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Sample records for aldehyde oxidizing enzymes

  1. Enzyme-inspired functional surfactant for aerobic oxidation of activated alcohols to aldehydes in water

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Batian

    2015-02-06

    We describe an enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional amphiphile. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically.

  2. The Oxidative Fermentation of Ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus Is a Two-Step Pathway Catalyzed by a Single Enzyme: Alcohol-Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH. We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2–C6 and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  3. The oxidative fermentation of ethanol in Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a two-step pathway catalyzed by a single enzyme: alcohol-aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ADHa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Escamilla, José E; González-Valdez, Abigail; López-Velázquez, Gabriel; Vanoye-Carlo, América; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; de la Mora-de la Mora, Ignacio; Garcia-Torres, Itzhel; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Arreguín-Espinosa, Roberto; Kroneck, Peter M H; Sosa-Torres, Martha Elena

    2015-01-07

    Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a N2-fixing bacterium endophyte from sugar cane. The oxidation of ethanol to acetic acid of this organism takes place in the periplasmic space, and this reaction is catalyzed by two membrane-bound enzymes complexes: the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). We present strong evidence showing that the well-known membrane-bound Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADHa) of Ga. diazotrophicus is indeed a double function enzyme, which is able to use primary alcohols (C2-C6) and its respective aldehydes as alternate substrates. Moreover, the enzyme utilizes ethanol as a substrate in a reaction mechanism where this is subjected to a two-step oxidation process to produce acetic acid without releasing the acetaldehyde intermediary to the media. Moreover, we propose a mechanism that, under physiological conditions, might permit a massive conversion of ethanol to acetic acid, as usually occurs in the acetic acid bacteria, but without the transient accumulation of the highly toxic acetaldehyde.

  4. Efficient and Highly Aldehyde Selective Wacker Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Teo, Peili

    2012-07-06

    A method for efficient and aldehyde-selective Wacker oxidation of aryl-substituted olefins using PdCl 2(MeCN) 2, 1,4-benzoquinone, and t-BuOH in air is described. Up to a 96% yield of aldehyde can be obtained, and up to 99% selectivity can be achieved with styrene-related substrates. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. Oxidation of Aromatic Aldehydes Using Oxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhari, Rajani; Maddukuri, Padma P.; Thottumkara, Vinod K.

    2007-01-01

    The experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using water as a solvent for organic reactions which highlights the cost and environmental benefits of its use is presented. The experiment encourages students to think in terms of the reaction mechanism of the oxidation of aldehydes knowing that potassium persulfate is the active oxidant in Oxone…

  6. Molybdenum incorporation in tungsten aldehyde oxidoreductase enzymes from Pyrococcus furiosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sevcenco, A.M; Bevers, L.E.; Pinkse, M.W.H.; Krijger, G.C.; Wolterbeek, H.T.; Verhaert, P.D.E.M.; Hagen, W.R.; Hagedoorn, P.L.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus expresses five aldehyde oxidoreductase (AOR) enzymes, all containing a tungsto-bispterin cofactor. The growth of this organism is fully dependent on the presence of tungsten in the growth medium. Previous studies have suggested that molybdenum is no

  7. The oxidation of the aldehyde groups in dialdehyde starch

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaksman, I.K.; Besemer, A.C.; Jetten, J.M.; Timmermans, J.W.; Slaghek, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the difference in relative reactivity of the aldehyde groups present in dialdehyde starch towards different oxidising agents. The oxidation of dialdehyde starch with peracetic acid and sodium bromide leads to only partial oxidation to give mono-aldehyde-carboxy starch, while oxi

  8. Catalyst-Controlled Wacker-Type Oxidation: Facile Access to Functionalized Aldehydes

    OpenAIRE

    Wickens, Zachary K.; Skakuj, Kacper; Morandi, Bill; Grubbs, Robert H

    2014-01-01

    The aldehyde-selective oxidation of alkenes bearing diverse oxygen groups in the allylic and homoallylic position was accomplished with a nitrite-modified Wacker oxidation. Readily available oxygenated alkenes were oxidized in up to 88% aldehyde yield and as high as 97% aldehyde selectivity. The aldehyde-selective oxidation enabled the rapid, enantioselective synthesis of an important pharmaceutical agent, atomoxetine. Finally, the influence of proximal functional groups on this anti-Markovni...

  9. Research advances in the catalysts for the selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; ZHAO Zhen; XU Chunming

    2005-01-01

    Selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes is one of the most difficult processes in the catalysis researches of low alkanes. The development of selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein) is discussed. The latest progress of the catalysts, including bulk or supported metal oxide catalysts, highly dispersed and isolated active sites catalysts, and the photo-catalytic ethane oxidation catalysts, partial oxidation of ethane in the gas phase, and the proposed reaction pathways from ethane to aldehydes are involved.

  10. Oxidation of N-alkyl and N-aryl azaheterocycles by free and immobilized rabbit liver aldehyde oxidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angelino, S.A.G.F.

    1984-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase isolated from rabbit liver is studied in this thesis with regard to its application in organic synthesis. The enzyme has a broad substrate specificity towards azaheterocycles and therefore offers great potential for profitable use.The oxidation of 1-alkyl(aryl)-3-aminocarbonylpyridi

  11. On the role of long-chain aldehydes in the light reaction in Photobacterium phosphoreum enzyme preparations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, Willemke

    1960-01-01

    1. (1) Active luciferase-DPNH-oxidase preparations from Photobacterium phosphoreum generally contain some aldehyde-attacking enzyme, probably ADH. Under the experimental conditions applied this enzyme appears to attack decanal, but not palmital. 2. (2) The presence of long-chain aldehydes in the en

  12. Release and Formation of Oxidation-Related Aldehydes during Wine Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Mónica; Carrascón, Vanesa; Ferreira, Vicente

    2016-01-27

    Twenty-four Spanish wines were subjected to five consecutive cycles of air saturation at 25 °C. Free and bound forms of carbonyls were measured in the initial samples and after each saturation. Nonoxidized commercial wines contain important and sensory relevant amounts of oxidation-related carbonyls under the form of odorless bound forms. Models relating the contents in total aldehydes to the wine chemical composition suggest that fermentation can be a major origin for Strecker aldehydes: methional, phenylacetaldehyde, isobutyraldehyde, 2-methylbutanal, and isovaleraldehyde. Bound forms are further cleaved, releasing free aldehydes during the first steps of wine oxidation, as a consequence of equilibrium shifts caused by the depletion of SO2. At low levels of free SO2, de novo formation and aldehyde degradation are both observed. The relative importance of these phenomena depends on both the aldehyde and the wine. Models relating aldehyde formation rates to wine chemical composition suggest that amino acids are in most cases the most important precursors for de novo formation.

  13. Functional analysis of aldehyde oxidase using expressed chimeric enzyme between monkey and rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kunio; Asakawa, Tasuku; Hoshino, Kouichi; Adachi, Mayuko; Fukiya, Kensuke; Watanabe, Nobuaki; Tanaka, Yorihisa

    2009-01-01

    Aldehyde oxidase (AO) is a homodimer with a subunit molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. Each subunit consists of about 20 kDa 2Fe-2S cluster domain storing reducing equivalents, about 40 kDa flavine adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain and about 85 kDa molybdenum cofactor (MoCo) domain containing a substrate binding site. In order to clarify the properties of each domain, especially substrate binding domain, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by mutual exchange of 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains between monkey and rat. Chimeric monkey/rat AO was referred to one with monkey type 2Fe-2S/FAD domains and a rat type MoCo domain. Rat/monkey AO was vice versa. AO-catalyzed 2-oxidation activities of (S)-RS-8359 were measured using the expressed enzyme in Escherichia coli. Substrate inhibition was seen in rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, but not in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, suggesting that the phenomenon might be dependent on the natures of MoCo domain of rat. A biphasic Eadie-Hofstee profile was observed in monkey AO and chimeric rat/monkey AO, but not rat AO and chimeric monkey/rat AO, indicating that the biphasic profile might be related to the properties of MoCo domain of monkey. Two-fold greater V(max) values were observed in monkey AO than in chimeric rat/monkey AO, and in chimeric monkey/rat AO than in rat AO, suggesting that monkey has the more effective electron transfer system than rat. Thus, the use of chimeric enzymes revealed that 2Fe-2S/FAD and MoCo domains affect the velocity and the quantitative profiles of AO-catalyzed (S)-RS-8359 2-oxidation, respectively.

  14. β-Cyclodextrin promoted oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids in water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Po Shi; Hong Bing Ji

    2009-01-01

    A facile,efficient and substrate-selective oxidation of aldehydes to carboxylic acids with NaC10 catalyzed by β-cyclodextdn in water has been developed.A series of aldehydes which could form inclusion complex with β-cyclodextrin(β-CD)were oxidized selectively with excellent yields.

  15. Metal-Free Direct Oxidation of Aldehydes to Esters Using TCCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaspa, Silvia; Porcheddu, Andrea; De Luca, Lidia

    2015-08-07

    Aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes are simply converted into esters by an efficient oxidative esterification carried out under mild conditions. The aldehydes are converted in situ into their corresponding acyl chlorides, which are then reacted with primary and secondary aliphatic, benzylic, allylic, and propargylic alcohols and phenols. A variety of esters are obtained in high yields.

  16. Modelling of the partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes on Mo-V-oxides based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehnke, H.; Petzoldt, J.C.; Stein, B.; Weimer, C.; Gaube, J.W. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Chemische Technologie

    1998-12-31

    A kinetic model based on the Mars-van Krevelen mechanism that allows to describe the microkinetics of the heterogeneously catalysed partial oxidation of {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehydes is presented. This conversion is represented by a network, composed of the oxidation of the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated aldehyde towards the {alpha}, {beta}-unsaturated carboxylic acid and the consecutive oxidation of the acid as well as the parallel reaction of the aldehyde to products of deeper oxidation. The reaction steps of aldehyde respectively acid oxidation and catalyst reoxidation have been investigated separately in transient experiments. The combination of steady state and transient experiments has led to an improved understanding of the interaction of the catalyst with the aldehyde and the carboxylic acids as well as to a support of the kinetic model assumptions. (orig.)

  17. The four aldehyde oxidases of Drosophila melanogaster have different gene expression patterns and enzyme substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelja, Zvonimir; Dambowsky, Miriam; Bolis, Marco; Georgiou, Marina L; Garattini, Enrico; Missirlis, Fanis; Leimkühler, Silke

    2014-06-15

    In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, four genes coding for aldehyde oxidases (AOX1-4) were identified on chromosome 3. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the AOX gene cluster evolved via independent duplication events in the vertebrate and invertebrate lineages. The functional role and the substrate specificity of the distinct Drosophila AOX enzymes is unknown. Two loss-of-function mutant alleles in this gene region, low pyridoxal oxidase (Po(lpo)) and aldehyde oxidase-1 (Aldox-1(n1)) are associated with a phenotype characterized by undetectable AOX enzymatic activity. However, the genes involved and the corresponding mutations have not yet been identified. In this study we characterized the activities, substrate specificities and expression profiles of the four AOX enzymes in D. melanogaster. We show that the Po(lpo)-associated phenotype is the consequence of a structural alteration of the AOX1 gene. We identified an 11-bp deletion in the Po(lpo) allele, resulting in a frame-shift event, which removes the molybdenum cofactor domain of the encoded enzyme. Furthermore, we show that AOX2 activity is detectable only during metamorphosis and characterize a Minos-AOX2 insertion in this developmental gene that disrupts its activity. We demonstrate that the Aldox-1(n1) phenotype maps to the AOX3 gene and AOX4 activity is not detectable in our assays.

  18. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  19. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  20. Role of reduced lipoic acid in the redox regulation of mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2) activity. Implications for mitochondrial oxidative stress and nitrate tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, Philip; Hink, Ulrich; Oelze, Matthias; Schuppan, Swaantje; Schaeuble, Karin; Schildknecht, Stefan; Ho, Kwok K; Weiner, Henry; Bachschmid, Markus; Münzel, Thomas; Daiber, Andreas

    2007-01-05

    Chronic therapy with nitroglycerin results in a rapid development of nitrate tolerance, which is associated with an increased production of reactive oxygen species. We have recently shown that mitochondria are an important source of nitroglycerin-induced oxidants and that the nitroglycerin-bioactivating mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase is oxidatively inactivated in the setting of tolerance. Here we investigated the effect of various oxidants on aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and its restoration by dihydrolipoic acid. In vivo tolerance in Wistar rats was induced by infusion of nitroglycerin (6.6 microg/kg/min, 4 days). Vascular reactivity was measured by isometric tension studies of isolated aortic rings in response to nitroglycerin. Chronic nitroglycerin infusion lead to impaired vascular responses to nitroglycerin and decreased dehydrogenase activity, which was corrected by dihydrolipoic acid co-incubation. Superoxide, peroxynitrite, and nitroglycerin itself were highly efficient in inhibiting mitochondrial and yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, which was restored by dithiol compounds such as dihydrolipoic acid and dithiothreitol. Hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide were rather insensitive inhibitors. Our observations indicate that mitochondrial oxidative stress (especially superoxide and peroxynitrite) in response to organic nitrate treatment may inactivate aldehyde dehydrogenase thereby leading to nitrate tolerance. Glutathionylation obviously amplifies oxidative inactivation of the enzyme providing another regulatory pathway. Furthermore, the present data demonstrate that the mitochondrial dithiol compound dihydrolipoic acid restores mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase activity via reduction of a disulfide at the active site and thereby improves nitrate tolerance.

  1. MOLECULAR MODELLING OF HUMAN ALDEHYDE OXIDASE AND IDENTIFICATION OF THE KEY INTERACTIONS IN THE ENZYME-SUBSTRATE COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siavoush Dastmalchi

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde oxidase (EC 1.2.3.1, a cytosolic enzyme containing FAD, molybdenum and iron-sulphur cluster, is a member of non-cytochrome P-450 enzymes called molybdenum hydroxylases which is involved in the metabolism of a wide range of endogenous compounds and many drug substances. Drug metabolism is one of the important characteristics which influences many aspects of a therapeutic agent such as routes of administration, drug interaction and toxicity and therefore, characterisation of the key interactions between enzymes and substrates is very important from drug development point of view. The aim of this study was to generate a three-dimensional model of human aldehyde oxidase (AO in order to assist us to identify the mode of interaction between enzyme and a set of phethalazine/quinazoline derivatives. Both sequence-based (BLAST and inverse protein fold recognition methods (THREADER were used to identify the crystal structure of bovine xanthine dehydrogenase (pdb code of 1FO4 as the suitable template for comparative modelling of human AO. Model structure was generated by aligning and then threading the sequence of human AO onto the template structure, incorporating the associated cofactors, and molecular dynamics simulations and energy minimization using GROMACS program. Different criteria which were measured by the PROCHECK, QPACK, VERIFY-3D were indicative of a proper fold for the predicted structural model of human AO. For example, 97.9 percentages of phi and psi angles were in the favoured and most favoured regions in the ramachandran plot, and all residues in the model are assigned environmentally positive compatibility scores. Further evaluation on the model quality was performed by investigation of AO-mediated oxidation of a set of phthalazine/quinazoline derivatives to develop QSAR model capable of describing the extent of the oxidation. Substrates were aligned by docking onto the active site of the enzyme using GOLD technology and then

  2. Oxidation of Group 8 transition-Metal Hydrides and Ionic Hydrogenation of Ketones and Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kjell-Tore

    1996-08-01

    Transition-metal hydrides have received considerable attention during the last decades because of their unusual reactivity and their potential as homogeneous catalysts for hydrogenation and other reactions of organic substrates. An important class of catalytic processes where transition-metal hydrides are involved is the homogeneous hydrogenation of alkenes, alkynes, ketones, aldehydes, arenes and nitro compounds. This thesis studies the oxidation of Group 8 transition-metal hydrides and the ionic hydrogenation of ketones and aldehydes.

  3. Nitric Oxide Mediates the Stress Response Induced by Diatom Aldehydes in the Sea Urchin Paracentrotus lividus

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanna Romano; Maria Costantini; Isabella Buttino; Adrianna Ianora; Anna Palumbo

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadie...

  4. Directing-group-assisted copper-catalyzed oxidative esterification of phenols with aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong; Song, Wei-Bin; Xuan, Li-Jiang

    2015-11-28

    A directing-group-assisted copper-catalyzed oxidative esterification of phenols with aldehydes using TBHP as an oxidant was described. This methodology which showed the advantages of base, ligand free, short routes and functional group tolerance could be used as an alternative protocol for the classical esterification reactions.

  5. Alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases: structures of the human liver enzymes, functional properties and evolutionary aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörnvall, H; Hempel, J; von Bahr-Lindström, H; Höög, J O; Vallee, B L

    1987-01-01

    All three types of subunit of class I human alcohol dehydrogenase have been analyzed both at the protein and cDNA levels, and the structures of alpha, beta 1, beta 2, gamma 1, and gamma 2 subunits are known. The same applies to class II pi subunits. Extensive protein data are also available for class III chi subunits. In the class I human isozymes, amino acid exchanges occur at 35 positions in total, with 21-28 replacements between any pair of the alpha/beta/gamma chains. These values, compared with those from species differences between the corresponding human and horse enzymes, suggest that isozyme developments in the class I enzyme resulted from separate gene duplications after the divergence of the human and equine evolutionary lines. All subunits exhibit some unique properties, with slightly closer similarity between the human gamma and horse enzyme subunits and somewhat greater deviations towards the human alpha subunit. Differences are large also in segments close to the active site zinc ligands and other functionally important positions. Species differences are distributed roughly equally between the two types of domain in the subunit, whereas isozyme differences are considerably more common in the catalytic than in the coenzyme-binding domain. These facts illustrate a functional divergence among the isozymes but otherwise similar changes during evolution. Polymorphic forms of beta and gamma subunits are characterized by single replacements at one and two positions, respectively, explaining known deviating properties. Class II and class III subunits are considerably more divergent. Their homology with class I isozymes exhibits only 60-65% positional identity. Hence, they reflect further steps towards the development of new enzymes, with variations well above the horse/human species levels, in contrast to the class I forms. Again, functionally important residues are affected, and patterns resembling those previously established for the divergently related

  6. Direct enzyme assay evidence confirms aldehyde reductase function of Ydr541cp and Ygl039wp from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jaewoong; Liu, Z Lewis

    2015-04-01

    The aldehyde reductase gene ARI1 is a recently characterized member of an intermediate subfamily within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily that clarified mechanisms of in situ detoxification of 2-furaldehyde and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Uncharacterized open reading frames (ORFs) are common among tolerant candidate genes identified for lignocellulose-to-advanced biofuels conversion. This study presents partially purified proteins of two ORFs, YDR541C and YGL039W, and direct enzyme assay evidence against aldehyde-inhibitory compounds commonly encountered during lignocellulosic biomass fermentation processes. Each of the partially purified proteins encoded by these ORFs showed a molecular mass of approximately 38 kDa, similar to Ari1p, a protein encoded by aldehyde reductase gene. Both proteins demonstrated strong aldehyde reduction activities toward 14 aldehyde substrates, with high levels of reduction activity for Ydr541cp toward both aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. While Ydr541cp was observed to have a significantly higher specific enzyme activity at 20 U/mg using co-factor NADPH, Ygl039wp displayed a NADH preference at 25 U/mg in reduction of butylaldehyde. Amino acid sequence analysis identified a characteristic catalytic triad, Ser, Tyr and Lys; a conserved catalytic motif of Tyr-X-X-X-Lys; and a cofactor-binding sequence motif, Gly-X-X-Gly-X-X-Ala, near the N-terminus that are shared by Ydr541cp, Ygl039wp, Yol151wp/GRE2 and Ari1p. Findings of aldehyde reductase genes contribute to the yeast gene annotation and aids development of the next-generation biocatalyst for advanced biofuels production.

  7. Aerobic oxidation of aldehydes under ambient conditions using supported gold nanoparticle catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsden, Charlotte Clare; Taarning, Esben; Hansen, David

    2008-01-01

    A new, green protocol for producing simple esters by selectively oxidizing an aldehyde dissolved in a primary alcohol has been established, utilising air as the oxidant and supported gold nanoparticles as catalyst. The oxidative esterifications proceed with excellent selectivities at ambient cond...... conditions; the reactions can be performed in an open flask and at room temperature. Benzaldehyde is even oxidised at a reasonable rate below -70 degrees C. Acrolein is oxidised to methyl acrylate in high yield using the same protocol....

  8. Aldehyde-Selective Wacker-Type Oxidation of Unbiased Alkenes Enabled by a Nitrite Co-Catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Wickens, Zachary K.

    2013-09-13

    Breaking the rules: Reversal of the high Markovnikov selectivity of Wacker-type oxidations was accomplished using a nitrite co-catalyst. Unbiased aliphatic alkenes can be oxidized with high yield and aldehyde selectivity, and several functional groups are tolerated. 18O-labeling experiments indicate that the aldehydic O atom is derived from the nitrite salt.

  9. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Romano

    Full Text Available Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  10. Nitric oxide mediates the stress response induced by diatom aldehydes in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Giovanna; Costantini, Maria; Buttino, Isabella; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms are ubiquitous and abundant primary producers that have been traditionally considered as a beneficial food source for grazers and for the transfer of carbon through marine food webs. However, many diatom species produce polyunsaturated aldehydes that disrupt development in the offspring of grazers that feed on these unicellular algae. Here we provide evidence that production of the physiological messenger nitric oxide increases after treatment with the polyunsaturated aldehyde decadienal in embryos of the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus. At high decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide mediates initial apoptotic events leading to loss of mitochondrial functionality through the generation of peroxynitrite. At low decadienal concentrations, nitric oxide contributes to the activation of hsp70 gene expression thereby protecting embryos against the toxic effects of this aldehyde. When nitric oxide levels were lowered by inhibiting nitric oxide synthase activity, the expression of hsp70 in swimming blastula decreased and the proportion of abnormal plutei increased. However, in later pluteus stages nitric oxide was no longer able to exert this protective function: hsp70 and nitric oxide synthase expression decreased with a consequent increase in the expression of caspase-8. Our findings that nitric oxide production increases rapidly in response to a toxic exogenous stimulus opens new perspectives on the possible role of this gas as an important messenger to environmental stress in sea urchins and for understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying toxicity during diatom blooms.

  11. Size-Selective Oxidation of Aldehydes with Zeolite Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane; Laursen, Anders Bo; Kegnæs, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Here, we report a synthesis and catalytic study of hybrid materials comprised of 1–3 nm sinter-stable Au nanoparticles in MFI-type zeolites. An optional post-treatment in aqua regia effectively remove Au from the external surfaces. The size-selective aerobic aldehyde oxidation verifies...

  12. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yantao; Gao, Yaohui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Yinan; Jiang, Yannan; Ji, Jun; Zhang, Jianian; Chen, Xuehua; Yang, Qiumeng; Su, Liping; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Bingya; Zhu, Zhenggang; Wang, Lishun; Yu, Yingyan

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) is a member of the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily and is involved with the metabolic processing of aldehydes. ALDH2 plays a cytoprotective role by removing aldehydes produced during normal metabolism. We examined the cytoprotective role of ALDH2 specifically in gastric mucosa cells. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased the viability of gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2, while knockdown of ALDH2 had an opposite effect. Moreover, overexpression of ALDH2 protected gastric mucosa cells against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis as determined by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33342, and TUNEL assays. Consistently, ALDH2 knockdown had an opposite effect. Additionally, DNA damage was ameliorated in ALDH2-overexpressing gastric mucosa cells treated with H2O2. We further identified that this cytoprotective role of ALDH2 was mediated by metabolism of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Consistently, 4-HNE mimicked the oxidative stress induced by H2O2 in gastric mucosa cells. Treatment with 4-HNE increased levels of DNA damage in ALDH2-knockdown GES-1 cells, while overexpression of ALDH2 decreased 4-HNE-induced DNA damage. These findings suggest that ALDH2 can protect gastric mucosa cells against DNA damage caused by oxidative stress by reducing levels of 4-HNE.

  13. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  14. Class 2 aldehyde dehydrogenase. Characterization of the hamster enzyme, sensitive to daidzin and conserved within the family of multiple forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjelmqvist, L; Lundgren, R; Norin, A; Jörnvall, H; Vallee, B; Klyosov, A; Keung, W M

    1997-10-13

    Mitochondrial (class 2) hamster aldehyde dehydrogenase has been purified and characterized. Its primary structure has been determined and correlated with the tertiary structure recently established for this class from another species. The protein is found to represent a constant class within a complex family of multiple forms. Variable segments that occur in different species correlate with non-functional segments, in the same manner as in the case of the constant class of alcohol dehydrogenases (class III type) of another protein family, but distinct from the pattern of the corresponding variable enzymes. Hence, in both these protein families, overall variability and segment architectures behave similarly, with at least one 'constant' form in each case, class III in the case of alcohol dehydrogenases, and at least class 2 in the case of aldehyde dehydrogenases.

  15. Selective Production of Aromatic Aldehydes from Heavy Fraction of Bio-oil via Catalytic Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Chang, Jie; Ouyang, Yong; Zheng, Xianwei [South China Univ. of Technology, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-06-15

    High value-added aromatic aldehydes (e. g. vanillin and syringaldehyde) were produced from heavy fraction of bio-oil (HFBO) via catalytic oxidation. The concept is based on the use of metalloporphyin as catalyst and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) as oxidant under alkaline condition. The biomimetic catalyst cobalt(II)-sulfonated tetraphenylporphyrin (Co(TPPS{sub 4})) was prepared and characterized. It exhibited relative high activity in the catalytic oxidation of HFBO. 4.57 wt % vanillin and 1.58 wt % syringaldehyde were obtained from catalytic oxidation of HFBO, compared to 2.6 wt % vanillin and 0.86 wt % syringaldehyde without Co(TPPS{sub 4}). Moreover, a possible mechanism of HFBO oxidation using Co(TPPS{sub 4})/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was proposed by the research of model compounds. The results showed that this is a promising and environmentally friendly method for production of aromatic aldehydes from HFBO under Co(TPPS{sub 4})/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system.

  16. Oxidation of N-Nitrosoalkylamines by human cytochrome P450 2A6: sequential oxidation to aldehydes and carboxylic acids and analysis of reaction steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Goutam; Calcutt, M Wade; Guengerich, F Peter

    2010-03-12

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 2A6 activates nitrosamines, including N,N-dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) and N,N-diethylnitrosamine (DEN), to alkyl diazohydroxides (which are DNA-alkylating agents) and also aldehydes (HCHO from DMN and CH(3)CHO from DEN). The N-dealkylation of DMN had a high intrinsic kinetic deuterium isotope effect ((D)k(app) approximately 10), which was highly expressed in a variety of competitive and non-competitive experiments. The (D)k(app) for DEN was approximately 3 and not expressed in non-competitive experiments. DMN and DEN were also oxidized to HCO(2)H and CH(3)CO(2)H, respectively. In neither case was a lag observed, which was unexpected considering the k(cat) and K(m) parameters measured for oxidation of DMN and DEN to the aldehydes and for oxidation of the aldehydes to the carboxylic acids. Spectral analysis did not indicate strong affinity of the aldehydes for P450 2A6, but pulse-chase experiments showed only limited exchange with added (unlabeled) aldehydes in the oxidations of DMN and DEN to carboxylic acids. Substoichiometric kinetic bursts were observed in the pre-steady-state oxidations of DMN and DEN to aldehydes. A minimal kinetic model was developed that was consistent with all of the observed phenomena and involves a conformational change of P450 2A6 following substrate binding, equilibrium of the P450-substrate complex with a non-productive form, and oxidation of the aldehydes to carboxylic acids in a process that avoids relaxation of the conformation following the first oxidation (i.e. of DMN or DEN to an aldehyde).

  17. A diatom gene regulating nitric-oxide signaling and susceptibility to diatom-derived aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Assaf; Bidle, Kay D; Kwityn, Clifford; Hirsh, Donald J; Thompson, Stephanie M; Callow, James A; Falkowski, Paul; Bowler, Chris

    2008-06-24

    Diatoms are unicellular phytoplankton accounting for approximately 40% of global marine primary productivity [1], yet the molecular mechanisms underlying their ecological success are largely unexplored. We use a functional-genomics approach in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum to characterize a novel protein belonging to the widely conserved YqeH subfamily [2] of GTP-binding proteins thought to play a role in ribosome biogenesis [3], sporulation [4], and nitric oxide (NO) generation [5]. Transgenic diatoms overexpressing this gene, designated PtNOA, displayed higher NO production, reduced growth, impaired photosynthetic efficiency, and a reduced ability to adhere to surfaces. A fused YFP-PtNOA protein was plastid localized, distinguishing it from a mitochondria-localized plant ortholog. PtNOA was upregulated in response to the diatom-derived unsaturated aldehyde 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DD), a molecule previously shown to regulate intercellular signaling, stress surveillance [6], and defense against grazers [7]. Overexpressing cell lines were hypersensitive to sublethal levels of this aldehyde, manifested by altered expression of superoxide dismutase and metacaspases, key components of stress and death pathways [8, 9]. NOA-like sequences were found in diverse oceanic regions, suggesting that a novel NO-based system operates in diatoms and may be widespread in phytoplankton, providing a biological context for NO in the upper ocean [10].

  18. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  19. Isolation of an aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in the oxidation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate in Streptomyces cattleya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, C D; Moss, S J; O'Hagan, D

    2001-10-01

    Streptomyces cattleya is unusual in that it produces fluoroacetate and 4-fluorothreonine as secondary metabolites. We now report the isolation of an NAD(+)-dependent fluoroacetaldehyde dehydrogenase from S. cattleya that mediates the oxidation of fluoroacetaldehyde to fluoroacetate. This is the first enzyme to be identified that is directly involved in fluorometabolite biosynthesis. Production of the enzyme begins in late exponential growth and continues into the stationary phase. Measurement of kinetic parameters shows that the enzyme has a high affinity for fluoroacetaldehyde and glycoaldehyde, but not acetaldehyde.

  20. Titanium superoxide--a stable recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for oxidative esterification of aldehydes with alkylarenes or alcohols using TBHP as an oxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Soumen; Gadakh, Sunita K; Sudalai, A

    2015-11-21

    Titanium superoxide efficiently catalysed the oxidative esterification of aldehydes with alkylarenes or alcohols, under truly heterogeneous conditions, to afford the corresponding benzyl and alkyl esters in excellent yields. Mechanistic studies have established that this "one pot" direct oxidative esterification process proceeds through a radical pathway, proven by a FTIR spectral study of a titanium superoxide-aldehyde complex as well as spin trapping experiments with TEMPO. The intramolecular version of this protocol has been successfully demonstrated in the concise synthesis of 3-butylphthalide, an anti-convulsant drug.

  1. cDNA cloning and analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, a salt inducible enzyme in sugar beet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCue, K.F.; Hanson, A.D. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Betaine accumulates and serves as a compatible osmolyte in some plants subjected to drought or salinity stress. The last enzyme in the betaine biosynthetic pathway is betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH). The activity of BADH increases in response to increasing salinity levels. This increase in activity corresponds to an increase in protein detectable by immunoblotting, and to an increase in the translatable BADH mRNA. BADH was cloned from a cDNA library constructed in {lambda}gt10 using poly(A){sup +} RNA from sugar beets salinized to 500 mM NaCl. cDNAs were size selected (>1kb) before ligation into the vector, and the library was screened with a spinach BADH cDNA probe. Three nearly full length clones obtained were confirmed as BADH by their nucleotide and deduced amino acid homology to spinach BADH. Clones averaged 1.8 kb and contained open reading frames of 500 amino acids at 80% identity with spinach BADH. RNA gel blot analysis of poly(A){sup +} RNA indicated that salinization to 500 mM NaCl resulted in a 5-fold increase of BADH mRNA level.

  2. Model studies on the pattern of volatiles generated in mixtures of amino acids, lipid oxidation-derived aldehydes, and glucose

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, An; Kitrytė, Vaida; Venskutonis, Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    The development of flavor and browning in thermally treated foods results mainly from the Maillard reaction and lipid degradation but also from the interactions between both reaction pathways. To study these interactions, we analyzed the volatile compounds resulting from model reactions of lysine or glycine with aldehydes originating from lipid oxidation [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, or (2E,4E)-decadienal] in the presence and absence of glucose. The main reaction products identified in these model...

  3. One-pot synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines using supported gold and base as catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegnæs, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines via intermediate formation of methyl esters is highly efficient and selective when using a catalytic system comprised of supported gold nanoparticles and added base in methanol.......Synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines via intermediate formation of methyl esters is highly efficient and selective when using a catalytic system comprised of supported gold nanoparticles and added base in methanol....

  4. Aldehyde sources, metabolism, molecular toxicity mechanisms, and possible effects on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Peter J; Siraki, Arno G; Shangari, Nandita

    2005-08-01

    Aldehydes are organic compounds that are widespread in nature. They can be formed endogenously by lipid peroxidation (LPO), carbohydrate or metabolism ascorbate autoxidation, amine oxidases, cytochrome P-450s, or myeloperoxidase-catalyzed metabolic activation. This review compares the reactivity of many aldehydes towards biomolecules particularly macromolecules. Furthermore, it includes not only aldehydes of environmental or occupational concerns but also dietary aldehydes and aldehydes formed endogenously by intermediary metabolism. Drugs that are aldehydes or form reactive aldehyde metabolites that cause side-effect toxicity are also included. The effects of these aldehydes on biological function, their contribution to human diseases, and the role of nucleic acid and protein carbonylation/oxidation in mutagenicity and cytotoxicity mechanisms, respectively, as well as carbonyl signal transduction and gene expression, are reviewed. Aldehyde metabolic activation and detoxication by metabolizing enzymes are also reviewed, as well as the toxicological and anticancer therapeutic effects of metabolizing enzyme inhibitors. The human health risks from clinical and animal research studies are reviewed, including aldehydes as haptens in allergenic hypersensitivity diseases, respiratory allergies, and idiosyncratic drug toxicity; the potential carcinogenic risks of the carbonyl body burden; and the toxic effects of aldehydes in liver disease, embryo toxicity/teratogenicity, diabetes/hypertension, sclerosing peritonitis, cerebral ischemia/neurodegenerative diseases, and other aging-associated diseases.

  5. Association of air pollution sources and aldehydes with biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary inflammation, and systemic oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemose, Brent; Robson, Mark G; Kipen, Howard M; Ohman Strickland, Pamela; Meng, Qingyu; Gong, Jicheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangfa; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-07-20

    Using data collected before, during, and after the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, this study examines associations between biomarkers of blood coagulation (vWF, sCD62P and sCD40L), pulmonary inflammation (EBC pH, EBC nitrite, and eNO), and systemic oxidative stress (urinary 8-OHdG) with sources of air pollution identified utilizing principal component analysis and with concentrations of three aldehydes of health concern. Associations between the biomarkers and the air pollution source types and aldehydes were examined using a linear mixed effects model, regressing through seven lag days and controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, gender, and day of week for the biomarker measurements. The biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation, particularly EBC pH and eNO, were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The biomarkers for blood coagulation, particularly vWF and sCD62p, were most consistently associated with oil combustion. Systemic oxidative stress biomarker (8-OHdG) was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. The associations of the biomarkers were generally not significant or consistent with secondary formation of pollutants and with the aldehydes. The findings support policies to control anthropogenic pollution sources rather than natural soil or road dust from a cardio-respiratory health standpoint.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 20 July 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.38.

  6. [Health effect of volatile aldehyde compounds in photocatalytic oxidation of aromatics compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-rong; Liao, Qiu-wen; Yang, Ya-nan; Dai, Jiu-song

    2013-05-01

    Photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) of toluene and benzaldehyde in indoor air by N doped TiO2 (N-TiO2) was conducted under UV irradiation of 254 nm. The intermediates were identified and monitored on real-time by proton transfer reaction-mass spectrometry. The health risks of PCO of toluene and benzaldehyde were assessed based on health risk influence index (eta). Results indicated that both the conversion rate and mineralization rate of toluene and benzaldehyde were relatively high, however, the volatile aldehyde compounds (VAs), including acetaldehyde and formaldehyde generated from ring-opening, significantly influenced the health risks of PCO of toluene and benzaldehyde. Acetaldehyde played a crucial role on health risks, which was inclined to desorb from the surface of catalysts, accumulate in gas-phase, and increase the health risks of PCO of the aromatic compounds. The concentration of formaldehyde kept stable at a relatively low level, however its impact cannot be neglected. In the PCO process of toluene and benzaldehyde, eta reached the maximum values of 8 499.68 and 21.43, with the eta(VAs), contribution of VAs to the health risk influence index of outlet, reaching 99.3% and 98.3%, respectively. The average values of eta in the PCO process of 30 min were 932.86 and 8.52, and for which eta(VAs), reached 98.5% and 98.0%, respectively. When PCO of toluene and benzaldehyde reached steady state, eta were 236.09 and 2.30, and eta(VAs) reached 97.9% and 97.8%, respectively. Hence, eta(VAs), can be taken as a characteristic parameter in assessment of health risks of PCO of aromatic compounds.

  7. Selective and Efficient Oxidation of Aldehydes to Their Corresponding Carboxylic Acids Using H2O2/HC1 in the Presence of Hydroxylamine Hydrochloride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAHRAMI,Kiumars; KHODAEI,Mohammad Mehdi; KAMALI,Shahab

    2008-01-01

    A wide variety of aldehydes were efficiently converted to their corresponding carboxylic acids in high yields using H2O2/HC1 in the presence of hydroxylamine hydrochloride.In addition,selective oxidation of aldehydes in the presence of other functional groups such as hydroxyl group,carbon-carbon double bond and other heteroatoms can be considered a noteworthy advantage of this method.

  8. Action of metadoxine on isolated human and rat alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases. Effect on enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parés, X; Moreno, A; Peralba, J M; Font, M; Bruseghini, L; Esteras, A

    1991-01-01

    Metadoxine (pyridoxine-pyrrolidone carboxylate) has been reported to accelerate ethanol metabolism. In the present work we have investigated the effect of metadoxine on the activities of isolated alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases from rat and man, and on the activity of these enzymes in chronic ethanol-fed rats. Our results indicate that in vitro metadoxine does not activate any of the enzymatic forms of alcohol dehydrogenase (classes I and II) or aldehyde dehydrogenase (low-Km and high-Km, cytosolic and mitochondrial). At concentrations higher than 0.1 mM, metadoxine inhibits rat class II alcohol dehydrogenase, although this would probably not affect the physiological ethanol metabolism. Chronic ethanol intake for 5 weeks results in a 25% decrease of rat hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (class I) activity as compared with the pair-fed controls. The simultaneous treatment with metadoxine prevents activity loss, suggesting that the positive effect of metadoxine on ethanol metabolism can be explained by the maintenance of normal levels of alcohol dehydrogenase during chronic ethanol intake. No specific effect of chronic exposure to ethanol or to metadoxine was detected on rat aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

  9. α,β-Unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein suppresses cardiomyocyte contractile function: Role of TRPV1 and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenbiao; He, Emily Y; Scott, Glenda I; Ren, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with an increased prevalence of heart disease and is known to trigger a proinflammatory response via stimulation of transient receptor potential vanilloid cation channels (TRPV1, also known as the capsaicin receptor). This study was designed to examine the effect of acrolein, an essential α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant, on myocardial contractile function and the underlying mechanism involved with a focus on TRPV1 and oxidative stress. Cardiomyocyte mechanical and intracellular Ca(2+) properties were evaluated using an IonOptix MyoCam® system including peak shortening (PS), maximal velocity of shortening/relengthening (± dL/dt), time-to-PS (TPS), time-to-90% relengthening (TR90 ), fura-2 fluorescence intensity (FFI) and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. Changes in apoptosis and TRPV1 were evaluated using Western blot analysis. The degree of oxidative stress was assessed using the ratio between reduced and oxidized glutathione. Results obtained revealed that exposure of cardiomyocytes to acrolein acutely compromised contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) properties including depressed PS, ± dL/dt and ΔFFI, as well as prolonged TR90 and intracellular Ca(2+) decay. In addition, acrolein exposure upregulated TRPV1 associated with an increase in both apoptosis and oxidative stress. However, the acrolein-induced cardiomyocyte contractile and intracellular Ca(2+) anomalies, as well as apoptosis (as evidenced by Bcl-2, Bax, FasL, Caspase-3 and -8), were negated by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger glutathione or the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine. Collectively these data suggest that the α,β-unsaturated aldehyde pollutant acrolein may play a role in the pathogenesis and sequelae of air pollution-induced heart disease via a TRPV1- and oxidative stress-dependent mechanism.

  10. Model studies on the pattern of volatiles generated in mixtures of amino acids, lipid-oxidation-derived aldehydes, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, An; Kitryté, Vaida; Venskutonis, Rimantas; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2011-02-23

    The development of flavor and browning in thermally treated foods results mainly from the Maillard reaction and lipid degradation but also from the interactions between both reaction pathways. To study these interactions, we analyzed the volatile compounds resulting from model reactions of lysine or glycine with aldehydes originating from lipid oxidation [hexanal, (E)-2-hexenal, or (2E,4E)-decadienal] in the presence and absence of glucose. The main reaction products identified in these model mixtures were carbonyl compounds, resulting essentially from amino-acid-catalyzed aldol condensation reactions. Several 2-alkylfurans were detected as well. Only a few azaheterocyclic compounds were identified, in particular 5-butyl-2-propylpyridine from (E)-2-hexenal model systems and 2-pentylpyridine from (2E,4E)-decadienal model reactions. Although few reaction products were found resulting from the condensation of an amino acid with a lipid-derived aldehyde, the amino acid plays an important role in catalyzing the degradation and further reaction of these carbonyl compounds. These results suggest that amino-acid-induced degradations and further reactions of lipid oxidation products may be of considerable importance in thermally processed foods.

  11. Glycation and glycoxidation of low-density lipoproteins by glucose and low-molecular mass aldehydes. Formation of modified and oxidized particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Heather M; Brown, Bronwyn E; Davies, Michael Jonathan;

    2003-01-01

    the nature, time course, and extent of LDL modifications induced by glucose and two aldehydes, methylglyoxal and glycolaldehyde. It has been shown that these agents modify Arg, Lys and Trp residues of the apoB protein of LDL, with the extent of modification induced by the two aldehydes being more rapid than...... or methylglyoxal in the presence of copper ions, whereas glycolaldehyde stimulated such reactions to a modest extent. These results suggest that the earliest significant events in this system are metal ion-independent glycation (modification) of the protein component of LDL, whilst oxidative events (glycoxidation...

  12. Induction of phase 2 enzymes by serum oxidized polyamines through activation of Nrf2: effect of the polyamine metabolite acrolein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W; Casero, Robert A

    2003-06-06

    The naturally occurring polycationic polyamines including putrescine, spermidine, and spermine play an important role in cell growth, differentiation, and gene expression. However, circulating polyamines are potential substrates for several oxidizing enzymes including copper-containing serum amine oxidase. These enzymes are capable of oxidizing serum polyamines to several toxic metabolites including aldehydes and H(2)O(2). In this study, we investigated the effects of polyamines as inducers of phase 2 enzymes and other genes that promote cell survival in a cell culture system in the presence of bovine serum. Spermidine and spermine (50 microM) increased NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) activity up to 3-fold in murine keratinocyte PE cells. Transcript levels for glutathione S-transferase (GST) A1, GST M1, NQO1, gamma-glutamylcysteine ligase regulatory subunit, and UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1A6 were significantly increased by spermidine and this effect was mediated through the antioxidant response element (ARE). The ARE from the mouse GST A1 promoter was activated about 9-fold by spermine and 5-fold by spermidine treatment, but could be inhibited by the amine oxidase inhibitor, aminoguanidine, suggesting that acrolein or hydrogen peroxide generated from polyamines by serum amine oxidase may be mediators for phase 2 enzyme induction. Elevations of ARE-luciferase expression and NQO1 enzyme activity by spermidine were not affected by catalase, while both were completely repressed by aldehyde dehydrogenase treatment. Direct addition of acrolein to PE cells induced multiple phase 2 genes and elevated nuclear levels of Nrf2, a transcription factor that binds to the ARE. Expression of mutant Nrf2 repressed the activation of the ARE-luciferase reporter by polyamines and acrolein. These results indicate that spermidine and spermine increase the expression of phase 2 genes in cells grown in culture through activation of the Nrf2-ARE pathway by generating the sulfhydryl

  13. Acrolein, a highly toxic aldehyde generated under oxidative stress in vivo, aggravates the mouse liver damage after acetaminophen overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tomoya; Koyama, Ryo; Yuasa, Makoto; Kitamura, Daisuke; Mizuta, Ryushin

    2014-01-01

    Although acetaminophen-induced liver injury in mice has been extensively studied as a model of human acute drug-induced hepatitis, the mechanism of liver injury remains unclear. Liver injury is believed to be initiated by metabolic conversion of acetaminophen to the highly reactive intermediate N-acetyl p-benzoquinoneimine, and is aggravated by subsequent oxidative stress via reactive oxygen species (ROS), including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the hydroxyl radical (•OH). In this study, we found that a highly toxic unsaturated aldehyde acrolein, a byproduct of oxidative stress, has a major role in acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Acetaminophen administration in mice resulted in liver damage and increased acrolein-protein adduct formation. However, both of them were decreased by treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or sodium 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate (MESNA), two known acrolein scavengers. The specificity of NAC and MESNA was confirmed in cell culture, because acrolein toxicity, but not H2O2 or •OH toxicity, was inhibited by NAC and MESNA. These results suggest that acrolein may be more strongly correlated with acetaminophen-induced liver injury than ROS, and that acrolein produced by acetaminophen-induced oxidative stress can spread from dying cells at the primary injury site, causing damage to the adjacent cells and aggravating liver injury.

  14. CuO and Ag2O/CuO Catalyzed Oxidation of Aldehydes to the Corresponding Carboxylic Acids by Molecular Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaowu Sha

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Furfural was oxidized to furoic acid by molecular oxygen under catalysis by 150nm-sized Ag2O/CuO (92% or simply CuO (86.6%. When 30 nm-size catalyst was used,the main product was a furfural Diels-Alder adduct. Detailed reaction conditions andregeneration of catalysts were investigated. Under optimal conditions, a series of aromaticand aliphatic aldehydes were oxidized to the corresponding acids in good yields.

  15. Immobilisation and characterisation of biocatalytic co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase and NADH oxidase, on aldehyde functional ReSyn™ polymer microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twala, Busisiwe V; Sewell, B Trevor; Jordaan, Justin

    2012-05-10

    The use of enzymes in industrial applications is limited by their instability, cost and difficulty in their recovery and re-use. Immobilisation is a technique which has been shown to alleviate these limitations in biocatalysis. Here we describe the immobilisation of two biocatalytically relevant co-factor recycling enzymes, glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) and NADH oxidase (NOD) on aldehyde functional ReSyn™ polymer microspheres with varying functional group densities. The successful immobilisation of the enzymes on this new high capacity microsphere technology resulted in the maintenance of activity of ∼40% for GDH and a maximum of 15.4% for NOD. The microsphere variant with highest functional group density of ∼3500 μmol g⁻¹ displayed the highest specific activity for the immobilisation of both enzymes at 33.22 U mg⁻¹ and 6.75 U mg⁻¹ for GDH and NOD with respective loading capacities of 51% (0.51 mg mg⁻¹) and 129% (1.29 mg mg⁻¹). The immobilised GDH further displayed improved activity in the acidic pH range. Both enzymes displayed improved pH and thermal stability with the most pronounced thermal stability for GDH displayed on ReSyn™ A during temperature incubation at 65 °C with a 13.59 fold increase, and NOD with a 2.25-fold improvement at 45 °C on the same microsphere variant. An important finding is the suitability of the microspheres for stabilisation of the multimeric protein GDH.

  16. A biphasic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones using a simplified packed-bed microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bogdan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the preparation and characterization of a simplified packed-bed microreactor using an immobilized TEMPO catalyst shown to oxidize primary and secondary alcohols via the biphasic Anelli-Montanari protocol. Oxidations occurred in high yields with great stability over time. We observed that plugs of aqueous oxidant and organic alcohol entered the reactor as plugs but merged into an emulsion on the packed-bed. The emulsion coalesced into larger plugs upon exiting the reactor, leaving the organic product separate from the aqueous by-products. Furthermore, the microreactor oxidized a wide range of alcohols and remained active in excess of 100 trials without showing any loss of catalytic activity.

  17. Protocatechuic aldehyde attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a classic chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat different types of cancers including ovarian, head and neck, testicular and uterine cervical carcinomas. However, cisplatin induces acute kidney injury by directly triggering an excessive inflammatory response, oxidative stress and programmed cell death of renal tubular epithelial cells. All of which lead to higher mortality rates in patients. In this study we examined the protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde (PA in vitro in cisplatin-treated tubular epithelial cells and in vivo in cisplatin nephropathy. PA is a monomer of Traditional Chinese Medicine isolated from the root of S. miltiorrhiza. Results show that PA prevented cisplatin-induced decline of renal function and histological damage, which was confirmed by attenuation of KIM1 in both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, PA reduced renal inflammation by suppressing oxidative stress and programmed cell death in response to cisplatin, which was further evidenced by in vitro data. Of note, PA suppressed NAPDH oxidases, including Nox2 and Nox4, in a dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, silencing Nox4, but not Nox2, removed the inhibitory effect of PA on cisplatin-induced renal injury, indicating that Nox4 may play a pivotal role in mediating the protective effect of PA in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Collectively, our data indicate that PA largely blocked cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation without compromising anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that PA and its derivatives may serve as potential protective agents for cancer patients with cisplatin treatment.

  18. Efficient Copper-bisisoquinoline-based Catalysts for Selective Aerobic Oxidation of Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaher M. A. Judeh

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The selective oxidation of alcohols with molecular oxygen was efficientlycompleted in high conversion and selectivity using copper-bisisoquinoline-based catalystsunder mild reaction condition. The effects of various parameters such as reactiontemperature, reaction time, oxidant, ligands, etc, were studied. Solvent effect has been aswell studied in ionic liquids [bmim]PF6, [omim]BF4 and [hmim]BF4, comparing totraditional volatile organic solvent. The use of ionic liquids was found to enhance thecatalytic properties of the catalysts used.

  19. The Effect of Polyunsaturated Aldehydes on Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae: The Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra A. Gallina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and reactive oxygen species (ROS production was investigated in the marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi (SM, exposed to 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DECA, 2E,4E/Z-octadienal (OCTA, 2E,4E/Z-heptadienal (HEPTA and a mix of these last two (MIX. When exposed to polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA, a decrease of NO was observed, proportional to the PUA concentration (85% of the initial level after 180 min with 66 µM DECA. Only OCTA, HEPTA and MIX induced a parallel increase of ROS, the highest (2.9-times the control with OCTA concentrations twice the EC50 for growth at 24 h (20 μM. The synthesis of carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll cycle (XC was enhanced during exposure, suggesting their antioxidant activity. Our data provide evidence that specific pathways exist as a reaction to PUA and that they depend upon the PUA used and/or the diatom species. In fact, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT produces NO in response to DECA, but not to OCTA. We advance the hypothesis that SM perceives OCTA and HEPTA as intra-population infochemicals (as it produces PUA, while PT (non-PUA producing species perceives them as allelochemicals. The ability to produce and to use PUA as infochemicals may underlie ecological traits of different diatom species and modulate ecological success in natural communities.

  20. The effect of polyunsaturated aldehydes on Skeletonema marinoi (Bacillariophyceae): the involvement of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallina, Alessandra A; Brunet, Christophe; Palumbo, Anna; Casotti, Raffaella

    2014-07-14

    Nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was investigated in the marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi (SM), exposed to 2E,4E/Z-decadienal (DECA), 2E,4E/Z-octadienal (OCTA), 2E,4E/Z-heptadienal (HEPTA) and a mix of these last two (MIX). When exposed to polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUA), a decrease of NO was observed, proportional to the PUA concentration (85% of the initial level after 180 min with 66 µM DECA). Only OCTA, HEPTA and MIX induced a parallel increase of ROS, the highest (2.9-times the control) with OCTA concentrations twice the EC50 for growth at 24 h (20 μM). The synthesis of carotenoids belonging to the xanthophyll cycle (XC) was enhanced during exposure, suggesting their antioxidant activity. Our data provide evidence that specific pathways exist as a reaction to PUA and that they depend upon the PUA used and/or the diatom species. In fact, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT) produces NO in response to DECA, but not to OCTA. We advance the hypothesis that SM perceives OCTA and HEPTA as intra-population infochemicals (as it produces PUA), while PT (non-PUA producing species) perceives them as allelochemicals. The ability to produce and to use PUA as infochemicals may underlie ecological traits of different diatom species and modulate ecological success in natural communities.

  1. Kinetics and Mechanistic Approach to the Benzimidazolium fluorochromate Oxidation of Indole-2-aldehyde in various percentages of Acetic acid and Water mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Saleem Malik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The kinetics of benzimidazolium fluorochromate (BIFC catalysed oxidation of indole-2-aldehyde (2-InA with perchloric acid in 50% acetic acid–50% water solvent mixture at 303 K has been followed spectrophotometrically. The reaction is first order with respect to [BIFC], [2-InA] and [H+] and the reaction is catalyzed by hydrogen ions. A suitable mechanism has been proposed.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 protects human umbilical vein endothelial cells against oxidative damage and increases endothelial nitric oxide production to reverse nitroglycerin tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, X Y; Fang, Q; Ma, D; Jiang, L; Yang, Y; Sun, J; Yang, C; Wang, J S

    2016-06-10

    Medical nitroglycerin (glyceryl trinitrate, GTN) use is limited principally by tolerance typified by a decrease in nitric oxide (NO) produced by biotransformation. Such tolerance may lead to endothelial dysfunction by inducing oxidative stress. In vivo studies have demonstrated that aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) plays important roles in GTN biotransformation and tolerance. Thus, modification of ALDH2 expression represents a potentially effective strategy to prevent and reverse GTN tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. In this study, a eukaryotic expression vector containing the ALDH2 gene was introduced into human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by liposome-mediated transfection. An indirect immunofluorescence assay showed that ALDH2 expression increased 24 h after transfection. Moreover, real-time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting revealed significantly higher ALDH2 mRNA and protein expression in the gene-transfected group than in the two control groups. GTN tolerance was induced by treating HUVECs with 10 mM GTN for 16 h + 10 min, which significantly decreased NO levels in control cells, but not in those transfected with ALDH2. Overexpression of ALDH2 increased cell survival against GTN-induced cytotoxicity and conferred protection from oxidative damage resulting from nitrate tolerance, accompanied by decreased production of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced expression of heme oxygenase 1. Furthermore, ALDH2 overexpression promoted Akt phosphorylation under GTN tolerance conditions. ALDH2 gene transfection can reverse and prevent tolerance to GTN through its bioactivation and protect against oxidative damage, preventing the development of endothelial dysfunction.

  3. Isolated tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase can synthesize acetoin which inhibits pyruvate oxidation as well as other aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggetto, L G; Lehninger, A L

    1987-05-29

    Oxidation of 1 mM pyruvate by Ehrlich and AS30-D tumor mitochondria is inhibited by acetoin, an unusual and important metabolite of pyruvate utilization by cancer cells, by acetaldehyde, methylglyoxal and excess pyruvate. The respiratory inhibition is reversed by other substrates added to pyruvate and also by 0.5 mM ATP. Kinetic properties of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex isolated from these tumor mitochondria have been studied. This complex appears to be able to synthesize acetoin from acetaldehyde plus pyruvate and is competitively inhibited by acetoin. The role of a new regulatory pattern for tumoral pyruvate dehydrogenase is presented.

  4. Wet Aerobic Oxidation of Lignin into Aromatic Aldehydes Catalysed by a Perovskite-type Oxide: LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The perovskite-type oxide catalyst LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 was prepared by the sol–gel method, and tested as a catalyst in the wet aerobic oxidation (WAO of lignin into aromatic aldehydes. The lignin conversion and the yield of each aromatic aldehyde were significantly enhanced in the catalytic process, compared with the non-catalyzed process. Moreover, it was shown that the stability of activity and structure of LaFe1-xCuxO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 remained nearly unchanged after a series of successive recyclings of the catalytic reactions, indicating it was an efficient and recyclable heterogeneous catalyst for the conversion of lignin into aromatic aldehydes in the WAO process.

  5. Glycosylation of resveratrol protects it from enzymic oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regev-Shoshani, Gilly; Shoseyov, Oded; Bilkis, Itzhak; Kerem, Zohar

    2003-01-01

    Plant polyphenols, including dietary polyphenols such as resveratrol, are important components in the plant antioxidant and defence systems. They are also known to exert beneficial effects on human health through diet. As they are produced, these polyphenols may be subjected to deleterious enzymic oxidation by the plant polyphenol oxidases. They are generally synthesized as glycosides like 5,4'-dihydroxystilbene-3-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside, the 3-glucoside of resveratrol. The effects of the glycosylation and methylation of the parent resveratrol on its enzymic oxidation were studied. Methyl and glucosyl derivatives were synthesized using simple one-step methodologies. The kinetics of their enzymic oxidation by tyrosinases were defined. Substitution at the p-hydroxy group, by either glucose or methyl, abolished enzymic oxidation by both mushroom and grape tyrosinases. Substitution at the m-hydroxy group with methyl had a small effect, but substitution with glucose resulted in a much lower affinity of the enzymes for the glycoside. We suggest that glycosylation of polyphenols in nature helps to protect these vital molecules from enzymic oxidation, extending their half-life in the cell and maintaining their beneficial antioxidant capacity and biological properties. PMID:12697026

  6. Novel oxidation of aromatic aldehydes catalyzed by Preyssler's anion, [NaP{sub 5}W{sub 30}O{sub 110}]{sup 14-}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamoharram, F.F.; Roshani, M.; Moghayadi, M. [Islamic Azad University-Mashhad Branch, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry]. E-mail: abamoharram@yahoo.com; Alizadeh, M.H. [Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Razavi, H. [Georgetown University, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2006-05-15

    Preyssler's anion, with formula [NaP{sub 5}W{sub 30}O{sub 110}]{sup 14-}, catalyzes the oxidation of aromatic aldehydes to related carboxylic acids by hydrogen peroxide as oxidizing agent, under microwave irradiation, or at 70 deg C. Both homogeneous and heterogeneous Preyssler's catalysts (as H{sub 14}[NaP{sub 5}W{sub 30}O{sub 110}]) were used and had their activity compared with those of some Keggin structures. Our data indicate that Sodium30-tungsto pentaphosphate, the so-called Preyssler's anion, with high hydrolytic (pH=0-12) and thermal stability is the best catalyst with high yield and good selectivity. Under microwave irradiation, this polyanion supported on SiO{sub 2} was found to be an excellent catalyst for aldehydes with low loss factor in 1-2 min (the loss factor is a measure of the ability of the material to dissipate energy). The effects of various parameters, including catalyst type, nature of the substituent in the aldehyde and temperature, on the yield of the carboxylic acids were studied. (author)

  7. Fatty Aldehyde and Fatty Alcohol Metabolism: Review and Importance for Epidermal Structure and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, William B.

    2014-01-01

    Normal fatty aldehyde and alcohol metabolism is essential for epidermal differentiation and function. Long-chain aldehydes are produced by catabolism of several lipids including fatty alcohols, sphingolipids, ether glycerolipids, isoprenoid alcohols and certain aliphatic lipids that undergo α- or ω-oxidation. The fatty aldehyde generated by these pathways is chiefly metabolized to fatty acid by fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH, alternately known as ALDH3A2), which also functions to oxidize fatty alcohols as a component of the fatty alcohol:NAD oxidoreductase (FAO) enzyme complex. Genetic deficiency of FALDH/FAO in patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) results in accumulation of fatty aldehydes, fatty alcohols and related lipids (ether glycerolipids, wax esters) in cultured keratinocytes. These biochemical changes are associated with abnormalities in formation of lamellar bodies in the stratum granulosum and impaired delivery of their precursor membranes to the stratum corneum (SC). The defective extracellular SC membranes are responsible for a leaky epidermal water barrier and ichthyosis. Although lamellar bodies appear to be the pathogenic target for abnormal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism in SLS, the precise biochemical mechanisms are yet to be elucidated. Nevertheless, studies in SLS highlight the critical importance of FALDH and normal fatty aldehyde/alcohol metabolism for epidermal function. PMID:24036493

  8. Reversible, partial inactivation of plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase by betaine aldehyde: mechanism and possible physiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate-Romero, Andrés; Murillo-Melo, Darío S; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Montiel, Carmina; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2016-04-01

    In plants, the last step in the biosynthesis of the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB) is the NAD(+)-dependent oxidation of betaine aldehyde (BAL) catalysed by some aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) 10 enzymes that exhibit betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) activity. Given the irreversibility of the reaction, the short-term regulation of these enzymes is of great physiological relevance to avoid adverse decreases in the NAD(+):NADH ratio. In the present study, we report that the Spinacia oleracea BADH (SoBADH) is reversibly and partially inactivated by BAL in the absence of NAD(+)in a time- and concentration-dependent mode. Crystallographic evidence indicates that the non-essential Cys(450)(SoBADH numbering) forms a thiohemiacetal with BAL, totally blocking the productive binding of the aldehyde. It is of interest that, in contrast to Cys(450), the catalytic cysteine (Cys(291)) did not react with BAL in the absence of NAD(+) The trimethylammonium group of BAL binds in the same position in the inactivating or productive modes. Accordingly, BAL does not inactivate the C(450)SSoBADH mutant and the degree of inactivation of the A(441)I and A(441)C mutants corresponds to their very different abilities to bind the trimethylammonium group. Cys(450)and the neighbouring residues that participate in stabilizing the thiohemiacetal are strictly conserved in plant ALDH10 enzymes with proven or predicted BADH activity, suggesting that inactivation by BAL is their common feature. Under osmotic stress conditions, this novel partial and reversible covalent regulatory mechanism may contribute to preventing NAD(+)exhaustion, while still permitting the synthesis of high amounts of GB and avoiding the accumulation of the toxic BAL.

  9. Isolation of liver aldehyde oxidase containing fractions from different animals and determination of kinetic parameters for benzaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadam R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde oxidase activity containing fractions from rabbit, guinea pig, rat and mouse livers were obtained by heat treatment and ammonium sulfate precipitation. Aldehyde oxidase activity was observed in rabbit and guinea pig livers, while aldehyde oxidase activity was absent in rat and mouse liver fractions. Enzyme kinetic parameters, K m and V max , were determined for the oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid by rabbit and guinea pig liver fractions, by spectrophotometric method, with potassium ferricyanide as the electron acceptor. The K m values obtained for both animal liver fractions were in the range of 10.3-19.1 µM.

  10. Pd/C-catalyzed aerobic oxidative esterification of alcohols and aldehydes: a highly efficient microwave-assisted green protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Caporaso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We herein describe an environmentally friendly microwave-assisted oxidative esterification of alcohols and aldehydes in the presence of molecular oxygen and a heterogeneous catalysis (Pd/C, 5 mol %. This efficient and ligandless conversion procedure does not require the addition of an organic hydrogen acceptor. The reaction rate is strongly enhanced by mild dielectric heating. Furthermore, it is a versatile green procedure which generally enables the isolation of esters to be carried out by simple filtration in almost quantitative yields.

  11. Surviving environmental stress: the role of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase in marine crustaceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NA Stephens-Camacho

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH belongs to the aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH family, an ancestral group of enzymes responsible for aldehyde detoxification in several organisms. The BADH enzyme catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine (GB an important osmoptrotector and osmoregulator accumulated in response to cellular osmotic stress. The BADH enzymes have been extensively described in terrestrial organisms, but information in marine crustaceans remains scarce. Research on crustacean stress-adaptive capacity to environmental stressors relates GB accumulation in response to salinity variations. Although GB de novo synthesis is confirmed on crustaceans, its metabolic pathways and regulation mechanism are unexplored. In this work, the state of the knowledge of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes in marine crustaceans is summarized, as a mechanism to overcome the deleterious effects of changes in temperature, salinity and dissolved oxygen concentration in seawater. The purpose of this review is to provide a more comprehensive overview to set the basis for exploring novel functions and properties of BADHs on the response of crustaceans to environmental stress.

  12. Solvent-free oxidation of aldehydes to acids by TBHP using environmental-friendly MnO$^{−1}_{4}$-exchanged Mg-Al hydrotalcite catalyst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasant R Choudhary; Deepa K Dumbre; Vijay S Narkhede

    2012-07-01

    A number of hydrotalcite (Mg-Al, Mn-Al, Co-Al, Ni-Al, Mg-Fe, Mg-Cr and Cu-Al) catalysts, with or without MnO$^{−1}_{4}$-exchange, were evaluated for their performance in the solvent-free oxidation of benzaldehyde to benzoic acid by tert-butyl hydroperoxide under reflux in the absence of any solvent. The MnO$^{−1}_{4}$-exchanged Mg-Al-hydrotalcite (Mg/Al = 10) showed high activity in the oxidation of different aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes to their corresponding acids and also showed excellent reusability in the oxidation process which is environmental-friendly.

  13. Toward aldehyde and alkane production by removing aldehyde reductase activity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Gabriel M; Atsumi, Shota

    2014-09-01

    Advances in synthetic biology and metabolic engineering have enabled the construction of novel biological routes to valuable chemicals using suitable microbial hosts. Aldehydes serve as chemical feedstocks in the synthesis of rubbers, plastics, and other larger molecules. Microbial production of alkanes is dependent on the formation of a fatty aldehyde intermediate which is converted to an alkane by an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO). However, microbial hosts such as Escherichia coli are plagued by many highly active endogenous aldehyde reductases (ALRs) that convert aldehydes to alcohols, which greatly complicates strain engineering for aldehyde and alkane production. It has been shown that the endogenous ALR activity outcompetes the ADO enzyme for fatty aldehyde substrate. The large degree of ALR redundancy coupled with an incomplete database of ALRs represents a significant obstacle in engineering E. coli for either aldehyde or alkane production. In this study, we identified 44 ALR candidates encoded in the E. coli genome using bioinformatics tools, and undertook a comprehensive screening by measuring the ability of these enzymes to produce isobutanol. From the pool of 44 candidates, we found five new ALRs using this screening method (YahK, DkgA, GldA, YbbO, and YghA). Combined deletions of all 13 known ALRs resulted in a 90-99% reduction in endogenous ALR activity for a wide range of aldehyde substrates (C2-C12). Elucidation of the ALRs found in E. coli could guide one in reducing competing alcohol formation during alkane or aldehyde production.

  14. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana: Biochemical requirements, metabolic pathways and functional analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim eStiti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs are a family of enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Here we summarize molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of selected Arabidopsis ALDH genes. Aldehyde molecules are very reactive and are involved in many metabolic processes but when they accumulate in excess they become toxic. Thus activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases is important in regulating the homeostasis of aldehydes. Overexpression of some ALDH genes demonstrated an improved abiotic stress tolerance. Despite the fact that several reports are available describing a role for specific ALDHs, their precise physiological roles are often still unclear. Therefore a number of genetic and biochemical tools have been generated to address the function with an emphasis on stress-related ALDHs. ALDHs exert their functions in different cellular compartments and often in a developmental and tissue specific manner. To investigate substrate specificity, catalytic efficiencies have been determined using a range of substrates varying in carbon chain length and degree of carbon oxidation. Mutational approaches identified amino acid residues critical for coenzyme usage and enzyme activities.

  15. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Arabidopsis thaliana: Biochemical Requirements, Metabolic Pathways, and Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiti, Naim; Missihoun, Tagnon D; Kotchoni, Simeon O; Kirch, Hans-Hubert; Bartels, Dorothea

    2011-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) are a family of enzymes which catalyze the oxidation of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acids. Here we summarize molecular genetic and biochemical analyses of selected ArabidopsisALDH genes. Aldehyde molecules are very reactive and are involved in many metabolic processes but when they accumulate in excess they become toxic. Thus activity of aldehyde dehydrogenases is important in regulating the homeostasis of aldehydes. Overexpression of some ALDH genes demonstrated an improved abiotic stress tolerance. Despite the fact that several reports are available describing a role for specific ALDHs, their precise physiological roles are often still unclear. Therefore a number of genetic and biochemical tools have been generated to address the function with an emphasis on stress-related ALDHs. ALDHs exert their functions in different cellular compartments and often in a developmental and tissue specific manner. To investigate substrate specificity, catalytic efficiencies have been determined using a range of substrates varying in carbon chain length and degree of carbon oxidation. Mutational approaches identified amino acid residues critical for coenzyme usage and enzyme activities.

  16. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A. M.; Olthuis, Wouter; Kengen, Servé W. M.; Zuilhof, Han; Franssen, Maurice C. R.

    2016-10-01

    Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH2-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  17. The diatom-derived aldehyde decadienal affects life cycle transition in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis through nitric oxide/ERK signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Immacolata; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-03-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are fatty-acid-derived metabolites produced by some microalgae, including different diatom species. PUAs are mainly produced as a wound-activated defence mechanism against microalgal predators or released from senescent cells at the end of a bloom. PUAs, including 2,4-trans-decadienal (DD), induce deleterious effects on embryonic and larval development of several planktonic and benthic organisms. Here, we report on the effects of DD on larval development and metamorphosis of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. Ciona larval development is regulated by the cross-talking of different molecular events, including nitric oxide (NO) production, ERK activation and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis. We report that treatment with DD at the competence larval stage results in a delay in metamorphosis. DD affects redox balance by reducing total glutathione and NO levels. By biochemical and quantitative gene expression analysis, we identify the NO-signalling network affected by DD, including the upregulation of ERK phosphatase mkp1 and consequent reduction of ERK phosphorylation, with final changes in the expression of downstream ERK target genes. Overall, these results give new insights into the molecular pathways induced in marine organisms after exposure to PUAs during larval development, demonstrating that this aldehyde affects key checkpoints of larval transition from the vegetative to the reproductive life stage.

  18. Reducing the Oxidation Level of Dextran Aldehyde in a Chitosan/Dextran-Based Surgical Hydrogel Increases Biocompatibility and Decreases Antimicrobial Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Chan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A highly oxidized form of a chitosan/dextran-based hydrogel (CD-100 containing 80% oxidized dextran aldehyde (DA-100 was developed as a post-operative aid, and found to significantly prevent adhesion formation in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS. However, the CD-100 hydrogel showed moderate in vitro cytotoxicity to mammalian cell lines, with the DA-100 found to be the cytotoxic component. In order to extend the use of the hydrogel to abdominal surgeries, reformulation using a lower oxidized DA (DA-25 was pursued. The aim of the present study was to compare the antimicrobial efficacy, in vitro biocompatibility and wound healing capacity of the highly oxidized CD-100 hydrogel with the CD-25 hydrogel. Antimicrobial studies were performed against a range of clinically relevant abdominal microorganisms using the micro-broth dilution method. Biocompatibility testing using human dermal fibroblasts was assessed via a tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT and a wound healing model. In contrast to the original DA-100 formulation, DA-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic, and showed no overall impairment of cell migration, with wound closure occurring at 72 h. However, the lower oxidation level negatively affected the antimicrobial efficacy of the hydrogel (CD-25. Although the CD-25 hydrogel’s antimicrobial efficacy and anti-fibroblast activity is decreased when compared to the original CD-100 hydrogel formulation, previous in vivo studies show that the CD-25 hydrogel remains an effective, biocompatible barrier agent in the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  19. Reducing the Oxidation Level of Dextran Aldehyde in a Chitosan/Dextran-Based Surgical Hydrogel Increases Biocompatibility and Decreases Antimicrobial Efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Maggie; Brooks, Heather J L; Moratti, Stephen C; Hanton, Lyall R; Cabral, Jaydee D

    2015-06-16

    A highly oxidized form of a chitosan/dextran-based hydrogel (CD-100) containing 80% oxidized dextran aldehyde (DA-100) was developed as a post-operative aid, and found to significantly prevent adhesion formation in endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). However, the CD-100 hydrogel showed moderate in vitro cytotoxicity to mammalian cell lines, with the DA-100 found to be the cytotoxic component. In order to extend the use of the hydrogel to abdominal surgeries, reformulation using a lower oxidized DA (DA-25) was pursued. The aim of the present study was to compare the antimicrobial efficacy, in vitro biocompatibility and wound healing capacity of the highly oxidized CD-100 hydrogel with the CD-25 hydrogel. Antimicrobial studies were performed against a range of clinically relevant abdominal microorganisms using the micro-broth dilution method. Biocompatibility testing using human dermal fibroblasts was assessed via a tetrazolium reduction assay (MTT) and a wound healing model. In contrast to the original DA-100 formulation, DA-25 was found to be non-cytotoxic, and showed no overall impairment of cell migration, with wound closure occurring at 72 h. However, the lower oxidation level negatively affected the antimicrobial efficacy of the hydrogel (CD-25). Although the CD-25 hydrogel's antimicrobial efficacy and anti-fibroblast activity is decreased when compared to the original CD-100 hydrogel formulation, previous in vivo studies show that the CD-25 hydrogel remains an effective, biocompatible barrier agent in the prevention of postoperative adhesions.

  20. Remarkable effect of bimetallic nanocluster catalysts for aerobic oxidation of alcohols: combining metals changes the activities and the reaction pathways to aldehydes/carboxylic acids or esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaizuka, Kosuke; Miyamura, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Shū

    2010-11-01

    Selective oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by novel carbon-stabilized polymer-incarcerated bimetallic nanocluster catalysts using molecular oxygen has been developed. The reactivity and the selectivity were strongly dependent on the combination of metals and solvent systems; aldehydes and ketones were obtained by the gold/platinum catalyst in benzotrifluoride, and esters were formed by the gold/palladium catalyst in methanol. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example that the reaction pathway has been changed dramatically in gold catalysis by combining with a second metal. The differences in the activity and the selectivity are considered to be derived from the difference in the structure of the bimetallic clusters.

  1. Application of ultraviolet, ozone, and advanced oxidation treatments to washwaters to destroy nitrosamines, nitramines, amines, and aldehydes formed during amine-based carbon capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Amisha D; Dai, Ning; Mitch, William A

    2013-03-19

    Although amine-based CO(2) absorption is a leading contender for full-scale postcombustion CO(2) capture at power plants, concerns have been raised about the potential release of carcinogenic N-nitrosamines and N-nitramines formed by reaction of exhaust gas NO(x) with the amines. Experiments with a laboratory-scale pilot unit suggested that washwater units meant to scrub contaminants from absorber unit exhaust could potentially serve as a source of N-nitrosamines via reactions of residual NO(x) with amines accumulating in the washwater. Dosage requirements for the continuous treatment of the washwater recycle line with ultraviolet (UV) light for destruction of N-nitrosamines and N-nitramines, and with ozone or hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) for destruction of amines and aldehydes, were evaluated. Although capture synergies between UV and ozone treatments.

  2. Salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase - temporal and population variability, correlations with drinking and smoking habits and activity towards aldehydes contained in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebułtowicz, Joanna; Dziadek, Marta; Wroczyński, Piotr; Woźnicka, Katarzyna; Wojno, Barbara; Pietrzak, Monika; Wierzchowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Fluorimetric method based on oxidation of the fluorogenic 6-methoxy-2-naphthaldehyde was applied to evaluate temporal and population variability of the specific activity of salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and the degree of its inactivation in healthy human population. Analyzed was also its dependence on drinking and smoking habits, coffee consumption, and its sensitivity to N-acetylcysteine. Both the specific activity of salivary ALDH and the degree of its inactivation were highly variable during the day, with the highest activities recorded in the morning hours. The activities were also highly variable both intra- and interpersonally, and negatively correlated with age, and this correlation was stronger for the subgroup of volunteers declaring abstinence from alcohol and tobacco. Moderately positive correlations of salivary ALDH specific activity with alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking were also recorded (r(s) ~0.27; p=0.004 and r(s) =0.30; p=0.001, respectively). Moderate coffee consumption correlated positively with the inactivation of salivary ALDH, particularly in the subgroup of non-drinking and non-smoking volunteers. It was found that mechanical stimulation of the saliva flow increases the specific activity of salivary ALDH. The specific activity of the salivary ALDH was strongly and positively correlated with that of superoxide dismutase, and somewhat less with salivary peroxidase. The antioxidant-containing drug N-acetylcysteine increased activity of salivary ALDH presumably by preventing its inactivation in the oral cavity. Some food-related aldehydes, mainly cinnamic aldehyde and anisaldehyde, were excellent substrates of the salivary ALDH3A1 enzyme, while alkenals, particularly those with short chain, were characterized by lower affinity towards this enzyme but high catalytic constants. The protective role of salivary ALDH against aldehydes in food and those found in the cigarette smoke is discussed, as well as its participation in

  3. Multi-enzyme catalyzed rapid ethanol lowering in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, D R; Chambers, R P; Dillon, A R

    1991-10-01

    Ethanol was oxidized to acetate by an enzyme system using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), yeast aldehyde dehydrogenase (YALDH), and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) recycling NAD in two model duodenal fluids and in canine duodenal aspirate in vitro. Sufficient enzyme activities were maintained to convert as much as 34% of the original ethanol to acetate with negligible acetaldehyde accumulation.

  4. Self-assembled monolayers of 1-alkenes on oxidized platinum surfaces as platforms for immobilized enzymes for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Jose Maria; Bielen, Abraham A.M. [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Olthuis, Wouter [BIOS Lab on a Chip Group, MESA+ and MIRA Institutes, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Kengen, Servé W.M. [Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, 6703HB Wageningen (Netherlands); Zuilhof, Han, E-mail: han.zuilhof@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands); Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 22254 (Saudi Arabia); Franssen, Maurice C.R., E-mail: maurice.franssen@wur.nl [Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 8, 6703 HB, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Three different oxidases are covalently attached to alkene based SAMs on PtOx. • Attached enzymes remain active and their activity is assessed by chronoamperometry. • Functionalized PtOx allows electron mediator free chronoamperometry measurements. • The thus formed enzyme electrodes are useful as biosensors for glucose and lactate. • Immobilization of human HAOX foresees in vivo lactate monitoring in humans. - Abstract: Alkene-based self-assembled monolayers grafted on oxidized Pt surfaces were used as a scaffold to covalently immobilize oxidase enzymes, with the aim to develop an amperometric biosensor platform. NH{sub 2}-terminated organic layers were functionalized with either aldehyde (CHO) or N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) ester-derived groups, to provide anchoring points for enzyme immobilization. The functionalized Pt surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), static water contact angle (CA), infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Glucose oxidase (GOX) was covalently attached to the functionalized Pt electrodes, either with or without additional glutaraldehyde crosslinking. The responses of the acquired sensors to glucose concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 100 mM were monitored by chronoamperometry. Furthermore, lactate oxidase (LOX) and human hydroxyacid oxidase (HAOX) were successfully immobilized onto the PtOx surface platform. The performance of the resulting lactate sensors was investigated for lactate concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 20 mM. The successful attachment of active enzymes (GOX, LOX and HAOX) on Pt electrodes demonstrates that covalently functionalized PtOx surfaces provide a universal platform for the development of oxidase enzyme-based sensors.

  5. Oxidative enzyme changes in sorghum infested by shoot fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaja, P G; Shwetha, B L; Swetha, G; Patil, J V

    2014-01-01

    This research investigated the role of oxidative enzymes in the defense response of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench (Poales: Poaceae), to the sorghum shoot fly, Atherigona soccata Rondani (Diptera: Muscidae). Changes in polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activity and total protein content were observed in resistant and susceptible sorghum genotypes in response to A. soccata feeding. Resistant plants exhibited higher levels of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities and total protein content compared with susceptible plants. Peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities and total protein content in the infested resistant and susceptible genotypes were higher when compared with their control plants, respectively. These findings suggest that resistant genotypes may be able to tolerate shoot fly feeding by increasing their peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities. Among the enzymes examined, differences in isozyme profiles for peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were detected between control and infested IS 18551, M35-1, 296B, SSV 84, and DJ 6514 plants. Differences in protein profiles were observed between A. soccata infested and their respective uninfested controls of all the genotypes. In conclusion, this study revealed that these defense enzymes and proteins might attribute to the resistance mechanisms in sorghum plants against A. soccata infestation.

  6. Aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity in raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen, Charlotte L; Andersen, Henrik J; Nielsen, Jacob H

    2002-12-04

    In the present study, the aldehyde-induced pro-oxidative activity of xanthine oxidase was followed in an accelerated raw milk system using spin-trap electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The aldehydes acetaldehyde, propanal, hexanal, trans-2-hexenal, trans-2-heptenal, trans-2-nonenal, and 3-methyl-2-butenal were all found to initiate radical reactions when added to milk. Formation of superoxide through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity is suggested as the initial reaction, as all tested aldehydes were shown to trigger superoxide formation in an ultrahigh temperature (UHT) milk model system with added xanthine oxidase. It was found that addition of aldehydes to milk initially increased the ascorbyl radical concentration with a subsequent decay due to ascorbate depletion, which renders the formation of superoxide in milk with added aldehyde. The present study shows for the first time potential acceleration of oxidative events in milk through aldehyde-induced xanthine oxidase activity.

  7. Air-Stable Gold Nanoparticles Ligated by Secondary Phosphine Oxides as Catalyst for the Chemoselective Hydrogenation of Substituted Aldehydes: a Remarkable Ligand Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Israel; Huertos, Miguel A; Chapman, Andrew M; Buntkowsky, Gerd; Gutmann, Torsten; Groszewicz, Pedro B; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2015-06-24

    Air-stable and homogeneous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs, 1a-5a) ligated by various secondary phosphine oxides (SPOs), [R(1)R(2)P(O)H] (R(1) = Naph, R(2) = (t)Bu, L1; R(1) = R(2) = Ph, L2; R(1) = Ph, R(2) = Naph, L3; R(1) = R(2) = Et, L4; R(1) = R(2) = Cy, L5; R(1) = R(2) = (t)Bu, L6), with different electronic and steric properties were synthesized via NaBH4 reduction of the corresponding Au(I)-SPO complex. These easily accessible ligands allow the formation of well dispersed and small nanoparticles (size 1.2-2.2 nm), which were characterized by the use of a wide variety of techniques, such as transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-vis, energy-dispersive X-ray, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR), and cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP MAS) NMR spectroscopy. A pronounced ligand effect was found, and CP MAS NMR experiments enabled us to probe important differences in the polarity of the P-O bond of the SPOs coordinated to the nanoparticle surface depending on the type of substituents in the ligand. AuNPs containing aryl SPOs carry only SPO anions and are highly selective for aldehyde hydrogenation. AuNPs of similar size made with alkyl SPOs contain also SPOH, hydrogen bonded to SPO anions. As a consequence they contain less Au(I) and more Au(0), as is also evidenced by XPS. They are less selective and active in aldehyde hydrogenation and now show the typical activity of Au(0)NPs in nitro group hydrogenation.

  8. Hepatic fatty acid oxidation : activity, localization and function of some enzymes involved

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. van Tol (Arie)

    1971-01-01

    textabstractFatty acid oxidation is an important pathway for energy production in mammals and birds. In animal tissues the enzymes of fatty acid oxidation are located in the mitochondrion. Recent reports suggest that this is not the case in Castor bean endosperm. In this tissue the enzymes of B-oxid

  9. Low-temperature catalytic oxidation of aldehyde mixtures using wood fly ash: kinetics, mechanism, and effect of ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Praveen; Kastner, James R

    2010-02-01

    Poultry rendering emissions contain volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that are nuisance, odorous, and smog and particulate matter precursors. Present treatment options, such as wet scrubbers, do not eliminate a significant fraction of the VOCs emitted including, 2-methylbutanal (2-MB), 3-methylbutanal, and hexanal. This research investigated the low-temperature (25-160 degrees C) catalytic oxidation of 2-MB and hexanal vapors in a differential, plug flow reactor using wood fly ash (WFA) as a catalyst and oxygen and ozone as oxidants. The oxidation rates of 2-MB and hexanal ranged between 3.0 and 3.5 x 10(-9)mol g(-1)s(-1) at 25 degrees C and the activation energies were 2.2 and 1.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively. The catalytic activity of WFA was comparable to other commercially available metal and metal oxide catalysts. We theorize that WFA catalyzed a free radical reaction in which 2-butanone and CO(2) were formed as end products of 2-MB oxidation, while CO(2), pentanal, and butanal were formed as end products of hexanal oxidation. When tested as a binary mixture at 25 and 160 degrees C, no inhibition was observed. Additionally, when ozone was tested as an oxidant at 160 degrees C, 100% removal was achieved within a 2-s reaction time. These results may be used to design catalytic oxidation processes for VOC removal at poultry rendering facilities and potentially replace energy and water intensive air pollution treatment technologies currently in use.

  10. Effect of different solvent on the photocatalytic activity of ZnIn2S4 for selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aromatic aldehydes under visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Ye, Xiangju; Meng, Sugang; Fu, Xianliang; Chen, Shifu

    2016-10-01

    A series of ternary chalcogenides, zinc indium sulphide (ZnIn2S4), were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method with different solvents. The structure, textural, and optical properties of the resulting materials were thoroughly characterized by several techniques. The as-prepared ZnIn2S4 samples could all be employed as excellent photocatalysts to activate O2 for selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to aromatic aldehydes under visible light illumination. The results showed that ZnIn2S4 prepared in ethanol solvent (ZIS-EtOH) exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity among the screened samples. The differences of photocatalytic performance for ZnIn2S4 samples prepared in different media were mainly attributed to the different levels of exposed {0001} special facets caused by the exposure extent of the basic crystal plane. In addition, rad O2- and positive holes were proved to be the main active species during the photocatalytic process. Combined with the previous reports, a possible photocatalytic mechanism for the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde over ZnIn2S4 sample was proposed.

  11. Formation of Nitric Oxide by Aldehyde Dehydrogenase-2 Is Necessary and Sufficient for Vascular Bioactivation of Nitroglycerin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opelt, Marissa; Eroglu, Emrah; Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Malli, Roland; Graier, Wolfgang F.; Fassett, John T.; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), resulting in activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and cGMP-mediated vasodilation. We have previously shown that a minor reaction of ALDH2-catalyzed GTN bioconversion, accounting for about 5% of the main clearance-based turnover yielding inorganic nitrite, results in direct NO formation and concluded that this minor pathway could provide the link between vascular GTN metabolism and activation of sGC. However, lack of detectable NO at therapeutically relevant GTN concentrations (≤1 μm) in vascular tissue called into question the biological significance of NO formation by purified ALDH2. We addressed this issue and used a novel, highly sensitive genetically encoded fluorescent NO probe (geNOp) to visualize intracellular NO formation at low GTN concentrations (≤1 μm) in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) expressing an ALDH2 mutant that reduces GTN to NO but lacks clearance-based GTN denitration activity. NO formation was compared with GTN-induced activation of sGC. The addition of 1 μm GTN to VSMC expressing either wild-type or C301S/C303S ALDH2 resulted in pronounced intracellular NO elevation, with maximal concentrations of 7 and 17 nm, respectively. Formation of GTN-derived NO correlated well with activation of purified sGC in VSMC lysates and cGMP accumulation in intact porcine aortic endothelial cells infected with wild-type or mutant ALDH2. Formation of NO and cGMP accumulation were inhibited by ALDH inhibitors chloral hydrate and daidzin. The present study demonstrates that ALDH2-catalyzed NO formation is necessary and sufficient for GTN bioactivation in VSMC. PMID:27679490

  12. Inhibitory effects of Ruta graveolens L. extract on guinea pig liver aldehyde oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirouzpanah, Saieed; Saieed, Pirouzpanah; Rashidi, Mohammad Reza; Reza, Rashidi Mohammad; Delazar, Abbas; Abbas, Delazar; Razavieh, Seyyed-Vali; Seyyedvali, Razavieh; Hamidi, Aliasghar; Aliasghar, Hamidi

    2006-01-01

    Ruta graveolens L. is a flavonoid-containing medicinal plant with various biological properties. In the present study, the effects of R. graveolens extract on aldehyde oxidase, a molybdenum hydroxylase, are investigated. Aldehyde oxidase was partially purified from liver homogenates of mature male guinea pigs by heat treatment and ammonium sulphate precipitation. The total extract was obtained by macerating the aerial parts of R. graveolens in MeOH 70% and the effect of this extract on the enzyme activity was assayed using phenanthridine, vanillin and benzaldehyde as substrates. Quercetin and its glycoside form, rutin were isolated, purified and identified from the extract and their inhibitory effects on the enzyme were investigated. R. graveolens extract exhibited a high inhibition on aldehyde oxidase activity (89-96%) at 100 microg/ml which was comparable with 10 microM of menadione, a specific potent inhibitor of aldehyde oxidase. The IC50 values for the inhibitory effect of extract against the oxidation of benzaldehyde, vanillin and phenanthridine were 10.4, 10.1, 43.2 microg/ml, respectively. Both quercetin and rutin at 10 microM caused 70-96% and 27-52% inhibition on the enzyme activity, respectively. Quercetin was more potent inhibitor than rutin, but both flavonols exerted their inhibitory effects mostly in a linear mixed-type.

  13. Protein film photoelectrochemistry of the water oxidation enzyme photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Zhang, Jenny Z; Paul, Nicholas; Reisner, Erwin

    2014-09-21

    Photosynthesis is responsible for the sunlight-powered conversion of carbon dioxide and water into chemical energy in the form of carbohydrates and the release of O2 as a by-product. Although many proteins are involved in photosynthesis, the fascinating machinery of Photosystem II (PSII) is at the heart of this process. This tutorial review describes an emerging technique named protein film photoelectrochemistry (PF-PEC), which allows for the light-dependent activity of PSII adsorbed onto an electrode surface to be studied. The technique is straightforward to use, does not require highly specialised and/or expensive equipment, is highly selective for the active fractions of the adsorbed enzyme, and requires a small amount of enzyme sample. The use of PF-PEC to study PSII can yield insights into its activity, stability, quantum yields, redox behaviour, and interfacial electron transfer pathways. It can also be used in PSII inhibition studies and chemical screening, which may prove useful in the development of biosensors. PSII PF-PEC cells also serve as proof-of-principle solar water oxidation systems; here, a comparison is made against PSII-inspired synthetic photocatalysts and materials for artificial photosynthesis.

  14. Effect of commonly used organic solvents on aldehyde oxidase-mediated vanillin, phthalazine and methotrexate oxidation in human, rat and mouse liver subcellular fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Dayanidhi; Pattem, Rambabu; Gudi, Girish

    2014-08-01

    1. Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) is a cytosolic molybdoflavoprotein enzyme widely distributed across many tissues. In this study, we report the effect of commonly used organic solvents such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), acetonitrile (ACN), methanol and ethanol on AOX activity in human, rat and mouse liver S9 fractions using vanillin, phthalazine and methotrexate as probe substrates. 2. Methanol was found to be the most potent solvent in inhibiting vanillic acid and 1-phthalazinone formation in comparison to DMSO, ACN and ethanol across the species tested, except 7-hydroxy methotrexate. 3. Treatment with these solvents at approximate IC50 (% v/v) concentrations showed significant reduction in Clint and Vmax of the probe substrates and also resulted in different effects on Km across the species. 4. Marked differences in the activity and affinity towards AOX were observed with different probe substrates with methotrexate showing least activity and affinity as compared to vanillin and phthalazine. 5. Overall, AOX activity seemed to be more resilient to the presence of organic solvents at higher concentrations in human and rodent species. These results suggest that low concentrations of organic solvents are acceptable for in vitro incubations involving AOX-mediated metabolism.

  15. Aldehyde Oxidase 4 Plays a Critical Role in Delaying Silique Senescence by Catalyzing Aldehyde Detoxification1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Dmitry; Soltabayeva, Aigerim; Samani, Talya

    2017-01-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) aldehyde oxidases are a multigene family of four oxidases (AAO1–AAO4) that oxidize a variety of aldehydes, among them abscisic aldehyde, which is oxidized to the phytohormone abscisic acid. Toxic aldehydes are generated in plants both under normal conditions and in response to stress. The detoxification of such aldehydes by oxidation is attributed to aldehyde dehydrogenases but never to aldehyde oxidases. The feasibility of the detoxification of aldehydes in siliques via oxidation by AAO4 was demonstrated, first, by its ability to efficiently oxidize an array of aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes, including the reactive carbonyl species (RCS) acrolein, hydroxyl-2-nonenal, and malondialdehyde. Next, exogenous application of several aldehydes to siliques in AAO4 knockout (KO) Arabidopsis plants induced severe tissue damage and enhanced malondialdehyde levels and senescence symptoms, but not in wild-type siliques. Furthermore, abiotic stresses such as dark and ultraviolet C irradiation caused an increase in endogenous RCS and higher expression levels of senescence marker genes, leading to premature senescence of KO siliques, whereas RCS and senescence marker levels in wild-type siliques were hardly affected. Finally, in naturally senesced KO siliques, higher endogenous RCS levels were associated with enhanced senescence molecular markers, chlorophyll degradation, and earlier seed shattering compared with the wild type. The aldehyde-dependent differential generation of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide by AAO4 and the induction of AAO4 expression by hydrogen peroxide shown here suggest a self-amplification mechanism for detoxifying additional reactive aldehydes produced during stress. Taken together, our results indicate that AAO4 plays a critical role in delaying senescence in siliques by catalyzing aldehyde detoxification. PMID:28188272

  16. Oxidative phenols in forage crops containing polyphenol oxidase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Ifat; Threadgill, Michael D; Moorby, Jon M; Winters, Ana

    2010-02-10

    Polyphenol oxidases (PPOs) are copper-containing enzymes that catalyze oxidation of endogenous monophenols to ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds and of ortho-dihydroxyaryl compounds to ortho-quinones. Subsequent nucleophilic addition reactions of phenols, amino acids, and proteins with the electrophilic ortho-quinones form brown-, black-, or red-colored secondary products associated with the undesired discolouration of fruit and vegetables. Several important forage plants also exhibit significant PPO activity, and a link with improved efficiency of ruminant production has been established. In ruminant animals, extensive degradation of forage proteins, following consumption, can result in high rates of excretion of nitrogen, which contributes to point-source and diffuse pollution. Reaction of quinones with forage proteins leads to the formation of protein-phenol complexes that are resistant to proteolytic activity during ensilage and during rumen fermentation. Thus, PPO in red clover (Trifolium pratense) has been shown to improve protein utilization by ruminants. While PPO activity has been demonstrated in a number of forage crops, little work has been carried out to identify substrates of PPO, knowledge of which would be beneficial for characterizing this trait in these forages. In general, a wide range of 1,2-dihydroxyarenes can serve as PPO substrates because these are readily oxidized because of the ortho positioning of the hydroxy groups. Naturally occurring phenols isolated from forage crops with PPO activity are reviewed. A large number of phenols, which may be directly or indirectly oxidized as a consequence of PPO activity, have been identified in several forage grass, legume, cereal, and brassica species; these include hydroxybenzoic acids, hydroxycinnamates, and flavonoids. In conclusion, a number of compounds are known or postulated to enable PPO activity in important PPO-expressing forage crops. Targeting the matching of these compounds with PPO activity

  17. EPR studies of the Mo-enzyme aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas: an application of the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory to a system containing weakly-coupled paramagnetic redox centers with different relaxation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Pablo J; Barrera, Guillermo I; Rizzi, Alberto C; Moura, José J G; Passeggi, Mario C G; Brondino, Carlos D

    2009-10-01

    Electron transfer proteins and redox enzymes containing paramagnetic redox centers with different relaxation rates are widespread in nature. Despite both the long distances and chemical paths connecting these centers, they can present weak magnetic couplings produced by spin-spin interactions such as dipolar and isotropic exchange. We present here a theoretical model based on the Bloch-Wangsness-Redfield theory to analyze the dependence with temperature of EPR spectra of interacting pairs of spin 1/2 centers having different relaxation rates, as is the case of the molybdenum-containing enzyme aldehyde oxidoreductase from Desulfovibrio gigas. We analyze the changes of the EPR spectra of the slow relaxing center (Mo(V)) induced by the faster relaxing center (FeS center). At high temperatures, when the relaxation time T(1) of the fast relaxing center is very short, the magnetic coupling between centers is averaged to zero. Conversely, at low temperatures when T(1) is longer, no modulation of the coupling between metal centers can be detected.

  18. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  19. Oligomerization and hydroxylation of green tea catechins by oxidative enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Verloop, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Black teas are known for their characteristic brown colour, bitter taste and astringent mouth feel. These sensory characteristics are mainly influenced by the phenolic oxidation products present in black tea. The oxidation of phenolics from green tea leaves during black tea manufacturing is an uncontrolled process. With the objective to make tea oxidation a more controlled process, the aim of this thesis was to understand the enzymatic oxidation reactions occurring during tea oxidation, and t...

  20. RNAi-directed downregulation of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (OsBADH1) results in decreased stress tolerance and increased oxidative markers without affecting glycine betaine biosynthesis in rice (Oryza sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wei; Sun, Jiaqi; Liu, Jia; Liu, Fangfang; Yan, Jun; Gou, Xiaojun; Lu, Bao-Rong; Liu, Yongsheng

    2014-11-01

    As an important osmoprotectant, glycine betaine (GB) plays an essential role in resistance to abiotic stress in a variety of organisms, including rice (Oryza sativa L.). However, GB content is too low to be detectable in rice, although rice genome possesses several orthologs coding for betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) involved in plant GB biosynthesis. Rice BADH1 (OsBADH1) has been shown to be targeted to peroxisome and its overexpression resulted in increased GB biosynthesis and tolerance to abiotic stress. In this study, we demonstrated a pivotal role of OsBADH1 in stress tolerance without altering GB biosynthesis capacity, using the RNA interference (RNAi) technique. OsBADH1 was ubiquitously expressed in different organs, including roots, stems, leaves and flowers. Transgenic rice lines downregulating OsBADH1 exhibited remarkably reduced tolerance to NaCl, drought and cold stresses. The decrease of stress tolerance occurring in the OsBADH1-RNAi repression lines was associated with an elevated level of malondialdehyde content and hydrogen peroxidation. No GB accumulation was detected in transgene-positive and transgene-negative lines derived from heterozygous transgenic T0 plants. Moreover, transgenic OsBADH1-RNAi repression lines showed significantly reduced seed set and yield. In conclusion, the downregulation of OsBADH1, even though not causing any change of GB content, was accounted for the reduction of ability to dehydrogenate the accumulating metabolism-derived aldehydes and subsequently resulted in decreased stress tolerance and crop productivity. These results suggest that OsBADH1 possesses an enzyme activity to catalyze other aldehydes in addition to betaine aldehyde (the precursor of GB) and thus alleviate their toxic effects under abiotic stresses.

  1. Detoxifying enzymes at the cross-roads of inflammation, oxidative stress and drug hypersensitivity: role of glutathione transferase P1-1 and aldose reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sánchez-Gómez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR and glutathione transferases (GST metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and AKR1B1 and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity.

  2. Detoxifying Enzymes at the Cross-Roads of Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Drug Hypersensitivity: Role of Glutathione Transferase P1-1 and Aldose Reductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Díez-Dacal, Beatriz; García-Martín, Elena; Agúndez, José A. G.; Pajares, María A.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Phase I and II enzymes are involved in the metabolism of endogenous reactive compounds as well as xenobiotics, including toxicants and drugs. Genotyping studies have established several drug metabolizing enzymes as markers for risk of drug hypersensitivity. However, other candidates are emerging that are involved in drug metabolism but also in the generation of danger or costimulatory signals. Enzymes such as aldo-keto reductases (AKR) and glutathione transferases (GST) metabolize prostaglandins and reactive aldehydes with proinflammatory activity, as well as drugs and/or their reactive metabolites. In addition, their metabolic activity can have important consequences for the cellular redox status, and impacts the inflammatory response as well as the balance of inflammatory mediators, which can modulate epigenetic factors and cooperate or interfere with drug-adduct formation. These enzymes are, in turn, targets for covalent modification and regulation by oxidative stress, inflammatory mediators, and drugs. Therefore, they constitute a platform for a complex set of interactions involving drug metabolism, protein haptenation, modulation of the inflammatory response, and/or generation of danger signals with implications in drug hypersensitivity reactions. Moreover, increasing evidence supports their involvement in allergic processes. Here, we will focus on GSTP1-1 and aldose reductase (AKR1B1) and provide a perspective for their involvement in drug hypersensitivity. PMID:27540362

  3. The ORF slr0091 of Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 encodes a high-light induced aldehyde dehydrogenase converting apocarotenals and alkanals

    KAUST Repository

    Trautmann, Danika

    2013-07-05

    Oxidative cleavage of carotenoids and peroxidation of lipids lead to apocarotenals and aliphatic aldehydes called alkanals, which react with vitally important compounds, promoting cytotoxicity. Although many enzymes have been reported to deactivate alkanals by converting them into fatty acids, little is known about the mechanisms used to detoxify apocarotenals or the enzymes acting on them. Cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic organisms must cope with both classes of aldehydes. Here we report that the Synechocystis enzyme SynAlh1, encoded by the ORF slr0091, is an aldehyde dehydrogenase that mediates oxidation of both apocarotenals and alkanals into the corresponding acids. Using a crude lysate of SynAlh1-expressing Escherichia coli cells, we show that SynAlh1 converts a wide range of apocarotenals and alkanals, with a preference for apocarotenals with defined chain lengths. As suggested by in vitro incubations and using engineered retinal-forming E. coli cells, we found that retinal is not a substrate for SynAlh1, making involvement in Synechocystis retinoid metabolism unlikely. The transcript level of SynAlh1 is induced by high light and cold treatment, indicating a role in the stress response, and the corresponding gene is a constituent of a stress-related operon. The assumptions regarding the function of SynAlh are further supported by the surprisingly high homology to human and plant aldehyde dehydrogenase that have been assigned to aldehyde detoxification. SynAlh1 is the first aldehyde dehydrogenase that has been shown to form both apocarotenoic and fatty acids. This dual function suggests that its eukaryotic homologs may also be involved in apocarotenal metabolism, a function that has not been considered so far. Aldehyde dehydrogenases play an important role in detoxification of reactive aldehydes. Here, we report on a cyanbacterial enzyme capable in converting two classes of lipid-derived aldehydes, apocaotenals and alkanals. The corresponding gene is a

  4. Site directed mutagenesis of amino acid residues at the active site of mouse aldehyde oxidase AOX1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schumann

    Full Text Available Mouse aldehyde oxidase (mAOX1 forms a homodimer and belongs to the xanthine oxidase family of molybdoenzymes which are characterized by an essential equatorial sulfur ligand coordinated to the molybdenum atom. In general, mammalian AOs are characterized by broad substrate specificity and an yet obscure physiological function. To define the physiological substrates and the enzymatic characteristics of mAOX1, we established a system for the heterologous expression of the enzyme in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein showed spectral features and a range of substrate specificity similar to the native protein purified from mouse liver. The EPR data of recombinant mAOX1 were similar to those of AO from rabbit liver, but differed from the homologous xanthine oxidoreductase enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids Val806, Met884 and Glu1265 at the active site resulted in a drastic decrease in the oxidation of aldehydes with no increase in the oxidation of purine substrates. The double mutant V806E/M884R and the single mutant E1265Q were catalytically inactive enzymes regardless of the aldehyde or purine substrates tested. Our results show that only Glu1265 is essential for the catalytic activity by initiating the base-catalyzed mechanism of substrate oxidation. In addition, it is concluded that the substrate specificity of molybdo-flavoenzymes is more complex and not only defined by the three characterized amino acids in the active site.

  5. Stabilization of oil-in-water emulsions by enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloyl groups can promote gelation of sugar beet pectin (SBP). It is uncertain how the enzyme kinetics of this cross-linking reaction are affected in emulsion systems and whether the gelation affects emulsion stability. In this study, SBP (2.5% w...

  6. Methane-Oxidizing Enzymes: An Upstream Problem in Biological Gas-to-Liquids Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Thomas J; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2016-08-03

    Biological conversion of natural gas to liquids (Bio-GTL) represents an immense economic opportunity. In nature, aerobic methanotrophic bacteria and anaerobic archaea are able to selectively oxidize methane using methane monooxygenase (MMO) and methyl coenzyme M reductase (MCR) enzymes. Although significant progress has been made toward genetically manipulating these organisms for biotechnological applications, the enzymes themselves are slow, complex, and not recombinantly tractable in traditional industrial hosts. With turnover numbers of 0.16-13 s(-1), these enzymes pose a considerable upstream problem in the biological production of fuels or chemicals from methane. Methane oxidation enzymes will need to be engineered to be faster to enable high volumetric productivities; however, efforts to do so and to engineer simpler enzymes have been minimally successful. Moreover, known methane-oxidizing enzymes have different expression levels, carbon and energy efficiencies, require auxiliary systems for biosynthesis and function, and vary considerably in terms of complexity and reductant requirements. The pros and cons of using each methane-oxidizing enzyme for Bio-GTL are considered in detail. The future for these enzymes is bright, but a renewed focus on studying them will be critical to the successful development of biological processes that utilize methane as a feedstock.

  7. Oligomerization and hydroxylation of green tea catechins by oxidative enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, J.W.

    2016-01-01

    Black teas are known for their characteristic brown colour, bitter taste and astringent mouth feel. These sensory characteristics are mainly influenced by the phenolic oxidation products present in black tea. The oxidation of phenolics from green tea leaves during black tea manufacturing is an uncon

  8. Oxidative bioelectrocatalysis: From natural metabolic pathways to synthetic metabolons and minimal enzyme cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minteer, Shelley D

    2016-05-01

    Anodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells are more complex than cathodic bioelectrodes for biofuel cells, because laccase and bilirubin oxidase can individually catalyze four electron reduction of oxygen to water, whereas most anodic enzymes only do a single two electron oxidation of a complex fuel (i.e. glucose oxidase oxidizing glucose to gluconolactone while generating 2 electrons of the total 24 electrons), so enzyme cascades are typically needed for complete oxidation of the fuel. This review article will discuss the lessons learned from natural metabolic pathways about multi-step oxidation and how those lessons have been applied to minimal or artificial enzyme cascades. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  9. CP12-mediated protection of Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marri, Lucia; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; Lebrun, Régine; Puppo, Rémy; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Trost, Paolo; Gontero, Brigitte; Sparla, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) are two energy-consuming enzymes of the Calvin-Benson cycle, whose regulation is crucial for the global balance of the photosynthetic process under different environmental conditions. In oxygen phototrophs, GAPDH and PRK regulation involves the redox-sensitive protein CP12. In the dark, oxidized chloroplast thioredoxins trigger the formation of a GAPDH/CP12/PRK complex in which both enzyme activities are down-regulated. In this report, we show that free GAPDH (A4-isoform) and PRK are also inhibited by oxidants like H2O2, GSSG and GSNO. Both in the land plant Arabidopsis thaliana and in the green microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both enzymes can be glutathionylated as shown by biotinylated-GSSG assay and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry. CP12 is not glutathionylated but homodisulfides are formed upon oxidant treatments. In Arabidopsis but not in Chlamydomonas, the interaction between oxidized CP12 and GAPDH provides full protection from oxidative damage. In both organisms, preformed GAPDH/CP12/PRK complexes are protected from GSSG or GSNO oxidation, and in Arabidopsis also from H2O2 treatment. Overall, the results suggest that the role of CP12 in oxygen phototrophs needs to be extended beyond light/dark regulation, and include protection of enzymes belonging to Calvin-Benson cycle from oxidative stress.

  10. The diatom-derived aldehyde decadienal affects life cycle transition in the ascidian Ciona intestinalis through nitric oxide/ERK signalling

    OpenAIRE

    Castellano, Immacolata; Ercolesi, Elena; Romano, Giovanna; Ianora, Adrianna; Palumbo, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are fatty-acid-derived metabolites produced by some microalgae, including different diatom species. PUAs are mainly produced as a wound-activated defence mechanism against microalgal predators or released from senescent cells at the end of a bloom. PUAs, including 2,4-trans-decadienal (DD), induce deleterious effects on embryonic and larval development of several planktonic and benthic organisms. Here, we report on the effects of DD on larval development and m...

  11. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Silva Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure. Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment.

  12. Photobiomodulation Therapy Decreases Oxidative Stress in the Lung Tissue after Formaldehyde Exposure: Role of Oxidant/Antioxidant Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Tarcio Teodoro; Barioni, Éric Diego; de Oliveira Duro, Stephanie; Ratto Tempestini Horliana, Anna Carolina; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Marcourakis, Tânia; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Formaldehyde is ubiquitous pollutant that induces oxidative stress in the lung. Several lung diseases have been associated with oxidative stress and their control is necessary. Photobiomodulation therapy (PBMT) has been highlighted as a promissory treatment, but its mechanisms need to be better investigated. Our objective was to evaluate the effects of PBMT on the oxidative stress generated by FA exposure. Male Wistar rats were submitted to FA exposure of 1% or vehicle (3 days) and treated or not with PBMT (1 and 5 h after each FA exposure). Rats treated only with laser were used as control. Twenty-four hours after the last FA exposure, we analyzed the effects of PBMT on the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide, oxidative burst, glutathione reductase, peroxidase, S-transferase enzyme activities, the gene expression of nitric oxide, cyclooxygenase, superoxide dismutase, the catalase enzyme, and heme oxygenase-1. PBMT reduced the generation of nitrites and hydrogen peroxide and increased oxidative burst in the lung cells. A decreased level of oxidant enzymes was observed which were concomitantly related to an increased level of antioxidants. This study provides new information about the antioxidant mechanisms of PBMT in the lung and might constitute an important tool for lung disease treatment. PMID:27293324

  13. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Zentella, Martha Lucinda; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH) in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver.

  14. Is Liver Enzyme Release Really Associated with Cell Necrosis Induced by Oxidant Stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Lucinda Contreras-Zentella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic diseases are a major concern worldwide. Increased specific plasma enzyme activities are considered diagnostic features for liver diseases, since enzymes are released into the blood compartment following the deterioration of the organ. Release of liver mitochondrial enzymes is considered strong evidence for hepatic necrosis, which is associated with an increased production of ROS, often leading to greater hepatic lipid peroxidation. Lipotoxic mediators and intracellular signals activated Kupffer cells, which provides evidence strongly suggesting the participation of oxidant stress in acute liver damage, inducing the progression of liver injury to chronic liver damage. Elevated transaminase activities are considered as an index marker of hepatotoxicity, linked to oxidant stress. However, a drastic increase of serum activities of liver enzyme markers ought not necessarily to reflect liver cell death. In fact, increased serum levels of cytoplasmic enzymes have readily been observed after partial hepatectomy (PH in the regenerating liver of rats. In this regard, we are now showing that in vitro modifications of the oxidant status affect differentially the release of liver enzymes, indicating that this release is a strictly controlled event and not directly related to the onset of oxidant stress of the liver.

  15. Neuroprotective effect of ginger on anti-oxidant enzymes in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Kondeti Ramudu; Mallikarjuna, Korivi; Kesireddy, Nishanth; Sathyavelu Reddy, Kesireddy

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ginger on oxidative stress markers in the mitochondrial fractions of cerebral cortex (CC), cerebellum (CB), hippocampus (HC) and hypothalamus (HT) of diabetic rats. Diabetes exacerbates neuronal injury induced by hyperglycemia mediated oxidative damage. A marked decrease in anti-oxidant marker enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), reduced glutathione (GSH) and increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) was observed in the diabetic rats. Decreased activities of anti-oxidant enzymes in diabetic rats were augmented on oral administration of ginger. Moreover, ginger administration depleted the MDA level, which was earlier increased in the diabetic rats. These results suggest that ginger exhibit a neuroprotective effect by accelerating brain anti-oxidant defense mechanisms and down regulating the MDA levels to the normal levels in the diabetic rats. Thus, ginger may be used as therapeutic agent in preventing complications in diabetic patients.

  16. Simultaneous involvement of a tungsten-containing aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase in anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnar-Daumler, Carlotta; Seubert, Andreas; Schmitt, Georg; Heider, Johann

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic phenylalanine metabolism in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum is initiated by conversion of phenylalanine to phenylacetate, which is further metabolized via benzoyl-coenzyme A (CoA). The formation of phenylacetate is catalyzed by phenylalanine transaminase, phenylpyruvate decarboxylase, and a phenylacetaldehyde-oxidizing enzyme. The presence of these enzymes was detected in extracts of cells grown with phenylalanine and nitrate. We found that two distinct enzymes are involved in the oxidation of phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetate, an aldehyde:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and a phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PDH). Based on sequence comparison, growth studies with various tungstate concentrations, and metal analysis of the enriched enzyme, AOR was shown to be a tungsten-containing enzyme, necessitating specific cofactor biosynthetic pathways for molybdenum- and tungsten-dependent enzymes simultaneously. We predict from the genome sequence that most enzymes of molybdopterin biosynthesis are shared, while the molybdate/tungstate uptake systems are duplicated and specialized paralogs of the sulfur-inserting MoaD and the metal-inserting MoeA proteins seem to be involved in dedicating biosynthesis toward molybdenum or tungsten cofactors. We also characterized PDH biochemically and identified both NAD(+) and NADP(+) as electron acceptors. We identified the gene coding for the enzyme and purified a recombinant Strep-tagged PDH variant. The homotetrameric enzyme is highly specific for phenylacetaldehyde, has cooperative kinetics toward the substrate, and shows considerable substrate inhibition. Our data suggest that A. aromaticum utilizes PDH as the primary enzyme during anaerobic phenylalanine degradation, whereas AOR is not essential for the metabolic pathway. We hypothesize a function as a detoxifying enzyme if high aldehyde concentrations accumulate in the cytoplasm, which would lead to substrate inhibition of PDH.

  17. Redox regulation of SUMO enzymes is required for ATM activity and survival in oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic-Valentin, Nicolas; Drzewicka, Katarzyna; König, Cornelia; Schiebel, Elmar; Melchior, Frauke

    2016-06-15

    To sense and defend against oxidative stress, cells depend on signal transduction cascades involving redox-sensitive proteins. We previously identified SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) enzymes as downstream effectors of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hydrogen peroxide transiently inactivates SUMO E1 and E2 enzymes by inducing a disulfide bond between their catalytic cysteines. How important their oxidation is in light of many other redox-regulated proteins has however been unclear. To selectively disrupt this redox switch, we identified a catalytically fully active SUMO E2 enzyme variant (Ubc9 D100A) with strongly reduced propensity to maintain a disulfide with the E1 enzyme in vitro and in cells. Replacement of Ubc9 by this variant impairs cell survival both under acute and mild chronic oxidative stresses. Intriguingly, Ubc9 D100A cells fail to maintain activity of the ATM-Chk2 DNA damage response pathway that is induced by hydrogen peroxide. In line with this, these cells are also more sensitive to the ROS-producing chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide/Vp16 and Ara-C. These findings reveal that SUMO E1~E2 oxidation is an essential redox switch in oxidative stress.

  18. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  19. Mitochondrial targeting of bilirubin regulatory enzymes: An adaptive response to oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhsain, Siti Nur Fadzilah, E-mail: sitinurfadzilah077@ppinang.uitm.edu.my [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Faculty of Pharmacy, University Teknologi Mara (Malaysia); Lang, Matti A., E-mail: m.lang@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Abu-Bakar, A' edah, E-mail: a.abubakar@uq.edu.au [The University of Queensland, National Research Centre for Environmental Toxicology (Entox), 4072 Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular level of bilirubin (BR), an endogenous antioxidant that is cytotoxic at high concentrations, is tightly controlled within the optimal therapeutic range. We have recently described a concerted intracellular BR regulation by two microsomal enzymes: heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), essential for BR production and cytochrome P450 2A5 (CYP2A5), a BR oxidase. Herein, we describe targeting of these enzymes to hepatic mitochondria during oxidative stress. The kinetics of microsomal and mitochondrial BR oxidation were compared. Treatment of DBA/2J mice with 200 mg pyrazole/kg/day for 3 days increased hepatic intracellular protein carbonyl content and induced nucleo-translocation of Nrf2. HMOX1 and CYP2A5 proteins and activities were elevated in microsomes and mitoplasts but not the UGT1A1, a catalyst of BR glucuronidation. A CYP2A5 antibody inhibited 75% of microsomal BR oxidation. The inhibition was absent in control mitoplasts but elevated to 50% after treatment. An adrenodoxin reductase antibody did not inhibit microsomal BR oxidation but inhibited 50% of mitochondrial BR oxidation. Ascorbic acid inhibited 5% and 22% of the reaction in control and treated microsomes, respectively. In control mitoplasts the inhibition was 100%, which was reduced to 50% after treatment. Bilirubin affinity to mitochondrial and microsomal CYP2A5 enzyme is equally high. Lastly, the treatment neither released cytochrome c into cytoplasm nor dissipated membrane potential, indicating the absence of mitochondrial membrane damage. Collectively, the observations suggest that BR regulatory enzymes are recruited to mitochondria during oxidative stress and BR oxidation by mitochondrial CYP2A5 is supported by mitochondrial mono-oxygenase system. The induced recruitment potentially confers membrane protection. - Highlights: • Pyrazole induces oxidative stress in the mouse liver. • Pyrazole-induced oxidative stress induces mitochondrial targeting of key bilirubin regulatory enzymes, HMOX1

  20. Star block-copolymers: Enzyme-inspired catalysts for oxidation of alcohols in water

    KAUST Repository

    Mugemana, Clement

    2014-01-01

    A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. This journal is © the Partner Organisations 2014.

  1. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative gelation of sugar beet pectin: Kinetics and rheology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz; Chronakis, Ioannis S.; Meyer, Anne S.

    2012-01-01

    Sugar beet pectin (SBP) is a marginally utilized co-processing product from sugar production from sugar beets. In this study, the kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of ferulic acid moieties (FA), was studied using small angle oscillatory measure...

  2. [Photodynamic reaction and oxidative stress - influence of the photodynamic effect on the activity antioxidant enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiszewska, Anna; Nowak-Stępniowska, Agata

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of light with a photosensitizer, accumulated in a tissue in the presence of oxygen, leads to formation of reactive oxygen species, mainly of singlet oxygen and free radicals. These factors react with biomolecules producing their oxidized states. Reactive oxygen species, such as singlet oxygen and free radicals are able to damage membranes, DNA, enzymes, structural peptides and other cellular structures leading to cell death. An antioxidant protection of cell is formed by enzymes belonging to the family of oxidoreductases: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase (GR). Photodynamic therapy leads to the increased production of oxidizing toxic forms. It is important to analyze impact of PDT on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as SOD, CAT, GPx. The activity of antioxidant enzymes during the photodynamic effect is influenced by both the light energy dose and the concentration of photosensitizer. The presence only of the photosensitizer or only the light energy may also result in changes in the activity of these enzymes. The differences in changes in the activity of these enzymes depend on the type of used photosensitizer. A phenomenon of selective accumulation of photosensitizer in tumor tissues is used in the photodynamic method of tumor diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Stabilized enzymes in continuous gas phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Fangxiao; LeJeune, K.; Yang, Zhen [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-01

    We are assessing the utility of enzymes to catalyze reactions in a continuous gas phase reactor. First, alcohol dehydrogenase has been used to oxidize an unsaturated alcohol, 3-methyl-2-buten-1-ol (UOL), to the corresponding unsaturated aldehyde, 3-methyl-2-butenal (UAL). Cofactor NAD{sup +} was regenerated by concomitant acetone reduction to isopropyl alcohol. Second, organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH) has been used to hydrolyze pesticide vapors. In order to control enzyme hydration level, enzyme water adsorption isotherms at different temperature have been studied. Huttig`s isotherm model has been found suitable to describe adsorption behavior. The influence of enzyme hydration level, enzyme loading on glass beads, reaction temperature and flow rate on enzymatic reaction rate and biocatalyst stability were investigated. Reaction kinetics were studied and a kinetic model was proposed. We will also report our attempts to further stabilize enzymes for use in gas reactions by incorporating them into polymer matrices.

  4. Fracturing Fluid (Guar Polymer Gel Degradation Study by using Oxidative and Enzyme Breaker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung Kyaw

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative and enzyme breakers are used in this research project with the main objective to study on the degradation pattern of fracturing fluid (i.e., guar polymer gel as a function of time, temperature and breaker concentration itself. The fracturing fluid used in hydraulic fracturing or frac pack contain a chemical breakers to reduce the viscosity of the fluid intermingled with the proppant. Chemical breakers reduce viscosity of the guar polymer by cleaving the polymer into small-molecular-weight fragments. The reduction of viscosity will facilitate the flow-back of residual polymer providing rapid recovery of polymer from proppant pack. Ineffective breakers or misapplication of breakers can result in screen-outs or flow-back of viscous fluids both of which can significantly decrease the well productivity. Breaker activity of low to medium temperature range oxidative and enzyme breaker systems was evaluated. ViCon NF an oxidative breaker (Halliburton product and GBW 12- CD an enzyme breaker (BJ Services product were used in this research project with the main objective to study on the degradation pattern of fracturing fluid (guar polymer gel as a function of (time, temperature and breaker concentration itself. This study provides focuses on the way to mix the fracturing fluid, compositions of the fracturing fluid and how to conduct the crosslink and break test. Crosslink test indicate the optimum cross-linker concentration to produce good crosslink gel and the break test gave the characteristic of the gel during degradation process and also the break time. Besides relying on the laboratory experiment, information obtained from research on SPE and US Pattern papers were used to make a comparison study on oxidative and enzyme breakers properties. Degradation pattern observed from the break test showed that reduction in gel viscosity depends on time, temperature and breaker concentration. Observations from experiment also revealed that small

  5. Metabolic engineering of glycine betaine synthesis: plant betaine aldehyde dehydrogenases lacking typical transit peptides are targeted to tobacco chloroplasts where they confer betaine aldehyde resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinasabapathi, B; McCue, K F; Gage, D A; Hanson, A D

    1994-01-01

    Certain higher plants synthesize and accumulate glycine betaine, a compound with osmoprotectant properties. Biosynthesis of glycine betaine proceeds via the pathway choline-->betaine aldehyde-->glycine betaine. Plants such as tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) which do not accumulate glycine betaine lack the enzymes catalyzing both reactions. As a step towards engineering glycine betaine accumulation into a non-accumulator, spinach and sugar beet complementary-DNA sequences encoding the second enzyme of glycine-betaine synthesis (betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) were expressed in tobacco. Despite the absence of a typical transit peptide, BADH was targeted to the chloroplast in leaves of transgenic plants. Levels of extractable BADH were comparable to those in spinach and sugar beet, and the molecular weight, isoenzyme profile and Km for betaine aldehyde of the BADH enzymes from transgenic plants were the same as for native spinach or sugar beet BADH. Transgenic plants converted supplied betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine at high rates, demonstrating that they were able to transport betaine aldehyde across both the plasma membrane and the chloroplast envelope. The glycine betaine produced in this way was not further metabolized and reached concentrations similar to those in plants which accumulate glycine betaine naturally. Betaine aldehyde was toxic to non-transformed tobacco tissues whereas transgenic tissues were resistant due to detoxification of betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine. Betaine aldehyded ehydrogenase is therefore of interest as a potential selectable marker, as well as in the metabolic engineering of osmoprotectant biosynthesis.

  6. Structure and Mechanism of ORF36, an Amino Sugar Oxidizing Enzyme in Everninomicin Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vey, Jessica L.; Al-Mestarihi, Ahmad; Hu, Yunfeng; Funk, Michael A.; Bachmann, Brian O.; Iverson, T.M. (Vanderbilt)

    2010-12-07

    Everninomicin is a highly modified octasaccharide that belongs to the orthosomycin family of antibiotics and possesses potent Gram-positive antibiotic activity, including broad-spectrum efficacy against multidrug resistant enterococci and Staphylococcus aureus. Among its distinctive structural features is a nitro sugar, L-evernitrose, analogues of which decorate a variety of natural products. Recently, we identified a nitrososynthase enzyme encoded by orf36 from Micromonospora carbonacea var. africana that mediates the flavin-dependent double oxidation of synthetically generated thymidine diphosphate (TDP)-L-epi-vancosamine to the corresponding nitroso sugar. Herein, we utilize a five-enzyme in vitro pathway both to verify that ORF36 catalyzes oxidation of biogenic TDP-L-epi-vancosamine and to determine whether ORF36 exhibits catalytic competence for any of its biosynthetic progenitors, which are candidate substrates for nitrososynthases in vivo. Progenitors solely undergo single-oxidation reactions and terminate in the hydroxylamine oxidation state. Performing the in vitro reactions in the presence of {sup 18}O{sub 2} establishes that molecular oxygen, rather than oxygen from water, is incorporated into ORF36-generated intermediates and products and identifies an off-pathway product that correlates with the oxidation product of a progenitor substrate. The 3.15 {angstrom} resolution X-ray crystal structure of ORF36 reveals a tetrameric enzyme that shares a fold with acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and class D flavin-containing monooxygenases, including the nitrososynthase KijD3. However, ORF36 and KijD3 have unusually open active sites in comparison to these related enzymes. Taken together, these studies map substrate determinants and allow the proposal of a minimal monooxygenase mechanism for amino sugar oxidation by ORF36.

  7. Hydride transfer made easy in the oxidation of alcohols catalyzed by choline oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadda, G.; Orville, A.; Pennati, A.; Francis, K.; Quaye, O.; Yuan, H.; Rungsrisuriyachai, K.; Finnegan, S.; Mijatovic, S.; Nguyen, T.

    2008-06-08

    Choline oxidase (E.C. 1.1.3.17) catalyzes the two-step, four-electron oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as enzyme-associated intermediate and molecular oxygen as final electron acceptor (Scheme 1). The gem-diol, hydrated species of the aldehyde intermediate of the reaction acts as substrate for aldehyde oxidation, suggesting that the enzyme may use similar strategies for the oxidation of the alcohol substrate and aldehyde intermediate. The determination of the chemical mechanism for alcohol oxidation has emerged from biochemical, mechanistic, mutagenetic, and structural studies. As illustrated in the mechanism of Scheme 2, the alcohol substrate is initially activated in the active site of the enzyme by removal of the hydroxyl proton. The resulting alkoxide intermediate is then stabilized in the enzyme-substrate complex via electrostatic interactions with active site amino acid residues. Alcohol oxidation then occurs quantum mechanically via the transfer of the hydride ion from the activated substrate to the N(5) flavin locus. An essential requisite for this mechanism of alcohol oxidation is the high degree of preorganization of the activated enzyme-substrate complex, which is achieved through an internal equilibrium of the Michaelis complex occurring prior to, and independently from, the subsequent hydride transfer reaction. The experimental evidence that support the mechanism for alcohol oxidation shown in Scheme 2 is briefly summarized in the Results and Discussion section.

  8. Oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid by an enzyme preparation from Zea mays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, D. M.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Indole-3-acetic acid is oxidized to oxindole-3-acetic acid by Zea mays tissue extracts. Shoot, root, and endosperm tissues have enzyme activities of 1 to 10 picomoles per hour per milligram protein. The enzyme is heat labile, is soluble, and requires oxygen for activity. Cofactors of mixed function oxygenase, peroxidase, and intermolecular dioxygenase are not stimulatory to enzymic activity. A heat-stable, detergent-extractable component from corn enhances enzyme activity 6- to 10-fold. This is the first demonstration of the in vitro enzymic oxidation of indole-3-acetic acid to oxindole-3-acetic acid in higher plants.

  9. Enzymes involved in the glycidaldehyde (2,3-epoxy-propanal) oxidation step in the kinetic resolution of racemic glycidol (2,3-epoxy-1-propanol) by Acetobacter pasteurianus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandel, U; Machado, S S.; Jongejan, J A.; Duine, J A.

    2001-02-01

    It is already known that kinetic resolution of racemic glycidol (2,3-epoxy-1-propanol) takes place when Acetobacter pasteurianus oxidizes the compound to glycidic acid (2,3-epoxy-propionic acid) with glycidaldehyde (2,3-epoxy-propanal) proposed to be the transient seen in this conversion. Since inhibition affects the feasibility of a process based on this conversion in a negative sense, and the chemical reactivity of glycidaldehyde predicts that it could be the cause for the phenomena observed, it is important to know which enzyme(s) oxidise(s) this compound. To study this, rac.- as well as (R)-glycidaldehyde were prepared by chemical synthesis and analytical methods developed for their determination. It appears that purified quinohemoprotein alcohol dehydrogenase (QH-ADH type II), the enzyme responsible for the kinetic resolution of rac.-glycidol, also catalyses the oxidation of glycidaldehyde. In addition, a preparation exhibiting dye-linked aldehyde dehydrogenase activity for acetaldehyde, most probably originating from molybdohemoprotein aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), which has been described for other Acetic acid bacteria, oxidised glycidaldehyde as well with a preference for the (R)-enantiomer, the selectivity quantified by an enantiomeric ratio (E) value of 7. From a comparison of the apparent kinetic parameter values of QH-ADH and ALDH, it is concluded that ALDH is mainly responsible for the removal of glycidaldehyde in conversions of glycidol catalysed by A. pasteurianus cells. It is shown that the transient observed in rac.-glycidol conversion by whole cells, is indeed (R)-glycidaldehyde. Since both QH-ADH and ALDH are responsible for vinegar production from ethanol by Acetobacters, growth and induction conditions optimal for this process seem also suited to yield cells with high catalytic performance with respect to kinetic resolution of glycidol and prevention of formation of inhibitory concentrations glycidaldehyde.

  10. Endurance exercise induces mRNA expression of oxidative enzymes in human skeletal muscle late in recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leick, Lotte; Plomgaard, Peter S.; Grønløkke, L.

    2010-01-01

    exercise. To test the hypothesis that mRNA expression of many oxidative enzymes is up-regulated late in recovery (10-24 h) after exercise, male subjects (n=8) performed a 90-min cycling exercise (70% VO(2-max)), with muscle biopsies obtained before exercise (pre), and after 10, 18 and 24 h of recovery......-responsive oxidative enzymes is up-regulated in human skeletal muscle at 10-24 h of recovery, supporting that exercise-induced adaptations of these oxidative enzymes can be the result of the cumulative effects of transient changes in mRNA expression.......Exercise-induced adaptations in skeletal muscle oxidative enzymes are suggested to result from the cumulative effects of transient changes in gene expression after each single exercise session. However, for several oxidative enzymes, no changes in mRNA expression are detected up to 8 h after...

  11. Actinobacteria isolated from termite guts as a source of novel oxidative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roes-Hill, Marilize; Rohland, Jeffrey; Burton, Stephanie

    2011-11-01

    A multi-faceted screening programme was designed to search for the oxidases, laccase, peroxidase and tyrosinase. Actinobacteria were selectively isolated from the paunch and colon region of the hindguts of the higher termite, Amitermes hastatus. The isolates were subjected to solid media assays (dye decolourization, melanin production and the utilization of indulin AT as sole carbon source) and liquid media assays. Eleven of the 39 strains had the ability to decolourize the dye RBBR, an indicator for the production of peroxidases in actinobacteria. Melanin production on ISP6 and ISP7 agar plates served as a good indicator for laccase and/or tyrosinase production and the ability of the strains to grow in the presence of indulin AT as a sole carbon source served as a good indicator of lignin peroxidase and/or general peroxidase production. Enzyme-producing strains were cultivated in liquid media and extracellular enzyme activities measured. Strains with the ability to produce oxidative enzymes under the conditions tested were identified to genus level by 16S rRNA gene analysis and compared to known oxidase producers. A strong relationship was observed between the environment sampled (termite guts where lignocellulose degradation occurs) and the dominant type of oxidative enzyme activity detected (laccases and peroxidases), which suggests the possibility of future targeted screening protocols linking the physical properties of the target enzymes with specific operational conditions required, such as lignocellulosic degradation in the preparation of biofuel feedstocks.

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 suggests three distinct pathways of nitroglycerin biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzl, M Verena; Beretta, Matteo; Griesberger, Martina; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Gorren, Antonius C F

    2011-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying reduction of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO) by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), we generated mutants of the enzyme lacking the cysteines adjacent to reactive Cys302 (C301S and C303S), the glutamate that participates as a general base in aldehyde oxidation (E268Q) or combinations of these residues. The mutants were characterized regarding acetaldehyde dehydrogenation, GTN-triggered enzyme inactivation, GTN denitration, NO formation, and soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Lack of the cysteines did not affect dehydrogenase activity but impeded GTN denitration, aggravated GTN-induced enzyme inactivation, and increased NO formation. A triple mutant lacking the cysteines and Glu268 catalyzed sustained formation of superstoichiometric amounts of NO and exhibited slower rates of inactivation. These results suggest three alternative pathways for the reaction of ALDH2 with GTN, all involving formation of a thionitrate/sulfenyl nitrite intermediate at Cys302 as the initial step. In the first pathway, which predominates in the wild-type enzyme and reflects clearance-based GTN denitration, the thionitrate apparently reacts with one of the adjacent cysteine residues to yield nitrite and a protein disulfide. The predominant reaction catalyzed by the single and double cysteine mutants requires Glu268 and results in irreversible enzyme inactivation. Finally, combined lack of the cysteines and Glu268 shifts the reaction toward formation of the free NO radical, presumably through homolytic cleavage of the sulfenyl nitrite intermediate. Although the latter reaction accounts for less than 10% of total turnover of GTN metabolism catalyzed by wild-type ALDH2, it is most likely essential for vascular GTN bioactivation.

  13. Evaluation of the mitochondrial respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation system using polarography and spectrophotometric enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrientos, Antoni; Fontanesi, Flavia; Díaz, Francisca

    2009-10-01

    The oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system consists of five multimeric complexes embedded in the mitochondrial inner membrane. They work in concert to drive the aerobic synthesis of ATP. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations affecting the accumulation and function of these enzymes are the most common cause of mitochondrial diseases and have also been associated with neurodegeneration and aging. For this reason, several approaches for the assessment of the OXPHOS system enzymes have been developed. Based on the methods described elsewhere, the assays describe methods that form a biochemical characterization of the OXPHOS system in cells and mitochondria isolated from cultured cells or tissues.

  14. Screening of Enzyme Biomarker for Nanotoxicity of Zinc Oxide in OREOCHROMIS MOSSAMBICUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Periasamy; Bupesh, Giridharan

    2011-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the effects of Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) on fish models. Oreochromis mossambicus was orally administered with ZnO NPs (50-100 nm) once and its effects at five different concentrations (60 ppm-100 ppm) were observed for 12 days. Enzymatic assays were performed at every three days interval in the vital tissues of liver, gill, muscle and kidney. The defense enzymes, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and glutathione S transferase (GST) exerted a dose dependent elevation up to 6 days. This hike then declines in higher concentrations and extended duration. Whereas the tissue damaging enzymes, glutamate oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamate pyruvic transaminase (GPT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) as well as the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) exhibited a dose and duration dependent increase until the end of the experiment. Among these enzymes, the antioxidant enzymes response to ZnO NP toxicity on fish showed notable continuous induction. This study demonstrates that antioxidant enzymes responses in O. mossambicus could be used as a biomarker for the early detection of nanotoxicity.

  15. Chilling Stress Upregulates α-Linolenic Acid-Oxidation Pathway and Induces Volatiles of C6 and C9 Aldehydes in Mango Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivankalyani, Velu; Maoz, Itay; Feygenberg, Oleg; Maurer, Dalia; Alkan, Noam

    2017-01-25

    Mango-fruit storage period and shelf life are prolonged by cold storage. However, chilling temperature induces physiological and molecular changes, compromising fruit quality. In our previous transcriptomic study of mango fruit, cold storage at suboptimal temperature (5 °C) activated the α-linolenic acid metabolic pathway. To evaluate changes in fruit quality during chilling, we analyzed mango "Keitt" fruit peel volatiles. GC-MS analysis revealed significant modulations in fruit volatiles during storage at suboptimal temperature. Fewer changes were seen in response to the time of storage. The mango volatiles related to aroma, such as δ-3-carene, (Z)-β-ocimene, and terpinolene, were downregulated during the storage at suboptimal temperature. In contrast, C6 and C9 aldehydes and alcohols-α-linolenic acid derivatives 1-hexanal, (Z)-3-hexenal, (Z)-3-hexenol, (E)-2-hexenal, and nonanal-were elevated during suboptimal-temperature storage, before chilling-injury symptoms appeared. Detection of those molecules before chilling symptoms could lead to a new agro-technology to avoid chilling injuries and maintain fruit quality during cold storage at the lowest possible temperature.

  16. Enzyme catalyzed oxidative cross-linking of feruloylated pectic polysaccharides from sugar beet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abang Zaidel, Dayang Norulfairuz

    -linking and consequently the properties of the gels formed. The kinetics of oxidative gelation of SBP, taking place via enzyme catalyzed cross-linking of FA, was evaluated by small angle oscillatory measurements. The result indicates a significant difference between the SBP gels produced from the catalysis of HRP...... and laccase, that is, laccase catalysis produced stronger SBP gels albeit slower rates of gelation than the HRP catalysis. Statistically design experiment has been constructed to investigate the effect of several reaction factors which might influence the rates of gelation of SBP catalyzed by HRP or laccase......, particularly the pectin level, temperature, enzyme dosage, pH and, for HRP, the H2O2 concentration. The result reveals that these reaction factors could be tuned in order to adjust the enzyme catalyzed gelation and the properties of the gels produced. Moreover, positive correlation between the rates...

  17. N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA, Liver Function Enzymes, Renal Function Parameters and Oxidative Stress Parameters: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usunobun Usunomena

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to review a procarcinogen, the N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA, liver and kidney functional enzymes (in assessing action of toxicants such as NDMA as well as oxidative stress parameters (in assessing the extent of free radical damage and scavenging. Catalase and hydro peroxidase enzymes convert hydrogen peroxide and hydro peroxides to non-radical forms and functions as natural antioxidant in human body. Enzymes like Superoxide Dismutase (SOD and Catalase (CAT and compounds such as tocopherol and ascorbic acid can protect organisms against free radical damage. Lipid peroxidation is a mechanism generally recognized as being the most important in the pathogenesis of liver injury by a number of toxic compounds including NDMA.

  18. Thymosin beta 4 protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress by targeting anti-oxidative enzymes and anti-apoptotic genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is a ubiquitous protein with many properties relating to cell proliferation and differentiation that promotes wound healing and modulates inflammatory mediators. The mechanism by which Tβ4 modulates cardiac protection under oxidative stress is not known. The purpose of this study is to dissect the cardioprotective mechanism of Tβ4 on H(2O(2 induced cardiac damage. METHODS: Rat neonatal cardiomyocytes with or without Tβ4 pretreatment were exposed to H(2O(2 and expression of antioxidant, apoptotic, and anti-inflammatory genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and western blotting. ROS levels were estimated by DCF-DA using fluorescent microscopy and fluorimetry. Selected antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic genes were silenced by siRNA transfections in neonatal cardiomyocytes and effect of Tβ4 on H(2O(2-induced cardiac damage was evaluated. RESULTS: Pre-treatment of Tβ4 resulted in reduction of the intracellular ROS levels induced by H(2O(2 in cardiomyocytes. Tβ4 pretreatment also resulted in an increase in the expression of antiapoptotic proteins and reduction of Bax/BCl(2 ratio in the cardiomyocytes. Pretreatment with Tβ4 resulted in stimulating the expression of antioxidant enzymes copper/zinc SOD and catalase in cardiomyocytes at both transcription and translation levels. Tβ4 treatment resulted in the increased expression of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory genes. Silencing of Cu/Zn SOD and catalase gene resulted in apoptotic cell death in the cardiomyocytes which was prevented by treatment with Tβ4. CONCLUSION: This is the first report that demonstrates the effect of Tβ4 on cardiomyocytes and its capability to selectively upregulate anti-oxidative enzymes, anti-inflammatory genes, and antiapoptotic enzymes in the neonatal cardiomyocytes thus preventing cell death thereby protecting the myocardium. Tβ4 treatment resulted in decreased oxidative stress and inflammation in the

  19. Effects of a Brussels sprouts extract on oxidative DNA damage and metabolising enzymes in rat liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M; Jensen, B R; Poulsen, H E

    2001-01-01

    of administration of a Brussels sprouts extract on the expression at the mRNA level and/or catalytic activity in rat liver of three phase I enzymes [cytochrome P450-1A2 (CYP1A2),-2B1/2 (CYP2B1/2) and-2E1 (CYP2E1)] and two phase II enzyme [NADPH:quinone reductase (QR) and glutathione S-transferase pi 7 (GSTpi)], all...... previously suggested to be induced by vegetables. We also examined the activity and/or expression of several important antioxidant enzymes: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase and gamma-glutamyl-cysteine synthetase (GCS) and the activity of the repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). QR, GPx...... and catalase activity was also assessed in the kidneys. In order to examine a possible effect of the Brussels sprouts related to oxidative stress, we measured oxidative DNA damage in terms of 7-hydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and lipid peroxidation in terms of malondialdehyde (MDA) formation...

  20. Facet Energy versus Enzyme-like Activities: The Unexpected Protection of Palladium Nanocrystals against Oxidative Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Cuicui; Fang, Ge; Shen, Xiaomei; Chong, Yu; Wamer, Wayne G; Gao, Xingfa; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2016-11-22

    To develop nanomaterials as artificial enzymes, it is necessary to better understand how their physicochemical properties affect their enzyme-like activities. Although prior research has demonstrated that nanomaterials exhibit tunable enzyme-like activities depending on their size, structure, and composition, few studies have examined the effect of surface facets, which determine surface energy or surface reactivity. Here, we use electron spin-resonance spectroscopy to report that lower surface energy {111}-faceted Pd octahedrons have greater intrinsic antioxidant enzyme-like activity than higher surface energy {100}-faceted Pd nanocubes. Our in vitro experiments found that those same Pd octahedrons are more effective than Pd nanocubes at scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Those reductions in ROS preserve the homogeneity of mitochondrial membrane potential and attenuate damage to important biomolecules, thereby allowing a substantially higher number of cells to survive oxidative challenges. Our computations of molecular mechanisms for the antioxidant activities of {111}- and {100}-faceted Pd nanocrystals, as well as their activity order, agree well with experimental observations. These findings can guide the design of antioxidant-mimicking nanomaterials, which could have therapeutic or preventative potential against oxidative stress related diseases.

  1. An oxidative N-demethylase reveals PAS transition from ubiquitous sensor to enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortmayer, Mary; Lafite, Pierre; Menon, Binuraj R K; Tralau, Tewes; Fisher, Karl; Denkhaus, Lukas; Scrutton, Nigel S; Rigby, Stephen E J; Munro, Andrew W; Hay, Sam; Leys, David

    2016-11-24

    The universal Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domain functions as a signal transduction module involved in sensing diverse stimuli such as small molecules, light, redox state and gases. The highly evolvable PAS scaffold can bind a broad range of ligands, including haem, flavins and metal ions. However, although these ligands can support catalytic activity, to our knowledge no enzymatic PAS domain has been found. Here we report characterization of the first PAS enzyme: a haem-dependent oxidative N-demethylase. Unrelated to other amine oxidases, this enzyme contains haem, flavin mononucleotide, 2Fe-2S and tetrahydrofolic acid cofactors, and specifically catalyses the NADPH-dependent oxidation of dimethylamine. The structure of the α subunit reveals that it is a haem-binding PAS domain, similar in structure to PAS gas sensors. The dimethylamine substrate forms part of a highly polarized oxygen-binding site, and directly assists oxygen activation by acting as both an electron and proton donor. Our data reveal that the ubiquitous PAS domain can make the transition from sensor to enzyme, suggesting that the PAS scaffold can support the development of artificial enzymes.

  2. Immunological detection of enzymes for sulfate reduction in anaerobic methane-oxidizing consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milucka, Jana; Widdel, Friedrich; Shima, Seigo

    2013-05-01

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) at marine gas seeps is performed by archaeal-bacterial consortia that have so far not been cultivated in axenic binary or pure cultures. Knowledge about possible biochemical reactions in AOM consortia is based on metagenomic retrieval of genes related to those in archaeal methanogenesis and bacterial sulfate reduction, and identification of a few catabolic enzymes in protein extracts. Whereas the possible enzyme for methane activation (a variant of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, Mcr) was shown to be harboured by the archaea, enzymes for sulfate activation and reduction have not been localized so far. We adopted a novel approach of fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin (0.3-0.5 μm) cryosections to localize two enzymes of the SR pathway, adenylyl : sulfate transferase (Sat; ATP sulfurylase) and dissimilatory sulfite reductase (Dsr) in microbial consortia from Black Sea methane seeps. Both Sat and Dsr were exclusively found in an abundant microbial morphotype (c. 50% of all cells), which was tentatively identified as Desulfosarcina/Desulfococcus-related bacteria. These results show that ANME-2 archaea in the Black Sea AOM consortia did not express bacterial enzymes of the canonical sulfate reduction pathway and thus, in contrast to previous suggestions, most likely cannot perform canonical sulfate reduction. Moreover, our results show that fluorescent immunolabelling on semi-thin cryosections which to our knowledge has been so far only applied on cell tissues, is a powerful tool for intracellular protein detection in natural microbial associations.

  3. Electrocatalytic tuning of biosensing response through electrostatic or hydrophobic enzyme-graphene oxide interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista-Pires, Luis; Pérez-López, Briza; Mayorga-Martinez, Carmen C; Morales-Narváez, Eden; Domingo, Neus; Esplandiu, Maria Jose; Alzina, Francesc; Sotomayor-Torres, Clivia M; Merkoçi, Arben

    2014-11-15

    The effect of graphene oxidative grades upon the conductivity and hydrophobicity and consequently the influence on an enzymatic biosensing response is presented. The electrochemical responses of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been compared with the responses obtained from the oxide form (oGO) and their performances have been accordingly discussed with various evidences obtained by optical techniques. We used tyrosinase enzyme as a proof of concept receptor with interest for phenolic compounds detection through its direct adsorption onto a screen-printed carbon electrode previously modified with oGO or rGO with a carbon-oxygen ratio of 1.07 or 1.53 respectively. Different levels of oGO directly affect the (bio)conjugation properties of the biosensor due to changes at enzyme/graphene oxide interface coming from the various electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions with biomolecules. The developed biosensor was capable of reaching a limit of detection of 0.01 nM catechol. This tuning capability of the biosensor response can be of interest for building several other biosensors, including immunosensors and DNA sensors for various applications.

  4. Purification and characterization of laccase from Coriolopsis floccosa MTCC-1177 and its use in the selective oxidation of aromatic methyl group to aldehyde without mediators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Chaurasia; A Yadav; R S S Yadav; S Yadava

    2013-11-01

    A laccase from the culture filtrate of white rot fungus Coriolopsis floccosa MTCC-1177 has been purified to homogeneity. The method involved concentration of the culture filtrate by ammonium sulphate precipitation and an anion exchange chromatography on diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) cellulose. Sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (native-PAGE) produced single protein bands indicating that the enzyme preparation was pure. Molecular mass of the enzyme determined from SDS-PAGE analysis was 64 kDa. Using 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP), 2,2'-[Azino-bis-(3-ethylbonzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) diammonium salt and 4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxy benzaldehyde azine (syringaldazine) as the substrates, the m, cat and cat/m values of the laccase were found to be 112.5 M, 5.16 s-1, 4.60 × 104M-1 s-1, 58 M, 5.16 s-1, 8.90 × 104M-1 s-1 and 100 M, 5.16 s-1, 5.16 × 104M-1 s-1, respectively. The pH and temperature optima were 5.0°C and 40°C, respectively. Activation energy for thermal denaturation of the enzyme was 36.6 kJ/mol/K. The enzyme was most stable at pH4.0 when exposed for 1 h. The purified laccase has yellow colour and does not show absorption band around 610 nm found in blue laccases. The enzyme transforms toluene, 3-nitrotoluene and 4-chlorotoluene to benzaldehyde, 3-nitrobenzaldehyde and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde, respectively, in the absence of electron transfer mediators.

  5. Women have higher protein content of beta-oxidation enzymes in skeletal muscle than men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Maher

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that compared with men, women have better ultra-endurance capacity, oxidize more fat during endurance exercise, and are more resistant to fat oxidation defects i.e. diet-induced insulin resistance. Several groups have shown that the mRNA and protein transcribed and translated from genes related to transport of fatty acids into the muscle are greater in women than men; however, the mechanism(s for the observed sex differences in fat oxidation remains to be determined. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained from moderately active men (N=12 and women (N=11 at rest to examine mRNA and protein content of genes involved in lipid oxidation. Our results show that women have significantly higher protein content for tri-functional protein alpha (TFPalpha, very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD, and medium chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD (P<0.05. There was no significant sex difference in the expression of short-chain hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (SCHAD, or peroxisome proliferator activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha, or PPARgamma, genes potentially involved in the transcriptional regulation of lipid metabolism. In conclusion, women have more protein content of the major enzymes involved in long and medium chain fatty acid oxidation which could account for the observed differences in fat oxidation during exercise.

  6. Alcohol, Aldehydes, Adducts and Airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Muna; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-11-05

    Drinking alcohol and smoking cigarettes results in the formation of reactive aldehydes in the lung, which are capable of forming adducts with several proteins and DNA. Acetaldehyde and malondialdehyde are the major aldehydes generated in high levels in the lung of subjects with alcohol use disorder who smoke cigarettes. In addition to the above aldehydes, several other aldehydes like 4-hydroxynonenal, formaldehyde and acrolein are also detected in the lung due to exposure to toxic gases, vapors and chemicals. These aldehydes react with nucleophilic targets in cells such as DNA, lipids and proteins to form both stable and unstable adducts. This adduction may disturb cellular functions as well as damage proteins, nucleic acids and lipids. Among several adducts formed in the lung, malondialdehyde DNA (MDA-DNA) adduct and hybrid malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) protein adducts have been shown to initiate several pathological conditions in the lung. MDA-DNA adducts are pre-mutagenic in mammalian cells and induce frame shift and base-pair substitution mutations, whereas MAA protein adducts have been shown to induce inflammation and inhibit wound healing. This review provides an insight into different reactive aldehyde adducts and their role in the pathogenesis of lung disease.

  7. Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation of 17β-Estradiol Using Immobilized Laccase from Trametes versicolor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantale Cardinal-Watkins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many natural and synthetic estrogens are amenable to oxidation through the catalytic action of oxidative enzymes such as the fungal laccase Trametes versicolor. This study focused on characterizing the conversion of estradiol (E2 using laccase that had been immobilized by covalent bonding onto silica beads contained in a bench-scale continuous-flow packed bed reactor. Conversion of E2 accomplished in the reactor declined when the temperature of the system was changed from room temperature to just above freezing at pH 5 as a result of a reduced rate of reaction rather than inactivation of the enzyme. Similarly, conversion increased when the system was brought to warmer temperatures. E2 conversion increased when the pH of the influent to the immobilized laccase reactor was changed from pH 7 to pH 5, but longer-term experiments showed that the enzyme is more stable at pH 7. Results also showed that the immobilized laccase maintained its activity when treating a constant supply of aqueous E2 at a low mean residence time over a 12-hour period and when treating a constant supply of aqueous E2 at a high mean residence time over a period of 9 days.

  8. Degradation of 4-aminophenol by hydrogen peroxide oxidation using enzyme from Serratia marcescens as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Min; YAO Risheng; YOU Yahua; DENG Shengsong; GAO Wenxia

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the degradation of 4-aminophenol using hydrogen peroxide as oxidizer and the enzyme from Serratia marcescens AB 90027 as catalyst.The effecting factors during degradation and the degrading mechanism were studied.Also,the location of the enzyme in the cell,which could catalyze the degradation of 4-aminophenol,was analyzed.The results showed that to degrade 50 mL of 4-aminophenol whose concentration was 500 mg/L,the optimal conditions were:volume of H2O2=3 mL,temperature=40-60℃ and pH=9-10]In the degradation process,4-aminophenol was first converted to benzo quinone and NH3,then organic acids including maleic acid,fumaleic acid,and oxalic acid were formed,and then finally CO2 and H2O were generated as final products.The enzyme that could catalyze the degradation of 4-aminophenol was mainly extracellular enzyme.

  9. Oxidative stress and the antioxidant enzyme system in the developing brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So-Yeon Shim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Preterm infants are vulnerable to the oxidative stress due to the production of large amounts of free radicals, antioxidant system insufficiency, and immature oligodendroglial cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS play a pivotal role in the development of periventricular leukomalacia. The three most common ROS are superoxide (O2&#8226;-, hydroxyl radical (OH&#8226;, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Under normal physiological conditions, a balance is maintained between the production of ROS and the capacity of the antioxidant enzyme system. However, if this balance breaks down, ROS can exert toxic effects. Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase are considered the classical antioxidant enzymes. A recently discovered antioxidant enzyme family, peroxiredoxin (Prdx, is also an important scavenger of free radicals. Prdx1 expression is induced at birth, whereas Prdx2 is constitutively expressed, and Prdx6 expression is consistent with the classical antioxidant enzymes. Several antioxidant substances have been studied as potential therapeutic agents; however, further preclinical and clinical studies are required before allowing clinical application.

  10. Evaluation of gender-related differences in various oxidative stress enzymes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Ji, Li-Li; Liu, Tian-Yu; Wang, Zheng-Tao

    2011-12-31

    Oxidative stress caused by redundant free radical, lipid oxygen and peroxide usually results in the pathogenesis of various diseases, which can be alleviated by cellular antioxidant enzymes. According to statistics, there are different incidence rates of some diseases depending on the gender. The present study aimed to investigate potential gender-related differences of antioxidant enzymes in mice. The activities of glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in the kidney, brain, lung and heart of both male and female mice were determined. Our results showed that GPx and GCL activities were higher in female kidney and brain than those in male. On the other hand, the activities of SOD were higher in female brain and lung than those in male. Moreover, female kidney appeared to show higher activities of CAT than the male kidney. But the activities of GCL and GPx were higher in male heart than those in female. Taken together, our results demonstrate that there are gender-related differences in the activities of cellular antioxidant enzymes in various important organs in mice. Variations in such enzymes may be the explanation for some gender-related diseases.

  11. Fast and Green Microwave-Assisted Conversion of Essential Oil Allylbenzenes into the Corresponding Aldehydes via Alkene Isomerization and Subsequent Potassium Permanganate Promoted Oxidative Alkene Group Cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luu, Thi Xuan Thi; Lam, Trinh To; Le, Thach Ngoc;

    2009-01-01

    oxidation of the latter to the corresponding benzaldehyde by KMnO4/CuSO4 center dot 5H(2)O. The assistance by microwave irradiation results in very short reaction times (eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) into vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) has been carried...

  12. Inhibition effect of graphene oxide on the catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2015-11-01

    Variations in the enzyme activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in the presence of the nano-material, graphene oxide (GO), were investigated with the use of molecular spectroscopy UV-visible and fluorescence methods. From these studies, important kinetic parameters of the enzyme were extracted; these were the maximum reaction rate, Vm , and the Michaelis constant, Km . A comparison of these parameters indicated that GO inhibited the catalytic activity of the AChE because of the presence of the AChE-GO complex. The formation of this complex was confirmed with the use of fluorescence data, which was resolved with the use of the MCR-ALS chemometrics method. Furthermore, it was found that the resonance light-scattering (RLS) intensity of AChE changed in the presence of GO. On this basis, it was demonstrated that the relationship between AChE and GO was linear and such models were used for quantitative analyses of GO.

  13. A novel glutamine biosensor based on zinc oxide nanorod and glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albayrak, Dilruba; Karakuş, Emine

    2016-01-01

    A novel biosensor for determination of L-glutamine in pharmaceutical glutamine powder was developed via immobilizing our produced glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina onto our prepared zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod and chitosan. ZnO nanorods were prepared as surface-dependent and surface-independent and both were used. The biosensor is specific for L-glutamine and the peculiar analytical properties (linearity range, reproducibility, and accuracy) of it were experimentally determined. The optimum operating conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, and medium temperature effect on the response of biosensor were studied. Km and Vmax values for the our-producing glutaminase enzyme from Hypocria jecorina immobilized on the biosensor were also determined as 0.29 mM and 208.33 mV/min., respectively, from Lineweaver-Burk plot. The biosensor was then used for the determination of glutamine contained in pharmaceutical formulations.

  14. Cyclodextrin Aldehydes are Oxidase Mimics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Thomas Hauch; Bjerre, Jeannette; Bols, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    Cyclodextrins containing 6-aldehyde groups were found to catalyse oxidation of aminophenols in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The catalysis followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics and is related to the catalysis previously observed with cyclodextrin ketones. A range of different cyclodextrin...

  15. [Stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative enzymes in acute cooling and its catecholamine mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulinskiĭ, V I; Medvedev, A I; Kuntsevich, A K

    1986-01-01

    Acute cooling of rats led to stimulation of NAD+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and NAD(P)+-transhydrogenase (TH) but did not affect the NADP+-ICDH activity in liver, heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria. After pretreatment of the animals with propranolol the stimulating effect was decreased, thus suggesting that endogenous catecholamines and beta-adrenoreceptors are of importance in activation of NAD+-ICDH, SDH and TH. The effects of cooling, noradrenaline and cAMP did not summarize. Role of catecholamines in stimulation of mitochondrial oxidative enzymes under conditions of cooling is discussed.

  16. Fast and Green Microwave-Assisted Conversion of Essential Oil Allylbenzenes into the Corresponding Aldehydes via Alkene Isomerization and Subsequent Potassium Permanganate Promoted Oxidative Alkene Group Cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi X. Thi Luu

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential oil allylbenzenes from have been converted quickly and efficiently into the corresponding benzaldehydes in good yields by a two-step “green” reaction pathway based on a solventless alkene group isomerization by KF/Al2O3 to form the corresponding 1-arylpropene and a subsequent solventless oxidation of the latter to the corresponding benzaldehyde by KMnO4/CuSO4·5H2O. The assistance by microwave irradiation results in very short reaction times (<15 minutes. The green conversion of eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol into vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde has been carried out in a similar way, requiring however two additional microwave-assisted synthetic steps for acetylation of the hydroxy group prior to the oxidation reaction, and for the final deacetylation of vanillin acetate (4-acetoxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde by KF/Al2O3 under solvent-free conditions, respectively.

  17. Fast and green microwave-assisted conversion of essential oil allylbenzenes into the corresponding aldehydes via alkene isomerization and subsequent potassium permanganate promoted oxidative alkene group cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Thi X Thi; Lam, Trinh To; Le, Thach Ngoc; Duus, Fritz

    2009-09-03

    Essential oil allylbenzenes from have been converted quickly and efficiently into the corresponding benzaldehydes in good yields by a two-step "green" reaction pathway based on a solventless alkene group isomerization by KF/Al(2)O(3) to form the corresponding 1-arylpropene and a subsequent solventless oxidation of the latter to the corresponding benzaldehyde by KMnO(4)/CuSO(4).5H(2)O. The assistance by microwave irradiation results in very short reaction times (<15 minutes). The green conversion of eugenol (4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol) into vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) has been carried out in a similar way, requiring however two additional microwave-assisted synthetic steps for acetylation of the hydroxy group prior to the oxidation reaction, and for the final deacetylation of vanillin acetate (4-acetoxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) by KF/Al(2)O(3) under solvent-free conditions, respectively.

  18. PPRODUCTION OF AROMATIC ALDEHYDE BY MICROWAVE CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF A LIGNIN MODEL COMPOUND WITH La-CONTAINING SBA-15/H2O2 SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Gu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A convenient and efficient application of heterogeneous La-containing SBA-15 systems for the microwave assisted oxidation of a lignin model phenolic monomer, 4-hydroxy-1-phenylpropane, is reported. Low-cost and environmentally friendly H2O2 was used as the oxygen atom donor. The catalyst was prepared by immobilizing lanthanum species on the periodic mesoporous channels of siliceous SBA-15. Powder X-ray diffraction data and ICP-AES revealed that the host retains its hexagonal mesoporous structure after immobilization and most of the lanthanum species are better dispersed in the calcined materials. The surface area and pore size of La/SBA-15 was considerably decreased, indicating the intrapore confinement of the Lanthanum species. The activity of the La/SBA-15 was investigated in the oxidation of 4-hydroxy-1-phenylpropane in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. 70.5% conversion of 4-hydroxy-1-phenylpropane was obtained after 30 min of reaction under 200W microwave irradiation, compared to a poor 28.1% degradation after 24h under conventional heating. The possibility of recycling the catalyst was studied.

  19. Glutathione, glutathione-related enzymes, and oxidative stress in individuals with subacute occupational exposure to lead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrakowski, Michał; Pawlas, Natalia; Hudziec, Edyta; Kozłowska, Agnieszka; Mikołajczyk, Agnieszka; Birkner, Ewa; Kasperczyk, Sławomir

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of subacute exposure to lead on the glutathione-related antioxidant defense and oxidative stress parameters in 36 males occupationally exposed to lead for 40±3.2days. Blood lead level in the examined population increased significantly by 359% due to lead exposure. Simultaneously, erythrocyte glutathione level decreased by 16%, whereas the activity of glutathione-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in erythrocytes and leukocytes decreased by 28% and 10%, respectively. Similarly, the activity of glutathione-S-transferase in erythrocytes decreased by 45%. However, the activity of glutathione reductase in erythrocytes and leukocytes increased by 26% and 6%, respectively, whereas the total oxidant status value in leukocytes increased by 37%. Subacute exposure to lead results in glutathione pool depletion and accumulation of lipid peroxidation products; however, it does not cause DNA damage. Besides, subacute exposure to lead modifies the activity of glutathione-related enzymes.

  20. Covalent Immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase on Aldehyde-Functionalized Magnetic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chun Chi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the synthesis and use of surface-modified iron oxide nanoparticles for the covalent immobilization of Bacillus licheniformis γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (BlGGT. Magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by an alkaline solution of divalent and trivalent iron ions, and they were subsequently treated with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APES to obtain the aminosilane-coated nanoparticles. The functional group on the particle surface and the amino group of BlGGT was then cross-linked using glutaraldehyde as the coupling reagent. The loading capacity of the prepared nanoparticles for BlGGT was 34.2 mg/g support, corresponding to 52.4% recovery of the initial activity. Monographs of transmission electron microscopy revealed that the synthesized nanoparticles had a mean diameter of 15.1 ± 3.7 nm, and the covalent cross-linking of the enzyme did not significantly change their particle size. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the immobilization of BlGGT on the magnetic nanoparticles. The chemical and kinetic behaviors of immobilized BlGGT are mostly consistent with those of the free enzyme. The immobilized enzyme could be recycled ten times with 36.2% retention of the initial activity and had a comparable stability respective to free enzyme during the storage period of 30 days. Collectively, the straightforward synthesis of aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles and the efficiency of enzyme immobilization offer wide perspectives for the practical use of surface-bound BlGGT.

  1. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Daishi; Nishida, Yoichiro; Nishina, Tomoko; Mogushi, Kaoru; Tajiri, Mio; Ishibashi, Satoru; Ajioka, Itsuki; Ishikawa, Kinya; Mizusawa, Hidehiro; Murayama, Shigeo; Yokota, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD) model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/-) mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3); Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD.

  2. Enhanced Phospholipase A2 Group 3 Expression by Oxidative Stress Decreases the Insulin-Degrading Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daishi Yui

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases and oxidative damage in specific regions of the brain is associated with selective neurodegeneration. We previously reported that Alzheimer disease (AD model mice showed decreased insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE levels in the cerebrum and accelerated phenotypic features of AD when crossbred with alpha-tocopherol transfer protein knockout (Ttpa-/- mice. To further investigate the role of chronic oxidative stress in AD pathophysiology, we performed DNA microarray analysis using young and aged wild-type mice and aged Ttpa-/- mice. Among the genes whose expression changed dramatically was Phospholipase A2 group 3 (Pla2g3; Pla2g3 was identified because of its expression profile of cerebral specific up-regulation by chronic oxidative stress in silico and in aged Ttpa-/- mice. Immunohistochemical studies also demonstrated that human astrocytic Pla2g3 expression was significantly increased in human AD brains compared with control brains. Moreover, transfection of HEK293 cells with human Pla2g3 decreased endogenous IDE expression in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings show a key role of Pla2g3 on the reduction of IDE, and suggest that cerebrum specific increase of Pla2g3 is involved in the initiation and/or progression of AD.

  3. Expression profile of oxidative and antioxidative stress enzymes based on ESTs approach of citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antonio Peroni

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants not only evolve but also reduce oxygen in photosynthesis. An inevitable consequence of this normal process is the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Plants are adequately protected by the presence of multiple antioxidative enzymes in the cytosol and also in the different cell organelles such as chloroplasts, mitochondria, and peroxisomes. Traditionally, ROS were considered to be only a toxic byproduct of aerobic metabolism. However, recently it has become apparent that plants actively produce these molecules which may control many different physiological processes such as abiotic and biotic stress response, pathogen defense and systemic signaling. The search results using the Citrus Genome Program in Brazil (CitEST for oxidative stress and the antioxidant enzyme system in Citrus Sinensis variety ‘Pera IAC’ indicated that the multiple ROS-scavenging enzymes were expressed throughout all citrus tissues. The analyses demonstrated the ubiquitous expression of metallothioneins, probably indicating a constitutive expression pattern. Oxalate oxidase has been identified as the most abundant expressed gene in developing fruits, which suggests a specific function in the ripening of citrus fruit. Moreover, infected leaves with Xylella fastidiosa and Leprosis citri showed a massive change in their ROS gene expression profile which may indicate that the suppression of ROS detoxifying mechanisms may be involved in the induction of the diseases.

  4. Nitric oxide mitigates salt stress by regulating levels of osmolytes and antioxidant enzymes in chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaiz eAhmad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to evaluate whether external application of nitric oxide (NO in the form of its donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP could mitigate the deleterious effects of NaCl stress on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. plants. SNAP (50 μM was applied to chickpea plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions (50 and 100 mM NaCl. Salt stress negatively affected growth and biomass yield, leaf relative water content (LRWC and chlorophyll content of chickpea plants. High salinity increased electrolyte leakage, carotenoid content and the levels of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, soluble proteins and soluble sugars, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA, as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, ascorbate peroxidase (APX, and glutathione reductase (GR in chickpea plants. Expression of the representative SOD, CAT and APX genes examined was also up-regulated in chickpea plants by salt stress. On the other hand, exogenous application of NO to salinized plants enhanced the growth parameters, LRWC, photosynthetic pigment production and levels of osmolytes, as well as the activities of examined antioxidant enzymes which is correlated with up-regulation of the examined SOD, CAT and APX genes, in comparison with plants treated with NaCl only. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 and MDA contents showed decline in salt-stressed plants supplemented with NO as compared with those in NaCl-treated plants alone. Thus, the exogenous application of NO protected chickpea plants against salt-induced oxidative damage by enhancing the biosynthesis of antioxidant enzymes, thereby improving plant growth under saline stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NO has capability to mitigate the adverse effects of high salinity on chickpea plants by improving LRWC, photosynthetic pigment biosyntheses, osmolyte accumulation and antioxidative defense system.

  5. Nitric Oxide Mitigates Salt Stress by Regulating Levels of Osmolytes and Antioxidant Enzymes in Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A.; Hashem, Abeer; Abd_Allah, Elsayed F.; Gucel, Salih; Tran, Lam-Son P.

    2016-01-01

    This work was designed to evaluate whether external application of nitric oxide (NO) in the form of its donor S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP) could mitigate the deleterious effects of NaCl stress on chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) plants. SNAP (50 μM) was applied to chickpea plants grown under non-saline and saline conditions (50 and 100 mM NaCl). Salt stress inhibited growth and biomass yield, leaf relative water content (LRWC) and chlorophyll content of chickpea plants. High salinity increased electrolyte leakage, carotenoid content and the levels of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine, soluble proteins and soluble sugars), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA), as well as the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase in chickpea plants. Expression of the representative SOD, CAT and APX genes examined was also up-regulated in chickpea plants by salt stress. On the other hand, exogenous application of NO to salinized plants enhanced the growth parameters, LRWC, photosynthetic pigment production and levels of osmolytes, as well as the activities of examined antioxidant enzymes which is correlated with up-regulation of the examined SOD, CAT and APX genes, in comparison with plants treated with NaCl only. Furthermore, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 and MDA contents showed decline in salt-stressed plants supplemented with NO as compared with those in NaCl-treated plants alone. Thus, the exogenous application of NO protected chickpea plants against salt stress-induced oxidative damage by enhancing the biosyntheses of antioxidant enzymes, thereby improving plant growth under saline stress. Taken together, our results demonstrate that NO has capability to mitigate the adverse effects of high salinity on chickpea plants by improving LRWC, photosynthetic pigment biosyntheses, osmolyte accumulation and antioxidative defense system. PMID:27066020

  6. Oxidative stress related enzymes in response to chromium (Ⅵ) toxicity in Oxya chinensis ( Orthoptera : Acridoidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-jun; ZHANG Feng; LIU Xue-mei; GUO Ya-ping; MA En-bo

    2005-01-01

    The toxic effects of Cr(Ⅵ) on antioxidant enzymes of Oxya chinensis(Orthoptera: Acridoidae) were determined. Changes in the activities of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase(SOD), catalase(CAT), and guaiacol peroxidase(GPx) were measured in O. chinensis insects injected with Cr(Ⅵ). Fifth-nymphs of O. chinensis insects were injected with Cr(Ⅵ) with different concentrations (0, 75, 150, 225, 300, 375, 450 mg/kg of body weight). The results showed that Cr(Ⅵ) led to the change of SOD, CAT, and GPx activities at different concentrations, which revealed that: (1) The oxidative stress of SOD increased with the increase of Cr (Ⅵ)concentration. (2) With the increase of Cr (Ⅵ) concentrations, CAT activities for females increased at lower concentrations, but decreased at higher concentration range, which indicated that antioxidant system of O. chinensis was not influenced by the presence of Cr (Ⅵ). A very similar response to Cr(Ⅵ) effect for males indicated that Cr(Ⅵ) concentrations were not high enough to damage O. chinensis in terms of CAT. (3) The GPx activity for females increased in all treatments, which revealed that the damage power of Cr(Ⅵ)was increased with the increase of Cr(Ⅵ) concentrations in terms of GPx, but the effect was not so remarkable. There was not a consistent trend of GPx activities for males in all treatments of Cr(Ⅵ). Cr(Ⅵ)-induced changes in antioxidant enzymes were different for SOD, CAT and GPx, of which the tendency was that activities generally changed with increase of concentrations of Cr(Ⅵ) suggesting SOD, CAT, and GPx could serve as indices of oxidative stress to some extent.

  7. Direct preparation of copper organometallics bearing an aldehyde function via an iodine-copper exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoyin; Knochel, Paul

    2006-06-21

    The iodine-copper exchange reaction allows the direct preparation of various aryl, heteroaryl and alkenyl cuprates bearing a formyl group, thus allowing a direct synthesis of polyfunctional aldehydes without the need of protecting groups or an additional oxidation step.

  8. Roles of antioxidant enzymes in corpus luteum rescue from reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gubory, Kaïs H; Garrel, Catherine; Faure, Patrice; Sugino, Norihiro

    2012-12-01

    Progesterone produced by the corpus luteum (CL) regulates the synthesis of various endometrial proteins required for embryonic implantation and development. Compromised CL progesterone production is a potential risk factor for prenatal development. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play diverse roles in mammalian reproductive biology. ROS-induced oxidative damage and subsequent adverse developmental outcomes constitute important issues in reproductive medicine. The CL is considered to be highly exposed to locally produced ROS due to its high blood vasculature and steroidogenic activity. ROS-induced apoptotic cell death is involved in the mechanisms of CL regression that occurs at the end of the non-fertile cycle. Luteal ROS production and propagation depend upon several regulating factors, including luteal antioxidants, steroid hormones and cytokines, and their crosstalk. However, it is unknown which of these factors have the greatest contribution to the maintenance of CL integrity and function during the oestrous/menstrual cycle. There is evidence to suggest that antioxidants play important roles in CL rescue from luteolysis when pregnancy ensues. As luteal phase defect impacts fertility by preventing implantation and early conceptus development in livestock and humans, this review attempts to address the importance of ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzymes in the control of mammalian CL function and integrity. The corpus luteum (CL) is a transient endocrine organ that develops after ovulation from the ovulated follicle during each reproductive cycle. The main function of the CL is the production and secretion of progesterone which is necessary for embryonic implantation and development. Compromised CL progesterone production is a potential risk factor for prenatal development and pregnancy outcomes. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are natural by-products of cellular respiration and metabolism, play diverse roles in mammalian reproductive biology. ROS

  9. The key nickel enzyme of methanogenesis catalyses the anaerobic oxidation of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Silvan; Goenrich, Meike; Boecher, Reinhard; Thauer, Rudolf K; Jaun, Bernhard

    2010-06-03

    Large amounts (estimates range from 70 Tg per year to 300 Tg per year) of the potent greenhouse gas methane are oxidized to carbon dioxide in marine sediments by communities of methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria, and thus are prevented from escaping into the atmosphere. Indirect evidence indicates that the anaerobic oxidation of methane might proceed as the reverse of archaeal methanogenesis from carbon dioxide with the nickel-containing methyl-coenzyme M reductase (MCR) as the methane-activating enzyme. However, experiments showing that MCR can catalyse the endergonic back reaction have been lacking. Here we report that purified MCR from Methanothermobacter marburgensis converts methane into methyl-coenzyme M under equilibrium conditions with apparent V(max) (maximum rate) and K(m) (Michaelis constant) values consistent with the observed in vivo kinetics of the anaerobic oxidation of methane with sulphate. This result supports the hypothesis of 'reverse methanogenesis' and is paramount to understanding the still-unknown mechanism of the last step of methanogenesis. The ability of MCR to cleave the particularly strong C-H bond of methane without the involvement of highly reactive oxygen-derived intermediates is directly relevant to catalytic C-H activation, currently an area of great interest in chemistry.

  10. Novel insights into the fungal oxidation of monoaromatic and biarylic environmental pollutants by characterization of two new ring cleavage enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Rabea; Lippmann, Ramona; Hammer, Elke; Gesell Salazar, Manuela; Schauer, Frieder

    2013-06-01

    The phenol-degrading yeast Trichosporon mucoides can oxidize and detoxify biarylic environmental pollutants such as dibenzofuran, diphenyl ether and biphenyl by ring cleavage. The degradation pathways are well investigated, but the enzymes involved are not. The high similarity of hydroxylated biphenyl derivatives and phenol raised the question if the enzymes of the phenol degradation are involved in ring cleavage or whether specific enzymes are necessary. Purification of enzymes from T. mucoides with catechol cleavage activity demonstrated the existence of three different enzymes: a classical catechol-1,2-dioxygenase (CDO), not able to cleave the aromatic ring system of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl, and two novel enzymes with a high affinity towards 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl. The comparison of the biochemical characteristics and mass spectrometric sequence data of these three enzymes demonstrated that they have different substrate specificities. CDO catalyzes the ortho-cleavage of dihydroxylated monoaromatic compounds, while the two novel enzymes carry out a similar reaction on biphenyl derivatives. The ring fission of 3,4-dihydroxybiphenyl by the purified enzymes results in the formation of (5-oxo-3-phenyl-2,5-dihydrofuran-2-yl)acetic acid. These results suggest that the ring cleavage enzymes catalyzing phenol degradation are not involved in the ring cleavage of biarylic compounds by this yeast, although some intermediates of the phenol metabolism may function as inducers.

  11. Metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide by cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahashi, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Yuuki; Usami, Atsushi; Rangsunvigit, Pramoch; Malakul, Pomthong; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide was investigated using human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 (P450 or CYP) enzymes for the first time. Both isomers of rose oxide were incubated with human liver microsomes, and the formation of the respective 9-oxidized metabolite were determined using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Of 11 different recombinant human P450 enzymes used, CYP2B6 and CYP2C19 were the primary enzymes catalysing the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide. CYP1A2 also efficiently oxidized (-)-cis-rose oxide at the 9-position but not (-)-trans-rose oxide. α-Naphthoflavone (a selective CYP1A2 inhibitor), thioTEPA (a CYP2B6 inhibitor) and anti-CYP2B6 antibody inhibited (-)-cis-rose oxide 9-hydroxylation catalysed by human liver microsomes. On the other hand, the metabolism of (-)-trans-rose oxide was suppressed by thioTEPA and anti-CYP2B6 at a significant level in human liver microsomes. However, omeprazole (a CYP2C19 inhibitor) had no significant effects on the metabolism of both isomers of rose oxide. Using microsomal preparations from nine different human liver samples, (-)-9-hydroxy-cis- and (-)-9-hydroxy-trans-rose oxide formations correlated with (S)-mephenytoin N-demethylase activity (CYP2B6 marker activity). These results suggest that CYP2B6 plays important roles in the metabolism of (-)-cis- and (-)-trans-rose oxide in human liver microsomes.

  12. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase prevents ROS-induced vascular contraction in angiotensin-II hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyehun; Tostes, Rita C; Webb, R Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is an enzyme that detoxifies aldehydes to carboxylic acids. ALDH2 deficiency is known to increase oxidative stress, which is the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and antioxidant defense activity. Increased ROS contribute to vascular dysfunction and structural remodeling in hypertension. We hypothesized that ALDH2 plays a protective role to reduce vascular contraction in angiotensin-II (AngII) hypertensive mice. Endothelium-denuded aortic rings from C57BL6 mice, treated with AngII (3.6 μg/kg/min, 14 days), were used to measure isometric force development. Rings treated with daidzin (10 μmol/L), an ALDH2 inhibitor, potentiated contractile responses to phenylephrine (PE) in AngII mice. Tempol (1 mmol/L) and catalase (600 U/mL) attenuated the augmented contractile effect of daidzin. In normotensive mice, contraction to PE in the presence of the daidzin was not different from control, untreated values. AngII aortic rings transfected with ALDH2 recombinant protein decreased contractile responses to PE compared with control. These data suggest that ALDH2 reduces vascular contraction in AngII hypertensive mice. Because tempol and catalase blocked the contractile response of the ALDH2 inhibitor, ROS generation by AngII may be decreased by ALDH2, thereby preventing ROS-induced contraction.

  13. Aldehydic acids in frying oils: formation, toxicological significance and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Aldehydic acids are generated in oxidized lipids as a result of decomposition of hydroperoxides by (β-scission reactions. Aldehydes are known to interact with proteins and DNA and to impair enzymatic functions. Aldehydic esters from oxidized lipids were reabsorbed to a significant extent in rats. This paper reviews the mechanism of formation of esterified aldehydic acids in frying oils and their physiological/toxicological effects. The paper also gives an overview of relevant basic analytical techniques that needs to be improved to establish reliable quantitative method (s.

    Ácidos aldehídicos son producidos en lípidos oxidados como resultado de la descomposición de hidroperóxidos por reacciones de (β-escición. Es conocido que los aldehídos interaccionan con las proteínas y el ADN y debilitan las funciones enzimáticas. Los esteres aldehídicos de lípidos oxidados fueron reabsorbidos en una cantidad significativa en ratas. Este artículo revisa los mecanismos de formación de ácidos aldehídicos esterificados en aceites de fritura y sus efectos fisiológicos/toxicológicos. El artículo también ofrece una visión de conjunto de las técnicas analíticas básicas que necesitan ser mejoradas para establecer métodos cuantitativos fiables.

  14. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  15. Expressional studies of the aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene during myogenic differentiation in C2C12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamli, Majid Rasool; Kim, Jihoe; Pokharel, Smritee; Jan, Arif Tasleem [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Eun Ju [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bovine Genome Resources Bank, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Inho, E-mail: inhochoi@ynu.ac.kr [School of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of); Bovine Genome Resources Bank, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • AOX1 contributes to the formation of myotube. • Silencing of AOX1 reduces myotube formation. • AOX1 regulates MyoG gene expression. • AOX1 contributes to myogenesis via H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Abstract: Aldehyde oxidases (AOXs), which catalyze the hydroxylation of heterocycles and oxidation of a wide variety of aldehydic compounds, have been present throughout evolution from bacteria to humans. While humans have only a single functional aldehyde oxidase (AOX1) gene, rodents are endowed with four AOXs; AOX1 and three aldehyde oxidase homologs (AOH1, AOH2 and AOH3). In continuation of our previous study conducted to identify genes differentially expressed during myogenesis using a microarray approach, we investigated AOX1 with respect to its role in myogenesis to conceptualize how it is regulated in C2C12 cells. The results obtained were validated by silencing of the AOX1 gene. Analysis of their fusion index revealed that formation of myotubes showed a marked reduction of up to 40% in AOX1{sub kd} cells. Expression of myogenin (MYOG), one of the marker genes used to study myogenesis, was also found to be reduced in AOX1{sub kd} cells. AOX1 is an enzyme of pharmacological and toxicological importance that metabolizes numerous xenobiotics to their respective carboxylic acids. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) produced as a by-product in this reaction is considered to be involved as a part of the signaling mechanism during differentiation. An observed reduction in the level of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} among AOX1{sub kd} cells confirmed production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the reaction catalyzed by AOX1. Taken together, these findings suggest that AOX1 acts as a contributor to the process of myogenesis by influencing the level of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  16. Morphological characteristics, oxidative stability and enzymic hydrolysis of amylose-fatty acid complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinopoulou, Anna; Papastergiadis, Efthimios; Raphaelides, Stylianos N; Kontominas, Michael G

    2016-05-05

    Complexes of amylose with fatty acids varying in carbon chain length and degree of unsaturation were prepared at 30, 50 or 70°C by dissolving amylose in 0.1N KOH and mixing with fatty acid potassium soap solution. The complexes were obtained in solid form as precipitates after neutralization. SEM microscopy revealed that the morphology of the complexes was that of ordered lamellae separated from amorphous regions whereas confocal laser scanning microscopy showed images of the topography of the guest molecules in the complex matrix. FTIR spectroscopy revealed that the absorption peak attributed to carbonyl group of free fatty acid was shifted when the fatty acid was in the form of amylose complex. Thermo-gravimetry showed that the unsaturated fatty acids were effectively protected from oxidation when they were complexed with amylose whereas enzymic hydrolysis experiments showed that the guest molecules were quantitatively released from the amylose complexes.

  17. Oxidative stress enzyme and histopathological lesions in Colossoma macropomum (pisces, ariidae) for environmental impact assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Ticianne de Sousa de Oliveira Mota; Sousa, Debora Batista Pinheiro; Dantas, Janaina Gomes; Castro, Jonatas da Silva; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2015-12-01

    This study used oxidative stress enzyme (Glutathione S-Transferase and Catalase), histopathological lesions (Branchial lesions) and biometric data in the freshwater fish tambaqui, Colossoma macropomum, to assess environmental impacts in an Environmental Protection Area at São Luis, Brazil. Fish were sampled from two locations (A1 = contaminated area and A2 = reference site) within the protected area on four occasions. The activity of catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in C. macropomum was compared with biometric data and histopathological lesions. Results have shown that biometric data decreased significantly in fish (p<0.05) at the contaminated site. The activity of CAT was higher in fish specifically caught in A1. A significant difference was observed in the GST activity in the liver of C. macropomum when comparing fish from the contaminated site and those from the reference site (p<0.05).

  18. Oxidative stress in cancer and fibrosis: Opportunity for therapeutic intervention with antioxidant compounds, enzymes, and nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingga Morry

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress, mainly contributed by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has been implicated in pathogenesis of several diseases. We review two primary examples; fibrosis and cancer. In fibrosis, ROS promote activation and proliferation of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts, activating TGF-β pathway in an autocrine manner. In cancer, ROS account for its genomic instability, resistance to apoptosis, proliferation, and angiogenesis. Importantly, ROS trigger cancer cell invasion through invadopodia formation as well as extravasation into a distant metastasis site. Use of antioxidant supplements, enzymes, and inhibitors for ROS-generating NADPH oxidases (NOX is a logical therapeutic intervention for fibrosis and cancer. We review such attempts, progress, and challenges. Lastly, we review how nanoparticles with inherent antioxidant activity can also be a promising therapeutic option, considering their additional feature as a delivery platform for drugs, genes, and imaging agents.

  19. Unravelling the Interactions between Hydrolytic and Oxidative Enzymes in Degradation of Lignocellulosic Biomass by Sporothrix carnis under Various Fermentation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olusola A. Ogunyewo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism underlying the action of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass remains unclear; hence, it is crucial to investigate enzymatic interactions involved in the process. In this study, degradation of corn cob by Sporothrix carnis and involvement of lignocellulolytic enzymes in biodegradation were investigated over 240 h cultivation period. About 60% degradation of corn cob was achieved by S. carnis at the end of fermentation. The yields of hydrolytic enzymes, cellulase and xylanase, were higher than oxidative enzymes, laccase and peroxidase, over 144 h fermentation period. Maximum yields of cellulase (854.4 U/mg and xylanase (789.6 U/mg were at 96 and 144 h, respectively. Laccase and peroxidase were produced cooperatively with maximum yields of 489.06 U/mg and 585.39 U/mg at 144 h. Drastic decline in production of cellulase at 144 h (242.01 U/mg and xylanase at 192 h (192.2 U/mg indicates that they play initial roles in biodegradation of lignocellulosic biomass while laccase and peroxidase play later roles. Optimal degradation of corn cob (76.6% and production of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes were achieved with 2.5% inoculum at pH 6.0. Results suggest synergy in interactions between the hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes which can be optimized for improved biodegradation.

  20. A highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for catechol using conducting polymer reduced graphene oxide-metal oxide enzyme modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethuraman, V; Muthuraja, P; Anandha Raj, J; Manisankar, P

    2016-10-15

    The fabrication, characterization and analytical performances were investigated for a catechol biosensor, based on the PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO composite modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. The graphene oxide (GO) doped conducting polymer poly (3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was prepared through electrochemical polymerization by potential cycling. Reduction of PEDOT-GO was carried out by amperometric method. Fe2O3 nanoparticles were synthesized in ethanol by hydrothermal method. The mixture of Fe2O3, PPO and glutaraldehyde was casted on the PEDOT-rGO electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrodes was studied by FE-SEM and AFM. Cyclic voltammetric studies of catechol on the enzyme modified electrode revealed higher reduction peak current. Determination of catechol was carried out successfully by Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV) technique. The fabricated biosensor investigated shows a maximum current response at pH 6.5. The catechol biosensor exhibited wide sensing linear range from 4×10(-8) to 6.20×10(-5)M, lower detection limit of 7×10(-9)M, current maxima (Imax) of 92.55µA and Michaelis-Menten (Km) constant of 30.48µM. The activation energy (Ea) of enzyme electrode is 35.93KJmol(-1) at 50°C. There is no interference from d-glucose and l-glutamic acid, ascorbic acid and o-nitrophenol. The PEDOT-rGO-Fe2O3-PPO biosensor was stable for at least 75 days when stored in a buffer at about 4°C.

  1. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 3 (FGE.10Rev3): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 63 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, including additional two substances in this Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission R...

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2 (FGE.10Rev2): Aliphatic primary and secondary saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acetals, carboxylic acids and esters containing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 61 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 10, Revision 2, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the sub...

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Material, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 1: Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev2 (2011)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 16 substances, the information is adequate....

  4. Insulin, catecholamines, glucose and antioxidant enzymes in oxidative damage during different loads in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koska, J; Blazícek, P; Marko, M; Grna, J D; Kvetnanský, R; Vigas, M

    2000-01-01

    Exercise, insulin-induced hypoglycemia and oral glucose loads (50 g and 100 g) were used to compare the production of malondialdehyde and the activity of antioxidant enzymes in healthy subjects. Twenty male volunteers participated in the study. Exercise consisted of three consecutive work loads on a bicycle ergometer of graded intensity (1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 W/kg, 6 min each). Hypoglycemia was induced by insulin (Actrapid MC Novo, 0.1 IU/kg, i.v.). Oral administration of 50 g and 100 g of glucose was given to elevate plasma glucose. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) was determined in red blood cells, whereas glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was measured in whole blood. The concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) was determined by HPLC, catecholamines were assessed radioenzymatically and glucose was measured by the glucose-oxidase method. Exercise increased MDA concentrations, GSH-Px and SOD activities as well as plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline levels. Insulin hypoglycemia increased plasma adrenaline levels, but the concentrations of MDA and the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were decreased. Hyperglycemia increased plasma MDA concentrations, but the activities of GSH-Px and SOD were significantly higher after a larger dose of glucose only. Plasma catecholamines were unchanged. These results indicate that the transient increase of plasma catecholamine and insulin concentrations did not induce oxidative damage, while glucose already in the low dose was an important triggering factor for oxidative stress.

  5. Applications of pulsed EPR spectroscopy to structural studies of sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Eric L.; Astashkin, Andrei V.; Raitsimring, Arnold M.; Enemark, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes (SOEs), including sulfite oxidase (SO) and bacterial sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH), catalyze the oxidation of sulfite (SO32-) to sulfate (SO42-). The active sites of SO and SDH are nearly identical, each having a 5-coordinate, pseudo-square-pyramidal Mo with an axial oxo ligand and three equatorial sulfur donor atoms. One sulfur is from a conserved Cys residue and two are from a pyranopterindithiolene (molybdopterin, MPT) cofactor. The identity of the remaining equatorial ligand, which is solvent-exposed, varies during the catalytic cycle. Numerous in vitro studies, particularly those involving electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy of the Mo(V) states of SOEs, have shown that the identity and orientation of this exchangeable equatorial ligand depends on the buffer pH, the presence and concentration of certain anions in the buffer, as well as specific point mutations in the protein. Until very recently, however, EPR has not been a practical technique for directly probing specific structures in which the solvent-exposed, exchangeable ligand is an O, OH-, H2O, SO32-, or SO42- group, because the primary O and S isotopes (16O and 32S) are magnetically silent (I = 0). This review focuses on the recent advances in the use of isotopic labeling, variable-frequency high resolution pulsed EPR spectroscopy, synthetic model compounds, and DFT calculations to elucidate the roles of various anions, point mutations, and steric factors in the formation, stabilization, and transformation of SOE active site structures.

  6. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    OpenAIRE

    Raheleh Ghanbari; Mohammad Zarei; Afshin Ebrahimpour; Azizah Abdul-Hamid; Amin Ismail; Nazamid Saari

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates,...

  7. Inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 activity enhances antimycin-induced rat cardiomyocytes apoptosis through activation of MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Xu, Danling; Wang, Shijun; Fu, Han; Wang, Keqiang; Zou, Yunzeng; Sun, Aijun; Ge, Junbo

    2011-12-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2), a mitochondrial-specific enzyme, has been proved to be involved in oxidative stress-induced cell apoptosis, while little is known in cardiomyocytes. This study was aimed at investigating the role of ALDH2 in antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis by suppressing ALDH2 activity with a specific ALDH2 inhibitor Daidzin. Antimycin A (40μg/ml) was used to induce neonatal cardiomyocytes apoptosis. Daidzin (60μM) effectively inhibited ALDH2 activity by 50% without own effect on cell apoptosis, and significantly enhanced antimycin A-induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis from 33.5±4.4 to 56.5±6.4% (Hochest method, pdaidzin treated cardiomyocytes compared to the cells treated with antimycin A alone. These findings indicated that modifying mitochondrial ALDH2 activity/expression might be a potential therapeutic option on reducing oxidative insults induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis.

  8. Glu504Lys Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 2 Gene and the Risk of Human Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH 2 is a mitochondrial enzyme that is known for its important role in oxidation and detoxification of ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde. ALDH2 also metabolizes other reactive aldehydes such as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal and acrolein. The Glu504Lys single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP of ALDH2 gene, which is found in approximately 40% of the East Asian populations, causes defect in the enzyme activity of ALDH2, leading to alterations in acetaldehyde metabolism and alcohol-induced “flushing” syndrome. Evidence suggests that ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP is a potential candidate genetic risk factor for a variety of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and late-onset Alzheimer’s disease. In addition, the association between ALDH2 Glu504Lys SNP and the development of these chronic diseases appears to be affected by the interaction between the SNP and lifestyle factors such as alcohol consumption as well as by the presence of other genetic variations.

  9. Regulation of oxidative enzyme activity and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 in human skeletal muscle: influence of gender and exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roepstorff, Carsten; Schjerling, P.; Vistisen, Bodil

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate gender-related differences in the responses of oxidative enzymes and eukaryotic elongation factor-2 (eEF2) to exercise. METHODS: The influence of exercise (90 min, 60%VO(2peak)) on citrate synthase (CS) and beta-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity and mRNA content, to...

  10. Kinetics of forming aldehydes in frying oils and their distribution in French fries revealed by LC-MS-based chemometrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldehydes are major secondary lipid oxidation products (LOPs) from heating vegetable oils and deep frying. The routes and reactions that generate aldehydes have been extensively investigated, but the sequences and kinetics of their formation in oils are poorly defined. In this study, a platform comb...

  11. GRE2 from Scheffersomyces stipitis as an aldehyde reductase contributes tolerance to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Ma, Menggen; Liu, Z Lewis; Xiang, Quanju; Li, Xi; Liu, Na; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-08-01

    Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis is one of the most promising yeasts for industrial bioethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass. S. stipitis is able to in situ detoxify aldehyde inhibitors (such as furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF)) to less toxic corresponding alcohols. However, the reduction enzymes involved in this reaction remain largely unknown. In this study, we reported that an uncharacterized open reading frame PICST_72153 (putative GRE2) from S. stipitis was highly induced in response to furfural and HMF stresses. Overexpression of this gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae improved yeast tolerance to furfural and HMF. GRE2 was identified as an aldehyde reductase which can reduce furfural to FM with either NADH or NADPH as the co-factor and reduce HMF to FDM with NADPH as the co-factor. This enzyme can also reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Amino acid sequence analysis indicated that it is a member of the subclass "intermediate" of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily. Although GRE2 from S. stipitis is similar to GRE2 from S. cerevisiae in a three-dimensional structure, some differences were predicted. GRE2 from S. stipitis forms loops at D133-E137 and T143-N145 locations with two α-helices at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations, different GRE2 from S. cerevisiae with an α-helix at D133-E137 and a β-sheet at T143-N145 locations, and two loops at E154-K157 and E252-A254 locations. This research provided guidelines for the study of other SDR enzymes from S. stipitis and other yeasts on tolerant mechanisms to aldehyde inhibitors derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

  12. Inactivation of enzymes and oxidative modification of proteins by stimulated neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, C N

    1987-02-15

    Differentiated, stimulated HL-60 cells and freshly isolated, stimulated neutrophils inactivate glutamine synthetase (L-glutamate:ammonia ligase (ADP-forming), EC 6.3.1.2) either inside or outside of Escherichia coli. Stimulated neutrophils also inactivate at least four endogenous enzymes which are inactivated by mixed-function oxidation (MFO) systems in vitro (L. Fucci, C.N. Oliver, M.J. Coon, and E.R. Stadtman (1983) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 80, 1521-1525). The inactivation of glutamine synthetase by stimulated neutrophils exhibits characteristics similar to those previously described using both enzymic and nonenzymic MFO systems (R.L. Levine, C.N. Oliver, R.M. Fulks, and E.R. Stadtman (1981) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 78, 2120-2124). Although the reaction occurs in the absence of Fe(III), it is stimulated by added Fe (III). Inactivation required molecular oxygen and is partially inhibited by Mn(II), catalase, superoxide dismutase, and metal chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and o-phenanthroline. Both the kinetics and the extent of glutamine synthetase inactivation differ when neutrophils are stimulated with phorbol esters compared with formylated peptides. Glutamine synthetase inactivation catalyzed by MFO systems is accompanied by the formation of protein carbonyl derivatives which form stable hydrazones when treated with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Multiple carbonyl derivatives are formed in the soluble protein fraction of stimulated neutrophils and these derivatives collectively exhibit an absorbance spectrum similar to that of glutamine synthetase inactivated by liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 MFO system (K. Nakamura, C.N. Oliver, and E.R. Stadtman (1985) Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 240, 319-329).

  13. INTERACTION OF ALDEHYDES DERIVED FROM LIPID PEROXIDATION AND MEMBRANE PROTEINS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania ePizzimenti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A great variety of compounds are formed during lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids of membrane phospholipids. Among them, bioactive aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxyalkenals, malondialdehyde (MDA and acrolein, have received particular attention since they have been considered as toxic messengers that can propagate and amplify oxidative injury. In the 4-hydroxyalkenal class, 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE is the most intensively studied aldehyde, in relation not only to its toxic function, but also to its physiological role. Indeed, HNE can be found at low concentrations in human tissues and plasma and participates in the control of biological processes, such as signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation. Moreover, at low doses, HNE exerts an anti-cancer effect, by inhibiting cell proliferation, angiogenesis, cell adhesion and by inducing differentiation and/or apoptosis in various tumor cell lines. It is very likely that a substantial fraction of the effects observed in cellular responses, induced by HNE and related aldehydes, be mediated by their interaction with proteins, resulting in the formation of covalent adducts or in the modulation of their expression and/or activity. In this review we focus on membrane proteins affected by lipid peroxidation-derived aldehydes, under physiological and pathological conditions.

  14. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women.

  15. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G A S; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2014-04-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with 1,10-PT + ethanol and ∼1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I-III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol.

  16. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  17. Alcohol oxidizing enzymes and ethanol-induced cytotoxicity in rat pancreatic acinar AR42J cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Falzon, Miriam; Ansari, G. A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is a serious inflammatory disease causing significant morbidity and mortality. Due to lack of a suitable animal model, the underlying mechanism of ACP is poorly understood. Chronic alcohol abuse inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and facilitates nonoxidative metabolism of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas frequently damaged during chronic ethanol abuse. Earlier, we reported a concentration-dependent formation of FAEEs and cytotoxicity in ethanol-treated rat pancreatic tumor (AR42J) cells, which express high FAEE synthase activity as compared to ADH and cytochrome P450 2E1. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to investigate the role of various ethanol oxidizing enzymes in ethanol-induced pancreatic acinar cell injury. Confluent AR42J cells were pre-treated with inhibitors of ADH class I and II [4-methylpyrazole (MP)] or class I, II, and III [1,10-phenanthroline (PT)], cytochrome P450 2E1 (trans-1,2-dichloroethylene) or catalase (sodium azide) followed by incubation with 800 mg% ethanol at 37°C for 6 h. Ethanol metabolism, cell viability, cytotoxicity (apoptosis and necrosis), cell proliferation status, and formation of FAEEs in AR42J cells were measured. The cell viability and cell proliferation rate were significantly reduced in cells pretreated with 1,10-PT + ethanol followed by those with 4-MP + ethanol. In situ formation of FAEEs was twofold greater in cells incubated with l,10-PT + ethanol and ~1.5-fold in those treated with 4-MP + ethanol vs. respective controls. However, cells treated with inhibitors of cytochrome P450 2E1 or catalase in combination of ethanol showed no significant changes either for FAEE formation, cell death or proliferation rate. Therefore, an impaired ADH class I—III catalyzed oxidation of ethanol appears to be a key contributing factor in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury via formation of nonoxidative metabolites of ethanol. PMID:24281792

  18. Hydrolysis of solubilized hemicellulose derived from wet-oxidized wheat straw by a mixture of commercial fungal enzyme preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skammelsen Schmidt, Anette; Thomsen, Alle Belinda; Woidemann, Anders [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Tenkanen, Maija [VTT Biotechnology and Food Research (Finland)

    1998-04-01

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of the solubilized hemicellulose fraction from wet-oxidized wheat straw was investigated for quantification purposes. An optimal hydrolysis depends on factors such as composition of the applied enzyme mixture and the hydrolysis conditions (enzyme loading, hydrolysis time, pH-value, and temperature). A concentrated enzyme mixture was used in this study prepared at VTT Biotechnology and Food Research, Finland, by mixing four commercial enzyme preparations. No distinctive pH-value and temperature optima were identified after a prolonged incubation of 24 hours. By reducing the hydrolysis time to 2 hours a temperature optimum was found at 50 deg. C, where a pH-value higher than 5.2 resulted in reduced activity. An enzyme-substrate-volume-ratio of 0.042, a pH-value of 5.0, and a temperature of 50 deg. C were chosen as the best hydrolysis conditions due to an improved monosaccharide yield. The hydrolysis time was chosen to be 24 hours to ensure equilibrium and total quantification. Even under the best hydrolysis conditions, the overall sugar yield from the enzymatic hydrolysis was only 85% of that of the optimal acid hydrolysis. The glucose yield were approximately the same for the two types of hydrolyses, probably due to the high cellulase activity in the VTT-enzyme mixture. For xylose and arabinose the enzymatic hydrolysis yielded only 80% of that of the acid hydrolysis. As the pentoses existed mainly as complex polymers their degradation required many different enzymes, some of which might be missing from the VTT-enzyme mixture. Furthermore, the removal of side-choins from the xylan backbone during the wet-oxidation pretreatment process might enable the hemicellulosic polymers to interact and precipitate, hence, reducing the enzymatic digestibility of the hemicellulose. (au) 8 tabs., 10 ills., 65 refs.

  19. Monounsaturated Fatty Acids Are Substrates for Aldehyde Generation in Tellurite-Exposed Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo A. Pradenas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS damage macromolecules and cellular components in nearly all kinds of cells and often generate toxic intracellular byproducts. In this work, aldehyde generation derived from the Escherichia coli membrane oxidation as well as membrane fatty acid profiles, protein oxidation, and bacterial resistance to oxidative stress elicitors was evaluated. Studies included wild-type cells as well as cells exhibiting a modulated monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA ratio. The hydroxyaldehyde 4-hydroxy 2-nonenal was found to be most likely produced by E. coli, whose levels are dependent upon exposure to oxidative stress elicitors. Aldehyde amounts and markers of oxidative damage decreased upon exposure to E. coli containing low MUFA ratios, which was paralleled by a concomitant increase in resistance to ROS-generating compounds. MUFAs ratio, lipid peroxidation, and aldehyde generation were found to be directly related; that is, the lower the MUFAs ratio, the lower the peroxide and aldehyde generation levels. These results provide additional evidence about MUFAs being targets for membrane lipid oxidation and their relevance in aldehyde generation.

  20. Antioxidant enzyme activities are affected by salt content and temperature and influence muscle lipid oxidation during dry-salted bacon processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guofeng; He, Lichao; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Jianhao; Ma, Meihu

    2013-12-01

    Fresh pork bacon belly was used as material and manufactured into dry-salted bacon through salting and drying-ripening. During processing both oxidative stability and antioxidant enzyme stability were evaluated by assessing peroxide value (PV), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), and their correlations were also analysed. The results showed that all antioxidant enzyme activities decreased (pbacon processing, antioxidant enzymes could effectively control lipid oxidation.

  1. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 2 (FGE.12Rev2): Primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohol, aldehyde, acid, and esters from chemical group 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... of the flavouring substances in Europe. However, when the Panel examined the information provided by the European Flavouring Industry on the use levels in various foods, it appeared obvious that the MSDI approach in a number of cases would grossly underestimate the intake by regular consumers of products flavoured...... at the use level reported by the Industry, especially in those cases where the annual production values were reported to be small. In consequence, the Panel had reservations about the data on use and use levels provided and the intake estimates obtained by the MSDI approach. In the absence of more precise...

  2. Altered expression and activities of enzymes involved in thiamine diphosphate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under oxidative and osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Ewa; Kujda, Marta; Wolak, Natalia; Kozik, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) serves as a cofactor for enzymes engaged in pivotal carbohydrate metabolic pathways, which are known to be modulated under stress conditions to ensure the cell survival. Recent reports have proven a protective role of thiamine (vitamin B(1)) in the response of plants to abiotic stress. This work aimed at verifying a hypothesis that also baker's yeast, which can synthesize thiamine de novo similarly to plants and bacteria, adjust thiamine metabolism to adverse environmental conditions. Our analyses on the gene expression and enzymatic activity levels generally showed an increased production of thiamine biosynthesis enzymes (THI4 and THI6/THI6), a TDP synthesizing enzyme (THI80/THI80) and a TDP-requiring enzyme, transketolase (TKL1/TKL) by yeast subjected to oxidative (1 mM hydrogen peroxide) and osmotic (1 M sorbitol) stress. However, these effects differed in magnitude, depending on yeast growth phase and presence of thiamine in growth medium. A mutant thi4Δ with increased sensitivity to oxidative stress exhibited enhanced TDP biosynthesis as compared with the wild-type strain. Similar tendencies were observed in mutants yap1Δ and hog1Δ defective in the signaling pathways of the defense against oxidative and osmotic stress, respectively, suggesting that thiamine metabolism can partly compensate damages of yeast general defense systems.

  3. Effect of commercially available green and black tea beverages on drug-metabolizing enzymes and oxidative stress in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Hsu, Ya-Ru; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Lin, Ai-Hsuan; Chang, Keng-Hao; Yang, Hui-Ting

    2014-08-01

    The effect of commercially available green tea (GT) and black tea (BT) drinks on drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed a laboratory chow diet and GT or BT drink for 5 weeks. Control rats received de-ionized water instead of the tea drinks. Rats received the GT and BT drinks treatment for 5 weeks showed a significant increase in hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 and CYP1A2, and a significant decrease in CYP2C, CYP2E1 and CYP3A enzyme activities. Results of immunoblot analyses of enzyme protein contents showed the same trend with enzyme activity. Significant increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity and reduced glutathione content in liver and lungs were observed in rats treated with both tea drinks. A lower lipid peroxide level in lungs was observed in rats treated with GT drink. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that both tea drinks decreased pregnane X receptor binding to DNA and increased nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 binding to DNA. These results suggest that feeding of both tea drinks to rats modulated DME activities and reduced oxidative stress in liver and lungs. GT drink is more effective on reducing oxidative stress than BT drink.

  4. Brain and Liver Headspace Aldehyde Concentration Following Dietary Supplementation with n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Brian M; Babay, Slim; Malik, Imran

    2015-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species react with unsaturated fatty acids to form a variety of metabolites including aldehydes. Many aldehydes are volatile enough to be detected in headspace gases of blood or cultured cells and in exhaled breath, in particular propanal and hexanal which are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Aldehydes are therefore potential non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress and of various diseases in which oxidative stress is thought to play a role including cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. It is unclear, however, how changes in the abundance of the fatty acid precursors, for example by altered dietary intake, affect aldehyde concentrations. We therefore fed male Wistar rats diets supplemented with either palm oil or a combination of palm oil plus an n-3 fatty acid (alpha-linolenic, eicosapentaenoic, or docosahexaenoic acids) for 4 weeks. Fatty acid analysis revealed large changes in the abundance of both n-3 and n-6 fatty acids in the liver with smaller changes observed in the brain. Despite the altered fatty acid abundance, headspace concentrations of C1-C8 aldehydes, and tissue concentrations of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, did not differ between the 4 dietary groups. Our data suggest that tissue aldehyde concentrations are independent of fatty acid abundance, and further support their use as volatile biomarkers of oxidative stress.

  5. Amino Acid Residues Critical for the Specificity for Betaine Aldehyde of the Plant ALDH10 Isoenzyme Involved in the Synthesis of Glycine Betaine1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Sánchez, Ángel G.; González-Segura, Lilian; Mújica-Jiménez, Carlos; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Montiel, Carmina; Martínez-Castilla, León P.; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A.

    2012-01-01

    Plant Aldehyde Dehydrogenase10 (ALDH10) enzymes catalyze the oxidation of ω-primary or ω-quaternary aminoaldehydes, but, intriguingly, only some of them, such as the spinach (Spinacia oleracea) betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (SoBADH), efficiently oxidize betaine aldehyde (BAL) forming the osmoprotectant glycine betaine (GB), which confers tolerance to osmotic stress. The crystal structure of SoBADH reported here shows tyrosine (Tyr)-160, tryptophan (Trp)-167, Trp-285, and Trp-456 in an arrangement suitable for cation-π interactions with the trimethylammonium group of BAL. Mutation of these residues to alanine (Ala) resulted in significant Km(BAL) increases and Vmax/Km(BAL) decreases, particularly in the Y160A mutant. Tyr-160 and Trp-456, strictly conserved in plant ALDH10s, form a pocket where the bulky trimethylammonium group binds. This space is reduced in ALDH10s with low BADH activity, because an isoleucine (Ile) pushes the Trp against the Tyr. Those with high BADH activity instead have Ala (Ala-441 in SoBADH) or cysteine, which allow enough room for binding of BAL. Accordingly, the mutation A441I decreased the Vmax/Km(BAL) of SoBADH approximately 200 times, while the mutation A441C had no effect. The kinetics with other ω-aminoaldehydes were not affected in the A441I or A441C mutant, demonstrating that the existence of an Ile in the second sphere of interaction of the aldehyde is critical for discriminating against BAL in some plant ALDH10s. A survey of the known sequences indicates that plants have two ALDH10 isoenzymes: those known to be GB accumulators have a high-BAL-affinity isoenzyme with Ala or cysteine in this critical position, while non GB accumulators have low-BAL-affinity isoenzymes containing Ile. Therefore, BADH activity appears to restrict GB synthesis in non-GB-accumulator plants. PMID:22345508

  6. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora Hydrolysates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raheleh Ghanbari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8% after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH (56.00% and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC (59.00% methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions.

  7. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-12-04

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions.

  8. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy V. Callaghan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM. The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria, wherein the archaeal members catalyze both methane oxidation and sulfate reduction and zero-valent sulfur is a key intermediate. The third AOM mechanism is a nitrite-dependent, intra-aerobic pathway described for the denitrifying bacterium, ‘Candidatus Methylomirabilis oxyfera.’ It is hypothesized that AOM proceeds via reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, followed by the conversion of two nitric oxide molecules to dinitrogen and molecular oxygen. The latter can be used to functionalize the methane via a particulate methane monooxygenase. With respect to non-methane alkanes, there also appears to be novel mechanisms of activation. The most well-described pathway is the addition of non-methane alkanes across the double bond of fumarate to form alkyl-substituted succinates via the putative glycyl radical enzyme, alkylsuccinate synthase (also known as methylalkylsuccinate synthase. Other proposed mechanisms include anaerobic hydroxylation via ethylbenzene dehydrogenase-like enzymes and an ‘intra-aerobic’ denitrification pathway similar to that described for ‘M. oxyfera.’

  9. The pathways of glutamate and glutamine oxidation by tumor cell mitochondria. Role of mitochondrial NAD(P)+-dependent malic enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Lehninger, A L

    1984-05-25

    Little evidence has been available on the oxidative pathways of glutamine and glutamate, the major respiratory substrates of cancer cells. Glutamate formed from glutamine by phosphate-dependent glutaminase undergoes quantitative transamination by aerobic tumor mitochondria to yield aspartate. However, when malate is also added there is a pronounced decrease in aspartate production and a large formation of citrate and alanine, in both state 3 and 4 conditions. In contrast, addition of malate to normal rat heart, liver, or kidney mitochondria oxidizing glutamate causes a marked increase in aspartate production. Further analysis showed that extramitochondrial malate is oxidized almost quantitatively to pyruvate + CO2 by NAD(P)+-linked malic enzyme, present in the mitochondria of all tumors tested, but absent in heart, liver, and kidney mitochondria. On the other hand intramitochondrial malate generated from glutamate is oxidized quantitatively to oxalacetate by mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase of tumors. Acetyl-CoA derived from extramitochondrial malate via pyruvate and oxalacetate derived from glutamate via intramitochondrial malate are quantitatively converted into citrate, which is extruded. No evidence was found that malic enzyme of tumor mitochondria converts glutamate-derived malate into pyruvate as postulated in other reports. Possible mechanisms for the integration of mitochondrial malic enzyme and malate dehydrogenase activities in tumors are discussed.

  10. [Activity of oxidation-reduction enzymes in endotheliocytes of the intestinal hemomicrocirculatory bed under normal conditions and in portal hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaĭvoronskiĭ, I V; Tikhonova, L P; Chepur, S V; Nichiporuk, G I

    1997-01-01

    An original quantitative examination of oxidation-reduction enzymes activity in endotheliocytes of hemomicroclrculatory vessels of jejunum and rectum submucosal base in normal state and in portal hypertension was performed by the authors. Comparative analysis of the activity of the enzymes studied revealed different metabolic processes intensity in these organs, dependent on current hemodynamic conditions. Cytochemical changes in hemomicrocirculatory bed are consistent with structural reorganizations that arise in the wall of vessels studied, consist of several phases and may be used as an assessment criterion for defining the portal hypertension stage.

  11. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena.

  12. Molecular analysis of the distribution and phylogeny of the soxB gene among sulfur-oxidizing bacteria - evolution of the Sox sulfur oxidation enzyme system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Birte; Imhoff, Johannes F; Kuever, Jan

    2007-12-01

    The soxB gene encodes the SoxB component of the periplasmic thiosulfate-oxidizing Sox enzyme complex, which has been proposed to be widespread among the various phylogenetic groups of sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (SOB) that convert thiosulfate to sulfate with and without the formation of sulfur globules as intermediate. Indeed, the comprehensive genetic and genomic analyses presented in the present study identified the soxB gene in 121 phylogenetically and physiologically divergent SOB, including several species for which thiosulfate utilization has not been reported yet. In first support of the previously postulated general involvement of components of the Sox enzyme complex in the thiosulfate oxidation process of sulfur-storing SOB, the soxB gene was detected in all investigated photo- and chemotrophic species that form sulfur globules during thiosulfate oxidation (Chromatiaceae, Chlorobiaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, Thiothrix, Beggiatoa, Thiobacillus, invertebrate symbionts and free-living relatives). The SoxB phylogeny reflected the major 16S rRNA gene-based phylogenetic lineages of the investigated SOB, although topological discrepancies indicated several events of lateral soxB gene transfer among the SOB, e.g. its independent acquisition by the anaerobic anoxygenic phototrophic lineages from different chemotrophic donor lineages. A putative scenario for the proteobacterial origin and evolution of the Sox enzyme system in SOB is presented considering the phylogenetic, genomic (sox gene cluster composition) and geochemical data.

  13. Ageing of enteric neurons: oxidative stress, neurotrophic factors and antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korsak Kris

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ageing is associated with gastrointestinal dysfunction, which can have a major impact on quality of life of the elderly. A number of changes in the innervation of the gut during ageing have been reported, including neuronal loss and degenerative changes. Evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS are elevated in ageing enteric neurons, but that neurotrophic factors may reduce generation of neuronal ROS. Two such factors, glial cell line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3 have also been found to protect enteric neurons against oxidative stress induced cell death of enteric ganglion cells in vitro. We have investigated the possible roles of neurotrophic factors further, by examining their expression in the gut during ageing, and by analysing their effects on antioxidant enzyme production in cultures of enteric ganglion cells. Results Analysis of the expression of GDNF and its receptors c-Ret and GFR α − 1 in rat gut by RT-PCR showed that expression continues throughout life and into ageing, in both ad libitum(AL and calorically-restricted (CR animals. Levels of expression of GDNF and GFR α − 1 were elevated in 24 month AL animals compared to 24 month CR animals, and to 24 CR and 6 month control animals respectively. The related factor Neurturin and its receptor GFR α − 2 were also expressed throughout life, the levels of the GFR – α-2(b isoform were reduced in 24 m AL animals. Immunolabelling showed that c-Ret and GFR α − 1 proteins were expressed by myenteric neurons in ageing animals. GDNF, but not NT-3, was found to increase expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase by cultured enteric ganglion cells. Conclusions The neurotrophic factors GDNF and neurturin and their receptors continue to be expressed in the ageing gut. Changes in the levels of expression of GDNF , GFR α-1 and GFR α-2(b isoform occurred in 24 m AL animals. GDNF, but not

  14. Gaseous aliphatic aldehydes in Chinese incense smoke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, J.M.; Wang, L.H. (National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China))

    1994-09-01

    Aliphatic aldehydes were found during the combustion of materials. Tobacco smoke contains aldehydes. Fire fighters were exposed to aldehydes when they conducted firefighting. Aldehydes in ambient air come mainly from the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons and from photochemical reaction. Most aldehydes in ambient air are formaldehyde and acetaldehyde. Formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propionaldehyde, butyraldehyde, and benzaldehyde were found in the atmosphere in Los Angeles. Burning Chinese incense for worshipping deities is a Chinese daily routine. It was suspected to be a factor causing nasopharynegeal cancer. Epidemiological studies correlated it with the high risk of childhood brain tumor and the high risk of childhood leukemia. Ames test identified the mutagenic effect of the smoke from burning Chinese incense. The smoke had bee proved to contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aromatic aldehydes. Suspicion about formaldehyde and other alphatic aldehydes was evoked, when a survey of indoor air pollution was conducted in Taipei city. This study determined the presence of aliphatic aldehydes in the smoke from burning Chinese incense under a controlled atmosphere. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Combining solvent isotope effects with substrate isotope effects in mechanistic studies of alcohol and amine oxidation by enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2015-11-01

    Oxidation of alcohols and amines is catalyzed by multiple families of flavin- and pyridine nucleotide-dependent enzymes. Measurement of solvent isotope effects provides a unique mechanistic probe of the timing of the cleavage of the OH and NH bonds, necessary information for a complete description of the catalytic mechanism. The inherent ambiguities in interpretation of solvent isotope effects can be significantly decreased if isotope effects arising from isotopically labeled substrates are measured in combination with solvent isotope effects. The application of combined solvent and substrate (mainly deuterium) isotope effects to multiple enzymes is described here to illustrate the range of mechanistic insights that such an approach can provide. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment.

  16. Molecular and catalytic properties of the aldehyde dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, a quinoheme protein containing pyrroloquinoline quinone, cytochrome b, and cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, S; Chavez-Pacheco, J L; Contreras-Zentella, M; Sosa-Torres, M E; Arreguín-Espinosa, R; Pérez de la Mora, M; Membrillo-Hernández, J; Escamilla, J E

    2010-11-01

    Several aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) complexes have been purified from the membranes of acetic acid bacteria. The enzyme structures and the chemical nature of the prosthetic groups associated with these enzymes remain a matter of debate. We report here on the molecular and catalytic properties of the membrane-bound ALDH complex of the diazotrophic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The purified ALDH complex is a heterodimer comprising two subunits of 79.7 and 50 kDa, respectively. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy led us to demonstrate, for the first time, the unequivocal presence of a pyrroloquinoline quinone prosthetic group associated with an ALDH complex from acetic acid bacteria. In addition, heme b was detected by UV-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and confirmed by reversed-phase HPLC. The smaller subunit bears three cytochromes c. Aliphatic aldehydes, but not formaldehyde, were suitable substrates. Using ferricyanide as an electron acceptor, the enzyme showed an optimum pH of 3.5 that shifted to pH 7.0 when phenazine methosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were the electron acceptors. Acetaldehyde did not reduce measurable levels of the cytochrome b and c centers; however, the dithionite-reduced hemes were conveniently oxidized by ubiquinone-1; this finding suggests that cytochrome b and the cytochromes c constitute an intramolecular redox sequence that delivers electrons to the membrane ubiquinone.

  17. Molecular and Catalytic Properties of the Aldehyde Dehydrogenase of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, a Quinoheme Protein Containing Pyrroloquinoline Quinone, Cytochrome b, and Cytochrome c▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, S.; Chavez-Pacheco, J. L.; Contreras-Zentella, M.; Sosa-Torres, M. E.; Arreguín-Espinosa, R.; Pérez de la Mora, M.; Membrillo-Hernández, J.; Escamilla, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Several aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) complexes have been purified from the membranes of acetic acid bacteria. The enzyme structures and the chemical nature of the prosthetic groups associated with these enzymes remain a matter of debate. We report here on the molecular and catalytic properties of the membrane-bound ALDH complex of the diazotrophic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus. The purified ALDH complex is a heterodimer comprising two subunits of 79.7 and 50 kDa, respectively. Reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy led us to demonstrate, for the first time, the unequivocal presence of a pyrroloquinoline quinone prosthetic group associated with an ALDH complex from acetic acid bacteria. In addition, heme b was detected by UV-visible light (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and confirmed by reversed-phase HPLC. The smaller subunit bears three cytochromes c. Aliphatic aldehydes, but not formaldehyde, were suitable substrates. Using ferricyanide as an electron acceptor, the enzyme showed an optimum pH of 3.5 that shifted to pH 7.0 when phenazine methosulfate plus 2,6-dichlorophenolindophenol were the electron acceptors. Acetaldehyde did not reduce measurable levels of the cytochrome b and c centers; however, the dithionite-reduced hemes were conveniently oxidized by ubiquinone-1; this finding suggests that cytochrome b and the cytochromes c constitute an intramolecular redox sequence that delivers electrons to the membrane ubiquinone. PMID:20802042

  18. Involvement of anti-oxidative enzymes, photosynthetic pigments and flavonoid metabolism in the adaptation of Reaumuria soongorica to salt stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YuBing Liu; Bo Cao; MeiLing Liu

    2013-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica is a short woody shrub widely found in semi-arid areas of China. It can survive severe environ-mental stress including high salinity in its natural habitat. Thus, we investigated the involvement of anti-oxidative enzymes, photosynthetic pigments and flavonoid metabolism in the adaptation of R. soongorica to saline environments. R. soon-gorica was treated with 0, 100, 200 and 400 mM NaCl solutions for 14 days. Soil salt content increased significantly by watering with high content of NaCl solution, and no variation between 8 and 14 days during treatment. The levels of pe-roxidation of lipid membranes (measured by malondialdehyde content) and the activities of three antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX)) increased under salt stress. Chlorophyll and carotenoid content decreased with increasing salt content. The ratio of Chl a/Chl b and carotenoid/Chl exhibited sig-nificant increase under 400 mM NaCl. However, total flavonoid and anthocyanin contents and key enzyme activities in the flavonoid pathway including phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL) and Chalcone isomerase (CHI) decreased under salt stress. These findings possibly suggest that R. soongorica has an adaptation protection mechanism against salt-induced oxidative damage by inducing the activity of antioxidant enzymes and maintaining a steady level of carotenoid/Chl.

  19. Role of Lipid Peroxidation-Derived α, β-Unsaturated Aldehydes in Vascular Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Eun Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vascular diseases are the most prominent cause of death, and inflammation and vascular dysfunction are key initiators of the pathophysiology of vascular disease. Lipid peroxidation products, such as acrolein and other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, have been implicated as mediators of inflammation and vascular dysfunction. α, β-Unsaturated aldehydes are toxic because of their high reactivity with nucleophiles and their ability to form protein and DNA adducts without prior metabolic activation. This strong reactivity leads to electrophilic stress that disrupts normal cellular function. Furthermore, α, β-unsaturated aldehydes are reported to cause endothelial dysfunction by induction of oxidative stress, redox-sensitive mechanisms, and inflammatory changes such as induction of cyclooxygenase-2 and cytokines. This review provides an overview of the effects of lipid peroxidation products, α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, on inflammation and vascular dysfunction.

  20. Significance of Lipid-Derived Reactive Aldehyde-Specific Immune Complexes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gangduo; Pierangeli, Silvia S.; Willis, Rohan; Gonzalez, Emilio B.; Petri, Michelle; Khan, M. Firoze

    2016-01-01

    Even though systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates among young and middle-aged women, the molecular mechanisms of disease pathogenesis are not fully understood. Previous studies from our laboratory suggested an association between oxidative stress and SLE disease activity (SLEDAI). To further assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in SLE, we examined the contribution of lipid-derived reactive aldehydes (LDRAs)-specific immune complexes in SLE. Sera from 60 SLE patients with varying SLEDAI and 32 age- and gender- matched healthy controls were analyzed for oxidative stress and related markers. Patients were divided into two groups based on their SLEDAI scores (<6 and ≥ 6). Both SLEDAI groups showed higher serum 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE)-/malondialdehyde (MDA)-protein adducts and their specific immune complexes (HNE-/MDA-specific ICs) together with IL-17 than the controls, but the levels were significantly greater in the high SLEDAI (≥ 6) group. Moreover, the serum levels of anti-oxidant enzymes Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were significantly reduced in both patient groups compared to controls. Remarkably, for the first time, our data show that increased HNE-/MDA-specific ICs are positively associated with SLEDAI and elevated circulating immune complexes (CICs), suggesting a possible causal relationship among oxidative stress, LDRA-specific ICs and the development of SLE. Our findings, apart from providing firm support to an association between oxidative stress and SLE, also suggest that these oxidative stress markers, especially the HNE-/MDA-specific ICs, may be useful in evaluating the prognosis of SLE as well as in elucidating the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. PMID:27749917

  1. Measuring Intracellular Enzyme Concentrations: Assessing the Effect of Oxidative Stress on the Amount of Glyoxalase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Hugo Vicente; Ferreira, Antonio E. N.; Quintas, Alexandre; Cordeiro, Carlos; Freire, Ana Ponces

    2008-01-01

    Enzymology is one of the fundamental areas of biochemistry and involves the study of the structure, kinetics, and regulation of enzyme activity. Research in this area is often conducted with purified enzymes and extrapolated to "in vivo" conditions. The specificity constant, k[subscript S], is the ratio between k[subscript cat] (the catalytic…

  2. Ultrasound-assisted extraction and characterization of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced by solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Orsolya Erzsebet; Csiszar, Emilia; Toth, Karolina; Szakacs, George; Koczka, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Ligninolytic and hydrolytic enzymes were produced with six selected fungi on flax substrate by solid state fermentation (SSF). The extracellular enzyme production of the organisms in two SSF media was evaluated by measuring the soluble protein concentration and the filter paper, endoxylanase, 1,4-β-d-glucosidase, 1,4-β-d-endoglucanase, polygalacturonase, lignin peroxidase, manganese peroxidase and laccase activities of the clear culture solutions produced by conventional extraction from the SSF materials. The SSF material of the best enzyme producer (Trichoderma virens TUB F-498) was further investigated to enhance the enzyme recovery by low frequency ultrasound treatment. Performance of both the original and ultrasound macerated crude enzyme mixtures was evaluated in degradation of the colored lignin-containing and waxy materials of raw linen fabric. Results proved that sonication (at 40%, 60% and 80% amplitudes, for 60min) did not result in reduction in the filter paper, lignin peroxidase and laccase activities of the crude enzyme solution, but has a significant positive effect on the efficiency of enzyme extraction from the SSF material. Depending on the parameters of sonication, the enzyme activities in the extracts obtained can be increased up to 129-413% of the original activities measured in the control extracts recovered by a common magnetic stirrer. Sonication also has an effect on both the enzymatic removal of the lignin-containing color materials and hydrophobic surface layer from the raw linen.

  3. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase obliterates insulin resistance-induced cardiac dysfunction through deacetylation of PGC-1α

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Yingmei

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance contributes to the high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus, leading to cardiac anomalies. Emerging evidence depicts a pivotal role for mitochondrial injury in oxidative metabolism and insulin resistance. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is one of metabolic enzymes detoxifying aldehydes although its role in insulin resistance remains elusive. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of ALDH2 overexpression on insulin resistance-induced myocardial damage and mechanisms involved with a focus on autophagy. Wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice overexpressing ALDH2 were fed sucrose or starch diet for 8 weeks and cardiac function and intracellular Ca2+ handling were assessed using echocardiographic and IonOptix systems. Western blot analysis was used to evaluate Akt, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), PGC-1α and Sirt-3. Our data revealed that sucrose intake provoked insulin resistance and compromised fractional shortening, cardiomyocyte function and intracellular Ca2+ handling (p 0.05), mitochondrial injury (elevated ROS generation, suppressed NAD+ and aconitase activity, p < 0.05 for all), the effect of which was ablated by ALDH2. In vitro incubation of the ALDH2 activator Alda-1, the Sirt3 activator oroxylin A and the histone acetyltransferase inhibitor CPTH2 rescued insulin resistance-induced changes in aconitase activity and cardiomyocyte function (p < 0.05). Inhibiting Sirt3 deacetylase using 5-amino-2-(4-aminophenyl) benzoxazole negated Alda-1-induced cardioprotective effects. Taken together, our data suggest that ALDH2 serves as an indispensable cardioprotective factor against insulin resistance-induced cardiomyopathy with a mechanism possibly associated with facilitation of the Sirt3-dependent PGC-1α deacetylation. PMID:27634872

  4. Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Gene Superfamily in Populus: Organization and Expression Divergence between Paralogous Gene Pairs.

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    Feng-Xia Tian

    Full Text Available Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs constitute a superfamily of NAD(P+-dependent enzymes that catalyze the irreversible oxidation of a wide range of reactive aldehydes to their corresponding nontoxic carboxylic acids. ALDHs have been studied in many organisms from bacteria to mammals; however, no systematic analyses incorporating genome organization, gene structure, expression profiles, and cis-acting elements have been conducted in the model tree species Populus trichocarpa thus far. In this study, a comprehensive analysis of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily was performed. A total of 26 Populus ALDH genes were found to be distributed across 12 chromosomes. Genomic organization analysis indicated that purifying selection may have played a pivotal role in the retention and maintenance of PtALDH gene families. The exon-intron organizations of PtALDHs were highly conserved within the same family, suggesting that the members of the same family also may have conserved functionalities. Microarray data and qRT-PCR analysis indicated that most PtALDHs had distinct tissue-specific expression patterns. The specificity of cis-acting elements in the promoter regions of the PtALDHs and the divergence of expression patterns between nine paralogous PtALDH gene pairs suggested that gene duplications may have freed the duplicate genes from the functional constraints. The expression levels of some ALDHs were up- or down-regulated by various abiotic stresses, implying that the products of these genes may be involved in the adaptation of Populus to abiotic stresses. Overall, the data obtained from our investigation contribute to a better understanding of the complexity of the Populus ALDH gene superfamily and provide insights into the function and evolution of ALDH gene families in vascular plants.

  5. Separation and Purification of Betaine Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Wild Suaeda liaotungensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    High active betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8) is found in wild Suaeda liaotungensis. The enzyme is purified 206-fold with recovery of 1.5%. It have a specific activity of 2363 nmol/min*mg protein and the molecular mass of each subunit is 64.5 kDa as determined by SDS-PAGE.

  6. Single-walled carbon nanotube release affects the microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Qin, Xiaosheng; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    The question how microbial enzyme-catalyzed oxidation processes of organic pollutants and lignin model compounds (LMCs) are affected by the release of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) into the environment remains to be addressed at the molecular level. We have, therefore concentrated the effects of SWCNT on some important properties associated with enzyme activity and function during microbial oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo(a)pyrene, acenaphthene and anthracene), LMCs (2,6-dimethoxyphenol, guaiacol and veratryl alcohol) and β-hexachlorocyclohexane, including the behaviour of water molecules, hydrogen bonds (HBs) and hydrophobic interactions (HYs) between ligand and the enzyme, and conformational dynamics in N- and C-terminus. Our study revealed that SWCNT significantly affected the behaviour of water molecules within 5 Å of both these substrates and their respective enzymes during oxidation (p microbial enzyme-catalyzed processes of organic pollutants and LMCs in nature.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups and serum levels of anti-oxidant enzymes in patients with osteoarthritis

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    Fernandez-Moreno Mercedes

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress play a main role in the initiation and progression of the OA disease and leads to the degeneration of mitochondria. To prevent this, the chondrocytes possess a well-coordinated enzymatic antioxidant system. Besides, the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA haplogroups are associated with the OA disease. Thus, the main goal of this work is to assess the incidence of the mtDNA haplogroups on serum levels of two of the main antioxidant enzymes, Manganese Superoxide Dismutase (Mn-SOD or SOD2 and catalase, and to test the suitability of these two proteins for potential OA-related biomarkers. Methods We analyzed the serum levels of SOD2 and catalase in 73 OA patients and 77 healthy controls carrying the haplogroups J, U and H, by ELISA assay. Knee and hip radiographs were classified according to Kellgren and Lawrence (K/L scoring from Grade 0 to Grade IV. Appropriate statistical analyses were performed to test the effects of clinical variables, including gender, body mass index (BMI, age, smoking status, diagnosis, haplogroups and radiologic K/L grade on serum levels of these enzymes. Results Serum levels of SOD2 appeared statistically increased in OA patients when compared with healthy controls (p Conclusions The increased levels of SOD2 in OA patients indicate an increased oxidative stress OA-related, therefore this antioxidant enzyme could be a suitable candidate biomarker for diagnosis of OA. Mitochondrial haplogroups significantly correlates with serum levels of catalase

  8. Comparison of anti-oxidant enzymes activity and levels of zinc and selenium in sperm and seminal plasma between fertile and idiopathic infertile men

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced lipidperoxidation can lead to dysfunction of sperm and thereby, infertility may be occurred. So, always there is a balance between amount of ROS and anti-oxidant molecules in semen. Anti-oxidant enzymes of sperm; superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), catalse and zinc and selenium can protect it from destructive effects of ROS. Hence, the present study was designed to compare the activities of these enzymes and trace element...

  9. The mitochondrial monoamine oxidase-aldehyde dehydrogenase pathway: a potential site of action of daidzin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooke, N; Li, D J; Li, J; Keung, W M

    2000-11-02

    Recent studies showed that daidzin suppresses ethanol intake in ethanol-preferring laboratory animals. In vitro, it potently and selectively inhibits the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-2). Further, it inhibits the conversion of monoamines such as serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA) into their respective acid metabolites, 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in isolated hamster or rat liver mitochondria. Studies on the suppression of ethanol intake and inhibition of 5-HIAA (or DOPAC) formation by six structural analogues of daidzin suggested a potential link between these two activities. This, together with the finding that daidzin does not affect the rates of mitochondria-catalyzed oxidative deamination of these monoamines, raised the possibility that the ethanol intake-suppressive (antidipsotropic) action of daidzin is not mediated by the monoamines but rather by their reactive biogenic aldehyde intermediates such as 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetaldehyde (5-HIAL) and/or 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) which accumulate in the presence of daidzin. To further evaluate this possibility, we synthesized more structural analogues of daidzin and tested and compared their antidipsotropic activities in Syrian golden hamsters with their effects on monoamine metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria using 5-HT as the substrate. Effects of daidzin and its structural analogues on the activities of monoamine oxidase (MAO) and ALDH-2, the key enzymes involved in 5-HT metabolism in the mitochondria, were also examined. Results from these studies reveal a positive correlation between the antidipsotropic activities of these analogues and their abilities to increase 5-HIAL accumulation during 5-HT metabolism in isolated hamster liver mitochondria. Daidzin analogues that potently inhibit ALDH-2 but have no or little effect on MAO are most antidipsotropic, whereas those that also potently inhibit MAO exhibit little, if

  10. Methanol extract of Desmodium gangeticum roots preserves mitochondrial respiratory enzymes, protecting rat heart against oxidative stress induced by reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurian, Gino A; Yagnesh, N; Kishan, R Sanchit; Paddikkala, Jose

    2008-04-01

    Ischaemia and reperfusion result in mitochondrial dysfunction, with decreased oxidative capacity, loss of cytochrome c and generation of reactive oxygen species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a methanol extract of Desmodium gangeticum (L) DC (Fabaceae) (DG) on lipid peroxidation and antioxidants in mitochondria and tissue homogenates of normal, ischaemic and ischaemia-reperfused rats. Myocardial lipid peroxidation products (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances; TBARS) in cardiac tissue homogenates and mitochondrial fractions were significantly increased during ischaemia reperfusion. Antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and glutathione reductase) in the myocardial tissue homogenate and mitochondria decreased significantly during ischaemia reperfusion, accompanied by a decreased activity of mitochondrial respiratory enzymes. Daily pretreatment of rats with DG (50 or 100 mgkg(-1)) orally for 30 days had a significant effect on the activity of mitochondrial and antioxidant enzymes. In-vitro studies showed that DG inhibited lipid peroxidation, and also scavenged hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. The concentrations required to scavenge 50% of the superoxide and hydroxyl radicals were 21 and 50.5 microgmL(-1), respectively. Administration of DG to normal rats did not have any significant effect on any of the parameters studied. The results of our study showed that DG possesses the ability to scavenge the free radicals generated during ischaemia and ischaemia reperfusion and thereby preserves the mitochondrial respiratory enzymes that eventually lead to cardioprotection.

  11. Thiocyanate hydrolase, the primary enzyme initiating thiocyanate degradation in the novel obligately chemolithoautotrophic halophilic sulfur-oxidizing bacterium Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezsudnova, Ekaterina Yu; Sorokin, Dimitry Yu; Tikhonova, Tamara V; Popov, Vladimir O

    2007-12-01

    Thiohalophilus thiocyanoxidans is a first halophilic sulfur-oxidizing chemolithoautotrophic bacterium capable of growth with thiocyanate as an electron donor at salinity up to 4 M NaCl. The cells, grown with thiocyanate, but not with thiosulfate, contained an enzyme complex hydrolyzing thiocyanate to sulfide and ammonia under anaerobic conditions with carbonyl sulfide as an intermediate. Despite the fact of utilization of the , high cyanase activity was also detected in thiocyanate-induced cells. Three-stage column chromotography resulted in a highly purified thiocyanate-hydrolyzing protein with an apparent molecular mass of 140 kDa that consists of three subunits with masses 17, 19 and 29 kDa. The enzyme is a Co,Fe-containing protein resembling on its function and subunit composition the enzyme thiocyanate hydrolase from the Betaproteobacterium Thiobacillus thioparus. Cyanase, copurified with thiocyanate hydrolase, is a bisubstrate multisubunit enzyme with an apparent subunit molecular mass of 14 kDa. A possible role of cyanase in thiocyanate degradation by T. thiocyanoxidans is discussed.

  12. Changes in oxidative enzyme activity during interspecific mycelial interactions involving the white-rot fungus Trametes versicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscox, Jennifer; Baldrian, Petr; Rogers, Hilary J; Boddy, Lynne

    2010-06-01

    Interspecific fungal antagonism leads to biochemical changes in competing mycelia, including up-regulation of oxidative enzymes. Laccase, manganese peroxidase (MnP), manganese-repressed peroxidase (MRP) and lignin peroxidase (LiP) gene expression and enzyme activity were compared during agar interactions between Trametes versicolor and five other wood decay fungi resulting in a range of interaction outcomes from deadlock to replacement of one fungus by another. Increased laccase and Mn-oxidising activities were detected at all interaction zones, but there were few changes in activity in regions away from the interaction zone in T. versicolor mycelia compared to self-pairings. Whilst no LiP activity was detected in any pairing, low level LiP gene expression was detected. MnP activity was detected but not expression of MnP genes; instead, MRP could explain the observed activity. No relationship was found between extent of enzyme activity increase and interaction outcome. Similarities between patterns of gene expression and enzyme activity are discussed.

  13. Respiratory burst enzymes, pro-oxidants and antioxidants status in Bangladeshi population with β-thalassemia major

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    Md. Faruk Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress is intimately associated with many diseases, including β-thalassemia. Aim: The study was to estimate the status of respiratory burst enzymes, pro-oxidants, and antioxidants in β-thalassemia major patients in Bangladesh and to compare with apparently healthy individuals. Materials and Methods: A total of 49 subjects were recruited which included 25 patients (age range 5 to 40 years with β-thalassemia major and 24 controls (age and sex matched. Superoxide dismutase (SOD and catalase (CAT represented respiratory burst enzymes; malondialdehyde (MDA, lipid hydroperoxide (LHP, and xanthine oxidase (XO were measured as pro-oxidants; and glutathione S transferase (GST, vitamin C (Vit.C, and glutathione (GSH were the measured antioxidants. Results: The activity of SOD was significantly (P < 0.001 increased by about 79% and the activity of CAT was significantly (P < 0.001 decreased by more than 34% in the blood of β-thalassemia major patients compared to the control group. The content of pro-oxidants such as MDA, LHP, and XO was significantly (P < 0.001 higher in patients by about 228%, 241.3% and 148.1% respectively compared to control group. The level of GSH and Vit.C were significantly (P = 0.000 decreased in patients by about 59% and 81% versus the healthy group, respectively; and GST activity was significantly (P < 0.001 declined by 44.25% in patients group. Conclusion: β-thalassemia major patients demonstrate raised oxidative stress compared to healthy subjects.

  14. Impact of L-FABP and glucose on polyunsaturated fatty acid induction of PPARα-regulated β-oxidative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-02-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the major soluble protein that binds very-long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in hepatocytes. However, nothing is known about L-FABP's role in n-3 PUFA-mediated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcription of proteins involved in long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation. This issue was addressed in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type, L-FABP-null, and PPARα-null mice with these major findings: 1) PUFA-mediated increase in the expression of PPARα-regulated LCFA β-oxidative enzymes, LCFA/LCFA-CoA binding proteins (L-FABP, ACBP), and PPARα itself was L-FABP dependent; 2) PPARα transcription, robustly potentiated by high glucose but not maltose, a sugar not taken up, correlated with higher protein levels of these LCFA β-oxidative enzymes and with increased LCFA β-oxidation; and 3) high glucose altered the potency of n-3 relative to n-6 PUFA. This was not due to a direct effect of glucose on PPARα transcriptional activity nor indirectly through de novo fatty acid synthesis from glucose. Synergism was also not due to glucose impacting other signaling pathways, since it was observed only in hepatocytes expressing both L-FABP and PPARα. Ablation of L-FABP or PPARα as well as treatment with MK886 (PPARα inhibitor) abolished/reduced PUFA-mediated PPARα transcription of these genes, especially at high glucose. Finally, the PUFA-enhanced L-FABP distribution into nuclei with high glucose augmentation of the L-FABP/PPARα interaction reveals not only the importance of L-FABP for PUFA induction of PPARα target genes in fatty acid β-oxidation but also the significance of a high glucose enhancement effect in diabetes.

  15. Repeated application of composted tannery sludge affects differently soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ademir Sérgio Ferreira; Lima, Luciano Moura; Santos, Vilma Maria; Schmidt, Radomir

    2016-10-01

    Repeated application of composted tannery sludge (CTS) changes the soil chemical properties and, consequently, can affect the soil microbial properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate the responses of soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms to repeated application of CTS. CTS was applied repeatedly during 6 years, and, at the sixth year, the soil microbial biomass, enzymes activity, and ammonia-oxidizing organisms were determined in the soil. The treatments consisted of 0 (without CTS application), 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 t ha(-1) of CTS (dry basis). Soil pH, EC, SOC, total N, and Cr concentration increased with the increase in CTS rate. Soil microbial biomass did not change significantly with the amendment of 2.5 Mg ha(-1), while it decreased at the higher rates. Total and specific enzymes activity responded differently after CTS application. The abundance of bacteria did not change with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment and decreased after this rate, while the abundance of archaea increased significantly with the 2.5-Mg ha(-1) CTS treatment. Repeated application of different CTS rates for 6 years had different effects on the soil microbial biomass and ammonia-oxidizing organisms as a response to changes in soil chemical properties.

  16. The Anopheles gambiae oxidation resistance 1 (OXR1 gene regulates expression of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species.

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    Giovanna Jaramillo-Gutierrez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: OXR1 is an ancient gene, present in all eukaryotes examined so far that confers protection from oxidative stress by an unknown mechanism. The most highly conserved region of the gene is the carboxyl-terminal TLDc domain, which has been shown to be sufficient to prevent oxidative damage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: OXR1 has a complex genomic structure in the mosquito A. gambiae, and we confirm that multiple splice forms are expressed in adult females. Our studies revealed that OXR1 regulates the basal levels of catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (Gpx expression, two enzymes involved in detoxification of hydrogen peroxide, giving new insight into the mechanism of action of OXR1. Gene silencing experiments indicate that the Jun Kinase (JNK gene acts upstream of OXR1 and also regulates expression of CAT and GPx. Both OXR1 and JNK genes are required for adult female mosquitoes to survive chronic oxidative stress. OXR1 silencing decreases P. berghei oocyst formation. Unexpectedly, JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, suggesting that JNK may also mediate some, yet to be defined, antiparasitic response. CONCLUSION: The JNK pathway regulates OXR1 expression and OXR1, in turn, regulates expression of enzymes that detoxify reactive oxygen species (ROS in Anopheles gambiae. OXR1 silencing decreases Plasmodium infection in the mosquito, while JNK silencing has the opposite effect and enhances infection.

  17. Biossensor enzimático para detecção de fungicidas ditiocarbamatos: estudo cinético da enzima aldeído desidrogenase e otimização do biossensor Enzymatic biosensor for the detection of dithiocarbamate fungicides: kinetic study of aldehyde dehydrogenase enzyme and biosensor optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberval Soares Lima

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Initially, all major factors that affect the rate of the AldH-catalyzed reaction (enzyme concentration, substrate concentration, temperature and pH were investigated. Optimal activity was observed between pH values of 7.5 and 9.5 in the temperature range of 25 to 50 ºC. Kinetic parameters, such as Km (2.92 µmol L-1 and Vmax (1.33 10-2 µmol min-1 demonstrate a strong enzyme-substrate affinity. The sensors were based on screen-printed electrodes modified with the Meldola Blue-Reinecke salt (MBRS combination. Operational conditions (NAD+ and substrate contents, enzyme loading and response time were optimized. Also, two enzyme immobilization procedures were tested: entrapment in poly(vinyl alcohol bearing styrylpyridinium groups (PVA-SbQ and crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Chronoamperometry was employed to observe the biosensor responses during enzymatic hydrolysis of propionaldehyde and also to construct inhibition curves with maneb and zineb fungicides. Best results were found with the following conditions: [NAD+] = 0.25 mmol L-1; [propionaldehyde] = 80 µmol L-1; enzyme loading = 0.8 U per electrode; response time = 10 min, and inhibition time = 10 min. Current intensities around 103 ± 13 nA with the sensors and good stability was obtained for both immobilization procedures. Detection limits, calculated using 10% inhibition were 31.5 µg L-1 and 35 µg L-1 for maneb and zineb, respectively. Results obtained with other MBRS-modified electrodes consisting of mono and bi-enzymic sensors were compared. The ability to catalyze NADH oxidation by MB was also highlighted.

  18. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors attenuate propofol-induced pro-oxidative and antifibrinolytic effect in human endothelial cells

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    Marzena Wojewodzka-Zelezniakowicz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of plasma and tissue angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-Is against propofol-induced endothelial dysfunction and to elucidate the involved mechanisms in vitro. Materials and methods: We examined the effects of propofol (50 μM, quinaprilat and enalaprilat (10−5 M on fibrinolysis (t-PA, PAI-1, TAFI antigen levels, oxidative stress parameters (H2O2 and MDA antigen levels and SOD and NADPH oxidase mRNA levels and nitric oxide bioavailability (NO2/NO3 concentration and NOS expression at the level of mRNA in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Results: We found that both ACE-Is promoted similar endothelial fibrinolytic properties and decreased oxidative stress in vitro. Propofol alone increased the release of antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative factors from the endothelium and increased mRNA iNOS expression. We also found that the incubation of HUVECs in the presence of propofol following ACE-Is pre-incubation caused weakness of the antifibrinolytic and pro-oxidative potential of propofol and this effect was similar after both ACE-Is. Conclusions: This observation suggests that the studied ACE-Is exerted protective effects against endothelial cell dysfunction caused by propofol, independently of hemodynamics.

  19. Pressure-related effects of hyperbaric oxygen exposure on oxidation products and antioxidant enzymes in the rat lung

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    Bulent Uysal

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to provide comprehensive information on the relationship between clinically used hyperbaric oxygen (HBO protocols and its oxidative effects. In order to enlighten this issue, we investigated the effects of various HBO pressure modalities on oxidant and antioxidant parameters in the rat lung. Methods: Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 6 groups. Group 1 was used as control. Groups 2 to 6 were subjected to 100% oxygen at a pressure of 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, and 3 ATA (atmosphere absolute respectively for 2 hours. The lungs were taken immediately after exposure. Oxidation products of lipids (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS and proteins (carbonyl formation, PCO, and antioxidant enzyme levels (superoxide dismutase, SOD; catalase, CAT, glutathione peroxidase, GSH-Px were determined. Results: TBARS, PCO, SOD and CAT levels increased concordantly with pressure. Significant change of TBARS levels started from 100% oxygen exposure at 1 ATA (normobaric, but PCO and CAT levels were affected first after 1.5, and SOD activity after 2 ATA. A significant correlation exists between exposure pressure and oxidative parameters. GSH-Px activity was not affected significantly. Conclusion: The oxidative effect of HBO in rat lung presents a positive correlation with increasing exposure pressure. [J Exp Integr Med 2011; 1(1: 37-42

  20. Neonatal hyperglycemia induces oxidative stress in the rat brain: the role of pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and NADPH oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Andrea Pereira; Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Dias; de Souza, Laila Oliveira; Bitencourt, Fernanda; Mazzola, Priscila Nicolao; Coelho, Juliana Gonzales; Mescka, Caroline Paula; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2015-05-01

    Recently, the consequences of diabetes on the central nervous system (CNS) have received great attention. However, the mechanisms by which hyperglycemia affects the central nervous system remain poorly understood. In addition, recent studies have shown that hyperglycemia induces oxidative damage in the adult rat brain. In this regard, no study has assessed oxidative stress as a possible mechanism that affects the brain normal function in neonatal hyperglycemic rats. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether neonatal hyperglycemia elicits oxidative stress in the brain of neonate rats subjected to a streptozotocin-induced neonatal hyperglycemia model (5-day-old rats). The activities of glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PD), 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase (6-PGD), NADPH oxidase (Nox), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), the production of superoxide anion, the thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), and the protein carbonyl content were measured. Neonatal hyperglycemic rats presented increased activities of G6PD, 6PGD, and Nox, which altogether may be responsible for the enhanced production of superoxide radical anion that was observed. The enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD, CAT, and GSHPx) that were observed in neonatal hyperglycemic rats, which may be caused by a rebound effect of oxidative stress, were not able to hinder the observed lipid peroxidation (TBA-RS) and protein damage in the brain. Consequently, these results suggest that oxidative stress could represent a mechanism that explains the harmful effects of neonatal hyperglycemia on the CNS.

  1. Aluminium oxide nanoparticles induce mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress and alter the expression of antioxidant enzymes in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Subbarayan, Periasamy Vaiyapuri; Ramesh, E; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Alwarthan, Abdulrahman A

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need for toxicological studies on aluminium oxide nanoparticles (Al(2) [Formula: see text]NPs) has arisen from their rapidly emerging range of applications in the food and agricultural sectors. Despite the widespread use of nanoscale aluminium and its composites in the food industry, there is a serious lack of information concerning the biological activities of Al(2) [Formula: see text]NPs (ANPs) and their impact on human health. In this preliminary study, the effects of ANPs on metabolic stress in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were analysed. The results showed dose-dependent effects, including cellular toxicity. The mitochondrial membrane potential in the hMSCs decreased with increasing ANP concentrations after 24 h of exposure. The expression levels of oxidative stress-responsive enzymes were monitored by RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYP1A and POR were up-regulated in response to ANPs, and a significant down-regulation in the expression of the antioxidant enzyme SOD was observed. Further, dose-dependent changes in the mRNA levels of GSTM3, GPX and GSR were noted. These findings suggest that the toxicity of ANPs in hMSCs may be mediated through an increase in oxidative stress. The results of this study clearly demonstrate the nanotoxicological effects of ANPs on hMSCs, which will be useful for nanotoxicological indexing.

  2. Enzymes oxidizing the azo dye 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol (Sudan I) and their contribution to its genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiborova, Marie; Schmeiser, Heinz H; Frei, Eva; Hodek, Petr; Martinek, Vaclav

    2014-01-01

    Sudan I [1-(phenylazo)-2-naphthol, C.I. Solvent Yellow 14] is an industrial dye, which was found as a contaminant in numerous foods in several European countries. Because Sudan I has been assigned by the IARC as a Category 3 carcinogen, the European Union decreed that it cannot be utilized as food colorant in any European country. Sudan I induces the malignancies in liver and urinary bladder of rats and mice. This carcinogen has also been found to be a potent mutagen, contact allergen and sensitizer, and exhibits clastogenic properties. The oxidation of Sudan I increases its toxic effects and leads to covalent adducts in DNA. Identification of enzymatic systems that contribute to Sudan I oxidative metabolism to reactive intermediates generating such covalent DNA adducts on the one hand, and to the detoxification of this carcinogen on the other, is necessary to evaluate susceptibility to this toxicant. This review summarizes the identification of such enzymes and the molecular mechanisms of oxidation reactions elucidated to date. Human and animal cytochrome P450 (CYP) and peroxidases are capable of oxidizing Sudan I. Of the CYP enzymes, CYP1A1 is most important both in Sudan I detoxification and its bio-activation. Ring-hydroxylated metabolites and a dimer of this carcinogen were found as detoxification products of Sudan I generated with CYPs and peroxidases, respectively. Oxidative bio-activation of this azo dye catalyzed by CYPs and peroxidases leads to generation of proximate genotoxic metabolites (the CYP-catalyzed formation of the benzenediazonium cation and the peroxidase-mediated generation of one-electron oxidation products), which covalently modify DNA both in vitro and in vivo. The predominant DNA adduct generated with the benzenediazonium cation was characterized to be 8-(phenylazo)guanine. The Sudan I radical species mediated by peroxidases reacts with the -NH2 group in (deoxy)guanosine, generating the 4-[(deoxy)guanosin-N(2)-yl]Sudan I product. Sudan I

  3. Chemoenzymatic Fc Glycosylation via Engineered Aldehyde Tags

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Glycoproteins with chemically defined glycosylation sites and structures are important biopharmaceutical targets and critical tools for glycobiology. One approach toward constructing such molecules involves chemical glycosylation of aldehyde-tagged proteins. Here, we report the installation of a genetically encoded aldehyde tag at the internal glycosylation site of the crystallizable fragment (Fc) of IgG1. We replaced the natural Fc N-glycosylation sequon with a five amino-acid sequence that ...

  4. Oxidative stress and redox state-regulating enzymes have prognostic relevance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

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    Peroja Pekka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress and redox-regulating enzymes may have roles both in lymphomagenesis and resistance to lymphoma therapy. Previous studies from the pre-rituximab era suggest that antioxidant enzyme expression is related to prognosis in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, although these results cannot be extrapolated to patient populations undergoing modern treatment modalities. In this study we assessed expression of the oxidative stress markers 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG and nitrotyrosine and the antioxidant enzymes thioredoxin (Trx, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD and glutamate-cysteine ligase (GCL via immunohistochemistry in 106 patients with DLBCL. All patients were treated with CHOP-like therapy combined with rituximab. Immunostaining results were correlated with progression-free survival, disease-specific survival and traditional prognostic factors of DLBCL. Results Strong 8-OHdG immunostaining intensity was associated with extranodal involvement (p = 0.00002, a high International Prognostic Index (p = 0.002 and strong Trx (p = 0.011 and GCL (p = 0.0003 expression. Strong Trx staining intensity was associated with poor progression-free survival (p = 0.046 and poor disease-specific survival (p = 0.015. Strong GCL immunostaining intensity predicted poor progression-free survival (p = 0.049. Patients with either strong Trx or strong nitrotyrosine expression showed significantly poorer progression-free survival (p = 0.003 and disease-specific survival (p = 0.031 compared with the other patients. Conclusions The redox state-regulating enzymes GCL and Trx are promising markers in the evaluation of DLBCL prognosis in the era of modern immunochemotherapy.

  5. Production of Oxidative and Hydrolytic Enzymes by Coprinus cinereus (Schaeff. Gray from Sisal Wastes Supplemented with Cow Dung Manure

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    Prosper Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes of the edible and medicinal white rot fungi Coprinus cinereus (Schaeff. Gray mushroom was observed during mycelia growth and fruiting body development in solid substrate fermentation using sisal waste fractions amended with cow dung manure as supplement. Laccase had the highest titre value among the five detected enzymes. Its activity was higher during mycelia growth compared to fruiting phase, with 10% supplemented substrate formulation unmixed sisal leaf decortication residues [abbreviated SL : SB (100 : 0] displaying the highest activity of 39.45±12.05 Ug−1. Lignin peroxidase (LiP exhibited a characteristic wave-like pattern with the highest peaks found either during full mycelia colonization or soon after first flush harvest; the highest activity of 1.93±0.62 Ug−1 was observed on unsupplemented SL : SB (100 : 0 substrate formulation during mycelia colonization. For hydrolytic enzymes, the highest carboxymethyl cellulase (CMCase activity of 2.03±0.70 Ug−1 was observed on 20% supplemented SL : SB (0 : 100 after first flush; that of pectinase (1.90±0.32 Ug−1 was revealed after third flush on 10% supplemented SL : SB (0 : 100 substrate formulation while 10% supplemented SL : SB (25 : 75 exhibited the highest xylanase activity (1.23±0.12 Ug−1 after first flush. These findings show that the activities of both oxidative and hydrolytic enzymes were regulated in line with developmental phase of growth of Coprinus cinereus.

  6. Site-Specific, Covalent Immobilization of Dehalogenase ST2570 Catalyzed by Formylglycine-Generating Enzymes and Its Application in Batch and Semi-Continuous Flow Reactors

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    Hui Jian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Formylglycine-generating enzymes can selectively recognize and oxidize cysteine residues within the sulfatase sub motif at the terminus of proteins to form aldehyde-bearing formylglycine (FGly residues, and are normally used in protein labeling. In this study, an aldehyde tag was introduced to proteins using formylglycine-generating enzymes encoded by a reconstructed set of the pET28a plasmid system for enzyme immobilization. The haloacid dehalogenase ST2570 from Sulfolobus tokodaii was used as a model enzyme. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 (ST2570CQ exhibited significant enzymological properties, such as new free aldehyde groups, a high level of protein expression and improved enzyme activity. SBA-15 has widely been used as an immobilization support for its large surface and excellent thermal and chemical stability. It was functionalized with amino groups by aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The C-terminal aldehyde-tagged ST2570 was immobilized to SBA-15 by covalent binding. The site-specific immobilization of ST2570 avoided the chemical denaturation that occurs in general covalent immobilization and resulted in better fastening compared to physical adsorption. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 showed 3-fold higher thermal stability, 1.2-fold higher catalytic ability and improved operational stability than free ST2570. The site-specific immobilized ST2570 retained 60% of its original activity after seven cycles of batch operation, and it was superior to the ST2570 immobilized to SBA-15 by physical adsorption, which loses 40% of its original activity when used for the second time. It is remarkable that the site-specific immobilized ST2570 still retained 100% of its original activity after 10 cycles of reuse in the semi-continuous flow reactor. Overall, these results provide support for the industrial-scale production and application of site-specific, covalently immobilized ST2570.

  7. Molecular cloning and characterization of two YGL039w genes encoding broad specificity NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductases from Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Hironaga; Watanabe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Nakashima, Nobutaka; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2015-08-01

    Two genes from Kluyveromyces marxianus strain DMB1, YGL039w1 and YGL039w2, encode putative uncharacterized oxidoreductases that respectively share 42 and 44% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae S288c NADPH-dependent methylglyoxal reductase (EC 1.1.1.283). To determine the enzymatic characteristics of their products, the two genes were expressed in recombinant Escherichia coli cells, after which the YGL039w1 and YGL039w2 proteins were purified to homogeneity. In the presence of NADPH, both enzymes showed reductive activities toward at least nine aldehyde substrates, but no NADP(+)-dependent oxidative activities. These two YGL039w proteins thus appear to be aldehyde reductases. In addition, although both enzymes retained more than 70% of their activities after incubation for 30 min at temperatures below 40°C or at pHs between 5.5 and 11.3, YGL039w2 was slightly more thermostable than YGL039w1.

  8. Activation of Human Salivary Aldehyde Dehydrogenase by Sulforaphane: Mechanism and Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Md. Fazle; Laskar, Amaj Ahmed; Maryam, Lubna

    2016-01-01

    Cruciferous vegetables contain the bio-active compound sulforaphane (SF) which has been reported to protect individuals against various diseases by a number of mechanisms, including activation of the phase II detoxification enzymes. In this study, we show that the extracts of five cruciferous vegetables that we commonly consume and SF activate human salivary aldehyde dehydrogenase (hsALDH), which is a very important detoxifying enzyme in the mouth. Maximum activation was observed at 1 μg/ml of cabbage extract with 2.6 fold increase in the activity. There was a ~1.9 fold increase in the activity of hsALDH at SF concentration of ≥ 100 nM. The concentration of SF at half the maximum response (EC50 value) was determined to be 52 ± 2 nM. There was an increase in the Vmax and a decrease in the Km of the enzyme in the presence of SF. Hence, SF interacts with the enzyme and increases its affinity for the substrate. UV absorbance, fluorescence and CD studies revealed that SF binds to hsALDH and does not disrupt its native structure. SF binds with the enzyme with a binding constant of 1.23 x 107 M-1. There is one binding site on hsALDH for SF, and the thermodynamic parameters indicate the formation of a spontaneous strong complex between the two. Molecular docking analysis depicted that SF fits into the active site of ALDH3A1, and facilitates the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. SF being an antioxidant, is very likely to protect the catalytic Cys 243 residue from oxidation, which leads to the increase in the catalytic efficiency and hence the activation of the enzyme. Further, hsALDH which is virtually inactive towards acetaldehyde exhibited significant activity towards it in the presence of SF. It is therefore very likely that consumption of large quantities of cruciferous vegetables or SF supplements, through their activating effect on hsALDH can protect individuals who are alcohol intolerant against acetaldehyde toxicity and also lower the risk of oral cancer

  9. Time course study of oxidative and nitrosative stress and antioxidant enzymes in K2Cr2O7-induced nephrotoxicity

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    Saldívar Liliana

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with oxidative and nitrosative stress. In this study we investigated the relation between the time course of the oxidative and nitrosative stress with kidney damage and alterations in the following antioxidant enzymes: Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, glutathione reductase (GR, and catalase (CAT. Methods Nephrotoxicity was induced in rats by a single injection of K2Cr2O7. Groups of animals were sacrificed on days 1,2,3,4,6,8,10, and 12. Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by histological studies and by measuring creatinine clearance, serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, and urinary excretion of N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG and total protein. Oxidative and nitrosative stress were measured by immunohistochemical localization of protein carbonyls and 3-nitrotyrosine, respectively. Cu, Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD, and CAT were studied by immunohistochemical localization. The activity of total SOD, CAT, GPx, and GR was also measured as well as serum and kidney content of chromium and urinary excretion of NO2 -/NO3-. Data were compared by two-way analysis of variance followed by a post hoc test. Results Serum and kidney chromium content increased reaching the highest value on day 1. Nephrotoxicity was made evident by the decrease in creatinine clearance (days 1–4 and by the increase in serum creatinine (days 1–4, BUN (days 1–6, urinary excretion of NAG (days 1–4, and total protein (day 1–6 and by the structural damage to the proximal tubules (days 1–6. Oxidative and nitrosative stress were clearly evident on days 1–8. Urinary excretion of NO2-/NO3- decreased on days 2–6. Mn-SOD and Cu, Zn-SOD, estimated by immunohistochemistry, and total SOD activity remained unchanged. Activity of GPx decreased on days 3–12 and those of GR and CAT on days 2–10. Similar findings were observed by immunohistochemistry of CAT

  10. Effects of gaseous hydrogen fluoride on oxidative enzymes of Pelargonium zonale leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poovaiah, B.W.; Wiebe, H.H.

    1971-10-01

    Changes in peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase enzymes were established histochemically in hydrogen fluoride fumigated leaves of Pelargonium zonale. Highest peroxidase and cytochrome oxidase activities were localized near the injured areas of fumigated leaves, and the greatest increase was observed in the phloem region.

  11. Aldehydes in Artic Snow at Barrow (AK) during the Barrow 2009 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Gallet, Jean-Charles; Domine, Florent; Beine, Harry; Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Weibring, Petter; Walega, James; Fried, Alan; Richter, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Aldehydes (RCHO) are key reactive intermediates in hydrocarbon oxidation and in OH cycling. They are also emitted and taken up by the snowpack and a combination of both physical and photochemical processes are likely involved. Since the photolysis of aldehydes is a source of HOx radicals, these exchanges can modify the oxidative capacity of the overlying air. Formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (MeCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methylglyoxal (MeCOCHO) concentrations were measured in over 250 snow samples collected during the Barrow 2009 campaign between late February and mid April 2009. Both continental and marine snowpacks were studied as well as frost flowers on sea ice. We found that HCHO was the most abundant aldehyde (1 to 9 µg/L), but significant concentrations of dicarbonyls glyoxal and methylglyoxal were also measured for the first time in Arctic snow. Similar concentrations were measured for the continental and marine snowpacks but some frost flowers exhibited HCHO concentrations as high as 150 µg/L. Daily cycles in the surface snow were observed for HCHO and CH3CHO but also for the dicarbonyls and we concluded to a photochemical production of these species from organic precursors. Additional data such as gas phase concentrations for the measured aldehydes and snow physical properties (specific surface area, density …) will be used to discuss on the location of aldehydes in the snow. This is essential to identify and quantify the physical processes that occur during the exchange of trace gases between the snow and the atmosphere.

  12. Protective role of Cys-178 against the inactivation and oligomerization of human insulin-degrading enzyme by oxidation and nitrosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralat, Luis A; Ren, Min; Schilling, Alexander B; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a 110-kDa metalloendopeptidase, hydrolyzes several physiologically relevant peptides, including insulin and amyloid-beta (Abeta). Human IDE has 13 cysteines and is inhibited by hydrogen peroxide and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), donors of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, respectively. Here, we report that the oxidative burst of BV-2 microglial cells leads to oxidation or nitrosylation of secreted IDE, leading to the reduced activity. Hydrogen peroxide and GSNO treatment of IDE reduces the V(max) for Abeta degradation, increases IDE oligomerization, and decreases IDE thermostability. Additionally, this inhibitory response of IDE is substrate-dependent, biphasic for Abeta degradation but monophasic for a shorter bradykinin-mimetic substrate. Our mutational analysis of IDE and peptide mass fingerprinting of GSNO-treated IDE using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer reveal a surprising interplay of Cys-178 with Cys-110 and Cys-819 for catalytic activity and with Cys-789 and Cys-966 for oligomerization. Cys-110 is near the zinc-binding catalytic center and is normally buried. The oxidation and nitrosylation of Cys-819 allow Cys-110 to be oxidized or nitrosylated, leading to complete inactivation of IDE. Cys-789 is spatially adjacent to Cys-966, and their nitrosylation and oxidation together trigger the oligomerization and inhibition of IDE. Interestingly, the Cys-178 modification buffers the inhibition caused by Cys-819 modification and prevents the oxidation or nitrosylation of Cys-110. The Cys-178 modification can also prevent the oligomerization-mediated inhibition. Thus, IDE can be intricately regulated by reactive oxygen or nitrogen species. The structure of IDE reveals the molecular basis for the long distance interactions of these cysteines and how they regulate IDE function.

  13. Identification and characterization of an antennae-specific aldehyde oxidase from the navel orangeworm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Moo Choo

    Full Text Available Antennae-specific odorant-degrading enzymes (ODEs are postulated to inactivate odorant molecules after they convey their signal. Different classes of insect ODEs are specific to esters, alcohols, and aldehydes--the major functional groups of female-produced, hydrophobic sex pheromones from moth species. Esterases that rapidly inactive acetate and other esters have been well-studied, but less is known about aldehyde oxidases (AOXs. Here we report cloning of an aldehyde oxidase, AtraAOX2, from the antennae of the navel orangeworm (NOW, Amyelois transitella, and the first activity characterization of a recombinant insect AOX. AtraAOX2 gene spans 3,813 bp and encodes a protein with 1,270 amino acid residues. AtraAOX2 cDNA was expressed in baculovirus-infected insect Sf21 cells as a ≈280 kDa homodimer with 140 kDa subunits. Recombinant AtraAOX2 degraded Z11Z13-16Ald and plant volatile aldehydes as substrates. However, as expected for aldehyde oxidases, recombinant AtraAOX2 did not show specificity for Z11Z13-16Ald, the main constituent of the sex pheromone, but showed high activity for plant volatile aldehydes. Our data suggest AtraAOX2 might be involved in degradation of a diversity of aldehydes including sex pheromones, plant-derived semiochemicals, and chemical cues for oviposition sites. Additionally, AtraAOX2 could protect the insect's olfactory system from xenobiotics, including pesticides that might reach the sensillar lymph surrounding the olfactory receptor neurons.

  14. Enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on methylene blue and the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Gorachand; Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Lapidus, Lisa J; Lillehoj, Peter B

    2017-06-15

    Enzyme-free electrochemical sensors enable rapid, high sensitivity measurements without the limitations associated with enzyme reporters. However, the performance of non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors tends to suffer from slow electrode kinetics and poor signal stability. We report a new enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on a unique competitive detection scheme using methylene blue (MB), hydrazine and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). This scheme is coupled with a robust immunosandwich format employing a MB-labelled detection antibody as a non-enzymatic reporter. In the presence of the target antigen, surface-immobilized MB consumes interfacial hydrazine thereby diminishing the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt NPs. Thus, the concentration of the antigen is directly proportional to the reduction in the electrochemical signal. For proof-of-concept, this sensor was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), an important malaria biomarker, in unadulterated human saliva samples. Chronocoulometric measurements showed that this platform exhibits pM-range sensitivity, high specificity and good reproducibility, making it well suited for many biosensing applications including noninvasive diagnostic testing.

  15. Organization of the Escherichia coli aerobic enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation in dynamic domains within the cytoplasmic membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Heiko; Dempwolff, Felix; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Riehle, Marc; Schäfer, Caspar; Pohl, Thomas; Graumann, Peter; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2014-06-01

    The Escherichia coli cytoplasmic membrane contains the enzyme complexes of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Not much is known about their supramolecular organization and their dynamics within the membrane in this model organism. In mitochondria and other bacteria, it was demonstrated by nondenaturing electrophoretic methods and electron microscopy that the OXPHOS complexes are organized in so-called supercomplexes, stable assemblies with a defined number of the individual enzyme complexes. To investigate the organization of the E. coli enzyme complexes of aerobic OXPHOS in vivo, we established fluorescent protein fusions of the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the succinate:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the cytochrome bd-I, and the cytochrome bo3 terminal oxidases, and the FoF1 ATP-synthase. The fusions were integrated in the chromosome to prevent artifacts caused by protein overproduction. Biochemical analysis revealed that all modified complexes were fully assembled, active, and stable. The distribution of the OXPHOS complexes in living cells was determined using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The dynamics within the membrane were detected by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. All aerobic OXPHOS complexes showed an uneven distribution in large mobile patches within the E. coli cytoplasmic membrane. It is discussed whether the individual OXPHOS complexes are organized as clustered individual complexes, here called "segrazones."

  16. Crystal Structure of Reduced and of Oxidized Peroxiredoxin IV Enzyme Reveals a Stable Oxidized Decamer and a Non-disulfide-bonded Intermediate in the Catalytic Cycle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenbo; Tavender, Timothy J.; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bulleid, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxiredoxin IV (PrxIV) is an endoplasmic reticulum-localized enzyme that metabolizes the hydrogen peroxide produced by endoplasmic reticulum oxidase 1 (Ero1). It has been shown to play a role in de novo disulfide formation, oxidizing members of the protein disulfide isomerase family of enzymes, and is a member of the typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin family. We have determined the crystal structure of both reduced and disulfide-bonded, as well as a resolving cysteine mutant of human PrxIV. We show that PrxIV has a similar structure to other typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and undergoes a conformational change from a fully folded to a locally unfolded form following the formation of a disulfide between the peroxidatic and resolving cysteine residues. Unlike other mammalian typical 2-Cys peroxiredoxins, we show that human PrxIV forms a stable decameric structure even in its disulfide-bonded state. In addition, the structure of a resolving cysteine mutant reveals an intermediate in the reaction cycle that adopts the locally unfolded conformation. Interestingly the peroxidatic cysteine in the crystal structure is sulfenylated rather than sulfinylated or sulfonylated. In addition, the peroxidatic cysteine in the resolving cysteine mutant is resistant to hyper-oxidation following incubation with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. These results highlight some unique properties of PrxIV and suggest that the equilibrium between the fully folded and locally unfolded forms favors the locally unfolded conformation upon sulfenylation of the peroxidatic cysteine residue. PMID:21994946

  17. Kinetic and solvent deuterium isotope effects in the oxidation of putrescine catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pałka, Katarzyna; Szymańska, Jolanta; Kańska, Marianna

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the kinetic isotope effects and solvent isotope effects in the reaction of the deamination of [(1R)-(2)H ] putrescine--catalysed by enzyme diamine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6)--were determined using a non-competitive spectroscopic method. Putrescine, stereospecifically labelled with deuterium, was obtained by enzymatic decarboxylation of l-ornithine that was carried out in a fully deuteriated incubation medium.

  18. ANTI-OXIDANT AND ENZYME-INHIBITORY POTENTIAL OF MARINE STREPTOMYCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Suthindhiran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Marine actinomycetes are potential source for the discovery of novel compounds and enzymes. Though extensive research on marine actinomycetes is underway globally, the actinomycetes research from Indian marine ecosystem is unexplored and understudied. Hence, the present research is focussed on the screening of bioactive compounds from marine actinomycetes isolated from Indian coastal region. This study is designed to determine the antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory potential of Streptomyces sp. VITMSS05 strain, isolated from Marakkanam, southern coast of India. An actinomycetes strain designated as VITMSS05 was isolated. This strain was cultivated in Starch Caesin Agar medium (SCA supplemented with sea water. The cultural, morphological and molecular characterization was determined for the isolate. The crude extract of the isolate was extracted with ethyl acetate. Antioxidant activity of the crude extract was determined by DPPH radical scavenging assay. Alpha amylase and alpha glucosidase inhibitory potential of the extract was determined. Based on the phenotypic and phylogenetic analysis the strain was identified as Streptomyces sp. Significant antioxidant activity of the extract was observed with an IC50 value of 92.49 μg mL-1. The extract shows 64.1% inhibition on α-amylase and 91.5% inhibition on α-glucosidase at 100 μg mL-1 with an IC50 value of 385.97 and 42.89 μg mL-1. From the results it is evident that the ethyl acetate extract of Streptomyces sp. VITMSS05 has potent antioxidant and enzyme inhibitory activity in vitro. The combined effect of free radical scavenging and enzyme inhibition makes it a potent anti diabetic drug.

  19. Malate metabolism in Bacillus subtilis: distinct roles for three classes of malate-oxidizing enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Frederik M; Stülke, Jörg

    2013-02-01

    The Gram-positive soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis uses glucose and malate as the preferred carbon sources. In the presence of either glucose or malate, the expression of genes and operons for the utilization of secondary carbon sources is subject to carbon catabolite repression. While glucose is a preferred substrate in many organisms from bacteria to man, the factors that contribute to the preference for malate have so far remained elusive. In this work, we have studied the contribution of the different malate-metabolizing enzymes in B. subtilis, and we have elucidated their distinct functions. The malate dehydrogenase and the phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase are both essential for malate utilization; they introduce malate into gluconeogenesis. The NADPH-generating malic enzyme YtsJ is important to establish the cellular pools of NADPH for anabolic reactions. Finally, the NADH-generating malic enzymes MaeA, MalS, and MleA are involved in keeping the ATP levels high. Together, this unique array of distinct activities makes malate a preferred carbon source for B. subtilis.

  20. Selenium ameliorates arsenic induced oxidative stress through modulation of antioxidant enzymes and thiols in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Rana Pratap; Singh, Pradyumna Kumar; Awasthi, Surabhi; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Tripathi, Rudra Deo

    2014-09-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of rice is a major problem for South-East Asia. In the present study, the effect of selenium (Se) on rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants exposed to As was studied in hydroponic culture. Arsenic accumulation, plant growth, thiolic ligands and antioxidative enzyme activities were assayed after single (As and Se) and simultaneous supplementations (As + Se). The results indicated that the presence of Se (25 µM) decreased As accumulation by threefold in roots and twofold in shoots as compared to single As (25 µM) exposed plants. Arsenic induced oxidative stress in roots and shoots was significantly ameliorated by Se supplementation. The observed positive response was found associated with the increased activities of ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx; EC 1.11.1.9) and induced levels of non-protein thiols (NPTs), glutathione (GSH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in As + Se exposed plants as compared to single As treatment. Selenium supplementation modulated the thiol metabolism enzymes viz., γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-ECS; EC 6.3.2.2), glutathione-S-transferase (GST; EC 2.5.1.18) and phytochelatin synthase (PCS; EC 2.3.2.15). Gene expression analysis of several metalloid responsive genes (LOX, SOD and MATE) showed upregulation during As stress, however, significant downregulation during As + Se exposure as compared to single As treatment. Gene expressions of enzymes of antioxidant and GSH and PC biosynthetic systems, such as APX, CAT, GPx, γ-ECS and PCS were found to be significantly positively correlated with their enzyme activities. The findings suggested that Se supplementation could be an effective strategy to reduce As accumulation and toxicity in rice plants.

  1. Green tea diet decreases PCB 126-induced oxidative stress in mice by up-regulating antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsome, Bradley J; Petriello, Michael C; Han, Sung Gu; Murphy, Margaret O; Eske, Katryn E; Sunkara, Manjula; Morris, Andrew J; Hennig, Bernhard

    2014-02-01

    Superfund chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls pose a serious human health risk due to their environmental persistence and link to multiple diseases. Selective bioactive food components such as flavonoids have been shown to ameliorate PCB toxicity, but primarily in an in vitro setting. Here, we show that mice fed a green tea-enriched diet and subsequently exposed to environmentally relevant doses of coplanar PCB exhibit decreased overall oxidative stress primarily due to the up-regulation of a battery of antioxidant enzymes. C57BL/6 mice were fed a low-fat diet supplemented with green tea extract (GTE) for 12 weeks and exposed to 5 μmol PCB 126/kg mouse weight (1.63 mg/kg-day) on weeks 10, 11 and 12 (total body burden: 4.9 mg/kg). F2-isoprostane and its metabolites, established markers of in vivo oxidative stress, measured in plasma via HPLC-MS/MS exhibited fivefold decreased levels in mice supplemented with GTE and subsequently exposed to PCB compared to animals on a control diet exposed to PCB. Livers were collected and harvested for both messenger RNA and protein analyses, and it was determined that many genes transcriptionally controlled by aryl hydrocarbon receptor and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 proteins were up-regulated in PCB-exposed mice fed the green tea-supplemented diet. An increased induction of genes such as SOD1, GSR, NQO1 and GST, key antioxidant enzymes, in these mice (green tea plus PCB) may explain the observed decrease in overall oxidative stress. A diet supplemented with green tea allows for an efficient antioxidant response in the presence of PCB 126, which supports the emerging paradigm that healthful nutrition may be able to bolster and buffer a physiological system against the toxicities of environmental pollutants.

  2. Effect of fat feeding on pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant enzyme systems in rat intestine: possible role in the turnover of enterocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Aasma; Gill, Ravinder; Dudeja, Pradeep K; Mohan, Harsh; Mahmood, Akhtar

    2009-06-01

    Immature epithelial cells generated in the crypt base undergo differentiation while progressing to the villus tip, where the cells upon apoptosis are detached from the underlying muscular tissue. We previously reported that lipid peroxidation might be involved in the turnover of enterocytes across the crypt-villus axis in rat intestine (Dig Dis Sci 52:1840-1844, 2007). To examine whether long-term feeding of fat with different fatty-acid composition influences this process, in the present study we investigated the effect of feeding fish oil (n - 3) and corn oil (n - 6) polyunsaturated fatty acids on lipid per-oxidation and anti-oxidant systems in different epithelial cell fractions isolated in rat intestine. Feeding fish oil or corn oil markedly enhanced lipid per-oxidation levels of enterocytes throughout villus height compared with control, but there was no difference in the distribution profile of pro- and anti-oxidant enzyme systems and lipid per-oxidation across the crypt-villus axis under these conditions. Analysis of lipid peroxidation levels in different cell fractions revealed that the thiobarbituric acid reactive substance were 9- to 11-fold higher at the villus tip compared with at the crypt base. The activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase were 2- to 5-fold higher in villus tip compared to the crypt region. However, the activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were 6- to 8-fold high at the crypt base compared with at villus tip cells. Immunocytolocalization of superoxide dismutase showed high staining in crypt base compared with that in villus, tip cells. These findings further suggest that generation of reactive oxygen species in enterocytes across the crypt-villus axis may be involved in turnover of enterocytes across the crypt-villus unit in rat intestine.

  3. Regulatory enzymes of mitochondrial beta-oxidation as targets for treatment of the metabolic syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreurs, M.; Kuipers, F.; van der Leij, F. R.

    2010-01-01

    P>Insulin sensitizers like metformin generally act through pathways triggered by adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) controls mitochondrial beta-oxidation and is inhibited by malonyl-CoA, the product of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). The adenosine

  4. Plasma Homocysteine Is Associated with Increased Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Enzyme Activity in Welders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Hsin Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the association of vitamin B6 status and plasma homocysteine with oxidative stress and antioxidant capacities in welders. Workers were divided into either the welding exposure group (n=57 or the nonexposure controls (n=42 based on whether they were employed as welders. There were no significant differences in vitamin B6 status and plasma homocysteine concentration between the welding exposure group and the nonexposure controls. The welding exposure group had significantly higher levels of oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and lower erythrocyte glutathione concentration and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities when compared to nonexposure controls. Plasma pyridoxal 5′-phosphate concentration did not correlate with oxidative stress indicators or antioxidant capacities in either group. However, plasma homocysteine significantly correlated with total antioxidant capacity (TAC (partial rs=-0.34, P<0.05 and erythrocyte SOD activities (partial rs=0.29, P<0.05 after adjusting for potential confounders in the welding exposure group. In the welding exposure group, adequate vitamin B6 status was not associated with oxidative stress or antioxidant capacities. However, elevated plasma homocysteine seemed to be a major contributing factor to antioxidant capacities (TAC and erythrocyte SOD activities in welders.

  5. Impaired energy metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baraibar, Martín A; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of oxidized proteins is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging. Adult muscle stem cell (or satellite cell) replication and differentiation is compromised with age contributing to sarcopenia. However, the molecular events related to satellite cell dysfunction during aging are not...

  6. Effect of curcumin on LDL oxidation in vitro, and lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes in cholesterol fed rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfouz, Mohamedain M; Zhou, Qi; Kummerow, Fred A

    2011-11-01

    In this study we examined the antioxidant effect of curcumin on lipid oxidation in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, curcumin at 5 microgM concentration completely prevented low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation by CuS0(4), indicating that curcumin is an effective antioxidant in vitro. In vivo, feeding a pure cholesterol (PC)-rich diet to rabbits significantly increased the plasma and liver lipids as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) levels. Addition of curcumin to the PC diet did not show any effect on either plasma lipid and TBARS or liver lipids. Liver TBARS tended to decrease but that decrease was not significant. Erythrocyte glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity was significantly decreased while catalase activity was significantly increased in rabbits fed a PC diet. The addition of curcumin to a PC diet did not show any significant effect on erythrocyte enzyme activities compared to the rabbits fed a PC diet. The liver GSH-Px and catalase activities were significantly decreased in rabbits fed a PC diet, but the addition of curcumin to the PC diet enhanced the liver GSH-Px activity, which became nonsignificantly different from the control group. These results were discussed considering that curcumin may not be well absorbed and it did not reach a level high enough in vivo to overcome the severe hypercholesterolemia and oxidative stress produced by the PC-rich diet.

  7. Zebrafish high-throughput screening to study the impact of dissolvable metal oxide nanoparticles on the hatching enzyme, ZHE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sijie; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Ear, Jason; Chang, Chong Hyun; Zhang, Haiyuan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Yamada, Kristin; Meng, Huan; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Mädler, Lutz; Damoiseaux, Robert; Xia, Tian; Godwin, Hilary A; Lin, Shuo; Nel, André E

    2013-05-27

    The zebrafish is emerging as a model organism for the safety assessment and hazard ranking of engineered nanomaterials. In this Communication, the implementation of a roboticized high-throughput screening (HTS) platform with automated image analysis is demonstrated to assess the impact of dissolvable oxide nanoparticles on embryo hatching. It is further demonstrated that this hatching interference is mechanistically linked to an effect on the metalloprotease, ZHE 1, which is responsible for degradation of the chorionic membrane. The data indicate that 4 of 24 metal oxide nanoparticles (CuO, ZnO, Cr2 O3 , and NiO) could interfere with embryo hatching by a chelator-sensitive mechanism that involves ligation of critical histidines in the ZHE1 center by the shed metal ions. A recombinant ZHE1 enzymatic assay is established to demonstrate that the dialysates from the same materials responsible for hatching interference also inhibit ZHE1 activity in a dose-dependent fashion. A peptide-based BLAST search identifies several additional aquatic species that express enzymes with homologous histidine-based catalytic centers, suggesting that the ZHE1 mechanistic paradigm could be used to predict the toxicity of a large number of oxide nanoparticles that pose a hazard to aquatic species.

  8. Biomimetic oxidation studies. 9. Mechanistic aspects of the oxidation of alcohols with functional,active site methane monooxygenase enzyme models in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabion, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Groupement de Recherche de Lacq, Artix (France); Chen, S.; Wang, J.; Buchanan, R.M. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States); Seris, J.L. [Groupement de recherche de Lacq, Artix (France); Fish, R.H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)]|[Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-12-13

    The syntheses of biomimetic complexes that mimic the major structural features of the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase enzyme (MMO) and, more importantly, that provide similar alkane functionalization activity, in the presence of an oxidant, have been of great interest to the discipline of bioinorganic chemistry. In this communication, we will demonstrate the feasibility of conducting biomimetic oxidation studies in H{sub 2}O with soluble substrates, i.e., alcohols (cyclohexanol, benzyl alcohol), using H{sub 2}O-stable MMO mimics at pH 4.2, and the oxidant, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). Both the Mitusunobu procedure and the mesylate displacement reaction proceeded with complete inversion of the stereo-center and provided optically pure penultimate intermediate (>99.9% ee). The synthesis was completed by reduction of the nitro group under standard conditions to deliver LY300164 in 87%. In summary, we have developed an efficient and environmentally benign synthesis of the 5H-2,3-benzodiazepine LY300164 that provides the optically pure compound in 51% overall yield. Intramolecular hydrazone alkylation led to a remarkably facile and selective formation of the benzodiazepine. Furthermore, the application of resins to whole-cell-based biotransformations should find general utility for similar reactions that are complicated by component inhibition and product isolation. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Health-Beneficial Phenolic Aldehyde in Antigonon leptopus Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanisree Mulabagal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tea prepared from the aerial parts of Antigonon leptopus is used as a remedy for cold and pain relief in many countries. In this study, A. leptopus tea, prepared from the dried aerial parts, was evaluated for lipid peroxidation (LPO and cyclooxygenase (COX-1 and COX-2 enzyme inhibitory activities. The tea as a dried extract inhibited LPO, COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes by 78%, 38% and 89%, respectively, at 100 g/mL. Bioassay-guided fractionation of the extract yielded a selective COX-2 enzyme inhibitory phenolic aldehyde, 2,3,4-trihydroxy benzaldehyde. Also, it showed LPO inhibitory activity by 68.3% at 6.25 g/mL. Therefore, we have studied other hydroxy benzaldehydes and their methoxy analogs for LPO, COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes inhibitory activities and found that compound 1 gave the highest COX-2 enzyme inhibitory activity as indicated by a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 at 9.7 g/mL. The analogs showed only marginal LPO activity at 6.25 g/mL. The hydroxy analogs 6, 7 and 9 showed 55%, 61% and 43% of COX-2 inhibition at 100 g/mL. However, hydroxy benzaldehydes 3 and 12 showed selective COX-1 inhibition while compounds 4 and 10 gave little or no COX-2 enzyme inhibition at 100 g/mL. At the same concentration, compounds 14, 21 and 22 inhibited COX-1 by 83, 85 and 70%, respectively. Similarly, compounds 18, 19 and 23 inhibited COX-2 by 68%, 72% and 70%, at 100 g/mL. This is the first report on the isolation of compound 1 from A. leptopus tea with selective COX-2 enzyme and LPO inhibitory activities.

  10. Structural and functional analysis of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halavaty, Andrei S; Rich, Rebecca L; Chen, Chao; Joo, Jeong Chan; Minasov, George; Dubrovska, Ievgeniia; Winsor, James R; Myszka, David G; Duban, Mark; Shuvalova, Ludmilla; Yakunin, Alexander F; Anderson, Wayne F

    2015-05-01

    When exposed to high osmolarity, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) restores its growth and establishes a new steady state by accumulating the osmoprotectant metabolite betaine. Effective osmoregulation has also been implicated in the acquirement of a profound antibiotic resistance by MRSA. Betaine can be obtained from the bacterial habitat or produced intracellularly from choline via the toxic betaine aldehyde (BA) employing the choline dehydrogenase and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) enzymes. Here, it is shown that the putative betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase SACOL2628 from the early MRSA isolate COL (SaBADH) utilizes betaine aldehyde as the primary substrate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as the cofactor. Surface plasmon resonance experiments revealed that the affinity of NAD(+), NADH and BA for SaBADH is affected by temperature, pH and buffer composition. Five crystal structures of the wild type and three structures of the Gly234Ser mutant of SaBADH in the apo and holo forms provide details of the molecular mechanisms of activity and substrate specificity/inhibition of this enzyme.

  11. Effect of dose and source of supplemental zinc on immune response and oxidative enzymes in lambs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagalakshmi, D; Dhanalakshmi, K; Himabindu, D

    2009-10-01

    An experiment of 150 days was conducted on 42 male Nellore lambs (28.3 +/- 0.64 kg) to determine the effect of zinc (Zn) supplementation (0,15, 30 and 45 ppm) in diet from inorganic (ZnSO(4)) and organic (Zn proteinate) sources on immune response and antioxidant enzyme activities by allotting them randomly to 7 groups in completely randomized design. The basal diet (BD) contained 29.28 ppm Zn. The humoral immune response assessed at 75 d against B. abortus was higher (Peffect on titres against chicken RBC antigen. The cell mediated immune response assessed as delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against phytohaemagglutinin-P and in vitro lymphocyte proliferative response against concanavalin A at 150 d was higher (Peffect on immune response. The DTH response and antibody titres against B.abortus were higher (Pconcentration and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity (75 d of experiment) was higher in Zn supplemented lambs. The ALP activity increased (P enzyme activities and immune response compared to ZnSO(4).

  12. Pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase: a circulating enzyme that modifies normal and oxidized lipoproteins in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Shamir, R.; Johnson, W. J.; Morlock-Fitzpatrick, K; R. Zolfaghari; Li, L; mas, e; Lombardo, D; Morel, D W; Fisher, E A

    1996-01-01

    Pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) hydrolyzes cholesteryl esters (CE), triglycerides (TG), and lysophospholipids, with CE and TG hydrolysis stimulated by cholate. Originally thought to be confined to the gastrointestinal system, CEL has been reported in the plasma of humans and other mammals, implying its potential in vivo to modify lipids associated with LDL, HDL (CE, TG), and oxidized LDL (lysophosphatidylcholine, lysoPC). We measured the concentration of CEL in human plasma as 1.2+/-0....

  13. Catalytic production of methyl acrylates by gold-mediated cross coupling of unsaturated aldehydes with methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakalos, Stavros; Zugic, Branko; Stowers, Kara J.; Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M.; Madix, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    Modern methods of esterification, one of the most important reactions in organic synthesis, are reaching their limits, as far as waste and expense are concerned. Novel chemical approaches to ester formation are therefore of importance. Here we report a simple procedure free of caustic reagents or byproducts for the facile direct oxidative methyl esterification of aldehydes over nanoporous Au catalysts. Complementary model studies on single crystal gold surfaces establish the fundamental reactions involved. We find that methanol more readily reacts with adsorbed active oxygen than do the aldehydes, but that once the aldehydes do react, they form strongly-bound acrylates that block reactive sites and decrease the yields of acrylic esters under steady flow conditions at 420 K. Significant improvements in yield can be achieved by operating at higher temperatures, which render the site-blocking acrylates unstable.

  14. Quercetin changes purinergic enzyme activities and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Zanini, Daniela; Cardoso, Andréia M; Abadalla, Fátima H; Thomé, Gustavo R; Murussi, Camila; Polachini, Carla R N; Delenogare, Diéssica P; Loro, Vania L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-12-01

    Diseases related to thyroid hormones have been extensively studied because affect a large number of individuals, and these hormones participate in the regulation of the whole organism homeostasis. However, little is known about the involvement of purinergic signaling related to oxidative stress in hypothyroidism and possible therapeutic adjuncts for treatment of this disorder. Thus, the present study investigates the effects of quercetin on NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities, platelet aggregation and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism. Methimazole at a concentration of 20mg/100mL was administered for 90days. From the second month the animals received quercetin 10 or 25mg/kg for 60days. Results showed that: Ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity decreased in methimazole/water group and the treatment with quercetin 25mg/kg decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities. Moreover, platelet aggregation increased in methimazole/water group. Lipid peroxidation increased while superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased, but, interestingly, the treatment with quercetin reversed these changes. These results demonstrated that quercetin modulates adenine nucleotide hydrolysis decreasing the ADP formation and adenosine deamination. At the same time quercetin improves the oxidative profile, as well as reduces platelet aggregation, which together with the modulation in the nucleotides levels can contribute to the prevention of platelet disorders.

  15. Thiamine biosensor based on oxidative trapping of enzyme-substrate intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halma, Matilte; Doumèche, Bastien; Hecquet, Laurence; Prévot, Vanessa; Mousty, Christine; Charmantray, Franck

    2017-01-15

    In the present work, we describe a new thiamine amperometric biosensor based on thiamine pyrophosphate (ThDP)-dependent transketolase (TK)-catalyzed reaction, followed by the oxidative trapping of TK intermediate α,β-dihydroxyethylthiamine diphosphate (DHEThDP) within the enzymatic active site. For the biosensor design purpose, TK from Escherichia coli (TKec) was immobilized in Mg2Al-NO3 Layered Double Hydroxides (LDH) and the electrochemical detection was achieved with the TKec/LDH modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The transduction process was based on the ability of Fe(CN)6(3-) to oxidize DHEThDP to glycolic acid along with ThDP regeneration. The released Fe(CN)6(4-) was re-oxidized at +0.5V vs Ag-AgCl and the reaction was followed by chronoamperometry. The TKec/LDH/GCE biosensor was optimized using the best TK donor substrates, namely l-erythrulose and d-fructose-6-phosphate. ThDP was assayed with great sensitivity (3831mAM(-1)cm(-2)) over 20-400nM linear range.

  16. Purification, characterization, and properties of an aryl aldehyde oxidoreductase from Nocardia sp. strain NRRL 5646.

    OpenAIRE

    Li, T.; Rosazza, J P

    1997-01-01

    An aryl aldehyde oxidoreductase from Nocardia sp. strain NRRL 5646 was purified 196-fold by a combination of Mono-Q, Reactive Green 19 agarose affinity, and hydroxyapatite chromatographies. The purified enzyme runs as a single band of 140 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The molecular mass was estimated to be 163 +/- 3.8 kDa by gel filtration, indicating that this enzyme is a monomeric protein. The binding of the enzyme to Reactive Green 19 agarose was Mg2+ de...

  17. Process requirements of galactose oxidase catalyzed oxidation of alcohols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Asbjørn Toftgaard; R. Birmingham, William; Rehn, Gustav

    2015-01-01

    biocatalyst for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones, respectively. However, GOase requires a number of additives to sustain its catalytic function, such as the enzyme catalase for degradation of the byproduct hydrogen peroxide as well as single......-electron oxidants to reactivate the enzyme upon loss of the amino acid radical in its active site. In this work, the addition of catalase, single-electron oxidants, and copper ions was investigated systematically in order to find the minimum concentrations required to obtain a fully active GOase. Furthermore......, it was found that the concentration and type of buffer is essential for the activity of GOase, which was significantly more active in sodium phosphate buffer than in other buffers investigated. Enzyme stability and oxygen requirements are of crucial importance for the implementation of oxidase based processes...

  18. Regulation of NF-B-Induced Inflammatory Signaling by Lipid Peroxidation-Derived Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C. S. Yadav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of a wide range of diseases including cancer. This view has broadened significantly with the recent discoveries that reactive oxygen species initiated lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of potentially toxic lipid aldehyde species such as 4-hydroxy-trans-2-nonenal (HNE, acrolein, and malondialdehyde which activate various signaling intermediates that regulate cellular activity and dysfunction via a process called redox signaling. The lipid aldehyde species formed during synchronized enzymatic pathways result in the posttranslational modification of proteins and DNA leading to cytotoxicity and genotoxicty. Among the lipid aldehyde species, HNE has been widely accepted as a most toxic and abundant lipid aldehyde generated during lipid peroxidation. HNE and its glutathione conjugates have been shown to regulate redox-sensitive transcription factors such as NF-B and AP-1 via signaling through various protein kinase cascades. Activation of redox-sensitive transcription factors and their nuclear localization leads to transcriptional induction of several genes responsible for cell survival, differentiation, and death. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which the lipid aldehydes transduce activation of NF-B signaling pathways that may help to develop therapeutic strategies for the prevention of a number of inflammatory diseases.

  19. Nitrite promotes protein carbonylation and Strecker aldehyde formation in experimental fermented sausages: are both events connected?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaverde, A; Ventanas, J; Estévez, M

    2014-12-01

    The role played by curing agents (nitrite, ascorbate) on protein oxidation and Strecker aldehyde formation is studied. To fulfill this objective, increasing concentrations of nitrite (0, 75 and 150ppm) and ascorbate (0, 250 and 500ppm) were added to sausages subjected to a 54day drying process. The concurrence of intense proteolysis, protein carbonylation and formation of Strecker aldehydes during processing of sausages suggests that α-aminoadipic semialdehyde (AAS) and γ-glutamic semialdehyde (GGS) may be implicated in the formation of Strecker aldehydes. The fact that nitrite (150ppm, ingoing amount) significantly promoted the formation of protein carbonyls at early stages of processing and the subsequent formation of Strecker aldehydes provides strength to this hypothesis. Ascorbate (125 and 250ppm) controlled the overall extent of protein carbonylation in sausages without declining the formation of Strecker aldehydes. These results may contribute to understanding the chemistry fundamentals of the positive influence of nitrite on the flavor and overall acceptability of cured muscle foods.

  20. Combined Effects of Excess Mn and Low pH on Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Enzymes in Cucumber Roots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qing-hua; ZHU Zhu-jun; LI Juan; QIAN Qiong-qiu

    2006-01-01

    The effects of excess Mn on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in cucumber roots under different pH (pH 4.5 and 6.5) were studied. The results indicated that lipid peroxidation was increasingly serious with the increased concentration of Mn, especially under low pH. As a result, the growth of cucumber roots and shoots was significantly inhibited. CAT was sensitive to excess Mn, and its activity significantly decreased under excess Mn and low pH, while activities of GPX, APX, DHAR and GR increased under low pH and to some extent under excess Mn, which indicated their important roles in scavenging reactive oxygen in tolerance to low pH and excess Mn of cucumber roots.

  1. Lithium and valproate modulate antioxidant enzymes and prevent ouabain-induced oxidative damage in an animal model of mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jornada, Luciano K; Valvassori, Samira S; Steckert, Amanda V; Moretti, Morgana; Mina, Francielle; Ferreira, Camila L; Arent, Camila O; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Quevedo, João

    2011-02-01

    In this study, we assessed the oxidative stress parameters in rats submitted to an animal model of mania induced by ouabain (OUA), which included the use of lithium (Li) and valproate (VPA). Li and VPA treatment reversed and prevented the OUA-induced damage in these structures, however, this effect varies depending on the brain region and treatment regimen. Moreover, the activity of the antioxidant enzymes, namely, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) was found to be increased and decreased, respectively, in the brain of OUA-administered rats. Li and VPA modulated SOD and CAT activities in OUA-subjected rats in both experimental models. Our results support the notion that Li and VPA exert antioxidant-like properties in the brain of rats submitted to animal model of mania induced by ouabain.

  2. Synthesis of Discodermolide Subunits by S(E)2' Addition of Nonracemic Allenylstannanes to Aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, James A.; Lu, Zhi-Hui; Johns, Brian A.

    1998-02-01

    Three subunits, 15, 29, and 34, of the immunosuppressant discodermolide were prepared starting from (S)-3-[(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)oxy]-2-methylpropanal ((S)-1) and the enantioenriched allenylstannanes (P)-2a, (P)-2b, and (P)-31. The route to 15 involved BF(3)-promoted addition of stannane (P)-2a to aldehyde (S)-1 which afforded the syn,syn-homopropargylic alcohol adduct 3 in 97% yield. The derived p-methoxybenzylidene acetal 5 was treated with Red-Al to effect cleavage of the pivalate and reduction of the double bond leading to the (E)-allylic alcohol 6. Sharpless epoxidation and subsequent addition of Me(2)CuCNLi(2) yielded the syn,syn,syn,anti stereopentad, diol 8. Protection of the secondary alcohol and oxidation of the primary gave aldehyde 12, which was treated with the alpha-bromo allylsilane 13 and CrCl(2), followed by NaH to effect elimination to the diene 15. A similar sequence was employed to prepare aldehyde 29. In this case aldehyde (S)-1 was converted to the anti,syn-homopropargylic alcohol 20 by treatment with the allenyl indium reagent formed in situ from allenylstannane (P)-2b and InBr(3). Epoxy alcohol 24, prepared from alcohol 20 by the above-described sequence, was reduced with Red-Al to afford diol 25. Protection of the secondary alcohol and oxidation of the primary completed the synthesis of 29. The anti,syn-homopropargylic alcohol 32 was obtained through addition of the allenic indium reagent, from allenylstannane (P)-31, to aldehyde (S)-1. Protection of the derived diol 33 as the p-methoxybenzylidene acetal afforded the third subunit, acetylene 34. Addition of the lithio derivative of 34 to aldehyde 29 gave alcohol 35 with the carbinyl stereochemistry needed for C7 of discodermolide as the major product.

  3. Oxidation of 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine in rat liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narimatsu, Shizuo; Yonemoto, Rei; Masuda, Kazufumi; Katsu, Takashi; Asanuma, Masato; Kamata, Tooru; Katagi, Munehiro; Tsuchihashi, Hitoshi; Kumamoto, Takuya; Ishikawa, Tsutomu; Naito, Shinsaku; Yamano, Shigeru; Hanioka, Nobumitsu

    2008-02-01

    The oxidative metabolism of 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), a tryptamine-type designer drug, was studied using rat liver microsomal fractions and recombinant cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. 5-MeO-DIPT was biotransformed mainly into a side-chain N-deisopropylated metabolite and partially into an aromatic ring O-demethylated metabolite in liver microsomal fractions from untreated rats of both sexes. This metabolic profile is different from our previous findings in human liver microsomal fractions, in which the aromatic ring O-demethylation was the major pathway whereas the side-chain N-deisopropylation was minor [Narimatsu S, Yonemoto R, Saito K, Takaya K, Kumamoto T, Ishikawa T, et al. Oxidative metabolism of 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (Foxy) by human liver microsomes and recombinant cytochrome P450 enzymes. Biochem Pharmacol 2006;71:1377-85]. Kinetic and inhibition studies indicated that the side-chain N-dealkylation is mediated by CYP2C11 and CYP3A2, whereas the aromatic ring O-demethylation is mediated by CYP2D2 and CYP2C6 in untreated male rats. Pretreatment of male rats with beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) produced an aromatic ring 6-hydroxylated metabolite. Recombinant rat and human CYP1A1 efficiently catalyzed 5-MeO-DIPT 6-hydroxylation under the conditions used. These results provide valuable information on the metabolic fate of 5-MeO-DIPT in rats that can be used in the toxicological study of this designer drug.

  4. The catabolism of 2,4-xylenol and p-cresol share the enzymes for the oxidation of para-methyl group in Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Fei; Chao, Hongjun; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2014-02-01

    Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 9866 utilizes p-cresol or 2,4-xylenol as a sole carbon and energy source. Enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of the para-methyl group of p-cresol have been studied in detail. However, those responsible for the oxidation of the para-methyl group in 2,4-xylenol catabolism are still not reported. In this study, real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated pchC- and pchF-encoded p-cresol methylhydroxylase (PCMH) and pchA-encoded p-hydroxybenzaldehyde dehydrogenase (PHBDD) in p-cresol catabolism were also likely involved in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol. Enzyme activity assays and intermediate identification indicated that the PCMH and PHBDD catalyzed the oxidations of 2,4-xylenol to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzaldehyde to 4-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoic acid, respectively. Furthermore, the PCMH-encoding gene pchF was found to be necessary for the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol, whereas the PHBDD-encoding gene pchA was not essential for the catabolism by gene knockout and complementation. Analyses of the maximum specific growth rate (μ m) and specific activity of the gene-knockout strain to different intermediates revealed the presence of other enzyme(s) with PHBDD activity in strain 9866. However, PHBDD played a major role in the catabolism of 2,4-xylenol in contrast to the other enzyme(s).

  5. Oxidative dechlorination of halogenated phenols catalyzed by two distinct enzymes: Horseradish peroxidase and dehaloperoxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatkowski, Lukasz; Thompson, Matthew K; Kaminski, Rafal; Franzen, Stefan; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka

    2011-01-01

    The mechanism of the dehalogenation step catalyzed by dehaloperoxidase (DHP) from Amphitrite ornata, an unusual heme-containing protein with a globin fold and peroxidase activity, has remarkable similarity with that of the classical heme peroxidase, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Based on quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) modeling and experimentally determined chlorine kinetic isotope effects, we have concluded that two sequential one electron oxidations of the halogenated phenol substrate leads to a cationic intermediate that strongly resembles a Meisenheimer intermediate - a commonly formed reactive complex during nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions especially in the case of arenes carrying electron withdrawing groups.

  6. Testicular toxicity in cannabis extract treated mice: association with oxidative stress and role of antioxidant enzyme systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Tapas K; Das, Nildari S

    2010-02-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of cannabis extract at low doses (total doses ranging from 40 mg to 60 mg per mouse) induced adverse effect on testes and oxidative stress. At low doses, there was a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and decrease in testicular lipid content, but the effects were significantly less at higher doses and at the withdrawal of cannabis treatment (recovery dose). There was a marked decrease in antioxidant enzyme profiles (superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase) and glutathione content at low doses, but these effects were higher at higher dose and at withdrawal of the treatment (recovery effect). Histology revealed significant shrinkage of tubular diameter and detrimental changes in seminiferous epithelium of testis with resulting lowered serum testosterone and pituitary gonadotropins (follicular stimulating [FSH] and luteinizing hormones [LH]) levels at low doses. But at higher doses and particularly at withdrawal of the treatment, regression of various germ cell layers of testes through the revival of testosterone hormone and pituitary gonadotropins (FSH and LH) were observed, indicating that recovery effects on testes became operative possibly through the corrective measure of endogenous testicular antioxidant enzymes profiles and pituitary gonadotropins hormones feedback mechanisms.

  7. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 73, Revision 2 (FGE.73Rev2). Consideration of alicyclic primary alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters evaluated by JECFA (59th meeting) structurally related to primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters evaluated by EFSA in FGE.12Rev3 (2012)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further...... for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for all 18 substances, the information is adequate....

  8. Interaction of carbohydrates with alcohol dehydrogenase: Effect on enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Swati B; Bankar, Sandip B; Granström, Tom; Ojamo, Heikki; Singhal, Rekha S; Survase, Shrikant A

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was covalently conjugated with three different oxidized carbohydrates i.e., glucose, starch and pectin. All the carbohydrates inhibited the enzyme. The inhibition was studied with respect to the inhibition rate constant, involvement of thiol groups in the binding, and structural changes in the enzyme. The enzyme activity decreased to half of its original activity at the concentration of 2 mg/mL of pectin, 4 mg/mL of glucose and 10 mg/mL of starch within 10 min at pH 7. This study showed oxidized pectin to be a potent inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase followed by glucose and starch. Along with the aldehyde-amino group interaction, thiol groups were also involved in the binding between alcohol dehydrogenase and carbohydrates. The structural changes occurring on binding of alcohol dehydrogenase with oxidized carbohydrates was also confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Oxidized carbohydrates could thus be used as potential inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase.

  9. Magnetically triggered clustering of biotinylated iron oxide nanoparticles in the presence of streptavidinylated enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodenius, Michael; Hieronymus, Thomas; Zenke, Martin; Becker, Christiane; Elling, Lothar; Bornemann, Jörg; Wong, John E; Richtering, Walter; Himmelreich, Uwe; De Cuyper, Marcel

    2012-09-07

    This work deals with the production and characterization of water-compatible, iron oxide based nanoparticles covered with functional poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-biotin surface groups (SPIO-PEG-biotin). Synthesis of the functionalized colloids occurred by incubating the oleate coated particles used as precursor magnetic fluid with anionic liposomes containing 14 mol% of a phospholipid-PEG-biotin conjugate. The latter was prepared by coupling dimyristoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DC(14:0)PE) to activated α-biotinylamido-ω -N-hydroxy-succinimidcarbonyl-PEG (NHS-PEG-biotin). Physical characterization of the oleate and PEG-biotin iron oxide nanocolloids revealed that they appear as colloidal stable clusters with a hydrodynamic diameter of 160 nm and zeta potentials of - 39 mV (oleate coated particles) and - 14 mV (PEG-biotin covered particles), respectively, as measured by light scattering techniques. Superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements revealed specific saturation magnetizations of 62-73 emu g(-1) Fe(3)O(4) and no hysteresis was observed at 300 K. MR relaxometry at 3 T revealed very high r(2) relaxivities and moderately high r(1) values. Thus, both nanocolloids can be classified as small, superparamagnetic, negative MR contrast agents. The capacity to functionalize the particles was illustrated by binding streptavidin alkaline phosphatase (SAP). It was found, however, that these complexes become highly aggregated after capturing them on the magnetic filter device during high-gradient magnetophoresis, thereby reducing the accessibility of the SAP.

  10. Role of beta-oxidation enzymes in gamma-decalactone production by the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Y; Aguedo, M; Choquet, A; Gatfield, I L; Nicaud, J M; Belin, J M

    2001-12-01

    Some microorganisms can transform methyl ricinoleate into gamma-decalactone, a valuable aroma compound, but yields of the bioconversion are low due to (i) incomplete conversion of ricinoleate (C(18)) to the C(10) precursor of gamma-decalactone, (ii) accumulation of other lactones (3-hydroxy-gamma-decalactone and 2- and 3-decen-4-olide), and (iii) gamma-decalactone reconsumption. We evaluated acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase activity (encoded by the POX1 through POX5 genes) in Yarrowia lipolytica in lactone accumulation and gamma-decalactone reconsumption in POX mutants. Mutants with no acyl-CoA oxidase activity could not reconsume gamma-decalactone, and mutants with a disruption of pox3, which encodes the short-chain acyl-CoA oxidase, reconsumed it more slowly. 3-Hydroxy-gamma-decalactone accumulation during transformation of methyl ricinoleate suggests that, in wild-type strains, beta-oxidation is controlled by 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. In mutants with low acyl-CoA oxidase activity, however, the acyl-CoA oxidase controls the beta-oxidation flux. We also identified mutant strains that produced 26 times more gamma-decalactone than the wild-type parents.

  11. Role of β-Oxidation Enzymes in γ-Decalactone Production by the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waché, Yves; Aguedo, Mario; Choquet, Armelle; Gatfield, Ian L.; Nicaud, Jean-Marc; Belin, Jean-Marc

    2001-01-01

    Some microorganisms can transform methyl ricinoleate into γ-decalactone, a valuable aroma compound, but yields of the bioconversion are low due to (i) incomplete conversion of ricinoleate (C18) to the C10 precursor of γ-decalactone, (ii) accumulation of other lactones (3-hydroxy-γ-decalactone and 2- and 3-decen-4-olide), and (iii) γ-decalactone reconsumption. We evaluated acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) oxidase activity (encoded by the POX1 through POX5 genes) in Yarrowia lipolytica in lactone accumulation and γ-decalactone reconsumption in POX mutants. Mutants with no acyl-CoA oxidase activity could not reconsume γ-decalactone, and mutants with a disruption of pox3, which encodes the short-chain acyl-CoA oxidase, reconsumed it more slowly. 3-Hydroxy-γ-decalactone accumulation during transformation of methyl ricinoleate suggests that, in wild-type strains, β-oxidation is controlled by 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase. In mutants with low acyl-CoA oxidase activity, however, the acyl-CoA oxidase controls the β-oxidation flux. We also identified mutant strains that produced 26 times more γ-decalactone than the wild-type parents. PMID:11722925

  12. Effect of high temperature treatment of Vicia faba roots on the oxidative stress enzymes in leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filek, M; Baczek, R; Niewiadomska, E; Pilipowicz, M; Kościelniak, J

    1997-01-01

    The following types of superoxide dismutase (SOD) have been found in the leaves of Vicia faba: one isoenzyme of Mn-SOD and four isoenzymes of Cu/Zn-SOD. The treatments of roots with boiling water caused an increase of SOD activity in the leaves. The highest increase was measured after 5 s of the treatment. It was accompanied by a significant increase in catalase activity. Analysis of cell fractions' revealed an increase of SOD activity in the plastids and mitochondria isolated from the leaves of those plants whose roots were heat-treated. However, there was no distinct change of SOD activity in the cytosolic fraction. The possibility of an electric wave intervention inducing oxidative stress in the leaves is discussed.

  13. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    OpenAIRE

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Celle...

  14. 40 CFR 721.5762 - Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.5762 Aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (generic). (a) Chemical substance... aromatic aldehyde phenolic resin (PMN P-01-573) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  15. Enhanced oxidation of benzo[a]pyrene by crude enzyme extracts produced during interspecific fungal interaction of Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linbo Qian; Baoliang Chen

    2012-01-01

    The effects of interspecific fungal interactions between Trametes versicolor and Phanerochaete chrysosporium on laccase activity and enzymatic oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated.A deadlock between the two mycelia rather than replacement of one fungus by another was observed on an agar medium.The laccase activity in crude enzyme extracts from interaction zones reached a maximum after a 5-day incubation,which was significantly higher than that from regions of T.versicolor or P.chrysosporium alone.The enhanced induction of laccase activity lasted longer in half nutrition than in normal nutrition.A higher potential to oxidize benzo[a]pyrene by a crude enzyme preparation extracted from the interaction zones was demonstrated.After a 48 hr incubation period,the oxidation of benzo[a]pyrene by crude enzyme extracts from interaction zones reached 26.2%,while only 9.5% of benzo[a]pyrene was oxidized by crude extracts from T.versicolor.The oxidation was promoted by the co-oxidant 2,2'-azinobis-3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonate diammonium salt (ABTS).These findings indicate that the application of co-culturing of white-rot fungi in bioremediation is a potential ameliorating technique for the restoration of PAH-contaminated soil.

  16. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase or histone deacetylase protects retinal pigment epithelial cells from DNA damage induced by oxidative stress by the stimulation of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokarz, Paulina; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-04-05

    Epigenetic modifications influence DNA damage response (DDR). In this study we explored the role of DNA methylation and histone acetylation in DDR in cells challenged with acute or chronic oxidative stress. We used retinal pigment epithelial cells (ARPE-19), which natively are exposed to oxidative stress due to permanent exposure to light and high blood flow. We employed a DNA methyltransferase inhibitor - RG108 (RG), or a histone deacetylase inhibitor - valproic acid (VA). ARPE-19 cells were exposed to tert-butyl hydroperoxide, an acute oxidative stress inducer, or glucose oxidase, which slowly liberates low-doses of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of glucose, creating chronic conditions. VA and RG reduced level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in ARPE-19 cells in normal condition and in oxidative stress. This protective effect of VA and RG was associated with the up-regulated expression of antioxidant enzyme genes: CAT, GPx1, GPx4, SOD1 and SOD2. RG decreased the number of cells in G2/M checkpoint in response to chronic oxidative stress. Neither RG nor VA changed the DNA repair or apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Therefore, certain epigenetic manipulations may protect ARPE-19 cells from detrimental effects of oxidative stress by modulation of antioxidative enzyme gene expression, which may be further explored in pharmacological studies on oxidative stress-related eye diseases.

  17. Comparative genomics of aldehyde dehydrogenase 5a1 (succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase and accumulation of gamma-hydroxybutyrate associated with its deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malaspina Patrizia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH; aldehyde dehydrogenase 5A1 [ALDH5A1]; locus 6p22 occupies a central position in central nervous system (CNS neurotransmitter metabolism as one of two enzymes necessary for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA recycling from the synaptic cleft. Its importance is highlighted by the neurometabolic disease associated with its inherited deficiency in humans, as well as the severe epileptic phenotype observed in Aldh5a1-/- knockout mice. Expanding evidence now suggests, however, that even subtle decreases in human SSADH activity, associated with rare and common single nucleotide polymorphisms, may produce subclinical pathological effects. SSADH, in conjunction with aldo-keto reductase 7A2 (AKR7A2, represent two neural enzymes responsible for further catabolism of succinic semialdehyde, producing either succinate (SSADH or γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB; AKR7A2. A GABA analogue, GHB is a short-chain fatty alcohol with unusual properties in the CNS and a long pharmacological history. Moreover, SSADH occupies a further role in the CNS as the enzyme responsible for further metabolism of the lipid peroxidation aldehyde 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE, an intermediate known to induce oxidant stress. Accordingly, subtle decreases in SSADH activity may have the capacity to lead to regional accumulation of neurotoxic intermediates (GHB, 4-HNE. Polymorphisms in SSADH gene structure may also associate with quantitative traits, including intelligence quotient and life expectancy. Further population-based studies of human SSADH activity promise to reveal additional properties of its function and additional roles in CNS tissue.

  18. Pathway and enzyme redundancy in putrescine catabolism in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Barbara L; Reitzer, Larry

    2012-08-01

    Putrescine as the sole carbon source requires a novel catabolic pathway with glutamylated intermediates. Nitrogen limitation does not induce genes of this glutamylated putrescine (GP) pathway but instead induces genes for a putrescine catabolic pathway that starts with a transaminase-dependent deamination. We determined pathway utilization with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source by examining mutants with defects in both pathways. Blocks in both the GP and transaminase pathways were required to prevent growth with putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Genetic and biochemical analyses showed redundant enzymes for γ-aminobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase (PatD/YdcW and PuuC), γ-aminobutyrate transaminase (GabT and PuuE), and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (GabD and PuuC). PuuC is a nonspecific aldehyde dehydrogenase that oxidizes all the aldehydes in putrescine catabolism. A puuP mutant failed to use putrescine as the nitrogen source, which implies one major transporter for putrescine as the sole nitrogen source. Analysis of regulation of the GP pathway shows induction by putrescine and not by a product of putrescine catabolism and shows that putrescine accumulates in puuA, puuB, and puuC mutants but not in any other mutant. We conclude that two independent sets of enzymes can completely degrade putrescine to succinate and that their relative importance depends on the environment.

  19. Oxidative stress as a risk factor for osteoporosis in elderly Mexicans as characterized by antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Correa-Muñoz Elsa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress (OxS has recently been linked with osteoporosis; however, we do not know the influence of OxS as an independent risk factor for this disease. Methods We conducted a case-control study in 94 subjects ≥60 years of age, 50 healthy and 44 with osteoporosis. We measured total antioxidant status, plasma lipid peroxides, antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and calculated the SOD/GPx ratio. Bone mineral density was obtained at the peripheral DXA in calcaneus using a portable Norland Apollo Densitometer®. Osteoporosis was considered when subjects had a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the mean value for young adults. Results GPx antioxidant activity was significantly lower in the group of subjects with osteoporosis in comparison with the group of healthy subjects (p p p = 0.034. Conclusion Our findings suggest that OxS is an independent risk factor for osteoporosis linked to increase of SOD/GPx ratio.

  20. Expression of a nitric oxide degrading enzyme induces a senescence programme in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishina, Tatiana E; Lamb, Chris; Zeier, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been proposed to act as a factor delaying leaf senescence and fruit maturation in plants. Here we show that expression of a NO degrading dioxygenase (NOD) in Arabidopsis thaliana initiates a senescence-like phenotype, an effect that proved to be more pronounced in older than in younger leaves. This senescence phenotype was preceded by a massive switch in gene expression in which photosynthetic genes were down-regulated, whereas many senescence-associated genes (SAGs) and the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase gene ACS6 involved in ethylene synthesis were up-regulated. External fumigation of NOD plants with NO as well as environmental conditions known to stimulate endogenous NO production attenuated the induced senescence programme. For instance, both high light conditions and nitrate feeding reduced the senescence phenotype and attenuated the down-regulation of photosynthetic genes as well as the up-regulation of SAGs. Treatment of plants with the cytokinin 6-benzylaminopurin (BAP) reduced the down-regulation of photosynthesis, although it had no consistent effect on SAG expression. Metabolic changes during NOD-induced senescence comprehended increases in salicylic acid (SA) levels, accumulation of the phytoalexin camalexin and elevation of leaf gamma-tocopherol contents, all of which occurred during natural senescence in Arabidopsis leaves as well. Moreover, NO fumigation delayed the senescence process induced by darkening individual Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) leaves. Our data thus support the notion that NO acts as a negative regulator of leaf senescence.

  1. Genome-wide identification and analysis of the aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) gene superfamily in apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Rongrong; Li, Jun; Singer, Stacy D; Zhang, Yucheng; Yin, Xiangjing; Zheng, Yi; Fan, Chonghui; Wang, Xiping

    2013-10-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) represent a protein superfamily encoding NAD(P)(+)-dependent enzymes that oxidize a wide range of endogenous and exogenous aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes. In plants, they are involved in many biological processes and play a role in the response to environmental stress. In this study, a total of 39 ALDH genes from ten families were identified in the apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) genome. Synteny analysis of the apple ALDH (MdALDH) genes indicated that segmental and tandem duplications, as well as whole genome duplications, have likely contributed to the expansion and evolution of these gene families in apple. Moreover, synteny analysis between apple and Arabidopsis demonstrated that several MdALDH genes were found in the corresponding syntenic blocks of Arabidopsis, suggesting that these genes appeared before the divergence of lineages that led to apple and Arabidopsis. In addition, phylogenetic analysis, as well as comparisons of exon-intron and protein structures, provided further insight into both their evolutionary relationships and their putative functions. Tissue-specific expression analysis of the MdALDH genes demonstrated diverse spatiotemporal expression patterns, while their expression profiles under abiotic stress and various hormone treatments indicated that many MdALDH genes were responsive to high salinity and drought, as well as different plant hormones. This genome-wide identification, as well as characterization of evolutionary relationships and expression profiles, of the apple MdALDH genes will not only be useful for the further analysis of ALDH genes and their roles in stress response, but may also aid in the future improvement of apple stress tolerance.

  2. Structure-based mutational studies of substrate inhibition of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase BetB from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Joo, Jeong Chan; Brown, Greg; Stolnikova, Ekaterina; Halavaty, Andrei S; Savchenko, Alexei; Anderson, Wayne F; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2014-07-01

    Inhibition of enzyme activity by high concentrations of substrate and/or cofactor is a general phenomenon demonstrated in many enzymes, including aldehyde dehydrogenases. Here we show that the uncharacterized protein BetB (SA2613) from Staphylococcus aureus is a highly specific betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase, which exhibits substrate inhibition at concentrations of betaine aldehyde as low as 0.15 mM. In contrast, the aldehyde dehydrogenase YdcW from Escherichia coli, which is also active against betaine aldehyde, shows no inhibition by this substrate. Using the crystal structures of BetB and YdcW, we performed a structure-based mutational analysis of BetB and introduced the YdcW residues into the BetB active site. From a total of 32 mutations, those in five residues located in the substrate binding pocket (Val288, Ser290, His448, Tyr450, and Trp456) greatly reduced the substrate inhibition of BetB, whereas the double mutant protein H448F/Y450L demonstrated a complete loss of substrate inhibition. Substrate inhibition was also reduced by mutations of the semiconserved Gly234 (to Ser, Thr, or Ala) located in the BetB NAD(+) binding site, suggesting some cooperativity between the cofactor and substrate binding sites. Substrate docking analysis of the BetB and YdcW active sites revealed that the wild-type BetB can bind betaine aldehyde in both productive and nonproductive conformations, whereas only the productive binding mode can be modeled in the active sites of YdcW and the BetB mutant proteins with reduced substrate inhibition. Thus, our results suggest that the molecular mechanism of substrate inhibition of BetB is associated with the nonproductive binding of betaine aldehyde.

  3. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oranuch Nakchat

    2014-05-01

    Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  4. Organic acids and aldehydes in rainwater in a northwest region of Spain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena, R.M.; Garcia, S.; Herrero, C. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Lugo (Spain). Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia

    2002-11-01

    During a 1 year period, measurements of carboxylic acids and aldehydes were carried out in rainwater samples collected at nine different sites in NW Spain surrounding a thermal power plant in order to determine concentration levels and sources. In addition, certain major ions (Cl{sup -}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, Na{sup +}, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, K{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}) were also determined. Aldehyde and carboxylic acid concentration patterns and their effects on rainwater composition concerning temporal, seasonal and spatial variations were evaluated. Among carboxylic acids, formic and acetic were predominant (VWA 7.0 and 8.3 {mu}M), while formaldehyde and acroleine were the dominant aldehydes (VWA 0.42 and 1.25 {mu}M). Carboxylic acids were estimated to account for 27.5% of the total free acidity (TFA), whereas sulphuric and nitric acid accounted for 46.2% and 26.2%, respectively. Oxalic acid was demonstrated to be an important contributing compound to the acidification in rainwater representing 7.1% of the TFA. The concentration of aldehydes and carboxylic acids, which originated mainly from biogenic emissions in the area studied, was strongly dependent on the season of the year (growing and non-growing). The ratios of formic to acetic acids are considerably different in the two seasons suggesting that there exist distinct sources in both growing and non-growing seasons. Principal component analysis was applied in order to elucidate the sources of aldehydes and organic acids in rainwater. The prevalence of natural vegetative origins for both of these compounds versus anthropogenic emissions was demonstrated and the importance of the oxidation of aldehydes as a relevant source of organic acids was also established. (author)

  5. Effect of Sodium Chloride and Cadmium on the Growth, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunsheng; XU Ying; JIANG Wei; LV Xin; DONG Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly under-stood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6%NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory ef-fect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  6. Oxidative stress determined through the levels of antioxidant enzymes and the effect of N-acetylcysteine in aluminum phosphide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash Agarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The primary objective of this study was to determine the serum level of antioxidant enzymes and to correlate them with outcome in patients of aluminum phosphide (ALP poisoning and, secondly, to evaluate the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC given along with supportive treatment of ALP poisoning. Design: We conducted a cohort study in patients of ALP poisoning hospitalized at a tertiary care center of North India. The treatment group and control group were enrolled during the study period of 1 year from May 2011 to April 2012. Interventions: Oxidative stress was evaluated in each subject by estimating the serum levels of the enzymes, viz. catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione reductase (GR. The treatment group comprised of patients who were given NAC in addition to supportive treatment (magnesium sulfate and vasopressors, if required, while in the control group, only supportive treatment was instituted. The primary endpoint of the study was the survival of the patients. Measurements and Results: The baseline catalase (P = 0.008 and SOD (P < 0.01 levels were higher among survivors than non-survivors. Of the total patients in the study, 31 (67.4% expired and 15 (32.6% survived. Among those who expired, the mean duration of survival was 2.92 ± 0.40 days in the test group and 1.82 ± 0.33 days in the control group (P = 0.043. Conclusions: This study suggests that the baseline level of catalase and SOD have reduced in ALP poisoning, but baseline GR level has not suppressed but is rather increasing with due time, and more so in the treatment group. NAC along with supportive treatment may have improved survival in ALP poisoning.

  7. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 regulates nociception in rodent models of acute inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambelli, Vanessa O; Gross, Eric R; Chen, Che-Hong; Gutierrez, Vanessa P; Cury, Yara; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2014-08-27

    Exogenous aldehydes can cause pain in animal models, suggesting that aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2), which metabolizes many aldehydes, may regulate nociception. To test this hypothesis, we generated a knock-in mouse with an inactivating point mutation in ALDH2 (ALDH2*2), which is also present in human ALDH2 of ~540 million East Asians. The ALDH2*1/*2 heterozygotic mice exhibited a larger response to painful stimuli than their wild-type littermates, and this heightened nociception was inhibited by an ALDH2-selective activator (Alda-1). No effect on inflammation per se was observed. Using a rat model, we then showed that nociception tightly correlated with ALDH activity (R(2) = 0.90) and that reduced nociception was associated with less early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) in the spinal cord and less reactive aldehyde accumulation at the insult site (including acetaldehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal). Further, acetaldehyde- and formalin-induced nociceptive behavior was greater in the ALDH2*1/*2 mice than in the wild-type mice. Finally, Alda-1 treatment was even beneficial when given after the inflammatory agent was administered. Our data in rodent models suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme ALDH2 regulates nociception and could serve as a molecular target for pain control, with ALDH2 activators, such as Alda-1, as potential non-narcotic, cardiac-safe analgesics. Furthermore, our results suggest a possible genetic basis for East Asians' apparent lower pain tolerance.

  8. Creatine and pyruvate prevent the alterations caused by tyrosine on parameters of oxidative stress and enzyme activities of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Rodrigo Binkowski; Gemelli, Tanise; Rojas, Denise Bertin; Bonorino, Narielle Ferner; Costa, Bruna May Lopes; Funchal, Cláudia; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Wannmacher, Clovis Milton Duval

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine accumulates in inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism, especially in tyrosinemia type II. In this disease caused by tyrosine aminotransferase deficiency, eyes, skin, and central nervous system disturbances are found. In the present study, we investigated the chronic effect of tyrosine methyl ester (TME) and/or creatine plus pyruvate on some parameters of oxidative stress and enzyme activities of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex homogenates of 21-day-old Wistar. Chronic administration of TME induced oxidative stress and altered the activities of adenylate kinase and mitochondrial and cytosolic creatine kinase. Total sulfhydryls content, GSH content, and GPx activity were significantly diminished, while DCFH oxidation, TBARS content, and SOD activity were significantly enhanced by TME. On the other hand, TME administration decreased the activity of CK from cytosolic and mitochondrial fractions but enhanced AK activity. In contrast, TME did not affect the carbonyl content and PK activity in cerebral cortex of rats. Co-administration of creatine plus pyruvate was effective in the prevention of alterations provoked by TME administration on the oxidative stress and the enzymes of phosphoryltransfer network, except in mitochondrial CK, AK, and SOD activities. These results indicate that chronic administration of TME may stimulate oxidative stress and alter the enzymes of phosphoryltransfer network in cerebral cortex of rats. In case this also occurs in the patients affected by these disorders, it may contribute, along with other mechanisms, to the neurological dysfunction of hypertyrosinemias, and creatine and pyruvate supplementation could be beneficial to the patients.

  9. Antioxidant enzymes as potential targets in cardioprotection and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Enzyme antioxidants: the next stage of pharmacological counterwork to the oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Vavaev

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The focus in antioxidant research is on enzyme derivative investigations. Extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD is of particular interest, as it demonstrates in vivo the protective action against development of atherosclerosis, hypertension, heart failure, diabetes mellitus. The reliable association of coronary artery disease with decreased level of heparin-released EC-SOD was established in clinical research. To create a base for and to develop antioxidant therapy, various SOD isozymes, catalase (CAT, methods of gene therapy, and combined applications of enzymes are used. Covalent bienzyme SOD-CHS-CAT conjugate (CHS, chondroitin sulphate showed high efficacy and safety as the drug candidate. There is an evident trend to use the components of glycocalyx and extracellular matrix for target delivery of medical substances. Development of new enzyme antioxidants for therapeutic application is closely connected with progress in medical biotechnology, pharmaceutical industry, and bioeconomy.

  10. Cytotoxic kurubasch aldehyde from Trichilia emetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Maminata; Zhai, Lin; Chen, Ming; Olsen, Carl Erik; Odile, Nacoulma; Pierre, Guissou I; Bosco, Ouédrago J; Robert, Guigemdé T; Christensen, S Brøgger

    2007-01-01

    Kurubasch aldehyde, a sesquiterpenoid with an hydroxylated humulene skeleton, was isolated as free alcohol from Trichilia emetica Vahl. (Meliaceae), belonging to the order Sapindales. Related substances have been previously found in plants as esters of aromatic acids, and these plants were species belonging to the distant order Apiales. This is the first report of humulenes found in the genus Trichilia and only the second of humulenes in the order Sapindales. The aldehyde is a modest inhibitor of the growth of Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 76 microM) and slow-proliferating breast cancer cells MCF7 (78 microM), but a potent inhibitor of proliferation of S180 cancer cells (IC50 7.4 microM).

  11. Kinetics of Forming Aldehydes in Frying Oils and Their Distribution in French Fries Revealed by LC-MS-Based Chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Csallany, A Saari; Kerr, Brian J; Shurson, Gerald C; Chen, Chi

    2016-05-18

    In this study, the kinetics of aldehyde formation in heated frying oils was characterized by 2-hydrazinoquinoline derivatization, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis, principal component analysis (PCA), and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The aldehydes contributing to time-dependent separation of heated soybean oil (HSO) in a PCA model were grouped by the HCA into three clusters (A1, A2, and B) on the basis of their kinetics and fatty acid precursors. The increases of 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and the A2-to-B ratio in HSO were well-correlated with the duration of thermal stress. Chemometric and quantitative analysis of three frying oils (soybean, corn, and canola oils) and French fry extracts further supported the associations between aldehyde profiles and fatty acid precursors and also revealed that the concentrations of pentanal, hexanal, acrolein, and the A2-to-B ratio in French fry extracts were more comparable to their values in the frying oils than other unsaturated aldehydes. All of these results suggest the roles of specific aldehydes or aldehyde clusters as novel markers of the lipid oxidation status for frying oils or fried foods.

  12. Determination of aldehydes in exhaled breath of patients with lung cancer by means of on-fiber-derivatisation SPME-GC/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Diana; Goldoni, Matteo; Corradi, Massimo; Acampa, Olga; Carbognani, Paolo; Internullo, Eveline; Casalini, Angelo; Mutti, Antonio

    2010-10-01

    A number of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been identified and used in preliminary clinical studies of the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of aldehydes (known biomarkers of oxidative stress) in the diagnosis of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We used an on-fiber-derivatisation SPME sampling technique coupled with GC/MS analysis to measure straight aldehydes C3-C9 in exhaled breath. Linearity was established over two orders of magnitude (range: 3.3-333.3×10(-12) M); the LOD and LOQ of all the aldehydes were respectively 1×10(-12) M and 3×10(-12) M. Accuracy was within 93% and precision calculated as % RSD was 7.2-15.1%. Aldehyde stability in a Bio-VOC(®) tube stored at +4°C was 10-17 h, but this became >10 days using a specific fiber storage device. Finally, exhaled aldehydes were measured in 38 asymptomatic non-smokers (controls) and 40 NSCLC patients. The levels of all of the aldehydes were increased in the NSCLC patients without any significant effect of smoking habits and little effect of age. The good discriminant power of the aldehyde pattern (90%) was confirmed by multivariate analysis. These results show that straight aldehydes may be promising biomarkers associated with NSCLC, and increase the sensitivity and specificity of previously identified VOC patterns.

  13. Theoretical structural study on the adsorption properties of aliphatic aldehydes on ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayebee, R.; Zamand, N.; Hosseini-nasr, A.; Kargar Razi, M.

    2014-05-01

    The structure optimizations for some aliphatic aldehydes adsorbed on ZnO nanoclusters, and graphene-like nanosheets were carried out using the B3LYP/LanL2DZ calculations and the adsorption energies were calculated. It was considered that adsorption of the examined aldehydes on the ZnO nanoclusters and graphene-like nanosheets occurred through carbonyl oxygens of aldehyde molecules with the surface Zn2+ ions of the central ring. Aldehydes with the general formula of R-COH (R denotes a branched or linear aliphatic chain with maximum of three carbon atoms) were considered. Also, Effects of chain length were investigated on the orientation of the aldehyde molecules with respect to the nanosheet and nanocluster surfaces. Findings revealed that the adsorption energy was decreased with enhancing chain length. However, the most negative adsorption energy was obtained for iso-butyraldehyde, as a branched aldehyde. Interaction of the aldehyde molecules with the surfaces of nanosheets were analyzed by means of DOS analysis and Bader's method. We hope the obtained results be helpful in identifying the mechanism of cyclotrimerization of aliphatic aldehydes on the surface of zinc oxide nanoparticles.

  14. Oxidative and nitrosative stress enzymes in relation to nitrotyrosine in Helicobacter pylori-infected humans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anders; Elfvin; Anders; Edebo; Peter; Hallersund; Anna; Casselbrant; Lars; Fndriks

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To compare a possible relation between Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) and the oxygen- and nitrogen radical system in humans. METHODS: Mechanisms for H. pylori to interfere with the oxygen and nitrogen radical system is of great importance for understanding of the H. pylori persistence and pathogenesis. Biopsies were obtained from the gastric wall of 21 individuals. Ongoing infection with H. pylori was detected using direct analyze from the biopsies using campylobacter-like organism test(CLO-test) and/or by using 14C-urea breath test. The individuals were divided in a negative H. pylori and a positive H. pylori group. Expression in the gastric mucosa of induc-ible nitric oxide syntase(iNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase(NADPH-oxidase) myeloperoxidase(MPO), and nitrotyrosine were assessed by Western blotting.RESULTS: The individuals who undervent gastroscopy were divided in a H. pylori neg. [n = 13, m/f = 7/6, age(mean) = 39] and a H. pylori pos. group [n = 8, m/f = 5/3, age(mean) = 53]. Using western blot analysis iNOS was detected as a 130 kDa band. The iNOS expression was upregulated in the antrum of H. pylori infected individuals in comparison to the controls, mean ± SD being 12.6 ± 2.4 vs 8.3 ± 3.1, P < 0.01. There was a markedly upregulated expression of MPO in the antrum of H. pylori infected individuals in comparison to the control group without infection. In several of noninfected controls it was not possible to detect any MPO expression at all, whereas the expression was high in all the infected subjects, mean ± SD being 5.1 ± 3.4 vs 2.1 ± 1.9, P < 0.05. The NADPH-oxidase expression was analysed by detecting the NADPH-oxidase subunit p47-phox expression. P47-phox was detected as a 47 kDa band using Western blot, and showed a significantly higher expression of p47-phox in the antrum of the H. pylori infected individuals compared to the controls, mean ± SD being 3.1 ± 2.2 vs 0.3 ± 0.2, P < 0.01. Regarding nitrotyrosine

  15. Mechanisms of nitric oxide crosstalk with reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes during abiotic stress tolerance in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Dhara; Jain, Prachi; Singh, Neha; Kaur, Harmeet; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) acts in a concentration and redox-dependent manner to counteract oxidative stress either by directly acting as an antioxidant through scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anions (O(2)(-)*), to form peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)) or by acting as a signaling molecule, thereby altering gene expression. NO can interact with different metal centres in proteins, such as heme-iron, zinc-sulfur clusters, iron-sulfur clusters, and copper, resulting in the formation of a stable metal-nitrosyl complex or production of varied biochemical signals, which ultimately leads to modification of protein structure/function. The thiols (ferrous iron-thiol complex and nitrosothiols) are also involved in the metabolism and mobilization of NO. Thiols bind to NO and transport it to the site of action whereas nitrosothiols release NO after intercellular diffusion and uptake into the target cells. S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) also has the ability to transnitrosylate proteins. It is an NO˙ reservoir and a long-distance signaling molecule. Tyrosine nitration of proteins has been suggested as a biomarker of nitrosative stress as it can lead to either activation or inhibition of target proteins. The exact molecular mechanism(s) by which exogenous and endogenously generated NO (or reactive nitrogen species) modulate the induction of various genes affecting redox homeostasis, are being extensively investigated currently by various research groups. Present review provides an in-depth analysis of the mechanisms by which NO interacts with and modulates the activity of various ROS scavenging enzymes, particularly accompanying ROS generation in plants in response to varied abiotic stress.

  16. Allylation of Aromatic Aldehyde under Microwave Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Yu-Mei; JIA,Xue-Feng; WANG,Jin-Xian

    2004-01-01

    @@ Allylation of carbonyl compounds is one of the most interesting processes for the preparation of homoallylic alcohols. Over the past few decades, many reagents have been developed for such reactions[1~3]. In this paper, we first report allylic zinc reagent 1, which can be prepared from zinc dust and allyl bromide conveniently in THF, and reacted with aromatic aldehyde to give homo-allylic alcohols under microwave irradiation.

  17. Phenolic Extract from Moringa oleifera Leaves Inhibits Key Enzymes Linked to Erectile Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Rats’ Penile Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganiyu Oboh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the antioxidant properties and inhibitory effects of extract from Moringa oleifera leaves on angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE and arginase activities in vitro. The extract was prepared and phenolic (total phenols and flavonoid contents, radical (nitric oxide (NO, hydroxyl (OH scavenging abilities, and Fe2+-chelating ability were assessed. Characterization of the phenolic constituents was done via high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the extract on Fe2+-induced MDA production in rats’ penile tissue homogenate as well as its action on ACE and arginase activities were also determined. The extract scavenged NO∗, OH∗, chelated Fe2+, and inhibited MDA production in a dose-dependent pattern with IC50 values of 1.36, 0.52, and 0.38 mg/mL and 194.23 µg/mL, respectively. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the leaf extract. The extract also inhibited ACE and arginase activities in a dose-dependent pattern and their IC50 values were 303.03 and 159.59 µg/mL, respectively. The phenolic contents, inhibition of ACE, arginase, and Fe2+-induced MDA production, and radical (OH∗, NO∗ scavenging and Fe2+-chelating abilities could be some of the possible mechanisms by which M. oleifera leaves could be used in the treatment and/or management of erectile dysfunction.

  18. Multiple strategies to prevent oxidative stress in Arabidopsis plants lacking the malate valve enzyme NADP-malate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbelmann, Inga; Selinski, Jennifer; Wehmeyer, Corinna; Goss, Tatjana; Voss, Ingo; Mulo, Paula; Kangasjärvi, Saijaliisa; Aro, Eva-Mari; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Do, Phuc T; Fernie, Alisdair R; Talla, Sai K; Raghavendra, Agepati S; Linke, Vera; Scheibe, Renate

    2012-02-01

    The nuclear-encoded chloroplast NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (NADP-MDH) is a key enzyme controlling the malate valve, to allow the indirect export of reducing equivalents. Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. T-DNA insertion mutants of NADP-MDH were used to assess the role of the light-activated NADP-MDH in a typical C(3) plant. Surprisingly, even when exposed to high-light conditions in short days, nadp-mdh knockout mutants were phenotypically indistinguishable from the wild type. The photosynthetic performance and typical antioxidative systems, such as the Beck-Halliwell-Asada pathway, were barely affected in the mutants in response to high-light treatment. The reactive oxygen species levels remained low, indicating the apparent absence of oxidative stress, in the mutants. Further analysis revealed a novel combination of compensatory mechanisms in order to maintain redox homeostasis in the nadp-mdh plants under high-light conditions, particularly an increase in the NTRC/2-Cys peroxiredoxin (Prx) system in chloroplasts. There were indications of adjustments in extra-chloroplastic components of photorespiration and proline levels, which all could dissipate excess reducing equivalents, sustain photosynthesis, and prevent photoinhibition in nadp-mdh knockout plants. Such metabolic flexibility suggests that the malate valve acts in concert with other NADPH-consuming reactions to maintain a balanced redox state during photosynthesis under high-light stress in wild-type plants.

  19. The effect of heavy metal-induced oxidative stress on the enzymes in white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qihua; Zeng, Guangming; Chen, Guiqiu; Yan, Min; Chen, Anwei; Du, Jianjian; Huang, Jian; Yi, Bin; Zhou, Ying; He, Xiaoxiao; He, Yan

    2015-02-01

    Prevalence of heavy metals in the living environment causes chemical stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium). However, the mechanisms involved in ROS defense are still under investigation. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of lead- and cadmium-induced oxidative stress on the activities of catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), lignin peroxidase (LiP), and manganese peroxidase (MnP). A time-dependent change in all enzyme activities was observed following exposure to 50 μM cadmium and 25 μM lead. The lowest values were recorded at 4 h after exposure. Both cadmium and lead inhibited CAT and POD. The cytochrome P450 (CYP450) levels increased under 50-100 μM cadmium or lead exposure and decreased when heavy metal concentration was under 50 μM; this suggested that ROS is not the only factor that alters the CYP450 levels. The cadmium removal rate in the sample containing 900 μM taxifolin (inhibitor of CYP450) and 100 μM cadmium was reduced to 12.34 %, 9.73 % lower than that of 100 μM cadmium-induced sample, indicating CYP450 may play an indirect but key role in the process of clearance of heavy metals. The pH of the substrate solution decreased steadily during the incubation process.

  20. Amplified inhibition of the electrochemical signal of ferrocene by enzyme-functionalized graphene oxide nanoprobe for ultrasensitive immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guosong; Cheng, Hui; Xin, Dinghong; Zhang, Haili; Yu, Aimin

    2016-01-01

    A nanoprobe-induced signal inhibition mechanism was designed for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay at a chitosan-ferrocene (CS-Fc) based immunosensor. The nanoprobe was prepared by covalently loading signal antibody and high-content horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on the graphene oxide (GO) nanocarrier. The immunosensor was prepared through the stepwise assembly of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) and capture antibody at a CS-Fc modified electrode. After sandwich immunoreaction, the GO-HRP nanoprobes were quantitatively captured onto the immunosensor surface and thus induced the production of a layer of insoluble film through the enzymatically catalytic reaction of the HRP labels. Both the dielectric immunocomplex formed on the immunosensor surface and the enzymatic precipitate with low electroconductivity led to the electrochemical signal decease of the Fc indicator, which was greatly amplified by the multi-enzyme signal amplification of the nanoprobe. Based on this amplified signal inhibition mechanism, a new ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay method was developed. Using carcinoembryonic antigen as a model analyte, this method showed a wide linear range over 5 orders of magnitude with a detection limit down to 0.54 pg/mL. Besides, the immunosensor showed good specificity, acceptable reproducibility and stability as well as satisfactory reliability for the serum sample analysis.

  1. Prevention of cumene hydroperoxide induced oxidative stress in cultured neonatal rat myocytes by scavengers and enzyme inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persoon-Rothert, M; Egas-Kenniphaas, J M; van der Valk-Kokshoorn, E J; Mauve, I; van der Laarse, A

    1990-10-01

    Oxidative stress induced by cumene hydroperoxide was studied in cultured neonatal rat myocytes. A progressive increase of irreversible cell injury as determined by leakage of the cytoplastic enzyme alpha-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase (alpha-HBDH) from the cells was noted at concentrations ranging from 25-100 microM cumene hydroperoxide (incubation time 90 min). Cumene hydroperoxide-induced damage was reduced or prevented by several compounds: the application of Trolox C, a water-soluble vitamin E analogue, and of phospholipase A2 inhibitors chlorpromazine and (to a lesser extent) quinacrine prevented alpha-HBDH release. ICRF-159, a chelator of divalent cations, ascorbic acid, a potent antioxidant, and the cysteine protease inhibitor leupeptin did not reduce the cumene hydroperoxide-induced cytotoxicity. Detoxification of hydroperoxides by the glutathione peroxidase system results in an increased flux through the pentose phosphate shunt and loss of NADPH. Glucose inhibited the cumene hydroperoxide-induced alpha-HBDH release, probably by replenishing NADPH. These results indicate that cumene hydroperoxide, after exhaustion of the glutathione system, induces irreversible injury in cultured myocytes by a mechanism that depends to a large extent on deterioration of cellular membranes caused by lipid peroxidation and phospholipase activation.

  2. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232 is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(OOONO2 formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios (3–8, the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOx photooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  3. Role of aldehyde chemistry and NOx concentrations in secondary organic aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. O. Wennberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aldehydes are an important class of products from atmospheric oxidation of hydrocarbons. Isoprene (2-methyl-1,3-butadiene, the most abundantly emitted atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbon, produces a significant amount of secondary organic aerosol (SOA via methacrolein (a C4-unsaturated aldehyde under urban high-NOx conditions. Previously, we have identified peroxy methacryloyl nitrate (MPAN as the important intermediate to isoprene and methacrolein SOA in this NOx regime. Here we show that as a result of this chemistry, NO2 enhances SOA formation from methacrolein and two other α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, specifically acrolein and crotonaldehyde, a NOx effect on SOA formation previously unrecognized. Oligoesters of dihydroxycarboxylic acids and hydroxynitrooxycarboxylic acids are observed to increase with increasing NO2/NO ratio, and previous characterizations are confirmed by both online and offline high-resolution mass spectrometry techniques. Molecular structure also determines the amount of SOA formation, as the SOA mass yields are the highest for aldehydes that are α, β-unsaturated and contain an additional methyl group on the α-carbon. Aerosol formation from 2-methyl-3-buten-2-ol (MBO232 is insignificant, even under high-NO2 conditions, as PAN (peroxy acyl nitrate, RC(OOONO2 formation is structurally unfavorable. At atmospherically relevant NO2/NO ratios, the SOA yields from isoprene high-NOxphotooxidation are 3 times greater than previously measured at lower NO2/NO ratios. At sufficiently high NO2 concentrations, in systems of α, β-unsaturated aldehydes, SOA formation from subsequent oxidation of products from acyl peroxyl radicals+NO2 can exceed that from RO2+HO2 reactions under the same inorganic seed conditions, making RO2+NO2 an important channel for SOA formation.

  4. The roles of bacterial biofilm and oxidizing enzymes in the biodegradation of plastic by the bacterium Rhodococcus ruber (C208)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivan, A.; Gilan, I.; Santo, M.

    2011-12-01

    novel method for isolating mutants impaired in their production of biofilms (but not in their growth performance) was developed and utilized to isolate such mutants. Indeed, combining the Crystal Violet staining with confocal microscopy we were able to show that such mutants, not only contains reduced amounts of biofilm but also alters biofilm architecture. The above characterization of wild type and mutant strains can be utilized to determine the role of biofilm on the biodegradation of polyethylene. C208 produces laccase (phenol oxidase). This is an oxidizing enzyme that requires copper for induction and activity. In the presence of copper the biodegradation of mineral oil and of polyethylene, by C208, increased by up to 25% and 100%, respectively. Treatment of polyethylene films with a cell free-extract of laccase resulted in an increase of more then 40% in the carbonyl peak (indicating oxidation) as measured by FTIR. Furthermore, during 2 weeks of incubation, with C208 laccase, the molecular weight of polyethylene was reduced by 25%. It seems that laccase alone could not account for all degrading activity and, presumably, more enzyme(s) capable of degrading olefins are yet to be discovered.

  5. Residues that influence coenzyme preference in the aldehyde dehydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Segura, Lilian; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Julián-Sánchez, Adriana; Muñoz-Clares, Rosario A

    2015-06-01

    To find out the residues that influence the coenzyme preference of aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), we reviewed, analyzed and correlated data from their known crystal structures and amino-acid sequences with their published kinetic parameters for NAD(P)(+). We found that the conformation of the Rossmann-fold loops participating in binding the adenosine ribose is very conserved among ALDHs, so that coenzyme specificity is mainly determined by the nature of the residue at position 195 (human ALDH2 numbering). Enzymes with glutamate or proline at 195 prefer NAD(+) because the side-chains of these residues electrostatically and/or sterically repel the 2'-phosphate group of NADP(+). But contrary to the conformational rigidity of proline, the conformational flexibility of glutamate may allow NADP(+)-binding in some enzymes by moving the carboxyl group away from the 2'-phosphate group, which is possible if a small neutral residue is located at position 224, and favored if the residue at position 53 interacts with Glu195 in a NADP(+)-compatible conformation. Of the residues found at position 195, only glutamate interacts with the NAD(+)-adenosine ribose; glutamine and histidine cannot since their side-chain points are opposite to the ribose, probably because the absence of the electrostatic attraction by the conserved nearby Lys192, or its electrostatic repulsion, respectively. The shorter side-chains of other residues-aspartate, serine, threonine, alanine, valine, leucine, or isoleucine-are distant from the ribose but leave room for binding the 2'-phosphate group. Generally, enzymes having a residue different from Glu bind NAD(+) with less affinity, but they can also bind NADP(+) even sometimes with higher affinity than NAD(+), as do enzymes containing Thr/Ser/Gln195. Coenzyme preference is a variable feature within many ALDH families, consistent with being mainly dependent on a single residue that apparently has no other structural or functional roles, and therefore can

  6. Association between maternal micronutrient status, oxidative stress, and common genetic variants in antioxidant enzymes at 15 weeks׳ gestation in nulliparous women who subsequently develop preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Hiten D; Gill, Carolyn A; Kurlak, Lesia O; Seed, Paul T; Hesketh, John E; Méplan, Catherine; Schomburg, Lutz; Chappell, Lucy C; Morgan, Linda; Poston, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific condition affecting 2-7% of women and a leading cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality. Deficiencies of specific micronutrient antioxidant activities associated with copper, selenium, zinc, and manganese have previously been linked to preeclampsia at the time of disease. Our aims were to investigate whether maternal plasma micronutrient concentrations and related antioxidant enzyme activities are altered before preeclampsia onset and to examine the dependence on genetic variations in these antioxidant enzymes. Predisease plasma samples (15±1 weeks׳ gestation) were obtained from women enrolled in the international Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study who subsequently developed preeclampsia (n=244) and from age- and BMI-matched normotensive controls (n=472). Micronutrient concentrations were measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry; associated antioxidant enzyme activities, selenoprotein-P, ceruloplasmin concentration and activity, antioxidant capacity, and markers of oxidative stress were measured by colorimetric assays. Sixty-four tag-single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within genes encoding the antioxidant enzymes and selenoprotein-P were genotyped using allele-specific competitive PCR. Plasma copper and ceruloplasmin concentrations were modestly but significantly elevated in women who subsequently developed preeclampsia (both Ppreeclampsia. The modest elevation in copper may contribute to oxidative stress, later in pregnancy, in those women that go on to develop preeclampsia. The lack of evidence to support the hypothesis that functional SNPs influence antioxidant enzyme activity in pregnant women argues against a role for these genes in the etiology of preeclampsia.

  7. Curcumin Induces Nrf2 Nuclear Translocation and Prevents Glomerular Hypertension, Hyperfiltration, Oxidant Stress, and the Decrease in Antioxidant Enzymes in 5/6 Nephrectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edilia Tapia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal injury resulting from renal ablation induced by 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6NX is associated with oxidant stress, glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, and impaired Nrf2-Keap1 pathway. The purpose of this work was to know if the bifunctional antioxidant curcumin may induce nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and prevents 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress, renal injury, decrease in antioxidant enzymes, and glomerular hypertension and hyperfiltration. Four groups of rats were studied: (1 control, (2 5/6NX, (3 5/6NX +CUR, and (4 CUR (n=8–10. Curcumin was given by gavage to NX5/6 +CUR and CUR groups (60 mg/kg/day starting seven days before surgery. Rats were studied 30 days after NX5/6 or sham surgery. Curcumin attenuated 5/6NX-induced proteinuria, systemic and glomerular hypertension, hyperfiltration, glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, interstitial inflammation, and increase in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen. This protective effect was associated with enhanced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and with prevention of 5/6NX-induced oxidant stress and decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes. It is concluded that the protective effect of curcumin against 5/6NX-induced glomerular and systemic hypertension, hyperfiltration, renal dysfunction, and renal injury was associated with the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the prevention of both oxidant stress and the decrease of antioxidant enzymes.

  8. Benzene Exposure Alters Expression of Enzymes Involved in Fatty Acid β-Oxidation in Male C3H/He Mice

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    Rongli Sun

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Benzene is a well-known hematotoxic carcinogen that can cause leukemia and a variety of blood disorders. Our previous study indicated that benzene disturbs levels of metabolites in the fatty acid β-oxidation (FAO pathway, which is crucial for the maintenance and function of hematopoietic and leukemic cells. The present research aims to investigate the effects of benzene on changes in the expression of key enzymes in the FAO pathway in male C3H/He mice. Results showed that benzene exposure caused reduced peripheral white blood cell (WBC, red blood cell (RBC, platelet (Pit counts, and hemoglobin (Hgb concentration. Investigation of the effects of benzene on the expression of FA transport- and β-oxidation-related enzymes showed that expression of proteins Cpt1a, Crat, Acaa2, Aldh1l2, Acadvl, Crot, Echs1, and Hadha was significantly increased. The ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential decreased in mice exposed to benzene. Meanwhile, reactive oxygen species (ROS, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, and malondialdehyde (MDA levels were significantly increased in the benzene group. Our results indicate that benzene induces increased expression of FA transport and β-oxidation enzymes, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress, which may play a role in benzene-induced hematotoxicity.

  9. Analysis of endogenous aldehydes in human urine by static headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, María; Gallego, Mercedes; Silva, Manuel

    2016-03-11

    Endogenous aldehydes (EAs) generated during oxidative stress and cell processes are associated with many pathogenic and toxicogenic processes. The aim of this research was to develop a solvent-free and automated analytical method for the determination of EAs in human urine using a static headspace generator sampler coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-GC-MS). Twelve significant EAs used as markers of different biochemical and physiological processes, namely short- and medium-chain alkanals, α,β-unsaturated aldehydes and dicarbonyl aldehydes have been selected as target analytes. Human urine samples (no dilution is required) were derivatized with O-2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzylhydroxylamine in alkaline medium (hydrogen carbonate-carbonate buffer, pH 10.3). The HS-GC-MS method developed renders an efficient tool for the sensitive and precise determination of EAs in human urine with limits of detection from 1 to 15ng/L and relative standard deviations, (RSDs) from 6.0 to 7.9%. Average recoveries by enriching urine samples ranged between 92 and 95%. Aldehydes were readily determined at 0.005-50μg/L levels in human urine from healthy subjects, smokers and diabetic adults.

  10. Zinc oxide-montmorillonite hybrid influences diarrhea, intestinal mucosal integrity, and digestive enzyme activity in weaned pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Caihong; Song, Juan; You, Zhaotong; Luan, Zhaoshuang; Li, Weifen

    2012-11-01

    One hundred-eighty piglets (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire), with an average initial weight of 7.4 kg weaned at 27 ± 1 days of age, were used to evaluate the effects of dietary zinc oxide-montmorillonite hybrid (ZnO-MMT) on growth performance, diarrhea, intestinal mucosal integrity, and digestive enzyme activity. All pigs were allotted to five treatments and fed with the basal diets supplemented with 0, 250, 500, and 750 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO-MMT or 2,000 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO. The results showed that supplementation with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT and 2,000 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO improved average daily gain, enhanced average daily feed intake, decreased fecal scores at 4, 8, and 14 days postweaning, reduced intestinal permeability which was evident from the reduced lactulose recovery and urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and improved the activities of protease, amylase, lipase, trypsin, and chymotrypsin both in pancreas and small intestinal contents of pigs as compared with the control. Supplemental 250 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT also decreased fecal scores at 8 and 14 days postweaning, decreased urinary lactulose/mannitol ratio, and improved chymotrypsin activity in pancreas and small intestinal contents as well as protease activity in small intestinal contents compared with control. Moreover, the above indexes of weanling pigs fed with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO-MMT did not differ from those fed with 2,000 mg/kg of Zn as ZnO. The results demonstrated that supplementation with 500 or 750 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO-MMT was as efficacious as 2,000 mg/kg of Zn from ZnO in improving growth performance, alleviating postweaning diarrhea, and enhancing intestinal mucosal integrity and the digestive enzyme activities in pancreas and small intestinal contents of pigs. The results that feeding lower concentrations of ZnO-MMT to weanling pigs maintained performance will be beneficial for the environment and for sustaining swine production.

  11. [Oxidative stress, rRNA genes, and antioxidant enzymes in pathogenesis of schizophrenia and autism: modeling and clinical advices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porokhovnik, L N; Pasekov, V P; Egolina, N A; Tsvetkova, T G; Kosiakova, N V; Gorbachevskaia, N L; Sukhotina, N K; Kozlovskaia, G V; Sorokin, A B; Korovina, N Iu; Liapunova, N A

    2013-01-01

    Ribosomal genes (RG), or genes for rRNA, are represented by multiple tandem repeats in eukaryotic genomes, and just a part of them is transcriptionally active. The quantity of active copies is a stable genome feature which determines the cell's capability for rapid synthesis of proteins, necessary to cope with stress conditions. Low number of active RG copies leads to reduced stress resistance and elevated risk of multifactorial disorders (MFD). Oxidative stress (OS) in the brain cells is believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of infantile autism (IA) and schizophrenia, i.e., MFDs with a manifested genetic predisposition. With autism, OS markers are found almost in every research, whilst with schizophrenia, the OS data are contradictory. Earlier, in a sample of patients with schizophrenia, we have found significantly higher quantity of active RG copies than at the average in healthy population. Here we have estimated the number of active RG copies in a sample of patients with IA (n = 51) and revealed significantly lower mean value than in healthy population. A novel mathematical model of the dynamic pattern of OS has been proposed. The model is realized as an ordinary differential equation system, supposing induction of antioxidant protection enzymes being mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), with the subsequent decrease of ROS content in a cell. The rate of synthesis of antioxidant protection enzymes is limited by the ribosome synthesis rate which depends on the number of active RG copies. Analysis of the model showed that the system always approaches a single stable equilibrium point along a damped oscillation trajectory, which in some degree resembles the dynamics of 'predator-prey' interaction in Lotka-Volterra model. The stationary ROS level inversely depends on the number of active RG copies. Our study explains the inconsistency of clinical data of OS in schizophrenia and suggests a novel criterion for discriminative cytogenetic diagnostics of

  12. LOXL2 Oxidizes Methylated TAF10 and Controls TFIID-Dependent Genes during Neural Progenitor Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iturbide, Ane; Pascual-Reguant, Laura; Fargas, Laura; Cebrià, Joan Pau; Alsina, Berta; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2015-06-04

    Protein function is often regulated and controlled by posttranslational modifications, such as oxidation. Although oxidation has been mainly considered to be uncontrolled and nonenzymatic, many enzymatic oxidations occur on enzyme-selected lysine residues; for instance, LOXL2 oxidizes lysines by converting the ε-amino groups into aldehyde groups. Using an unbiased proteomic approach, we have identified methylated TAF10, a member of the TFIID complex, as a LOXL2 substrate. LOXL2 oxidation of TAF10 induces its release from its promoters, leading to a block in TFIID-dependent gene transcription. In embryonic stem cells, this results in the inactivation of the pluripotency genes and loss of the pluripotent capacity. During zebrafish development, the absence of LOXL2 resulted in the aberrant overexpression of the neural progenitor gene Sox2 and impaired neural differentiation. Thus, lysine oxidation of the transcription factor TAF10 is a controlled protein modification and demonstrates a role for protein oxidation in regulating pluripotency genes.

  13. Epoxide hydrolase-catalyzed enantioselective conversion of trans-stilbene oxide: Insights into the reaction mechanism from steady-state and pre-steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archelas, Alain; Zhao, Wei; Faure, Bruno; Iacazio, Gilles; Kotik, Michael

    2016-02-01

    A detailed kinetic study based on steady-state and pre-steady-state measurements is described for the highly enantioselective epoxide hydrolase Kau2. The enzyme, which is a member of the α/β-hydrolase fold family, preferentially reacts with the (S,S)-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide (TSO) with an E value of ∼200. The enzyme follows a classical two-step catalytic mechanism with formation of an alkyl-enzyme intermediate in the first step and hydrolysis of this intermediate in a rate-limiting second step. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching during TSO conversion appears to correlate with alkylation of the enzyme. The steady-state data are consistent with (S,S) and (R,R)-TSO being two competing substrates with marked differences in k(cat) and K(M) values. The high enantiopreference of the epoxide hydrolase is best explained by pronounced differences in the second-order alkylation rate constant (k2/K(S)) and the alkyl-enzyme hydrolysis rate k3 between the (S,S) and (R,R)-enantiomers of TSO. Our data suggest that during conversion of (S,S)-TSO the two active site tyrosines, Tyr(157) and Tyr(259), serve mainly as electrophilic catalysts in the alkylation half-reaction, polarizing the oxirane oxygen of the bound epoxide through hydrogen bond formation, however, without fully donating their hydrogens to the forming alkyl-enzyme intermediate.

  14. Potent inhibition of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 by diphenyleneiodonium: focus on nitroglycerin bioactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Regina; Neubauer, Andrea; Wölkart, Gerald; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Lang, Barbara; Schmidt, Kurt; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Gorren, Antonius C F; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2013-09-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) catalyzes vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN) to yield nitric oxide (NO) or a related species that activates soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), resulting in cGMP-mediated vasodilation. Accordingly, established ALDH2 inhibitors attenuate GTN-induced vasorelaxation in vitro and in vivo. However, the ALDH2 hypothesis has not been reconciled with early studies demonstrating potent inhibition of the GTN response by diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), a widely used inhibitor of flavoproteins, in particular NADPH oxidases. We addressed this issue and investigated the effects of DPI on GTN-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings and the function of purified ALDH2. DPI (0.3 µM) inhibited the high affinity component of aortic relaxation to GTN without affecting the response to NO, indicating that the drug interfered with GTN bioactivation. Denitration and bioactivation of 1-2 µM GTN, assayed as 1,2-glycerol dinitrate formation and activation of purified sGC, respectively, were inhibited by DPI with a half-maximally active concentration of about 0.2 µM in a GTN-competitive manner. Molecular modeling indicated that DPI binds to the catalytic site of ALDH2, and this was confirmed by experiments showing substrate-competitive inhibition of the dehydrogenase and esterase activities of the enzyme. Our data identify ALDH2 as highly sensitive target of DPI and explain inhibition of GTN-induced relaxation by this drug observed previously. In addition, the data provide new evidence for the essential role of ALDH2 in GTN bioactivation and may have implications to other fields of ALDH2 research, such as hepatic ethanol metabolism and cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  15. Aldehyde dehydrogenase-independent bioactivation of nitroglycerin in porcine and bovine blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Regina; Wölkart, Gerald; Opelt, Marissa; Schwarzenegger, Christine; Hofinger, Marielies; Neubauer, Andrea; Kollau, Alexander; Schmidt, Kurt; Schrammel, Astrid; Mayer, Bernd

    2015-02-15

    The vascular bioactivation of the antianginal drug nitroglycerin (GTN), yielding 1,2-glycerol dinitrate and nitric oxide or a related activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, is catalyzed by aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (ALDH2) in rodent and human blood vessels. The essential role of ALDH2 has been confirmed in many studies and is considered as general principle of GTN-induced vasodilation in mammals. However, this view is challenged by an early report showing that diphenyleneiodonium, which we recently characterized as potent ALDH2 inhibitor, has no effect on GTN-induced relaxation of bovine coronary arteries (De La Lande et al., 1996). We investigated this issue and found that inhibition of ALDH2 attenuates GTN-induced coronary vasodilation in isolated perfused rat hearts but has no effect on relaxation to GTN of bovine and porcine coronary arteries. This observation is explained by low levels of ALDH2 protein expression in bovine coronary arteries and several types of porcine blood vessels. ALDH2 mRNA expression and the rates of GTN denitration were similarly low, excluding a significant contribution of ALDH2 to the bioactivation of GTN in these vessels. Attempts to identify the responsible pathway with enzyme inhibitors did not provide conclusive evidence for the involvement of ALDH3A1, cytochrome P450, or GSH-S-transferase. Thus, the present manuscript describes a hitherto unrecognized pathway of GTN bioactivation in bovine and porcine blood vessels. If present in the human vasculature, this pathway might contribute to the therapeutic effects of organic nitrates that are not metabolized by ALDH2.

  16. Biomass Vanillin-Derived Polymeric Microspheres Containing Functional Aldehyde Groups: Preparation, Characterization, and Application as Adsorbent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huanyu; Yong, Xueyong; Zhou, Jinyong; Deng, Jianping; Wu, Youping

    2016-02-03

    The contribution reports the first polymeric microspheres derived from a biomass, vanillin. It reacted with methacryloyl chloride, providing monomer vanillin methacrylate (VMA), which underwent suspension polymerization in aqueous media and yielded microspheres in high yield (>90 wt %). By controlling the N2 bubbling mode and by optimizing the cosolvent for dissolving the solid monomer, the microspheres were endowed with surface pores, demonstrated by SEM images and mercury intrusion porosimetry measurement. Taking advantage of the reactive aldehyde groups, the microspheres further reacted with glycine, thereby leading to a novel type of Schiff-base chelating material. The functionalized microspheres demonstrated remarkable adsorption toward Cu(2+) (maximum, 135 mg/g) which was taken as representative for metal ions. The present study provides an unprecedented class of biobased polymeric microspheres showing large potentials as adsorbents in wastewater treatment. Also importantly, the reactive aldehyde groups may enable the microspheres to be used as novel materials for immobilizing biomacromolecules, e.g. enzymes.

  17. Phenolic Extract from Moringa oleifera Leaves Inhibits Key Enzymes Linked to Erectile Dysfunction and Oxidative Stress in Rats' Penile Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Ademosun, Ayokunle O; Olasehinde, Tosin A; Oyeleye, Sunday I; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L

    2015-01-01

    This study was designed to determine the antioxidant properties and inhibitory effects of extract from Moringa oleifera leaves on angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) and arginase activities in vitro. The extract was prepared and phenolic (total phenols and flavonoid) contents, radical (nitric oxide (NO), hydroxyl (OH)) scavenging abilities, and Fe(2+)-chelating ability were assessed. Characterization of the phenolic constituents was done via high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) analysis. Furthermore, the effects of the extract on Fe(2+)-induced MDA production in rats' penile tissue homogenate as well as its action on ACE and arginase activities were also determined. The extract scavenged NO (∗) , OH (∗) , chelated Fe(2+), and inhibited MDA production in a dose-dependent pattern with IC50 values of 1.36, 0.52, and 0.38 mg/mL and 194.23 µg/mL, respectively. Gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol were the most abundant phenolic compounds identified in the leaf extract. The extract also inhibited ACE and arginase activities in a dose-dependent pattern and their IC50 values were 303.03 and 159.59 µg/mL, respectively. The phenolic contents, inhibition of ACE, arginase, and Fe(2+)-induced MDA production, and radical (OH (∗) , NO (∗) ) scavenging and Fe(2+)-chelating abilities could be some of the possible mechanisms by which M. oleifera leaves could be used in the treatment and/or management of erectile dysfunction.

  18. Isolation of animal cell mutants defective in long-chain fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase. Sensitivity to fatty aldehydes and Schiff's base modification of phospholipids: implications for Sj-ogren-Larsson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, P F; Zoeller, R A

    1997-09-19

    Using tritium suicide, we have isolated a variant of the Chinese hamster ovary cell line, CHO-K1, that is deficient in long-chain fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase (FAO; EC 1.1.1.192). Specifically, it was the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase component that was affected. The enzymatic deficiency found in this mutant strain, designated FAA. K1A, was similar to that displayed by fibroblasts from patients with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome (SLS), an inheritable neurocutaneous disorder. Complementation analyses suggested that the deficiency in fatty alcohol oxidation in the FAA.K1A cells and the SLS fibroblasts is a result of lesions in homologous genes. The FAA.K1A cells were unable to convert long chain fatty aldehydes to the corresponding fatty acids. This resulted in a hypersensitivity of the FAA.K1A cells to the cytotoxic effects of long chain fatty aldehydes. The difference between the mutant and wild-type cells was most obvious when using fatty aldehydes between 14 and 20 carbons, with the greatest difference between wild-type and mutant cells found when using octadecanal. Fibroblasts from a patient with SLS also displayed the hypersensitivity phenotype when compared with FAldDH+ human fibroblasts. In both CHO and human FAldDH- cell lines, addition of long chain fatty aldehydes to the medium caused a dramatic increase in aldehyde-modified phosphatidylethanolamine, presumably through Schiff's base addition to the primary amine of the ethanolamine head group. When 25 microM hexadecanal was added to the growth medium, approximately 10% of the phosphatidylethanolamine was found in the fatty aldehyde-modified form in FAA.K1A, although this was not observed in wild-type cells. Modified phosphatidylethanolamine could be detected in FAldDH- cells even when exogenous fatty aldehydes were not added to the medium. We propose a possible role for fatty aldehydes, or other aldehydic species, in mediating some of the symptoms associated with Sjögren-Larsson syndrome.

  19. Systematic methodology for the development of biocatalytic hydrogen-borrowing cascades: application to the synthesis of chiral α-substituted carboxylic acids from α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Tanja; Mutti, Francesco G; Humphreys, Luke D; Turner, Nicholas J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2015-01-07

    Ene-reductases (ERs) are flavin dependent enzymes that catalyze the asymmetric reduction of activated carbon-carbon double bonds. In particular, α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds (e.g. enals and enones) as well as nitroalkenes are rapidly reduced. Conversely, α,β-unsaturated esters are poorly accepted substrates whereas free carboxylic acids are not converted at all. The only exceptions are α,β-unsaturated diacids, diesters as well as esters bearing an electron-withdrawing group in α- or β-position. Here, we present an alternative approach that has a general applicability for directly obtaining diverse chiral α-substituted carboxylic acids. This approach combines two enzyme classes, namely ERs and aldehyde dehydrogenases (Ald-DHs), in a concurrent reductive-oxidative biocatalytic cascade. This strategy has several advantages as the starting material is an α-substituted α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, a class of compounds extremely reactive for the reduction of the alkene moiety. Furthermore no external hydride source from a sacrificial substrate (e.g. glucose, formate) is required since the hydride for the first reductive step is liberated in the second oxidative step. Such a process is defined as a hydrogen-borrowing cascade. This methodology has wide applicability as it was successfully applied to the synthesis of chiral substituted hydrocinnamic acids, aliphatic acids, heterocycles and even acetylated amino acids with elevated yield, chemo- and stereo-selectivity. A systematic methodology for optimizing the hydrogen-borrowing two-enzyme synthesis of α-chiral substituted carboxylic acids was developed. This systematic methodology has general applicability for the development of diverse hydrogen-borrowing processes that possess the highest atom efficiency and the lowest environmental impact.

  20. Acute liver failure in rats activates glutamine-glutamate cycle but declines antioxidant enzymes to induce oxidative stress in cerebral cortex and cerebellum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Liver dysfunction led hyperammonemia (HA causes a nervous system disorder; hepatic encephalopathy (HE. In the brain, ammonia induced glutamate-excitotoxicity and oxidative stress are considered to play important roles in the pathogenesis of HE. The brain ammonia metabolism and antioxidant enzymes constitute the main components of this mechanism; however, need to be defined in a suitable animal model. This study was aimed to examine this aspect in the rats with acute liver failure (ALF. METHODS: ALF in the rats was induced by intraperitoneal administration of 300 mg thioacetamide/Kg. b.w up to 2 days. Glutamine synthetase (GS and glutaminase (GA, the two brain ammonia metabolizing enzymes vis a vis ammonia and glutamate levels and profiles of all the antioxidant enzymes vis a vis oxidative stress markers were measured in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum of the control and the ALF rats. RESULTS: The ALF rats showed significantly increased levels of ammonia in the blood (HA but little changes in the cortex and cerebellum. This was consistent with the activation of the GS-GA cycle and static levels of glutamate in these brain regions. However, significantly increased levels of lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl contents were consistent with the reduced levels of all the antioxidant enzymes in both the brain regions of these ALF rats. CONCLUSION: ALF activates the GS-GA cycle to metabolize excess ammonia and thereby, maintains static levels of ammonia and glutamate in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Moreover, ALF induces oxidative stress by reducing the levels of all the antioxidant enzymes which is likely to play important role, independent of glutamate levels, in the pathogenesis of acute HE.

  1. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Alleviated the Inhibition of Photosynthesis and Antioxidant Enzyme Activities in Iron-Deficient Chinese Cabbage(Brassica chinensis L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Fei; WANG Xiu-feng; SHI Qing-hua; WANG Mei-ling; YANG Feng-juan; GAO Qing-hai

    2008-01-01

    The effects of exogenous nitric oxide(NO)on plant growth,chlorophyll contents,photosynthetic and chlorophyll fluorescence parameters as well as lipid peroxidation and activities of antioxidant enzymes were investigated in Chinese cabbage plants exposed to iron(Fe)deficiency.Iron deficiency led to serious chlorosis in Chinese cabbage leaves,and resulted in significant decrease in plant growth,photosynthetic pigments,net photosynthetic rate,Fv/Fm,ΦPsⅡand activities of antioxidant enzymes,and increase in lipid peroxidation.While treatment with SNP,a NO donor,it could revert the iron deficiency symptoms,increased photosynthetic rate as well as activities of antioxidant enzymes,and protected membrane from lipid peroxidation,as a result,the growth inhibition of Chinese cabbage by Fe deficiency was alleviated.

  2. Biogenic aldehyde determination by reactive paper spray ionization mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bag, Soumabha; Hendricks, P.I. [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reynolds, J.C. [Centre for Analytical Science, Loughborough University, Loughborough, Leicestershire (United Kingdom); Cooks, R.G., E-mail: cooks@purdue.edu [Aston Labs, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2015-02-20

    Highlights: • In-situ derivatization and simultaneous ionization used to detect aldehydes. • Biogenic aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes reacted with 4-aminophenol. • Derivatized products yield structurally characteristic fragment ions. • This measurement demonstrated using a miniaturized portable mass spectrometer. - Abstract: Ionization of aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes is improved by performing simultaneous chemical derivatization using 4-aminophenol to produce charged iminium ions during paper spray ionization. Accelerated reactions occur in the microdroplets generated during the paper spray ionization event for the tested aldehydes (formaldehyde, n-pentanaldehyde, n-nonanaldehyde, n-decanaldehyde, n-dodecanaldehyde, benzaldehyde, m-anisaldehyde, and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde). Tandem mass spectrometric analysis of the iminium ions using collision-induced dissociation demonstrated that straight chain aldehydes give a characteristic fragment at m/z 122 (shown to correspond to protonated 4-(methyleneamino)phenol), while the aromatic aldehyde iminium ions fragment to give a characteristic product ion at m/z 120. These features allow straightforward identification of linear and aromatic aldehydes. Quantitative analysis of n-nonaldehyde using a benchtop mass spectrometer demonstrated a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude from 2.5 ng to 5 μg of aldehyde loaded on the filter paper emitter. The limit of detection was determined to be 2.2 ng for this aldehyde. The method had a precision of 22%, relative standard deviation. The experiment was also implemented using a portable ion trap mass spectrometer.

  3. Bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite--possible role in the onset of toxicity induced by the anti-HIV drug abacavir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Nádia M; Charneira, Catarina; Pereira, Sofia A; Monteiro, Emília C; Marques, M Matilde; Antunes, Alexandra M M

    2014-01-30

    Aldehydes are highly reactive molecules, which can be generated during numerous physiological processes, including the biotransformation of drugs. Several non-P450 enzymes participate in their metabolism albeit alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase are the ones most frequently involved in this process. Endogenous and exogenous aldehydes have been strongly implicated in multiple human pathologies. Their ability to react with biomacromolecules (e.g. proteins) yielding covalent adducts is suggested to be the common primary mechanism underlying the toxicity of these reactive species. Abacavir is one of the options for combined anti-HIV therapy. Although individual susceptibilities to adverse effects differ among patients, abacavir is associated with idiosyncratic hypersensitivity drug reactions and an increased risk of cardiac dysfunction. This review highlights the current knowledge on abacavir metabolism and discusses the potential role of bioactivation to an aldehyde metabolite, capable of forming protein adducts, in the onset of abacavir-induced toxic outcomes.

  4. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods: Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glut...

  5. The putative endoglucanase PcGH61D from Phanerochaete chrysosporium is a metal-dependent oxidative enzyme that cleaves cellulose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørge Westereng

    Full Text Available Many fungi growing on plant biomass produce proteins currently classified as glycoside hydrolase family 61 (GH61, some of which are known to act synergistically with cellulases. In this study we show that PcGH61D, the gene product of an open reading frame in the genome of Phanerochaete chrysosporium, is an enzyme that cleaves cellulose using a metal-dependent oxidative mechanism that leads to generation of aldonic acids. The activity of this enzyme and its beneficial effect on the efficiency of classical cellulases are stimulated by the presence of electron donors. Experiments with reduced cellulose confirmed the oxidative nature of the reaction catalyzed by PcGH61D and indicated that the enzyme may be capable of penetrating into the substrate. Considering the abundance of GH61-encoding genes in fungi and genes encoding their functional bacterial homologues currently classified as carbohydrate binding modules family 33 (CBM33, this enzyme activity is likely to turn out as a major determinant of microbial biomass-degrading efficiency.

  6. A Catalase-related Hemoprotein in Coral Is Specialized for Synthesis of Short-chain Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teder, Tarvi; Lõhelaid, Helike; Boeglin, William E.; Calcutt, Wade M.; Brash, Alan R.; Samel, Nigulas

    2015-01-01

    In corals a catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein transforms arachidonic acid to the allene oxide 8R,9-epoxy-5,9,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid from which arise cyclopentenones such as the prostanoid-related clavulones. Recently we cloned two catalase-lipoxygenase fusion protein genes (a and b) from the coral Capnella imbricata, form a being an allene oxide synthase and form b giving uncharacterized polar products (Lõhelaid, H., Teder, T., Tõldsepp, K., Ekins, M., and Samel, N. (2014) PloS ONE 9, e89215). Here, using HPLC-UV, LC-MS, and NMR methods, we identify a novel activity of fusion protein b, establishing its role in cleaving the lipoxygenase product 8R-hydroperoxy-eicosatetraenoic acid into the short-chain aldehydes (5Z)-8-oxo-octenoic acid and (3Z,6Z)-dodecadienal; these primary products readily isomerize in an aqueous medium to the corresponding 6E- and 2E,6Z derivatives. This type of enzymatic cleavage, splitting the carbon chain within the conjugated diene of the hydroperoxide substrate, is known only in plant cytochrome P450 hydroperoxide lyases. In mechanistic studies using 18O-labeled substrate and incubations in H218O, we established synthesis of the C8-oxo acid and C12 aldehyde with the retention of the hydroperoxy oxygens, consistent with synthesis of a short-lived hemiacetal intermediate that breaks down spontaneously into the two aldehydes. Taken together with our initial studies indicating differing gene regulation of the allene oxide synthase and the newly identified catalase-related hydroperoxide lyase and given the role of aldehydes in plant defense, this work uncovers a potential pathway in coral stress signaling and a novel enzymatic activity in the animal kingdom. PMID:26100625

  7. Role of cysteine residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of cyanobacterial aldehyde deformylating oxygenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuuki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (AD is a key enzyme for alkane biosynthesis in cyanobacteria, and it can be used as a catalyst for alkane production in vitro and in vivo. However, three free Cys residues in AD may impair its catalytic activity by undesired disulfide bond formation and oxidation. To develop Cys-deficient mutants of AD, we examined the roles of the Cys residues in the structure, stability, and alkane producing activity of AD from Nostoc punctiforme PCC 73102 by systematic Cys-to-Ala/Ser mutagenesis. The C71A/S mutations reduced the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD and facilitated the formation of a dimer, indicating that the conserved Cys71, which is located in close proximity to the substrate-binding site, plays crucial roles in maintaining the activity, structure, and stability of AD. On the other hand, mutations at Cys107 and Cys117 did not affect the hydrocarbon producing activity of AD. Therefore, we propose that the C107A/C117A double mutant is preferable to wild type AD for alkane production and that the double mutant may be used as a pseudo-wild type protein for further improvement of the alkane producing activity of AD.

  8. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 218, Revision 1 (FGE.218Rev1): alpha,beta-Unsaturated aldehydes and precursors from subgroup 4.2 of FGE.19: Furfural derivatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    .001], for which there was a request for genotoxicity data in FGE.218. Flavouring Group Evaluation 218 (FGE.218) consists of furfural [FL-no: 13.018] and seven substances structurally related to furfural, 5-methylfurfural [FL-no: 13.001], furfuryl alcohol [FL-no: 13.019] and five esters of furfuryl alcohol...... is expected to be oxidised to the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde furfural. However, based on the data then available the Panel concluded that furfural is not of concern with respect to genotoxicity. Furthermore, the Panel concluded that not only furfural but also the structurally related furfuryl alcohol...... to 5-[(sulphoxy)methyl]furfural which shows genotoxic potential in vitro, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure. Accordingly, the Panel concluded that 5-methylfurfural could not be evaluated through the Procedure either. Industry has submitted additional data on the 5...

  9. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  10. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.I. Omotayo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump.

  11. Supplementation with l-arginine stabilizes plasma arginine and nitric oxide metabolites, suppresses elevated liver enzymes and peroxidation in sickle cell anaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaja, S I; Ogungbemi, S O; Kehinde, M O; Anigbogu, C N

    2016-06-01

    The effect of l-arginine on liver function in SCD has received little or no attention. The effect of a chronic, oral, low-dose supplementation with l-arginine (1gm/day for 6 weeks) on some liver enzymes, lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide metabolites was studied in 20 normal (non-sickle cell anaemia; NSCA) subjects and 20 sickle cell anaemia (SCA) subjects. Ten milliliters of blood was withdrawn from an ante-cubital vein for the estimation of plasma arginine concentration ([R]), alanine aminotransaminase (ALT), aspartate aminotransaminase (AST) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), plasma total bilirubin concentration [TB], malondialdehyde concentration [MDA] and nitric oxide metabolites concentration [NOx]. Before supplementation, ALT, AST, ALP (pconcentration and nitric oxide metabolites levels in NSCA and SCA subjects. Responses in SCA subjects to l-arginine were more sensitive than in NSCA subjects.

  12. Strictosidine-related enzymes involved in the alkaloid biosynthesis of Uncaria tomentosa root cultures grown under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera-Reyes, Ileana; Huerta-Heredia, Ariana A; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Flores-Sanchez, Isvett Josefina; Esparza-García, Fernando; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2013-01-01

    The activity and gene expression of strictosidine-related enzymes in Uncaria tomentosa root cultures exposed to oxidative stress were studied. Elicitation with 0.2 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) or a combination of 0.8 mM buthionine sulfoximine and 0.2 mM jasmonic acid (BSO-JA) increased peroxidase activities by twofold at Day 8 and glutathione reductase by 1.4-fold at Day 5 in H2 O2 elicited cultures respect to the control. Production of monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (MOA), 3α-dihydrocadambine, and dolichantoside was stimulated after H2 O2 elicitation, reaching levels of 886.4 ± 23.6, 847.7 ± 25.4, and 87.5 ± 7.2 µg/g DW, at Day 8 which were 1.7-, 2.1-, and 2.3-fold higher relative to control. BSO-JA elicited cultures produced about twice alkaloids than H2 O2 -treated cultures, following a biphasic pattern with maxima at 0.5 and 8 days. Alkaloid production was preceded by increase in strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) activities. After elicitation with H2 O2 or BSO-JA, the STR activity (pKat/mg protein) increased by 1.9-fold (93.8 ± 17.8 at 24 h) or 2.5-fold (102.4 ± 2.2 at 6 h) and the SGD activity (pKat/mg protein) by 2.8-fold (245.2 ± 14.4 at 6 h) or 4.2-fold (421.2 ± 1.8 at 18 h) relative to control. STR and SGD transcripts were upregulated after elicitation. H2 O2 -treated roots showed higher levels of STR at 48-192 h and SGD at 24-48 h, while BSO-JA treatments showed STR increased at 12 h and SGD at 24 h. Also, LC/ESI-MS confirmed the biosynthesis of dolichantoside from N-ω-methyltryptamine and secologanin by U. tomentosa protein extracts.

  13. Antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress adaptation to exercise training: Comparison of endurance, resistance, and concurrent training in untrained males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Azizbeigi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of endurance training (ET, resistance training (RT, and concurrent training (CT on circulating antioxidant capacity and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 30 men aged 21.7 ± 2.4 years were assigned to the following three training groups: ET, which included continuous running with incremental intensity that was increased up to 80% of maximal heart rate (n = 10; RT, which included a beginning load of 50% of one repetition maximum (1RM that was increased up to 80% of 1RM (n = 10; and CT, which included ET and RT programs every other day during the week (n = 10. Activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx in erythrocytes and total antioxidant capacity (TAC and malondialdehyde (MDA level in plasma were measured. The results showed that SOD significantly increased by 21.85% (p = 0.020, 9.54% (p = 0.032, and 14.55% (p = 0.038 in the ET, RT, and CT groups, respectively. Furthermore, the activity of erythrocyte GPx significantly increased in the ET (p = 0.018 and CT (p = 0.042 groups. The TAC increased significantly in the ET (p = 0.040 and CT (p = 0.049 groups compared with the pretest values. The MDA level significantly decreased in the ET group by 32.7% (p = 0.028, by 32% in the RT group (p = 0.025, and by 29.1% (p = 0.047 in the CT group. However, there was no significant difference in the interaction of time and group between variables of SOD and GPx enzymes and TAC of plasma and MDA in the ET, RT, and CT groups (p < 0.05. It can be concluded that all three training types induced the same changes in redox state (increased SOD activity and reduction in MDA levels, but at different rates.

  14. Oxidative enzymes activities from Lentinula edodes on agribusiness substrate / Atividade de enzimas oxidativas do Lentinula edodes em substratos agroindustriais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Perani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Basidyomycete Lentinula edodes has its related enzymatic activity mainly on the agribusiness waste kind used as a substrate. The objective of this work was to verify the activity of oxidative enzymes lacase (Lac, lignina peroxidase (LiP and manganese peroxidase (MnP of three L. edodes strains, in stationary system, cultivated the 25 ºC, in the absence of light, in substrates wtih 20% of bran of rice, 1% of CaCO3 and 79% of rice husk (CA, eucalyptus sawdust (SE, cassava bagasse (BM and sugarcane bagasse (BC, adjusted to 60% of humidity. The Lac and MnP activities were bigger in eucalyptus sawdust (SE and sugarcane bagasse (BC. The LiP activity was not induced for tested substrates. The rice husk (CA and cassava bagasse (BM substrates, although are not adequate to produce Lac or MnP, can be used as additives to increase the porosity, air availability and easy metabolism polysaccharides.O basidiomiceto Lentinula edodes tem sua atividade enzimática relacionada, principalmente, ao tipo de resíduo agroindustrial utilizado como substrato. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar a atividade das enzimas oxidativas lacase (Lac, lignina peroxidase (LiP e manganês peroxidase (MnP de três linhagens de L. edodes, em sistema estacionário, cultivadas a 25 ºC, na ausência de luz, em substratos compostos de 20% de farelo de arroz, 1% de CaCO3 e 79% de casca de arroz (CA, serragem de eucalipto (SE, bagaço de mandioca (BM e bagaço de cana-de-açúcar (BC, ajustados à 60% de umidade. As atividades de Lac e MnP foram maiores nos substratos a base de serragem de eucalipto (SE e bagaço de cana-de-açúcar (BC. A atividade de LiP não foi induzida pelos substratos testados. Os substratos à base de casca de arroz (CA e bagaço de mandioca (BM, não se mostraram adequados na indução da produção de Lac ou MnP, mas podem ser utilizados como aditivos para aumentar a porosidade, disponibilidade de ar e fornecer polissacarídeos de fácil metabolização.

  15. Enhanced and selective delivery of enzyme therapy to 9L-glioma tumor via magnetic targeting of PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Gao, Wenxi

    2014-01-01

    The stability of enzyme-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in plasma is of great importance for in vivo delivery of the conjugated enzyme. In this study, β-glucosidase was conjugated on aminated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the glutaraldehyde method (β-Glu-MNP), and further PEGylated via N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The PEG-modified, β-glucosidase-immobilized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG-β-Glu-MNPs) were characterized by hydrodynamic diameter distribution, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. The results showed that the multidomain structure and magnetization properties of these nanoparticles were conserved well throughout the synthesis steps, with an expected diameter increase and zeta potential shifts. The Michaelis constant was calculated to evaluate the activity of conjugated β-glucosidase on the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating 73.0% and 65.4% of enzyme activity remaining for β-Glu-MNP and PEG-β-Glu-MNP, respectively. Both magnetophoretic mobility analysis and pharmacokinetics showed improved in vitro/in vivo stability of PEG-β-Glu-MNP compared with β-Glu-MNP. In vivo magnetic targeting of PEG-β-Glu-MNP was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and electron spin resonance analysis in a mouse model of subcutaneous 9L-glioma. Satisfactory accumulation of PEG-β-Glu-MNP in tumor tissue was successfully achieved, with an iron content of 627±45 nmol Fe/g tissue and β-glucosidase activity of 32.2±8.0 mU/g tissue.

  16. Fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase multigene family involved in the assimilation of n-alkanes in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2014-11-28

    In the n-alkane assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, n-alkanes are oxidized to fatty acids via fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes, after which they are utilized as carbon sources. Here, we show that four genes (HFD1-HFD4) encoding fatty aldehyde dehydrogenases (FALDHs) are involved in the metabolism of n-alkanes in Y. lipolytica. A mutant, in which all of four HFD genes are deleted (Δhfd1-4 strain), could not grow on n-alkanes of 12-18 carbons; however, the expression of one of those HFD genes restored its growth on n-alkanes. Production of Hfd2Ap or Hfd2Bp, translation products of transcript variants generated from HFD2 by the absence or presence of splicing, also supported the growth of the Δhfd1-4 strain on n-alkanes. The FALDH activity in the extract of the wild-type strain was increased when cells were incubated in the presence of n-decane, whereas this elevation in FALDH activity by n-decane was not observed in Δhfd1-4 strain extract. Substantial FALDH activities were detected in the extracts of Escherichia coli cells expressing the HFD genes. Fluorescent microscopic observation suggests that Hfd3p and Hfd2Bp are localized predominantly in the peroxisome, whereas Hfd1p and Hfd2Ap are localized in both the endoplasmic reticulum and the peroxisome. These results suggest that the HFD multigene family is responsible for the oxidation of fatty aldehydes to fatty acids in the metabolism of n-alkanes, and raise the possibility that Hfd proteins have diversified by gene multiplication and RNA splicing to efficiently assimilate or detoxify fatty aldehydes in Y. lipolytica.

  17. Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, V; Croes, K; Waelkens, E

    1999-01-01

    Purification, molecular cloning, and expression of 2-hydroxyphytanoyl- CoA lyase, a peroxisomal thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon-carbon bond cleavage during à-oxidation of 3- methyl-branched fatty acids

  18. Metabolite Profile Resulting from the Activation/Inactivation of 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and 2-Methyltetrahydro-β-carboline by Oxidative Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Herraiz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic enzymes are involved in the activation/deactivation of the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyiridine (MPTP neurotoxin and its naturally occurring analogs 2-methyltetrahydro-β-carbolines. The metabolic profile and biotransformation of these protoxins by three enzymes, monoamine oxidase (MAO, cytochrome P450, and heme peroxidases (myeloperoxidase and lactoperoxidase, were investigated and compared. The metabolite profile differed among the enzymes investigated. MAO and heme peroxidases activated these substances to toxic pyridinium and β-carbolinium species. MAO catalyzed the oxidation of MPTP to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-2,3-dihydropyridinium cation (MPDP+, whereas heme peroxidases catalyzed the oxidation of MPDP+ to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ and of 2-methyltetrahydro-β-carboline to 2-methyl-3,4-dihydro-β-carbolinium cation (2-Me-3,4-DHβC+. These substances were inactivated by cytochrome P450 2D6 through N-demethylation and aromatic hydroxylation (MPTP and aromatic hydroxylation (2-methyltetrahydro-β-carboline. In conclusion, the toxicological effects of these protoxins might result from a balance between the rate of their activation to toxic products (i.e., N-methylpyridinium-MPP+ and MPDP+- and N-methyl-β-carbolinium—βC+— by MAO and heme peroxidases and the rate of inactivation (i.e., N-demethylation, aromatic hydroxylation by cytochrome P450 2D6.

  19. Enzymes involved in the anaerobic oxidation of n-alkanes: from methane to long-chain paraffins

    OpenAIRE

    Callaghan, Amy V.

    2013-01-01

    Anaerobic microorganisms play key roles in the biogeochemical cycling of methane and non-methane alkanes. To date, there appear to be at least three proposed mechanisms of anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The first pathway is mediated by consortia of archaeal anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-reducing bacteria via ‘reverse methanogenesis’ and is catalyzed by a homologue of methyl-coenzyme M reductase. The second pathway is also mediated by anaerobic methane oxidizers and sulfate-red...

  20. Nitro-Oleic Acid Reduces J774A.1 Macrophage Oxidative Status and Triglyceride Mass: Involvement of Paraoxonase2 and Triglyceride Metabolizing Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblat, Mira; Rom, Oren; Volkova, Nina; Aviram, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Nitro-fatty acids possess anti-atherogenic properties, but their effects on macrophage oxidative status and lipid metabolism that play important roles in atherosclerosis development are unclear. This study compared the effects of nitro-oleic acid (OLA-NO2) with those of native oleic acid (OLA) on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, anti-oxidants and metabolism of triglycerides and cholesterol in J774A.1 macrophages. Upon incubating the cells with physiological concentrations of OLA-NO2 (0-1 µM) or with equivalent levels of OLA, ROS levels measured by 2, 7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate, decreased dose-dependently, but the anti-oxidative effects of OLA-NO2 were significantly augmented. Copper ion addition increased ROS generation in OLA treated macrophages without affecting OLA-NO2 treated cells. These effects could be attributed to elevated glutathione levels and to increased activity and expression of paraoxonase2 that were observed in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated cells. Beneficial effects on triglyceride metabolism were noted in OLA-NO2 vs OLA treated macrophages in which cellular triglycerides were reduced due to attenuated biosynthesis and accelerated hydrolysis of triglycerides. Accordingly, OLA-NO2 treated cells demonstrated down-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase1, the key enzyme in triglyceride biosynthesis, and increased expression of hormone-sensitive lipase and adipose triglyceride lipase that regulate triglyceride hydrolysis. Finally, OLA-NO2 vs OLA treatment resulted in modest but significant beneficial effects on macrophage cholesterol metabolism, reducing cholesterol biosynthesis rate and low density lipoprotein influx into the cells, while increasing high density lipoprotein-mediated cholesterol efflux from the macrophages. Collectively, compared with OLA, OLA-NO2 modestly but significantly reduces macrophage oxidative status and cellular triglyceride content via modulation of cellular anti-oxidants and triglyceride

  1. Responses of soil hydrolytic enzymes, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea to nitrogen applications in a temperate grassland in Inner Mongolia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyu; Tang, Yuqian; Shi, Yao; He, Nianpeng; Wen, Xuefa; Yu, Qiang; Zheng, Chunyu; Sun, Xiaomin; Qiu, Weiwen

    2016-09-01

    We used a seven-year urea gradient applied field experiment to investigate the effects of nitrogen (N) applications on soil N hydrolytic enzyme activity and ammonia-oxidizing microbial abundance in a typical steppe ecosystem in Inner Mongolia. The results showed that N additions inhibited the soil N-related hydrolytic enzyme activities, especially in 392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 treatment. As N additions increased, the amoA gene copy ratios of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) to ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) decreased from 1.13 to 0.65. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the AOA gene copies were negatively related with NH4+-N content. However, the AOB gene copies were positively correlated with NO3‑-N content. Moderate N application rates (56–224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) accompanied by P additions are beneficial to maintaining the abundance of AOB, as opposed to the inhibition of highest N application rate (392 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1) on the abundance of AOB. This study suggests that the abundance of AOB and AOA would not decrease unless N applications exceed 224 kg N ha‑1 yr‑1 in temperate grasslands in Inner Mongolia.

  2. Separation and distribution of thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme, tetrathionate reductase, and thiosulfate reductase in extracts of marine heterotroph strain 16B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whited, G M; Tuttle, J H

    1983-11-01

    Thiosulfate-oxidizing enzyme (TSO), tetrathionate reductase (TTR), and thiosulfate reductase (TSR) were demonstrated in cell-free extracts of the marine heterotrophic thiosulfate-oxidizing bacterium strain 16B. Extracts prepared from cells cultured aerobically in the absence of thiosulfate or tetrathionate exhibited constitutive TSO and TTR activity which resided in the soluble fraction of ultracentrifuged crude extracts. Constitutive TSO and TTR cochromatographed on DEAE-Sephadex A-50, Cellex D, Sephadex G-150, and orange A dye-ligand affinity gels. Extracts prepared from cells cultured anaerobically with tetrathionate or aerobically with thiosulfate followed by oxygen deprivation showed an 11- to 30-fold increase in TTR activity, with no increase in TSO activity. The inducible TTR resided in both the ultracentrifuge pellet and supernatant fractions and was readily separated from constitutive TSO and TTR in the latter by DEAE-Sephadex chromatography. Inducible TTR exhibited TSR activity, which was also located in both membrane and soluble extract fractions and which cochromatographed with inducible TTR. The results indicate that constitutive TSO and TTR in marine heterotroph 16B represent reverse activities of the same enzyme whose major physiological function is thiosulfate oxidation. Evidence is also presented which suggests a possible association of inducible TTR and TSR in strain 16B.

  3. Thiamine increases the resistance of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against oxidative, osmotic and thermal stress, through mechanisms partly independent of thiamine diphosphate-bound enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolak, Natalia; Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have established a hypothesis that thiamine (vitamin B1 ) is involved in the responses of different organisms against stress, also suggesting that underlying mechanisms are not limited to the universal role of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) in the central cellular metabolism. The current work aimed at characterising the effect of exogenously added thiamine on the response of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the oxidative (1 mM H2 O2 ), osmotic (1 M sorbitol) and thermal (42 °C) stress. As compared to the yeast culture in thiamine-free medium, in the presence of 1.4 μM external thiamine, (1) the relative mRNA levels of major TDP-dependent enzymes under stress conditions vs. unstressed control (the 'stress/control ratio') were moderately lower, (2) the stress/control ratio was strongly decreased for the transcript levels of several stress markers localised to the cytoplasm, peroxisomes, the cell wall and (with the strongest effect observed) the mitochondria (e.g. Mn-superoxide dismutase), (3) the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions was markedly decreased, with the significant alleviation of concomitant protein oxidation. The results obtained suggest the involvement of thiamine in the maintenance of redox balance in yeast cells under oxidative stress conditions, partly independent of the functions of TDP-dependent enzymes.

  4. Lycium chinensis Mill attenuates glutamate induced oxidative toxicity in PC12 cells by increasing antioxidant defense enzymes and down regulating ROS and Ca(2+) generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Opeyemi J; Chen, Hongxia; Zhou, Yifeng

    2016-03-11

    Lycium chinensis Mill is a famous traditional Chinese medicine which displays several medicinal activities including antioxidant and neuroprotective activities. However, the mechanism of action towards the neuroprotective action has not been fully elucidated. This work was aimed at investigating the neuroprotective effects of L. chinensis Mill against glutamate-induced oxidative neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. Oxidative cell death was induced with 5mM glutamate in PC12 cells. Cell viability, LDH release, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, GSH-Px, CAT and SOD antioxidant enzyme levels were measured. Our results indicated that pretreatment of PC12 cells with L. chinensis Mill extracts markedly attenuated the loss of cell viability, the release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Ca(2+) overload, ROS generation, and cell apoptosis induced by glutamate toxicity. Furthermore, L. chinensis Mill extracts also significantly increased the levels of innate antioxidant enzymes GSH-Px, SOD and CAT in glutamate-induced PC12 cells. Conclusively, our results provided substantial evidence that L. chinensis Mill protected PC12 cells against glutamate-induced cell death by attenuating ROS generation, Ca(2+) influx, and increased the antioxidant defense capacity of PC12 cells against oxidative stress damages, suggesting the possible potential of extracts from the plant as sources of bioactive molecules in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases and other oxidative enzymes are abundantly secreted by Aspergillus nidulans grown on different starches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nekiunaite, Laura; Arntzen, Magnus Ø.; Svensson, Birte;

    2016-01-01

    Starch is the second most abundant plant-derived biomass and a major feedstock in non-food industrial applications and first generation biofuel production. In contrast to lignocellulose, detailed insight into fungal degradation of starch is currently lacking. This study explores the secretomes...... by amylolytic activity measurements. Nearly half of the 312 proteins in the secretomes were carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), mostly glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and oxidative auxiliary activities (AAs). The abundance of the GH13 α-amylase (AmyB) decreased with time, as opposed to other starch......-degrading enzymes, e.g., the GH13 AmyF, GH15 glucoamylases (GlaA and GlaB), and the GH31 α-glucosidase (AgdE). Two AA13 LPMOs displayed similar secretion patterns as amylolytic hydrolases and were among the most abundant CAZymes. The starch-active AnLPMO13A that possesses a CBM20 carbohydrate-binding module...

  6. Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondria-Enriched Fraction Isolated from the Frontal Cortex and Hippocampus of Apolipoprotein E Knockout Mice Treated with Alda-1, an Activator of Mitochondrial Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowicz, Aneta; Olszanecki, Rafał; Suski, Maciej; Głombik, Katarzyna; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Adamek, Dariusz; Korbut, Ryszard

    2017-01-01

    The role of different genotypes of apolipoprotein E (apoE) in the etiology of Alzheimer’s disease is widely recognized. It has been shown that altered functioning of apoE may promote 4-hydroxynonenal modification of mitochondrial proteins, which may result in mitochondrial dysfunction, aggravation of oxidative stress, and neurodegeneration. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) is an enzyme considered to perform protective function in mitochondria by the detoxification of the end products of lipid peroxidation, such as 4-hydroxynonenal and other reactive aldehydes. The goal of our study was to apply a differential proteomics approach in concert with molecular and morphological techniques to elucidate the changes in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE−/−) mice upon treatment with Alda-1—a small molecular weight activator of ALDH2. Despite the lack of significant morphological changes in the brain of apoE−/− mice as compared to age-matched wild type animals, the proteomic and molecular approach revealed many changes in the expression of genes and proteins, indicating the impairment of energy metabolism, neuroplasticity, and neurogenesis in brains of apoE−/− mice. Importantly, prolonged treatment of apoE−/− mice with Alda-1 led to the beneficial changes in the expression of genes and proteins related to neuroplasticity and mitochondrial function. The pattern of alterations implies mitoprotective action of Alda-1, however, the accurate functional consequences of the revealed changes require further research. PMID:28218653

  7. Aldehyde concentrations in wet deposition and river waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dąbrowska, Agata, E-mail: agatadab@amu.edu.pl; Nawrocki, Jacek

    2013-05-01

    The process of pollutants removal from the atmosphere can be responsible for the appearance of aldehydes in surface waters. We observed that formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, propanal, glyoxal, methylglyoxal and acetone were commonly present in precipitations as well as in surface water samples, while semi-volatile and poorly soluble aldehydes as nonanal and decanal were observed seasonally. Particularly high level of carbonyls concentration was noted after periods of drought and at the beginning of rainy periods. We estimated that ca. 40% of aldehydes from wet precipitations were delivered into river waters. The level of carbonyl concentration in river was positively correlated with specific local meteorological conditions such as solar radiation and ozone concentration, in contrast, there was negative correlation between aldehyde concentration in the river samples and the precipitation intensity. - Highlights: ► Atmosphere pollutants are responsible for the appearance of aldehydes in surface waters. ► Volatile aldehydes are commonly present in precipitations as well as in surface waters. ► Semi-volatile and poorly soluble aldehydes as nonanal and decanal were observed seasonally. ► High concentration of carbonyls were noted after periods of drought and at the beginning of rain. ► Carbonyl concentration in river is correlated to meteorological conditions.

  8. Enhanced and selective delivery of enzyme therapy to 9L-glioma tumor via magnetic targeting of PEG-modified, ß-glucosidase- conjugated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Jie Zhou,1,* Jian Zhang,2,* Wenxi Gao11Department of Urology, Hubei Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The stability of enzyme-conjugated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in plasma is of great importance for in vivo delivery of the conjugated enzyme. In this study, ß-glucosidase was conjugated on aminated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the glutaraldehyde method (ß-Glu-MNP, and further PEGylated via N-hydroxysuccinimide chemistry. The PEG-modified, ß-glucosidase-immobilized magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEG-ß-Glu-MNPs were characterized by hydrodynamic diameter distribution, zeta potential, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and a superconducting quantum interference device. The results showed that the multidomain structure and magnetization properties of these nanoparticles were conserved well throughout the synthesis steps, with an expected diameter increase and zeta potential shifts. The Michaelis constant was calculated to evaluate the activity of conjugated ß-glucosidase on the magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, indicating 73.0% and 65.4% of enzyme activity remaining for ß-Glu-MNP and PEG-ß-Glu-MNP, respectively. Both magnetophoretic mobility analysis and pharmacokinetics showed improved in vitro/in vivo stability of PEG-ß-Glu-MNP compared with ß-Glu-MNP. In vivo magnetic targeting of PEG-ß-Glu-MNP was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and electron spin resonance analysis in a mouse model of subcutaneous 9L-glioma. Satisfactory accumulation of PEG-ß-Glu-MNP in tumor tissue was successfully achieved, with an iron content of 627±45 nmol Fe/g tissue and ß-glucosidase activity of 32.2±8.0 mU/g tissue.Keywords: ß-glucosidase, enzyme

  9. Metal organic frameworks for enzyme immobilization in biofuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodell, JaDee

    Interest in biofuel cells has been rapidly expanding as an ever-growing segment of the population gains access to electronic devices. The largest areas of growth for new populations using electronic devices are often in communities without electrical infrastructure. This lack of infrastructure in remote environments is one of the key driving factors behind the development of biofuel cells. Biofuel cells employ biological catalysts such as enzymes to catalyze oxidation and reduction reactions of select fuels to generate power. There are several benefits to using enzymes to catalyze reactions as compared to traditional fuel cells which use metal catalysts. First, enzymes are able to catalyze reactions at or near room temperature, whereas traditional metal catalysts are only efficient at very high temperatures. Second, biofuel cells can operate under mild pH conditions which is important for the eventual design of safe, commercially viable devices. Also, biofuel cells allow for implantable and flexible technologies. Finally, enzymes exhibit high selectivity and can be combined to fully oxidize or reduce the fuel which can generate several electrons from a single molecule of fuel, increasing the overall device efficiency. One of the main challenges which persist in biofuel cells is the instability of enzymes over time which tend to denature after hours or days. For a viable commercial biofuel cell to be produced, the stability of enzymes must be extended to months or years. Enzymes have been shown to have improved stability after being immobilized. The focus of this research was to find a metal organic framework (MOF) structure which could successfully immobilize enzymes while still allowing for electron transport to occur between the catalytic center of the enzyme and the electrode surface within a biofuel cell for power generation. Four MOF structures were successfully synthesized and were subsequently tested to determine the MOF's ability to immobilize the following

  10. Turn on Fluorescent Probes for Selective Targeting of Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Dilek

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Two different classes of fluorescent dyes were prepared as a turn off/on sensor system for aldehydes. Amino derivatives of a boron dipyrromethene (BDP fluorophore and a xanthene-derived fluorophore (rosamine were prepared. Model compounds of their product with an aldehyde were prepared using salicylaldehyde. Both amino boron dipyrromethene and rosamine derivatives are almost non-fluorescent in polar and apolar solvent. However, imine formation with salicylaldehyde on each fluorophore increases the fluorescence quantum yield by almost a factor of 10 (from 0.05 to 0.4. These fluorophores are therefore suitable candidates for development of fluorescence-based sensors for aldehydes.

  11. Enzymes involved in vinyl acetate decomposition by Pseudomonas fluorescens PCM 2123 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczyrba, Elżbieta; Greń, Izabela; Bartelmus, Grażyna

    2014-03-01

    Esterases are widely used in food processing industry, but there is little information concerning enzymes involved in decompositions of esters contributing to pollution of environment. Vinyl acetate (an ester of vinyl alcohol and acetic acid) is a representative of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in decomposition, of which hydrolyses and oxidoreductases are mainly involved. Their activities under periodically changing conditions of environment are essential for the removal of dangerous VOCs. Esterase and alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase activities were determined in crude cell extract from Pseudomonas fluorescens PMC 2123 after vinyl acetate induction. All examined enzymes exhibit their highest activity at 30-35 °C and pH 7.0-7.5. Esterase preferably hydrolyzed ester bonds with short fatty chains without plain differences for C2 or C4. Comparison of Km values for alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases for acetaldehyde suggested that this metabolite was preferentially oxidized than reduced. Activity of alcohol dehydrogenase reducing acetaldehyde to ethanol suggested that one mechanism of defense against the elevated concentration of toxic acetaldehyde could be its temporary reduction to ethanol. Esterase activity was inhibited by phenylmethanesulfonyl fluoride, while β-mercaptoethanol, dithiothreitol, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid had no inhibitor effect. From among metal ions, only Mg(2+) and Fe(2+) stimulated the cleavage of ester bond.

  12. Efficient synthesis of 2-amino-6-arylbenzothiazoles via Pd(0) Suzuki cross coupling reactions: potent urease enzyme inhibition and nitric oxide scavenging activities of the products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gull, Yasmeen; Rasool, Nasir; Noreen, Mnaza; Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Yaqoob, Asma; Kousar, Shazia; Rasheed, Umer; Bukhari, Iftikhar Hussain; Zubair, Muhammad; Islam, Md Saiful

    2013-07-25

    In general, benzothiazole derivatives have attracted great interest due to thier pharmaceutical and biological importance. New 2-amino-6-arylbenzothiazoles were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields via Suzuki cross coupling reactions using various aryl boronic acids and aryl boronic acid pinacol esters and the antiurease and nitric oxide (NO) scavenging activity of the products were also examined. The most active compound concerning urease enzyme inhibition was 6-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole-2-amine 3e, with an IC₅₀ value of 26.35 µg/mL. Compound 3c, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl) benzo[d]thiazole-2-amine, exhibited the highest nitric oxide percentage scavenging at 100 µg/mL.

  13. Efficient Synthesis of 2-Amino-6-Arylbenzothiazoles via Pd(0 Suzuki Cross Coupling Reactions: Potent Urease Enzyme Inhibition and Nitric Oxide Scavenging Activities of the Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In general, benzothiazole derivatives have attracted great interest due to thier pharmaceutical and biological importance. New 2-amino-6-arylbenzothiazoles were synthesized in moderate to excellent yields via Suzuki cross coupling reactions using various aryl boronic acids and aryl boronic acid pinacol esters and the antiurease and nitric oxide (NO scavenging activity of the products were also examined. The most active compound concerning urease enzyme inhibition was 6-phenylbenzo[d]thiazole-2-amine 3e, with an IC50 value of 26.35 µg/mL. Compound 3c, 6-(4-methoxyphenyl benzo[d]thiazole-2-amine, exhibited the highest nitric oxide percentage scavenging at 100µg/mL.

  14. Effects of cerium oxide supplementation to laying hen diets on performance, egg quality, some antioxidant enzymes in serum and lipid oxidation in egg yolk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölükbaşı, S C; Al-Sagan, A A; Ürüşan, H; Erhan, M K; Durmuş, O; Kurt, N

    2016-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of dietary cerium oxide levels (0, 100, 200, 300 or 400 mg/kg) on the laying performance, egg quality, some blood serum parameters and egg lipid peroxidation of laying hen. In total, one hundred and twenty 22-week-old brown Lohman LSL laying hens were randomly assigned to five groups equally (n = 24). Each treatment was replicated six times. Dietary supplementation of cerium oxide had no significant effect on feed intake and egg weight. The addition of cerium oxide to the laying hens' feed improved feed conversion ratio and increased (p laying hens feed led to a significant (p laying hen diets. It was also observed that serum superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration decreased significantly with supplementation of cerium oxide in diets. Inclusion of cerium oxide resulted in a significant reduction in thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values in egg yolk in this study. It can be concluded that the addition of cerium oxide had positive effects on egg production, feed conversion ratio and egg shelf life. Based on the results of this study, it could be advised to supplement laying hens feed with cerium oxide as feed additives.

  15. Mild and efficient strategy for site-selective aldehyde modification of glycosaminoglycans: tailoring hydrogels with tunable release of growth factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujiang; Oommen, Oommen P; Yan, Hongji; Varghese, Oommen P

    2013-07-01

    Aldehydes have been used as an important bioorthogonal chemical reporter for conjugation of large polymers and bioactive substances. However, generating aldehyde functionality on carbohydrate-based biopolymers without changing its native chemical structure has always persisted as a challenging task. The common methods employed to achieve this require harsh reaction conditions, which often compromise the structural integrity and biological function of these sensitive molecules. Here we report a mild and simple method to graft aldehydes groups on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in a site-selective manner without compromising the structural integrity of the biopolymer. This regio-selective modification was achieved by conjugating the amino-glycerol moiety on the carboxylate residue of the polymer, which allowed selective cleavage of pendent diol groups without interfering with the C2-C3 diol groups of the native glucopyranose residue. Kinetic evaluation of this reaction demonstrated significant differences in second-order reaction rate for periodate oxidation (by four-orders of magnitude) between the two types of vicinal diols. We employed this chemistry to develop aldehyde modifications of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs such as hyaluronic acid (HA), heparin (HP), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). We further utilized these aldehyde grafted GAGs to tailor extracellular matrix mimetic injectable hydrogels and evaluated its rheological properties. The composition of the hydrogels was also found to modulate release of therapeutic protein such as FGF-2, demonstrating controlled release (60%) for over 14 days. In short, our result clearly demonstrates a versatile strategy to graft aldehyde groups on sensitive biopolymers under mild conditions that could be applied for various bioconjugation and biomedical applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine.

  16. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  17. Cloning and heterologous expression of two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tomofumi [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Fukuoka Institute of Health and Environmental Sciences, 39 Mukaizano, Dazaifu-shi, Fukuoka 818-0135 (Japan); Ichinose, Hirofumi [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Wariishi, Hiroyuki, E-mail: hirowari@agr.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Agriculture, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Bio-Architecture Center, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan)

    2010-04-09

    We identified two aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenase proteins (PcALDH1 and PcALDH2) from the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Both PcALDHs were translationally up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of vanillin, one of the key aromatic compounds in the pathway of lignin degradation by basidiomycetes. To clarify the catalytic functions of PcALDHs, we isolated full-length cDNAs encoding these proteins and heterologously expressed the recombinant enzymes using a pET/Escherichia coli system. The open reading frames of both PcALDH1 and PcALDH2 consisted of 1503 nucleotides. The deduced amino acid sequences of both proteins showed high homologies with aryl-aldehyde dehydrogenases from other organisms and contained ten conserved domains of ALDHs. Moreover, a novel glycine-rich motif 'GxGxxxG' was located at the NAD{sup +}-binding site. The recombinant PcALDHs catalyzed dehydrogenation reactions of several aryl-aldehyde compounds, including vanillin, to their corresponding aromatic acids. These results strongly suggested that PcALDHs metabolize aryl-aldehyde compounds generated during fungal degradation of lignin and various aromatic xenobiotics.

  18. Dietary antioxidant supplementation enhances lipid and protein oxidative stability of chicken broiler meat through promotion of antioxidant enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delles, Rebecca M; Xiong, Youling L; True, Alma D; Ao, Touying; Dawson, Karl A

    2014-06-01

    Recent nutrigenomic studies have shown that animal nutrition can have a major influence on tissue gene expression. Dietary antioxidant supplements can enhance the quality of meat through modification of tissue metabolic processes. This study investigated the influence of dietary antioxidants and quality of oil on the oxidative and enzymatic properties of chicken broiler breast meat stored in an oxygen-enriched package (HiOx: 80% O2/20% CO2) in comparison with air-permeable polyvinylchloride (PVC) or skin packaging systems during retail display at 2 to 4°C for up to 21 d. Broilers were fed either a diet with a low-oxidized (peroxide value 23 mEq of O2/kg) or high-oxidized (peroxide value 121 mEq of O2/kg) oil, supplemented with or without an algae-based Se yeast and organic mineral antioxidant pack for 42 d. Lipid and protein oxidation and tissue enzymatic activity were analyzed. In all packaging systems, lipid oxidation (TBA reactive substances) was inhibited by up to 32.5% (P antioxidant-supplemented diet when compared with diets without antioxidants, particularly in the HiOx and PVC systems. Protein sulfhydryls were significantly protected by antioxidant diets (e.g., by 14.6 and 17.8% for low-and high-oxidized dietary groups, respectively, in PVC d 7 samples). Glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly higher (P antioxidant-supplemented diets compared with the basal diet, regardless of oil quality. Also, serum carbonyls were lower in broilers fed a low-oxidized antioxidant-supplemented treatment. The results demonstrate that dietary antioxidants can minimize the oxidative instability of proteins and lipids, and the protection may be linked to improved cellular antioxidant enzymatic activity.

  19. Oxidants downstream from superoxide inhibit nitric oxide production by vascular endothelium--a key role for selenium-dependent enzymes in vascular health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, M F

    1999-10-01

    Although superoxide can directly quench endothelium-generated nitric oxide (NO), there is considerable evidence that oxidants derived from superoxide--notably peroxides and their further derivatives--can also impair NO bioactivity. In part, this reflects inhibition of NO synthase activity, perhaps mediated by the oxidation of labile sulfhydryl groups, as well as the activation of protein kinase C. Selenium deficiency exacerbates these effects, presumably owing to the crucial role of selenium-dependent thioredoxin reductase and glutathione peroxidases in preventing and reversing oxidant damage to proteins. High-normal homocyst(e)ine levels may induce an 'effective selenium deficiency' by suppressing glutathione peroxidase transcription in endothelial cells. Considerable epidemiology, primarily of European origin, points to mediocre selenium nutrition as a significant vascular risk factor; the risk associated with elevated plasma homocyst(e)ine levels is now well established. In addition to preventing LDL oxidation, vitamin E can be expected to minimize the contribution of lipid peroxides to endothelial dysfunction. Lipoic acid, which can function in vivo as a versatile antioxidant and sulfhydryl reductant, may have particular value for protecting endothelium from oxidants; its clinical utility in diabetic neuropathy may reflect this benefit. Good selenium status, as well as supra-nutritional intakes of lipoic acid, may down-regulate cytokine-mediated endothelial activation by helping to maintain the proper structure of oxidant-labile proteins--such as tyrosine phosphatases--that modulate this signaling. It can be concluded that a number of supplemental nutrients--including selenium, vitamin E, lipoic acid, and the vitamins that promote catabolism of homocysteine--have the potential to promote vascular health by mitigating the adverse impact of superoxide-derived oxidants on endothelial function.

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 72, Revision 1 (FGE.72Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic, branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids, and related esters, evaluated by the JECFA (61st meeting) structurally related to branched- and straight-chain unsaturated carboxylic acids, esters of these and straight-chain aliphatic saturated alcohols evaluated by EFSA in FGE.05Rev2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    evaluation is necessary, as laid down in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. The present consideration concerns a group of 23 aliphatic branched-chain saturated and unsaturated alcohols, aldehydes, acids and related esters, evaluated by the JECFA at their 61st meeting. This revision is made due...

  1. NITRIC OXIDE (NO, CITRULLINE - NO CYCLE ENZYMES, GLUTAMINE SYNTHETASE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS IN ANOXIA (HYPOBARIC HYPOXIA AND REPERFUSION IN RAT BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Swamy, Mohd Jamsani Mat Salleh, K. N .S. Sirajudeen, Wan Roslina Wan Yusof, G. Chandran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is postulated to be involved in the pathophysiology of neurological disorders due to hypoxia/ anoxia in brain due to increased release of glutamate and activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in pathophysiology of many neurological disorders and in brain function. To understand their role in anoxia (hypobaric hypoxia and reperfusion (reoxygenation, the nitric oxide synthase, argininosuccinate synthetase, argininosuccinate lyase, glutamine synthetase and arginase activities along with the concentration of nitrate /nitrite, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total antioxidant status were estimated in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and brain stem of rats subjected to anoxia and reperfusion. The results of this study clearly demonstrated the increased production of nitric oxide by increased activity of nitric oxide synthase. The increased activities of argininosuccinate synthetase and argininosuccinate lyase suggest the increased and effective recycling of citrulline to arginine in anoxia, making nitric oxide production more effective and contributing to its toxic effects. The decreased activity of glutamine synthetase may favor the prolonged availability of glutamic acid causing excitotoxicity leading to neuronal damage in anoxia. The increased formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and decreased total antioxidant status indicate the presence of oxidative stress in anoxia and reperfusion. The increased arginase and sustained decrease of GS activity in reperfusion group likely to be protective.

  2. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 06, Revision 3 (FGE.06Rev3): Straight- and branched-chain aliphatic unsaturated primary alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and esters from chemical groups 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 50 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 6, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None of the subs...

  3. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 3, Revision 2 (FGE.03Rev2): Acetals of branched- and straight-chain aliphatic saturated primary alcohols and branched- and straight-chain saturated or unsaturated, aldehydes, an ester of a hemiacetal and an orthoester of formic acid, from chemical groups 1, 2 and 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate one flavouring substance, acetaldehyde ethyl isopropyl acetal [FL-no: 06.137], structurally related to the 58 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group...

  4. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Ai ds (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 208 (FGE.208): Consideration of genotoxicity data on representatives for 10 alicyclic aldehydes with the α , β - unsaturation in ring / side - chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Lund, Pia

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate the genotoxic potential of one flavouring substance from subgroup 2.2 of FGE.19 in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 208. The Flavour Industry has provided a...

  5. Lanthanide dithiocarbamate complexes: efficient catalysts for the cyanosilylation of aldehydes

    OpenAIRE

    VALE, JULIANA A.; FAUSTINO, WAGNER M.; Menezes, Paulo H.; Sá,Gilberto F. de

    2006-01-01

    A new class of lanthanide dithiocarbamate complexes was used to promote the cyanosilylation of aldehydes at high yields at room temperature. This represents the first application of lanthanide dithiocarbamate acting as Lewis acid.

  6. Deodorants: an experimental provocation study with cinnamic aldehyde

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruze, Magnus; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Andersen, Klaus Ejner

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Axillary dermatitis is common and overrepresented in individuals with contact allergy to fragrances. Many individuals suspect their deodorants to be the incriminating products. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to investigate the significance of cinnamic aldehyde in deodorants for the developmen...

  7. Molecular Structure and Reactivity in the Pyrolysis of Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, Eric; Cole, Sarah; Sowards, John; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; McCunn, Laura R.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of alkyl chain structure on pyrolysis mechanisms has been investigated in a series of aldehydes. Isovaleraldehyde, CH_3CH(CH_3)CH_2CHO, and pivaldehyde, (CH_3)_3CCHO, were subject to thermal decomposition in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor at 800-1200 °C. Matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify pyrolysis products. Carbon monoxide and isobutene were major products from each of the aldehydes, which is consistent with what is known from previous studies of unbranched alkyl-chain aldehydes. Other products observed include vinyl alcohol, propene, acetylene, and ethylene, revealing complexities to be considered in the pyrolysis of large, branched-chain aldehydes.

  8. Silver-catalyzed synthesis of amides from amines and aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madix, Robert J; Zhou, Ling; Xu, Bingjun; Friend, Cynthia M; Freyschlag, Cassandra G

    2014-11-18

    The invention provides a method for producing amides via the reaction of aldehydes and amines with oxygen adsorbed on a metallic silver or silver alloy catalyst. An exemplary reaction is shown in Scheme 1: (I), (II), (III). ##STR00001##

  9. 27 CFR 24.183 - Use of distillates containing aldehydes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the fermentation of wine and then returned to the distilled spirits plant from which distillates were... fermentation of wine made from a different kind of fruit. Distillates containing aldehydes which are...

  10. Recyclable enzyme mimic of cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles loaded on graphene oxide-dispersed carbon nanotubes with enhanced peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hua; Li, Shuai; Si, Yanmei; Sun, Zhongzhao; Li, Shuying; Lin, Yuehe

    2014-01-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles as nanocatalysts may present peroxidase-like catalysis activities and high electrocatalysis if loaded on conductive carbon nanotube (CNT) supports; however, their catalysis performances in an aqueous system might still be challenged by the poor aqueous dispersion of hydrophobic carbon supports and/or low stability of loaded iron catalysts. In this work, amphiphilic graphene oxide nanosheets were employed as “surfactant” to disperse CNTs to create stable graphene oxide-dispersed CNT (GCNT) supports in water for covalently loading cubic Fe3O4 nanoparticles with improved distribution and binding efficiency. Compared with original Fe3O4 nanos and CNT-loaded Fe3O4 nanocomplex, the prepared GCNT–Fe3O4 nanocomposite could achieve higher aqueous stability and, especially, much stronger peroxidase-like catalysis and electrocatalysis to H2O2, presumably resulting from the synergetic effects of two conductive carbon supports and cubic Fe3O4 nanocatalysts effectively loaded. Colorimetric and direct electrochemical detections of H2O2 and glucose using the GCNT–Fe3O4 nanocomposite were conducted with high detection sensitivities, demonstrating the feasibility of practical sensing applications. Such a magnetically recyclable “enzyme mimic” may circumvent some disadvantages of natural protein enzymes and common inorganic catalysts, featuring the multi-functions of high peroxidase-like catalysis, strong electrocatalysis, magnetic separation/recyclability, environmental stability, and direct H2O2 electrochemistry.

  11. Effects of Different Levels of Water Stress on Leaf Water Potential, Stomatal Resistance, Protein and Chlorophyll Content and Certain Anti-oxidative Enzymes in Tomato Plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hatem Zgallai; Kathy Steppe; Raoul Lemeur

    2006-01-01

    A greenhouse experiment was performed in order to investigate the effects of different levels of water stress on leaf water potential (ψw), stomatal resistance (rs), protein content and chlorophyll (Chi) content of tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Nikita). Water stress was induced by adding polyethylene glycol (PEG 6 000) to the nutrient solution to reduce the osmotic potential (ψs). We investigated the behavior of anti-oxidant enzymes, such as catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), during the development of water stress. Moderate and severe water stress (i.e.ψs= -0.51 and -1.22 MPa, respectively) caused a decrease in ψw for all treated (water-stressed) plants compared with control plants, with the reduction being more pronounced for severely stressed plants. In addition, rs was significantly affected by the induced water stress and a decrease in leaf soluble proteins and Chi content was observed. Whereas CAT activity remained constant, SOD activity was increased in water-stressed plants compared with unstressed plants. These results indicate the possible role of SOD as an anti-oxidant protector system for plants under water stress conditions. Moreover, it suggests the possibility of using this enzyme as an additional screening criterion for detecting water stress in plants.

  12. Tamarind seed coat extract restores reactive oxygen species through attenuation of glutathione level and antioxidant enzyme expression in human skin fibroblasts in response to oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Oranuch Nakchat; Nonthaneth Nalinratana; Duangdeun Meksuriyen; Sunanta Pongsamart

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the role and mechanism of tamarind seed coat extract (TSCE) on normal human skin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells under normal and oxidative stress conditions induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Methods:Tamarind seed coats were extracted with boiling water and then partitioned with ethyl acetate before the cell analysis. Effect of TSCE on intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), glutathione (GSH) level, antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase activity including antioxidant protein expression was investigated. Results: TSCE significantly attenuated intracellular ROS in the absence and presence of H2O2 by increasing GSH level. In the absence of H2O2, TSCE significantly enhanced SOD and catalase activity but did not affected on GPx. Meanwhile, TSCE significantly increased the protein expression of SOD and GPx in H2O2-treated cells. Conclusions: TSCE exhibited antioxidant activities by scavenging ROS, attenuating GSH level that could protect human skin fibroblast cells from oxidative stress. Our results highlight the antioxidant mechanism of tamarind seed coat through an antioxidant enzyme system, the extract potentially benefits for health food and cosmeceutical application of tamarind seed coat.

  13. L-carnitine Mediated Reduction in Oxidative Stress and Alteration in Transcript Level of Antioxidant Enzymes in Sheep Embryos Produced In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A; Reddy, I J; Gupta, P S P; Mondal, S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to find out the effect of L-carnitine on oocyte maturation and subsequent embryo development, with L-carnitine-mediated alteration if any in transcript level of antioxidant enzymes (GPx, Cu/Zn-SOD (SOD1) and Mn-SOD (SOD2) in oocytes and developing sheep embryos produced in vitro. Different concentrations of L-carnitine (0 mm, 2.5 mm, 5 mm, 7.5 mm and 10 mm) were used in maturation medium. Oocytes matured with 10 mm L-carnitine showed significantly (p carnitine were not significantly different. Maturation rate was not influenced by supplementation of any experimental concentration of L-carnitine. There was a significant (p carnitine-treated oocytes and embryos than control group. Antioxidant effect of L-carnitine was proved by culturing oocytes and embryos with H2O2 in the presence of L-carnitine which could be able to protect oocytes and embryos from H2O2-induced oxidative damage. L-carnitine supplementation significantly (p carnitine supplementation during in vitro maturation reduces oxidative stress-induced embryo toxicity by decreasing intracellular ROS and increasing intracellular GSH that in turn improved developmental potential of oocytes and embryos and alters transcript level of antioxidant enzymes.

  14. Iron mediates catalysis of nucleic acid processing enzymes: support for Fe(II) as a cofactor before the great oxidation event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okafor, C Denise; Lanier, Kathryn A; Petrov, Anton S; Athavale, Shreyas S; Bowman, Jessica C; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2017-03-15

    Life originated in an anoxic, Fe2+-rich environment. We hypothesize that on early Earth, Fe2+ was a ubiquitous cofactor for nucleic acids, with roles in RNA folding and catalysis as well as in processing of nucleic acids by protein enzymes. In this model, Mg2+ replaced Fe2+ as the primary cofactor for nucleic acids in parallel with known metal substitutions of metalloproteins, driven by the Great Oxidation Event. To test predictions of this model, we assay the ability of nucleic acid processing enzymes, including a DNA polymerase, an RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase, to use Fe2+ in place of Mg2+ as a cofactor during catalysis. Results show that Fe2+ can indeed substitute for Mg2+ in catalytic function of these enzymes. Additionally, we use calculations to unravel differences in energetics, structures and reactivities of relevant Mg2+ and Fe2+ complexes. Computation explains why Fe2+ can be a more potent cofactor than Mg2+ in a variety of folding and catalytic functions. We propose that the rise of O2 on Earth drove a Fe2+ to Mg2+ substitution in proteins and nucleic acids, a hypothesis consistent with a general model in which some modern biochemical systems retain latent abilities to revert to primordial Fe2+-based states when exposed to pre-GOE conditions.

  15. Daidzin: a potent, selective inhibitor of human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    OpenAIRE

    Keung, W M; Vallee, B L

    1993-01-01

    Human mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH-I) is potently, reversibly, and selectively inhibited by an isoflavone isolated from Radix puerariae and identified as daidzin, the 7-glucoside of 4',7-dihydroxyisoflavone. Kinetic analysis with formaldehyde as substrate reveals that daidzin inhibits ALDH-I competitively with respect to formaldehyde with a Ki of 40 nM, and uncompetitively with respect to the coenzyme NAD+. The human cytosolic aldehyde dehydrogenase isozyme (ALDH-II) is nearly 3...

  16. Comparison of anti-oxidant enzymes activity and levels of zinc and selenium in sperm and seminal plasma between fertile and idiopathic infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Kharazi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reactive oxygen species (ROS-induced lipidperoxidation can lead to dysfunction of sperm and thereby, infertility may be occurred. So, always there is a balance between amount of ROS and anti-oxidant molecules in semen. Anti-oxidant enzymes of sperm; superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, catalse and zinc and selenium can protect it from destructive effects of ROS. Hence, the present study was designed to compare the activities of these enzymes and trace elements between fertile and idiopathic infertile men.Methods: Semen specimens were collected from 30 infertile men with proven infertility by an urologist, and 30 fertile men as control donors, with age range between 20-40 years old. Semen analysis was conducted by CASA method. Atomic absorption method was used for measuring of zinc and selenium concentration. Activity assays of SOD and GPX were performed by Randox Kits. Aebi method also was applied for evaluation of catalase activity.Results: There was no difference between the activities of enzymes in fertile men and infertile ones. Also, it wasn't seen any difference in the selenium and zinc levels of seminal plasma. There was no relationship between evaluated items with sperm parameters. Only, in asthenoteratospermic individuals negative correlations were found between GPX and sperm motility, selenium and sperm morphology. Also, in these individuals ,there was a positive correlation between SOD and catalse activity.Conclusion: Measuring activities of SOD, GPx, and catalase and the contents of zinc and selenium of seminal plasma do not appear to be suitable tools for determining the fertility potential of sperm.

  17. Role of oxidative stress and the activity of ethylene biosynthetic enzymes on the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamani, J E; Shivashankara, K S; Roy, T K

    2010-06-01

    Spongy tissue formation in 'Alphonso' mangoes (Mangifera indica L) is a major national problem leading to loss for farmers and traders. Spongy tissue is whitish sponge like tissue formed near the seed with insipid taste and off odour. Lipid peroxidation of membranes as studied by malondialdehyde formation was significantly higher in spongy tissue. Activities of antioxidative enzymes like superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase were lower in spongy tissue. Among the antioxidative enzymes, activities of catalase and peroxidases were severely reduced leading to membrane damage in spongy tissue. A significant reduction in 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidase and accumulation of ACC was also observed in spongy tissue. However, ACC synthase activity in spongy tissue was more compared to healthy tissue. Results indicate that the membrane peroxidation leading to lower activity of ACC oxidase might lead to the formation of spongy tissue in 'Alphonso' mango.

  18. Amine-functionalized porous silicas as adsorbents for aldehyde abatement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Akihiro; Jones, Christopher W

    2013-06-26

    A series of aminopropyl-functionalized silicas containing of primary, secondary, or tertiary amines is fabricated via silane-grafting on mesoporous SBA-15 silica and the utility of each material in the adsorption of volatile aldehydes from air is systematically assessed. A particular emphasis is placed on low-molecular-weight aldehydes such as formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, which are highly problematic volatile organic compound (VOC) pollutants. The adsorption tests demonstrate that the aminosilica materials with primary amines most effectively adsorbed formaldehyde with an adsorption capacity of 1.4 mmolHCHO g(-1), whereas the aminosilica containing secondary amines showed lower adsorption capacity (0.80 mmolHCHO g(-1)) and the aminosilica containing tertiary amines adsorbed a negligible amount of formaldehyde. The primary amine containing silica also successfully abated higher aldehyde VOC pollutants, including acetaldehyde, hexanal, and benzaldehyde, by effectively adsorbing them. The adsorption mechanism is investigated by (13)C CP MAS solid-state NMR and FT-Raman spectroscopy, and it is demonstrated that the aldehydes are chemically attached to the surface of aminosilica in the form of imines and hemiaminals. The high aldehyde adsorption capacities of the primary aminosilicas in this study demonstrate the utility of amine-functionalized silica materials for reduction of gaseous aldehydes.

  19. Two-Step biocatalytic conversion of an ester to an aldehyde in reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, F; Russell, A J

    1994-02-01

    Lipases from Candida cyclindracea (L-1754) and wheat germ (L-3001) have been used to hydrolyze esters to their corresponding alcohols and acids in reverse micelles. Alcohol dehydrogenase from baker's yeast (YADH) was subsequently used to reduce the alcohol products to aldehydes. Cofactor recycling in the redox reaction was achieved using a sacrificial cosubstrate, as described previously. Four surfactants (sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate, Nonidet P-40 with Triton X-35, polyoxyethylene, 10-cetyl-ether, polyoxyethylene sorbitan trioleate) were employed to determine the effect of amphiphile on ester hydrolysis and redox reaction rates separately. The effect of type of organic solvent, W(0) [(water]/[surfactant)], and substrate concentration on separte enzyme activity were also investigated. A brief investigation of a single phase, two-step reaction catalyzed by the combination of lipase and YADH in reverse micelles is also reported. The activities of the enzymes are significantly different when used together instead of independently. (c) 1994 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  20. EFSA CEF Panel (EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids), 2013. Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4): primary saturated or unsaturated alicyclic alcohols, aldehydes, acids and esters from chemical groups 1 and 7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz;

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 12 flavouring substances in Flavouring Group Evaluation 12, Revision 4 (FGE.12Rev4), including two additional substances, using the Procedure in Commission...... of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 12 candidate substances....

  1. Threshold responses in cinnamic-aldehyde-sensitive subjects: results and methodological aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, J D; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Rastogi, S C

    1996-01-01

    tests and 6-week graded use tests with 0.02, 0.1 and 0.8% cinnamic aldehyde in ethanol was studied in a group of cinnamic-aldehyde-sensitive eczema patients. The minimum effect level demonstrated was 0.02% cinnamic aldehyde on patch testing and 0.1% cinnamic aldehyde on use testing, which are allowed...... exposure information is needed to evaluate more fully the consequences of cinnamic aldehyde sensitivity....

  2. YNL134C from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a novel protein with aldehyde reductase activity for detoxification of furfural derived from lignocellulosic biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xianxian; Tang, Juan; Wang, Xu; Yang, Ruoheng; Zhang, Xiaoping; Gu, Yunfu; Li, Xi; Ma, Menggen

    2015-05-01

    Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) are the two main aldehyde compounds derived from pentoses and hexoses, respectively, during lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment. These two compounds inhibit microbial growth and interfere with subsequent alcohol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae has the in situ ability to detoxify furfural and HMF to the less toxic 2-furanmethanol (FM) and furan-2,5-dimethanol (FDM), respectively. Herein, we report that an uncharacterized gene, YNL134C, was highly up-regulated under furfural or HMF stress and Yap1p and Msn2/4p transcription factors likely controlled its up-regulated expression. Enzyme activity assays showed that YNL134C is an NADH-dependent aldehyde reductase, which plays a role in detoxification of furfural to FM. However, no NADH- or NADPH-dependent enzyme activity was observed for detoxification of HMF to FDM. This enzyme did not catalyse the reverse reaction of FM to furfural or FDM to HMF. Further studies showed that YNL134C is a broad-substrate aldehyde reductase, which can reduce multiple aldehydes to their corresponding alcohols. Although YNL134C is grouped into the quinone oxidoreductase family, no quinone reductase activity was observed using 1,2-naphthoquinone or 9,10-phenanthrenequinone as a substrate, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that it is genetically distant to quinone reductases. Proteins similar to YNL134C in sequence from S. cerevisiae and other microorganisms were phylogenetically analysed.

  3. Spectroscopic Analyses of the Biofuels-Critical Phytochemical Coniferyl Alcohol and Its Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor; Adams, Paul; Simmons, Blake; Singh, Anup

    2011-07-13

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudo-kinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 mu L volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 mu M respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 mu g/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 mu g/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 mu M coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 mu M when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 mu g/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  4. Spectroscopic Analyses of the Biofuels-Critical Phytochemical Coniferyl Alcohol and Its Enzyme-Catalyzed Oxidation Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anup Kumar Singh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudokinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 μL volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 μM respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 μg/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 μg/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 μM coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 ± 150.7 μM when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 μg/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s. These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  5. Spectroscopic analyses of the biofuels-critical phytochemical coniferyl alcohol and its enzyme-catalyzed oxidation products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor Elayavalli; Adams, Paul David; Simmons, Blake Alexander; Singh, Anup Kumar

    2009-11-23

    Lignin composition (monolignol types of coniferyl, sinapyl or p-coumaryl alcohol) is causally related to biomass recalcitrance. We describe multiwavelength (220, 228, 240, 250, 260, 290, 295, 300, 310 or 320 nm) absorption spectroscopy of coniferyl alcohol and its laccase- or peroxidase-catalyzed products during real time kinetic, pseudokinetic and endpoint analyses, in optical turn on or turn off modes, under acidic or basic conditions. Reactions in microwell plates and 100 microL volumes demonstrated assay miniaturization and high throughput screening capabilities. Bathochromic and hypsochromic shifts along with hyperchromicity or hypochromicity accompanied enzymatic oxidations by laccase or peroxidase. The limits of detection and quantitation of coniferyl alcohol averaged 2.4 and 7.1 muM respectively, with linear trend lines over 3 to 4 orders of magnitude. Coniferyl alcohol oxidation was evident within 10 minutes or with 0.01 microg/mL laccase and 2 minutes or 0.001 microg/mL peroxidase. Detection limit improved to 1.0 microM coniferyl alcohol with Km of 978.7 +/- 150.7 microM when examined at 260 nm following 30 minutes oxidation with 1.0 microg/mL laccase. Our assays utilized the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of coniferyl alcohol or its oxidation products for enabling detection, without requiring chemical synthesis or modification of the substrate or product(s). These studies facilitate lignin compositional analyses and augment pretreatment strategies for reducing biomass recalcitrance.

  6. Protein conjugated with aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation as an independent parameter of the carbonyl stress in the kidney damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medina-Navarro Rafael

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the well-defined and characterized protein modifications usually produced by oxidation is carbonylation, an irreversible non-enzymatic modification of proteins. However, carbonyl groups can be introduced into proteins by non-oxidative mechanisms. Reactive carbonyl compounds have been observed to have increased in patients with renal failure. In the present work we have described a procedure designed as aldehyde capture to calculate the protein carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation. Methods Acrolein-albumin adduct was prepared as standard at alkaline pH. Rat liver microsomal membranes and serum samples from patients with diabetic nephropathy were subjected to the aldehyde capture procedure and aldol-protein formation. Before alkalinization and incubation, samples were precipitated and redisolved in 6M guanidine. The absorbances of the samples were read with a spectrophotometer at 266 nm against a blank of guanidine. Results Evidence showed abundance of unsaturated aldehydes derived from lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomal membranes and in the serum of diabetic patients with advanced chronic kidney disease. Carbonyl protein and aldol-proteins resulted higher in the diabetic nephropathy patients (p Conclusion The aldehyde-protein adduct represents a non oxidative component of carbonyl stress, independent of the direct amino acid oxidation and could constitute a practical and novelty strategy to measure the carbonyl stress derived solely from lipid peroxidation and particularly in diabetic nephropathy patients. In addition, we are in a position to propose an alternative explanation of why alkalinization of urine attenuates rhabdomyolysis-induced renal dysfunction.

  7. Paraoxonases-2 and -3 Are Important Defense Enzymes against Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence Factors due to Their Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva-Maria Schweikert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes serious damage in immunocompromised patients by secretion of various virulence factors, among them the quorum sensing N-(3-oxododecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12 and the redox-active pyocyanin (PCN. Paraoxonase-2 (PON2 may protect against P. aeruginosa infections, as it efficiently inactivates 3OC12 and diminishes PCN-induced oxidative stress. This defense could be circumvented because 3OC12 mediates intracellular Ca2+-rise in host cells, which causes rapid inactivation and degradation of PON2. Importantly, we recently found that the PON2 paralogue PON3 prevents mitochondrial radical formation. Here we investigated its role as additional potential defense mechanism against P. aeruginosa infections. Our studies demonstrate that PON3 diminished PCN-induced oxidative stress. Moreover, it showed clear anti-inflammatory potential by protecting against NF-κB activation and IL-8 release. The latter similarly applied to PON2. Furthermore, we observed a Ca2+-mediated inactivation and degradation of PON3, again in accordance with previous findings for PON2. Our results suggest that the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory functions of PON2 and PON3 are an important part of our innate defense system against P. aeruginosa infections. Furthermore, we conclude that P. aeruginosa circumvents PON3 protection by the same pathway as for PON2. This may help identifying underlying mechanisms in order to sustain the protection afforded by these enzymes.

  8. Investigation of Propolis’ Effect on Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances and Anti-Oxidant Enzyme Levels of Hippocampus in Diabetic Rats Induced by Streptozotocin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal, Burcu; Emre, Memet Hanifi; Polat, Alaadin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Propolis is an organic resinous viscous substance collected from flower bud and plant sprig by bees. Propolis has a potential treatment agent for oxidative damage caused by diabetes in hippocampus due to its flavonoid and phenolic content. AIM: In this study effect of propolis on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and anti-oxidative enzyme levels of hippocampus in diabetic rats induced by streptozotocin was investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study involved measuring levels of SOD, CAT, GSH-Px and TBARs in hippocampus tissue of STZ-induced diabetic rats (Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats) after applying propolis for one month. The subjects of the study were composed of 51 rats randomly assigned to four groups (Control, STZ, P+STZ and STZ+P). For analysis of data, Kruskal Wallis Test was utilized. RESULTS: The findings of the study showed that there were no significant difference in the levels of TBARS, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px of hippocampus across the groups. CONCLUSION: Propolis application in four-week duration does not have effect on TBARS, SOD, CAT and GSH-Px levels of hippocampus of diabetic rats. These findings mean that more time for observing oxidative harms on hippocampus is needed. PMID:27275196

  9. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by aspirin and salicylate: assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shou-Lun; Lee, Yung-Pin; Wu, Min-Li; Chi, Yu-Chou; Liu, Chiu-Ming; Lai, Ching-Long; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported that aspirin significantly reduced the first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol in humans thereby increasing adverse effects of alcohol. The underlying causes, however, remain poorly understood. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), principal enzymes responsible for metabolism of ethanol, are complex enzyme families that exhibit functional polymorphisms among ethnic groups and distinct tissue distributions. We investigated the inhibition profiles by aspirin and its major metabolite salicylate of ethanol oxidation by recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and acetaldehyde oxidation by ALDH1A1 and ALDH2, at pH 7.5 and 0.5 mM NAD(+). Competitive inhibition pattern was found to be a predominant type among the ADHs and ALDHs studied, although noncompetitive and uncompetitive inhibitions were also detected in a few cases. The inhibition constants of salicylate for the ADHs and ALDHs were considerably lower than that of aspirin with the exception of ADH1A that can be ascribed to a substitution of Ala-93 at the bottom of substrate pocket as revealed by molecular docking experiments. Kinetic inhibition equation-based simulations show at higher therapeutic levels of blood plasma salicylate (1.5 mM) that the decrease of activities at 2-10 mM ethanol for ADH1A/ADH2 and ADH1B2/ADH1B3 are predicted to be 75-86% and 31-52%, respectively, and that the activity decline for ALDH1A1 and ALDH2 at 10-50 μM acetaldehyde to be 62-73%. Our findings suggest that salicylate may substantially inhibit hepatic FPM of alcohol at both the ADH and ALDH steps when concurrent intaking aspirin.

  10. Inhibition of human alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases by acetaminophen: Assessment of the effects on first-pass metabolism of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yung-Pin; Liao, Jian-Tong; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Wu, Ting-Lun; Lee, Shou-Lun; Liu, Jong-Kang; Yin, Shih-Jiun

    2013-11-01

    Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used over-the-counter analgesic, antipyretic medications. Use of acetaminophen and alcohol are commonly associated. Previous studies showed that acetaminophen might affect bioavailability of ethanol by inhibiting gastric alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH). However, potential inhibitions by acetaminophen of first-pass metabolism (FPM) of ethanol, catalyzed by the human ADH family and by relevant aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) isozymes, remain undefined. ADH and ALDH both exhibit racially distinct allozymes and tissue-specific distribution of isozymes, and are principal enzymes responsible for ethanol metabolism in humans. In this study, we investigated acetaminophen inhibition of ethanol oxidation with recombinant human ADH1A, ADH1B1, ADH1B2, ADH1B3, ADH1C1, ADH1C2, ADH2, and ADH4, and inhibition of acetaldehyde oxidation with recombinant human ALDH1A1 and ALDH2. The investigations were done at near physiological pH 7.5 and with a cytoplasmic coenzyme concentration of 0.5 mM NAD(+). Acetaminophen acted as a noncompetitive inhibitor for ADH enzymes, with the slope inhibition constants (Kis) ranging from 0.90 mM (ADH2) to 20 mM (ADH1A), and the intercept inhibition constants (Kii) ranging from 1.4 mM (ADH1C allozymes) to 19 mM (ADH1A). Acetaminophen exhibited noncompetitive inhibition for ALDH2 (Kis = 3.0 mM and Kii = 2.2 mM), but competitive inhibition for ALDH1A1 (Kis = 0.96 mM). The metabolic interactions between acetaminophen and ethanol/acetaldehyde were assessed by computer simulation using inhibition equations and the determined kinetic constants. At therapeutic to subtoxic plasma levels of acetaminophen (i.e., 0.2-0.5 mM) and physiologically relevant concentrations of ethanol (10 mM) and acetaldehyde (10 μm) in target tissues, acetaminophen could inhibit ADH1C allozymes (12-26%) and ADH2 (14-28%) in the liver and small intestine, ADH4 (15-31%) in the stomach, and ALDH1A1 (16-33%) and ALDH2 (8.3-19%) in all 3 tissues. The

  11. Distinct roles of jasmonates and aldehydes in plant-defense responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Wassim Chehab

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many inducible plant-defense responses are activated by jasmonates (JAs, C(6-aldehydes, and their corresponding derivatives, produced by the two main competing branches of the oxylipin pathway, the allene oxide synthase (AOS and hydroperoxide lyase (HPL branches, respectively. In addition to competition for substrates, these branch-pathway-derived metabolites have substantial overlap in regulation of gene expression. Past experiments to define the role of C(6-aldehydes in plant defense responses were biased towards the exogenous application of the synthetic metabolites or the use of genetic manipulation of HPL expression levels in plant genotypes with intact ability to produce the competing AOS-derived metabolites. To uncouple the roles of the C(6-aldehydes and jasmonates in mediating direct and indirect plant-defense responses, we generated Arabidopsis genotypes lacking either one or both of these metabolites. These genotypes were subsequently challenged with a phloem-feeding insect (aphids: Myzus persicae, an insect herbivore (leafminers: Liriomyza trifolii, and two different necrotrophic fungal pathogens (Botrytis cinerea and Alternaria brassicicola. We also characterized the volatiles emitted by these plants upon aphid infestation or mechanical wounding and identified hexenyl acetate as the predominant compound in these volatile blends. Subsequently, we examined the signaling role of this compound in attracting the parasitoid wasp (Aphidius colemani, a natural enemy of aphids. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study conclusively establishes that jasmonates and C(6-aldehydes play distinct roles in plant defense responses. The jasmonates are indispensable metabolites in mediating the activation of direct plant-defense responses, whereas the C(6-aldehyes are not. On the other hand, hexenyl acetate, an acetylated C(6-aldehyde, is the predominant wound-inducible volatile signal that mediates indirect defense responses by directing tritrophic

  12. Bioaccumulation of Cry1Ab protein from an herbivore reduces anti-oxidant enzyme activities in two spider species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    Full Text Available Cry proteins are expressed in rice lines for lepidopteran pest control. These proteins can be transferred from transgenic rice plants to non-target arthropods, including planthoppers and then to a predatory spider. Movement of Cry proteins through food webs may reduce fitness of non-target arthropods, although recent publications indicated no serious changes in non-target populations. Nonetheless, Cry protein intoxication influences gene expression in Cry-sensitive insects. We posed the hypothesis that Cry protein intoxication influences enzyme activities in spiders acting in tri-trophic food webs. Here we report on the outcomes of experiments designed to test our hypothesis with two spider species. We demonstrated that the movement of CryAb protein from Drosophila culture medium into fruit flies maintained on the CryAb containing medium and from the flies to the spiders Ummeliata insecticeps and Pardosa pseudoannulata. We also show that the activities of three key metabolic enzymes, acetylcholine esterase (AchE, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were significantly influenced in the spiders after feeding on Cry1Ab-containing fruit flies. We infer from these data that Cry proteins originating in transgenic crops impacts non-target arthropods at the physiological and biochemical levels, which may be one mechanism of Cry protein-related reductions in fitness of non-target beneficial predators.

  13. Activity-Based Protein Profiling Reveals Mitochondrial Oxidative Enzyme Impairment and Restoration in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Angel, Thomas E.; Lewis, Michael P.; Pederson, Leeanna M.; Chauvigne-Hines, Lacie M.; Wiedner, Susan D.; Zink, Erika M.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2012-10-24

    High-fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and concomitant development of insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes mellitus have been linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is not clear whether mitochondrial dysfunction is a direct effect of a HFD or if the mitochondrial function is reduced with increased HFD duration. We hypothesized that the function of mitochondrial oxidative and lipid metabolism functions in skeletal muscle mitochondria for HFD mice are similar or elevated relative to standard diet (SD) mice, thereby IR is neither cause nor consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction. We applied a chemical probe approach to identify functionally reactive ATPases and nucleotide-binding proteins in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle of C57Bl/6J mice fed HFD or SD chow for 2-, 8-, or 16-weeks; feeding time points known to induce IR. A total of 293 probe-labeled proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, of which 54 differed in abundance between HFD and SD mice. We found proteins associated with the TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), and lipid metabolism were altered in function when comparing SD to HFD fed mice at 2-weeks, however by 16-weeks HFD mice had TCA cycle, β-oxidation, and respiratory chain function at levels similar to or higher than SD mice.

  14. Magnetically responsive enzyme powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pospiskova, Kristyna, E-mail: kristyna.pospiskova@upol.cz [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Safarik, Ivo, E-mail: ivosaf@yahoo.com [Regional Centre of Advanced Technologies and Materials, Palacky University, Slechtitelu 11, 783 71 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Department of Nanobiotechnology, Institute of Nanobiology and Structural Biology of GCRC, Na Sadkach 7, 370 05 Ceske Budejovice (Czech Republic)

    2015-04-15

    Powdered enzymes were transformed into their insoluble magnetic derivatives retaining their catalytic activity. Enzyme powders (e.g., trypsin and lipase) were suspended in various liquid media not allowing their solubilization (e.g., saturated ammonium sulfate and highly concentrated polyethylene glycol solutions, ethanol, methanol, 2-propanol) and subsequently cross-linked with glutaraldehyde. Magnetic modification was successfully performed at low temperature in a freezer (−20 °C) using magnetic iron oxides nano- and microparticles prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis from ferrous sulfate. Magnetized cross-linked enzyme powders were stable at least for two months in water suspension without leakage of fixed magnetic particles. Operational stability of magnetically responsive enzymes during eight repeated reaction cycles was generally without loss of enzyme activity. Separation of magnetically modified cross-linked powdered enzymes from reaction mixtures was significantly simplified due to their magnetic properties. - Highlights: • Cross-linked enzyme powders were prepared in various liquid media. • Insoluble enzymes were magnetized using iron oxides particles. • Magnetic iron oxides particles were prepared by microwave-assisted synthesis. • Magnetic modification was performed under low (freezing) temperature. • Cross-linked powdered trypsin and lipase can be used repeatedly for reaction.

  15. Improved tolerance to various abiotic stresses in transgenic sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas expressing spinach betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijuan Fan

    Full Text Available Abiotic stresses are critical delimiters for the increased productivity and cultivation expansion of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas, a root crop with worldwide importance. The increased production of glycine betaine (GB improves plant tolerance to various abiotic stresses without strong phenotypic changes, providing a feasible approach to improve stable yield production under unfavorable conditions. The gene encoding betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH is involved in the biosynthesis of GB in plants, and the accumulation of GB by the heterologous overexpression of BADH improves abiotic stress tolerance in plants. This study is to improve sweet potato, a GB accumulator, resistant to multiple abiotic stresses by promoted GB biosynthesis. A chloroplastic BADH gene from Spinacia oleracea (SoBADH was introduced into the sweet potato cultivar Sushu-2 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. The overexpression of SoBADH in the transgenic sweet potato improved tolerance to various abiotic stresses, including salt, oxidative stress, and low temperature. The increased BADH activity and GB accumulation in the transgenic plant lines under normal and multiple environmental stresses resulted in increased protection against cell damage through the maintenance of cell membrane integrity, stronger photosynthetic activity, reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and induction or activation of ROS scavenging by the increased activity of free radical-scavenging enzymes. The increased proline accumulation and systemic upregulation of many ROS-scavenging genes in stress-treated transgenic plants also indicated that GB accumulation might stimulate the ROS-scavenging system and proline biosynthesis via an integrative mechanism. This study demonstrates that the enhancement of GB biosynthesis in sweet potato is an effective and feasible approach to improve its tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses without causing phenotypic defects. This strategy for trait

  16. Identification and Overexpression of a Bifunctional Aldehyde/Alcohol Dehydrogenase Responsible for Ethanol Production in Thermoanaerobacter mathranii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Shuo; Just Mikkelsen, Marie

    2010-01-01

    Thermoanaerobacter mathranii contains four genes, adhA, adhB, bdhA and adhE, predicted to code for alcohol dehydrogenases involved in ethanol metabolism. These alcohol dehydrogenases were characterized as NADP(H)-dependent primary alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA), secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh......B), butanol dehydrogenase (BdhA) and NAD(H)-dependent bifunctional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE), respectively. Here we observed that AdhE is an important enzyme responsible for ethanol production in T. mathranii based on the constructed adh knockout strains. An adhE knockout strain fails to produce...... ethanol as a fermentation product, while other adh knockout strains showed no significant difference from the wild type. Further analysis revealed that the ΔadhE strain was defective in aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, but still maintained alcohol dehydrogenase activity. This showed that AdhE is the major...

  17. Quantum chemical modeling of methanol oxidation mechanisms by methanol dehydrogenase enzyme: effect of substitution of calcium by barium in the active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idupulapati, Nagesh B; Mainardi, Daniela S

    2010-02-04

    Previous experimental studies have shown that the activation energy for methanol oxidation by naturally occurring Ca(2+)-containing methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) enzyme is double the methanol activation energy by Ba(2+)-MDH. However, neither the reason for this difference nor the specific transition states and intermediates involved during the methanol oxidation by Ba(2+)-MDH have been clearly stated. Hence, an MDH active site model based on the well-documented X-ray crystallographic structure of Ca(2+)-MDH is selected, where the Ca(2+) is replaced by a Ba(2+) ion at the active site center, and the addition-elimination (A-E) and hydride-transfer (H-T) methanol oxidation mechanisms, already proposed in the literature for Ca(2+)-MDH, are tested for Ba(2+)-MDH at the BLYP/DNP theory level. Changes in the geometries and energy barriers for all the steps are identified, and qualitatively, similar (when compared to Ca(2+)-MDH) intermediates and transition states associated with each step of the mechanisms are found in the case of Ba(2+)-MDH. For both the A-E and H-T mechanisms, almost all the free-energy barriers associated with all of the steps are reduced in the presence of Ba(2+)-MDH, and they are kinetically feasible. The free energy barriers for methanol oxidation by Ba(2+)-MDH, particularly for the rate-limiting steps of both mechanisms, are almost half the corresponding barriers calculated for the case of Ca(2+)-MDH, which is in agreement with experimental observations.

  18. Arctigenin promotes degradation of inducible nitric oxide synthase through CHIP-associated proteasome pathway and suppresses its enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiangyang; Li, Guilan; Lü, Chaotian; Xu, Hui; Yin, Zhimin

    2012-10-01

    Arctigenin, a natural dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan compound, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory properties. Previous works showed that arctigenin decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced iNOS at transcription level. However, whether arctigenin could regulate iNOS at the post-translational level is still unclear. In the present study, we demonstrated that arctigenin promoted the degradation of iNOS which is expressed under LPS stimulation in murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells. Such degradation of iNOS protein is due to CHIP-associated ubiquitination and proteasome-dependency. Furthermore, arctigenin decreased iNOS phosphorylation through inhibiting ERK and Src activation, subsequently suppressed iNOS enzyme activity. In conclusion, our research displays a new finding that arctigenin can promote the ubiqitination and degradation of iNOS after LPS stimulation. iNOS activity regulated by arctigenin is likely to involve a multitude of crosstalking mechanisms.

  19. Inhibitory potential of ginger extracts against enzymes linked to type 2 diabetes, inflammation and induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, M Priya; Padmakumari, K P; Sankarikutty, B; Cherian, O Lijo; Nisha, V M; Raghu, K G

    2011-03-01

    Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) continues to be used as an important cooking spice and herbal medicine around the world. Gingerols, the major pungent components of ginger, are known to improve diabetes, including the effect of enhancement against insulin sensitivity. In the current study, ginger sequentially extracted with different solvents-namely, hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, 70% methanol-water and water-were screened to determine the variations in phenolic-linked active constituents. The potential of these extracts to inhibit key enzymes relevant to type 2 diabetes and inflammation was studied. Phenolic compounds-namely, gingerols and shoagols-were quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. Ethyl acetate extract showed higher activity compared with other extracts. These studies indicate that ginger has very good potential for α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibition relevant for type 2 diabetes management and cyclooxygenase inhibition for inflammation.

  20. Effect of different methods of hypoxic exercise training on free radical oxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity in the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, JIE; WANG, YUXIA

    2013-01-01

    The effects of different modes of hypoxic exercise training on free radical production and antioxidant enzyme activity in the brain of rats were investigated in this study. A total of 40 healthy 2-month-old male Wister rats were randomly assigned to 5 groups according to different training modes. Endurance training sessions were performed for 5 weeks under different normoxic (atmospheric pressure ~632 mmHg, altitude ~1,500 m) and hypoxic conditions (atmospheric pressure ~493 mmHg, altitude ~3,500 m) at the same relative intensity. The superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activity and the malondialdehyde (MDA) content of the brain were evaluated by spectrophotometric analysis. Compared to the low-training low (LL) group, the SOD activity was significantly increased by 68.73, 54.28 and 304.02% in the high-training high (HH), high-training low (HL) and high-exercise high-training low (HHL) groups, respectively. However, no obvious change was observed for the low-training high (LH) group. In comparison to the LL group, the GSH-Px activity was found to be significantly higher in the HH, HL, LH and HHL groups. Similarly, in comparison to the LL group, the CAT activity exhibited a significant increase in the HH, HL, LH and HHL groups. Compared to the LL group, the MDA content was significantly increased in the HH, HL and HHL groups, although no significant difference was detected for the LH group. Following exhaustive exercise, the antioxidant enzyme activities in the rat brains were immediately improved in all the hypoxia modes. Moreover, the free radical production was increased after all the modes of hypoxic exercise training, with the LH mode being the only exception. PMID:24649054

  1. Aldehyde-modified proteins as mediators of early inflammation in atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniak, Derrick T; Duryee, Michael J; Mikuls, Ted R; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Anderson, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Inflammation is widely accepted to play a major role in atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, the exact mechanism(s) by which inflammation exerts its pathogenic effect remains poorly understood. A number of oxidatively modified proteins have been associated with cardiovascular disease. Recently, attention has been given to the oxidative compound of malondialdehyde and acetaldehyde, two reactive aldehydes known to covalently bind and adduct macromolecules. These products have been shown to form stable malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) adducts that are reactive and induce immune responses. These adducts have been found in inflamed and diseased cardiovascular tissue of patients. Antibodies to these adducted proteins are measurable in the serum of diseased patients. The isotypes involved in the immune response to MAA (i.e., IgM, IgG, and IgA) are predictive of atherosclerotic disease progression and cardiovascular events such as an acute myocardial infarction or coronary artery bypass grafting. Therefore, it is the purpose of this article to review the past and current knowledge of aldehyde-modified proteins and their role in cardiovascular disease.

  2. Structures of reduced and ligand-bound nitric oxide reductase provide insights into functional differences in respiratory enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Nozomi; Ishii, Shoko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hino, Tomoya; Fukumori, Yoshihiro; Sako, Yoshihiko; Shiro, Yoshitsugu; Tosha, Takehiko

    2014-07-01

    Nitric oxide reductase (NOR) catalyzes the generation of nitrous oxide (N2O) via the reductive coupling of two nitric oxide (NO) molecules at a heme/non-heme Fe center. We report herein on the structures of the reduced and ligand-bound forms of cytochrome c-dependent NOR (cNOR) from Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a resolution of 2.3-2.7 Å, to elucidate structure-function relationships in NOR, and compare them to those of cytochrome c oxidase (CCO) that is evolutionarily related to NOR. Comprehensive crystallographic refinement of the CO-bound form of cNOR suggested that a total of four atoms can be accommodated at the binuclear center. Consistent with this, binding of bulky acetaldoxime (CH3-CH=N-OH) to the binuclear center of cNOR was confirmed by the structural analysis. Active site reduction and ligand binding in cNOR induced only ∼0.5 Å increase in the heme/non-heme Fe distance, but no significant structural change in the protein. The highly localized structural change is consistent with the lack of proton-pumping activity in cNOR, because redox-coupled conformational changes are thought to be crucial for proton pumping in CCO. It also permits the rapid decomposition of cytotoxic NO in denitrification. In addition, the shorter heme/non-heme Fe distance even in the bulky ligand-bound form of cNOR (∼4.5 Å) than the heme/Cu distance in CCO (∼5 Å) suggests the ability of NOR to maintain two NO molecules within a short distance in the confined space of the active site, thereby facilitating N-N coupling to produce a hyponitrite intermediate for the generation of N2O.

  3. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2017-01-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of different dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics ( Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  4. Changes of the activities of glycolytic and oxidative enzymes before and after slaughter in the longissimus muscle of Pietrain and Duroc pigs and a Duroc-Pietrain crossbreed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, C; Natter, R; Wicke, M

    2010-12-01

    After slaughter of pigs, the pH of the meat decreases due to lactate accumulation within the tissue. In addition to calcium homeostasis, energy metabolism plays a key role during the muscle-to-meat transition, and it is interesting to know how specific enzymes of the glycolytic and oxidative pathways change during this process, especially in relation to the antemortem situation, and if there is an impact of these alterations on the meat quality characteristics. Therefore, in the present study samples of the LM from the pig genetic groups Pietrain (Pi), Duroc (Du), and a Du × Pi crossbreed population (DuPi) were collected 24 h before as well as 1 min, 40 min, and 12 h after slaughter, and the activities of the glycogen phosphorylase (GP), phosphofructokinase (PFK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), citrate synthase (CS), NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I), and cytochrome oxidase were analyzed. Additional investigations include carcass and meat quality characteristics as well as the microstructure of the LM. The Pi breed had greater (P meat values, but no differences (P > 0.05) of the meat quality traits could be determined between the investigated pig breeds. The Pi pigs exhibited a greater (P after slaughter (1 min postmortem) of the pigs and the activity of the LDH within 40 min postmortem. After 12 h, the GP, PFK, LDH, and complex I activities decreased to the amount of the preslaughter sample. No differences could be found with regard to the enzyme activities of the CS and cytochrome oxidase at all determination times. Considering the enzyme activities within the different breeds, the Pi pigs exhibited greater (P animals exhibited greater (P meat transition process after slaughter of the animals without an impact on the muscle quality. The activities of the GP, PFK, CS, and complex I reflect the differences of the muscle fiber composition between the Pi and Du pigs.

  5. Effects of small peptides, probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics on growth performance, digestive enzymes, and oxidative stress in orange-spotted grouper, Epinephelus coioides, juveniles reared in artificial seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Cheng, Yongzhou; Chen, Xiaoyan; Liu, Zhaopu; Long, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    Aquaculture production efficiency may increase by using feed additives. This study investigated the effects of diff erent dietary additives [w/w: 2% small peptides, 0.01% probiotics (Bacillus licheniformis) and 0.2% prebiotics (inulin)] on growth performance, digestive enzyme activities, and oxidative stress in juvenile Epinephelus coioides reared in artificial seawater of two salt concentrations (13.5 vs. 28.5). Weight gain rate was significantly higher in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides, B. licheniformis, inulin, or synbiotics than that in fish fed the basal diet; the greatest weight gain rate was found in fish fed the small peptide treatment [56.0% higher than basal diet]. Higher feed efficiency was detected in fish fed the diet supplemented with small peptides than that of fish in the other dietary treatments. Total protease activity in the stomach and intestines was highest in fish fed the small peptide-treated diet, whereas lipase activity was highest in those fed synbiotics (combination of Bacillus licheniformis and inulin) than that in fish fed the other treatments. Antioxidant enzyme (total superoxide dismutase and catalase) activities and hepatic malondialdehyde content were higher in fish receiving the dietary supplements and maintained in artificial seawater containing 13.5 salinity compared with those in the control (28.5). Hepatic catalase activity in grouper fed the diets with small peptides or synbiotics decreased significantly compared with that in control fish. Overall, the three types of additives improved growth rate of juvenile grouper and digestive enzymes activities to varying degrees but did not effectively improve antioxidant capacity under low-salinity stress conditions.

  6. Impact of L-FABP and glucose on polyunsaturated fatty acid induction of PPARα-regulated β-oxidative enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Petrescu, Anca D.; Huang, Huan; Martin, Gregory G.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Storey, Stephen M.; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-01-01

    Liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) is the major soluble protein that binds very-long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) in hepatocytes. However, nothing is known about L-FABP's role in n-3 PUFA-mediated peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα) transcription of proteins involved in long-chain fatty acid (LCFA) β-oxidation. This issue was addressed in cultured primary hepatocytes from wild-type, L-FABP-null, and PPARα-null mice with these major findings: 1) PUF...

  7. Changes of platelet antioxidative enzymes during oxidative stress: the protective effect of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa and grape seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedzierska, Magdalena; Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wiesław; Erler, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Aronia melanocarpa fruits (Rosaceae) and grape seeds (seeds of Vitis vinifera, Vitaceae) are two of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances, and they have been shown to have various biological activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the action of phenolic extracts (at concentrations 5-100 µg/mL) of two different plants, berries of A. melanocarpa (chokebbery) and grape seeds, on the activities of various antioxidative enzymes, the amount of glutathione (as an important component of redox status) in control the platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2) (the strong physiological oxidant) in vitro. The properties of these two tested extracts were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative and antiplatelet commercial monomeric polyphenol - resveratrol. The extract from berries of A. melanocarpa, like the extract from grape seeds, reduced the changes in activities of different antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, and catalase) in platelets treated with H(2)O(2). The action of the two tested plant extracts and H(2)O(2) evoked a significant increase of reduced glutathione in platelets compared with platelets treated with H(2)O(2) only. Comparative studies indicate that the two tested plant extracts had similar antioxidative properties, and were found to be more reactive in blood platelets than the solution of resveratrol.

  8. Effect of trichloroethylene (TCE) toxicity on the enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism, brush border membrane and oxidative stress in kidney and other rat tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sheeba; Priyamvada, Shubha; Khan, Sara A; Khan, Wasim; Farooq, Neelam; Khan, Farah; Yusufi, A N K

    2009-07-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE), an industrial solvent, is a major environmental contaminant. Histopathological examinations revealed that TCE caused liver and kidney toxicity and carcinogenicity. However, biochemical mechanism and tissue response to toxic insult are not completely elucidated. We hypothesized that TCE induces oxidative stress to various rat tissues and alters their metabolic functions. Male Wistar rats were given TCE (1000 mg/kg/day) in corn oil orally for 25 d. Blood and tissues were collected and analyzed for various biochemical and enzymatic parameters. TCE administration increased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, cholesterol and alkaline phosphatase but decreased serum glucose, inorganic phosphate and phospholipids indicating kidney and liver toxicity. Activity of hexokinase, lactate dehydrogenase increased in the intestine and liver whereas decreased in renal tissues. Malate dehydrogenase and glucose-6-phosphatase and fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase decreased in all tissues whereas increased in medulla. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased but NADP-malic enzyme decreased in all tissues except in medulla. The activity of BBM enzymes decreased but renal Na/Pi transport increased. Superoxide dismutase and catalase activities variably declined whereas lipid peroxidation significantly enhanced in all tissues. The present results indicate that TCE caused severe damage to kidney, intestine, liver and brain; altered carbohydrate metabolism and suppressed antioxidant defense system.

  9. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  10. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in type 2 diabetic patients with and without diastolic dysfunction and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Nada

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Antioxidant systems are important factors affecting the oxidation of lipoproteins and thereby the progression of atherosclerotic disease. It has been suggested that physical activity might maintain and promote the antioxidant defence capacity against the oxidative stress. Left ventricular dysfunction (LVDD and hypertension are more common in subjects with diabetes mellitus (DM type 2. Objective. To evaluate the oxidative stress in patients with DM type 2, particularly with LVDD and hypertension and to determine the influence of acute exercise training on the investigated parameters. Methods. To assess the oxidative stress of patients, we determined the following antioxidative parameters: triglycerides (TG, total cholesterol, low density cholesterol, OxLDL cholesterol, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, plasminogen activator-type 1 (PAI-1 which were measured at rest and immediately after the acute bout of the cardiopulmonary exercise cycle ergometer test. Results. In basal conditions, diabetic patients had a significant increase of TG (3.12±1.09 vs 1.74±0.9 mmol/l; p<0.01, OxLDL cholesterol (84.73±16.9 vs 79.00±29.26 mmol/l; p<0.05 and SOD enzyme activity (913.38±120.36 vs 877.14 ±153.18; p<0.05 compared to controls. During the acute exercise test, there were significantly greater levels of OxLDL (84.73±16.90 vs 92.33±23.29 mmol/l; p<0.05 in study patients. SOD significantly increased in both groups during exercise, in diabetic patients (913.38±120.36 vs 921.50±130.03 U/g Hb; p<0.05 and in controls (877.14±153.18 vs 895.00±193.49 U/g Hb; p<0.05. GSH-Px significantly increased only in diabetic patients after acute exercise (45.04±11.19 vs 51.81±15.07 U/g Hb; p<0.01, but not in controls. PAI significantly decreased during the exercise test only in healthy subjects (2.60±0.35 vs 2.22±0.65; p<0.05. Type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular complications (LVDD and hypertension had a significant

  11. Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel-Based QCM Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Recognition of Volatile Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chuanjun; Wyszynski, Bartosz; Yatabe, Rui; Hayashi, Kenshi; Toko, Kiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    The detection and recognition of metabolically derived aldehydes, which have been identified as important products of oxidative stress and biomarkers of cancers; are considered as an effective approach for early cancer detection as well as health status monitoring. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor arrays based on molecularly imprinted sol-gel (MISG) materials were developed in this work for highly sensitive detection and highly selective recognition of typical aldehyde vapors including hexanal (HAL); nonanal (NAL) and bezaldehyde (BAL). The MISGs were prepared by a sol-gel procedure using two matrix precursors: tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and tetrabutoxytitanium (TBOT). Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT); diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EAP) and trimethoxy-phenylsilane (TMP) were added as functional monomers to adjust the imprinting effect of the matrix. Hexanoic acid (HA); nonanoic acid (NA) and benzoic acid (BA) were used as psuedotemplates in view of their analogous structure to the target molecules as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with the matrix. Totally 13 types of MISGs with different components were prepared and coated on QCM electrodes by spin coating. Their sensing characters towards the three aldehyde vapors with different concentrations were investigated qualitatively. The results demonstrated that the response of individual sensors to each target strongly depended on the matrix precursors; functional monomers and template molecules. An optimization of the 13 MISG materials was carried out based on statistical analysis such as principle component analysis (PCA); multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). The optimized sensor array consisting of five channels showed a high discrimination ability on the aldehyde vapors; which was confirmed by quantitative comparison with a randomly selected array. It was suggested that both the molecularly imprinting (MIP) effect and the matrix

  12. Molecularly Imprinted Sol-Gel-Based QCM Sensor Arrays for the Detection and Recognition of Volatile Aldehydes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The detection and recognition of metabolically derived aldehydes, which have been identified as important products of oxidative stress and biomarkers of cancers; are considered as an effective approach for early cancer detection as well as health status monitoring. Quartz crystal microbalance (QCM sensor arrays based on molecularly imprinted sol-gel (MISG materials were developed in this work for highly sensitive detection and highly selective recognition of typical aldehyde vapors including hexanal (HAL; nonanal (NAL and bezaldehyde (BAL. The MISGs were prepared by a sol-gel procedure using two matrix precursors: tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS and tetrabutoxytitanium (TBOT. Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APT; diethylaminopropyltrimethoxysilane (EAP and trimethoxy-phenylsilane (TMP were added as functional monomers to adjust the imprinting effect of the matrix. Hexanoic acid (HA; nonanoic acid (NA and benzoic acid (BA were used as psuedotemplates in view of their analogous structure to the target molecules as well as the strong hydrogen-bonding interaction with the matrix. Totally 13 types of MISGs with different components were prepared and coated on QCM electrodes by spin coating. Their sensing characters towards the three aldehyde vapors with different concentrations were investigated qualitatively. The results demonstrated that the response of individual sensors to each target strongly depended on the matrix precursors; functional monomers and template molecules. An optimization of the 13 MISG materials was carried out based on statistical analysis such as principle component analysis (PCA; multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA. The optimized sensor array consisting of five channels showed a high discrimination ability on the aldehyde vapors; which was confirmed by quantitative comparison with a randomly selected array. It was suggested that both the molecularly imprinting (MIP effect and the matrix

  13. Identification of crucial amino acids in mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 that determine substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Mahro

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate factors that determine substrate specificity and activity of mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins we performed site directed mutagenesis of mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 (mAOX3. The sequence alignment of different aldehyde oxidase (AOX isoforms identified variations in the active site of mAOX3 in comparison to other AOX proteins and xanthine oxidoreductases (XOR. Based on the structural alignment of mAOX3 and bovine XOR, differences in amino acid residues involved in substrate binding in XORs in comparison to AOXs were identified. We exchanged several residues in the active site to the ones found in other AOX homologues in mouse or to residues present in bovine XOR in order to examine their influence on substrate selectivity and catalytic activity. Additionally we analyzed the influence of the [2Fe-2S] domains of mAOX3 on its kinetic properties and cofactor saturation. We applied UV-VIS and EPR monitored redox-titrations to determine the redox potentials of wild type mAOX3 and mAOX3 variants containing the iron-sulfur centers of mAOX1. In addition, a combination of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations (MD was used to investigate factors that modulate the substrate specificity and activity of wild type and AOX variants. The successful conversion of an AOX enzyme to an XOR enzyme was achieved exchanging eight residues in the active site of mAOX3. It was observed that the absence of the K889H exchange substantially decreased the activity of the enzyme towards all substrates analyzed, revealing that this residue has an important role in catalysis.

  14. GH overexpression modifies muscle expression of anti-oxidant enzymes and increases spinal curvature of old zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Carlos Eduardo da; Kuradomi, Rafael Yutaka; Almeida, Daniela Volcan; Lannes, Carlos Frederico Ceccon; Figueiredo, Márcio de Azevedo; Dytz, Aline Guerra; Fonseca, Duane Barros; Marins, Luis Fernando

    2010-06-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess causes an increment in the metabolic rate and in reactive oxygen species generation, which accelerate the ageing process in mammals. Considering that there is no information on this subject in fish, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the excess GH effect on senescence in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) transgenic model. In order to reach this objective, we analyzed the phenotype of spinal curvature and expression of genes related to the anti-oxidant defense system and myogenesis in muscle of 8 and 30 months old GH-transgenic males. Gene expression analyses revealed that both superoxide dismutase isoforms were down-regulated only in 30 months old animals, while glutamate cysteine ligase was down-regulated in GH-transgenic zebrafish. Acceleration of the spinal curvature and a reduction in the expression of miogenin at both ages and MyoD in the old fish were also observed. Although neurolipofuscin accumulation was not significant in GH-transgenic zebrafish, the estimation of maximum longevity based on the von Bertalanffy growth function was significantly lower in this group. The results obtained here indicate that GH overexpression reduces the transcription of anti-oxidant defense system and myogenesis-related genes, which probably accelerates senescence in the zebrafish transgenic model used.

  15. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reymond, Jean-Louis; Fluxà, Viviana S; Maillard, Noélie

    2009-01-07

    Enzyme assays are analytical tools to visualize enzyme activities. In recent years a large variety of enzyme assays have been developed to assist the discovery and optimization of industrial enzymes, in particular for "white biotechnology" where selective enzymes are used with great success for economically viable, mild and environmentally benign production processes. The present article highlights the aspects of fluorogenic and chromogenic substrates, sensors, and enzyme fingerprinting, which are our particular areas of interest.

  16. An electric detection of immunoglobulin G in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using an indium oxide nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongjin; Cui, Tianhong

    2012-01-01

    Semiconducting nanoparticle ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) are used to detect immunoglobulin G (IgG) in the conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Indium oxide and silica nanoparticles were layer-by-layer self-assembled with the oppositely charged polyelectrolyte as the electrochemical transducer and antibody immobilization site, respectively. The assay was conducted on a novel platform of indium oxide nanoparticle ISFETs, where the electric signals are generated in response to the concentration of target IgG using the labeled detecting antibody. The sandwiched ELISA structure catalyzed the conversion of the acidic substrate into neutral substance with the aid of horseradish peroxidase. The pH change in the substrate solution was detected by nanoparticle ISFETs. Normal rabbit IgG was used as a model antigen whose detection limit of 0.04 ng ml-1 was found. The facile electric detection in the conventional assay through the semiconducting nanoparticle ISFET has potential applications as a point-of-care detection or a sensing element in a lab-on-a-chip system.

  17. In vitro antidiabetic and inhibitory potential of turmeric (Curcuma longa L) rhizome against cellular and LDL oxidation and angiotensin converting enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekshmi, P C; Arimboor, Ranjith; Nisha, V M; Menon, A Nirmala; Raghu, K G

    2014-12-01

    Turmeric (Curcuma longa L) rhizome extracts were evaluated for their antidiabetic, antihypertensive and antioxidant potentials. α-Glucosidase (0.4 μg/mL) and α-amylase (0.4 μg/mL) inhibitory potential of turmeric ethyl acetate extract was significantly higher than those of the reference drug acarbose (17.1 μg/mL and 290.6 μg/mL respectively). Protein glycation inhibitory potential of ethyl acetate extract was 800 times higher than that of ascorbic acid. High potential of ethyl acetate extract to scavenge free radicals and to reduce LDL oxidation and cellular oxidative stress was also revealed. The positive correlation obtained between the free radical scavenging capacity of the extracts and their antiglycation potential further confirmed the role of antioxidants in controlling glycation reactions. Ethyl acetate extract was also found as effective in reducing hypertension by inhibiting angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). Antidiabetic, ACE inhibitory and antioxidant capacities of the extracts were in the order of their curcumin contents.

  18. Antioxidant-enzyme reaction to the oxidative stress due to alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahid, Karim; Laglaoui, Amin; Zantar, Said; Ennabili, Abdeslam

    2015-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) becomes one of the world's foremost vegetables, and its world production and consumption have increased fairly quickly. The capacity to induce oxidative stress in tomato plant, exposed to three xenobiotics such as alpha-cypermethrin, chlorpyriphos, and pirimicarb, was investigated by the evaluation of lipid peroxidation by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) rate; also, we studied the response of tomato to this stress by assessing the response of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione-s-transferase (GST), and glutathione reductase (GR). The effect of the insecticides was observed using four concentrations (25, 50, 75, and 100%) for germinating seeds and only the recommended concentration in agriculture (100%) for growing plants. Our results show an important accumulation of MDA, demonstrating the increase of lipid peroxidation in consequence of the excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) production due to insecticide treatment. In response to this oxidative stress in tomato seedlings and plants, the activities of antioxidant-enzyme system were generally enhanced. The electrophoretic analysis showed also the apparition of new isoenzymes as the case for CAT and POD.

  19. Effects of Urtica dioica supplementation on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in type 2 diabetic patients: A double blind, randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri Behzadi, Alidad; Kalalian-Moghaddam, Hamid; Ahmadi, Amir Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Oxidative stress plays an important role in the development of diabetic complications including metabolic abnormality-induced diabetic micro-vascular and macro-vascular complications. Urtica dioica L. (U. dioica) has been traditionally used in Iranian medicine as an herbal remedy for hypoglycemic or due to its anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica on blood lipids, hepatic enzymes and nitric oxide levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Materials and Methods: 50 women with type 2 diabetes participated in this study and were randomly divided into two groups namely, control and intervention groups. Control group received placebo and intervention group received hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica. Before and after 8 weeks of continuous treatment, some biochemical serum levels including FPG, TG, SGPT, SGOT, HDL, LDL, SOD and NO were measured. Results: The results indicated that after 8 weeks, in the intervention group, FPG, TG, and SGPT levels significantly decreased and HDL, NO and SOD levels significantly increased as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our results encourage the use of hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica as an antioxidant agent for additional therapy of diabetes as hydro-alcoholic extract of U. dioica may decrease risk factors of cardiovascular incidence and other complications in patients with diabetes mellitus. PMID:28078249

  20. Effect of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokines, oxidative stress, and cytochrome P450 enzymes in HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anusha Ande

    Full Text Available Mild-to-moderate tobacco smoking is highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals, and is known to exacerbate HIV pathogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine the specific effects of mild-to-moderate smoking on viral load, cytokine production, and oxidative stress and cytochrome P450 (CYP pathways in HIV-infected individuals who have not yet received antiretroviral therapy (ART. Thirty-two human subjects were recruited and assigned to four different cohorts as follows: a HIV negative non-smokers, b HIV positive non-smokers, c HIV negative mild-to-moderate smokers, and d HIV positive mild-to-moderate smokers. Patients were recruited in Cameroon, Africa using strict selection criteria to exclude patients not yet eligible for ART and not receiving conventional or traditional medications. Those with active tuberculosis, hepatitis B or with a history of substance abuse were also excluded. Our results showed an increase in the viral load in the plasma of HIV positive patients who were mild-to-moderate smokers compared to individuals who did not smoke. Furthermore, although we did not observe significant changes in the levels of most pro-inflammatory cytokines, the cytokine IL-8 and MCP-1 showed a significant decrease in the plasma of HIV-infected patients and smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Importantly, HIV-infected individuals and smokers showed a significant increase in oxidative stress compared with HIV negative non-smoker subjects in both plasma and monocytes. To examine the possible pathways involved in increased oxidative stress and viral load, we determined the mRNA levels of several antioxidant and cytochrome P450 enzymes in monocytes. The results showed that the levels of most antioxidants are unaltered, suggesting their inability to counter oxidative stress. While CYP2A6 was induced in smokers, CYP3A4 was induced in HIV and HIV positive smokers compared with HIV negative non-smokers. Overall, the findings suggest

  1. Climate change (elevated CO{sub 2}, elevated temperature and moderate drought) triggers the antioxidant enzymes' response of grapevine cv. Tempranillo, avoiding oxidative damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar-Parra, C.; Aguirreolea, J.; Sanchez-Diaz, M.; Irigoyen, J.J.; Morales, F. (Departamento de Biologia Vegetal, Seccion Biologia Vegetal (Unidad Asociada al CSIC, EEAD, Zaragoza e ICVV, Logrono), Facultades de Ciencias y Farmacia, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain))

    2012-07-01

    Photosynthetic carbon fixation (A{sub N}) and photosynthetic electron transport rate (ETR) are affected by different environmental stress factors, such as those associated with climate change. Under stress conditions, it can be generated an electron excess that cannot be consumed, which can react with O{sub 2}, producing reactive oxygen species. This work was aimed to evaluate the influence of climate change (elevated CO{sub 2}, elevated temperature and moderate drought) on the antioxidant status of grapevine (Vitis vinifera) cv. Tempranillo leaves, from veraison to ripeness. The lowest ratios between electrons generated (ETR) and consumed (A{sub N} + respiration + photorespiration) were observed in plants treated with elevated CO{sub 2} and elevated temperature. In partially irrigated plants under current ambient conditions, electrons not consumed seemed to be diverted to alternative ways. Oxidative damage to chlorophylls and carotenoids was not observed. However, these plants had increases in thiobarbituric acid reacting substances, an indication of lipid peroxidation. These increases matched well with an early rise of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and antioxidant enzyme activities, superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1), ascorbate peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.11) and catalase (EC 1.11.1.6). Enzymatic activities were maintained high until ripeness. In conclusion, plants grown under current ambient conditions and moderate drought were less efficient to cope with oxidative damage than well-irrigated plants, and more interestingly, plants grown under moderate drought but treated with elevated CO{sub 2} and elevated temperature were not affected by oxidative damage, mainly because of higher rates of electrons consumed in photosynthetic carbon fixation. (Author)

  2. Genetic inactivation of mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA preserves neuronal viability and mitochondrial integrity in response to oxidative challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eForte

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential to neuronal viability and function due to their roles in ATP production, intracellular calcium regulation, and activation of apoptotic pathways. Accordingly, mitochondrial dysfunction has been indicated in a wide variety of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke and multiple sclerosis (MS. Recent evidence points to the permeability transition pore (PTP as a key player in mitochondrial dysfunction in these diseases, in which pathologic opening leads to mitochondrial swelling, rupture, release of cytochrome c, and neuronal death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are inducers of PTP opening, have been prominently implicated in the progression of many of these neurodegenerative diseases. In this context, inactivation of a mitochondria-targeted redox enzyme p66ShcA (p66 has been recently shown to prevent the neuronal cell death leading to axonal severing in the murine model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. To further characterize the response of neurons lacking p66, we assessed their reaction to treatment with oxidative stressors implicated in neurodegenerative pathways. Specifically, p66-knockout (p66-KO and wild-type (WT neurons were treated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and nitric oxide (NO, and assessed for cell viability and changes in mitochondrial properties, including morphology and ROS production. The results showed that p66-KO neurons had greater survival following treatment with oxidative stressors and generated less ROS when compared to WT neurons. Correspondingly, mitochondria in p66-KO neurons showed diminished morphological changes in response to these challenges. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of developing mitochondria-targeted therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders, and emphasize p66, mitochondrial ROS, and the PTP as key targets for maintaining mitochondrial and neuronal

  3. Mixed-function oxidase enzyme activity and oxidative stress in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) exposed to 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palace, V.P. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Zoology; Klaverkamp, J.F.; Lockhart, W.L. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Zoology]|[Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.; Metner, D.A.; Muir, D.C.G.; Brown, S.B. [Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

    1996-06-01

    Juvenile lake trout were intraperitoneally injected with corn oil containing nominal concentrations of 0, 0.6, 6.3, or 25 {micro}g [{sup 14}C]-3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126) per gram of body weight. The PCB-126 accumulated in liver in a dose-dependent manner to a sustained concentration by 6 weeks and remained elevated for the 30-week experimental period. Mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme activity was elevated in the two highest dose groups relative to the control group, but not in the low-dose group throughout the 30 weeks. Oxidative stress, measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances test, was correlated with ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and was elevated in liver of the two highest PCB dose groups but not the low-dose group. The activities of the enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidant tocopherol was depleted to approximately 75% of the control concentration in liver of all three PCB-dosed groups. Hepatic ascorbic acid levels were not different in any of the treatment groups. Retinol was depleted by greater than an order of magnitude in liver of the two highest dose groups but not in the los-dose group. This study demonstrates a correlation between hepatic MFO activity and oxidative stress in PCB-exposed lake trout. Tocopherol and retinol may be important mediators of oxidative stress but additional study is required to confirm the antioxidant activity of retinol.

  4. Effect of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) intake on urinary apigenin excretion, blood antioxidant enzymes and biomarkers for oxidative stress in human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, S E; Young, J F; Daneshvar, B; Lauridsen, S T; Knuthsen, P; Sandström, B; Dragsted, L O

    1999-06-01

    Seven men and seven women participated in a randomized crossover trial to study the effect of intake of parsley (Petroselinum crispum), containing high levels of the flavone apigenin, on the urinary excretion of flavones and on biomarkers for oxidative stress. The subjects received a strictly controlled diet low in flavones and other naturally occurring antioxidants during the 2 weeks of intervention. This basic diet was supplemented with parsley providing 3.73-4.49 mg apigenin/MJ in one of the intervention weeks. Urinary excretion of apigenin was 1.59-409.09 micrograms/MJ per 24 h during intervention with parsley and 0-112.27 micrograms/MJ per 24 h on the basic diet (P < 0.05). The fraction of apigenin intake excreted in the urine was 0.58 (SE 0.16)% during parsley intervention. Erythrocyte glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.1; GR) and superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1; SOD) activities increased during intervention with parsley (P < 0.005) as compared with the levels on the basic diet, whereas erythrocyte catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) activities did not change. No significant changes were observed in plasma protein 2-adipic semialdehyde residues, a biomarker of plasma protein oxidation. In this short-term investigation, an overall decreasing trend in the activity of antioxidant enzymes was observed during the 2-week study. The decreased activity of SOD was strongly correlated at the individual level with an increased oxidative damage to plasma proteins. However, the intervention with parsley seemed, partly, to overcome this decrease and resulted in increased levels of GR and SOD.

  5. Effect of Piper betle on cardiac function, marker enzymes, and oxidative stress in isoproterenol-induced cardiotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Dharamvir Singh; Arora, Sachin; Malik, Salma; Nepal, Saroj; Kumari, Santosh; Ojha, Shreesh

    2010-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the cardioprotective potential of Piper betle (P. betle) against isoproterenol (ISP)-induced myocardial infarction in rats. Rats were randomly divided into eight groups viz. control, ISP, P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) and P. betle (75, 150, and 300 mg/kg) + ISP treated group. P. betle leaf extract (75, 150, or 300 mg/kg) or saline was orally administered for 30 days. ISP (85 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered at an interval of 24 h on the 28(th) and 29(th) day and on day 30 the functional and biochemical parameters were measured. ISP administration showed a significant decrease in systolic, diastolic, mean arterial pressure (SAP, DAP, MAP), heart rate (HR), contractility (+LVdP/dt), and relaxation (-LVdP/dt) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP). ISP also caused significant decrease in myocardial antioxidants; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), reduced glutathione (GSH), and myocyte injury marker enzymes; creatine phosphokinase-MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) along with enhanced lipid peroxidation; thiobarbituric acid reacting species (TBARS) in heart. Pre-treatment with P. betle favorably modulated hemodynamic (SAP, DAP, and MAP) and ventricular function parameters (-LVdP/dt and LVEDP). P. betle pre-treatment also restored SOD, CAT, GSH, and GPx, reduced the leakage of CK-MB isoenzyme and LDH along with decreased lipid peroxidation in the heart. Taken together, the biochemical and functional parameters indicate that P. betle 150 and 300 mg/kg has a significant cardioprotective effect against ISP-induced myocardial infarction. Results of the present study suggest the cardioprotective potential of P. betle.

  6. Plaque growth-inhibiting effects of an abrasive fluoride-chlorhexidine toothpaste and a fluoride toothpaste containing oxidative enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemadzadeh, H; Ainamo, J; Murtomaa, H

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this 4 times cross-over double-blind clinical trial was to test the plaque-inhibiting effect of 2 fluoride-containing toothpastes. One toothpaste contained 0.8% chlorhexidine together with amine fluoride (0.1% F degrees) and a suitable abrasive agent. The other contained 1.7 U/g glucose oxidase and 8.0 U/g amyloglucosidase, added to an amine fluoride (0.1% F degrees) toothpaste. 1% Hibitane dental gel was used as a positive and a conventional fluoride toothpaste (Vademecum MFP Fluor) as a negative control. 9 dental students, in a randomized sequence, applied the 4 dentifrices twice daily from Monday afternoon to Friday morning with cap splints, designed to cover the teeth and about 2 mm of gingiva. No other oral hygiene measures were allowed during the 4 test periods. On Fridays, the teeth were cleaned professionally and good oral hygiene was maintained during the week-ends. At the beginning and at the end of each test period, per student plaque thickness was recorded using the plaque index, the visible plaque index, and plaque fresh weight as parameters, and the area of plaque as related to the area of the tooth surface was recorded planimetrically and according to the PLQ index. The best plaque growth-inhibiting effect was recorded for the positive control (CHX) with the test chlorhexidine toothpaste (TX) as next best. The enzyme-containing toothpaste (TE) did not differ significantly from the negative control (C). All the significant differences in anti-plaque effect between the 4 toothpastes were obtained by recordings of plaque thickness and none on the basis of area of plaque.

  7. Expression of betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase gene and salinity tolerance in rice transgenic plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭岩; 张莉; 肖岗; 曹守云; 谷冬梅; 田文忠; 陈受宜

    1997-01-01

    Betaine as one of osmolytes plays an important role in osmoregulation of most high plants. Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase C BADH) is the second enzyme involved in betaine biosynthesis. The BADH gene from a halophite, Atriplex hortensis, was transformed into rice cultivars by bombarment method. Totally 192 transgenic rice plants were obtained and most of them had higher salt tolerance than controls. Among transgenic plants transplanted in the saline pool containing 0.5% NaCl in a greenhouse, 22 survived, 13 of which set seeds, and the frequency of seed setting was very low, only 10% . But the controls could not grow under the same condition. The results of BADH ac-tivity assay and Northern blot showed that the BADH gene was integrated into chromosomes of transgenic plants and expressed.

  8. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 mediates a GABA synthesis pathway in midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Ick; Ganesan, Subhashree; Luo, Sarah X; Wu, Yu-Wei; Park, Esther; Huang, Eric J; Chen, Lu; Ding, Jun B

    2015-10-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons are an essential component of the basal ganglia circuitry, playing key roles in the control of fine movement and reward. Recently, it has been demonstrated that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter, is co-released by dopamine neurons. Here, we show that GABA co-release in dopamine neurons does not use the conventional GABA-synthesizing enzymes, glutamate decarboxylases GAD65 and GAD67. Our experiments reveal an evolutionarily conserved GABA synthesis pathway mediated by aldehyde dehydrogenase 1a1 (ALDH1a1). Moreover, GABA co-release is modulated by ethanol (EtOH) at concentrations seen in blood alcohol after binge drinking, and diminished ALDH1a1 leads to enhanced alcohol consumption and preference. These findings provide insights into the functional role of GABA co-release in midbrain dopamine neurons, which may be essential for reward-based behavior and addiction.

  9. New Tailor-Made Alkyl-Aldehyde Bifunctional Supports for Lipase Immobilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Carlos Alnoch

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Immobilized and stabilized lipases are important biocatalytic tools. In this paper, different tailor-made bifunctional supports were prepared for the immobilization of a new metagenomic lipase (LipC12. The new supports contained hydrophobic groups (different alkyl groups to promote interfacial adsorption of the lipase and aldehyde groups to react covalently with the amino groups of side chains of the adsorbed lipase. The best catalyst was 3.5-fold more active and 5000-fold more stable than the soluble enzyme. It was successfully used in the regioselective deacetylation of peracetylated d-glucal. The PEGylated immobilized lipase showed high regioselectivity, producing high yields of the C-3 monodeacetylated product at pH 5.0 and 4 °C.

  10. Reaction of benzoxasilocines with aromatic aldehydes: Synthesis of homopterocarpans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodríguez-García Ignacio

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Condensation of 2H-benzo[g][1,2]oxasilocines with aromatic aldehydes in the presence of boron trifluoride affords mixtures of cis/trans 2-phenyl-3-vinylchromans with moderate yields. These can be transformed into homopterocarpans, a synthetic group of substances homologous to the natural isoflavonoid pterocarpans.

  11. Lipid-derived aldehyde degradation under thermal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Rosario; Navarro, José L; Aguilar, Isabel; Hidalgo, Francisco J

    2015-05-01

    Nucleophilic degradation produced by reactive carbonyls plays a major role in food quality and safety. Nevertheless, these reactions are complex because reactive carbonyls are usually involved in various competitive reactions. This study describes the thermal degradation of 2-alkenals (2-pentenal and 2-octenal) and 2,4-alkadienals (2,4-heptadienal and 2,4-decadienal) in an attempt to both clarify the stability of aldehydes and determine new compounds that might also play a role in nucleophile/aldehyde reactions. The obtained results showed that alkenals and alkadienals decomposed rapidly in the presence of buffer and air to produce formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and the aldehydes corresponding to the breakage of the carboncarbon double bonds: propanal, hexanal, 2-pentenal, 2-octenal, glyoxal, and fumaraldehyde. The activation energy of double bond breakage was relatively low (∼ 25 kJ/mol) and the yield of alkanals (10-18%) was higher than that of 2-alkenals (∼ 1%). All these results indicate that these reactions should be considered in order to fully understand the range of nucleophile/aldehyde adducts produced.

  12. Acetic acid assisted cobalt methanesulfonate catalysed chemoselective diacetylation of aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Wang; Zhi Guo Song; Hong Gong; Heng Jiang

    2008-01-01

    Cobalt methanesulfonate in combination with acetic acid catalysed the chemoselective diacetylation of aldehyde with acetic anhydride at room temperature under solvent free conditions. After reaction, cobalt methanesulfonate can be easily recovered and mused many times. The reaction was mild and efficient with good to high yields.

  13. Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artavazd Badalyan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl. The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A “reagentless” biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10–150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1 of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13 for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer.

  14. VX-509 (Decernotinib)-Mediated CYP3A Time-Dependent Inhibition: An Aldehyde Oxidase Metabolite as a Perpetrator of Drug-Drug Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetterberg, Craig; Maltais, Francois; Laitinen, Leena; Liao, Shengkai; Tsao, Hong; Chakilam, Ananthsrinivas; Hariparsad, Niresh

    2016-08-01

    (R)-2-((2-(1H-pyrrolo[2,3-b]pyridin-3-yl)pyrimidin-4-yl)amino)-2-methyl-N-(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl)butanamide (VX-509, decernotinib) is an oral Janus kinase 3 inhibitor that has been studied in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis often receive multiple medications, such as statins and steroids, to manage the signs and symptoms of comorbidities, which increases the chances of drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Mechanism-based inhibition is a subset of time-dependent inhibition (TDI) and occurs when a molecule forms a reactive metabolite which irreversibly binds and inactivates drug-metabolizing enzymes, potentially increasing the systemic load to toxic concentrations. Traditionally, perpetrating compounds are screened using human liver microsomes (HLMs); however, this system may be inadequate when the precipitant is activated by a non-cytochrome P450 (P450)-mediated pathway. Even though studies assessing competitive inhibition and TDI using HLM suggested a low risk for CYP3A4-mediated DDI in the clinic, VX-509 increased the area under the curve of midazolam, atorvastatin, and methyl-prednisolone by approximately 12.0-, 2.7-, and 4.3-fold, respectively. Metabolite identification studies using human liver cytosol indicated that VX-509 is converted to an oxidative metabolite, which is the perpetrator of the DDIs observed in the clinic. As opposed to HLM, hepatocytes contain the full complement of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters and can be used to assess TDI arising from non-P450-mediated metabolic pathways. In the current study, we highlight the role of aldehyde oxidase in the formation of the hydroxyl-metabolite of VX-509, which is involved in clinically significant TDI-based DDIs and represents an additional example in which a system-dependent prediction of TDI would be evident.

  15. Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badalyan, Artavazd; Dierich, Marlen; Stiba, Konstanze; Schwuchow, Viola; Leimkühler, Silke; Wollenberger, Ulla

    2014-12-01

    Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below -0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl). The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A "reagentless" biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10-150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1) of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13) for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T) and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer.

  16. Antibiotics from basidiomycetes. 26. Phlebiakauranol aldehyde an antifungal and cytotoxic metabolite from Punctularia atropurpurascens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anke, H; Casser, I; Steglich, W; Pommer, E H

    1987-04-01

    Phlebiakauranol aldehyde and the corresponding alcohol were isolated from cultures of Punctularia atropurpurascens. The aldehyde but not the alcohol exhibited strong antifungal activity against several phytopathogens as well as antibacterial and cytotoxic activities. Two acetylated derivatives prepared from the aldehyde showed only very weak antifungal and antibacterial and moderate cytotoxic activities. We therefore assume, that the aldehyde group together with the high number of hydroxyl groups are responsible for the biological activity of the compound.

  17. Biodegradation of softwood lignin and guaiacylglycerol-beta-guiacyl ether by extracellular enzyme in shiitake Lentinus edodes (Berk) Sing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, T.; Senba, Y.; Ishikawa, H.

    1982-01-01

    In order to explain the biodegradation of softwood lignin by shiitake (Lentinus edodes Berk. Sing.), akamatsu (Pinus densiflora Sekb. and Zucc.) dioxane lignin (NDL) and guaicylglycerol-beta-guaiacyl ether (I) were degraded by extracellular enzyme from the NDL-contained potato and malt extracts cultures of shiitake TMI-563 and 655 at 25 degrees C for a prolonged period. The main results on the basis of a functional group analysis and gel-filtration of NDL before and after the enzymatic degradation showed that the degraded DL had a higher content of phenolic OH groups than sound lignin, whereas the methoxyl or aromatic aldehyde-yielding group content was lower in the degraded lignin. The main degradation products formed from I in a crude enzyme solution were guaiacol, guaiacylglycerol, guaiacylglycol-beta-guaiacyl ether (II), and guaiacoxyacetoguaiacone (III), although the polymer was formed at pH 4.0, which is the optimum pH of peroxidase and laccase. It also was clarified that the oxidative polymerization of NDL and I occurred preferably in a crude enzyme solution at pH 4.0, and that these compounds were degraded to lower molecular fragments at pH 6.8 under the same conditions. From the above results, it is suggested that softwood lignin is more effectively degraded by the other enzyme than polyphenoloxidase, such as laccase and peroxidase, in a crude enzyme solution of L. edodes. (Refs. 9).

  18. Identification and characterisation of Aedes aegypti aldehyde dehydrogenases involved in pyrethroid metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nongkran Lumjuan

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides, especially permethrin and deltamethrin, have been used extensively worldwide for mosquito control. However, insecticide resistance can spread through a population very rapidly under strong selection pressure from insecticide use. The upregulation of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH has been reported upon pyrethroid treatment. In Aedes aegypti, the increase in ALDH activity against the hydrolytic product of pyrethroid has been observed in DDT/permethrin-resistant strains. The objective of this study was to identify the role of individual ALDHs involved in pyrethroid metabolism.Three ALDHs were identified; two of these, ALDH9948 and ALDH14080, were upregulated in terms of both mRNA and protein levels in a DDT/pyrethroid-resistant strain of Ae. aegypti. Recombinant ALDH9948 and ALDH14080 exhibited oxidase activities to catalyse the oxidation of a permethrin intermediate, phenoxybenzyl aldehyde (PBald, to phenoxybenzoic acid (PBacid.ALDHs have been identified in association with permethrin resistance in Ae. aegypti. Characterisation of recombinant ALDHs confirmed the role of this protein in pyrethroid metabolism. Understanding the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of pyrethroid resistance provides information for improving vector control strategies.

  19. NADP-Dependent Aldehyde Dehydrogenase from Archaeon Pyrobaculum sp.1860: Structural and Functional Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Yu. Bezsudnova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the functional and structural characterization of the first archaeal thermostable NADP-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase AlDHPyr1147. In vitro, AlDHPyr1147 catalyzes the irreversible oxidation of short aliphatic aldehydes at 60–85°С, and the affinity of AlDHPyr1147 to the NADP+ at 60°С is comparable to that for mesophilic analogues at 25°С. We determined the structures of the apo form of AlDHPyr1147 (3.04 Å resolution, three binary complexes with the coenzyme (1.90, 2.06, and 2.19 Å, and the ternary complex with the coenzyme and isobutyraldehyde as a substrate (2.66 Å. The nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme is disordered in two binary complexes, while it is ordered in the ternary complex, as well as in the binary complex obtained after additional soaking with the substrate. AlDHPyr1147 structures demonstrate the strengthening of the dimeric contact (as compared with the analogues and the concerted conformational flexibility of catalytic Cys287 and Glu253, as well as Leu254 and the nicotinamide moiety of the coenzyme. A comparison of the active sites of AlDHPyr1147 and dehydrogenases characterized earlier suggests that proton relay systems, which were previously proposed for dehydrogenases of this family, are blocked in AlDHPyr1147, and the proton release in the latter can occur through the substrate channel.

  20. Alcohol dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene polymorphisms, alcohol intake and the risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrari, P.; McKay, J. D.; Jenab, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian populati......BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Heavy alcohol drinking is a risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC), but little is known on the effect of polymorphisms in the alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) on the alcohol-related risk of CRC in Caucasian...... populations.SUBJECTS/METHODS: A nested case-control study (1269 cases matched to 2107controls by sex, age, study centre and date of blood collection) was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) to evaluate the impact of rs1229984 (ADH1B), rs1573496 (ADH7...

  1. The enzymes associated with denitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the reduction of nitrogenous oxides are thought to be intermediates in denitrification processes. This review examines the roles of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductases, nitric oxide reductase, mechanisms of N-N bond formation, and nitrous oxide reductases.

  2. Abrogation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by alpha lipoic acid through ameliorating oxidative stress and enhancing gene expression of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Beshbishy, Hesham A; Bahashwan, Saleh A; Aly, Hamdy A A; Fakher, Hesham A

    2011-10-01

    Cisplatin is chemotherapeutic drug used in treatment of malignancies. However, its clinical utility is limited by nephrotoxicity. The purpose of present study is to investigate biochemical and molecular effects of alpha lipoic acid (ALA) to protect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Cisplatin (12 mg/kg/day) was administered i.p. for 4 days. Group of mice were given ALA (20 mg/kg/day) for 18 days. Another set were administered ALA for 4 days before and 14 days after cisplatin intoxication. The results obtained revealed that kidney/body weight ratio of cisplatin-treated mice was increased by +40%. ALA intake declined the ratio by -19%. Serum creatinine and urea levels were increased in cisplatin-treated mice by +375% and +69%, respectively. These changes were moved to normalcy upon ALA intake. Cisplatin treatment elevated malondialdehyde (MDA) by 27 fold and declined reduced glutathione (GSH) by -49%. Cisplatin decreased catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzymes by -47%, -49% and -59%, respectively. ALA decreased the MDA by -286% and increased the GSH, catalase, SOD and GPx levels by +60%, +81%, +90% and +38%, respectively. ALA increased mRNA expression of catalase, CuZn SOD and GPx genes near to normalcy compared to cisplatin-treated mice. Cisplatin-treated mice increased caspase-3-activity by +223%, nitric oxide (NO) by +74% and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by 10 fold. ALA intake declined these changes by -43%, -45% and -73%, respectively. ALA may play renoprotective role on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through antioxidant and antiapoptotic mechanisms combined with initiation of mRNA expression of antioxidant genes.

  3. Increment of antioxidase activity of transgenic tobacco with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the leaves of transgenic tobacco plants with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) gene was about 36% higher than that in the control plants (parent plants),activities of peroxi-dase (POD) and catalase (Cat) increased by about 62% and 88% respectively. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase (AsSPOD),dehydroascorbate redutase (DAsAR) and gluta-thione reductase (GR) in ascorbate-glutothion pathway lo-cated at chloroplasts increased by 67.7%,47.9% and 38.8% respectively. These results indicated that the H2O2 produced by SOD catalyzing superoxide anion radicals (O2- ) could be fully decomposed,and could not derive to form the strongest toxicant radicals ·OH. This is the first report to elucidate quantitatively that the activities of two kinds of antioxidative enzymes decomposed radicals and active oxygen were matched. Photoinhibition tolerant capacity of the transgenic tobacco plants was 35% higher than that in the parent plants. Increment of photoinhibition tolerant capacity in the trans-genic tobacco plants might be due to increment of antioxida-tive enzymes activities,in turn being able to more effectively scavenge active oxygen and radicals,protect organization and function of chloroplasts. These results showed that the increment of antioxidative enzymes activities in the trans-genic tobacco might be one of the reasons for the increment of resistance in the transgenic tobacco.

  4. Possible Involvement of Anti-Oxidant Enzymes in the Cross-Tolerance of the Germination/Growth of Wheat Seeds to Salinity and Heat Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-Bao LEI; Song-Quan SONG; Jia-Rui FU

    2005-01-01

    The germination/growth of wheat (Triticun aestivum L. cv. Zimai 1) seeds and changes in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and catalase (CAT), as well as in the content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), in response to salt and heat stress, as well as cross-stress, were investigated in the present study. With increasing temperature and decreasing water potential caused by NaC1 solution, the germination percentage of seeds and the fresh weight of seedlings decreased markedly, SOD activity increased, activities of APX and CAT decreased distinctly, and the TBARS content increased gradually. Seeds pretreated at 33 ℃ for different times displayed increased tolerance to subsequent salt stress, enhanced SOD, APX, and CAT activities, and decreased TBARS content. Seeds pretreated at -0.8 MPa NaC1 for different times displayed increased tolerance to subsequent heat stress and marked increases in SOD, APX, and CAT activities, which were associated with decreased TBARS content. It is considered that the common component in the cross-tolerance of the germination and growth of wheat seeds to salinity and heat stress is the anti-oxidant enzyme system.

  5. Effects of cocoa extract and dark chocolate on angiotensin-converting enzyme and nitric oxide in human endothelial cells and healthy volunteers--a nutrigenomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ingrid A L; Persson, Karin; Hägg, Staffan; Andersson, Rolf G G

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cocoa from the bean of Theobroma cacao L. has beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate if cocoa extract and dark chocolate influence angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) in human endothelial cells (in vitro) and in healthy volunteers (in vivo). ACE activity was analyzed with a commercial radioenzymatic assay and measured in human endothelial cells from umbilical veins (HUVEC) after 10 minutes of incubation with cocoa extract. NO was measured after 24 hours of incubation. ACE activity and NO were measured at baseline and after 30, 60, and 180 minutes in 16 healthy volunteers after a single intake of 75 g of dark chocolate containing 72% cocoa. Significant inhibition of ACE activity (P < 0.01) and significant increase of NO (P < 0.001) were seen in HUVEC. In the study subjects, a significant inhibition of ACE activity (mean 18%) 3 hours after intake of dark chocolate was seen, but no significant change in NO was seen. According to ACE genotype, significant inhibition of ACE activity was seen after 3 hours in individuals with genotype insertion/insertion and deletion/deletion (mean 21% and 28%, respectively). Data suggest that intake of dark chocolate containing high amount of cocoa inhibits ACE activity in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Unchanged content of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers and V˙O2 kinetics after intensified training in trained cyclists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Thomassen, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined if high intensity training (HIT) could increase the expression of oxidative enzymes in fast-twitch muscle fibers causing a faster oxygen uptake (V˙O2) response during intense (INT), but not moderate (MOD), exercise and reduce the V˙O2 slow component and muscle metabolic...... perturbation during INT. Pulmonary V˙O2 kinetics was determined in eight trained male cyclists (V˙O2-max: 59 ± 4 (means ± SD) mL min(-1) kg(-1)) during MOD (205 ± 12 W ~65% V˙O2-max) and INT (286 ± 17 W ~85% V˙O2-max) exercise before and after a 7-week HIT period (30-sec sprints and 4-min intervals) with a 50...... between MOD and INT. Muscle creatine phosphate was lower (42 ± 15 vs. 66 ± 17 mmol kg DW(-1)) and muscle lactate was higher (40 ± 18 vs. 14 ± 5 mmol kg DW(-1)) at 6 min of INT (P training with a volume reduction did not increase the content...

  7. Oral administration of Nigella sativa oil ameliorates the effect of cisplatin on membrane enzymes, carbohydrate metabolism and oxidative damage in rat liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeba Farooqui

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CP is a potent anti-cancer drug widely used against solid tumors. However, it exhibits pronounced adverse effects including hepatotoxicity. Several strategies were attempted to prevent CP hepatotoxicity but were not found suitable for therapeutic application. Nigella sativa has been shown to prevent/reduce the progression of certain type of cardiovascular, kidney and liver diseases. Present study investigates whether N. sativa oil (NSO can prevent CP induced hepatotoxic effects. Rats were divided into four groups viz. control, CP, NSO and CPNSO. Animals in CPNSO and NSO group were administered NSO (2 ml/kg bwt, orally with or without single hepatotoxic dose of CP (6 mg/kg bwt, i.p. respectively. CP hepatotoxicity was recorded by increased serum ALT and AST activities. CP treatment caused oxidant/antioxidant imbalances as reflected by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. Furthermore, the activities of various carbohydrate metabolism and membrane enzymes were altered by CP treatment. In contrast, NSO administration to CP treated rats, markedly ameliorated the CP elicited deleterious alterations in liver. Histopathological observations showed extensive liver damage in CP treated animals while greatly reduced tissue injury in CPNSO group. In conclusion, NSO appears to protect CP induced hepatotoxicity by improving energy metabolism and strengthening antioxidant defense mechanism.

  8. Sulfhydryl angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor promotes endothelial cell survival through nitric-oxide synthase, fibroblast growth factor-2, and telomerase cross-talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnini, Sandra; Terzuoli, Erika; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2010-03-01

    The protective effect exerted by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) in cardiovascular diseases caused by endothelial injury and aging has been attributed to the restoration of endothelial cell functions. Recently, we demonstrated a central role of the fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)/FGF receptor-1 system in mediating the acquisition of an angiogenic phenotype in coronary microvascular endothelium exposed to ACEI. Here, we report on the rescuing effect of ACEI on impaired endothelium and the intracellular signaling mechanisms that lead endothelial cells to enter apoptosis and to senesce. Conditions mimicking pathological cell damage (serum deprivation) lead to endothelial apoptosis as evidenced by increased caspase-3 activity. ACEI enhanced cell survival through activation of prosurvival and antiaging signals involving Akt phosphorylation, endothelial nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and activation, FGF-2 and telomerase catalytic subunit (TERT) up-regulation, and delayed senescence. In microvascular endothelial cells exposed to ACEI, Akt/eNOS pathway-dependent FGF-2 was necessary for gene transcription of TERT. These protective effects were particularly evident for sulfhydryl-containing ACEI (zofenoprilat), which were reported to exhibit potent antioxidant effects. In conclusion, ACEI with antioxidant properties up-regulate eNOS, FGF-2, and TERT mRNA, which favor endothelial cell survival and prolong their lifespan, thus restoring endothelial cell functions after vascular damage. These effects could explain the beneficial effects of these drugs in various cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial injury and aging.

  9. Prevalence and mechanism of polyunsaturated aldehydes production in the green tide forming macroalgal genus Ulva (Ulvales, Chlorophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsufyani, Taghreed; Engelen, Aschwin H; Diekmann, Onno E; Kuegler, Stefan; Wichard, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Lipoxygenase/hydroperoxide lyase mediated transformations convert polyunsaturated fatty acids into various oxylipins. First, lipoxygenases catalyze fatty acid oxidation to fatty acid hydroperoxides. Subsequently, breakdown reactions result in a wide array of metabolites with multiple physiological and ecological functions. These fatty acid transformations are highly diverse in marine algae and play a crucial rule in e.g., signaling, chemical defense, and stress response often mediated through polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs). In this study, green tide-forming macroalgae of the genius Ulva (Chlorophyta) were collected at various sampling sites in the lagoon of the Ria Formosa (Portugal) and were surveyed for PUAs. We demonstrated that sea-lettuce like but not tube-like morphotypes produce elevated amounts of volatile C10-polyunsaturated aldehydes (2,4,7-decatrienal and 2,4-decadienal) upon tissue damage. Moreover, morphogenetic and phylogenetic analyses of the collected Ulva species revealed chemotaxonomic significance of the perspective biosynthetic pathways. The aldehydes are derived from omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) with 20 or 18 carbon atoms including eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 n-3), arachidonic acid (C20:4 n-6), stearidonic acid (C18:4 n-3), and γ-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-6). We present first evidences that lipoxygenase-mediated (11-LOX and 9-LOX) eicosanoid and octadecanoid pathways catalyze the transformation of C20- and C18-polyunsaturated fatty acids into PUAs and concomitantly into short chain hydroxylated fatty acids.

  10. Interactions Between Exogenous Bt Insecticidal Protein and Cotton Terpenoid Aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yong-jun; GUO Yu-yuan; WU Kong-ming; WANG Wu-gang

    2002-01-01

    The contents of terpenoid aldehydes in Bt transgenic cotton and their non-Bt parental varieties were analyzed by the HPLC method. Statistical analysis of variance showed that Bt insecticidal protein Bt-ICP expression has no negative effect on the synthesis of gossypol, total heliocides and total resistant terpenoids.The results of the combined dosage test of Bt-ICP and gossypoi in vitro showed that there is no interaction between gossypol and Bt-ICP on the mortality of cotton boilworm larvae Helicoverpa armigera (Hubnner). It is indicated that the actions of Bt-ICP and gossypol on cotton bollworm are additive. Therefore, it is advantageous to combine Bt-ICP with cotton terpenoid aldehydes in controlling cotton bollworm.

  11. Integrated engineering of β-oxidation reversal and ω-oxidation pathways for the synthesis of medium chain ω-functionalized carboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clomburg, James M; Blankschien, Matthew D; Vick, Jacob E; Chou, Alexander; Kim, Seohyoung; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2015-03-01

    An engineered reversal of the β-oxidation cycle was exploited to demonstrate its utility for the synthesis of medium chain (6-10-carbons) ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids from glycerol as the only carbon source. A redesigned β-oxidation reversal facilitated the production of medium chain carboxylic acids, which were converted to ω-hydroxyacids and dicarboxylic acids by the action of an engineered ω-oxidation pathway. The selection of a key thiolase (bktB) and thioesterase (ydiI) in combination with previously established core β-oxidation reversal enzymes, as well as the development of chromosomal expression systems for the independent control of pathway enzymes, enabled the generation of C6-C10 carboxylic acids and provided a platform for vector based independent expression of ω-functionalization enzymes. Using this approach, the expression of the Pseudomonas putida alkane monooxygenase system, encoded by alkBGT, in combination with all β-oxidation reversal enzymes resulted in the production of 6-hydroxyhexanoic acid, 8-hydroxyoctanoic acid, and 10-hydroxydecanoic acid. Following identification and characterization of potential alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases, chnD and chnE from Acinetobacter sp. strain SE19 were expressed in conjunction with alkBGT to demonstrate the synthesis of the C6-C10 dicarboxylic acids, adipic acid, suberic acid, and sebacic acid. The potential of a β-oxidation cycle with ω-oxidation termination pathways was further demonstrated through the production of greater than 0.8 g/L C6-C10 ω-hydroxyacids or about 0.5 g/L dicarboxylic acids of the same chain lengths from glycerol (an unrelated carbon source) using minimal media.

  12. Evaluation of milk enzymes and electrolytes, plasma metabolites, and oxidative status in twin cows milked in an automatic milking system or twice daily in a conventional milking parlor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeni, F; Terzano, M G; Speroni, M; Migliorati, L; Capelletti, M; Calza, F; Bianchi, L; Pirlo, G

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this paper was to evaluate the effects of automatic milking (AM) on milk enzymes and minerals related to mammary epithelial integrity in comparison with twice-daily conventional milking (CM). One cow from each of 6 pairs of twins was assigned to be milked with AM or with CM throughout first lactation. Milk production was recorded and milk samples were collected at 4, 11, 18, 25, 32, and 39 wk of lactation (WOL) to determine fat and protein content, somatic cell count, pH, plasminogen (pl) and plasmin (Pl) activities, Na, K, and Cl. Body condition score was monitored; blood samples were collected to determine energy-related metabolites in the first third of lactation (14 WOL), and plasma oxidative status throughout lactation. Overall mean and standard deviation of milking frequency (MF) in AM were 2.69 and 0.88, respectively. Milk production, fat and protein contents, and somatic cell count did not differ between milking systems. The pl and pl+Pl activities were lesser in AM than in CM. Milk pH was greater in AM than in CM. Milk Na, K, Na/K ratio, and Cl did not differ across the whole lactation. Milk pH had a positive correlation with milk Pl activity (r = 0.41), Na (r = 0.37), and Cl (r = 0.40) concentration, and negative correlation with the log(10) of pl/Pl ratio (r = -0.47). The milk Na/K ratio had a positive correlation (r = 0.55) with milk Pl activity. Milking system (MS) did not seem to affect mammary epithelial permeability. The differences in enzymatic (proteolytic) activity due to the MS, probably related to daily MF, lead one to suppose that the quality of the protein fraction for the cheese-making process was preserved better with AM than with CM, even if differences in pH might negatively interfere. No difference was detected in BCS, and in plasma concentration of triglycerides and nonesterified fatty acids, whereas plasma cholesterol concentration during the first 10 WOL was lesser in AM than CM. Oxidative status, measured by plasma

  13. Protective effects of a wheat germ rich diet against the toxic influence of profenofos on rat tissue lipids and oxidative pentose phosphate shunt enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Rahim, G. A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of technical and formulated forms of profenofos on the metabolic lipid fractions of the liver, brain and kidneys as well as the activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD and 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase (6PGD, which consider lipid related enzymes, were studied. The two forms of profenofos were given separately either orally or by dermal at doses of 1/20 LD50 for 3 months (one dose every 48 h. Total lipids and lipid fractions (cholesterol, triglycerides and phospholipid contents decreased in the three studied organ tissues either in technical or formulated profenofos-induced rats compared with normal control animals. The highest effect was observed in the case of orally formulated profenofo induction, and the lowest was detected for the dermal technical one. The same trend was found in the activities of G6PD and 6PGD associated with lipid metabolism in the liver, brain and kidney tissues under the same conditions. On other hand, the treatment of profenofos-induced animals by feeding a wheat germ rich diet (as antioxidant agent produced significant improvements in both lipid fraction content and enzyme activity. In addition, the effects of the wheat germ rich diet (α-tocopherol rich source readjusted and improved the disturbed metabolic fractions of the lipid profiles in the profenofos-induced rats as well as their related enzyme activities (G6PD and 6PGD: oxidative pentose phosphate shunt.

    El efecto de formas técnicas o formuladas de profenofós en la fracción lipídica metabólica de hígado, cerebro y riñones así como la actividad de la glucosa-6-fosfato deshidrogenasa (G6PD y 6-fosfogluconato deshidrogenasa (6PGD, que son consideradas enzimas relacionadas con los lípidos, fueron estudiadas. Ambas formas de profenofós fueron suministradas separadamente tanto por vía oral como cutánea a una dosis de 1/20 LD50 durante 3 meses (una dosis cada 48 horas. Los lípidos totales y

  14. Alpha lipoic acid protects lens from H2O2-induced cataract by inhibiting apoptosis of lens epithelial cells and inducing activation of anti-oxidative enzymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Li; Ya-Zhen Liu; Jing-Ming Shi; Song-Bai Jia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether alpha lipoic acid (LA) can effectively protect lenses from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced cataract. Methods: Lens from adult Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured in 24-well plates and treated without or with 0.2 mM of H2O2, 0.2 mM of H2O2 plus 0.5 mM, 1.0 mM, or 2.0 mM of LA for 24 h. Cataract was assessed using cross line grey scale measurement. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione (GSH-Px), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and malondialdehyde (MDA) activity or level in lens homogenates was measured. Apoptosis of lens epithelial cells in each group were detected by Terminal Deoxynucleotidyl Transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling (TUNEL) Assay. Results: A total of 0.2 mM of H2O2 induced obvious cataract formation and apoptosis in lens’ epithelial cells, but 0.5-2.0 mM of LA could block the effect of 0.2 mM H2O2 in inducing cataract and apoptosis. Furthermore, 0.2 mM of H2O2 significantly decreased SOD, GSH-Px, and LDH activity and significant increased MDA level in the lens, but 0.5-2.0 mM of LA blocked the effect of 0.2 mM H2O2. One mM of LA was found to be the most effective. Conclusions: LA can protect lens from H2O2-induced cataract. LA exerts protective effects through inhibition of lens’ epithelial cell apoptosis and activation of anti-oxidative enzymes.

  15. Phenol-oxidizing enzyme expression in Lentinula edodes by the addition of sawdust extract, aromatic compounds, or copper in liquid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanesaka, Eiji; Takeda, Hironori; Yoshida, Motonobu

    2013-01-01

    This study examined how the addition of a sawdust extract from Castanopsis cuspidata, several aromatic compounds, and copper affected the expression of a phenol-oxidizing enzyme in the white-rot basidiomycete, Lentinula edodes. Compared to liquid media that had not been supplemented with sawdust extract (MYPG), MYPG containing low (MYPG-S100) or high (MYPG-S500) concentrations of sawdust extract had a marked effect on the promotion of mycelial growth. No manganese peroxidase (MnP) production was observed in either MYPG or MYPG-S100 media until 35 days after inoculation. However, MnP production was enhanced by culture in MYPG-S500, with a marked increase observed suddenl