman scattering in amorphous silicon nanoparticles embedded in Si-rich nitride/silicon superlattice structures (SRN/Si-SLs is reported. Using a 1427 nm continuous-wavelength pump laser, an amplification of Stokes signal up to 0.9 dB/cm at 1540.6 nm and a significant reduction in threshold power of about 40% with respect to silicon are experimentally demonstrated. Our results indicate that amorphous silicon nanoparticles are a great promise for Si-based Raman lasers.

  2. Atomistic and infrared study of CO-water amorphous ice onto olivine dust grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla-Roa, Elizabeth; Moreno, Fernando; López-Moreno, J. Juan; Sainz-Díaz, C. Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    This work is a study of CO and H2O molecules as adsorbates that interact on the surface of olivine dust grains. Olivine (forsterite) is present on the Earth, planetary dust, in the interstellar medium (ISM) and in particular in comets. The composition of amorphous ice is very important for the interpretation of processes that occur in the solar system and the ISM. Dust particles in ISM are composed of a heterogeneous mixture of amorphous or crystalline silicates (e.g. olivine) organic material, carbon, and other minor constituents. These dust grains are embedded in a matrix of ices, such as H2O, CO, CO2, NH3, and CH4. We consider that any amorphous ice will interact and grow faster on dust grain surfaces. In this work we explore the adsorption of CO-H2O amorphous ice onto several (100) forsterite surfaces (dipolar and non-dipolar), by using first principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). These models are applied to two possible situations: i) adsorption of CO molecules mixed into an amorphous ice matrix (gas mixture) and adsorbed directly onto the forsterite surface. This interaction has lower adsorption energy than polar molecules (H2O and NH3) adsorbed on this surface; ii) adsorption of CO when the surface has previously been covered by amorphous water ice (onion model). In this case the calculations show that adsorption energy is low, indicating that this interaction is weak and therefore the CO can be desorbed with a small increase of temperature. Vibration spectroscopy for the most stable complex was also studied and the frequencies were in good agreement with experimental frequency values.

  3. Solvent-mediated amorphous-to-crystalline transformation of nitrendipine in amorphous particle suspensions containing polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Dengning; Wu, Jian-Xiong; Cui, Fude;

    2012-01-01

    quantitatively determined using image analysis based on polarized light microscopy. The findings from the image analysis revealed that the transformation process occurred through the dissolution of amorphous drug precipitate followed by the nucleation and growth of the crystalline phase with the amorphous....... However, a further increase in drug concentration to 100mg/ml decelerated the growth of nitrendipine crystals. Combining image analysis of polarized light micrographs together with Raman spectroscopy and XRPD provided an in-depth insight into solid state transformations in amorphous nitrendipine...

  4. Hydrogen Bonding Interactions in Amorphous Indomethacin and Its Amorphous Solid Dispersions with Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) and Poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate) Studied Using (13)C Solid-State NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoda; Xiang, Tian-Xiang; Anderson, Bradley D; Munson, Eric J

    2015-12-07

    Hydrogen bonding interactions in amorphous indomethacin and amorphous solid dispersions of indomethacin with poly(vinylpyrrolidone), or PVP, and poly(vinylpyrrolidone-co-vinyl acetate), or PVP/VA, were investigated quantitatively using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. Indomethacin that was (13)C isotopically labeled at the carboxylic acid carbon was used to selectively analyze the carbonyl region of the spectrum. Deconvolution of the carboxylic acid carbon peak revealed that 59% of amorphous indomethacin molecules were hydrogen bonded through carboxylic acid cyclic dimers, 15% were in disordered carboxylic acid chains, 19% were hydrogen bonded through carboxylic acid and amide interactions, and the remaining 7% were free of hydrogen bonds. The standard dimerization enthalpy and entropy of amorphous indomethacin were estimated to be -38 kJ/mol and -91 J/(mol · K), respectively, using polystyrene as the "solvent". Polymers such as PVP and PVP/VA disrupted indomethacin self-interactions and formed hydrogen bonds with the drug. The carboxylic acid dimers were almost completely disrupted with 50% (wt) of PVP or PVP/VA. The fraction of disordered carboxylic acid chains also decreased as the polymer content increased. The solid-state NMR results were compared with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations from the literature. The present work highlights the potential of (13)C solid-state NMR to detect and quantify various hydrogen bonded species in amorphous solid dispersions as well as to serve as an experimental validation of MD simulations.

  5. Carbon Superatom Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canning, A. [Cray Research, PSE, EPFL, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Canning, A.; Galli, G. [Institut Romand de Recherche Numerique en Physique des Materiaux (IRRMA), IN-Ecublens, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Kim, J. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    1997-06-01

    We report on quantum molecular dynamics simulations of C{sub 28} deposition on a semiconducting surface. Our results show that under certain deposition conditions C{sub 28} {close_quote}s act as building blocks on a nanometer scale to form a thin film of nearly defect-free molecules. The C{sub 28} {close_quote}s behave as carbon superatoms, with the majority of them being threefold or fourfold coordinated, similar to carbon atoms in amorphous systems. The microscopic structure of the deposited film supports recent suggestions about the stability of a new form of carbon, the hyperdiamond solid. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Production, Properties and Applications of Bulk Amorphous Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Zhang; Akihisa Inoue

    2000-01-01

    A review is given of recent work concerned with the production method, the characteristic properties(1) Bulk amorphous system; (2) Mechanical and magnetic properties of bulkamorphous alloys; (3)application of bulk amorphous alloys.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Multipacting Suppression by amorphous Carbon Coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Holz, Michael

    The presence of electron cloud is considered as the most important limitation concerning the quality of the particle beam in the accelerators, especially with respect to the forthcoming LHC luminosity upgrade. The electron cloud can be mitigated by coating the vacuum beam chambers with thin films of low secondary electron yield (SEY). This technique is applied to two stand-alone main bending dipoles of the SPS, where the RF power is fed through a tungsten wire, stretched inside the vacuum chamber. A dipole with a bare stainless steel chamber shows a clear power threshold initiating an abrupt rise in reflected power and pressure. The effect is enhanced at RF frequencies corresponding to electron cyclotron resonances for given magnetic fields. The first results of a fully coated beam chamber do not exhibit any pressure rise or reflected RF power up to the maximum available input power. Here, reflected power has been observed only once and could not be reproduced. The results of a partially coated beam chamber s...

  8. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  9. Athermal nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Smarajit; Lerner, Edan; Procaccia, Itamar

    2010-08-01

    We derive expressions for the lowest nonlinear elastic constants of amorphous solids in athermal conditions (up to third order), in terms of the interaction potential between the constituent particles. The effect of these constants cannot be disregarded when amorphous solids undergo instabilities such as plastic flow or fracture in the athermal limit; in such situations the elastic response increases enormously, bringing the system much beyond the linear regime. We demonstrate that the existing theory of thermal nonlinear elastic constants converges to our expressions in the limit of zero temperature. We motivate the calculation by discussing two examples in which these nonlinear elastic constants play a crucial role in the context of elastoplasticity of amorphous solids. The first example is the plasticity-induced memory that is typical to amorphous solids (giving rise to the Bauschinger effect). The second example is how to predict the next plastic event from knowledge of the nonlinear elastic constants. Using the results of our calculations we derive a simple differential equation for the lowest eigenvalue of the Hessian matrix in the external strain near mechanical instabilities; this equation predicts how the eigenvalue vanishes at the mechanical instability and the value of the strain where the mechanical instability takes place.

  10. Electrodeposition of amorphous gold alloy films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Masaru; Senda, Kazutaka [Central Research Laboratory, Kanto Chemical Co., Inc., Saitama 340-0003 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Musha, Yuta [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Sasano, Junji [Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Okinaka, Yutaka [Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Osaka, Tetsuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan); Advanced Research Institute for Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: osakatet@waseda.jp

    2007-11-20

    The process for electroplating amorphous gold-nickel-tungsten alloy that we developed previously based on the addition of a gold salt to a known amorphous Ni-W electroplating solution was investigated further using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method for the purpose of quickly surveying the effects of various experimental variables on the microstructure of the alloy. In this system the gold concentration in the plating bath was found to be critical; i.e., when it is either very low or very high, the deposit becomes crystalline to XRD. The deposit composition varies linearly with the mole ratio of Au to Ni in solution, and the alloy deposit is amorphous to XRD when the atomic ratio of Au/Ni in the deposit is between 0.5 and 1.5. At suitable concentrations of the metal ions, the deposit contains essentially no tungsten. By extending the work on the Au-Ni-W system, an amorphous Au-Co alloy plating process was also developed.

  11. Radiative recombination of excitons in amorphous semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Jai [School of Engineering and Logistics, Faculty Technology, B-41, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, NT 0909 (Australia)]. E-mail: jai.singh@cdu.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    A theory for calculating the radiative lifetime of excitons in amorphous semiconductors is presented. Four possibilities of excitonic radiative recombination are considered and the corresponding rates are derived at thermal equilibrium. The radiative lifetime is calculated from the inverse of the maximum rate for all the four possibilities. Results agree very well with experiments.

  12. Noise and degradation of amorphous silicon devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, J.P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Electrical noise measurements are reported on two devices of the disordered semiconductor hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The material is applied in sandwich structures and in thin-film transistors (TFTs). In a sandwich configuration of an intrinsic layer and two thin doped layers, the obse

  13. Amorphous Alloy and Magnetic Stabilization Bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by NSFC,a research team led by Prof.Enze Min (CAS Member) from Research Institute of Petroleum Processing,through 20 years' effort,settled the puzzled grave issue that amorphous alloy material has small specific surface area and low thermal stability.

  14. Compaction of amorphous iron–boron powder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Mørup, Steen; Koch, Christian;

    1993-01-01

    report on attempts to compact amorphous iron–boron particles prepared by chemical reduction of Fe(II) ions in aqueous solution by NaBH4 (Ref. 2). The particles prepared in this way are pyrophoric, but can be passivated. The small particle size (10–100 nm), characteristic of this preparation technique...

  15. Trap level spectroscopy in amorphous semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor V

    2010-01-01

    Although amorphous semiconductors have been studied for over four decades, many of their properties are not fully understood. This book discusses not only the most common spectroscopic techniques but also describes their advantages and disadvantages.Provides information on the most used spectroscopic techniquesDiscusses the advantages and disadvantages of each technique

  16. Amorphous silicon for thin-film transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schropp, Rudolf Emmanuel Isidore

    1987-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) has considerable potential as a semiconducting material for large-area photoelectric and photovoltaic applications. Moreover, a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFT’s) are very well suited as switching devices in addressable liquid crystal display panels and addres

  17. Amorphous track models: a numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Hahn, Ute;

    Amorphous track models such as Katz' Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach [1, 2] or the Local Effect Model (LEM) [3, 4] had reasonable success in predicting the response of solid state dosimeters and radiobiological systems. LEM is currently applied in radiotherapy for biological dose optimization in ca...

  18. Amorphous track models: A numerical comparison study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, L.; Bassler, N.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an open-source code library for amorphous track modelling which is suppose to faciliate the application and numerical comparability as well as serve as a frame-work for the implementation of new models. We show an example of using the library indicating the choice of submodels has a si...

  19. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger;

    2015-01-01

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co......-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed...... the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from...

  20. Homogeneous Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Composites Prepared by Catalyzed Carbonization Approach at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjiang Li

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize carbon nanotube (CNT/carbon composite using catalyzed carbonization of CNT/Epoxy Resin composite at a fairly low temperature of about 400∘C. The microstructure of the composite is characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscope (TEM, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results indicate that CNTs and pyrolytic carbon blend well with each other. Pyrolytic carbon mainly stays in an amorphous state, with some of it forming crystalline structures. The catalyst has the effect of eliminating the interstices in the composites. Remarkable increases in thermal and electrical conductivity are also reported.

  1. Transitions of amorphous- crystalline-amorphous in bulk metallic glass under HP and HT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In-situ SR-XRD measurements revealed that the crystallization process in Zr41.2Ti13.sCu12.5Ni10Be22.5 bulk metallic glass is significantly different from that in traditional glasses. Subsequent heating at 10 GPa converts the sample from amorphous phase into the metastable fcc phase and then leads to the fcc phase back to the amorphous phase,nomena in the material under high pressure and high temperature.``

  2. The Metastable Persistence of Vapor-Deposited Amorphous Ice at Anomalously High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, David F.; Jenniskens, Peter; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Studies of the gas release, vaporization behavior and infrared (IR) spectral properties of amorphous and crystalline water ice have direct application to cometary and planetary outgassing phenomena and contribute to an understanding of the physical properties of astrophysical ices. Several investigators report anomalous phenomena related to the warming of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs. However gas release, ice volatilization and IR spectral features are secondary or tertiary manifestations of ice structure or morphology. These observations are useful in mimicking the bulk physical and chemical phenomena taking place in cometary and other extraterrestrial ices but do not directly reveal the structural changes which are their root cause. The phenomenological interpretation of spectral and gas release data is probably the cause of somewhat contradictory explanations invoked to account for differences in water ice behavior in similar temperature regimes. It is the microstructure, micromorphology and microchemical heterogeneity of astrophysical ices which must be characterized if the mechanisms underlying the observed phenomena are to be understood. We have been using a modified Transmission Electron Microscope to characterize the structure of vapor-deposited astrophysical ice analogs as a function of their deposition, temperature history and composition. For the present experiments, pure water vapor is deposited at high vacuum onto a 15 K amorphous carbon film inside an Hitachi H-500H TEM. The resulting ice film (approx. 0.05 micrometers thick) is warmed at the rate of 1 K per minute and diffraction patterns are collected at 1 K intervals. These patterns are converted into radial intensity distributions which are calibrated using patterns of crystalline gold deposited on a small part of the carbon substrate. The small intensity contributed by the amorphous substrate is removed by background subtraction. The proportions of amorphous and crystalline material

  3. Thon rings from amorphous ice and implications of beam-induced Brownian motion in single particle electron cryo-microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, G; Vinothkumar, K R; Henderson, R

    2015-11-01

    We have recorded dose-fractionated electron cryo-microscope images of thin films of pure flash-frozen amorphous ice and pre-irradiated amorphous carbon on a Falcon II direct electron detector using 300 keV electrons. We observe Thon rings [1] in both the power spectrum of the summed frames and the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. The Thon rings from amorphous carbon images are always more visible in the power spectrum of the summed frames whereas those of amorphous ice are more visible in the sum of power spectra from the individual frames. This difference indicates that while pre-irradiated carbon behaves like a solid during the exposure, amorphous ice behaves like a fluid with the individual water molecules undergoing beam-induced motion. Using the measured variation in the power spectra amplitude with number of electrons per image we deduce that water molecules are randomly displaced by a mean squared distance of ∼1.1 Å(2) for every incident 300 keV e(-)/Å(2). The induced motion leads to an optimal exposure with 300 keV electrons of 4.0 e(-)/Å(2) per image with which to observe Thon rings centred around the strong 3.7 Å scattering peak from amorphous ice. The beam-induced movement of the water molecules generates pseudo-Brownian motion of embedded macromolecules. The resulting blurring of single particle images contributes an additional term, on top of that from radiation damage, to the minimum achievable B-factor for macromolecular structure determination.

  4. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi [Nissin Ion Equipment Co., Ltd., 575 Kuze Tonoshiro-cho, Minami-ku, Kyoto, 601-8205 (Japan)

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  5. Newly developed stepwise electroless deposition enables a remarkably facile synthesis of highly active and stable amorphous Pd nanoparticle electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Kee Chun; Tan, Desmond C L; Vo, Thang D T; Khezri, Bahareh; Su, Haibin; Webster, Richard D; Sato, Hirotaka

    2014-04-09

    This paper reports on highly active and stable amorphous Pd nanoparticle electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. The amorphous catalysts were synthesized by a remarkably facile and quick electroless deposition process newly developed in this study (process time <5 min). An electrode substrate (glassy carbon, carbon cloth) was sequentially dipped for 10 s into two separate solutions of a reducing agent (sodium hypophosphite (NaH2PO2)) and Pd ions to deposit amorphous Pd nanoparticles containing phosphorus (Pd-P). By repeating the deposition cycles, the specific and mass activities of the Pd nanoparticles can be actively tuned. Owing to the nanoscale amorphous nature, the obtained Pd-P nanoparticle electrocatalysts exhibited superior specific and mass activities compared with crystalline Pd nanoparticles synthesized by another reducing agent (N2H4) and commercial Pt-loaded carbon (Pt/C) and Pd-loaded carbon (Pd/C). The specific and mass activities of the amorphous Pd-P nanoparticles were over 4.5 times and 2.6 times higher than previously reported values of Pd and Pt catalysts.

  6. Modelling structure and properties of amorphous silicon boron nitride ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Christian Schön

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon boron nitride is the parent compound of a new class of high-temperature stable amorphous ceramics constituted of silicon, boron, nitrogen, and carbon, featuring a set of properties that is without precedent, and represents a prototypical random network based on chemical bonds of predominantly covalent character. In contrast to many other amorphous materials of technological interest, a-Si3B3N7 is not produced via glass formation, i.e. by quenching from a melt, the reason being that the binary components, BN and Si3N4, melt incongruently under standard conditions. Neither has it been possible to employ sintering of μm-size powders consisting of binary nitrides BN and Si3N4. Instead, one employs the so-called sol-gel route starting from single component precursors such as TADB ((SiCl3NH(BCl2. In order to determine the atomic structure of this material, it has proven necessary to simulate the actual synthesis route.Many of the exciting properties of these ceramics are closely connected to the details of their amorphous structure. To clarify this structure, it is necessary to employ not only experimental probes on many length scales (X-ray, neutron- and electron scattering; complex NMR experiments; IR- and Raman scattering, but also theoretical approaches. These address the actual synthesis route to a-Si3B3N7, the structural properties, the elastic and vibrational properties, aging and coarsening behaviour, thermal conductivity and the metastable phase diagram both for a-Si3B3N7 and possible silicon boron nitride phases with compositions different from Si3N4: BN = 1 : 3. Here, we present a short comprehensive overview over the insights gained using molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations to explore the energy landscape of a-Si3B3N7, model the actual synthesis route and compute static and transport properties of a-Si3BN7.

  7. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  8. Breakdown of elasticity in amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biroli, Giulio; Urbani, Pierfrancesco

    2016-12-01

    What characterizes a solid is the way that it responds to external stresses. Ordered solids, such as crystals, exhibit an elastic regime followed by a plastic regime, both understood microscopically in terms of lattice distortion and dislocations. For amorphous solids the situation is instead less clear, and the microscopic understanding of the response to deformation and stress is a very active research topic. Several studies have revealed that even in the elastic regime the response is very jerky at low temperature, resembling very much the response of disordered magnetic materials. Here we show that in a very large class of amorphous solids this behaviour emerges upon decreasing temperature, as a phase transition, where standard elastic behaviour breaks down. At the transition all nonlinear elastic moduli diverge and standard elasticity theory no longer holds. Below the transition, the response to deformation becomes history- and time-dependent.

  9. Fetus Amorphous Acardious – A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Kamakeri

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fetus amorphous acardious is a rare fetal malformation lacking a functional heart and bearing no resemblance to human embryos. The main differential diagnosis is with placental teratoma and is based on the degree of skeletal organization and umbilical cord formation. A 26 year old woman delivered a healthy newborn at 38 weeks of gestation by caesarian section. An amorphous mass covered with healthy looking skin was connected to the placenta with a short pedicle. Xray examination of the mass revealed the presence of vertebral column associated with ribs and pelvic bones and axial skeleton. Histopathological examination demonstrates the presence of cartilage, bone, adipose tissue, skin with adnexal structures and neural tissue.

  10. Crystalline-Amorphous Core−Shell Silicon Nanowires for High Capacity and High Current Battery Electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Li-Feng

    2009-01-14

    Silicon is an attractive alloy-type anode material for lithium ion batteries because of its highest known capacity (4200 mAh/g). However silicon\\'s large volume change upon lithium insertion and extraction, which causes pulverization and capacity fading, has limited its applications. Designing nanoscale hierarchical structures is a novel approach to address the issues associated with the large volume changes. In this letter, we introduce a core-shell design of silicon nanowires for highpower and long-life lithium battery electrodes. Silicon crystalline- amorphous core-shell nanowires were grown directly on stainless steel current collectors by a simple one-step synthesis. Amorphous Si shells instead of crystalline Si cores can be selected to be electrochemically active due to the difference of their lithiation potentials. Therefore, crystalline Si cores function as a stable mechanical support and an efficient electrical conducting pathway while amorphous shells store Li ions. We demonstrate here that these core-shell nanowires have high charge storage capacity (̃1000 mAh/g, 3 times of carbon) with ̃90% capacity retention over 100 cycles. They also show excellent electrochemical performance at high rate charging and discharging (6.8 A/g, ̃20 times of carbon at 1 h rate). © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  11. Metastable states in amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Mikla, Victor I

    2009-01-01

    This book addresses an interesting and technologically important class of materials, the amorphous chalcogenide semiconductors. Experimental results on the structural and electronic metastable states in Se-rich chalcogenides are presented. Special attention is paid to the states in the mobility gap and their sensitivity to various factors such as irradiation, annealing and composition. Photoinduced changes of structure and physical properties are also considered and structural transformation at photocrystallization is studied in detail. Finally, the authors discuss potential applications of th

  12. Formation of iron disilicide on amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlesand, U.; Östling, M.; Bodén, K.

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of iron disilicide, β-FeSi 2 were formed on both amorphous silicon and on crystalline silicon. The β-phase is reported to be semiconducting with a direct band-gap of about 0.85-0.89 eV. This phase is known to form via a nucleation-controlled growth process on crystalline silicon and as a consequence a rather rough silicon/silicide interface is usually formed. In order to improve the interface a bilayer structure of amorphous silicon and iron was sequentially deposited on Czochralski silicon in an e-gun evaporation system. Secondary ion mass spectrometry profiling (SIMS) and scanning electron micrographs revealed an improvement of the interface sharpness. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray diffractiometry showed β-FeSi 2 formation already at 525°C. It was also observed that the silicide growth was diffusion-controlled, similar to what has been reported for example in the formation of NiSi 2 for the reaction of nickel on amorphous silicon. The kinetics of the FeSi 2 formation in the temperature range 525-625°C was studied by RBS and the activation energy was found to be 1.5 ± 0.1 eV.

  13. Concurrent multiscale modeling of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Vincent

    2013-03-01

    An approach to multiscale modeling of amorphous materials is presented whereby atomistic scale domains coexist with continuum-like domains. The atomistic domains faithfully predict severe deformation while the continuum domains allow the computation to scale up the size of the model without incurring excessive computational costs associated with fully atomistic models and without the introduction of spurious forces across the boundary of atomistic and continuum-like domains. The material domain is firstly constructed as a tessellation of Amorphous Cells (AC). For regions of small deformation, the number of degrees of freedom is then reduced by computing the displacements of only the vertices of the ACs instead of the atoms within. This is achieved by determining, a priori, the atomistic displacements within such Pseudo Amorphous Cells associated with orthogonal deformation modes of the cell. Simulations of nanoscale polymer tribology using full molecular mechanics computation and our multiscale approach give almost identical prediction of indentation force and the strain contours of the polymer. We further demonstrate the capability of performing adaptive simulations during which domains that were discretized into cells revert to full atomistic domains when their strain attain a predetermined threshold. The authors would like to acknowledge the financial support given to this study by the Agency of Science, Technology and Research (ASTAR), Singapore (SERC Grant No. 092 137 0013).

  14. Shock induced crystallization of amorphous Nickel powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukara, Mathew; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental work has shown the efficacy of amorphous Ni/crystalline Al composites as energetic materials, with flame velocities twice that of a comparable crystalline Ni/crystalline Al system. Of further interest is the recrystallization mechanisms in the pure amorphous Ni powders, both thermally induced and mechanically induced. We present large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced recrystallization in loosely packed amorphous Nickel powders. We study the time dependent nucleation and growth processes by holding the shocked samples at the induced pressures and temperatures for extended periods following the passage of the shock (up to 6 ns). We find that the nanostructure of the recrystallized Ni and time scales of recrystallization are dependent on the piston velocity. At low piston velocities, nucleation events are rare, leading to long incubation times and a relatively coarse nanostructure. At higher piston velocities, local variations in temperature due to jetting phenomena and void collapse, give rise to multiple nucleation events on time scales comparable to the passage of the shock wave, leading to the formation of a fine-grained nanostructure. Interestingly, we observe that the nucleation and growth process occurs in two steps, with the first nuclei crystallizing into the BCC structure, before evolving over time into the expected FCC structure. U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency, HDTRA1-10-1-0119 (Program Manager Suhithi Peiris).

  15. Interactions of hydrogen with amorphous hafnium oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas'ev, Valeri V.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2017-02-01

    We used density functional theory (DFT) calculations to study the interaction of hydrogen with amorphous hafnia (a -HfO2 ) using a hybrid exchange-correlation functional. Injection of atomic hydrogen, its diffusion towards electrodes, and ionization can be seen as key processes underlying charge instability of high-permittivity amorphous hafnia layers in many applications. Hydrogen in many wide band gap crystalline oxides exhibits negative-U behavior (+1 and -1 charged states are thermodynamically more stable than the neutral state) . Our results show that in a -HfO2 hydrogen is also negative-U, with charged states being the most thermodynamically stable at all Fermi level positions. However, metastable atomic hydrogen can share an electron with intrinsic electron trapping precursor sites [Phys. Rev. B 94, 020103 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.020103] forming a [etr -+O -H ] center, which is lower in energy on average by about 0.2 eV. These electron trapping sites can affect both the dynamics and thermodynamics of the interaction of hydrogen with a -HfO2 and the electrical behavior of amorphous hafnia films in CMOS devices.

  16. Amorphous molybdenum silicon superconducting thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bosworth

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous superconductors have become attractive candidate materials for superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors due to their ease of growth, homogeneity and competitive superconducting properties. To date the majority of devices have been fabricated using WxSi1−x, though other amorphous superconductors such as molybdenum silicide (MoxSi1−x offer increased transition temperature. This study focuses on the properties of MoSi thin films grown by magnetron sputtering. We examine how the composition and growth conditions affect film properties. For 100 nm film thickness, we report that the superconducting transition temperature (Tc reaches a maximum of 7.6 K at a composition of Mo83Si17. The transition temperature and amorphous character can be improved by cooling of the substrate during growth which inhibits formation of a crystalline phase. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy studies confirm the absence of long range order. We observe that for a range of 6 common substrates (silicon, thermally oxidized silicon, R- and C-plane sapphire, x-plane lithium niobate and quartz, there is no variation in superconducting transition temperature, making MoSi an excellent candidate material for SNSPDs.

  17. Characterization of Amorphous and Co-Amorphous Simvastatin Formulations Prepared by Spray Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craye, Goedele; Löbmann, Korbinian; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas; Laitinen, Riikka

    2015-12-03

    In this study, spray drying from aqueous solutions, using the surface-active agent sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) as a solubilizer, was explored as a production method for co-amorphous simvastatin-lysine (SVS-LYS) at 1:1 molar mixtures, which previously have been observed to form a co-amorphous mixture upon ball milling. In addition, a spray-dried formulation of SVS without LYS was prepared. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) revealed that SLS coated the SVS and SVS-LYS particles upon spray drying. X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that in the spray-dried formulations the remaining crystallinity originated from SLS only. The best dissolution properties and a "spring and parachute" effect were found for SVS spray-dried from a 5% SLS solution without LYS. Despite the presence of at least partially crystalline SLS in the mixtures, all the studied formulations were able to significantly extend the stability of amorphous SVS compared to previous co-amorphous formulations of SVS. The best stability (at least 12 months in dry conditions) was observed when SLS was spray-dried with SVS (and LYS). In conclusion, spray drying of SVS and LYS from aqueous surfactant solutions was able to produce formulations with improved physical stability for amorphous SVS.

  18. Carbon. Examples of Property Realization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Kossko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Examples of realization of carbon properties in formation of section near-surface boundaries defining the mechanism of oxidizing (normal wear are presented. Synthesis of strengt hening diamond- lonsdaleite -carbene «frame» and graphite with function of solid lubricant on a friction surface in high-desperse carbon environment is reviewed. Prospects of carbon ap placation in implementation of the concept of electronics on one element, and also use of thin-film structures of amorphous carbon – metal for data recording are discussed.

  19. Analysis of the Formation of Multi-Layer Carbon Nanotubes in the Process of Mechanical Activation of the Pyrolysis Products of Vegetable Raw Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, V. P.; Filatenkov, A. E.; Yagofarov, V. U.; Gulevskii, D. A.; Kuryavyi, V. G.; Mansurov, Yu N.

    2016-04-01

    The carbon nanotubes are formed by pyrolytic and mechanochemical technology. Amorphous carbon is produced at 950°C and then subjected to mechanochemical treatment in a planetary mill for 1-46 h. Analysis ofinfluence of duration of mechanical activation of amorphous carbon on the morphology of moldable multilayer carbon nanotubes. It is demonstrated that prolonged mechanical activation of carbon composite in a vario-planetary mill promotes to formation of aggregates and amorphous carbon and to loss of thermal stability of nanotubeswith furtherconduct of vacuum annealing.

  20. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  1. Characterizing Amorphous Silicates in Extraterrestrial Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, X.; Wang, A.; Krawczynski, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Amorphous silicates are common in extraterrestrial materials. They are seen in the matrix of carbonaceous chondrites as well as in planetary materials. Tagish Lake is one of the most primitive carbonaceous meteorites in which TEM and XRD analyses found evidence for poorly crystalline phyllosilicate-like species; Raman spectra revealed amorphous silicates with variable degree of polymerization and low crystallinity. On Mars, CheMin discovered amorphous phases in all analyzed samples, and poorly crystalline smectite in mudstone samples. These discoveries pose questions on the crystallinity of phyllosilicates found by remote sensing on Mars, which is directly relevant to aqueous alteration during geologic history of Mars. Our goal is to use spectroscopy to better characterize amorphous silicates. We use three approaches: (1) using silicate glasses synthesized with controlled chemistry to study the effects of silicate polymerization and (2) using phyllosilicates synthesized with controlled hydrothermal treatment to study the effect of crystallinity on vibrational spectroscopy, finally (3) to use the developed correlations in above two steps to study amorphous phases in meteorites, and those found in future missions to Mars. In the 1st step, silicate glasses were synthesized from pure oxides in a range of NBO/T ratios (from 0 to 4). Depending on the targeted NBO/T and composition of mixed oxides, temperatures for each experiment fell in a range from 1260 to 1520 °C, run for ~ 4 hrs. The melt was quenched in liquid N2 or water. Homogeneity of glass was checked under optical microscopy. Raman spectra were taken over 100 spots on small chips free of bubbles and crystals. We have observed that accompanying an increase of NBO/T, there is a strengthening and a position shift of the Raman peak near 1000 cm-1 (Si-Onon-bridging stretching mode), and the weakening of broad Raman peaks near 500 cm-1 (ring breathing mode) and 700cm-1 (Si-Obridging-Si mode). We are building the

  2. CO2 capture in different carbon materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Vicente; Ramírez-Lucas, Ana; Díaz, José Antonio; Sánchez, Paula; Romero, Amaya

    2012-07-03

    In this work, the CO(2) capture capacity of different types of carbon nanofibers (platelet, fishbone, and ribbon) and amorphous carbon have been measured at 26 °C as at different pressures. The results showed that the more graphitic carbon materials adsorbed less CO(2) than more amorphous materials. Then, the aim was to improve the CO(2) adsorption capacity of the carbon materials by increasing the porosity during the chemical activation process. After chemical activation process, the amorphous carbon and platelet CNFs increased the CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.6 times, whereas fishbone and ribbon CNFs increased their CO(2) adsorption capacity 1.1 and 8.2 times, respectively. This increase of CO(2) adsorption capacity after chemical activation was due to an increase of BET surface area and pore volume in all carbon materials. Finally, the CO(2) adsorption isotherms showed that activated amorphous carbon exhibited the best CO(2) capture capacity with 72.0 wt % of CO(2) at 26 °C and 8 bar.

  3. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SIEGAL,MICHAEL P.; TALLANT,DAVID R.; PROVENCIO,PAULA P.; OVERMYER,DONALD L.; SIMPSON,REGINA L.; MARTINEZ-MIRANDA,L.J.

    2000-01-27

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5--10%. The authors report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approximately} 15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure.

  4. Ultrahard carbon nanocomposite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegal, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Tallant, D. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Provencio, P. N. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Overmyer, D. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Simpson, R. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1421 (United States); Martinez-Miranda, L. J. [Department of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2000-05-22

    Modest thermal annealing to 600 degree sign C of diamondlike amorphous-carbon (a-C) films grown at room temperature results in the formation of carbon nanocomposites with hardness similar to diamond. These nanocomposite films consist of nanometer-sized regions of high density a-C embedded in an a-C matrix with a reduced density of 5%-10%. We report on the evolution of density and bonding topologies as a function of annealing temperature. Despite a decrease in density, film hardness actually increases {approx}15% due to the development of the nanocomposite structure. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Spatial confinement can lead to increased stability of amorphous indomethacin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Gordon, Keith C.;

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the physical stability of amorphous indomethacin can be improved by separating the drug material into small units by the use of microcontainers. Crystallisation from the spatially confined amorphous indomethacin in the microcontainers was determined...... and compared with the crystallisation kinetics of amorphous bulk indomethacin.Amorphous indomethacin in both a bulk form and contained within microcontainers was prepared by melting of bulk or container-incorporated γ-indomethacin, respectively, followed by quench-cooling. Microcontainers of three different...... microcontainers of each size was selected and measured on a Raman microscope over a period of 30days to ascertain whether the indomethacin in each container was amorphous or crystalline. Over time, a crystallisation number was obtained for the amorphous indomethacin in the microcontainers. The crystallisation...

  6. Crystallization inhibition of an amorphous sucrose system using raffinose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LEINEN K.M.; LABUZA T.P.

    2006-01-01

    The shelf life of pure amorphous sucrose systems, such as cotton candy, can be very short. Previous studies have shown that amorphous sucrose systems held above the glass transition temperature will collapse and crystallize. One study,however, showed that adding a small percent of another type of sugar, such as trehalose, to sucrose can extend the shelf life of the amorphous system by slowing crystallization. This study explores the hypothesis that raffinose increases the stability of an amorphous sucrose system. Cotton candy at 5 wt% raffinose and 95 wt% sucrose was made and stored at room temperature and three different relative humidities (%RH) 11%RH, 33%RH, and 43%RH. XRD patterns, and glass transition temperatures were obtained to determine the stability as a function of %RH. The data collected showed that raffinose slows sucrose crystallization in a low moisture amorphous state above the glass transition temperature and therefore improves the stability of amorphous sucrose systems.

  7. [The development of co-amorphous drug systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jing; Shi, Nian-Qiu; Wang, Xing-Lin

    2013-05-01

    Converting two poorly water-soluble crystalline drugs to co-amorphous drug systems by ball milling, quench-cooling, or cryo-milling method can improve stability of the drug, enhance dissolution rates, and reduce adverse reactions of the single drug. Co-amorphous system has been used to solve problems of co-administration of medicines. Formation and intermolecular interactions of co-amorphous drug systems may be verified by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), Raman spectroscopy (RS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Stability of co-amorphous drug systems is influenced by their glass transition temperature (Tg) and intermolecular interactions. The theoretical Tg values and the interaction parameter x are calculated by Gordon-Taylor equation and the Flory-Huggins equation, respectively. Thus, co-amorphous drug systems are analyzed theoretically at molecular level. Co-amorphous drug systems provide a new sight for the co-administration of medicines.

  8. Template-assisted mineral formation via an amorphous liquid phase precursor route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Fairland F.

    The search for alternative routes to synthesize inorganic materials has led to the biomimetic route of producing ceramics. In this method, materials are manufactured at ambient temperatures and in aqueous solutions with soluble additives and insoluble matrix, similar to the biological strategy for the formation of minerals by living organisms. Using this approach, an anionic polypeptide additive was used to induce an amorphous liquid-phase precursor to either calcium carbonate or calcium phosphate. This precursor was then templated on either organic or inorganic substrates. Non-equilibrium morphologies, such as two-dimensional calcium carbonate films, one-dimensional calcium carbonate mesostructures and "molten" calcium phosphate spherulites were produced, which are not typical of the traditional (additive-free) solution grown crystals in the laboratory. In the study of calcium carbonate, the amorphous calcium carbonate mineral formed via the liquid-phase precursor, either underwent a dissolution-recrystallization event or a pseudo-solid-state transformation to produce different morphologies and polymorphs of the mineral. Discrete or aggregate calcite crystals were formed via the dissolution of the amorphous phase to allow the reprecipitation of the stable crystal. Non-equilibrium morphologies, e.g., films, mesotubules and mesowires were templated using organic and inorganic substrates and compartments. These structures were generated via an amorphous solid to crystalline solid transformation. Single crystalline tablets and mesowires of aragonite, which are reported to be found only in nature as skeletal structures of marine organisms, such as mollusk nacre and echinoderm teeth, were successfully synthesized. These biomimetic structures were grown via the polymer-induced liquid-phase precursor route in the presence of magnesium. Only low magnesium-bearing calcite was formed in the absence of the polymer. A similar approach of using a polymeric additive was

  9. Amorphous semiconductor solar cell having a grained transparent electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y.; Iida, H.; Itou, A.; Karasawa, H.; Mishuku, T.; Shiba, N.; Yamanaka, M.

    1985-02-19

    An amorphous semiconductor solar cell is disclosed which comprises a glass substrate and a transparent electrode coated on the substrate. The device also comprises an amorphous semiconductor layer on the transparent electrode, and a rear electrode on the amorphous layer, wherein the average grain diameter of the surface of the transparent electrode ranges from 0.1 ..mu..m to 2.5 ..mu..m.

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt-Carbon Core-Shell Microspheres in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-song Yang; Qian-wang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis of cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres in supercritical carbon dioxide system was investigated. Cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres with diameter of about 1μm were prepared at 350℃ for 12 h in a closed vessel containing an appropriate amount of bis(cyclopentadienyl)cobalt powder and dry ice.Characterization by a variety of techniques,including X-ray powder diffraction,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,Transmission electron microscope,Fourier transform infrared spectrum and Raman spectroscopy analysis reveals that each cobalt-carbon core-shell microsphere is made up of an amorphous cobalt core with diameter less than 1 μm and an amorphous carbon shell with thickness of about 200 nm.The possible growth mechanism of cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres is discussed,based on the pyrolysis of bis(cyclopentadienyl)cobalt in supercritical carbon dioxide and the deposition of carbon or carbon clusters with odd electrons on the surface of magnetic cobalt cores due to magnetic attraction.Magnetic measurements show 141.41 emu/g of saturation magnetization of a typical sample,which is lower than the 168 emu/g of the corresponding metal cobalt bulk material.This is attributed to the considerable mass of the carbon shell and amorphous nature of the magnetic core.Control of magnetism in the cobalt-carbon core-shell microspheres was achieved by annealing treatments.

  11. Delivery of poorly soluble compounds by amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Thomas W Y; Boersen, Nathan A; Hui, H W; Chow, S F; Wan, K Y; Chow, Albert H L

    2014-01-01

    Solid state manipulation by amorphous solid dispersion has been the subject of intensive research for decades due to their excellent potential for dissolution and bioavailability enhancement. The present review aims to highlight the latest advancement in this area, with focus on the fundamentals, characterization, formulation development and manufacturing of amorphous solid dispersions as well as the new generation amorphization technologies. Additionally, specific applications of amorphous solid dispersion in the formulation of herbal drugs or bioactive natural products are reviewed to reflect the growing interest in this relatively neglected area.

  12. Excessively High Vapor Pressure of Al-based Amorphous Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Im Jeong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum-based amorphous alloys exhibited an abnormally high vapor pressure at their approximate glass transition temperatures. The vapor pressure was confirmed by the formation of Al nanocrystallites from condensation, which was attributed to weight loss of the amorphous alloys. The amount of weight loss varied with the amorphous alloy compositions and was inversely proportional to their glass-forming ability. The vapor pressure of the amorphous alloys around 573 K was close to the vapor pressure of crystalline Al near its melting temperature, 873 K. Our results strongly suggest the possibility of fabricating nanocrystallites or thin films by evaporation at low temperatures.

  13. Surface magnetic anisotropy in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Rubio, H.; Elbaile, L.; Iglesias, R. (Univ. de Oviedo (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-11-01

    The total in-plane magnetic anisotropy and the in-plane surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been measured in nearly-zero magnetostrictive amorphous ribbons in as-quenched state. The magnetostatic energy of a two-dimensional square-lattice of parallelepipeds or ellipsoids, whose dimensions are determined by the parameters characterizing the roughness, is evaluated. From the results obtained, they can conclude that the in-plane surface anisotropy can be magnetostatic in origin but it has little influence on the total in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the ribbon.

  14. On the crystallization of amorphous germanium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, F.; Komem, Y.; Bendayan, M.; Beserman, R.

    1993-06-01

    The incubation time for crystallization of amorphous Ge (a-Ge) films, deposited by e-gun, was studied as a function of temperature between 150 and 500°C by means of both in situ transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering spectroscopy. The temperature dependence of t0 follows an Arrhenius curve with an activation energy of 2.0 eV for free-sustained a-Ge films. In the case where the a-Ge films were on Si 3N 4 substrate, the activation energy of the incubation process was 1.3 eV.

  15. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Tai; Chu-Hsuan Lin; Chih-Ming Wang; Chun-Chieh Lin

    2011-01-01

    Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si...

  16. Encoding of Memory in Sheared Amorphous Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, Davide; Foffi, Giuseppe; Sastry, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    We show that memory can be encoded in a model amorphous solid subjected to athermal oscillatory shear deformations, and in an analogous spin model with disordered interactions, sharing the feature of a deformable energy landscape. When these systems are subjected to oscillatory shear deformation, they retain memory of the deformation amplitude imposed in the training phase, when the amplitude is below a "localization" threshold. Remarkably, multiple persistent memories can be stored using such an athermal, noise-free, protocol. The possibility of such memory is shown to be linked to the presence of plastic deformations and associated limit cycles traversed by the system, which exhibit avalanche statistics also seen in related contexts.

  17. Femtosecond laser crystallization of amorphous Ge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salihoglu, Omer; Kürüm, Ulaş; Yaglioglu, H. Gul; Elmali, Ayhan; Aydinli, Atilla

    2011-06-01

    Ultrafast crystallization of amorphous germanium (a-Ge) in ambient has been studied. Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition grown a-Ge was irradiated with single femtosecond laser pulses of various durations with a range of fluences from below melting to above ablation threshold. Extensive use of Raman scattering has been employed to determine post solidification features aided by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements. Linewidth of the Ge optic phonon at 300 cm-1 as a function of laser fluence provides a signature for the crystallization of a-Ge. Various crystallization regimes including nanostructures in the form of nanospheres have been identified.

  18. Magnetic carbon nanostructures: microwave energy-assisted pyrolysis vs. conventional pyrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiahua; Pallavkar, Sameer; Chen, Minjiao; Yerra, Narendranath; Luo, Zhiping; Colorado, Henry A; Lin, Hongfei; Haldolaarachchige, Neel; Khasanov, Airat; Ho, Thomas C; Young, David P; Wei, Suying; Guo, Zhanhu

    2013-01-11

    Magnetic carbon nanostructures from microwave assisted- and conventional-pyrolysis processes are compared. Unlike graphitized carbon shells from conventional heating, different carbon shell morphologies including nanotubes, nanoflakes and amorphous carbon were observed. Crystalline iron and cementite were observed in the magnetic core, different from a single cementite phase from the conventional process.

  19. Appearance of perfect amorphous linear bulk polyethylene under applied electric field and the analysis by radial distribution function and direct tunneling effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Bin, Yuezhen; Yang, Wenxiao; Fan, Shaoyan; Matsuo, Masaru

    2014-02-27

    Without melting flow, linear ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) provided X-ray intensity curve from only amorphous halo at 129.0 °C (surface temperature, Ts arisen by Joule heat) lower than the conventionally known melting point 145.5 °C on applying electric field to UHMWPE-nickel-coated carbon fiber (NiCF) composite. Such surprising phenomenon was analyzed by simultaneous measurements of X-ray intensity, electric current, and Ts as a function of time. The calculated radial distribution function revealed the amorphous structure with disordered chain arrangement. The appearance of such amorphous phase was arisen by the phenomenon that the transferring electrons between overlapped adjacent NiCFs by tunneling effect struck together with X-ray photons and some of the transferring electron flown out from the gap to UHMWPE matrix collided against carbon atoms of UHMWPE. The impact by the collision caused disordering chain arrangement in crystal grains.

  20. Enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes by acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chensha Li; Baoyou Zhang; Xingjuan Chen; Xiaoqing Hu; Ji Liang

    2005-01-01

    Three approaches of treating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including acid treatment, air oxidization and heat treatment at high temperature were studied to enhance the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. High temperature heat-treatment elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes. Acid treatment removes parts of amorphous carbonaceous matter through its oxidization effect.Air oxidization disperses carbon nanotubes and amorphous carbonaceous matter. The treatment of combining acid treatment with heat-treatment further elevates the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes comparing with acid treatment or heat-treatment. The combination of the three treatments creates the thorough effects of enhancing the crystalline degree of carbon nanotubes.

  1. Synthesis and electrochemical evaluation of an amorphous titanium dioxide derived from a solid state precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joyce, Christopher D.; LaDuca, Holly; Lopez, Carmen M.; Jansen, Andrew N.; Vaughey, J.T. [Electrochemical Energy Storage Group, Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); McIntyre, Toni; Simmons, Sade; Breitzer, Jonathan G. [Department of Natural Science, Fayetteville State University, Fayetteville, NC (United States)

    2010-04-02

    Titanium oxides are an important class of lithium-ion battery electrodes owing to their good capacity and stability within the cell environment. Although most Ti(IV) oxides are poor electronic conductors, new methods developed to synthesize nanometer scale primary particles have achieved the higher rate capability needed for modern commercial applications. In this report, the anionic water stable titanium oxalate anion [TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-} was isolated in high yield as the insoluble DABCO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) salt. Powder X-ray diffraction studies show that the titanium dioxide material isolated after annealing in air is initially amorphous, converts to N-doped anatase above 400 C, then to rutile above 600 C. Electrochemical studies indicate that the amorphous titanium dioxide phase within a carbon matrix has a stable cycling capacity of {proportional_to}350 mAh g{sup -1}. On crystallizing at 400 C to a carbon-coated anatase the capacity drops to 210 mAh g{sup -1}, and finally upon carbon burn-off to 50 mAh g{sup -1}. Mixtures of the amorphous titanium dioxide and Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} showed a similar electrochemical profile and capacity to Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12} but with the addition of a sloping region to the end of the discharge curve that could be advantageous for determining state-of-charge in systems using Li{sub 4}Ti{sub 5}O{sub 12}. (author)

  2. POROUS AMORPHOUS FLUOROPOLYMER FILMS WITH ULTRALOW DIELECTRIC CONSTANT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING SHI-JIN; WANG PENG-FEI; ZHANG WEI; WANG JI-TAO; WEI WILLIAM LEE; ZHANG YE-WEN; KIA ZHONG-FU

    2000-01-01

    With the development of ultralarge scale integrated circuit, new interlayer dielectrics with low dielectric constant for multilevel interconnections are required, instead of conventional SiO2 films. For the sake of seeking perfect dielectrics, amorphous fluoropolymer (AF) thin film with a thickness of about 0.9μm has been prepared by spin-coating method, following the principle of phase separation. By capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements the dielectric constant of the thin film is equal to 1.57 at 1 MHz, which is attributed to numerous pores contained in the film matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) spectra show that after annealing, about 71% CFa groups in the AF film have decomposed into CF2, CF, etc. This leads to the increase of CF2 groups by three times and CF groups by 8% in the AF film. In a word, compared with the film without being annealed, about 25% carbon, 7% fluorine and 12% oxygen atoms will be lost after annealing at 400℃ for 30min.

  3. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ping; Zou, Xingquan; Chi, Lingfei; Li, Qiang; Xiao, Tan

    2007-03-01

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO2 and active carbon at 1000 °C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 µm. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiOx nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  4. Growth model of lantern-like amorphous silicon oxide nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Ping; Zou Xingquan; Chi Lingfei; Li Qiang; Xiao Tan [Department of Physics, Shantou University, Shantou 515063 (China)

    2007-03-28

    Silicon oxide nanowire assemblies with lantern-like morphology were synthesized by thermal evaporation of the mixed powder of SnO{sub 2} and active carbon at 1000 deg. C and using the silicon wafer as substrate and source. The nano-lanterns were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM), energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDS) and selective area electron diffraction (SAED). The results show that the nano-lantern has symmetrical morphology, with one end connecting with the silicon wafer and the other end being the tin ball. The diameter of the nano-lantern is about 1.5-3.0 {mu}m. Arc silicon oxide nanowire assemblies between the two ends have diameters ranging from 70 to 150 nm. One single catalyst tin ball catalyzes more than one amorphous nanowires' growth. In addition, the growth mechanism of the nano-lantern is discussed and a growth model is proposed. The multi-nucleation sites round the Sn droplet's perimeter are responsible for the formation of many SiO{sub x} nanowires. The growing direction of the nanowires is not in the same direction of the movement of the catalyst tin ball, resulting in the bending of the nanowires and forming the lantern-like silicon oxide morphology. The controllable synthesis of the lantern-like silicon oxide nanostructure may have potential applications in the photoelectronic devices field.

  5. Electronic and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogenated Irradiated and Amorphous Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    Defect engineering and chemical functionalization of graphene are promising routes for fabrication of carbon nanostructures and 2D metamaterials with unique properties and function. Here, we use hydrogenation of irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene as a means of studying chemical functionalization effects on its electronic structure and mechanical response. We use molecular-dynamics simulations based on a reliable bond-order potential to prepare the hydrogenated configurations and carry out dynamic deformation tests at constant strain rate and temperature. Our mechanical tests show that hydrogenation does not affect the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the irradiated graphene sheet if the hydrogenated C atoms remain sp2-hybridized; however, upon inducing sp3 hybridization of these C atoms, UTS decreases by about 10 GPa. Furthermore, the fracture strain of the irradiated structure decreases by up to 30% upon hydrogenation independent of the hybridization type. We also report results for the electronic structure of hydrogenated configurations based on a density-functional tight-binding approach and assess the potential for tuning the electronic properties of these defective, functionalized graphenes.

  6. Cyclic behaviors of amorphous shape memory polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kai; Li, Hao; McClung, Amber J W; Tandon, Gyaneshwar P; Baur, Jeffery W; Qi, H Jerry

    2016-04-01

    Cyclic loading conditions are commonly encountered in the applications of shape memory polymers (SMPs), where the cyclic characteristics of the materials determine their performance during the service life, such as deformation resistance, shape recovery speed and shape recovery ratio. Recent studies indicate that in addition to the physical damage or some other irreversible softening effects, the viscoelastic nature could also be another possible reason for the degraded cyclic behavior of SMPs. In this paper, we explore in detail the influence of the viscoelastic properties on the cyclic tension and shape memory (SM) behavior of an epoxy based amorphous thermosetting polymer. Cyclic experiments were conducted first, which show that although the epoxy material does not have any visible damage or irreversible softening effect during deformation, it still exhibits obvious degradation in the cyclic tension and SM behaviors. A linear multi-branched model is utilized to assist in the prediction and understanding of the mechanical responses of amorphous SMPs. Parametric studies based on the applied model suggest that the shape memory performance can be improved by adjusting programming and recovery conditions, such as lowering the loading rate, increasing the programming temperature, and reducing the holding time.

  7. Anisotropic mechanical amorphization drives wear in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastewka, Lars; Moser, Stefan; Gumbsch, Peter; Moseler, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Diamond is the hardest material on Earth. Nevertheless, polishing diamond is possible with a process that has remained unaltered for centuries and is still used for jewellery and coatings: the diamond is pressed against a rotating disc with embedded diamond grit. When polishing polycrystalline diamond, surface topographies become non-uniform because wear rates depend on crystal orientations. This anisotropy is not fully understood and impedes diamond's widespread use in applications that require planar polycrystalline films, ranging from cutting tools to confinement fusion. Here, we use molecular dynamics to show that polished diamond undergoes an sp(3)-sp(2) order-disorder transition resulting in an amorphous adlayer with a growth rate that strongly depends on surface orientation and sliding direction, in excellent correlation with experimental wear rates. This anisotropy originates in mechanically steered dissociation of individual crystal bonds. Similarly to other planarization processes, the diamond surface is chemically activated by mechanical means. Final removal of the amorphous interlayer proceeds either mechanically or through etching by ambient oxygen.

  8. Reducing the magnetic losses of amorphous ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raybould, D.; Das, S.K. [AlliedSignal Inc., Morristown, NJ (United States). Aerospace Technol. Team; Meola, M.; Bye, R. [AlliedSignal Inc., Amorphous Metals, Morristown, NJ 07962-1021 (United States)

    1998-01-30

    Amorphous alloys have lower magnetization losses than silicon steel and are therefore used as the cores of high-efficiency electrical transformers. Laser scribing the amorphous alloys using a very low power, so as not to melt the surface, results in an appreciable decrease in core loss with no decrease in measurable induction. A 2-5 mm line spacing appears optimum. Scribing prior to or after magnetic annealing results in similar properties, although the former requires a slightly higher laser power. Excimer and YAG lasers using optimized parameters both result in identical magnetic properties, but the optimum morphology of the scribed line is different for the two types of laser. For 25 {mu}m thick ribbon, a 29% decrease in core loss is obtained with no increase in exciting power. For thick, 50 {mu}m ribbon, properties superior to those of conventional 25 {mu}m ribbon are achievable, the core loss being decreased nearly 50% with no increase in exciting power. Thick ribbon with these properties could decrease the fabrication cost, while increasing the efficiency of power transformers. (orig.) 15 refs.

  9. Emergent interparticle interactions in thermal amorphous solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendelman, Oleg; Lerner, Edan; Pollack, Yoav G.; Procaccia, Itamar; Rainone, Corrado; Riechers, Birte

    2016-11-01

    Amorphous media at finite temperatures, be them liquids, colloids, or glasses, are made of interacting particles that move chaotically due to thermal energy, continuously colliding and scattering off each other. When the average configuration in these systems relaxes only at long times, one can introduce effective interactions that keep the mean positions in mechanical equilibrium. We introduce a framework to determine the effective force laws that define an effective Hessian that can be employed to discuss stability properties and the density of states of the amorphous system. We exemplify the approach with a thermal glass of hard spheres; these experience zero forces when not in contact and infinite forces when they touch. Close to jamming we recapture the effective interactions that at temperature T depend on the gap h between spheres as T /h [C. Brito and M. Wyart, Europhys. Lett. 76, 149 (2006), 10.1209/epl/i2006-10238-x]. For hard spheres at lower densities or for systems whose binary bare interactions are longer ranged (at any density), the emergent force laws include ternary, quaternary, and generally higher-order many-body terms, leading to a temperature-dependent effective Hessian.

  10. Formation of single-crystalline aragonite tablets/films via an amorphous precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Fairland F; Sharbaugh, Denise M; Talham, Daniel R; Gower, Laurie B; Fricke, Marc; Volkmer, Dirk

    2007-02-13

    Thin tablets and films of calcium carbonate have been grown at the air-water interface via an amorphous precursor route using soluble process-directing agents and a Langmuir monolayer based on resorcarene. By using appropriate concentrations of poly(acrylic acid-sodium salt) in combination with Mg2+ ion, an initially amorphous film is deposited on the monolayer template, which subsequently crystallizes into a mosaic film composed of a mixture of single-crystalline and spherulitic patches of calcite and aragonite. Of particular importance is the synthesis of single-crystalline "tablets" of aragonite (approximately 600 nm thick), because this phase generally forms needle-like polycrystalline aggregates when grown in vitro. To our knowledge, a tabular single-crystalline morphology of aragonite has only been observed in the nacreous layer of mollusk shells. Therefore, this in vitro system may serve as a useful model for examining mechanistic issues pertinent to biomineralization, such as the influence of organic templates on nucleation from an amorphous phase.

  11. Semiconducting graphene nanoribbon retains band gap on amorphous or crystalline SiO_2

    OpenAIRE

    Hossain, M. Zubaer

    2011-01-01

    Electronic properties of a semiconducting armchair graphene nanoribbon on SiO_2 are examined using first-principles calculations and taking into account the van der Waals interaction. Unlike semiconducting carbon nanotubes, which exhibit variations in band gap on SiO_2, the nanoribbon is found to retain its band gap on SiO_2, regardless of the separation distance or the dielectric’s surface type—crystalline or amorphous. The interfacial interaction leads to electron-transfer from the nanor...

  12. Structural transformations of amorphous iron-based alloys upon abrasive and thermal treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korshunov, L. G.; Shabashov, V. A.; Litvinov, A. V.; Chernenko, N. L.

    2010-05-01

    Wear resistance and structural changes have been investigated in amorphous alloys Fe64Co30Si3B3 and Fe73.5Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 upon wear using a fixed abrasive. The structural studies have been performed by the methods of metallography, electron microscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy. It has been shown that the abrasive resistance of amorphous alloys is 1.6-3.1 times lower than that of high-carbon tool steels, which have a close level of hardness. The low abrasive wear resistance of amorphous alloys is caused by the deformation softening of the alloy surface in the process of wear. The major volume of the deformed surface layer of the alloys preserves the amorphous state. Its structural changes upon wear are characterized by the formation of inhomogeneities (fragments with a size of 10-50 nm) and by a decrease in the width of the strongest “halo” in the selected-area electron-diffractions patterns. In the amorphous matrix of the Fe64Co30Si3B3 alloy, a strong magnetic texture is formed and a redistribution of atoms occurs, which leads to an increase in the local shortrange order corresponding to FeB, Fe2B, Fe3B and α-Fe phases. In microvolumes of a thin (several μm) surface layer, the formation of a nanocrystalline structure (on the order of several volume %) was revealed. A tempering of the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3S13.5B9 alloy at temperatures below 500°C does not affect the hardness and wear resistance of the alloy. At 500°C, there occurs an increase in microhardness and wear resistance of the Fe73.5Cu1Nb3S13.5B9 alloy as a result of the formation in it of a nanocrystalline structure with the retention of a certain amount of the amorphous phase. The complete crystallization of the alloy at 540°C increases the brittleness of the alloy, which leads to a sharp reduction in its wear resistance.

  13. Silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films: Control of film properties and nanocrystals growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbe, Jeremy, E-mail: jeremy.barbe@hotmail.com [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); Xie, Ling; Leifer, Klaus [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, S-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Faucherand, Pascal; Morin, Christine; Rapisarda, Dario; De Vito, Eric [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Makasheva, Kremena; Despax, Bernard [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Perraud, Simon [CEA, Liten, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-11-01

    The present study demonstrates the growth of silicon nanocrystals on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films. Amorphous silicon carbide films [a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H (with x < 0.3)] were obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition from a mixture of silane and methane diluted in hydrogen. The effect of varying the precursor gas-flow ratio on the film properties was investigated. In particular, a wide optical band gap (2.3 eV) was reached by using a high methane-to-silane flow ratio during the deposition of the a-Si{sub 1-x}C{sub x}:H layer. The effect of short-time annealing at 700 Degree-Sign C on the composition and properties of the layer was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. It was observed that the silicon-to-carbon ratio in the layer remains unchanged after short-time annealing, but the reorganization of the film due to a large dehydrogenation leads to a higher density of SiC bonds. Moreover, the film remains amorphous after the performed short-time annealing. In a second part, it was shown that a high density (1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2}) of silicon nanocrystals can be grown by low pressure chemical vapor deposition on a-Si{sub 0.8}C{sub 0.2} surfaces at 700 Degree-Sign C, from silane diluted in hydrogen. The influence of growth time and silane partial pressure on nanocrystals size and density was studied. It was also found that amorphous silicon carbide surfaces enhance silicon nanocrystal nucleation with respect to SiO{sub 2}, due to the differences in surface chemical properties. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silicon nanocrystals (Si-NC) growth on amorphous silicon carbide alloy thin films Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plasma deposited amorphous silicon carbide films with well-controlled properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study on the thermal effect of 700 Degree-Sign C short-time annealing on the layer properties Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low pressure

  14. Quantitative Phase Development of crystalline, nano-crystalline and amorphous phases during hydration of OPC blended with siliceous fly ash

    OpenAIRE

    Dittrich, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Ambitious efforts driven by political and environmental considerations to reduce carbon dioxide emission are currently present, amongst other branches in the construction material industry as well. One possible solution concentrates on the replacement of cement by supplementary cementitious materials like fly ash or granulated blast furnace slag. Due to its high amorphous phase content and the related reactivity potential fly ash seems well suited for being used in cement or concrete. Unfortu...

  15. Prenatal toxicity of synthetic amorphous silica nanomaterial in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmanna, T.; Schneider, S.; Wolterbeek, A.; Sandt, H. van de; Landsiedel, R.; Ravenzwaay, B. van

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic amorphous silica is a nanostructured material, which is produced and used in a wide variety of technological applications and consumer products. No regulatory prenatal toxicity studies with this substance were reported yet. Therefore, synthetic amorphous silica was tested for prenatal toxi

  16. Quantifying Nanoscale Order in Amorphous Materials via Fluctuation Electron Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogle, Stephanie Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Fluctuation electron microscopy (FEM) has been used to study the nanoscale order in various amorphous materials. The method is explicitly sensitive to 3- and 4-body atomic correlation functions in amorphous materials; this is sufficient to establish the existence of structural order on the nanoscale, even when the radial distribution function…

  17. Polarization effects in femtosecond laser induced amorphization of monocrystalline silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Feng; Li, Hong-Jin; Huang, Yuan-Yuan; Fan, Wen-Zhong; Pan, Huai-Hai; Wang, Zhuo; Wang, Cheng-Wei; Qian, Jing; Li, Yang-Bo; Zhao, Quan-Zhong

    2016-10-01

    We have used femtosecond laser pulses to ablate monocrystalline silicon wafer. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis of ablation surface indicates horizontally polarized laser beam shows an enhancement in amorphization efficiency by a factor of 1.6-1.7 over the circularly polarized laser ablation. This demonstrates that one can tune the amorphization efficiency through the polarization of irradiation laser.

  18. Recent advances in co-amorphous drug formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dengale, Swapnil Jayant; Grohganz, Holger; Rades, Thomas;

    2016-01-01

    Co-amorphous drug delivery systems have recently gained considerable interest in the pharmaceutical field because of their potential to improve oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs through drug dissolution enhancement as a result of the amorphous nature of the material. A co-amorpho...... findings. In particular, we investigate co-amorphous formulations from the viewpoint of solid dispersions, describe their formation and mechanism of stabilization, study their impact on dissolution and in vivo performance and briefly outline the future potentials.......Co-amorphous drug delivery systems have recently gained considerable interest in the pharmaceutical field because of their potential to improve oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble drugs through drug dissolution enhancement as a result of the amorphous nature of the material. A co-amorphous...... system is characterized by the use of only low molecular weight components that are mixed into a homogeneous single-phase co-amorphous blend. The use of only low molecular weight co-formers makes this approach very attractive, as the amount of amorphous stabilizer can be significantly reduced compared...

  19. Creep of FINEMET alloy at amorphous to nanocrystalline transition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Csach, K.; Miškuf, J.; Juríková, A.; Ocelík, V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of FINEMET-type materials with specific magnetic properties prepared by the crystallization of amorphous alloys is often limited by their brittleness. The structure of these materials consists of nanosized Fe-based grains surrounded with amorphous phase. Then the final macroscopic me

  20. Rate equations for sodium catalyzed amorphous silica dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimstidt, J. Donald; Zhang, Yilun; Zhu, Chen

    2016-12-01

    Newly measured amorphous silica dissolution rate data were combined with data from the literature to produce an equation that predicts the dissolution flux (J, mol/m2 s) of amorphous silica as a function of temperature (T, K), sodium concentration (mNa+, molal), and hydrogen ion activity (aH+).

  1. Magnetic flux distribution in the amorphous modular transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczuk, B.; Koteras, D.

    2011-06-01

    3D magnetic fluxes in one-phase and three-phase transformers with amorphous modular cores have been studied. Scalar potentials were implemented for the 3D Finite Element field calculation. Due to the inability to simulate each thin amorphous layer, we introduced supplementary permeabilities along the main directions of magnetization. The calculated fluxes in the cores were tested on the prototypes.

  2. RAPID ASSOCIATION OF UNCONJUGATED BILIRUBIN WITH AMORPHOUS CALCIUM-PHOSPHATE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEERE, CN; SHOEMAKER, B; VANDERMEER, R; GROEN, AK; JANSEN, PLM; ELFERINK, RPJO

    1995-01-01

    The association of unconjugated bilirubin (UCB) with amorphous calcium phosphate was studied in vitro. To this end UCB, solubilized in different micellar bile salt solutions, was incubated with freshly prepared calcium phosphate precipitate. It was demonstrated that amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)

  3. Novel Carbon Nanotubes-supported NiB Amorphors Alloy Catalyst for Benzene Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Hua YANG; Rong Bin ZHANG; Feng Yi LI

    2004-01-01

    The NiB amorphous alloy catalysts supported on CNTs and alumina were prepared by impregnation and chemical reduction. The gas-phase benzene hydrogenation was used as a probe reaction to evaluate the catalytic activity. The result showed that the NiB amorphous alloy catalyst supported on carbon nanotubes exhibited higher activity than that supported on alumina.

  4. Charge transport in amorphous organic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukyanov, Alexander

    2011-03-15

    Organic semiconductors with the unique combination of electronic and mechanical properties may offer cost-effective ways of realizing many electronic applications, e. g. large-area flexible displays, printed integrated circuits and plastic solar cells. In order to facilitate the rational compound design of organic semiconductors, it is essential to understand relevant physical properties e. g. charge transport. This, however, is not straightforward, since physical models operating on different time and length scales need to be combined. First, the material morphology has to be known at an atomistic scale. For this atomistic molecular dynamics simulations can be employed, provided that an atomistic force field is available. Otherwise it has to be developed based on the existing force fields and first principle calculations. However, atomistic simulations are typically limited to the nanometer length- and nanosecond time-scales. To overcome these limitations, systematic coarse-graining techniques can be used. In the first part of this thesis, it is demonstrated how a force field can be parameterized for a typical organic molecule. Then different coarse-graining approaches are introduced together with the analysis of their advantages and problems. When atomistic morphology is available, charge transport can be studied by combining the high-temperature Marcus theory with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The approach is applied to the hole transport in amorphous films of tris(8- hydroxyquinoline)aluminium (Alq{sub 3}). First the influence of the force field parameters and the corresponding morphological changes on charge transport is studied. It is shown that the energetic disorder plays an important role for amorphous Alq{sub 3}, defining charge carrier dynamics. Its spatial correlations govern the Poole-Frenkel behavior of the charge carrier mobility. It is found that hole transport is dispersive for system sizes accessible to simulations, meaning that calculated

  5. Atomistic simulation of damage accumulation and amorphization in Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Selles, Jose L., E-mail: joseluis.gomezselles@imdea.org; Martin-Bragado, Ignacio [IMDEA Materials Institute, Eric Kandel 2, 28906 Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Claverie, Alain [CEMES/CNRS, 29 rue J. Marvig, 31055 Toulouse Cedex (France); Sklenard, Benoit [CEA, LETI, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Benistant, Francis [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore Pte Ltd., 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2015-02-07

    Damage accumulation and amorphization mechanisms by means of ion implantation in Ge are studied using Kinetic Monte Carlo and Binary Collision Approximation techniques. Such mechanisms are investigated through different stages of damage accumulation taking place in the implantation process: from point defect generation and cluster formation up to full amorphization of Ge layers. We propose a damage concentration amorphization threshold for Ge of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 22} cm{sup −3} which is independent on the implantation conditions. Recombination energy barriers depending on amorphous pocket sizes are provided. This leads to an explanation of the reported distinct behavior of the damage generated by different ions. We have also observed that the dissolution of clusters plays an important role for relatively high temperatures and fluences. The model is able to explain and predict different damage generation regimes, amount of generated damage, and extension of amorphous layers in Ge for different ions and implantation conditions.

  6. Composition Range of Amorphous Mg-Ni-Y Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈红梅; 钟夏平; 欧阳义芳

    2003-01-01

    Based on the thermodynamic point of view, a method for predication of the composition range of amorphous ternary alloys was proposed. The composition range of amorphous ternary alloys is determined by the comparison of the excess free energy of the amorphous alloy and the free energy of competing crystalline states. The free energy is extrapolated from the data of three binary alloys by using Toop′s model. The method was applied to predict the composition range of amorphous Mg-Ni-Y alloys. The theoretical results are in good agreement with the available experimental results. It indicates that the present method can be used to predict the composition range for amorphous ternary alloys.

  7. Parametrized dielectric functions of amorphous GeSn alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Wei; Schmidt, Daniel; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2015-09-01

    We obtained the complex dielectric function of amorphous Ge1-xSnx (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.07) alloys using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.4 to 4.5 eV. Amorphous GeSn films were formed by room-temperature implantation of phosphorus into crystalline GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical response of amorphous GeSn alloys is similar to amorphous Ge and can be parametrized using a Kramers-Kronig consistent Cody-Lorentz dispersion model. The parametric model was extended to account for the dielectric functions of amorphous Ge0.75Sn0.25 and Ge0.50Sn0.50 alloys from literature. The compositional dependence of band gap energy Eg and parameters associated with the Lorentzian oscillator have been determined. The behavior of these parameters with varying x can be understood in terms of the alloying effect of Sn on Ge.

  8. Surface complexation model for strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Criscenti Louise J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Strontium sorption to amorphous silica and goethite was measured as a function of pH and dissolved strontium and carbonate concentrations at 25°C. Strontium sorption gradually increases from 0 to 100% from pH 6 to 10 for both phases and requires multiple outer-sphere surface complexes to fit the data. All data are modeled using the triple layer model and the site-occupancy standard state; unless stated otherwise all strontium complexes are mononuclear. Strontium sorption to amorphous silica in the presence and absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with tetradentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ complexes on the β-plane and a monodentate Sr2+complex on the diffuse plane to account for strontium sorption at low ionic strength. Strontium sorption to goethite in the absence of dissolved carbonate can be fit with monodentate and tetradentate SrOH+ complexes and a tetradentate binuclear Sr2+ species on the β-plane. The binuclear complex is needed to account for enhanced sorption at hgh strontium surface loadings. In the presence of dissolved carbonate additional monodentate Sr2+ and SrOH+ carbonate surface complexes on the β-plane are needed to fit strontium sorption to goethite. Modeling strontium sorption as outer-sphere complexes is consistent with quantitative analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS on selected sorption samples that show a single first shell of oxygen atoms around strontium indicating hydrated surface complexes at the amorphous silica and goethite surfaces. Strontium surface complexation equilibrium constants determined in this study combined with other alkaline earth surface complexation constants are used to recalibrate a predictive model based on Born solvation and crystal-chemistry theory. The model is accurate to about 0.7 log K units. More studies are needed to determine the dependence of alkaline earth sorption on ionic strength and dissolved carbonate and sulfate concentrations for the development of

  9. Energy landscape of relaxed amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiquette, Francis; Mousseau, Normand

    2003-09-01

    We analyze the structure of the energy landscape of a well-relaxed 1000-atom model of amorphous silicon using the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau). Generating more than 40 000 events starting from a single minimum, we find that activated mechanisms are local in nature, that they are distributed uniformly throughout the model, and that the activation energy is limited by the cost of breaking one bond, independently of the complexity of the mechanism. The overall shape of the activation-energy-barrier distribution is also insensitive to the exact details of the configuration, indicating that well-relaxed configurations see essentially the same environment. These results underscore the localized nature of relaxation in this material.

  10. Nickel-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, J A; Arce, R D; Buitrago, R H [INTEC (CONICET-UNL), Gueemes 3450, S3000GLN Santa Fe (Argentina); Budini, N; Rinaldi, P, E-mail: jschmidt@intec.unl.edu.a [FIQ - UNL, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2009-05-01

    The nickel-induced crystallization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is used to obtain large grained polycrystalline silicon thin films on glass substrates. a-Si:H is deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition at 200 deg. C, preparing intrinsic and slightly p-doped samples. Each sample was divided in several pieces, over which increasing Ni concentrations were sputtered. Two crystallization methods are compared, conventional furnace annealing (CFA) and rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The crystallization was followed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observations, X-ray diffraction, and reflectance measurements in the UV region. The large grain sizes obtained - larger than 100{mu}m for the samples crystallized by CFA - are very encouraging for the preparation of low-cost thin film polycrystalline silicon solar cells.

  11. A tissue-inspired amorphous photonic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dapeng

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by how cells pack in dense biological tissues, we design an amorphous material which possesses a complete photonic band gap. A physical parameter inspired by how cells adhere with one another and regulate their shapes can continuously tune the photonic band gap size as well as the bulk mechanical property of the material. The material can be further tuned to undergo a solid-fluid phase transition during which the shear modulus vanishes yet the photonic band gap persists, hence giving rise to a photonic fluid that is robust to flow and rearrangements. Experimentally this design should lead to the engineering of self-assembled non-rigid photonic structures with photonic band gaps that can be controlled in real time.

  12. Negative Magnetoresistance in Amorphous Indium Oxide Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sreemanta; Tewari, Girish C.; Mahalu, Diana; Shahar, Dan

    2016-11-01

    We study magneto-transport properties of several amorphous Indium oxide nanowires of different widths. The wires show superconducting transition at zero magnetic field, but, there exist a finite resistance at the lowest temperature. The R(T) broadening was explained by available phase slip models. At low field, and far below the superconducting critical temperature, the wires with diameter equal to or less than 100 nm, show negative magnetoresistance (nMR). The magnitude of nMR and the crossover field are found to be dependent on both temperature and the cross-sectional area. We find that this intriguing behavior originates from the interplay between two field dependent contributions.

  13. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  14. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed.

  15. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  16. Preparation of High Purity Amorphous Boron Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Tilekar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous boron powder of high purity (92-94 % with a particle size of l-2 mm is preferred as a fuel for fuel-rich propellants for integrated rocket ramjets and for igniter formulations. Thispaper describes the studies on process optimisation of two processes, ie, oxidative roasting of boron (roasting boron in air and roasting boron with zinc in an inert medium for preparing high purity boron. Experimental studies reveal that roasting boron with zinc at optimised process conditions yields boron of purity more than 93 per cent, whereas oxidative roasting method yields boron of purity - 92 per cent. Oxidative roasting has comparative edge over the other processes owing to its ease of scale-up and simplicity

  17. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold.

  18. Amorphous silica scale in cooling waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Midkiff, W.S.; Foyt, H.P.

    1976-01-01

    In 1968, most of the evaporation cooled recirculating water systems at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were nearly inoperable due to scale. These systems, consisting of cooling towers, evaporative water coolers, evaporative condensers, and air washers had been operated on continuous blowdown without chemical treatment. The feedwater contained 80 mg/l silica. A successful program of routine chemical addition in the make-up water was begun. Blends of chelants, dispersants and corrosion inhibitors were found to gradually remove old scale, prevent new scale, and keep corrosion to less than an indicated rate of one mil per year. An explanation has been proposed that amorphous silica by itself does not form a troublesome scale. When combined with a crystal matrix such as calcite, the resultant silica containing scale can be quite troublesome. Rapid buildup of silica containing scale can be controlled and prevented by preventing formation of crystals from other constituents in the water such as hardness or iron. (auth)

  19. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Vivekchang, SRC; Govindaraj, A.

    2003-01-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spect...

  20. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S R C Vivekchand; A Govindaraj

    2003-10-01

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled carbon nanotubes. The purified single-walled carbon nanotubes have been characterised by low-angle X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, thermo-gravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. Phyllosilicates and Amorphous Gel in the Nakhlites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, L. J.; Bridges, J. C.; Gurman, S. J.

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies of the nakhlite martian meteorites have revealed hydrothermal minerals present within the fractures of the olivine minerals and the mesostasis. The olivine fractures of the Lafayette nakhlite reveal variations with initial deposits of siderite on the fracture walls, followed by crystalline phyllosilicates (smectite), and finishing with a rapidly cooled amorphous silicate gel within the central regions of the fractures. The mesostasis fractures of Lafayette also contain a crystalline phyllosilicate (serpentine). The amorphous gel is the most abundant secondary phase within the fractures of the other nakhlites [1, 2]. By studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED). BF studying nine nakhlite samples, including Lafayette, Governador Valadares, Nakhla, Y-000593, Y-000749, Miller-Range 03346, NWA 817, NWA 998, and NWA 5790, our aim is to constrain the identity of the phyllosilicate secondary phase minerals found throughout the nakhlite martian meteorites. This is achieved using methods including Electron Probe Micro-analysis (EPMA); X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (Fe-K XANES) spectroscopy measured using Beamline I-18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron; and the use of Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) at the University of Leicester for High-Resolution (HR) imaging and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED).

  2. Catalytic activity of carbons for methane decomposition reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Catalytic decomposition of methane is an environmentally attractive approach to CO{sub 2}-free production of hydrogen. The objective of this work is to evaluate catalytic activity of a wide range of carbon materials for methane decomposition reaction and determine major factors governing their activity. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of carbon materials for methane decomposition is mostly determined by their structural and surface properties. Kinetics of methane decomposition reaction over disordered (amorphous) carbons such as carbon black and activated carbon were determined. The mechanism of carbon-catalyzed methane decomposition reaction and the nature of active sites on the carbon surface are discussed in this paper.

  3. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  4. Crystallization Process of Heat-treated Amorphous Ni-P Alloy Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JIN Shi-wei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Amorphous Ni-P alloy coatings were prepared on 45 carbon steel blocks using electrodeposition method. The thermal effect and quality change of Ni-P alloy coating under heating rate of 20℃/min were analyzed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and thermogravimetry (TG. Coatings were heat-treated at 300℃ and 400℃ for 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75min respectively, coating surface was characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD, microhardness tester. The result shows that the exothermic peak of Ni-P alloy coating appears at 284.8℃, coating quality and elemental composition are stable during the heat treatment. Crystallization process experiences a transformation of amorphous, metastable state NiP and Ni5P2, stable state Ni3P. The microhardness of coating can be improved remarkably after heat treatment, namely, the maximum value of heat-treated coating is 1036.56HV, which is nearly 2 times as hard as as-deposited coating. The corrosion resistance of heat-treated Ni-P alloy coating in NaCl solution is inferior to as-deposited coating, but they are both much better than 45 carbon steel substrate.

  5. Novel Solid Encapsulation of Ethylene Gas Using Amorphous α-Cyclodextrin and the Release Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Binh T; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-05-04

    This research investigated the encapsulation of ethylene gas into amorphous α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) at low (LM) and high (HM) moisture contents at 1.0-1.5 MPa for 24-120 h and its controlled release characteristics at 11.2-52.9% relative humidity (RH) for 1-168 h. The inclusion complexes (ICs) were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP-MAS (13)C NMR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ethylene concentrations in the ICs were from 0.45 to 0.87 mol of ethylene/mol CD and from 0.42 to 0.54 mol of ethylene/mol CD for LM and HM α-CDs, respectively. Ethylene gas released from the encapsulated powder at higher rates with increasing RH. An analysis of release kinetics using Avrami's equation showed that the LM and HM amorphous α-CDs were not associated with significant differences in release constant k and parameter n for any given RH condition. NMR spectra showed the presence of the characteristic carbon-carbon double bond of ethylene gas in the encapsulated α-CD powder.

  6. Stabilization of organic matter in soils: role of amorphous mineral phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zewde Tamrat, Wuhib; Rose, Jérôme; Levard, Clément; Chaurand, Perrine; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle

    2016-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) globally contributes the largest portion of continental carbon stock. One major issue concerning this large C pool includes its instability by mineralization and erosion due to land use. The main hypothesis of this work is that physicochemical stabilization of SOM is mainly driven by interactions of organic compounds, not with mineral surfaces as classically considered, but with amorphous polymers continuously formed by the alteration of soil minerals(1-3). Our objective is to understand how nano-organomineral complexes (nCOMx) are structured at the nanoscale, assess mechanisms of their formation, and quantify the effects of their occurrence on SOM turnovers. Due to inherent high complexity of natural samples, our methodology is based on the formation of nCOMx from both synthetic systems and natural mineral-weathered components. For the mineral component, biotite (from Bancroft, Canada) was selected. For the organic component, 3,4-Dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine, an amino acid with hydroxyl (pKa=9.95), carboxyl (pKa=2,58), amino (pKa=9,24) and an aromatic functions was chosen. The methodology aimed at developing conditions that generate biotite dissolution and nCOMx precipitation. The second step of the experiment consisted of the precipitation of nCOMx by slowly increasing pH over 3 to 12 hours of hydrolysis. Three final pH conditions were tested (4.2, 5 and 7) with Metal/Carbon ratios of 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 'No Carbon'. The first results of dissolution rates and congruency, AFM imaging, ICPMS, HR-TEM and XRD as well as XAS characterizations (transmission and florescence mode at the Fe K-edge) of nCOMx will be presented. Experiments and analysis techniques were designed to study these synthetic phases with regard to Si, Al, Fe and OM proportions to increase the OM proportion (as in natural soil phases) and also increase the stability of the OM phase (as in increased residence time of OM in the soil). We will focus particularly on the Fe state

  7. Photoemission studies of amorphous silicon induced by P + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petö, G.; Kanski, J.

    1995-12-01

    An amorphous Si layer was formed on a Si (1 0 0) surface by P + implantation at 80 keV. This layer was investigated by means of photoelectron spectroscopy. The resulting spectra are different from earlier spectra on amorphous Si prepared by e-gun evaporation or cathode sputtering. The differences consist of a decreased intensity in the spectral region corresponding to p-states, and appearace of new states at higher binding energy. Qualitativity similar results have been reported for Sb implanted amorphous Ge and the modification seems to be due to the changed short range order.

  8. Continuous controllable amorphization ratio of nanoscale phase change memory cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Li, Z.; Peng, J. H.; Deng, Y. F.; Zeng, B. J.; Zhou, W.; Miao, X. S.

    2014-06-01

    The controllable heat behavior, including heat generation and dissipation, is one of the most important physical problems of nanoscale phase-change memory (PCM). A method based on heat accumulation effect to control heat behavior by synthetically modulating the three parameters of applied double pulses is proposed to achieve any expected amorphization ratio. A compact model of nanoscale PCM cells is used to simulate the thermal behavior and amorphization ratio under the condition of single parameter and multi-parameter change of applied double pulses. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Repeated experiments also prove the feasibility of continuous controllable amorphization ratio of nanoscale phase-change materials.

  9. Amorphous Photonic Lattices: Band Gaps, Effective Mass and Suppressed Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Rechtsman, Mikael; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-01-01

    We present, theoretically and experimentally, amorphous photonic lattices exhibiting a band-gap yet completely lacking Bragg diffraction: 2D waveguides distributed randomly according to a liquid-like model responsible for the absence of Bragg peaks as opposed to ordered lattices containing disorder, which always exhibit Bragg peaks. In amorphous lattices the bands are comprised of localized states, but we find that defect states residing in the gap are more localized than the Anderson localization length. Finally, we show how the concept of effective mass carries over to amorphous lattices.

  10. Preparation of Ti-based amorphous brazing alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Jia-sheng; JIANG Zhi-guo; XU Zhi-rong; CHEN Guang

    2006-01-01

    A new kind of amorphous active brazing alloy foil with the composition of Ti40Zr25Ni15Cu20 was successfully synthesized using melt spinning in roll forging machine in argon atmosphere. The amorphous structure and composition were examined by X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis and energy dispersive X-ray detector. The results show that the Ti40Zr25Ni15Cu20 amorphous alloy foil has excellent wettability on Si3N4 ceramic and demonstrate a strong glass forming ability. The reduced glass transition temperature (Trg) and the temperature interval of supercooled liquid region before crystallization are 0.76 and 78 K, respectively.

  11. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices.

  12. Hydrogen-induced crystallization of an amorphous metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Pil-Ryung [School of Advanced Materials Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: cprdream@kookmin.ac.kr; Kim, Yu Chan [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Bae [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Seok, Hyun-Kwang [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Fleury, Eric [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung-Hee [Advanced Metals Research Center, Korean Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    The influence of hydrogen on the structural stability of an amorphous nickel has been analyzed by molecular dynamics simulation. We find that the volume of the amorphous metal increases nonlinearly with the hydrogen concentration and that it crystallizes at a certain critical concentration. The crystallization is shown to be caused by hydrogen-induced transition from the amorphous to the supercooled liquid state, and the change of diffusion mechanism from atomic hopping to string-like collective motion is also observed at the transition.

  13. Structural studies of several distinct metastable forms of amorphous ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulk, C A; Benmore, C J; Urquidi, J; Klug, D D; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2002-08-23

    Structural changes during annealing of high-density amorphous ice were studied with both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The first diffraction peak was followed from the high- to the low-density amorphous form. Changes were observed to occur through a series of intermediate forms that appear to be metastable at each anneal temperature. Five distinct amorphous forms were studied with neutron scattering, and many more forms may be possible. Radial distribution functions indicate that the structure evolves systematically between 4 and 8 angstroms. The phase transformations in low-temperature liquid water may be much more complex than currently understood.

  14. Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coscia, U. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CNISM Unita' di Napoli, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Ambrosone, G., E-mail: ambrosone@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli “Federico II” Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); SPIN-CNR, Complesso Universitario MSA, via Cinthia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Basa, D.K. [Department of Physics, Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Rigato, V. [INFN Laboratori Nazionali Legnaro, 35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Ferrero, S.; Virga, A. [Dipartimento di Scienza Applicata e Tecnologia, Politecnico di Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-09-30

    Nanostructured silicon carbon thin films, composed of Si nanocrystallites embedded in hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbon matrix, have been prepared by varying rf power in ultra high vacuum plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system using silane and methane gas mixtures diluted in hydrogen. In this paper we have studied the compositional, structural and electrical properties of these films as a function of rf power. It is shown that with increasing rf power the atomic densities of carbon and hydrogen increase while the atomic density of silicon decreases, resulting in a reduction in the mass density. Further, it is demonstrated that carbon is incorporated into amorphous matrix and it is mainly bonded to silicon. The study has also revealed that the crystalline volume fraction decreases with increase in rf power and that the films deposited with low rf power have a size distribution of large and small crystallites while the films deposited with relatively high power have only small crystallites. Finally, the enhanced transport properties of the nanostructured silicon carbon films, as compared to amorphous counterpart, have been attributed to the presence of Si nanocrystallites. - Highlights: • The mass density of silicon carbon films decreases from 2.3 to 2 g/cm{sup 3}. • Carbon is incorporated in the amorphous phase and it is mainly bonded to silicon. • Nanostructured silicon carbon films are deposited at rf power > 40 W. • Si nanocrystallites in amorphous silicon carbon enhance the electrical properties.

  15. Dynamics of Gold Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanostructures Driven by van der Waals and Electrostatic Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Alessandro; Gimenez-Lopez, Maria del Carmen; Fay, Michael W; Lucas, Carlos Herreros; Brown, Paul D; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2015-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy studies on the assembly and growth of gold nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes supported on few-layer graphene and amorphous carbon reveal a competition between van der Waals forces and electrostatic interactions, enabling controlled positioning and sizing of adsorbed nanoparticles at the nanochannels formed between the carbon nanotube and the few-layer graph-ene surface.

  16. Nanocavity Shrinkage and Preferential Amorphization during Irradiation in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xian-Fang; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We model the recent experimental results and demonstrate that the internal shrinkage of nanocavities in silicon is intrinsically associated with preferential amorphization as induced by self-ion irradiation.

  17. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of wetting on modified amorphous silica surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Jingchun; Liu, Shuyan; Yang, Xiaoning

    2009-08-01

    The microscopic wetting of water on amorphous silica surfaces has been investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. Different degrees of surface hydroxylation/silanization were considered. It was observed that the hydrophobicity becomes enhanced with an increase in the degree of surface silanization. A continuous transformation from hydrophilicity to hydrophobicity can be attained for the amorphous silica surfaces through surface modification. From the simulation result, the contact angle can exceed 90° when surface silanization percentage is above 50%, showing a hydrophobic character. It is also found that when the percentage of surface silanization is above 70% on the amorphous silica surface, the water contact angle almost remains unchanged (110-120°). This phenomenon is a little different from the wetting behavior on smooth quartz plates in previous experimental report. This change in the wettability on modified amorphous silica surfaces can be interpreted in terms of the interaction between water molecules and the silica surfaces.

  19. Stress originating from nanovoids in hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zumin; Flötotto, David; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2017-03-01

    Structural inhomogeneities in the form of voids of nanometer sizes (nanovoids) have long been known to be present in hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors (Si, Ge). The physical and electrical properties of hydrogenated amorphous semiconductors can be pronouncedly influenced by the presence and characteristics of such nanovoids. In this work, by measuring in situ the intrinsic stress developments during deposition of pure, amorphous and of hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor (Si, Ge) thin films, under the same conditions in ultrahigh vacuum and on a comparative basis, a major source of tensile stress development could be ascribed to the occurrence of nanovoids in a-Si:H and a-Ge:H. The measurements allowed a quantitative evaluation of the surface stress acting along the surface of the nanovoids: 1.1-1.9 N/m for a-Si:H and 0.9-1.9 N/m for a-Ge:H.

  20. Refining stability and dissolution rate of amorphous drug formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grohganz, Holger; Priemel, Petra A; Löbmann, Korbinian;

    2014-01-01

    amorphous counterpart is often seen as a potential solution to increase the solubility. However, amorphous systems are physically unstable. Therefore, pharmaceutical formulations scientists need to find ways to stabilise amorphous forms. Areas covered: The use of polymer-based solid dispersions is the most......Introduction: Poor aqueous solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) is one of the main challenges in the development of new small molecular drugs. Additionally, the proportion of poorly soluble drugs among new chemical entities is increasing. The transfer of a crystalline drug to its...... established technique for the stabilisation of amorphous forms, and this review will initially focus on new developments in this field. Additionally, newly discovered formulation approaches will be investigated, including approaches based on the physical restriction of crystallisation and crystal growth...

  1. Amorphous solid dispersions: Rational selection of a manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Teófilo; Marques, Sara; das Neves, José; Sarmento, Bruno

    2016-05-01

    Amorphous products and particularly amorphous solid dispersions are currently one of the most exciting areas in the pharmaceutical field. This approach presents huge potential and advantageous features concerning the overall improvement of drug bioavailability. Currently, different manufacturing processes are being developed to produce amorphous solid dispersions with suitable robustness and reproducibility, ranging from solvent evaporation to melting processes. In the present paper, laboratorial and industrial scale processes were reviewed, and guidelines for a rationale selection of manufacturing processes were proposed. This would ensure an adequate development (laboratorial scale) and production according to the good manufacturing practices (GMP) (industrial scale) of amorphous solid dispersions, with further implications on the process validations and drug development pipeline.

  2. Influence of amorphous structure on polymorphism in vanadia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Kevin H.; Schelhas, Laura T.; Garten, Lauren M.; Shyam, Badri; Mehta, Apurva; Ndione, Paul F.; Ginley, David S.; Toney, Michael F.

    2016-07-01

    Normally we think of the glassy state as a single phase and therefore crystallization from chemically identical amorphous precursors should be identical. Here we show that the local structure of an amorphous precursor is distinct depending on the initial deposition conditions, resulting in significant differences in the final state material. Using grazing incidence total x-ray scattering, we have determined the local structure in amorphous thin films of vanadium oxide grown under different conditions using pulsed laser deposition (PLD). Here we show that the subsequent crystallization of films deposited using different initial PLD conditions result in the formation of different polymorphs of VO2. This suggests the possibility of controlling the formation of metastable polymorphs by tuning the initial amorphous structure to different formation pathways.

  3. Predicting Crystallization of Amorphous Drugs with Terahertz Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibik, Juraj; Löbmann, Korbinian; Rades, Thomas; Zeitler, J Axel

    2015-08-03

    There is a controversy about the extent to which the primary and secondary dielectric relaxations influence the crystallization of amorphous organic compounds below the glass transition temperature. Recent studies also point to the importance of fast molecular dynamics on picosecond-to-nanosecond time scales with respect to the glass stability. In the present study we provide terahertz spectroscopy evidence on the crystallization of amorphous naproxen well below its glass transition temperature and confirm the direct role of Johari-Goldstein (JG) secondary relaxation as a facilitator of the crystallization. We determine the onset temperature Tβ above which the JG relaxation contributes to the fast molecular dynamics and analytically quantify the level of this contribution. We then show there is a strong correlation between the increase in the fast molecular dynamics and onset of crystallization in several chosen amorphous drugs. We believe that this technique has immediate applications to quantify the stability of amorphous drug materials.

  4. Structure and Properties of an Amorphous Metal-Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Thomas D.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Barney, Emma R.; Soper, Alan K.; Bithell, Erica G.; Tan, Jin-Chong; Cheetham, Anthony K.

    2010-03-01

    ZIF-4, a metal-organic framework (MOF) with a zeolitic structure, undergoes a crystal-amorphous transition on heating to 300°C. The amorphous form, which we term a-ZIF, is recoverable to ambient conditions or may be converted to a dense crystalline phase of the same composition by heating to 400°C. Neutron and x-ray total scattering data collected during the amorphization process are used as a basis for reverse Monte Carlo refinement of an atomistic model of the structure of a-ZIF. The structure is best understood in terms of a continuous random network analogous to that of a-SiO2. Optical microscopy, electron diffraction and nanoindentation measurements reveal a-ZIF to be an isotropic glasslike phase capable of plastic flow on its formation. Our results suggest an avenue for designing broad new families of amorphous and glasslike materials that exploit the chemical and structural diversity of MOFs.

  5. Raman and ellipsometric characterization of hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin films were deposited by plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) at different silane temperatures (Tg) before glow-discharge. The effect of Tg on the amorphous network and optoelectronic properties of the films has been investigated by Raman scattering spectra, ellipsometric transmittance spectra, and dark conductivity measurement, respectively. The results show that the increase in Tg leads to an improved ordering of amorphous network on the short and intermediate scales and an increase of both refractive index and absorption coefficient in a-Si:H thin films. It is indicated that the dark conductivity increases by two orders of magnitude when Tg is raised from room temperature (RT) to 433 K. The continuous ordering of amorphous network of a-Si:H thin films deposited at a higher Tg is the main cause for the increase of dark conductivity.

  6. Amorphous semiconductor sample preparation for transmission EXAFS measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridgway, M.C.; Glover, C.J.; Tan, H.H. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia). Dept. of Electronic Materials Engineering] [and others

    1998-12-31

    A novel methodology has been developed for the preparation of amorphous semiconductor samples for use in transmission extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements. Epitaxial heterostructures were fabricated by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (group III-Vs) or molecular beam epitaxy (group IVs). An epitaxial layer of {approximately} 2 {micro}m thickness was separated from the underlying substrate by selective chemical etching of an intermediate sacrificial layer. Ion implantation was utilized to amorphize the epitaxial layer either before or after selective chemical etching. The resulting samples were both stoichiometric and homogeneous in contrast to those produced by conventional techniques. The fabrication of amorphous GaAs, InP, In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1{minus}x} samples is described. Furthermore, EXAFS measurements comparing both fluorescence and transmission detection, and crystalline and amorphized GaAs, are shown.

  7. Microcavity effects in the photoluminescence of hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serpenguzel, Ali; Aydinli, Atilla; Bek, Alpan

    1998-07-01

    Fabry-Perot microcavities are used for the alteration of photoluminescence in hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride grown with and without ammonia. The photoluminescence is red-near-infrared for the samples grown without ammonia, and blue-green for the samples grown with ammonia. In the Fabry- Perot microcavities, the amplitude of the photoluminescence is enhanced, while its linewidth is reduced with respect to the bulk hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride. The microcavity was realized by a metallic back mirror and a hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride--air or a metallic front mirror. The transmittance, reflectance, and absorbance spectra were also measured and calculated. The calculated spectra agree well with the experimental spectra. The hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride microcavity has potential for becoming a versatile silicon based optoelectronic device such as a color flat panel display, a resonant cavity enhanced light emitting diode, or a laser.

  8. Directional amorphization of boron carbide subjected to laser shock compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shiteng; Kad, Bimal; Remington, Bruce A.; LaSalvia, Jerry C.; Wehrenberg, Christopher E.; Behler, Kristopher D.; Meyers, Marc A.

    2016-10-01

    Solid-state shock-wave propagation is strongly nonequilibrium in nature and hence rate dependent. Using high-power pulsed-laser-driven shock compression, unprecedented high strain rates can be achieved; here we report the directional amorphization in boron carbide polycrystals. At a shock pressure of 45˜50 GPa, multiple planar faults, slightly deviated from maximum shear direction, occur a few hundred nanometers below the shock surface. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals that these planar faults are precursors of directional amorphization. It is proposed that the shear stresses cause the amorphization and that pressure assists the process by ensuring the integrity of the specimen. Thermal energy conversion calculations including heat transfer suggest that amorphization is a solid-state process. Such a phenomenon has significant effect on the ballistic performance of B4C.

  9. Hydrogen Bonding in Hydrogenated Amorphous Germanium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.S.Abo-Ghazala; S. Al Hazmy

    2004-01-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) were prepared by radio frequency glow discharge deposition at various substrate temperatures. The hydrogen distribution and bonding structure in a-Ge:H were discussed based on infrared absorption data. The correlation between infrared absorption spectra and hydrogen effusion measurements was used to determine the proportionality constant for each vibration mode of the Ge-H bonds. The results reveal that the bending mode appearing at 835 cm?1 is associated with the Ge-H2 (dihydride) groups on the internal surfaces of voids. While 1880 cm?1 is assigned to vibrations of Ge-H (monohydride) groups in the bulk, the 2000 cm?1 stretching mode is attributed to Ge-H and Ge-H2 bonds located on the surfaces of voids. For films associated with bending modes in the infrared spectra, the proportionality constant values of the stretching modes near 1880 and 2000 cm?1 are found to be lower than those of films which had no corresponding bending modes.

  10. Stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Munyeme, G; Van der Meer, L F G; Dijkhuis, J I; Van der Weg, W F; Schropp, R

    2004-01-01

    In order to elucidate the microscopic mechanism for the earlier observed enhanced stability of deuterated amorphous silicon solar cells we conducted a side by-side study of fully deuterated intrinsic layers on crystalline silicon substrates using the free-electron laser facility at Nieuwegein (FELIX) to resonantly excite the Si-D stretching vibration and measure the various relaxation channels available to these modes, and of p-i-n solar cells with identical intrinsic absorber layers on glass/TCO substrates to record the degradation and stabilization of solar cell parameters under prolonged light soaking treatments. From our comparative study it is shown that a-Si:D has a superior resistance against light-induced defect creation as compared to a-Si:H and that this can now be explained in the light of the 'H collision model' since the initial step in the process, the release of H, is more likely than that of D. Thus, a natural explanation for the stability as observed in a-Si:D solar cells is provided.

  11. Hydrogen effusion from tritiated amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kherani, N. P.; Liu, B.; Virk, K.; Kosteski, T.; Gaspari, F.; Shmayda, W. T.; Zukotynski, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2008-01-01

    Results for the effusion and outgassing of tritium from tritiated hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H:T) films are presented. The samples were grown by dc-saddle field glow discharge at various substrate temperatures between 150 and 300°C. The tracer property of radioactive tritium is used to detect tritium release. Tritium effusion measurements are performed in a nonvacuum ion chamber and are found to yield similar results as reported for standard high vacuum technique. The results suggest for decreasing substrate temperature the growth of material with an increasing concentration of voids. These data are corroborated by analysis of infrared absorption data in terms of microstructure parameters. For material of low substrate temperature (and high void concentration) tritium outgassing in air at room temperature was studied, and it was found that after 600h about 0.2% of the total hydrogen (hydrogen+tritium) content is released. Two rate limiting processes are identified. The first process, fast tritium outgassing with a time constant of 15h, seems to be related to surface desorption of tritiated water (HTO) with a free energy of desorption of 1.04eV. The second process, slow tritium outgassing with a time constant of 200-300h, appears to be limited by oxygen diffusivity in a growing oxide layer. This material of lowest H stability would lose half of the hydrogen after 60years.

  12. Inversion of diffraction data for amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anup; Biswas, Parthapratim; Drabold, D. A.

    2016-09-01

    The general and practical inversion of diffraction data-producing a computer model correctly representing the material explored-is an important unsolved problem for disordered materials. Such modeling should proceed by using our full knowledge base, both from experiment and theory. In this paper, we describe a robust method to jointly exploit the power of ab initio atomistic simulation along with the information carried by diffraction data. The method is applied to two very different systems: amorphous silicon and two compositions of a solid electrolyte memory material silver-doped GeSe3. The technique is easy to implement, is faster and yields results much improved over conventional simulation methods for the materials explored. By direct calculation, we show that the method works for both poor and excellent glass forming materials. It offers a means to add a priori information in first-principles modeling of materials, and represents a significant step toward the computational design of non-crystalline materials using accurate interatomic interactions and experimental information.

  13. Thermal decomposition of silane to form hydrogenated amorphous Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strongin, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Wiesmann, H.J.; Rock, E.B.; Lutz, H.A. III

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, at elevated temperatures of about 1700 to 2300/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10/sup -8/ to 10/sup -4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate to form hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

  14. Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellman, Frances

    1998-10-03

    OAK B204 Growth Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Crystalline and Amorphous Thin Films. The work in the past 6 months has involved three areas of magnetic thin films: (1) amorphous rare earth-transition metal alloys, (2) epitaxial Co-Pt and hTi-Pt alloy thin films, and (3) collaborative work on heat capacity measurements of magnetic thin films, including nanoparticles and CMR materials.

  15. Domain Wall Mobility in Co-Based Amorphous Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kladivova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of the domain wall between opposite circularly magnetized domains in amorphous cylindrical sample with circular easy direction is theoretically studied. The wall is driven by DC current. Various mechanisms which influence the wall velocity were taken into account: current magnitude, deformation of the mowing wall, Hall effect, axially magnetized domain in the middle of the wire. Theoretical results obtained are in a good agreement with experiments on Cobased amorphous ferromagnetic wires.

  16. Structure and Properties of Amorphous Transparent Conducting Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, Julia

    Driven by technological appeal, the research area of amorphous oxide semiconductors has grown tremendously since the first demonstration of the unique properties of amorphous indium oxide more than a decade ago. Today, amorphous oxides, such as a-ITO, a-IZO, a-IGZO, or a-ZITO, exhibit the optical, electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties that are comparable or even superior to those possessed by their crystalline counterparts, pushing the latter out of the market. Large-area uniformity, low-cost low-temperature deposition, high carrier mobility, optical transparency, and mechanical flexibility make these materials appealing for next-generation thin-film electronics. Yet, the structural variations associated with crystalline-to-amorphous transition as well as their role in carrier generation and transport properties of these oxides are far from being understood. Although amorphous oxides lack grain boundaries, factors like (i) size and distribution of nanocrystalline inclusions; (ii) spatial distribution and clustering of incorporated cations in multicomponent oxides; (iii) formation of trap defects; and (iv) piezoelectric effects associated with internal strains, will contribute to electron scattering. In this work, ab-initio molecular dynamics (MD) and accurate density-functional approaches are employed to understand how the properties of amorphous ternary and quaternary oxides depend on quench rates, cation compositions, and oxygen stoichiometries. The MD results, combined with thorough experimental characterization, reveal that interplay between the local and long-range structural preferences of the constituent oxides gives rise to a complex composition-dependent structural behavior in the amorphous oxides. The proposed network models of metal-oxygen polyhedra help explain the observed intriguing electrical and optical properties in In-based oxides and suggest ways to broaden the phase space of amorphous oxide semiconductors with tunable properties. The

  17. Amorphous Photonic Lattices: Band Gaps, Effective Mass and Suppressed Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Rechtsman, Mikael; Szameit, Alexander; Dreisow, Felix; Heinrich, Matthias; Keil, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-01-01

    We present, theoretically and experimentally, amorphous photonic lattices exhibiting a band-gap yet completely lacking Bragg diffraction: 2D waveguides distributed randomly according to a liquid-like model responsible for the absence of Bragg peaks as opposed to ordered lattices containing disorder, which always exhibit Bragg peaks. In amorphous lattices the bands are comprised of localized states, but we find that defect states residing in the gap are more localized than the Anderson localiz...

  18. Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Ronkart, Sebastien N; Blecker, Christophe; Deroanne, Claude; Paquot, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Glass transition phenomena applied to powdered amorphous food carbohydrates. During these last fifteen years, some food technologists and scientists have become aware of the importance of the glass transition, a thermal property of glassy or amorphous material, in food preparation processes. Recent studies have successfully correlated this fundamental notion to technofunctional changes within the powder. The aim of this paper is to present in a non exhaustive manner the relationship between g...

  19. Threshold irradiation dose for amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The amorphization of silicon carbide due to ion and electron irradiation is reviewed with emphasis on the temperature-dependent critical dose for amorphization. The effect of ion mass and energy on the threshold dose for amorphization is summarized, showing only a weak dependence near room temperature. Results are presented for 0.56 MeV silicon ions implanted into single crystal 6H-SiC as a function of temperature and ion dose. From this, the critical dose for amorphization is found as a function of temperature at depths well separated from the implanted ion region. Results are compared with published data generated using electrons and xenon ions as the irradiating species. High resolution TEM analysis is presented for the Si ion series showing the evolution of elongated amorphous islands oriented such that their major axis is parallel to the free surface. This suggests that surface of strain effects may be influencing the apparent amorphization threshold. Finally, a model for the temperature threshold for amorphization is described using the Si ion irradiation flux and the fitted interstitial migration energy which was found to be {approximately}0.56 eV. This model successfully explains the difference in the temperature-dependent amorphization behavior of SiC irradiated with 0.56 MeV silicon ions at 1 x 10{sup {minus}3} dpa/s and with fission neutrons irradiated at 1 x 10{sup {minus}6} dpa/s irradiated to 15 dpa in the temperature range of {approximately}340 {+-} 10K.

  20. Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten-bearing Alloys and Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    8725 John J. Kingman Road, MS-6201 Fort Belvoir, VA 22060-6201 T E C H N IC A L R E P O R T DTRA-TR-14-73 Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten ...Technology, Boise State University, Army Research Laboratory Project Title: Powder Processing of Amorphous Tungsten -bearing Alloys and Composites...strength, we made them better suited to study the mechanical alloying of tungsten -transition metal couples in which interdiffusion during mechanical

  1. Nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide with enhanced antioxidant activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madhu, G. [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India); Department of Physics, University College, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695034 (India); Biju, V., E-mail: bijunano@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala 695581 (India)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide by a facile chemical route. • Enhanced antioxidant activity of amorphous NiO compared to crystalline samples. • Role of O{sup 2−} vacancies and high specific surface area in antioxidant activity. • Use of DC conductivity, XPS and BET to explain enhanced antioxidant activity. - Abstract: Nanostructured amorphous nickel oxide was synthesized by the thermal decomposition of nickel chloride–ethanol amine complex. The X-ray diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopic studies established the amorphous nature of the sample. The Fourier Transform Infrared, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic studies of the sample revealed the formation of NiO. The specific surface area of the sample is measured using Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis and the mesoporous nature of the sample is established through Barrett–Joyner–Halenda pore size distribution analysis. The antioxidant activity of the amorphous sample measured by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging is found to be nearly twice greater than that reported for nanocrystalline NiO samples. The estimated radical scavenging activity of the sample is correlated with the DC conductivity values measured in vacuum and air ambience. The enhanced antioxidant activity of the amorphous NiO is accounted by the increase in the concentration of O{sup 2−} vacancies and the specific surface area. The Ni 2p and O 1s X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopic studies of the sample support the inference.

  2. Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perchikov, Nathan; Bouchbinder, Eran

    2014-06-01

    Variable-amplitude oscillatory shear tests are emerging as powerful tools to investigate and quantify the nonlinear rheology of amorphous solids, complex fluids, and biological materials. Quite a few recent experimental and atomistic simulation studies demonstrated that at low shear amplitudes, an amorphous solid settles into an amplitude- and initial-conditions-dependent dissipative limit cycle, in which back-and-forth localized particle rearrangements periodically bring the system to the same state. At sufficiently large shear amplitudes, the amorphous system loses memory of the initial conditions, exhibits chaotic particle motions accompanied by diffusive behavior, and settles into a stochastic steady state. The two regimes are separated by a transition amplitude, possibly characterized by some critical-like features. Here we argue that these observations support some of the physical assumptions embodied in the nonequilibrium thermodynamic, internal-variables based, shear-transformation-zone model of amorphous viscoplasticity; most notably that "flow defects" in amorphous solids are characterized by internal states between which they can make transitions, and that structural evolution is driven by dissipation associated with plastic deformation. We present a rather extensive theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic shear-transformation-zone model for a variable-amplitude oscillatory shear protocol, highlighting its success in accounting for various experimental and simulational observations, as well as its limitations. Our results offer a continuum-level theoretical framework for interpreting the variable-amplitude oscillatory shear response of amorphous solids and may promote additional developments.

  3. Radiative Transfer Modeling of MESSENGER VIR Spectra of Mercury: Detection and Mapping of Submicroscopic Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trang, D.; Lucey, P. G.; Izenberg, N.

    2015-12-01

    The composition of Mercury is elusive because the planet is optically dark and exhibits a relatively featureless red visible and near-infrared spectrum. Studies have invoked opaque minerals and space weathering to explain these characteristics. In this study we used radiative transfer modeling of MESSENGER VIRS data to show that carbon is required to explain the detailed shape of the spectrum of Mercury from 0.3-1.5 µm. In this model, we assume the regolith comprises a high albedo host mineral, which contains nanophase and microphase iron and carbon. We varied the abundance of nanophase and microphase iron and carbon to fit the observed spectra. We found that the nanophase and microphase iron alone inadequately fits the visible portion of the observed spectra. By adding carbon, we find that nanophase and microphase iron and nanophase amorphous carbon fit the VIRS spectra consistently. We produced a global nanophase amorphous carbon map as well as nanophase and microphase iron maps. From the carbon map (see figure), we find that nanophase amorphous carbon is sensitive to geologic features associated with space weathering, such as fresh crater rays. Thus, amorphous carbon is a new indicator for regolith maturity. We also observe that the global average submicroscopic carbon content is 1.4±0.3 wt.% C, which is consistent with MESSENGER Gamma-Ray Spectrometer measurements. Using this abundance, we can constrain the source of water and carbon on Mercury. Assuming the water ice in the poles is derived from wet impactors, both asteroids and comets, and knowing C/H ratios of those sources, the surface nanophase carbon layer can be no thicker than 10 m if all carbon is derived from an exogenous source. It is almost certain the space weathered regolith on Mercury is thicker than 10 m, so the majority of carbon on Mercury must be endogenous. Figure: Nanophase amorphous carbon map. In this map, fresh craters and their rays are distinguishable by the lower proportion of

  4. Understanding the Tendency of Amorphous Solid Dispersions to Undergo Amorphous–Amorphous Phase Separation in the Presence of Absorbed Moisture

    OpenAIRE

    Rumondor, Alfred C. F.; Wikström, Håkan; Van Eerdenbrugh, Bernard; Taylor, Lynne S.

    2011-01-01

    Formulation of an amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) is one of the methods commonly considered to increase the bioavailability of a poorly water-soluble small-molecule active pharmaceutical ingredient (API). However, many factors have to be considered in designing an API–polymer system, including any potential changes to the physical stability of the API. In this study, the tendency of ASD systems containing a poorly water-soluble API and a polymer to undergo amorphous–amorphous phase separatio...

  5. Processing and characterization of amorphous magnesium based alloy for application in biomedical implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telma Blanco Matias

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based bulk metallic glasses are attractive due to their single-phase, chemically homogeneous alloy system and the absence of second-phase, which could impair the mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. However, one of the unsolved problems for the manufacturability and the applications of bulk metallic glasses is that their glass-forming ability is very sensitive to the preparation techniques and impurity of components since oxygen in the environment would markedly deteriorate the glass-forming ability. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish proper processing conditions to obtain a magnesium-based amorphous ternary alloy and its characterization. The final composition was prepared using two binary master alloys by melting in an induction furnace. Carbon steel crucible was used in argon atmosphere with and without addition of SF6 gas in order to minimize the oxygen contamination. The microstructure, amorphous nature, thermal properties and chemical analysis of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry, respectively. The oxygen content of the as-cast samples was chemically analyzed by using carrier gas hot extraction (O/N Analyzer TC-436/LECO and was kept bellow 25 ppm (without SF6 and 10 ppm (with SF6. Bulk samples were produced by rapid cooling in a cooper mold until 1.5 mm thickness, with amorphous structures being observed up to 2.5 mm.

  6. Small diameter carbon nanopipettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Riju; Bhattacharyya, Sayan; Orynbayeva, Zulfiya; Vitol, Elina; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2010-01-01

    Nanoscale multifunctional carbon probes facilitate cellular studies due to their small size, which makes it possible to interrogate organelles within living cells in a minimally invasive fashion. However, connecting nanotubes to macroscopic devices and constructing an integrated system for the purpose of fluid and electrical signal transfer is challenging, as is often the case with nanoscale components. We describe a non-catalytic chemical vapor deposition based method for batch fabrication of integrated multifunctional carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) with tip diameters much smaller (10-30 nm) than previously reported (200 nm and above) and approaching those observed for multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This eliminates the need for complicated attachment/assembly of nanotubes into nanofluidic devices. Variable tip geometries and structures were obtained by controlled deposition of carbon inside and outside quartz pipettes. We have shown that the capillary length and gas flow rate have a marked effect on the carbon deposition. This gives us a flexible protocol, useful for growing carbon layers of different thicknesses at selective locations on a glass pipette to yield a large variety of cellular probes in bulk quantities. The CNPs possess an open channel for fluid transfer with the carbon deposited inside at 875 °C behaving like an amorphous semiconductor. Vacuum annealing of the CNP tips at temperatures up to 2000 °C yields graphitic carbon structures with an increase in conductivity of two orders of magnitude. Penetration of the integrated carbon nanoprobes into cells was shown to produce minimal Ca2+ signals, fast recovery of basal Ca2+ levels and no adverse activation of the cellular metabolism during interrogation times as long as 0.5-1 h.

  7. Single-Step, Solvent-Free, Catalyst-Free Preparation of Holey Carbon Allotropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Connell, John W. (Inventor); Funk, Michael R. (Inventor); Campbell, Caroline J. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Methods for forming holey carbon allotropes and graphene nanomeshes are provided by the various embodiments. The various embodiments may be applicable to a variety of carbon allotropes, such as graphene, graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide, thermal exfoliated graphene, graphene nanoribbons, graphite, exfoliated graphite, expanded graphite, carbon nanotubes (e.g., single-walled carbon nanotubes, double-walled carbon nanotubes, few-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, etc.), carbon nanofibers, carbon fibers, carbon black, amorphous carbon, fullerenes, etc. The methods may produce holey carbon allotropes without the use of solvents, catalysts, flammable gas, additional chemical agents, or electrolysis to produce the pores (e.g., holes, etc.) in the carbon allotropes. In an embodiment, a carbon allotrope may be heated at a working window temperature for a working period of time to create holes in the carbon allotrope.

  8. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merget, R.; Bruening, T. [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Bauer, T. [Bergmannsheil, University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumonology, Allergology and Sleep Medicine, Bochum (Germany); Kuepper, H.U.; Breitstadt, R. [Degussa-Huels Corp., Wesseling (Germany); Philippou, S. [Department of Pathology, Augusta Krankenanstalten, Bochum (Germany); Bauer, H.D. [Research Institute for Hazardous Substances (IGF), Bochum (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or

  9. Solid state photochemistry. Subpanel A-2(b): Metastability in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, D. [Solarex Corporation, Newton, PA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    All device quality amorphous silicon based materials exhibit degradation in electronic properties when exposed to sunlight. The photo-induced defects are associated with Si dangling bonds that are created by the recombination and/or trapping of photogenerated carriers. The defects are metastable and can be annealed out at temperatures of about 150 to 200 degrees Centigrade. The density of metastable defects is larger in films that are contaminated with > 10{sup 19} per cubic cm of impurities such as oxygen, carbon and nitrogen. However, recent experimental results indicate that some metastable defects are still present in films with very low impurity concentrations. The photo-induced defects typically saturate after 100 to 1000 hours of exposure to one sun illumination depending on the deposition conditions. There is also experimental evidence that photo-induced structural changes are occurring in the amorphous silicon based materials and that hydrogen may be playing an important role in both the photo-induced structural changes and in the creation of metastable defects.

  10. Tailoring the optical and hydrophobic property of zinc oxide nanorod by coating with amorphous graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, D.; Das, N. S.; Das, B.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.; Banerjee, D.

    2016-09-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods were synthesized at room temperature on potassium permanganate activated silicon and glass substrate by simple chemical method using zinc acetate as precursor. To modify the surface energy of the as prepared ZnO thin films the samples were coated with amorphous graphene (a-G) synthesized by un-zipping of chemically synthesized amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). All the pure and coated samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscope, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The roughness analysis of the as prepared samples was done by atomic force microscopic analysis. The detail optical properties of all the samples were studied with the help of a UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The surface energy of the as prepared pure and coated samples was calculated by measuring the contact angle of two different liquids. It is seen that the water repellence of ZnO nanorods got increased after they are being coated with a-Gs. Also even after UV irradiation the contact angle remain same unlike the case for the uncoated sample where the contact angle gets decreased significantly after UV irradiation. Existing Cassie-Wenzel model has been employed along with the Owen's approach to determine the different components of surface energy.

  11. Amorphous metal distribution transformers: The energy-efficient alternative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrity, T.F. [GE Power Systems, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Amorphous metal distribution transformers have been commercially available for the past 13 years. During that time, they have realized the promise of exceptionally high core efficiency as compared to silicon steel transformer cores. Utility planners today must consider all options available to meet the requirements of load growth. While additional generation capacity will be added, many demand-side initiatives are being undertaken as complementary programs to generation expansion. The efficiency improvement provided by amorphous metal distribution transformers deserves to be among the demand-side options. The key to understanding the positive impact of amorphous metal transformer efficiency is to consider the aggregate contribution those transformers can make towards demand reduction. It is estimated that distribution transformer core losses comprise at least 1% of the utility`s peak demand. Because core losses are continuous, any significant reduction in their magnitude is of great significance to the planner. This paper describes the system-wide economic contributions amorphous metal distribution transformers can make to a utility and suggests evaluation techniques that can be used. As a conservation tool, the amorphous metal transformer contributes to reduced power plant emissions. Calibration of those emissions reductions is also discussed in the paper.

  12. Two-phase electrochemical lithiation in amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang Wei; He, Yu; Fan, Feifei; Liu, Xiao Hua; Xia, Shuman; Liu, Yang; Harris, C Thomas; Li, Hong; Huang, Jian Yu; Mao, Scott X; Zhu, Ting

    2013-02-13

    Lithium-ion batteries have revolutionized portable electronics and will be a key to electrifying transport vehicles and delivering renewable electricity. Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is being intensively studied as a high-capacity anode material for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. Its lithiation has been widely thought to occur through a single-phase mechanism with gentle Li profiles, thus offering a significant potential for mitigating pulverization and capacity fade. Here, we discover a surprising two-phase process of electrochemical lithiation in a-Si by using in situ transmission electron microscopy. The lithiation occurs by the movement of a sharp phase boundary between the a-Si reactant and an amorphous Li(x)Si (a-Li(x)Si, x ~ 2.5) product. Such a striking amorphous-amorphous interface exists until the remaining a-Si is consumed. Then a second step of lithiation sets in without a visible interface, resulting in the final product of a-Li(x)Si (x ~ 3.75). We show that the two-phase lithiation can be the fundamental mechanism underpinning the anomalous morphological change of microfabricated a-Si electrodes, i.e., from a disk shape to a dome shape. Our results represent a significant step toward the understanding of the electrochemically driven reaction and degradation in amorphous materials, which is critical to the development of microstructurally stable electrodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries.

  13. Amorphous computing in the presence of stochastic disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Dominique; Barnes, David J; Perkins, Samuel

    2014-11-01

    Amorphous computing is a non-standard computing paradigm that relies on massively parallel execution of computer code by a large number of small, spatially distributed, weakly interacting processing units. Over the last decade or so, amorphous computing has attracted a great deal of interest both as an alternative model of computing and as an inspiration to understand developmental biology. A number of algorithms have been developed that can take advantage of the massive parallelism of this computing paradigm to solve specific problems. One of the interesting properties of amorphous computers is that they are robust with respect to the loss of individual processing units, in the sense that a removal of some of them should not impact on the computation as a whole. However, much less understood is to what extent amorphous computers are robust with respect to minor disturbances to the individual processing units, such as random motion or occasional faulty computation short of total component failure. In this article we address this question. As an example problem we choose an algorithm to calculate a straight line between two points. Using this example, we find that amorphous computers are not in general robust with respect to Brownian motion and noise, but we find strategies that restore reliable computation even in their presence. We will argue that these strategies are generally applicable and not specific to the particular AC we consider, or even specific to electronic computers.

  14. Devitrification of rapidly quenched Al–Cu–Ti amorphous alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D K Misra; R S Tiwari; O N Srivastava

    2003-08-01

    X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry were carried out to study the transformation from amorphous to icosahedral/crystalline phases in the rapidly quenched Al50Cu45Ti5 and Al45Cu45Ti10 alloys. In the present investigation, we have studied the formation and stability of amorphous phase in Al50Cu45Ti5 and Al45Cu45Ti10 rapidly quenched alloys. The DSC curve shows a broad complex type of exothermic overlapping peaks (288–550°C) for Al50Cu45Ti5 and a well defined peak around 373°C for Al45Cu45Ti10 alloy. In the case of Al50Cu45Ti5 alloy amorphous to icosahedral phase transformation has been observed after annealing at 280°C for 73 h. Large dendritic growth of icosahedral phase along with -Al phase has been found. Annealing of Al50Cu45Ti5 alloy at 400°C for 8 h results in formation of Al3Ti type phase. Al45Cu45Ti10 amorphous alloy is more stable in comparison to Al50Cu45Ti5 alloy and after annealing at 400°C for 8 h it also transforms to Al3Ti type phase. However, this alloy does not show amorphous to icosahedral phase transformation.

  15. Comprehensive modeling of ion-implant amorphization in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mok, K.R.C. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain) and Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: g0202446@nus.edu.sg; Jaraiz, M. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Martin-Bragado, I. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Synopsys, Karl-Hammerschmidt Strasse 34, D-85609 Aschheim/Dornach (Germany); Rubio, J.E. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Castrillo, P. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Pinacho, R. [Departamento de E. y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSIT Campus Miguel Delibes, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Srinivasan, M.P. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Benistant, F. [Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing. 60 Woodlands Industrial Park D, Street 2, Singapore 738406 (Singapore)

    2005-12-05

    A physically based model has been developed to simulate the ion-implant induced damage accumulation up to amorphization in silicon. Based on damage structures known as amorphous pockets (AP), which are three-dimensional, irregularly shaped agglomerates of interstitials (I) and vacancies (V) surrounded by crystalline silicon, the model is able to reproduce a wide range of experimental observations of damage accumulation and amorphization with interdependent implantation parameters. Instead of recrystallizing the I's and V's instantaneously, the recrystallization rate of an AP containing nI and mV is a function of its effective size, defined as min(n, m), irrespective of its internal spatial configuration. The parameters used in the model were calibrated using the experimental silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature as a function of dose rate for C, Si, and Ge. The model is able to show the superlinear damage build-up with dose, the extent of amorphous layer and the superadditivity effect of polyatomic ions.

  16. Electroplating process of amorphous Fe-Ni-Cr alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何湘柱; 夏畅斌; 王红军; 龚竹清; 蒋汉瀛

    2001-01-01

    A novel process of electroplating amorphous Fe-Cr-Ni alloy in chloride aqueous solution with Fe( Ⅱ ), Ni ( lⅡ ) and Cr( Ⅲ ) was reported. Couple plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray diffractometry(XRD),scanning electronic microscopy(SEM), microhardness test and rapid heating-cooling method were adopted to detect the properties of the amorphous Fe-Ni-Cr deposit, such as composition, crystalline structure, micrograph, hardness, and adherence between deposit and substrate. The effects of the operating parameters on the electrodeposit of the amorphous FeNi-Cr alloy were discussed in detail. The results show that a 8.7 μm thick mirror-like amorphous Fe-Ni-Cr alloy deposit,with Vicker's hardness of 530 and composition of 45%~55% Fe, 33%~37% Ni, 9%~23% Cr was obtained by electroplating for 20 min at room temperature( 10 30 C ), cathode current 10~16 A/dm2, pH = 1.0~3.0. The XRD pat terns show that there only appears a broad hump around 2θ of 41 °~47 °for the amorphous Fe-Ni-Cr alloy deposit, while the SEM micrographs show that the deposit contains only a few fine cracks but no pinholes.

  17. Parametrized dielectric functions of amorphous GeSn alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Costa, Vijay Richard, E-mail: elevrd@nus.edu.sg; Wang, Wei; Yeo, Yee-Chia, E-mail: eleyeoyc@nus.edu.sg [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117583 (Singapore); Schmidt, Daniel [Singapore Synchrotron Light Source, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117603 (Singapore)

    2015-09-28

    We obtained the complex dielectric function of amorphous Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.07) alloys using spectroscopic ellipsometry from 0.4 to 4.5 eV. Amorphous GeSn films were formed by room-temperature implantation of phosphorus into crystalline GeSn alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The optical response of amorphous GeSn alloys is similar to amorphous Ge and can be parametrized using a Kramers-Kronig consistent Cody-Lorentz dispersion model. The parametric model was extended to account for the dielectric functions of amorphous Ge{sub 0.75}Sn{sub 0.25} and Ge{sub 0.50}Sn{sub 0.50} alloys from literature. The compositional dependence of band gap energy E{sub g} and parameters associated with the Lorentzian oscillator have been determined. The behavior of these parameters with varying x can be understood in terms of the alloying effect of Sn on Ge.

  18. Ab initio modelling of boron related defects in amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Tiago A.; Torres, Vitor J.B. [Department of Physics, University of Aveiro, Campus Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-10-15

    We have modeled boron related point defects in amorphous silicon, using an ab initio method, the Density functional theory-pseudopotential code Aimpro. The boron atoms were embedded in 64 atom amorphous silicon cubic supercells. The calculations were performed using boron defects in 15 different supercells. These supercells were developed using a modified Wooten-Winer-Weaire bond switching mechanism. In average, the properties of the 15 supercells agree with the observed radial and bond angle distributions, as well the electronic and vibrational density of states and Raman spectra. In amorphous silicon it has been very hard to find real self-interstitials, since for almost all the tested configurations, the amorphous lattice relaxes overall. We found that substitutional boron prefers to be 4-fold coordinated. We find also an intrinsic hole-trap in the non-doped amorphous lattice, which may explain the low efficiency of boron doping. The local vibrational modes are, in average, higher than the correspondent crystalline values (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Elusive Amorphous Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerakines, Perry A.; Hudson, Reggie L.

    2015-01-01

    New and accurate laboratory results are reported for amorphous methane (CH4) ice near 10 K for the study of the interstellar medium (ISM) and the outer Solar System. Near- and mid-infrared (IR) data, including spectra, band strengths, absorption coefficients, and optical constants, are presented for the first time for this seldom-studied amorphous solid. The apparent IR band strength near 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) for amorphous CH4 is found to be about 33% higher than the value long used by IR astronomers to convert spectral observations of interstellar CH4 into CH4 abundances. Although CH4 is most likely to be found in an amorphous phase in the ISM, a comparison of results from various laboratory groups shows that the earlier CH4 band strength at 1300 cm(exp -1) (7.69 micrometer) was derived from IR spectra of ices that were either partially or entirely crystalline CH4 Applications of the new amorphous-CH4 results are discussed, and all optical constants are made available in electronic form.

  20. Amorphous Dielectric Thin Films with Extremely Low Mechanical Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu X.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitous low-energy excitations are one of the universal phenomena of amorphous solids. These excitations dominate the acoustic, dielectric, and thermal properties of structurally disordered solids. One exception has been a type of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H with 1 at.% H. Using low temperature elastic and thermal measurements of electron-beam evap-orated amorphous silicon (a-Si, we show that TLS can be eliminated in this system as the films become denser and more structurally ordered under certain deposition conditions. Our results demonstrate that TLS are not intrinsic to the glassy state but instead reside in low density regions of the amorphous network. This work obviates the role hydrogen was previously thought to play in removing TLS in a-Si:H and favors an ideal four-fold covalently bonded amorphous structure as the cause for the disappearance of TLS. Our result supports the notion that a-Si can be made a “perfect glass” with “crystal-like” properties, thus offering an encouraging opportunity to use it as a simple crystal dielectric alternative in applications, such as in modern quantum devices where TLS are the source of dissipation, decoherence and 1/f noise.