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Sample records for alcoholic pancreatitis pathogenesis

  1. Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Pathogenesis, Incidence and Treatment with Special Reference to the Associated Pain

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    Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic pancreatitis continues to stir up controversy. One of the most debated points is whether from onset it is a chronic disease or whether it progresses to a chronic form after repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. Histological studies on patients with alcoholic pancreatitis have shown that the disease is chronic from onset and that alcoholic acute pancreatitis occurs in a pancreas already damaged by chronic lesions. Genetic factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic disease. The incidence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis seems to have decreased in the last twenty years. Finally, recent therapeutic studies which have shown medical or surgical approaches capable of reducing the pain episodes in chronic pancreatitis patients will be described.

  2. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

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    Wang, Guo-Jun; Gao, Chun-Fang; Wei, Dong; Wang, Cun; Ding, Si-Qin

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hype...

  3. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

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    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  4. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

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    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  5. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

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    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  6. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  7. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V; Feick, Peter

    2010-01-01

    In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated. PMID:20617020

  8. The role of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

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    Hegyi, Peter; Rakonczay, Zoltan

    2015-07-01

    Pancreatic ducts secrete 2.5 l of alkaline, HCO3(-)-rich fluid daily which greatly contributes to the homeostasis of the pancreas. Ducts are also important in the pathophysiology of the pancreas; alteration of ductal function can lead to severe diseases such as cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis. The role of pancreatic ducts in the development of acute pancreatitis has only been uncovered recently. Pancreatitis inducing agents like bile acids and ethanol dose-dependently affect pancreatic ductal secretion; low concentrations stimulate, whereas high concentrations inhibit secretion. The majority of the review will focus on the central role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a critical protein in the regulation of ductal secretion, in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis which is highlighted by numerous investigations. Downregulation of CFTR expression results in increased severity of acute pancreatitis in mice. Furthermore, human genetic studies have demonstrated statistically significant association of CFTR mutations with acute recurrent pancreatitis. Overall, the data support the involvement of pancreatic ducts in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Pancreatic lithiasis and intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm with special reference to the pathogenesis of lithiasis.

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    Kimura, Wataru

    2010-11-01

    In pancreatic lithiasis in elderly autopsy cases, the stones are small and the pancreatic duct is changed very slightly when viewed by simple X-ray film, pancreatic ductography and gross appearance. Histologically, a slight fibrous increase is seen very locally, but findings consistent with chronic pancreatitis are not found throughout the whole pancreas. However, marked, diffuse and irregular dilatation of the pancreatic duct is frequently found in operative cases with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic stones. These findings show that the changes seen with aging and with chronic pancreatitis can be distinguished based on the findings of pancreatic ductography. Mucin production in epithelia in intraductal papillary-mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) may not be strongly associated with the pathogenesis of pancreatic lithiasis. Pancreatic lithiasis may be related to squamous cell metaplasia. IPMN and dilatation of the pancreatic duct are closely associated with mucin production. An increase in intraductal pressure of the pancreatic duct may be somewhat related to the mechanism of stone formation. The incidental co-existence of pancreatic epithelia with pancreatic lithiasis in patients with chronic pancreatitis and the development of IPMN may also be possible. IPMN and pancreatic lithiasis may be related through the mechanism(s) of their pathogenesis, their synergism and the pathogenesis of stone formation. The relation between mucinous metaplasia and stone formation is slight and, therefore, there may be only a weak correlation between IPMN and pancreatic stones. This may explain why there are few reports of the co-existence of IPMN and pancreatic stones (Kimura in Kan Tan Sui 58:485-492, 2009).

  10. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

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    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis: Effect of Antioxidant Therapy

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    Robles, Lourdes; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Ichii, Hirohito

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The exact pathogenesis of pancreatitis remains unknown but several mechanisms related to oxidative and inflammatory stress are implicated. It is reasonable to surmise that antioxidants would play a protective role in ameliorating the deleterious effects of pancreatitis. We have a wealth of data from animal models that reveal a positive correlation between antioxidant drugs and improved outcomes in experimental...

  12. ALCOHOLIC CARDIOMYOPATHY: BASIC ASPECTS OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, PATHOGENESIS AND PHARMACOTHERAPY

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    A. O. Yusupova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Data on the epidemiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic cardiomyopathy (ACMP are presented. Special aspects of clinical manifestations as well as management of these patients are considered. Psychotropic therapy aimed at reduction in motivation to alcohol consumption in patients with ACMP is discussed separately.

  13. Hospital contacts with alcohol problems prior to liver cirrhosis or pancreatitis diagnosis

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    Askgaard, Gro; Neermark, Søren; Leon, David A.

    2017-01-01

    AIM To evaluate prior hospital contacts with alcohol problems in patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis and pancreatitis. METHODS This was a register-based study of all patients diagnosed with alcoholic liver cirrhosis or pancreatitis during 2008-2012 in Denmark. Hospital contacts with alcohol p...... alcoholic liver cirrhosis or pancreatitis with preventive interventions in the hospital setting....

  14. Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis: A quality of life study

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    Simone Carla BENINCÁ; Angelica de Freitas MELHEM; Renato Duffles MARTINS; Ermelindo Della LIBERA JÚNIOR

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the quality of life between patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and controls, and between diabetic and non-diabetic patients, correlating clinical, sociodemographic, and nutritional factors with their quality of life scores. Methods: Forty-three outpatients of the pancreas and biliary tract clinic diagnosed with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis were assessed. Quality of life was measured by the Brazilian version of the Short Form-36. The control group c...

  15. Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis: A quality of life study

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    Simone Carla BENINCÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the quality of life between patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and controls, and between diabetic and non-diabetic patients, correlating clinical, sociodemographic, and nutritional factors with their quality of life scores. Methods: Forty-three outpatients of the pancreas and biliary tract clinic diagnosed with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis were assessed. Quality of life was measured by the Brazilian version of the Short Form-36. The control group consisted of 43 healthy companions. Nutritional status was classified according to body mass index and triceps, biceps, suprailiac, and subscapular skinfold thicknesses, using the appropriate methods. The percentage of body fat was given by adding the four skinfold thicknesses and by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The statistical tests included the Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman's correlation tests, with the significance level set at p<0.05. Results: The sociodemographic variables of the case and control groups did not differ. Quality of life was lower in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients than in controls. The only quality of life domain that differed between diabetics and non-diabetics was functional capacity, lower in diabetics (p=0.022. Smoking duration, alcohol intake in grams, and time since pancreatic surgery correlated negatively with the quality of life of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients. Old age, skinfold thicknesses, and percentage of body fat correlated positively with quality of life. Conclusion: Quality of life is low in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients because of the negative influence of certain factors, such as smoking duration, amount of alcohol consumed, and time since pancreatic surgery.

  16. Microsatellite Scan Identifies New Candidate Genes for Susceptibility to Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis in Japanese Patients

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    Kei Kitahara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is one of the most common risk factor for chronic pancreatitis, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify genes that contribute to susceptibility or resistance for alcoholic chronic pancreatitis by screening the whole genome. Sixty-five patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (63 men and 2 women, mean age 55.2 years and 99 healthy Japanese controls were enrolled in this study. This was an association study using 400 polymorphic microsatellite markers with an average spacing of 10.8 cM distributed throughout the whole genome. This search revealed 10 candidate susceptibility regions and 5 candidate resistant regions throughout the genome. No specific microsatellite markers were detected in association with previously reported susceptibility genes for chronic pancreatitis, such as PRSS1, PRSS2, CTRC, SPINK1, CFTR, ALDH2, and CYP2E1. Among the statistically significant markers, D15S1007 on chromosome 15q14 showed strong evidence for disease susceptibility (70.8% vs. 35.1%, Pc = 0.0001. Within 500 kb of D15S1007, several genes were candidate genes for susceptibility, including FMN1, DKFZP686C2281, LOC440268, RYR3, and AVEN, This study identified 10 candidate susceptibility and 5 candidate resistant regions that may contain genes involved in ACP pathogenesis.

  17. Pathogenesis of Cardiac Depression in Acute Destructive Pancreatitis

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    A. V. Ershov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to identify the pathogenic factors for progression of pancreatogenic cardiac failure in the nearest and remote periods.Materials and methods. The study was carried out on 130 male Wistar rats (292±4.0 g divided into 4 groups. The animals were anesthetized with ethyl ether. Acute destructive pancreatitis was simulated in three experimental groups by infusion of bile (0.15 ml/kg body weight taken from the bile duct into the pancreatic tissue. The isolated isovolumically contracting rat heart (according to E. L. Fallen et al was simulated 24 hours, 7 days and 1 month after the bile infusion. The pressure in the left ventricle was measured by electric manometer BMT and registered along with the first derivative at the device N3384P calculating the systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and the speed of contraction and relaxation. At the same time the perfusate samples passed through the coronary arteries were har vested, and aspartate aminotransferase (AST and glucose were determined by standard methods. To identify the cardiac depression, the high contraction rhythm and hypercalcemic and hypoxic perfusion were applied.Results. It was found that in acute destructive pancreatitis the power and speed parameters of the heart con tractile function were altered that led to lowering the systolic blood pressure and velocity of contraction and relax ation of the left ventricular myocardium and increased diastolic blood pressure as an indicator of cardyomyocyte contracture rate. These abnormalities were evidently manifested in increased heartbits, including hypercalcemic and hypoxic perfusion of the isolated hearts. Glucose consumption was raised per each mmHg generated by the ventricular pressure.Conclusion. the most significant pathogenetic factors of pancreatogenic heart failure include hypoxia, car diomyocyte membrane destruction, inhibition of sarcolemma Capump, sarcoplasmic reticulum, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The maximum depression

  18. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

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    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  19. Acute alcohol-induced pancreatic injury is similar with intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration.

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    Schneider, Lutz; Dieckmann, Ralf; Hackert, Thilo; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Werner, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Five percent of alcoholics develop an acute pancreatitis (AP). The mechanism leading to pancreatic injury is not yet understood. Microcirculatory disorders seem to play a pivotal role. The objective of this study was to compare alcoholic pancreatic injury in response to intravenous and intragastric routes of alcohol administration. Alcohol was applied in rats intravenously (IV) or gastric via a surgical implanted feeding tube (IG). Serum alcohol concentration was maintained between 1.5‰ and 2.5‰. Four subgroups (n = 6/group) were examined in the IV/IG arm and compared with healthy controls. Pancreatic microcirculation, enzyme levels, and morphological damage were assessed after 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Microcirculatory analysis showed significantly disturbed pancreatic perfusion and increased adherent leukocytes in IV and IG animals. In IV and IG groups, serum amylase was increased without morphological signs of AP compared with healthy controls. Alcohol application does not induce AP in rodents, but impairs pancreatic microcirculation irrespectively of the application route. Intravenous application is commonly used and shows no disadvantages compared with the physiological intragastric application form. Therefore, the intravenous route offers a valid model, which mimics the physiological process for further studies of the influence of acute alcohol intoxication on the pancreas.

  20. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis

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    Brambs, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  1. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

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    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate...... the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP)....

  2. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

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    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  3. Role of Protein Quality Control Failure in Alcoholic Hepatitis Pathogenesis.

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    French, Samuel W; Masouminia, Maryam; Samadzadeh, Sara; Tillman, Brittany C; Mendoza, Alejandro; French, Barbara A

    2017-02-08

    The mechanisms of protein quality control in hepatocytes in cases of alcoholic hepatitis (AH) including ufmylation, FAT10ylation, metacaspase 1 (Mca1), ERAD (endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation), JUNQ (juxta nuclear quality control), IPOD (insoluble protein deposit) autophagocytosis, and ER stress are reviewed. The Mallory-Denk body (MDB) formation develops in the hepatocytes in alcoholic hepatitis as a consequence of the failure of these protein quality control mechanisms to remove misfolded and damaged proteins and to prevent MDB aggresome formation within the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. The proteins involved in the quality control pathways are identified, quantitated, and visualized by immunofluorescent antibody staining of liver biopsies from patients with AH. Quantification of the proteins are achieved by measuring the fluorescent intensity using a morphometric system. Ufmylation and FAT10ylation pathways were downregulated, Mca1 pathways were upregulated, autophagocytosis was upregulated, and ER stress PERK (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase) and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein) mechanisms were upregulated. Despite the upregulation of several pathways of protein quality control, aggresomes (MDBs) still formed in the hepatocytes in AH. The pathogenesis of AH is due to the failure of protein quality control, which causes balloon-cell change with MDB formation and ER stress.

  4. Role of Protein Quality Control Failure in Alcoholic Hepatitis Pathogenesis

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    Samuel W. French

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of protein quality control in hepatocytes in cases of alcoholic hepatitis (AH including ufmylation, FAT10ylation, metacaspase 1 (Mca1, ERAD (endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation, JUNQ (juxta nuclear quality control, IPOD (insoluble protein deposit autophagocytosis, and ER stress are reviewed. The Mallory–Denk body (MDB formation develops in the hepatocytes in alcoholic hepatitis as a consequence of the failure of these protein quality control mechanisms to remove misfolded and damaged proteins and to prevent MDB aggresome formation within the cytoplasm of hepatocytes. The proteins involved in the quality control pathways are identified, quantitated, and visualized by immunofluorescent antibody staining of liver biopsies from patients with AH. Quantification of the proteins are achieved by measuring the fluorescent intensity using a morphometric system. Ufmylation and FAT10ylation pathways were downregulated, Mca1 pathways were upregulated, autophagocytosis was upregulated, and ER stress PERK (protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase and CHOP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein mechanisms were upregulated. In conclusion: Despite the upregulation of several pathways of protein quality control, aggresomes (MDBs still formed in the hepatocytes in AH. The pathogenesis of AH is due to the failure of protein quality control, which causes balloon-cell change with MDB formation and ER stress.

  5. Pentoxifylline Treatment in Acute Pancreatitis (AP)

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    2018-02-21

    Acute Pancreatitis (AP); Gallstone Pancreatitis; Alcoholic Pancreatitis; Post-ERCP/Post-procedural Pancreatitis; Trauma Acute Pancreatitis; Hypertriglyceridemia Acute Pancreatitis; Idiopathic (Unknown) Acute Pancreatitis; Medication Induced Acute Pancreatitis; Cancer Acute Pancreatitis; Miscellaneous (i.e. Acute on Chronic Pancreatitis)

  6. The incidence of acute pancreatitis: impact of social deprivation, alcohol consumption, seasonal and demographic factors1

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    Roberts, SE; Akbari, A; Thorne, K; Atkinson, M; Evans, PA

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of acute pancreatitis has increased sharply in many European countries and the USA in recent years. Aim To establish trends in incidence and mortality for acute pancreatitis in Wales, UK, and to assess how incidence may be linked to factors including social deprivation, seasonal effects and alcohol consumption. Methods Use of record linked inpatient, mortality and primary care data for 10 589 hospitalised cases of acute pancreatitis between 1999 and 2010. Results The incidence of acute pancreatitis was 30.0 per 100 000 population overall, mortality was 6.4% at 60 days. Incidence increased significantly from 27.6 per 100 000 in 1999 to 36.4 in 2010 (average annual increase = 2.7% per year), there was little trend in mortality (0.2% average annual reduction). The largest increases in incidence were among women aged acute pancreatitis and 1.5 for gallstone acute pancreatitis). Acute pancreatitis was increased significantly during the Christmas and New Year weeks by 48% (95% CI = 24–77%) for alcoholic aetiology, but not for gallstone aetiology (9%). Alcoholic admissions were increased with higher consumption of spirits and beer, but not wine. Conclusions The study shows an elevated rate of alcoholic acute pancreatitis during the Christmas and New Year period. Acute pancreatitis continues to rise, most rapidly for young women, while alcoholic acute pancreatitis is linked strongly with social deprivation. PMID:23859492

  7. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol.

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    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S; Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu, Hai; Boor, Paul J; Ansari, G A Shakeel

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH(-)) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH(-) and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH(+)) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼1.5-fold greater in ADH(-) vs. ADH(+) deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH(-) deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH - ) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH - and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH + ) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼ 1.5-fold greater in ADH - vs. ADH + deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH - deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  9. Implications for the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. Explore the possibility that increased gastrointestinal alcohol production may play a role in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in patients with the metabolic syndrome. Methods. Blood, urine and breath levels of alcohol measured in 20 patients with the metabolic syndrome were compared with those of ...

  10. Pathogenesis of Metastatic Calcification and Acute Pancreatitis in Adult T-Cell Leukemia under Hypercalcemic State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masachika Senba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL. Hypercalcemia is common in patients with ATL. These patients rarely develop metastatic calcification and acute pancreatitis. The underlying pathogenesis of this condition is osteoclast hyperactivity with associated overproduction of parathyroid hormone-related protein, which results in hypercalcemia in association with bone demineralization. The discovery of the osteoclast differentiation factor receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL, its receptor RANK, and its decoy receptor osteoprotegerin (OPG, enhanced our understanding of the mechanisms of ATL-associated hypercalcemia. Macrophage inflammatory protein-1-α, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1, and interleukin-6 are important molecules that enhance the migration and differentiation of osteoclasts and the associated enhanced production of RANKL for osteoblast formation. In this paper, we focus on metastatic calcification and acute pancreatitis in ATL, highlighting recent advances in the understanding of the molecular role of the RANKL/RANK/OPG system including its interaction with various cytokines and calciotropic hormones in the regulation of osteoclastogenesis for bone resorption in hypercalcemic ATL patients.

  11. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  12. Pancreatic morphological changes in long-term follow-up after initial episode of acute alcoholic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Jussi; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Räty, Sari; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Lappalainen-Lehto, Riitta; Järvinen, Satu; Seppänen, Hanna; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani

    2014-01-01

    The long-term morphological changes induced by a single episode of alcoholic pancreatitis are not known. Our aim was to study these morphological changes in secretin-stimulated magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (S-MRCP) after the first episode of alcohol-associated acute pancreatitis and to evaluate the risk factors and possible protective factors potentially associated with later chronic findings. We have previously reported 2-year follow-up results in pancreatic morphology. This study extends the follow-up to 9 years. In this prospective follow-up study, S-MRCP imaging was performed for 44 (41 M, 3 F; mean age, 46 (25-68) years) patients after their first episode of alcohol-associated pancreatitis. Pancreatic morphology was evaluated at 3 months and at 2, 7, and 9 years after hospitalization. Recurrent attacks of pancreatitis were studied and pancreatic function was monitored by laboratory tests. Patients' alcohol consumption was evaluated with questionnaires, laboratory markers, and self-estimated alcohol consumption via interview. Smoking and body mass index were annually recorded. At 3 months, 32 % of the patients had normal findings in S-MRCP, 52 % had acute, and 16 % had chronic changes. At 7 years, S-MRCP was performed on 36 patients with normal findings in 53 %, the rest (47 %) having chronic findings. Pancreatic cyst was present in 36 %, parenchymal changes in 28 %, and atrophy in 28 % of the cases. There were no new changes in the pancreas in the attending patients between 7 and 9 years (18 patients). Of the patients with only acute findings at 3 months, 60 % resolved to normal in 7 years, but the rest (40 %) showed chronic changes later on. The initial attack was mild in 65 %, moderate in 25 %, and severe in 10 % of the patients. Patients with mild first attack had fewer chronic changes at 7 years compared to patients with moderate or moderate and severe together (p = 0.03, p = 0.01). Of the patients in the

  13. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis : Clinical significance and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Knegt, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a form of liver disease resembling alcoholic liver disease in a patient who does not consume significant amounts of alcohol. Since its first description in 1980 it has been recognized with increasing frequency. The natural course is relatively benign, but

  14. The Long-term Prospective Follow-up of Pancreatic Function After the First Episode of Acute Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Recurrence Predisposes One to Pancreatic Dysfunction and Pancreatogenic Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikkola, Jussi; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Lahtela, Jorma; Seppänen, Hanna; Järvinen, Satu; Nordback, Isto; Sand, Juhani

    2017-02-01

    Data on the prevalence of pancreatic dysfunction after an episode of acute pancreatitis are conflicting. Our aim was to evaluate the natural course of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function in the long-term follow-up after the first episode of acute alcoholic pancreatitis (AAP). A total of 77 patients who survived their first episode of AAP between January 2001 and February 2005 were prospectively followed up for a maximum of 13 years. During the follow-up, patients were repeatedly interviewed and monitored for recurrences, new diabetes, and chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatic function was evaluated repeatedly during the follow-up. Of the patients, 35% had ≥1 recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) episodes during the follow-up. New pancreatogenic diabetes developed in 19% of the previously nondiabetic patients, but only in patients with RAP (13/26 vs. 0/42; OR=39; 95% CI, 4.6-327.1). In addition, 55% of the patients developed new prediabetes or diabetes, and even this was more frequent in patients with RAP (86% vs. 42%; OR=8.2; 95% CI, 1.2-54.3). Exocrine dysfunction developed in 24% of the patients and was associated with abnormal findings in the endocrine function (P=0.003). Patients with RAP had a higher overall mortality compared with patients without RAP episodes during the follow-up (36% vs. 13%; HR=4.0; 95% CI, 1.4-11.0). The risk for pancreatic endocrine dysfunction, pancreatogenic diabetes and mortality increases significantly if the patient has recurrent episodes of AAP. The risk of developing pancreatic dysfunction after AAP should be recognized and pancreatic function should be screened routinely during the years after the first episode of AAP.

  15. The Burden of Systemic Adiposity on Pancreatic Disease: Acute Pancreatitis, Non-Alcoholic Fatty Pancreas Disease, and Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malli, Ahmad; Li, Feng; Conwell, Darwin L; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Hussan, Hisham; Krishna, Somashekar G

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic as recognized by the World Health Organization. Obesity and its related comorbid conditions were recognized to have an important role in a multitude of acute, chronic, and critical illnesses including acute pancreatitis, nonalcoholic fatty pancreas disease, and pancreatic cancer. This review summarizes the impact of adiposity on a spectrum of pancreatic diseases.

  16. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to January 2015. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After adjustment for potential confounders, opium use (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06-3.43) and alcohol consumption (OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.86-9.31) were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find an association between ever tobacco smoking and pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.62-1.39). In our study, opium use and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cigarette smoking was not.

  17. Association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Rahman

    Full Text Available Evidence is inconsistent regarding alcohol and pancreatic cancer risk, although heavy drinking may increase risk.A population-based case-control study was conducted using 345 pancreas cancer cases diagnosed 2011-2012 and 1,285 frequency-matched controls from Ontario, Canada. Logistic regression was used to evaluate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer risk; data was also stratified by sex and smoking status to assess interaction.Alcohol consumption was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (age-adjusted odds ratio=0.78, 95% CI: 0.58, 1.05 for 1 - 3 drinks/week; age-adjusted odds ratio=0.86, 95% CI: 0.63, 1.17 for 4 - 20 drinks/week, however there was a non-significant increased risk for heavy drinkers consuming ≥ 21 drinks/week (age-adjusted odds ratio=1.35, 95% CI: 0.81, 2.27. Cigarette smoking modified the alcohol-cancer relationship; among current smokers, heavy alcohol consumption was associated with a significantly increased pancreatic cancer risk (age-adjusted odds ratio=4.04, 95% CI: 1.58, 10.37, whereas this significant association with heavy drinking was not observed among non-smokers (age-adjusted odds ratio=2.01, 95% CI: 0.50, 8.18. Furthermore, light - moderate alcohol intake was associated with increased pancreas cancer risk among current smokers.While alcohol was not significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk, smoking status modified this relationship such that among current smokers, alcohol intake was associated with a greater than two-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer. The results should be interpreted with caution due to small sample sizes within subgroups and correction for multiple comparisons should be considered. These findings should be replicated in larger studies where more precise estimates of risk can be obtained.

  18. Pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Dowman, J. K.; Tomlinson, J.W.; Newsome, P.N.

    2009-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) represents a spectrum of disease ranging from hepatocellular steatosis through steatohepatitis to fibrosis and irreversible cirrhosis. The prevalence of NAFLD has risen rapidly in parallel with the dramatic rise in obesity and diabetes, and is rapidly becoming the most common cause of liver disease in Western countries. Indeed, NAFLD is now recognized to be the aetiology in many cases previously labelled as cryptogenic cirrhosis.

  19. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  20. Hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase deficiency induces pancreatic injury in chronic ethanol feeding model of deer mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Samir M; Bhopale, Kamlesh K; Kakumanu, Ramu D; Popov, Vsevolod L; Rampy, Bill A; El-Mehallawi, Inas H; Ashmawy, Magdy M; Shakeel Ansari, G A; Kaphalia, Bhupendra S

    2018-02-01

    The single most common cause of chronic pancreatitis (CP, a serious inflammatory disease) is chronic alcohol abuse, which impairs hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, a major ethanol oxidizing enzyme). Previously, we found ~5 fold greater fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs), and injury in the pancreas of hepatic ADH deficient (ADH - ) vs. hepatic normal ADH (ADH + ) deer mice fed 3.5g% ethanol via liquid diet daily for two months. Therefore, progression of ethanol-induced pancreatic injury was determined in ADH - deer mice fed ethanol for four months to delineate the mechanism and metabolic basis of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP). In addition to a substantially increased blood alcohol concentration and plasma FAEEs, significant degenerative changes, including atrophy and loss of acinar cells in some areas, ultrastructural changes evident by such features as swelling and disintegration of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cisternae and ER stress were observed in the pancreas of ethanol-fed ADH - deer mice vs. ADH + deer mice. These changes are consistent with noted increases in pancreatic injury markers (plasma lipase, pancreatic trypsinogen activation peptide, FAEE synthase and cathepsin B) in ethanol-fed ADH - deer mice. Most importantly, an increased levels of pancreatic glucose regulated protein (GRP) 78 (a prominent ER stress marker) were found to be closely associated with increased phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α signaling molecule in PKR-like ER kinase branch of unfolded protein response (UPR) as compared to X box binding protein 1S and activating transcription factor (ATF)6 - 50kDa protein of inositol requiring enzyme 1α and ATF6 branches of UPR, respectively, in ethanol-fed ADH - vs. ADH + deer mice. These results along with findings on plasma FAEEs, and pancreatic histology and injury markers suggest a metabolic basis of ethanol-induced pancreatic injury, and provide new avenues to understand metabolic basis and molecular mechanism of ACP

  1. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP, characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP, with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse.

  2. Alcoholic pancreatitis in rats fed ethanol in a nutritionally adequate liquid diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M

    1987-01-01

    In an effort to develop a model of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis in Sprague-Dawley rats fed a nutritionally adequate diet, 3 groups of 15 animals each were fed Wayne Rodent-Blox ad libitum, Lieber-DeCarli diet with 40% of carbohydrate calories replaced by ethanol ad libitum and isocaloric amounts of Lieber-DeCarli diet respectively for a period of 18 months. Rats were anesthetized and basal and secretin-stimulated pancreatic juice was obtained. Pancreatic glands were isolated and divided into portions for histology, biochemical analyses, and cell fractionation. The homogenate, zymogen granule fraction, mitochondrial-lysosomal fraction, microsomal fraction and postmicrosomal supernatant as well as aliquots of pancreatic juice were analyzed for cathepsin B, acid phosphatase, beta-D-glucoronidase, arylsulphatase and leucine naphthylamidase. All of the ethanol-fed animals developed morphological changes akin to human chronic pancreatitis. There were focal areas of parenchymal degeneration with fibrosis, protein plug formation and tubular complexes. In the pancreatic tissue of animals fed ethanol, total protein, trypsinogen (and free trypsin) were increased and amylase was decreased. While acid phosphatase was increased in all of the particulate fractions, cathepsin B was increased in the zymogen granule and mitochondrial-lysosomal fractions. Basal and post-secretin pancreatic juice did not show a significant increase in digestive or lysosomal enzymes. It is suggested that focal degenerative changes may be due to trypsin generated by intracellular activation of digestive enzymes by lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B.

  3. Proinflammatory cytokines in alcohol or gallstone induced acute pancreatitis. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novovic, Srdan; Andersen, Anders Møller; Ersbøll, Annette Kjaer

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: If differences of inflammatory pathways in acute pancreatitis exist for various etiologies, selective and specific antiinflammatory and other modulatory treatment regimens might be indicated. Circulating levels of prominent proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, 8, 18, and TNF-alpha were...... measured in patients having their first attack of either alcohol- or gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Seventy-five consecutive patients were prospectively included over a 15-month period, sixty of them being either alcohol- or gallstone-induced. All patients were treated according...... and clinical outcome is independent of the underlying etiology. Revealing the complex spatial and temporal profile of proinflammatory cytokine expression in acute pancreatitis is necessary and important for the development of a more targeted rational therapy....

  4. Risk of pancreatitis according to alcohol drinking habits: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, L.; Gronbaek, M.; Tolstrup, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The association between alcohol intake and pancreatitis has been examined previously in case-control studies, mostly consisting of men. The significance of beverage type and drinking pattern is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the association between amount, type, and frequency...... on pancreatitis was obtained from national registers. A high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis. Hazard ratios associated with drinking 1-6, 7-13, 14-20, 21-34, 35-48, and >48 drinks/week were 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.6), 1.2 (95% CI: 0.8, 1.8), 1.3 (95% CI: 0.8, 2...... of alcohol intake and risk of pancreatitis. For this purpose, the authors used data on 17,905 men and women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976-1978, 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001-2003 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Alcohol intake and covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Information...

  5. Risk of pancreatitis according to alcohol drinking habits: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, L.; Gronbaek, M.; Tolstrup, J.S.

    2008-01-01

    The association between alcohol intake and pancreatitis has been examined previously in case-control studies, mostly consisting of men. The significance of beverage type and drinking pattern is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the association between amount, type, and frequency...... of alcohol intake and risk of pancreatitis. For this purpose, the authors used data on 17,905 men and women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976-1978, 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001-2003 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Alcohol intake and covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Information...... on pancreatitis was obtained from national registers. A high alcohol intake was associated with a higher risk of pancreatitis. Hazard ratios associated with drinking 1-6, 7-13, 14-20, 21-34, 35-48, and >48 drinks/week were 1.1 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.8, 1.6), 1.2 (95% CI: 0.8, 1.8), 1.3 (95% CI: 0.8, 2...

  6. Vagotomy plus Bilroth II gastrectomy for the prevention of recurrent alcohol-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, H H; Mullins, R J; Scovill, W A

    1985-06-01

    Three retrospective reviews documenting a lessened frequency of acute recurrent alcohol-induced pancreatitis following vagotomy, with or without gastrectomy or gastroenterostomy, prompted a prospective evaluation of truncal vagotomy with Bilroth II gastrectomy as a means of preventing such exacerbations. Randomization between operation and encouragement to abstain from alcohol in patients with a history of more than one, but less than ten, acute bouts of alcohol-induced pancreatitis was set by odd-even digits in the hospital number. Of 176 patients admitted with acute alcoholic pancreatitis during 23 months of study, 49 were excluded because of too few or too many prior attacks. Another 61 refused to enter the study. At least one (average 1.9) recurrence requiring hospitalization was noted in 49, or 80%, of these patients on follow-up for 2 to 26 months (average 14 months). Of the 66 who consented to participate, 33 were randomized not to undergo operation and had almost identical recurrence statistics (i.e., an average of 1.7 recurrences in 24, or 73%). By contrast, only two of 31, or six per cent, allocated to operation have experienced a recurrence (p less than 0.001). Two who had been randomized were excluded because of persisting active pancreatitis.

  7. A murine model of obesity implicates the adipokine milieu in the pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyromski, Nicholas J; Mathur, Abhishek; Pitt, Henry A; Lu, Debao; Gripe, John T; Walker, Julia J; Yancey, Kyle; Wade, Terence E; Swartz-Basile, Deborah A

    2008-09-01

    Obesity is clearly an independent risk factor for increased severity of acute pancreatitis (AP), although the mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. Adipokines (including leptin and adiponectin) are pleiotropic molecules produced by adipocytes that are important regulators of the inflammatory response. We hypothesized that the altered adipokine milieu observed in obesity contributes to the increased severity of pancreatitis. Lean (C57BL/6J), obese leptin-deficient (LepOb), and obese hyperleptinemic (LepDb) mice were subjected to AP by six hourly intraperitoneal injections of cerulein (50 microg/kg). Severity of AP was assessed by histology and by measuring pancreatic concentration of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-6, the chemokine MCP-1, and the marker of neutrophil activation MPO. Both congenitally obese strains of mice developed significantly more severe AP than wild-type lean animals. Severity of AP was not solely related to adipose tissue volume: LepOb mice were heaviest; however, LepDb mice developed the most severe AP both histologically and biochemically. Circulating adiponectin concentrations inversely mirrored the severity of pancreatitis. These data demonstrate that congenitally obese mice develop more severe AP than lean animals when challenged by cerulein hyperstimulation and suggest that alteration of the adipokine milieu exacerbates the severity of AP in obesity.

  8. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  9. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes. Treatment Treatment for pancreatitis may include a hospital stay for intravenous (IV) fluids, pain medicine, and other medicines. Surgery is sometimes needed to treat complications. Eating, Diet, & Nutrition If you have pancreatitis, your health care ...

  10. GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia: implications in pathogenesis, diagnosis, and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basturk, Olca; Singh, Rajendra; Kaygusuz, Ecmel; Balci, Serdar; Dursun, Nevra; Culhaci, Nil; Adsay, N Volkan

    2011-03-01

    GLUT-1 has been found to have an important role in the upregulation of various cellular pathways and implicated in neoplastic transformation correlating with biological behavior in malignancies. However, literature regarding the significance of GLUT-1 expression in pancreatic neoplasia has been limited and controversial. Immunohistochemical expression of GLUT-1 was tested in a variety of pancreatic neoplasia including ductal adenocarcinomas (DAs), pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs), and serous cystadenomas. There was a progressive increase in the expression of GLUT-1 from low- to higher-grade dysplastic lesions: All higher-grade PanINs/IPMNs (the ones with moderate/high-grade dysplasia) revealed noticeable GLUT-1 expression. Among the 94 DAs analyzed, there were minimal/moderate expression in 46 and significant expression in 24 DAs. However, all 4 clear-cell variants of DAs revealed significant GLUT-1 immunolabeling, as did areas of clear-cell change seen in other DAs. Moreover, all 12 serous cystadenomas expressed significant GLUT-1. GLUT-1 expression was also directly correlated with DA histological grade (P = 0.016) and tumor size (P = 0.03). GLUT-1 may give rise to the distinctive clear-cell appearance of these tumors by inducing the accumulation of glycogen in the cytoplasm. Additionally, because GLUT-1 expression was related to histological grade and tumor size of DA, further studies are warranted to investigate the association of GLUT-1 with prognosis and tumor progression.

  11. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In this study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking...... alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  12. Roles of abnormal lipid metabolism in pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LU Ran

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD keeps rising worldwide along with the increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Although most NAFLD patients present with simple steatosis of hepatocytes, some patients progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and even cancer. In the Western world, NAFLD is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes, and hence there has been a growing interest in this disease. Given that fat deposition in the liver is the hallmark of NAFLD, we review the roles and the underlying mechanism of disturbed lipid metabolism in the development of NAFLD and suggest that more insights into the pathogenesis of NAFLD will help develop targeted strategies for the prevention and treatment of this disease.

  13. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    .001) compared to pre-stimulatory levels and controls, and a variance analysis showed significantly (P Alcohol consumption (40 g), however, did not influence plasma levels of TGF-1beta, IGF-I or IGFBP-3 in either of the two groups...... was to evaluate the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: Twelve male patients with severe CP and 11 matched controls ingested 40 g alcohol. Plasma cytokine concentrations were measured for 24 h and assessed by sandwich ELISA...... techniques. RESULTS: IL-6 was higher in CP at fasting and 1, 4 and 24 h after alcohol intake (P

  14. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  15. Effect of alcohol on insulin secretion and viability of human pancreatic islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. There are controversial data in the literature on the topic of effects of alcohol on insulin secretion, apoptosis, and necrosis of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The goal of this research was to determine how alcohol affects the insulin secretion and viability of human adult pancreatic islets in vitro during a seven-day incubation. Methods. Human pancreatic tissue was digested with Collagenase XI, using a non-automated method. Cultures were incubated in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI medium containing alcohol (10 μl of alcohol in 100 ml of medium. Insulin stimulation index (SI and viability of the islets were determined on the first, third, and seventh day of cultivation. Results. Analysis of the viability of the islets showed that there wasn’t significant difference between the control and the test group. In the test group, viability of the cultures declined with the time of incubation. SI of the test group was higher compared to the control group, by 50% and 25% on the first and third day of cultivation, respectively. On the seventh day, insulin secretion was reduced by 25%. The difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. In the test group, significant decline in insulin secretion was found on the third and seventh day of incubation (p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion. Alcohol can increase or decrease insulin secretion of islets cultures, which may result in an inadequate response of pancreatic β-cells to blood glucose, leading to insulin resistance, and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 41002

  16. A common variant of PNPLA3 (p.I148M) is not associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendahl, J.; Tonjes, A.; Schleinitz, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wiegand, J.; Ruffert, C.; Jesinghaus, M.; Schober, R.; Herms, M.; Grutzmann, R.; Schulz, H.U.; Stickel, F.; Werner, J.; Bugert, P.; Bluher, M.; Stumvoll, M.; Bohm, S.; Berg, T. van den; Wittenburg, H.; Mossner, J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Derikx, M.; Keim, V.; Witt, H.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease that in some patients leads to exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. In industrialized countries the most common aetiology is chronic alcohol abuse. Descriptions of associated genetic alterations in alcoholic CP are rare. However, a

  17. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Treutlein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i AD; (ii chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP; and (iii alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC. Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach (puncorrected = 1.2 × 10−6; pcorrected = 0.020. This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed.

  19. Pancreatic Juice Culture in Acute Pancreatitis and Other Pancreatic Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Masataka Kikuyama; Tatsunori Sato; Takafumi Kurokami; Yuji Ota; Yoshihiro Yokoi

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively evaluated the results of pancreatic juice cultures of patients with acute pancreatitis and other pancreatic disorders. Methods Twenty patients who underwent pancreatic juice culture were studied. Nine had acute pancreatitis due to alcohol (n=5), idiopathic causes (n=2), drugs (n=1), or gallstones (n=1), and remaining 11 had other pancreatic disorders such as an intraductal papillary mucin-producing neoplasm (n=3) and main pancreatic duct dilatation with a stricture due to a...

  20. Patients With Sentinel Acute Pancreatitis of Alcoholic Etiology Are at Risk for Organ Failure and Pancreatic Necrosis: A Dual-Center Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easler, Jeffrey J; de-Madaria, Enrique; Nawaz, Haq; Moya-Hoyo, Neftalí; Koutroumpakis, Efstratios; Rey-Riveiro, Mónica; Singh, Vijay P; Acevedo-Piedra, Nelly G; Whitcomb, David C; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2016-08-01

    To assess the relationship between alcoholic etiology, tobacco use, and severe acute pancreatitis (AP). Smoking and alcohol exposure were recorded upon admission in a cohort of patients with AP within the United States. Patients with first, "sentinel" attack of AP were identified for analysis.Associations between alcohol, smoking, and severe AP were validated in an independent cohort of patients from Spain. US cohort (n = 222): Thirty-five percent developed organ failure (OF), 35% pancreatic necrosis (PNec), and 7% died. OF (54% vs 33%, P = 0.03), PNec (62% vs 31%, P = 0.006), intensive care unit admission (58% vs 36%, P = 0.03), and length of stay (LOS) (20 vs 8 days, P = 0.007) were greater in alcoholic when compared to other etiologies.Spanish cohort (n = 366): Similar differences in outcomes were also found with between alcoholic and nonalcoholic etiologies: OF (24% vs 8%, P = 0.001), PNec (38% vs 14%, P < 0.001), intensive care unit admission (20% vs 3%, P < 0.001), and LOS (17 vs 11 days, P = 0.04).Multivariable analysis confirmed alcoholic etiology to be independently associated with OF and PNec in both cohorts. Alcoholic etiology is independently associated with OF and PNec in patients with sentinel AP and is important when evaluating risk for severe disease in AP.

  1. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation Involving the Duodenum Embolized with Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Luppi, Giacomo; Faiella, Eliodoro; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Giurazza, Francesco; Borzomati, Domenico; Coppola, Roberto; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is a rare condition. Most patients are asymptomatic or alternatively may present with a wide spectrum of symptoms. Traditionally, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice; however, alternative approaches, such as transcatheter embolization (TAE), may be proposed. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with a pancreatic head AVM, presenting with upper abdominal pain and slight anemia. The patient refused surgery and underwent TAE by means of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH). At 3 months follow-up, the patient was able to eat regularly, with no residual pain and no signs of anemia.

  2. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation Involving the Duodenum Embolized with Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Luppi, Giacomo; Faiella, Eliodoro; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Giurazza, Francesco [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy); Borzomati, Domenico; Coppola, Roberto [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of General Surgery (Italy); Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is a rare condition. Most patients are asymptomatic or alternatively may present with a wide spectrum of symptoms. Traditionally, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice; however, alternative approaches, such as transcatheter embolization (TAE), may be proposed. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with a pancreatic head AVM, presenting with upper abdominal pain and slight anemia. The patient refused surgery and underwent TAE by means of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH). At 3 months follow-up, the patient was able to eat regularly, with no residual pain and no signs of anemia.

  3. Proteomic and genomic studies of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease - clues in the pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun Wei; Dillon, John; Miller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a widely prevalent hepatic disorder that covers wide spectrum of liver pathology. NAFLD is strongly associated with liver inflammation, metabolic hyperlipidaemia and insulin resistance. Frequently, NAFLD has been considered as the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome. The pathophysiology of NAFLD has not been fully elucidated. Some patients can remain in the stage of simple steatosis, which generally is a benign condition; whereas others can develop liver inflammation and progress into non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The mechanism behind the progression is still not fully understood. Much ongoing proteomic researches have focused on discovering the unbiased circulating biochemical markers to allow early detection and treatment of NAFLD. Comprehensive genomic studies have also begun to provide new insights into the gene polymorphism to understand patient-disease variations. Therefore, NAFLD is considered a complex and mutifactorial disease phenotype resulting from environmental exposures acting on a susceptible polygenic background. This paper reviewed the current status of proteomic and genomic studies that have contributed to the understanding of NAFLD pathogenesis. For proteomics section, this review highlighted functional proteins that involved in: (1) transportation; (2) metabolic pathway; (3) acute phase reaction; (4) anti-inflammatory; (5) extracellular matrix; and (6) immune system. In the genomic studies, this review will discuss genes which involved in: (1) lipolysis; (2) adipokines; and (3) cytokines production. PMID:25024592

  4. Vitamin D and pancreas: The role of sunshine vitamin in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Barbara; Grant, William B; Della Casa, Silvia; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Sarno, Gerardo; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2017-11-02

    Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D exerts multiple effects beyond bone and calcium metabolism. Vitamin D seems to play a role in pancreatic disease, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D's immune-modulatory action suggests that it could help prevent type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, vitamin D may influence β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and systematic inflammation-all characteristic pathways of that disease. Data from observational studies correlated vitamin D deficiency with risk of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prospective and ecological studies of pancreatic cancer incidence generally support a beneficial effect of higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as well as inverse correlations between UVB dose or exposure and incidence and/or mortality rate of pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the literature regarding vitamin D's role in risk of diabetes and pancreatic cancer. The results to date generally satisfy Hill's criteria for causality regarding vitamin D and incidence of these pancreatic diseases. However, large randomized, blinded, prospective studies are required to more fully evaluate the potential therapeutic role of vitamin D in preventing pancreatic diseases.

  5. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evalu......BACKGROUND: Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study...

  6. Length of Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeats in the Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Gene May Confer Susceptibility to Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis but Not Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeld, Karianne; Beer, Sebastian; Johnstone, Marianne; Zimmer, Constantin; Mössner, Joachim; Ruffert, Claudia; Krehan, Mario; Zapf, Christian; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Johansson, Stefan; Bugert, Peter; Miyajima, Fabio; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Brown, Laura J; Winn, Simon A; Davies, Kelly; Latawiec, Diane; Gunson, Bridget K; Criddle, David N; Pirmohamed, Munir; Grützmann, Robert; Michl, Patrick; Greenhalf, William; Molven, Anders; Sutton, Robert; Rosendahl, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) contributes to fatty acid ethyl ester metabolism, which is implicated in alcoholic pancreatitis. The CEL gene harbours a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) region in exon 11. Variation in this VNTR has been linked to monogenic pancreatic disease, while conflicting results were reported for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we aimed to investigate a potential association of CEL VNTR lengths with alcoholic CP. Overall, 395 alcoholic CP patients, 218 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) serving as controls with a comparable amount of alcohol consumed, and 327 healthy controls from Germany and the United Kingdom (UK) were analysed by determination of fragment lengths by capillary electrophoresis. Allele frequencies and genotypes of different VNTR categories were compared between the groups. Twelve repeats were overrepresented in UK ACP patients (P = 0.04) compared to controls, whereas twelve repeats were enriched in German ALC compared to alcoholic CP patients (P = 0.03). Frequencies of CEL VNTR lengths of 14 and 15 repeats differed between German ALC patients and healthy controls (P = 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). However, in the genotype and pooled analysis of VNTR lengths no statistical significant association was depicted. Additionally, the 16-16 genotype as well as 16 repeats were more frequent in UK ALC than in alcoholic CP patients (P = 0.034 and 0.02, respectively). In all other calculations, including pooled German and UK data, allele frequencies and genotype distributions did not differ significantly between patients and controls or between alcoholic CP and ALC. We did not obtain evidence that CEL VNTR lengths are associated with alcoholic CP. However, our results suggest that CEL VNTR lengths might associate with ALC, a finding that needs to be clarified in larger cohorts.

  7. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates.

  8. Acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhisa; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Onodera, Makoto; Kikuchi, Satoshi; Sato, Masayuki; Kojika, Masahiro; Sato, Hisaho; Suzuki, Keijiro; Matsumoto, Masanori

    2016-04-01

    Recent successive reports on acute pancreatitis-induced thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) have revealed that TTP-related microvascular damage is an aggravating factor of acute pancreatitis. Here, we report the case of a 26-year-old man diagnosed with acute pancreatitis due to high alcohol consumption. The patient was unconscious as he had taken an overdose of medication, and presented with fever and renal failure due to acute pancreatitis on admission. Although the pancreatitis subsequently improved, the symptoms were still observed; on the next day, he exhibited hemoglobinuria, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, general blood examinations indicated the presence of schistocytes and reduced activity of ADAMTS13 (a disintegrin-like metalloproteinase with thrombospondin type 1 motif 13) to 47 %. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with TTP, and plasma exchange was performed. After the development of TTP, the acute pancreatitis recurred, but a severe pathogenesis was prevented by plasma exchange. Thus, ADAMTS13 activity may be useful for predicting a severe pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. In ADAMTS13-deficient cases, plasma exchange may be an effective technique for preventing aggravation of acute pancreatitis.

  9. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: The link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-01-01

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of p...

  10. Alcohol-induced severe acute pancreatitis followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome managed with continuous renal replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peng; Yuan, Ai-hong; Wang, Chun-hua; Li, Xin; Wu, Hai-yang

    2014-01-06

    Acute kidney injury in patients with acute pancreatitis carries a poor prognosis. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney, and though rare in adults it is associated with high mortality and a high rate of chronic renal failure. Herein, we report a case of alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old Chinese female complicated by HUS. Her renal function progressively deteriorated in 2 days, and daily continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) was thus performed for a total of 13 treatments. She also received intermittent transfusions of fresh frozen plasma. Her renal failure was successfully managed, with subsequent return of normal renal function. She was discharged 1 month after admission and follow-up at 3 months revealed normal urea and creatinine. CRRT was shown to be useful for the treatment of HUS following acute pancreatitis. Prior case reports and our case should remind clinicians that HUS is a possible complication of acute pancreatitis. This study highlights the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of CRRT to prevent mortality and improve outcomes.

  11. Roles of abnormal lipid metabolism in pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    LU Ran; HONG Tianpei

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) keeps rising worldwide along with the increasing prevalence of metabolic diseases such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia. Although most NAFLD patients present with simple steatosis of hepatocytes, some patients progress to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and even cancer. In the Western world, NAFLD is the most common cause of elevated liver enzymes, and hence there has been a growing interest in this disea...

  12. Relationship of coping and patterns of dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis of biliary and alcoholic etiology in aspect of differentiation of its medical and psychological support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Маріанна Владиславівна Маркова

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Choric pancreatitis is an actual medical and psychological problem in Ukraine. The aim of the work was to study the features of coping in patients with chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic and biliary etiology.Methods. For detecting coping-mechanisms the standard method WCQ Р of Lazarus was used. The study of addictive tendencies was carried out with the help of questionnaire AUDIT and UDIT-tests oriented on patterns of dependent behavior.Results. The study of features of coping-mechanisms and an addiction to dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis revealed intergroup and intragroup differences. Confrontation and low levels of self-control, responsibility and positive assessment were intrinsic for respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Women demonstrated the high addiction to the search of social support, men – to distancing. As to an addictive behavior there was revealed that the typical common tendencies were the consumption of coffee, alcohol, internet-dependence, the specific ones for women – TV, shopping-dependencies, for men – workaholism in patients with biliary and computer-addiction in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Intergroup differences were demonstrated by an addiction to disorder of food behavior in patients with biliary and consumption of alcohol and smoking in respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis.Conclusions. The revealed differences in coping-strategies of patients with different nosological forms of chronic pancreatitis give important information for detecting the targets of medical and psychological influence and constructing of differentiated program of medical and psychological help to patients of this type

  13. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: the link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-10-28

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of patients with Cushing's syndrome have hepatic steatosis. Aiming at clarifying the reasons whereby patients suffering from Cushing's syndrome - a condition characterized by profound metabolic changes - present low prevalence of hepatic steatosis, the Authors reviewed the current concepts on the link between hypercortisolism and obesity/metabolic syndrome. They hypothesize that this low prevalence of fat accumulation in the liver of patients with Cushing's syndrome could result from the inhibition of the so-called low-grade chronic-inflammation, mainly mediated by Interleukin 6, due to an excess of cortisol, a hormone characterized by an anti-inflammatory effect. The Cushing's syndrome, speculatively considered as an in vivo model of the hepatic steatosis, could also help clarify the mechanisms of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  14. New insights in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaemers, Ingrid C.; Groen, Albert K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is hepatic steatosis. This is mostly a benign condition, but for largely unknown reasons it progresses to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma in about 10% of patients. In this review we discuss recent

  15. Alcohol and Tobacco Lower the Age of Presentation in Sporadic Pancreatic Cancer in a Dose-Dependent Manner: A Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michelle A.; Zolotarevsky, Eugene; Cooper, Kristine L.; Sherman, Simon; Shats, Oleg; Whitcomb, David C.; Lynch, Henry T.; Ghiorzo, Paola; Rubinstein, Wendy S.; Vogel, Kristen J.; Sasson, Aaron R.; Grizzle, William E.; Ketcham, Marsha A.; Lee, Shih-Yuan; Normolle, Daniel; Plonka, Caitlyn M.; Mertens, Amy N.; Tripon, Renee C.; Brand, Randall E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to examine the association between tobacco and alcohol dose and type and the age of onset of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PancCa). METHODS Prospective data from the Pancreatic Cancer Collaborative Registry were used to examine the association between age of onset and variables of interest including: gender, race, birth country, educational status, family history of PancCa, diabetes status, and tobacco and alcohol use. Statistical analysis included logistic and linear regression, Cox proportional hazard regression, and time-to-event analysis. RESULTS The median age to diagnosis for PancCa was 66.3 years (95% confidence intervals (CIs), 64.5–68.0). Males were more likely than females to be smokers (77% vs. 69%, P = 0.0002) and heavy alcohol and beer consumers (19% vs. 6%, 34% vs. 19%, P < 0.0001). In univariate analysis for effects on PancCa presentation age, the following were significant: gender, alcohol and tobacco use (amount, status and type), family history of PancCa, and body mass index. Both alcohol and tobacco had dose-dependent effects. In multivariate analysis, alcohol status and dose were independently associated with increased risk for earlier PancCa onset with greatest risk occurring in heavy drinkers (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.04–2.54). Smoking status had the highest risk for earlier onset pancreatic cancer with a HR of 2.69 (95% CI, 1.97–3.68) for active smokers and independent effects for dose (P = 0.019). The deleterious effects for alcohol and tobacco appear to resolve after 10 years of abstinence. CONCLUSIONS Alcohol and tobacco use are associated with a dose-related increased risk for earlier age of onset of PancCa. Although beer drinkers develop pancreatic cancer at an earlier age than nondrinkers, alcohol type did not have a significant effect after controlling for alcohol dose. PMID:22929760

  16. Relationship between adipose tissue dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency and the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Flavia A; Barchetta, Ilaria; Carotti, Simone; Bertoccini, Laura; Baroni, Marco G; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Cavallo, Maria-Gisella; Morini, Sergio

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Its pathogenesis is complex and not yet fully understood. Over the years many studies have proposed various pathophysiological hypotheses, among which the currently most widely accepted is the “multiple parallel hits” theory. According to this model, lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes and insulin resistance increase the vulnerability of the liver to many factors that act in a coordinated and cooperative manner to promote hepatic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Among these factors, adipose tissue dysfunction and subsequent chronic low grade inflammation play a crucial role. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D exerts an immune-regulating action on adipose tissue, and the growing wealth of epidemiological data is demonstrating that hypovitaminosis D is associated with both obesity and NAFLD. Furthermore, given the strong association between these conditions, current findings suggest that vitamin D may be involved in the relationship between adipose tissue dysfunction and NAFLD. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of recent advances in the pathogenesis of NAFLD in relation to adipose tissue dysfunction, and in the pathophysiology linking vitamin D deficiency with NAFLD and adiposity, together with an overview of the evidence available on the clinical utility of vitamin D supplementation in cases of NAFLD. PMID:28596677

  17. Relationship between adipose tissue dysfunction, vitamin D deficiency and the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Flavia A; Barchetta, Ilaria; Carotti, Simone; Bertoccini, Laura; Baroni, Marco G; Vespasiani-Gentilucci, Umberto; Cavallo, Maria-Gisella; Morini, Sergio

    2017-05-21

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common chronic liver disease worldwide. Its pathogenesis is complex and not yet fully understood. Over the years many studies have proposed various pathophysiological hypotheses, among which the currently most widely accepted is the "multiple parallel hits" theory. According to this model, lipid accumulation in the hepatocytes and insulin resistance increase the vulnerability of the liver to many factors that act in a coordinated and cooperative manner to promote hepatic injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Among these factors, adipose tissue dysfunction and subsequent chronic low grade inflammation play a crucial role. Recent studies have shown that vitamin D exerts an immune-regulating action on adipose tissue, and the growing wealth of epidemiological data is demonstrating that hypovitaminosis D is associated with both obesity and NAFLD. Furthermore, given the strong association between these conditions, current findings suggest that vitamin D may be involved in the relationship between adipose tissue dysfunction and NAFLD. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of recent advances in the pathogenesis of NAFLD in relation to adipose tissue dysfunction, and in the pathophysiology linking vitamin D deficiency with NAFLD and adiposity, together with an overview of the evidence available on the clinical utility of vitamin D supplementation in cases of NAFLD.

  18. Effects of alcoholic extract of Momordica charantia (Linn.) whole fruit powder on the pancreatic islets of alloxan diabetic albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N; Gupta, M; Sirohi, P; Varsha

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholic extract of whole fruit of Momordica charantia was prepared. Adult healthy albino rats were divided into four groups and received a dose of 6 mg/l00 gm. body weight of alloxan monohydrate. Animals of group I served as diabetic control group. The animals of II, III, and IV groups received 25 mg, 50 mg and 75 mg doses of the extract respectively for different durations. 75 mg dose showed increase in body weight. All doses of alcoholic extract of M. charantia were able to decrease the blood sugar level significantly. Extract feeding showed definite improvement in the islets of Langerhans. No toxic effect was observed in the liver The significant features of the study have been blood glucose once lowered by the treatment with M. charantia fruit extract remained static even after discontinuation of drug for 15 days. Blood sugar never fell below normal values even with a high dose, in pancreatic islets, beta cells showed definite improvement.

  19. Pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contrera, J.D.; Uemura, L.; Palma, J.K.; Souza, L.P. de; Ferraz, L.R.L.; Magalhaes, P.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    Radiological and ultrasonographic studies of ten patients with surgically confirmed pancreatic pseudocysts were reviewed. All of them were male, with previous story of chronic alcoholism and clinical evidences of pancreatitis. The most important radiological finding consisted of a mass opacifying the epigastrium, displacing the stomach and bowel loops. ultrasound studies showed that the lesions were predominantly cystic, rounded or oval-shaped with smooth or irregular contours and of various sizes. (Author) [pt

  20. Pathogenesis and management issues for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvnjak, Marko; Lerotić, Ivan; Baršić, Neven; Tomašić, Vedran; Jukić, Lucija Virović; Velagić, Vedran

    2007-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has, although it is a very common disorder, only relatively recently gained broader interest among physicians and scientists. Fatty liver has been documented in up to 10 to 15 percent of normal individuals and 70 to 80 percent of obese individuals. Although the pathophysiology of NAFLD is still subject to intensive research, several players and mechanisms have been suggested based on the substantial evidence. Excessive hepatocyte triglyceride accumulation resulting from insulin resistance is the first step in the proposed ‘two hit’ model of the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial fatty acids oxidation, NF-κB-dependent inflammatory cytokine expression and adipocytokines are all considered to be the potential factors causing second hits which lead to hepatocyte injury, inflammation and fibrosis. Although it was initially believed that NAFLD is a completely benign disorder, histologic follow-up studies have showed that fibrosis progression occurs in about a third of patients. A small number of patients with NAFLD eventually ends up with end-stage liver disease and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Although liver biopsy is currently the only way to confirm the NAFLD diagnosis and distinguish between fatty liver alone and NASH, no guidelines or firm recommendations can still be made as for when and in whom it is necessary. Increased physical activity, gradual weight reduction and in selected cases bariatric surgery remain the mainstay of NAFLD therapy. Studies with pharmacologic agents are showing promising results, but available data are still insufficient to make specific recommendations; their use therefore remains highly individual. PMID:17729403

  1. Long Non-Coding RNA Profiling in a Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rodent Model: New Insight into Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most prevalent chronic liver diseases worldwide with an unclear mechanism. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as important regulatory molecules. To better understand NAFLD pathogenesis, lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA microarrays were conducted in an NAFLD rodent model. Potential target genes of significantly changed lncRNA were predicted using cis/trans-regulatory algorithms. Gene Ontology (GO analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analysis were then performed to explore their function. In the current analysis, 89 upregulated and 177 downregulated mRNAs were identified, together with 291 deregulated lncRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis of these RNAs has categorized these RNAs into pathways including arachidonic acid metabolism, circadian rhythm, linoleic acid metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway, sphingolipid metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism and tyrosine metabolism were compromised. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of representative nine mRNAs and eight lncRNAs (named fatty liver-related lncRNA, FLRL was conducted and this verified previous microarray results. Several lncRNAs, such as FLRL1, FLRL6 and FLRL2 demonstrated to be involved in circadian rhythm targeting period circadian clock 3 (Per3, Per2 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Arntl, respectively. While FLRL8, FLRL3 and FLRL7 showed a potential role in PPAR signaling pathway through interaction with fatty acid binding protein 5 (Fabp5, lipoprotein lipase (Lpl and fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2. Functional experiments showed that interfering of lncRNA FLRL2 expression affected the expression of predicted target, circadian rhythm gene Arntl. Moreover, both FLRL2 and Arntl were downregulated in the NAFLD cellular model. The current study identified lncRNA and corresponding mRNA in NAFLD

  2. PATHOGENESIS OF HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA DEVELOPMENT IN NON ALCOHOLIC FATTY LIVER DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Kirti; Chen, Jian; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Jogunoori, Wilma; Mishra, Lopa

    2015-06-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being recognized as an increasingly important contributor to the burden of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide. It is often accompanied by obesity and diabetes mellitus and is believed to be the hepatic representation of the metabolic syndrome. HCC development in NAFLD is multifactorial and complex. It is dependent on not only the well-described mechanisms noted in chronic liver injury, but also on the molecular derangements associated with obesity and dysmetabolism. These include adipocyte remodeling, adipokine secretion, lipotoxicity and insulin resistance. Recent advances focus on the importance of the gut-liver axis in accelerating the process of oncogenesis in NAFLD. The farnesoid X nuclear receptor (FXR) has been demonstrated to have important metabolic effects and its pharmacological activation by obeticholic acid has been recently reported to produce histological improvement in NASH. It is hoped that delineating the mechanisms of hepatic fibrosis and oncogenesis in NASH will lead to enhanced strategies for cancer prevention, surveillance and therapy in this population.

  3. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Martín-Domínguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of alterations that go from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2 and obesity are the principle factors associated to NAFLD. A 20-30 % prevalence in general population has been described. The survival of this type of patient is lower than the general population's, showing a higher incidence of hepatic and cardiovascular complications. The aetiopathogenesis is still unclear, but we know the intervention of different factors that produce fatty-acid accumulation in hepatic parenchyma, causing oxidative stress, oxygen-free radicals and the synthesis of an inflammatory cascade, that determine the progression of this disease from steatosis up to advanced fibrosis. The diagnostic gold-standard is still the liver biopsy, even though the development of newer non-invasive techniques, like serological and imaging (radiology, have opened a new field for research that allows bloodless testing of these patients and better study of the natural history of this disease. Nowadays, there is still no specific treatment for NAFLD. The development of healthy life habits and moderate exercise continue to be the pillars of treatment. Different pharmacological approaches have been studied and applied, such as the control of insulin resistance, lowering cholesterol levels, antioxidants, and other alternatives in experimental trials.

  4. Hypoxia-regulated mechanisms in the pathogenesis of obesity and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefere, Sander; Van Steenkiste, Christophe; Verhelst, Xavier; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Devisscher, Lindsey; Geerts, Anja

    2016-09-01

    The pandemic rise in obesity has resulted in an increased incidence of metabolic complications. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and has become the most common chronic liver disease in large parts of the world. The adipose tissue expansion and hepatic fat accumulation characteristics of these disorders compromise local oxygen homeostasis. The resultant tissue hypoxia induces adaptive responses to restore oxygenation and tissue metabolism and cell survival. Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) function as master regulators of this hypoxia adaptive response, and are in turn hydroxylated by prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs). PHDs are the main cellular oxygen sensors and regulate HIF proteasomal degradation in an oxygen-dependent manner. HIFs and PHDs are implicated in numerous physiological and pathological conditions. Extensive research using genetic models has revealed that hypoxia signaling is also a key mechanism in adipose tissue dysfunction, leading to adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation and insulin resistance. Moreover, hypoxia affects liver lipid metabolism and deranges hepatic lipid accumulation. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms through which the hypoxia adaptive response affects adipocyte and hepatic metabolism, and the therapeutic possibilities of modulating HIFs and PHDs in obesity and fatty liver disease.

  5. Neurohistopathologic findings after a neurolytic celiac plexus block with alcohol in patients with pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W. A.; van Kemenade, F. J.; Dzoljic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a very poor prognosis resulting in the death of 98% of patients. Pain may be severe and difficult to treat. Management of pain includes chemotherapy, radiotherapy, pharmacologic treatment, and neurolytic celiac plexus block. Recent reviews of the efficacy of neurolytic celiac

  6. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [de

  7. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  8. Association between novel MRI-estimated pancreatic fat and liver histology-determined steatosis and fibrosis in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, N S; Peterson, M R; Brenner, D A; Heba, E; Sirlin, C; Loomba, R

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic fat deposition in the pancreas and its association with hepatic steatosis have not previously been examined in patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). To quantify pancreatic fat using a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique and determine whether it is associated with hepatic steatosis and/or fibrosis in patients with NAFLD. This is a cross-sectional study including 43 adult patients with biopsy-proven NAFLD who underwent clinical evaluation, biochemical testing and MRI. The liver biopsy assessment was performed using the NASH-CRN histological scoring system, and liver and pancreas fat quantification was performed using a novel, validated MRI biomarker; the proton density fat fraction. The average MRI-determined pancreatic fat in patients with NAFLD was 8.5% and did not vary significantly between head, body, and tail of the pancreas. MRI-determined pancreatic fat content increased significantly with increasing histology-determined hepatic steatosis grade; 4.6% in grade 1; 7.7% in grade 2; 13.0% in grade 3 (P = 0.004) respectively. Pancreatic fat content was lower in patients with histology-determined liver fibrosis than in those without fibrosis (11.2% in stage 0 fibrosis vs. 5.8% in stage 1-2 fibrosis, and 6.9% in stage 3-4 fibrosis, P = 0.013). Pancreatic fat did not correlate with age, body mass index or diabetes status. In patients with NAFLD, increased pancreatic fat is associated with hepatic steatosis. However, liver fibrosis is inversely associated with pancreatic fat content. Further studies are needed to determine underlying mechanisms to understand if pancreatic steatosis affects progression of NAFLD. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. [Osteo-articular manifestations after suppurative pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateş, I N; Dinu, Daniela; Lupu, Amelia; Popescu, Luminiţa; Bălănescu, Andra; Constantinoiu, S

    2003-01-01

    Osseous and joint manifestations (decalcification, osteolysis, osteonecrosis; poliarthrytis; periarticular fat necrosis) are sometimes encountered in chronic pancreatitis or carcinoma, but exceptional after severe acute pancreatitis, especially infected pancreatic necrosis. Pathogenesis of calcium deficiency in acute pancreatitis is multifactorial, including extensive lipolysis and metabolic disturbances. We report on a healthy, young male, that developed decalcification and polyarthritis consecutive to a long-outcome, severe acute pancreatitis. We comment upon hypocalcemia, as a rare complication of acute pancreatitis.

  10. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  11. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook

    1995-01-01

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  12. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center.

  13. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  14. Targeting Trysin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0258 TITLE: Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis model PRINCIPAL...From - To) 15 Sep 2016 – 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting trypsin-inflammation axis for pancreatitis therapy in a humanized pancreatitis ... pancreatitis especially due to alcohol and smoking goes onto chronic pancreatitis which, in turn, is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Because only a

  15. Pancreatitis Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Pablo Chapela

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is one of the commonest diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, characterized by epigastric pain of moderate to severe intensity, which radiates to the back, elevation of pancreatic lipase and amylase enzymes, and changes in pancreatic parenchyma in imaging methods. The most common etiologies vary, generally the most frequent being biliary lithiasis and alcohol, followed by hypertriglyceridemia. Among the less frequent causes is drug-induced pancreatitis. We report a case of acute pancreatitis caused by cocaine, rarely described in literature.

  16. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 in different forms of pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weis

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells and might thereby prevent the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Transcription of HMOX1 in humans is influenced by a GT-repeat located in the promoter. As such, HMOX1 variants might be of importance in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.The GT-repeat and SNP rs2071746 were investigated with fluorescence labelled primers and by melting curve analysis in 285 patients with acute pancreatitis, 208 patients with alcoholic CP, 207 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and in 289 controls, respectively. GT-repeat analysis was extended to a total of 446 alcoholic CP patients. In addition, we performed DNA sequencing in 145 patients with alcoholic CP, 138 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and 151 controls. Exon 3 screening was extended to additional patients and controls.S- and L-alleles of the GT-repeat, genotypes and alleles of SNP rs2071746 and non-synonymous variants detected by sequencing were found with similar frequencies in all groups.Although functional data implicate a potential influence of HMOX1 variants on the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, we did not find any association. As rare non-synonymous HMOX1 variants were found in patients and controls, it is rather unlikely that they will have functional consequences essential for pancreatitis development.

  17. A review of the role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of oral cancer and the link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reidy, John T

    2011-08-01

    This article will review the most recent literature on the effects of alcohol on the oral mucosa, and the possible mechanisms by which alcohol is thought to act as a carcinogen. The article will also consider the possible link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer. The authors recommend that the use of alcohol-containing mouthrinses in high-risk populations should be restricted, pending the outcome of further research.

  18. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  20. Recent advances in understanding the role of adipocytokines during non-alcoholic fatty liver disease pathogenesis and their link with hepatokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panera, Nadia; Della Corte, Claudia; Crudele, Annalisa; Stronati, Laura; Nobili, Valerio; Alisi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is currently considered the main cause of chronic liver disease worldwide. Mechanisms leading to the development and progression of this disease are topics of great interest for researchers and clinicians. The current multi-hit hypothesis has thrown the crosstalk between liver and adipose tissue into sharp focus. It is well known that adipose tissue produces circulating factors, known as adipocytokines, which exert several effects on liver cells, promoting the onset of NAFLD and its progression to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis in obese subjects. In a similar way, hepatocytes may also respond to obesogenic stimuli by producing and releasing hepatokines into the circulation. Here, the authors provide an overview of recent advances in our understanding of the role of the most relevant adipocytokines and hepatokines in NAFLD pathogenesis, highlighting their possible molecular and functional interactions.

  1. Roles of silent information regulator 1-serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 10-lipin 1 axis in the pathogenesis of alcohol fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhou, Junying

    2017-06-01

    Alcohol exposure is a major reason of morbidity and mortality all over the world, with much of detrimental consequences attributing to alcoholic liver disease (ALD). With the continued ethanol consumption, alcoholic fatty liver disease (AFLD, the earliest and reversible form of ALD) can further develop to more serious forms of alcoholic liver damage, including alcoholic steatohepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and even eventually progress to hepatocellular carcinoma and liver failure. Furthermore, cell trauma, inflammation, oxidative stress, regeneration, and bacterial translocation are crucial promoters of ethanol-mediated liver lesions. AFLD is characterized by excessive fat deposition in liver induced by excessive drinking, which is related closely to the raised synthesis of fatty acids and triglyceride, reduction of mitochondrial fatty acid β-oxidation, and the aggregation of very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL). Although little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms of AFLD, it seems to be correlated to diverse signal channels. Massive studies have suggested that liver steatosis is closely associated with the inhibition of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and the augment of lipin1 β/α ratio mediated by ethanol. Recently, serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 10 (SFRS10), a specific molecule functioning in alternative splicing of lipin 1 (LPIN1) pre-mRNAs, has emerged as the central connection between SIRT1 and lipin1 signaling. It seems a new signaling axis, SIRT1-SFRS10-LPIN1 axis, acting in the pathogenesis of AFLD exists. This article aims to further explore the interactions among the above three molecules and their influences on the development of AFLD. Impact statement ALD is a major health burden in industrialized countries as well as China. AFLD, the earliest and reversible form of ALD, can progress to hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, even hepatoma. While the mechanisms, by which ethanol consumption leads to AFLD, are complicated and

  2. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis Hereditary Pancreatitis (HP) is a rare genetic condition characterized by ... of pancreatic attacks, which can progress to chronic pancreatitis . Symptoms include abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. Onset ...

  3. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  4. Pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Jennifer J; Gideonsen, Mark D; Song, Jonathan Y; Grobman, William A; O'Halloran, Peggy

    2008-11-01

    To estimate the incidence, cause, and complications of pancreatitis in pregnancy and to identify factors associated with adverse outcomes. This study was a chart review of all pregnant patients diagnosed with pancreatitis from 1992-2001 at 15 participating hospitals. Information was collected on presentation, management, and outcome, along with the number of deliveries at each hospital. During the 10 years of the study, 101 cases of pancreatitis occurred among 305,101 deliveries, yielding an incidence of one in 3,021 (.03%). There were no maternal deaths; perinatal mortality was 3.6%. Eighty-nine women had acute pancreatitis, and 12 women had chronic pancreatitis. The majority (66%) of cases of acute pancreatitis were biliary in origin, and they were associated with better outcomes than nonbiliary causes. Cases of gallstone pancreatitis that received surgical or endoscopic intervention during pregnancy had lower rates of preterm delivery and recurrence than those that were conservatively managed, but this difference was not significant (P=.2). Alcohol was responsible for 12.3% of acute pancreatitis cases and 58% of chronic pancreatitis cases and was associated with increased rates of recurrence and preterm delivery. A calcium level, triglycerides, or both was not obtained in half of cases identified as idiopathic. Pancreatitis is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. Although it is most often acute and related to gallstones, nonbiliary causes should be sought because they are associated with worse outcomes. III.

  5. Kill two birds with one stone: making multi-transgenic pre-diabetes mouse models through insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Kong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance accompanied by defective insulin secretion. Transgenic mouse models play an important role in medical research. However, single transgenic mouse models may not mimic the complex phenotypes of most cases of type 2 diabetes. Methods Focusing on genes related to pancreatic islet damage, peripheral insulin resistance and related environmental inducing factors, we generated single-transgenic (C/EBP homology protein, CHOP mice (CHOP mice, dual-transgenic (human islet amyloid polypeptide, hIAPP; CHOP mice (hIAPP-CHOP mice and triple-transgenic (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1; hIAPP; CHOP mice (11β-HSD1-hIAPP- CHOP mice. The latter two types of transgenic (Tg animals were induced with high-fat high-sucrose diets (HFHSD. We analyzed the diabetes-related symptoms and histology features of the transgenic animals. Results Comparing symptoms on the spot-checked points, we determined that the triple-transgene mice were more suitable for systematic study. The results of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT of triple-transgene animals began to change 60 days after induction (p < 0.001. After 190 days of induction, the body weights (p < 0.01 and plasma glucose of the animals in Tg were higher than those of the animals in Negative Control (Nc. After sacrificed, large amounts of lipid were found deposited in adipose (p < 0.01 and ectopically deposited in the non-adipose tissues (p < 0.05 or 0.01 of the animals in the Tg HFHSD group. The weights of kidneys and hearts of Tg animals were significantly increased (p < 0.01. Serum C peptide (C-P was decreased due to Tg effects, and insulin levels were increased due to the effects of the HFHSD in the Tg HFHSD group, indicating that damaged insulin secretion and insulin resistance hyperinsulinemia existed simultaneously in these animals. The serum corticosterone of Tg was slightly higher than those of Nc due to the

  6. Role of Endogenous Peptides and Enzymes in the Pathogenesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pathogenesis mechanism of acute pancreatitis that are related to various inflammatory and pro- inflammatory mediators. Keywords: Acute ... cytokines which are released by neutrophils and macrophages during acute pancreatitis, ... platelet activating factor have been shown to play significant roles in the pathogenesis of ...

  7. Involvement of a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis on the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Masato; Naka, Shuhei; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Wada, Koichiro; Endo, Hiroki; Mawatari, Hironori; Imajo, Kento; Nomura, Ryota; Hokamura, Kazuya; Ono, Masafumi; Murata, Shogo; Tohnai, Iwai; Sumida, Yoshio; Shima, Toshihide; Kuboniwa, Masae; Umemura, Kazuo; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Amano, Atsuo; Okanoue, Takeshi; Ooshima, Takashi; Nakajima, Atsushi

    2012-02-16

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that is closely associated with multiple factors such as obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, other risk factors for the development of NAFLD are unclear. With the association between periodontal disease and the development of systemic diseases receiving increasing attention recently, we conducted this study to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), a major causative agent of periodontitis. The detection frequencies of periodontal bacteria in oral samples collected from 150 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (102 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and 48 with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) patients) and 60 non-NAFLD control subjects were determined. Detection of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria were detected by PCR assay. In addition, effect of P. gingivalis-infection on mouse NAFLD model was investigated. To clarify the exact contribution of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal treatments were also undertaken for 3 months in 10 NAFLD patients with periodontitis. The detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NAFLD patients was significantly higher than that in the non-NAFLD control subjects (46.7% vs. 21.7%, odds ratio: 3.16). In addition, the detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NASH patients was markedly higher than that in the non-NAFLD subjects (52.0%, odds ratio: 3.91). Most of the P. gingivalis fimbria detected in the NAFLD patients was of invasive genotypes, especially type II (50.0%). Infection of type II P. gingivalis on NAFLD model of mice accelerated the NAFLD progression. The non-surgical periodontal treatments on NAFLD patients carried out for 3 months ameliorated the liver function parameters, such as the serum levels of AST and ALT. Infection with high-virulence P. gingivalis might be an additional risk factor for the

  8. Involvement of a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis on the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoneda Masato

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that is closely associated with multiple factors such as obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, other risk factors for the development of NAFLD are unclear. With the association between periodontal disease and the development of systemic diseases receiving increasing attention recently, we conducted this study to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, a major causative agent of periodontitis. Methods The detection frequencies of periodontal bacteria in oral samples collected from 150 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (102 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and 48 with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL patients and 60 non-NAFLD control subjects were determined. Detection of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria were detected by PCR assay. In addition, effect of P. gingivalis-infection on mouse NAFLD model was investigated. To clarify the exact contribution of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal treatments were also undertaken for 3 months in 10 NAFLD patients with periodontitis. Results The detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NAFLD patients was significantly higher than that in the non-NAFLD control subjects (46.7% vs. 21.7%, odds ratio: 3.16. In addition, the detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NASH patients was markedly higher than that in the non-NAFLD subjects (52.0%, odds ratio: 3.91. Most of the P. gingivalis fimbria detected in the NAFLD patients was of invasive genotypes, especially type II (50.0%. Infection of type II P. gingivalis on NAFLD model of mice accelerated the NAFLD progression. The non-surgical periodontal treatments on NAFLD patients carried out for 3 months ameliorated the liver function parameters, such as the serum levels of AST and ALT. Conclusions Infection with high-virulence P

  9. A new look at the pathogenesis of the meconium aspiration syndrome: a role for fetal pancreatic proteolytic enzymes in epithelial cell detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Vadim A; Gewolb, Ira H; Uhal, Bruce D

    2010-09-01

    We hypothesized that fetal pancreatic digestive enzymes play a role in the lung damage after meconium aspiration. We studied the effect of meconium on the A549 alveolar epithelial cell line. The exposure of the cells to 0.5 to 5% meconium resulted in significant disruption of connections between A549 cells and caused dose-dependent cell detachment, without signs of cell death. A protease inhibitor cocktail prevented the A549 cell detachment induced by meconium. After the exposure to 2.5% meconium, a protective effect was quantified by measuring light absorbance by gentian violet stain of still attached cells. The protease inhibitor cocktail and chymostatin showed significant protective effects, increasing the number of attached cells by 135 and 123%, respectively (p meconium aspiration syndrome (MAS). We speculate that disruption of intercellular connections and cell detachment from the basement membrane are key events in the pathology associated with MAS. The observed protective effects of protease inhibitors suggest that they may be useful in the treatment and/or prophylaxis of MAS.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  11. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because that's how many accidents occur. What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  12. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  13. Alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Junior, L.

    1988-01-01

    The alcohol production as a secondary energy source, the participation of the alcohol in Brazilian national economic and social aspects are presented. Statistical data of alcohol demand compared with petroleum by-products and electricity are also included. (author)

  14. TRO40303 Ameliorates Alcohol-Induced Pancreatitis Through Reduction of Fatty Acid Ethyl Ester–Induced Mitochondrial Injury and Necrotic Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Muhammad Ahsan; Wen, Li; Awais, Muhammad; Latawiec, Diane; Huang, Wei; Chvanov, Michael; Schaller, Sophie; Bordet, Thierry; Michaud, Magali; Pruss, Rebecca; Tepikin, Alexei; Criddle, David; Sutton, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibition is a promising approach to treat acute pancreatitis (AP). We sought to determine (i) the effects of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore inhibitor 3,5-seco-4-nor-cholestan-5-one oxime-3-ol (TRO40303) on murine and human pancreatic acinar cell (PAC) injury induced by fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) or taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate and (ii) TRO40303 pharmacokinetics and efficacy in experimental alcoholic AP (FAEE-AP). Methods Changes in mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), and cell fate were examined in freshly isolated murine or human PACs by confocal microscopy. TRO40303 pharmacokinetics were assessed in cerulein-induced AP and therapeutic efficacy in FAEE-AP induced with palmitoleic acid and ethanol. Severity of AP was assessed by standard biomarkers and blinded histopathology. Results TRO40303 prevented loss of Δψm and necrosis induced by 100 μM palmitoleic acid ethyl ester or 500 μM taurolithocholic acid-3-sulfate in murine and human PACs. Pharmacokinetic analysis found TRO40303 accumulated in the pancreas. A single dose of 3 mg/kg TRO40303 significantly reduced serum amylase (P = 0.043), pancreatic trypsin (P = 0.018), and histopathology scores (P = 0.0058) in FAEE-AP. Conclusions TRO40303 protects mitochondria and prevents necrotic cell death pathway activation in murine and human PACs, ameliorates the severity of FAEE-AP, and is a candidate drug for human AP. PMID:29200128

  15. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  17. Chronic Pancreatitis and Neoplasia: Correlation or Coincidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Zografos

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Any link between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could reflect the malignant potential of a chronic inflammatory process. Four patients with ductal adenocarcinomas had a long history of pancreatic pain (median duration 5 years and showed clearcut evidence of chronic pancreatitis “downstream” of the tumour. Four were alcoholics and two heavy smokers. These four cases arose within a surgical series of approximately 250 patients with chronic pancreatitis, giving an incidence of 1.6 per cent. The incidence and anatomical distribution of carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis could possibly be consistent with a casual relationship.

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Acute Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  19. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  20. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol abuse is responsible for 4 percent of global deaths and disability, nearly as much as tobacco and five times the burden of illicit drugs (WHO). In developing countries with low mortality, alcohol is the leading risk factor for males, causing 9.8 percent of years lost to death and disability. Alcohol abuse...

  1. Complement and alcoholic liver disease: role of C1q in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jessica I; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; McMullen, Megan R; Stavitsky, Abram B; Nagy, Laura E

    2010-08-01

    Complement is involved in the development of alcoholic liver disease in mice; however, the mechanisms for complement activation during ethanol exposure have not been identified. C1q, the recognition subunit of the first complement component, binds to apoptotic cells, thereby activating the classical complement pathway. Because ethanol exposure increases hepatocellular apoptosis, we hypothesized that ethanol-induced apoptosis would lead to activation of complement via the classical pathway. Wild-type and C1qa-/- mice were allowed free access to ethanol-containing diets or pair-fed control diets for 4 or 25 days. Ethanol feeding for 4 days increased apoptosis of Kupffer cells in both wild-type and C1qa-/- mice. Ethanol-induced deposition of C1q and C3b/iC3b/C3c was colocalized with apoptotic Kupffer cells in wild-type, but not C1qa-/-, mice. Furthermore, ethanol-induced increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 expression at this early time point were suppressed in C1q-deficient mice. Chronic ethanol feeding (25 days) increased steatosis, hepatocyte apoptosis, and activity of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases in wild-type mice. These markers of hepatocyte injury were attenuated in C1qa-/- mice. In contrast, chronic ethanol (25 days)-induced increases in cytochrome P450 2E1 expression and oxidative stress did not differ between wild-type and C1qa-/- mice. For the first time, these data indicate that ethanol activates the classical complement pathway via C1q binding to apoptotic cells in the liver and that C1q contributes to the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury. Copyright (c) 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  3. Genetic aspects of chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disorder. A key characteristic of the condition is severe recurrent abdominal pain. The origin of CP is mixed, with about 70% of the cases being attributed to alcohol abuse even though 95% of all alcoholics never develop CP. Approximately half

  4. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  5. Lipolysis of visceral adipocyte triglyceride by pancreatic lipases converts mild acute pancreatitis to severe pancreatitis independent of necrosis and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krutika; Trivedi, Ram N; Durgampudi, Chandra; Noel, Pawan; Cline, Rachel A; DeLany, James P; Navina, Sarah; Singh, Vijay P

    2015-03-01

    Visceral fat necrosis has been associated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) for over 100 years; however, its pathogenesis and role in SAP outcomes are poorly understood. Based on recent work suggesting that pancreatic fat lipolysis plays an important role in SAP, we evaluated the role of pancreatic lipases in SAP-associated visceral fat necrosis, the inflammatory response, local injury, and outcomes of acute pancreatitis (AP). For this, cerulein pancreatitis was induced in lean and obese mice, alone or with the lipase inhibitor orlistat and parameters of AP induction (serum amylase and lipase), fat necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, and multisystem organ failure, and inflammatory response were assessed. Pancreatic lipases were measured in fat necrosis and were overexpressed in 3T3-L1 cells. We noted obesity to convert mild cerulein AP to SAP with greater cytokines, unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs), and multisystem organ failure, and 100% mortality without affecting AP induction or pancreatic necrosis. Increased pancreatic lipase amounts and activity were noted in the extensive visceral fat necrosis of dying obese mice. Lipase inhibition reduced fat necrosis, UFAs, organ failure, and mortality but not the parameters of AP induction. Pancreatic lipase expression increased lipolysis in 3T3-L1 cells. We conclude that UFAs generated via lipolysis of visceral fat by pancreatic lipases convert mild AP to SAP independent of pancreatic necrosis and the inflammatory response. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru B.H. Ko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP is a progressive inflammatory disease in which the pancreatic secretory parenchyma is destroyed and replaced by fibrosis. The presence of intraductal pancreatic stone(s is important for the diagnosis of CP; however, the precise molecular mechanisms of pancreatic stone formation in CP were left largely unknown. CFTR is a chloride channel expressed in the apical plasma membrane of pancreatic duct cells and plays a central role in HCO3- secretion. In previous studies, we have found that CFTR is largely mislocalized to the cytoplasm of pancreatic duct cells in all forms of CP and corticosteroids normalizes the localization of CFTR to the proper apical membrane at least in autoimmune pancreatitis. From these observations, we could conclude that the mislocalization of CFTR is a cause of protein plug formation in CP, subsequently resulting in pancreatic stone formation.Considering our observation that the mislocalization of CFTR also occurs in alcoholic or idiopathic CP, it is very likely that these pathological conditions can also be treated by corticosteroids, thereby preventing pancreatic stone formation in these patients. Further studies are definitely required to clarify these fundamental issues.

  7. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimac, Davor; Stimac, Tea

    2011-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare condition estimated to occur in 1 per 1000 to 1 per 12,000 pregnancies. The most frequent etiology in pregnancy is biliary, followed by hyperlipidemia and/or alcohol abuse. Abdominal ultrasound and endoscopic ultrasound are ideal imaging techniques for diagnosing disease because they have no radiation risk. Computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography should be used with caution. Treatment could be conservative or surgical, and standard algorithms are slightly modified in pregnant women. In the last decades the outcome of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is much better, and perinatal mortality is less than 5%.

  8. Role of Endogenous Peptides and Enzymes in the Pathogenesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease with the clinical manifestation of acute abdominal pain. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The exact mechanism(s) by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. However, one of the proposed mechanisms for induction ...

  9. Alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.F.; Tol, A. van

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol consumption affects overall mortality. Light to moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of coronary heart disease; epidemiological, physiological and genetic data show a causal relationship. Light to moderate drinking is also associated with a reduced risk of other vascular diseases

  10. Astrovirus Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cydney Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astroviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young, elderly, and the immunocompromised. Since the discovery of human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV-1 in 1975, the family Astroviridae has expanded to include two more human clades and numerous mammalian and avian-specific genotypes. Despite this, there is still little known about pathogenesis. The following review highlights the current knowledge of astrovirus pathogenesis, and outlines the critical steps needed to further astrovirus research, including the development of animal models of cell culture systems.

  11. Pancreatitis - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007679.htm Pancreatitis - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pancreatitis in children occurs when the pancreas becomes swollen ...

  12. Pancreatitis - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100149.htm Pancreatitis - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatitis A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  13. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  14. Swinging heart in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamparter, Steffen; Sundermann, Henrike

    2013-08-01

    Pleural effusions and ascites are not uncommon in acute pancreatitis; however, pericardial effusions complicated by cardiac tamponade are extremely rare and definite treatment has yet to be established. This case report illustrates the findings in a 57-year-old patient, who was diagnosed of an acute alcoholic pancreatitis. The clinical course was complicated by recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis, and eventually, the patient developed acute circulatory failure that was caused by cardiac tamponade. The patient was successfully treated by an emergency pericardiocentesis; however, although the patient was treated with intrapericardial triamcinolone and octreotide, pericardial effusion reoccurred. Eventually, a pancreaticopericardial fistula was diagnosed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography, and after successful stent placement in a disrupted pancreatic duct, the clinical recovery was uneventful. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a successful endoscopic treatment of a pancreaticopericardial fistula complicated by cardiac tamponade in a patient with acute pancreatitis.

  15. Down-regulation of BRCA1 in chronic pancreatitis and sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Carmela; Ramadani, Marco; Meyer, Stephan; Leder, Gerd; Krüger, Martin; Welte, Karl; Gansauge, Frank; Beger, Hans G

    2004-06-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 are considered to be breast cancer susceptibility genes that may also contribute to pancreatic cancer development because family studies revealed mutation carriers to have an increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, as demonstrated for breast and ovarian cancer, inactivation of BRCA in sporadic diseases is based on alteration in gene expression or functional alteration. To study a potential correlation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 to chronic pancreatitis and development of sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma, we have analyzed the expression of these genes by quantitative PCR and performed immunohistochemical analyses in normal pancreatic tissues, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens. BRCA1 expression was down-regulated in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in particular on the RNA level. Furthermore, our data indicate suppressed BRCA1 expression in pancreatic cancer on both the RNA and protein levels. Quantitative analysis of BRCA1 protein expression demonstrated regular staining in 50% of tumor specimens tested and reduced staining in 50% of tumor specimens tested. Correlation with the clinical outcome revealed a significantly better 1-year overall survival for patients with BRCA1-regular as compared with BRCA1-reduced or BRCA1-absent tumors. In contrast, no substantial differences in BRCA2 expression were found in chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer samples. Our data demonstrate alteration of BRCA1 expression in chronic pancreatitis and sporadic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. We, for the first time, provide evidence for a role of BRCA1 in pancreatic carcinogenesis of noninherited tumors and for clinical outcome.

  16. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Cook; Michael J. Moore

    1999-01-01

    Excess drinking is associated with lost productivity, accidents, disability, early death, crime, neglect of family responsibilities, and personality deterioration. These and related concerns have justified special restrictions on alcoholic-beverage commerce and consumption. The nature and extent of government involvement in this arena vary widely over time and place, and are often controversial. Economists have contributed to the evaluation of alcohol policy through empirical work on the effe...

  17. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  19. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  20. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  1. Dual drainage using a percutaneous pancreatic duct technique contributed to resolution of severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tatsunori; Kikuyama, Masataka; Yokoi, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Shinya

    2017-04-01

    A 66-year-old man was admitted for severe acute alcoholic pancreatitis with infected pancreatic necrosis (IPN). Abdominal computed tomography revealed an inflamed pancreatic head, a dilated main pancreatic duct (MPD), and a large cavity with heterogeneous fluid containing gas adjacent to the pancreatic head, and extending to the pelvis. The cavity was drained percutaneously near the pancreatic head on admission; another tube was inserted into the pelvic cavity on hospital day 3. The drained fluid contained pus with high amylase concentration. Nasopancreatic drainage tube placement was unsuccessfully attempted on hospital day 9. On hospital day 23, percutaneous puncture of the MPD and placement of a pancreatic duct drainage tube was performed. Pancreatography revealed major extravasation from the pancreatic head. The IPN cavity receded; the percutaneous IPN drainage tube was removed on hospital day 58. On hospital day 83, the pancreatic drainage was changed to a transpapillary pancreatic stent, and the patient was discharged. Measuring the amylase concentration of peripancreatic fluid collections can aid in the diagnosis of pancreatic duct disruption; moreover, dual percutaneous necrotic cavity drainage plus pancreatic duct drainage may be essential for treating IPN. If transpapillary drainage tube placement is difficult, percutaneous pancreatic duct drainage may be feasible.

  2. Acute pancreatitis following medical abortion: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Hashem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy. Although most pregnant women with acute pancreatitis have associated gallstones, less common causes such as drugs have been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who underwent medical abortion with mifepristone and gemeprost and received codeine as pain-relief during the induction of abortion. She developed a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis which required 14 days of intensive care. Other possible etiological factors, i.e. gallstone, alcohol intake and hyperlipidemia, were excluded. Conclusions The reported case of acute pancreatitis was most likely drug-induced.

  3. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  4. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...

  5. Genetic factors in chronic pancreatitis; implications for diagnosis, management and prognosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, M.H.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a clinical situation with persisting inflammation leading to destruction of the pancreas ensuing endocrine and exocrine failure. There are 4 subtypes: hereditary, idiopathic, alcoholic and tropical pancreatitis. Genetic factors can explain a significant proportion of CP

  6. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    increased alcohol consumption. Methods: All patients with first-time AP between 2003 and 2012 in a well-defined area in Sweden were retrospectively identified. Data on AP aetiology (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) and severity were registered. Data on annual alcohol sales as well as on self-reported alcohol...

  7. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on the Outcome of Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Beg, Muhammad Shaalan; Dwivedi, Alok Kumar; Ahmad, Syed Arif; Ali, Sadia; Olowokure, Olugbenga

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) has the potential to impact the pathogenesis, treatment, and outcome of pancreatic cancer. This study evaluates the impact of DM on pancreatic cancer survival. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Central Cancer Registry (VACCR) for pancreatic cancer cases between 1995 and 2008. DM and no-DM cases were identified from comorbidity data. Univariate and multivariable analysis was performed. Multiple imputation method...

  8. An Unusual Case of Colon Perforation Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Aghenta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications of severe acute pancreatitis occur rarely. Although there have been several theories on how pancreatic pseudocysts rupture into the colon, the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. We report an unusual case of pseudocysts complicating severe acute pancreatitis presenting with colonic perforation in a 71-year-old man with a history of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pressure effects from a giant pseudocyst and intravascular volume depletion with acute insult on chronic mesenteric ischemia are highlighted as possible etiologic factors.

  9. Issues in hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay P; Pitchumoni, C S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-03-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established but underestimated cause of acute pancreatitis and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (familial combined hyperlipidemia or familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of acute pancreatitis in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 and >2000 mg/dL is ∼ 5% and 10% to 20%, respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride (TG) levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in the management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, and control of secondary factors are key to the treatment, and medications are useful adjuncts to the long-term management of TG levels. Control of TG levels to 500 mg/dL or less can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis.

  10. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis: complications and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, M V; Keogh, G W; Wilson, J S

    1999-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by progressive and irreversible loss of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine function. In the majority of cases, particularly in Western populations, the disease is associated with alcohol abuse. The major complications of chronic pancreatitis include abdominal pain, malabsorption, and diabetes. Of these, pain is the most difficult to treat and is therefore the most frustrating symptom for both the patient and the physician. While analgesics form the cornerstone of pain therapy, a number of other treatment modalities (inhibition of pancreatic secretion, antioxidants, and surgery) have also been described. Unfortunately, the efficacy of these modalities is difficult to assess, principally because of the lack of properly controlled clinical trials. Replacement of pancreatic enzymes (particularly lipase) in the gut is the mainstay of treatment for malabsorption; the recent discovery of a bacterial lipase (with high lipolytic activity and resistance to degradation in gastric and duodenal juice) represents an important advance that may significantly increase the efficacy of enzyme replacement therapy by replacing the easily degradable porcine lipase found in existing enzyme preparations. Diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis is difficult to control and its course is often complicated by hypoglycaemic attacks. Therefore, it is essential that caution is exercised when treating this condition with insulin. This paper reviews recent research and prevailing concepts regarding the three major complications of chronic pancreatitis noted above. A comprehensive discussion of current opinion on clinical issues relating to the other known complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pseudocysts, venous thromboses, biliary and duodenal obstruction, biliary cirrhosis, and pancreatic cancer is also presented.

  12. Relação lipase/amilase nas pancreatites agudas de causa biliar e nas pancreatites agudas/crônicas agudizadas de causa alcoólica Lipase/amylase ratio in biliary acute pancreatitis and alcoholic acute/acutized chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Custódio Pacheco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Pancreatites agudas de causas alcoólica ou biliar podem necessitar de abordagens terapêuticas diferentes. OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade da relação lipase/amilase em diferenciar as causas alcoólica ou biliar na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes com pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica, todos homens, com idade média (desvio padrão de 39,8 ± 7,0 anos (grupo I e 29 com pancreatite aguda biliar, sendo 8 homens e 21 mulheres, com idade média de 43,6 ± 19,9 anos (grupo II. As amilasemias e lipasemias foram determinadas em pacientes com sintomatologia há, no máximo, 48 horas. A relação lipase/amilase foi calculada utilizando-se valores de amilasemia e lipasemia expressas como múltiplos de seus respectivos valores superiores de referência. RESULTADOS: As médias das lipasemias (4.814 ± 3.670 U/L e amilasemias (1.282 ± 777 U/L no grupo I foram semelhantes às do grupo II (2.697 ± 2.391 e 1.878 ± 1.319 U/L, respectivamente, mas a média das relações lipase/amilase foi significantemente maior no grupo I (4,4 ± 3,6 do que no grupo II (2,2 ± 2,2. Relação lipase/amilase >3 foi significantemente mais freqüente no grupo I (66,7% do que no grupo II (24,1% e diferenciou os dois grupos com sensibilidade de 67% e especificidade de 76%. CONCLUSÕES: 1 as amilasemias e lipasemias não diferenciaram os dois grupos avaliados; 2 relação lipase/amilase >3 é mais freqüente na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica do que na pancreatite aguda biliar, e pode ser útil na diferenciação destas duas causas de pancreatite.BACKGROUND: Alcoholic or biliary acute pancreatitis may need different therapeutic approaches. AIM: Assessing the validity of lipase/amylase ratio in differentiating biliary from alcoholic acute pancreatitis/acutized chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Nine male patients (mean age and standard deviation: 39.8 ± 7.0 years

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? ... will develop diabetes in adolescence. Who gets chronic pancreatitis? Those at risk for chronic pancreatitis are children ...

  14. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatic cysts Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Doctors & departments Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  16. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the severity of the pancreatic insufficiency. As further alterations may be needed from time to time, it ... m. PT), or email patientcentral@pancan.org to speak with a knowledgeable and compassionate associate. Information provided ...

  17. Relationship between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Stephanie L M; Kennedy, James I C; Murphy, Rinki; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-12-07

    . Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency occurs in 40% of individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. Further studies are needed to investigate the pathogenesis of diabetes in this setting.

  18. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  19. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  20. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  1. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  2. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  3. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absence of tumor, it often appears reasonable to consider a drug as the cause of acute pancreatitis. Over 100 drugs have been implicated by case reports as causing acute pancreatitis. While some of these case reports are well written, many case reports represent poorly written experiences of the clinician simply implicating a drug without a careful evaluation. Over-reliance on case reports while ignoring randomized clinical trials and large pharmacoepidemiologic surveys has led to confusion about drug induced acute pancreatitis. This review will explain that drug induced acute pancreatitis does occur, but it is rare, and over diagnosis leads to misconceptions about the disease resulting in inappropriate patient care, increased litigation and a failure to address the true entity: idiopathic acute pancreatitis. PMID:25469020

  4. Roux-en-Y drainage of a pancreatic fistula for disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome after acute necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Erik G; Scaife, Courtney L; Mulvihill, Sean J; Glasgow, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    After acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP), a pancreatic fistula may occur from disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome (DPDS) where a segment of the pancreas is no longer in continuity with the main pancreatic duct. To study the outcome of patients treated using Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy for DPDS after ANP. Between 2002 and 2011, patients treated for DPDS in the setting of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or magnetic resonance cholangiopanreatography (MRCP) documented main pancreatic duct disruption with Roux-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy. In all, seven patients with DPDS were treated. The median age was 62 years (range 49-78) and five were men. The cause of ANP was gallstones (2), alcohol (1), ERCP (1) and idiopathic (3). Pancreatic necrosectomy was done in six patients. Time from onset of pancreatitis to fistula drainage was 270 days (164-365). Pancreatic fistulae arose from DPDS in the head/neck (4) and body/tail (3). Patients had a median fistula output of 140 ml (100-200) per day before surgery. The median operative time was 142 min (75-367) and estimated blood loss was 150 ml (25 to 500). Patients began an oral diet on post-operative day 4 (3-6) and were hospitalized for a median of 7 days (5-12). The median follow-up was 264 days (29-740). Subsequently, one patient required a distal pancreatectomy. After surgery, three patients required oral hypoglycaemics. No patient developed pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Internal surgical drainage using Roux-en-Y pancreatic fistula tract-jejunostomy is a safe and definitive treatment for patients with DPDS. © 2011 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  5. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  6. Affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related mortality in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse has numerous adverse health and social consequences. The consumer response to changes in alcohol affordability is an important issue on alcohol policy debates. Studies from many countries have shown an inverse relationship between alcohol prices and alcohol consumption in the population. There are, however, suggestions that increasing the price of alcohol by rising taxes may have limited effect on alcohol-related problems, associated with long-term heavy drinking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between alcohol affordability and alcohol-related mortality rates in post-Soviet Belarus. For this purpose trends in alcohol-related mortality rates (mortality from liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, alcoholism and alcohol psychoses) and affordability of vodka between 1990 and 2010 were compared. The time series analysis revealed that 1% increase in vodka affordability is associated with an increase in liver cirrhosis mortality of 0,77%, an increase in pancreatitis mortality of 0.53%, an increase in mortality from alcoholism and alcohol psychoses of 0,70%. The major conclusion emerging from this study is that affordability of alcohol is one of the most important predictor of alcohol-related problems in a population. These findings provide additional evidence that decreasing in affordability of alcohol is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

  7. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In around 30% of patients with necrotising pancreatitis, secondary infection of necrosis occurs, probably due to bacterial translocation from the patient’s own gut. Infected necrosis is an indication for ...

  8. A case of insulinoma with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Roles of hyperphagia and hyperinsulinemia in pathogenesis of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokutan, Mariyo; Yabe, Daisuke; Komoto, Izumi; Kurose, Takeshi; Kawai, Jun; Nakamura, Takefumi; Imamura, Masayuki; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a serious health-related condition all over the world; the number of patients is increasing in Asian countries including Japan. Better understanding of its pathophysiology is required to develop effective therapeutics, as patients may go on to develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinomas. While NAFLD is believed to be associated with metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, its etiology remains largely unknown and the development or co-existence of NAFLD in patients with insulinoma has not been investigated. A 33-year-old male with an insulinoma, who had been hypoglycemic during the previous four years, developed abnormally elevated levels of liver enzymes and histological fatty liver characteristic of NAFLD by the time of admission to our hospital for resection of an insulinoma. His medical records for the previous eight years revealed that his bodyweight had increased gradually from 60 kg to 71 kg for seven years and then acutely increased to 79 kg in the latest one-year period. This sudden increase was thought to be due to the patient's self-described overeating of fruits to forestall hypoglycemia. Fresh fruits are rich in fructose, and the patient's triglycerides, alanine and aspartate transaminases showed an acute increase in the previous one-year period. After resection of the insulinoma, the levels of these parameters all were mostly restored, which suggests that hyperinsulinemia and subsequent hyperphagia played a role in the development of NAFLD in this case. This is the first report of patient with NAFLD and an insulinoma.

  9. Short article: Presence, extent and location of pancreatic necrosis are independent of aetiology in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Robert C; Sternby, Hanna; Dimova, Alexandra; Ignatavicius, Povilas; Koiva, Peter; Penttila, Anne K; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Regner, Sara; Rosendahl, Jonas; Bollen, Thomas L

    2018-03-01

    The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN was calculated. In total, 159 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis were identified from a cohort of 285 patients. The most frequent aetiologies were biliary (105 patients, 37%), followed by alcohol (102 patients, 36%) and other aetiologies including idiopathic (78 patients, 27%). No relationship was found between the aetiology and the presence of pancreatic necrosis, EXPN, location of pancreatic necrosis or presence of collections. We found no association between the aetiology of AP and the presence, extent and anatomical location of pancreatic necrosis.

  10. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  11. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  13. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-10-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis may be at an increased risk of low bone density because of malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium, poor diet, pain, alcoholism, and smoking. We investigated the rates of osteoporosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis compared to matched controls.

  14. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In

  15. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  16. Pancreatic enzyme therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2007-04-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency with steatorrhea is a major consequence of pancreatic diseases (eg, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer), extrapancreatic diseases such as celiac disease and Crohn's disease, and gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgical resection. Recognition of this entity is highly relevant to avoid malnutrition-related morbidity and mortality. Therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is based on the oral administration of pancreatic enzymes aiming at providing the duodenal lumen with sufficient active lipase at the time of gastric emptying of nutrients. Administration of enzymes in the form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres avoids acid-mediated lipase inactivation and ensures gastric emptying of enzymes in parallel with nutrients. Nevertheless, such factors as acidic intestinal pH and bacterial overgrowth may prevent normalization of fat digestion even in compliant patients. The present article critically reviews current therapeutic approaches to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

  17. An Exploratory Study on the Development of an Animal Model of Acute Pancreatitis Following Nicotine Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is known to be a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis is believed to be a predisposed condition for pancreatic cancer. As of this date, there is no established experimental animal model to conduct detailed studies on these two deadly diseases. Our aim is to establish a rodent model by which we can systematically study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Methods Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to graded doses of nicotine by various routes for periods of three to 16 weeks. Blood samples were measured for hormonal and metabolic parameters. The pancreas was evaluated for histopathological changes and its function was assessed in isolated pancreatic acini upon stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK or carbachol (Cch. The pancreatic tissue was evaluated further for oncogene expression. Results Body weight, food and fluid intakes, plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in animals with nicotine exposure when compared to control. However, CCK and gastrin levels in the blood were significantly elevated. Pancreatic function was decreased significantly with no alteration in CCK receptor binding. Pancreatic histology revealed vacuolation, swelling, cellular pyknosis and karyorrhexis. Mutant oncogene, H-ras, was overexpressed in nicotine-treated pancreatic tissue. Summary and conclusion The results suggest that alterations in metabolic, hormonal and pathologic parameters following nicotine-treatment appear consistent with diagnostic criteria of human pancreatitis. It is proposed that rats could be considered as a potential animal model to study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  18. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  19. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P gland volume was negatively correlated to the duration of CP (r = -0.39, P gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in anorexia and bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Luc G; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Herring, Sharon; Marti, Jennifer L

    2004-07-01

    Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol for many years. Imaging studies during all three admissions failed to identify any biliary disease, including gallstones or biliary sludge. A cholecystectomy was performed, with a normal intraoperative cholangiogram, and no abnormalities on pathologic examination of the gallbladder and bile. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10 with no pain, and she has begun to return to regular eating habits. Pancreatitis has not recurred after 6 months of follow up. We have identified 14 cases in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with anorexia or bulimia. In the absence of evidence for gallstone, alcohol or metabolic etiologies, eating disorders may contribute to the pathophysiology of some idiopathic cases of pancreatitis.

  1. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  2. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Sang Wook [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  3. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  4. Biliary and pancreatic secretions in abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becciolini, A.; Cionini, L.; Cappellini, M.; Atzeni, G.

    1979-01-01

    The biliary and pancreatic secretions have been determined in patients given pelvic or para-aortic irradiation, with a dose of 50 Gy in the former group and between 36 and 40 Gy in the latter. A test meal containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as reference substance was used. Each sample of the duodenal content was assayed for volume, PEG content, amylase and trypsin activity, pH and biliary secretion. No significant modifications of biliary and pancreatic secretions were demonstrated after irradiation, suggesting that these functions are not involved in the pathogenesis of the malabsorption radiation syndrome. (Auth.)

  5. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  6. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  7. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Efstathios P; Sarigianni, Maria; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Mamopoulos, Apostolos; Karagiannis, Vasilios

    2011-12-01

    Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy but it is associated with increased incidence of maternal and fetal mortality. It should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper quadrant abdominal pain with or without nausea and vomiting. The commonest identified causes of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia. The main laboratory finding is increased amylase activity. Appropriate investigations include ultrasound of the right upper quadrant and measurement of serum triglycerides and ionized calcium. Management of gallstone pancreatitis is controversial, although laparoscopic cholecystectomy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) are often used and may be associated with lower complication rates. In hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis ω-3 fatty acids and even therapeutic plasma exchange can be used. We also discuss preventive measures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ∼5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  9. Cyclooxygenase-2 is overexpressed in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Wolfgang; Schlosser, Sophia; Ramadani, Marco; Gansauge, Frank; Gansauge, Susanne; Beger, Hans-Günter

    2002-07-01

    Cyclooxygenase enzymes catalyze a critical step in the conversion of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, which are important mediators of acute and chronic inflammation. The constitutively expressed cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) appears to regulate many normal physiologic functions in several cell types, whereas the inducible cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) enzyme mediates the inflammatory response. We investigated the expression of COX-2 in tissues of 35 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 6 patients with pancreatic cancer, and 5 control patients by immunohistochemical analysis and correlations to clinicopathologic features. We found an overexpression of COX-2 in the atrophic acinar cells (80% of patients), hyperplastic ductal cells (86% of patients), and islets cells (97% of patients) but not in normal pancreatic tissues. The COX-2 overexpression in the tissue of patients with chronic pancreatitis was significantly correlated with the frequency of acute attacks of pancreatitis. Tissue from patients who had more than five acute attacks of pancreatitis (n = 10) exhibited COX-2 immunoreactivity of a significantly higher score in atrophic acinar cells (p = 0.004). No correlation could be found with other examined clinical features such as duration of the disease, diabetes, alcohol consumption, smoking, or pain. Our results support the hypothesis that COX-2 may be involved in inflammatory responses in chronic pancreatitis and in the progression of this chronic inflammatory disease.

  10. Neural plasticity in pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2015-11-01

    Pancreatic nerves undergo prominent alterations during the evolution and progression of human chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Intrapancreatic nerves increase in size (neural hypertrophy) and number (increased neural density). The proportion of autonomic and sensory fibres (neural remodelling) is switched, and are infiltrated by perineural inflammatory cells (pancreatic neuritis) or invaded by pancreatic cancer cells (neural invasion). These neuropathic alterations also correlate with neuropathic pain. Instead of being mere histopathological manifestations of disease progression, pancreatic neural plasticity synergizes with the enhanced excitability of sensory neurons, with Schwann cell recruitment toward cancer and with central nervous system alterations. These alterations maintain a bidirectional interaction between nerves and non-neural pancreatic cells, as demonstrated by tissue and neural damage inducing neuropathic pain, and activated neurons releasing mediators that modulate inflammation and cancer growth. Owing to the prognostic effects of pain and neural invasion in pancreatic cancer, dissecting the mechanism of pancreatic neuroplasticity holds major translational relevance. However, current in vivo models of pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis contain many discrepancies from human disease that overshadow their translational value. The present Review discusses novel possibilities for mechanistically uncovering the role of the nervous system in pancreatic disease progression.

  11. CXCR2 inhibition suppresses acute and chronic pancreatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Colin W; Karim, Saadia A; Foth, Mona; Rishi, Loveena; Leach, Joshua D G; Porter, Ross J; Nixon, Colin; Jeffry Evans, T R; Carter, C Ross; Nibbs, Robert J B; Sansom, Owen J; Morton, Jennifer P

    2015-09-01

    Pancreatitis is a significant clinical problem and the lack of effective therapeutic options means that treatment is often palliative rather than curative. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of both acute and chronic pancreatitis is necessary to develop new therapies. Pathological changes in pancreatitis are dependent on innate immune cell recruitment to the site of initial tissue damage, and on the coordination of downstream inflammatory pathways. The chemokine receptor CXCR2 drives neutrophil recruitment during inflammation, and to investigate its role in pancreatic inflammation, we induced acute and chronic pancreatitis in wild-type and Cxcr2(-/-) mice. Strikingly, Cxcr2(-/-) mice were strongly protected from tissue damage in models of acute pancreatitis, and this could be recapitulated by neutrophil depletion or by the specific deletion of Cxcr2 from myeloid cells. The pancreata of Cxcr2(-/-) mice were also substantially protected from damage during chronic pancreatitis. Neutrophil depletion was less effective in this model, suggesting that CXCR2 on non-neutrophils contributes to the development of chronic pancreatitis. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of CXCR2 in wild-type mice replicated the protection seen in Cxcr2(-/-) mice in acute and chronic models of pancreatitis. Moreover, acute pancreatic inflammation was reversible by inhibition of CXCR2. Thus, CXCR2 is critically involved in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis in mice, and its inhibition or loss protects against pancreatic damage. CXCR2 may therefore be a viable therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreatitis. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  12. Clinical Study on Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy in 26 Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Qihui, Cheng; Xiping, Zhang; Xianfeng, Ding

    2012-01-01

    Aim. This paper investigated the pathogenesis and treatment strategies of acute pancreatitis (AP) in pregnancy. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively the characteristics, auxiliary diagnosis, treatment strategies, and clinical outcomes of 26 cases of patients with AP in pregnancy. Results. All patients were cured finally. (1) Nine cases of 22 mild acute pancreatitis (MAP) patients selected automatic termination of pregnancy because of the unsatisfied therapeutic efficacy or those patients’ req...

  13. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult. MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP.

  14. Acute management of hyperlipaemic pancreatitis: a successful ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    successful treatment modality in the acute management of hyperlipaemic pancreatitis. Case study. A 32-year-old ... including diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, hypothyroidism, excessive alcohol intake and nephrotic syndrome, as well as the .... Hypertriglyceridemia: its etiology, effects and treatment. Canad Med Assoc J. 2007 ...

  15. Incretin-based therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Pedersen, Lars; Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of incretin-based drugs (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4] inhibitors) is associated with acute pancreatitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was a nationwide population-based case-control study using medical databases...... in Denmark. Participants were 12,868 patients with a first-time hospitalization for acute pancreatitis between 2005 and 2012 and a population of 128,680 matched control subjects. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for acute pancreatitis associated with different antihyperglycemic drugs. We...... adjusted for history of gallstones, alcoholism, obesity, and other pancreatitis-associated comorbidities and medications. RESULTS: A total of 89 pancreatitis patients (0.69%) and 684 control subjects (0.53%) were ever users of incretins. The crude OR for acute pancreatitis among incretin users was 1.36 (95...

  16. Analysis of multiple factors of postsurgical gastroparesis syndrome after pancreaticoduodenectomy and cryotherapy for pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Ke; Li, Bo; Guan, Quan-Lin; Huang, Tao

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of postsurgical gastroparesis syndrome (PGS) after pancreatic cancer cryotherapy (PCC) or pancreatico-duodenectomy (PD), and to analyze the correlation between the multiple factors and PGS caused by the operations.

  17. Effect of Non-Alcoholic Compounds of Alcoholic Drinks on the Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Feick, Peter; Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 30 years the role of alcohol (ethanol) in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been intensively investigated. However, ethanol is generally consumed in form of alcoholic beverages which contain numerous non-alcoholic compounds. At least on gastric acid secretion it has been convincingly demonstrated that alcohol and alcoholic beverages have markedly different effects. In the present article, we provide an overview about the effect of different non-alcoholic cons...

  18. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... referrals. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  19. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis......: Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between...

  20. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  1. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  2. Imaging of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoeni, Ruedi F

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas. Several classification systems have been used in the past but were considered unsatisfactory. A revised Atlanta classification of acute pancreatitis was published that assessed the clinical course and severity of disease; divided acute pancreatitis into interstitial edematous pancreatitis and necrotizing pancreatitis; discerned an early phase (first week) from a late phase (after the first week); and focused on systemic inflammatory response syndrome and organ failure. This article focuses on the revised classification of acute pancreatitis, with emphasis on imaging features, particularly on newly-termed fluid collections and implications for the radiologist. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula: Serial imaging and clinical follow-up from pseudocyst to fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Keun Nahn [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula is an extremely rare complication of pancreatitis. Only 18 such cases have been previously reported in the medical literature. However, a serial process from pancreatic pseudocyst to fistula formation has not been described. The serial clinical and radiological findings in a 52-year-old chronic alcoholic male patient with fistula between pancreatic pseudocyst and main portal vein are presented.

  4. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: an unresolved issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pankaj

    2010-04-28

    Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is based on expert opinion only, due to geographic and ethic variations. Nonbiliary causes should be sought as they are associated with worse outcomes. Alcohol as a cause of acute pancreatitis is not rare. Hemoconcentration as a marker of fluid deficit and severity should be predicted with caution and fluid resuscitation should be done carefully by closely monitoring the central venous pressure, cardiac and respiratory system. Hypercalcemia of hyperparathyroidism may be falsely lowered due to hypoalbuminemia or suppressed by magnesium tocolysis.

  5. The Pathogenesis of Nontraumatic Osteonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Seamon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nontraumatic osteonecrosis continues to be a challenging problem causing debilitating major joint diseases. The etiology is multifactorial, but steroid- and alcohol-induced osteonecrosis contribute to more than two thirds of all cases with genetic risk factors playing an important role in many other cases, especially when they contribute to hypercoagulable states. While the exact mechanisms remain elusive, many new insights have emerged from research in the last decade that have given us a clearer picture of the pathogenesis of nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Progression to end stage osteonecrosis of the femoral head appears to be related to four main factors: interactions involving the differentiation pathway of osteoprogenitor cells that promote adipogenesis, decreased angiogenesis, direct suppression of osteogenic gene expression and proliferation of bone marrow stem cells, and genetic anomalies or other diseases that promote hypercoagulable states.

  6. How Does Cholecystectomy Influence Recurrence of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Claire L; Abbas, Saleh M; Watters, David A K

    2016-12-01

    Idiopathic acute pancreatitis is diagnosed in approximately 10-30 % of cases of acute pancreatitis. While there is evidence to suggest that the cause in many of these patients is microlithiasis, this fact has not been translated into a resource efficient treatment strategy that is proven to reduce recurrence rates. The aim of this study was to examine the value of prophylactic cholecystectomy following an episode of acute pancreatitis in patients with no history of alcohol abuse and no stones found on ultrasound. This was a retrospective study of 2236 patients who presented to a regional Australian hospital. Patients were included when diagnosed with acute pancreatitis with no confirmed cause. Recurrence of acute pancreatitis was compared between those that did and did not undergo cholecystectomy. One hundred ninety-five consecutive patients met the study definition of "idiopathic" acute pancreatitis. 33.8 % (66/195) underwent cholecystectomy. The patients who had cholecystectomy had a recurrence rate of 19.7 % (13/66) whereas, of those managed expectantly, 42.8 % (68/159) had at least one recurrence of acute pancreatitis (P = 0.001). Following an episode of acute pancreatitis with no identifiable cause, in patients fit for surgery, cholecystectomy should be considered to reduce the risk of recurrent episodes of pancreatitis.

  7. Epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of acute pancreatitis: A retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvaderani, Maryam; Eslick, Guy D; Vagg, Daniel; Faraj, Shadi; Cox, Michael R

    2015-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common acute surgical presentation in Western Society. The causes and pattern of pancreatitis has not been previously documented for Western Sydney. As Western Sydney contains many areas of low socio-economic status with an expected high level of alcohol abuse, it was hypothesised that alcoholic pancreatitis would be more prevalent in this population. The aims of this study were to determine the epidemiology, aetiology and outcomes of acute pancreatitis. A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with acute pancreatitis to four tertiary hospitals over a four-year period was undertaken. 932 patients presented with acute pancreatitis with a median age of 50 years (range 16-95); 470 (50.4%) were female. Almost half had gallstones (40%), 25.6% idiopathic, 22% alcohol induced and 3.9% post ERCP. 69 (7.4%) of patients were admitted to ICU/HDU, with a median length of stay in ICU was 6 days (range 1-106). 85 (11.1%) patients had severe pancreatitis (score ≥ 3). Mortality in this study was 1% (9). The majority of patients with acute pancreatitis in Western Sydney present with mild disease and have a low risk of morbidity or mortality. The ratio of gallstone to alcohol aetiology was 2:1. Idiopathic pancreatitis is responsible for more cases than expected. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pancreatic islet regeneration: Therapeutic potential, unknowns and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L. Cockburn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis in mammals is primarily maintained by the insulin-secreting β-cells contained within pancreas-resident islets of Langerhans. Gross disruption of this glucose regulation as a result of pancreatic dysfunction frequently results in diabetes, which is currently a major health concern in South Africa, as well as globally. For many years, researchers have realised that the pancreas, and specifically the islets of Langerhans, have a regenerative capacity, as islet mass has frequently been shown to increase following induced pancreatic injury. Given that gross β-cell loss contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, endogenous pancreatic islet regeneration has been investigated extensively as a potential β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. From the extensive research conducted on pancreatic regeneration, opposing findings and opinions have arisen as to how, and more recently even if, pancreatic regeneration occurs following induced injury. In this review, we outline and discuss the three primary mechanisms by which pancreatic regeneration is proposed to occur: neogenesis, β-cell replication and transdifferentiation. We further explain some of the advanced techniques used in pancreatic regeneration research, and conclude that despite the technologically advanced research tools available to researchers today, the mechanisms governing pancreatic regeneration may remain elusive until more powerful techniques are developed to allow for real-time, live-cell assessment of morphology and gene expression within the pancreas.

  9. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  10. The role of melatonin in pancreatic protection: could melatonin be used in the treatment of acute pancreatitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworek, Jolanta; Leja-Szpak, Anna; Kot, Michalina; Jaworek, Andrzej; Nawrot-Porbka, Katarzyna; Bonior, Joanna; Szklarczyk, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a disease, which could be manifested as either a mild edematous form or a more severe necrotizing pancreatitis which has a poor prognosis. The etiology and pathogenesis of this ailment is not completely clear. Melatonin is an indoleamine which is produced from L-tryptophan in the pineal gland and in the other tissue including gastrointestinal tract. Both melatonin and its precursor have been demonstrated to protect the pancreas against acute pancreatitis and to attenuate pancreatic tissue damage. In the pancreas melatonin and L-tryptophan activate complex mechanisms which involve direct scavenging of the radical oxygen and nitrogen species, activation of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dysmutase, glutation peroxidase), reduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins, activation of heat shock protein, and a decrease of necrosis and increase of regeneration in the pancreas. There are several arguments for the idea that endogenous melatonin produced in the pineal gland and in the gastrointestinal system could be the part of a native mechanisms for protecting the pancreas against acute damage: 1/ the melatonin precursor L-tryptophan exerts similar protective effect as melatonin, 2/ application of the melatonin receptor antagonist, luzindole aggravates acute pancreatitis, 3/ pinealectomy results in the exacerbation of acute pancreatitis, 4/ low melatonin plasma levels are associated with an increased risk of severe acute pancreatitis. These observations leads to the idea that perhaps melatonin could be used in clinical trials as supportive therapy in acute pancreatitis.

  11. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  12. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  13. Unraveling Pancreatic Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Yohann; de Mestier, Louis; Perez, Manuela; Avisse, Claude; Lévy, Philippe; Kianmanesh, Reza

    2018-04-01

    Limited pancreatic resections are increasingly performed, but the rate of postoperative fistula is higher than after classical resections. Pancreatic segmentation, anatomically and radiologically identifiable, may theoretically help the surgeon removing selected anatomical portions with their own segmental pancreatic duct and thus might decrease the postoperative fistula rate. We aimed at systematically and comprehensively reviewing the previously proposed pancreatic segmentations and discuss their relevance and limitations. PubMed database was searched for articles investigating pancreatic segmentation, including human or animal anatomy, and cadaveric or surgical studies. Overall, 47/99 articles were selected and grouped into 4 main hypotheses of pancreatic segmentation methodology: anatomic, vascular, embryologic and lymphatic. The head, body and tail segments are gross description without distinct borders. The arterial territories defined vascular segments and isolate an isthmic paucivascular area. The embryological theory relied on the fusion plans of the embryological buds. The lymphatic drainage pathways defined the lymphatic segmentation. These theories had differences, but converged toward separating the head and body/tail parts, and the anterior from posterior and inferior parts of the pancreatic head. The rate of postoperative fistula was not decreased when surgical resection was performed following any of these segmentation theories; hence, none of them appeared relevant enough to guide pancreatic transections. Current pancreatic segmentation theories do not enable defining anatomical-surgical pancreatic segments. Other approaches should be explored, in particular focusing on pancreatic ducts, through pancreatic ducts reconstructions and embryologic 3D modelization.

  14. The fusion of autophagosome with lysosome is impaired in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hongwei; Yu, Xiao; Zhu, Shaihong; Li, Xia; Lu, Ben; Li, Zhiqiang; Yu, Can

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory pancreatic disease that carries considerable morbidity and mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease remains poorly understood. We investigated the incidence of autophagy in mice following induction of acute pancreatitis. Mice were received intraperitoneal injections of L-arginine (200 mg × 2/100 g BW), while controls were administered with saline. Pancreatic tissues were assessed by histology, electron microscopy and western blotting. Injection of L-arginine resulted in the accumulation of autophagosomes and a relative paucity of autolysosomes. Moreover, the autophagy marker p62 is significantly increased. However, the lysosomal-associated membrane protein-2 (Lamp-2), a protein that is required for the proper fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes, is decreased in acute pancreatitis. These results suggest that a crucial role for autophagy and Lamp-2 in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Our data suggest that the autophagic flux is impaired in acute pancreatitis. The depletion of Lamp-2 may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  15. Pancreatitis after percutaneous ethanol injection into HCC: a minireview of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrella Eleonora

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Deaths after percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI into hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC may occur within a few hours to a few days following the procedure because of hemoperitoneum and haemorrhage from oesophageal varices or hepatic insufficiency. Pancreatitis has been recently reported as a rare lethal complication of intra-arterial PEI, another modality for treating HCCs. In this minireview, we analyze the literature concerning the development of acute pancreatitis after PEI. Pathogenesis of pancreatitis from opioids and ethanol is also addressed. Treatment with opioids to reduce the patient's abdominal pain after PEI in combination with the PEI itself may lead to direct toxic effects, thus favouring the development of pancreatitis.

  16. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  17. The Scandinavian baltic pancreatic club (SBPC) database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Søren S; Poulsen, Jakob Lykke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a multifaceted disease associated with several risk factors and a complex clinical presentation. We established the Scandinavian Baltic Pancreatic Club (SBPC) Database to characterise and study the natural history of CP in a Northern European cohort. Here......, we describe the design of the database and characteristics of the study cohort. METHODS: Nine centres from six different countries in the Scandinavian-Baltic region joined the database. Patients with definitive or probable CP (M-ANNHEIM diagnostic criteria) were included. Standardised case report......: The study cohort comprised of 910 patients (608 men: 302 women; median age 58 (IQR: 48-67) years with definite 848 (93%) or probable CP 62 (7%). Nicotine (70%) and alcohol (59%) were the most frequent aetiologies and seen in combination in 44% of patients. A history of recurrent acute pancreatitis was seen...

  18. Ansa pancreatica as a predisposing factor for recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Takana Yamakawa; Gonoi, Wataru; Yoshikawa, Takeharu; Hayashi, Naoto; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-10-28

    To determine the non-biased prevalence and clinical significance of ansa pancreatica in patients with acute pancreatitis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our institutional review board approved this cross-sectional study, which consisted of a community-based cohort of 587 consecutive participants in a whole-body health-check program, and 73 subjects with episode of acute pancreatitis (55 patients with a single episode of acute pancreatitis, and 18 patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis). All of the subjects underwent abdominal MRI including magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, medical examinations, and blood tests. Two board-certified, diagnostic, abdominal radiologists evaluated the images, and ansa pancreatica was diagnosed based on its characteristic anatomy on MRI. Compared with the community group [5/587 (0.85%)], patients with recurrent acute pancreatitis had a significantly higher frequency of ansa pancreatica [2/18 (11.1%)] ( P = 0.016; OR = 14.3; 95%CI: 1.27-96.1), but not compared with patients with single-episode acute pancreatitis [1/55 (1.8%)] ( P = 0.42; OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 0.44-19.7). Multiple logistic regression analysis using age, alcohol intake, presence of ansa pancreatica, and presence of autoimmune disease as independent covariates, revealed a significant relationship between the presence of ansa pancreatica and recurrent acute pancreatitis. The presence of autoimmune disease was also significantly associated with the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. On the other hand, neither age nor alcohol intake were significantly related to the onset of recurrent acute pancreatitis. The present study is the first to provide robust evidence that the presence of ansa pancreatica is significantly associated with recurrent acute pancreatitis.

  19. [Treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis by an endoscopic method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seicean, Andrada; Burtin, Pascal; Boyer, Jean; Pascu, Oliviu

    2002-06-01

    The epigastric pain is the most frequent manifestation in chronic pancreatitis. It is due to intraductal pancreatic pressure, presence of compressive pseudocysts and probably to neuroinflammatory process caused by alcohol. The aim of our study was to assess the influence of endoscopic treatment on pain in chronic pancreatitis and the correlation between residual pain after endoscopic treatment and pancreatic morphology. Forty-four patients from the Gastroenterology Department of Angers (France) with chronic pancreatitis were included in our retrospective clinical study. Thirty-seven patients underwent a diagnostic ERCP and only 28 needed an endoscopic treatment. The pain was evaluated semi-quantitatively before and after the endoscopic treatment. The mean follow-up was 28.6 months. Among the 28 patients with endoscopic treatment, 18 had a complete improvement of the pain, 4 an incomplete improvement and 6 had no improvement; these last were submitted to pancreatic surgery. The pain evolution had a good correlation with the reduction of Wirsung diameter; there was no correlation with ductal stenosis, residual lithiasis and pseudocysts presence. Alcohol consumption had no influence on the pain evolution. The endoscopic treatment of intraductal lithiasis and pseudocysts is a useful method for Wirsung decompression, improving the pain in chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Acute pancreatitis in five European countries: etiology and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Lucio; Migliori, Marina; Oláh, Attila; Farkas, Gyula; Levy, Philippe; Arvanitakis, Constantine; Lankisch, Paul; Beger, Hans

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, many advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis that have lead to a significant reduction in both morbidity and mortality; however, knowledge of the etiology and of the relation between etiology and mortality is far from complete. To obtain a more comprehensive view of the etiology and mortality of acute pancreatitis in Europe than has been given by previous single-center studies. The study comprised 1,068 patients in five European countries who were admitted to hospitals for acute pancreatitis from January 1990 to December 1994. Data for each patient were collected on a standardized form. Of the 1,068 patients (692 men, 376 women; mean age, 52.8 years; range, 10-95 years), 589 had edematous pancreatitis, and 479 the necrotic form. Cholelithiasis (37.1%) and alcohol (41.0%) were the most frequent etiologic factors. In Germany, cholelithiasis and alcohol occurred with similar frequency (34.9 and 37.9%, respectively); in Hungary, alcohol predominates over cholelithiasis (60.7 vs. 24.0%); in France, a small predominance of alcohol was seen (38.5 vs. 24.6%); and in Greece and Italy, there was a clear predominance of cholelithiasis over alcohol (71.4 vs. 6.0% and 60.3 vs. 13.2%, respectively). The differences in the frequency of cholelithiasis and alcohol between Greece and Italy and the other countries were statistically significant (p relationship between mortality and age.

  1. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Chronic pancreatitis in a patient with malnutrition due to anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Russell N; Sparaco, Anna; Smith, Martin D

    2008-05-08

    Both acute and chronic pancreatitis are associated with eating disorders, including malnutrition found in anorexia, bulimia, and major depression. We report a case of a female patient suffering from severe malnutrition and anorexia with repeated attacks of pancreatic pain and an enlarging cystic lesion in the pancreatic head. Due to a progressively enlarging lesion on CT, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed. Histology demonstrated chronic pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis remains to be well defined. There is evidence that an imbalance between oxidative stress and antioxidant capacity results in pancreatic inflammation and activation of periacinar myofibroblasts. It has been demonstrated that protein energy malnutrition is associated with increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines as well as pancreatic acinar cell damage and ductal disruption. Furthermore, it has been shown that protein energy malnutrition including anorexia nervosa is associated with a depleted antioxidant status. Thus there is a possible pathogenic basis for severe malnutrition leading to chronic pancreatitis. Our patient underwent surgery based on the presumption that she had a symptomatic cystic neoplasm. Chronic pancreatitis was demonstrated. Patients presenting with malnutrition and recurrent epigastric pain should be investigated for pancreatic pathology and the possibility of pancreatitis and the presence of pseudocysts entertained.

  3. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance...

  4. Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Kristiansen, Louise; Becker, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    . Information on incident cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were obtained by record linkage with the Danish national registries. RESULTS: A total of 235 cases of pancreatitis occurred during follow-up. A dose-response association between smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis was observed......BACKGROUND: Alcohol and gallstone disease are the most established risk factors for pancreatitis. Smoking is rarely considered to be a cause despite the fact that a few studies have indicated the opposite. We aimed to assess the independent effects of smoking on the risk of pancreatitis. METHODS...... in both men and women. For example, the hazard ratio of developing pancreatitis was 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-4.7) among women and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1-6.2) among men who smoked 15 to 24 grams of tobacco per day. Alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis (hazard ratio...

  5. Comparative analysis of extracellular matrix proteins in chronic pancreatitis: differences between pancreatic head and tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehling, B; Kolb, A; Ramadani, M; Schmidt, E; Gansauge, F; Beger, H G

    2004-03-01

    In patients with chronic pancreatitis (cP) with an inflammatory mass in the pancreatic head, the degree of fibrosis in the pancreatic head compared with the tail should be determined and differences in the expression pattern of collagen types I, III, and IV; laminin; vitronectin; and fibronectin should be evaluated. From 12 patients with alcohol-induced and idiopathic cP who underwent surgery due to local complications, 24 corresponding cP tissue samples from the pancreatic head and the resection margin were obtained. The degree of fibrosis was calculated using a computer-assisted method (Adobe Photo Shop). The expression pattern of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) was investigated by immunostaining using the streptavidin-peroxidase technique. In each case, the degree of fibrosis was higher in the pancreatic head than in the resection margin. For alcohol-induced cP, the median degree of fibrosis in the head was 64% versus 47% in the resection margin, and for idiopathic cP, it was 40% versus 32%. Staining intensity of collagen type IV and laminin in the head was higher than in the resection surface. In degenerative tissue, collagen types I, III, and IV and laminin were moderately expressed, fibronectin was weakly expressed, and vitronectin was not expressed, with no differences between the head and resection margin. Basement membranes in the head and the resection margin predominantly consisted of collagen types I, III, and IV and laminin. In ductal epithelia, collagen type IV staining in the head was stronger than in the resection margin. In cP with an inflammatory mass in the head, the degree of fibrosis in the pancreatic head is higher than in the resection margin. Differences in the expression pattern of ECMPs could be detected for collagen type IV and laminin. These results underline the hypothesis of the pancreatic head being the pacemaker of cP in which collagen type IV and laminin may play an important role.

  6. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency following acute pancreatitis: Systematic review and study level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollemans, Robbert A; Hallensleben, Nora D L; Mager, David J; Kelder, Johannes C; Besselink, Marc G; Bruno, Marco J; Verdonk, Robert C; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C

    2018-04-01

    This study systematically explores the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) after acute pancreatitis in different subgroups of etiology (biliary/alcoholic/other), disease severity and follow-up time ( 36 months after index admission). PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, 32 studies were included in this study level meta-analysis. In a total of 1495 patients with acute pancreatitis, tested at a mean of 36 months after index admission, the pooled prevalence of PEI was 27.1% (95%-confidence interval [CI]: 20.3%-35.1%). Patients from seven studies (n = 194) underwent direct tests with pooled prevalence of 41.7% [18.5%-69.2%]. Patients from 26 studies (n = 1305) underwent indirect tests with pooled prevalence of 24.4% [18.3%-31.8%]. In subgroup analyses on patients that underwent fecal elastase-1 tests, PEI occurred more often in alcoholic pancreatitis (22.7% [16.6%-30.1%]) than in biliary pancreatitis (10.2% [6.2%-16.4%]) or other etiology (13.4% [7.7%-22.4%]; P = 0.02). Pooled prevalence of PEI after mild and severe pancreatitis was 19.4% [8.6%-38.2%] and 33.4% [22.6%-46.3%] respectively in studies using fecal elaste-1 tests (P = 0.049). Similar results were seen in patients without (18.9% [9.3%-34.6%]) and with necrotizing pancreatitis (32.0% [18.2%-49.8%]; P = 0.053). Over time, the prevalence of PEI decreased in patients who underwent the fecal elastase-1 test and increased in patients who underwent the fecal fat analysis. After acute pancreatitis, a quarter of all patients develop PEI during follow-up. Alcoholic etiology and severe and necrotizing pancreatitis are associated with higher risk of PEI. The prevalence of PEI may change as time of follow-up increases. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. [Croatian guidelines for the management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustemović, Nadan; Krznarić, Zeljko; Bender, Darija Vranesić; Ostojić, Rajko; Cavka, Silvija Cuković; Milić, Sandra; Anić, Branimir; Ljubicić, Neven; Mesarić, Jasna; Stimac, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is a major consequence of pancreatic diseases (e. g. chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis), extrapancreatic diseases like celiac disease and Crohn's disease, and gastrointestinal and pancreatic surgical resections. Recognition of this entity is highly relevant to avoid malnutrition-related morbidity and mortality. The main clinical consequence of PEI is fat maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in steatorrhoea. Pancreatic exocrine function should be assessed by measuring levels of faecal elastase-1. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for PEI. Administration of enzymes in form of enteric-coated minimicrospheres avoids acid-mediated lipase inactivation and ensures gastric emptying of enzymes in parallel with nutrients. In adults, the initial recommended dose of pancreatic enzymes is 25.000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 80000 units of lipase per meal. Large meals require 25.000 - 80.000 units of lipase per meal while snacks require 10.000 - 40.000 units of lipase per meal. Oral pancreatic enzymes should be taken with meals to ensure adequate mixing with the chyme. Adjunct therapy with acid-suppressing agents may be useful in patients who continue to experience symptoms of PEI despite high-dose enzyme therapy. Patients with PEI should be encouraged to consume small, frequent meals and to abstain from alcohol. Dietary fat restriction is not recommended for patients with PEI.

  8. Pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver Pseudoquiste pancreático de localización hepática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Les

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage.

  9. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  10. Clinical Study on Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy in 26 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Qihui

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This paper investigated the pathogenesis and treatment strategies of acute pancreatitis (AP in pregnancy. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively the characteristics, auxiliary diagnosis, treatment strategies, and clinical outcomes of 26 cases of patients with AP in pregnancy. Results. All patients were cured finally. (1 Nine cases of 22 mild acute pancreatitis (MAP patients selected automatic termination of pregnancy because of the unsatisfied therapeutic efficacy or those patients’ requirements. (2 Four cases of all patients were complicated with severe acute pancreatitis (SAP; 2 cases underwent uterine incision delivery while one of them also received cholecystectomy, debridement and drainage of pancreatic necrosis, and percutaneous jejunostomy. One case had a fetal death when complicated with SAP; she had to receive extraction of bile duct stones and drainage of abdominal cavity after induced abortion. The other one case with hyperlipidemic pancreatitis was given induced abortion and hemofiltration. Conclusions. The first choice of MAP in pregnancy is the conventional therapy. Apart from the conventional therapy, we need to terminate pregnancy as early as possible for patients with SAP. Removing biliary calculi and drainage is supposed to be considered for acute biliary pancreatitis. Lowering blood lipids treatment should be applied to hyperlipidemic pancreatitis or given to hemofiltration when necessary.

  11. Docosahexaenoic Acid Inhibits Cerulein-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an important regulator in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP. Reactive oxygen species induce activation of inflammatory cascades, inflammatory cell recruitment, and tissue damage. NF-κB regulates inflammatory cytokine gene expression, which induces an acute, edematous form of pancreatitis. Protein kinase C δ (PKCδ activates NF-κB as shown in a mouse model of cerulein-induced AP. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an ω-3 fatty acid, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects in various cells and tissues. This study investigated whether DHA inhibits cerulein-induced AP in rats by assessing pancreatic edema, myeloperoxidase activity, levels of lipid peroxide and IL-6, activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, and by histologic observation. AP was induced by intraperitoneal injection (i.p. of cerulein (50 μg/kg every hour for 7 h. DHA (13 mg/kg was administered i.p. for three days before AP induction. Pretreatment with DHA reduced cerulein-induced activation of NF-κB, PKCδ, and IL-6 in pancreatic tissues of rats. DHA suppressed pancreatic edema and decreased the abundance of lipid peroxide, myeloperoxidase activity, and inflammatory cell infiltration into the pancreatic tissues of cerulein-stimulated rats. Therefore, DHA may help prevent the development of pancreatitis by suppressing the activation of NF-κB and PKCδ, expression of IL-6, and oxidative damage to the pancreas.

  12. Toxic-Metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sohail Z.; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D.; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies and their rationale. Methods We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: (a) hyperlipidemia, (b) hypercalcemia, (c) chronic renal failure, (d) smoking exposure, (e) alcohol, and (f) medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Results Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dl or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and by-stander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. Conclusions The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/ removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children. PMID:26594832

  13. The epidemiology, pathogenesis and histopathology of fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levene, Adam P; Goldin, Robert D

    2012-08-01

    Fatty liver disease includes non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and alcoholic liver disease (ALD), each of which is increasing in prevalence. Each represents a histological spectrum that extends from isolated steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. NAFLD is associated with obesity, diabetes, and insulin resistance, and is considered to be the liver manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of NAFLD and ALD involves cytokines, adipokines, oxidative stress, and apoptosis. Histopathology is the gold standard for assessing the severity of liver damage in NAFLD and ALD. We have reviewed the literature, and described and compared the epidemiology, natural disease history, pathogenesis and histopathology of NAFLD and ALD. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  15. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ronak Patel; Ali Safdar Khan; Sami Naveed; Jason Brazleton; Mel Wilcox

    2015-01-01

    Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his ...

  16. The Pathogenesis of Autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy John Watts

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Autism is well known as a complex developmental disorder with a seemingly confusing and uncertain pathogenesis. The definitive mechanisms that promote autism are poorly understood and mostly unknown, yet available theories do appear to focus on the disruption of normal cerebral development and its subsequent implications on the functional brain unit. This mini-review aims solely to discuss and evaluate the most prominent current theories regarding the pathogenesis of autism. The main conclusion is that although there is not a clear pathway of mechanisms directed towards a simple pathogenesis and an established link to autism on the symptomatic level; there are however several important theories (neural connectivity, neural migration, excitatory-inhibitory neural activity, dendritic morphology, neuroimmune; calcium signalling and mirror neurone which appear to offer an explanation to how autism develops. It seems probable that autism's neurodevelopmental defect is ‘multi-domain’ in origin (rather than a single anomaly and is hence distributed across numerous levels of study (genetic, immunopathogenic, etc.. A more definitive understanding of the pathogenesis could facilitate the development of better treatments for this complex psychiatric disorder.

  17. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  18. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... 466 KB] No. 81: Exploring Treatment Options for Alcohol Use Disorders [ PDF - 539K] No. 80: Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: ...

  19. Surgery for Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Navadgi, Suresh; Pandanaboyana, Sanjay; Windsor, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Surgery for acute pancreatitis has undergone significant changes over the last 3 decades. A better understanding of the pathophysiology has contributed to this, but the greatest driver for change has been the rise of less invasive interventions in the fields of laparoscopy, endoscopy and radiology. Surgery has a very limited role in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The most common indication for intervention in acute pancreatitis is for the treatment of complications and most notably the ...

  20. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Liqun; Li, Weiqin; Geng, Yanxia; Shen, Bo; Li, Jieshou

    2011-06-01

    The highest maternal-fetal risk from pancreatitis in pregnancy is likely to be posed by the most severe cases, which we have compared with mild cases. Retrospective observational study. A general surgery department of a university referral hospital in Nanjing, China. Eighteen pregnancies complicated with severe acute pancreatitis and 51 pregnancies complicated with mild acute pancreatitis. Medical records were reviewed for every pregnant woman with mild or severe acute pancreatitis during January 1999 to December 2009. Information on demographics, clinical and laboratory data, maternal and fetal outcomes. Gestational age of onset was significantly higher in the severe acute pancreatitis group than in the mild acute pancreatitis group. Severe hypertriglyceridemia was considered the main cause of severe acute pancreatitis (OR 20.7; 95% CI 4.6-92.4, ppancreatitis (OR 7.3; 95% CI 1.8-30.1, ppancreatitis and biliary pancreatitis are the main causes of severe and mild disease, respectively. Severe acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester, and the affected severe patients are more liable to develop a critical condition that results in higher risk of intrauterine fetal death. © 2011 The Authors Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2011 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  1. Long-term high-fat diet induces pancreatic injuries via pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress in rats with hyperlipidemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Mingxian; Li Yanqing; Meng Min; Ren Hongbo; Kou Yi

    2006-01-01

    Relations between hyperlipidemia and chronic pancreatitis remain unclear. Microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress are involved in pathogeneses of a high numbers of diseases. The objective of this study was to induce hyperlipidemia in rats by long-term high-fat diet intake, then investigate the biochemical, microcirculatory, and histological alterations in blood and pancreatic tissues of these animals, and discuss their potential significances. Pancreatic blood flow was detected by intravital microscope; malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in pancreatic tissues for assessment of oxidative stress and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. The results showed that the velocity of pancreatic microvascular blood flow of rats with hyperlipidemia decreased significantly as compared to control value (p = 0.008). Pancreatic MDA content increased whereas SOD activity decreased in these rats (p = 0.022; p = 0.039, respectively). Histologically, microvesicles in acinar and islet cells, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondrion and modified vascular endothelial cells were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, α-SMA expression was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that long-term high-fat diet can induce chronic pancreatic injuries which could be considered as 'nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease', and pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress may play an important part in the underlying pathogenesis

  2. The incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen E; Morrison-Rees, Sian; John, Ann; Williams, John G; Brown, Tim H; Samuel, David G

    Acute pancreatitis is increasingly one of the most important acute gastrointestinal conditions throughout much of the world, although incidence and aetiology varies across countries and regions. This study investigated regional and national patterns in the incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis, demographic patterns in incidence and trends over time in incidence across Europe. A structured review of acute pancreatitis incidence and aetiology from studies of hospitalised patient case series, cohort studies or other population based studies from 1989 to 2015 and a review of trends in incidence from 1970 to 2015 across all 51 European states. The incidence of acute pancreatitis was reported from 17 countries across Europe and ranged from 4.6 to 100 per 100 000 population. Incidence was usually highest in eastern or northern Europe, although reported rates often varied according to case ascertainment criteria. Of 20 studies that reported on trends in incidence, all but three show percentage increases over time (overall median increase = 3.4% per annum; range = -0.4%-73%). The highest ratios of gallstone to alcohol aetiologies were identified in southern Europe (Greece, Turkey, Italy and Croatia) with lowest ratios mainly in eastern Europe (Latvia, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Lithuania). The incidence of acute pancreatitis varies across Europe. Gallstone is the dominant aetiology in southern Europe and alcohol in eastern Europe with intermediate ratios in northern and western Europe. Acute pancreatitis continues to increase throughout most of Europe. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Current trends in the management of infected necrotizing pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakorafas, George H; Lappas, Christos; Mastoraki, Aikaterini; Delis, Spiros G; Safioleas, Michael

    2010-02-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is a potentially life-threatening disease. Pancreatic necrosis is associated with an aggravated prognosis, while superimposed infection is almost always lethal without surgery. Bacterial translocation mainly from the gut is the most widely accepted mechanism in the pathogenesis of infected pancreatic necrosis. Infected pancreatic necrosis should be suspected in the presence of the usual markers of systemic inflammation (i.e., fever and leukocytosis), organ failure, or a protracted severe clinical course. The diagnostic method of choice to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis is contrast-enhanced computed tomography, where necrotic areas are evidenced as regions without enhancement. The presence of pancreatic necrotic infection should be based on a combination of clinical manifestations, results of laboratory investigation (mainly increased levels of CRP and / or procalcitonin), and can be confirmed by image-guided fine-needle aspiration and gram stain /culture of the aspirates. Surgery remains the treatment of choice for the management of infected pancreatic necrosis and involves open necrosectomy (debridement) and wide drainage of the peripancreatic areas, often in association with continuous irrigation. Planned reoperations may be required to achieve complete removal of the necrotic / infected material. The timing of surgery is of paramount importance; ideally, surgery should be performed after 2 or 3 weeks from the onset of pancreatitis. Recently, various minimally invasive approaches have been described, but they have not been compared in prospective trials with the classical open surgery. Antibiotic therapy is routinely used in patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis, in conjunction with surgical debridement; its role, however, in the management of patients with sterile necrosis is recently questioned. Nutritional support should be taken into consideration in these patients; enteral nutrition should be preferred over

  4. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance....... The economic implications of alcohol abuse in surgical patients are tremendous. Interventional studies are required to reduce future increases in post-operative morbidity....

  5. Population attributable risk for pancreatic cancer in Northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosato, Valentina; Polesel, Jerry; Bosetti, Cristina; Serraino, Diego; Negri, Eva; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2015-03-01

    To provide data on the impact of known risk factors on pancreatic cancer burden, we estimated the population attributable risks (PARs) in the Italian population. Data were derived from a case-control study conducted in Northern Italy between 1991 and 2008, including 326 case patients with incident pancreatic cancer and 652 hospital control subjects. We found that 13.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.3-20.8) of pancreatic cancers were attributable to tobacco smoking, 13.0% (95% CI, 2.7-23.2) were attributable to heavy alcohol drinking, 9.7% (95% CI, 5.3-14.1) were attributable to diabetes, 11.9% (95% CI, -8.0 to 31.8) were attributable to a low adherence to Mediterranean diet, and 0.6% (95% CI, -1.8 to 2.9) were attributable to a family history of pancreatic cancer. The PARs for tobacco smoking increased up to 25.7% when we considered it jointly with alcohol, up to 21.7% with diabetes, and up to 24.8% with low Mediterranean diet adherence. For all the risk factors considered, the PARs were higher in men than in women, the differences being particularly evident for heavy alcohol consumption and for a low Mediterranean diet adherence. These results suggest that an appreciable proportion of pancreatic cancers could be avoided in this Italian population by intervention on a few selected modifiable lifestyle factors.

  6. Factors That Affect Disease Progression After First Attack of Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Little is known about recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode, and little is known about how the disease progresses or what factors affect progression. We performed a population-based study of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) to determine their outcomes.......27-2.79; P complications (HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.22-2.27; P pancreatitis, although alcohol-associated AP progressed most frequently (2.8/100 patient-years). Patients with recurrent AP were at the highest risk for chronic pancreatitis (HR, 6...... pancreatitis, and mortality. Patients were followed up for a median time of 4.6 years, until death or the end of 2013. RESULTS: We identified 1457 patients with first-time AP (48% biliary disease, 17% alcohol-associated, 9.9% severe); 23% of patients had 1 or more recurrences. Risk for recurrence...

  7. Acute pancreatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an unusual etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Lacasa, Teresa; Duarte Borges, María Alejandra; García Marín, Alicia; Gómez Cuervo, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the most important etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol consumption. Once these causes have been ruled out, especially in young adults, it is important to consider less frequent etiologic factors such as drugs, trauma, malformations, autoimmunity or systemic diseases. Other rare and less well studied causes of this pathology are infections, among which Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported to cause acute pancreatitis as an unusual extrapulmonary manifestation. Here, we report the case of a 21-year-old patient who had acute idiopathic pancreatitis associated with an upper respiratory tract infection. After an in-depth study, all other causes of pancreatitis were ruled out and Mycoplasma was established as the clinical etiology.

  8. Genetics and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  9. Management of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tejal; Poon, Leona C Y; Teoh, T G; Moorthy, K; Robinson, Stephen; Neary, Nicola; Valabhji, Jonathan

    2015-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a recognised rare complication in pregnancy. The reported incidence varies between 3 and 7 in 10 000 pregnancies and is higher in the third trimester. The commonest causes in pregnancy include gallstones, alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia. Non-gallstone pancreatitis is associated with more complications and poorer outcome with hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis having mortality rates ranging from 7.5 to 9.0% and 10.0 to 17.5% for mother and foetus, respectively. A 40-year-old para 4 woman, who presented at 15(+4) weeks' gestation, was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis. Past medical history included Graves' disease and hypertriglyceridaemia. Fenofibrate was discontinued immediately after discovery of the pregnancy. Initial investigations showed elevated amylase (475.0 µ/L) and triglycerides (46.6 mmol/L). Imaging revealed an inflamed pancreas without evidence of biliary obstruction/gallstones hence confirming the diagnosis of hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis. Laboratory tests gradually improved (triglyceride 5.2 mmol/L on day 17). On day 18, ultrasound confirmed foetal demise (18(+1) weeks) and a hysterotomy was performed as she had had four previous caesarean sections. Management of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy requires a multi-disciplinary approach. Hypertriglyceridaemia-induced acute pancreatitis has poor outcomes when diagnosed in early pregnancy. Identifying those at risk pre-pregnancy and antenatally can allow close monitoring through pregnancy to optimise care.

  10. Pancreatitis in pregnancy: etiology, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Padmavathi

    2016-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is a rare and dangerous disease. This study aimed to examine the etiology, treatment, and outcomes of pancreatitis in pregnancy. A total of 25 pregnant patients diagnosed with pancreatitis during the period of 1994 and 2014 was analyzed retrospectively. The pregnant patients were diagnosed with pancreatitis during a period of 21 years. Most (60%) of the patients were diagnosed with pancreatitis in the third trimester. The mean age of the patients at presentation was 25.7 years, with a mean gestational age of 24.4 weeks. Abdominal pain occurred in most patients and vomiting in one patient was associated hyperemesis gravidarum. The common cause of the disease was gallstone-related (56%), followed by alcohol-related (16%), post-ERCP (4%), hereditary (4%) and undetermined conditions (20%). The level of triglycerides was minimally high in three patients. ERCP and wire-guided sphincterotomy were performed in 6 (43%) of 14 patients with gallstone-related pancreatitis and elevated liver enzymes with no complications. Most (84%) of the patients underwent a full-term, vaginal delivery. There was no difference in either maternal or fetal outcomes after ERCP. Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, occurring most commonly in the third trimester, and gallstones are the most common cause. When laparoscopic cholecystectomy is not feasible and a common bile duct stone is highly suspected on imaging, endoscopic sphincterotomy or stenting may help to prevent recurrence and postpone cholecystectomy until after delivery.

  11. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  12. Pancreatitis in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, P Jane; Williams, David A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatitis was considered a rare disease in the cat until a couple of decades ago when several retrospective studies of severe acute pancreatitis were published. It was apparent that few of the diagnostic tests of value in the dog were helpful in cats. With increasing clinical suspicion, availability of abdominal ultrasonography, and introduction of pancreas-specific blood tests of increasing utility, it is now accepted that acute pancreatitis is probably almost as common in cats as it is in dogs, although the etiology(s) remain more obscure. Pancreatitis in cats often co-exists with inflammatory bowel disease, less commonly with cholangitis, and sometimes with both. Additionally, pancreatitis may trigger hepatic lipidosis, while other diseases, such as diabetes mellitus, may be complicated by pancreatitis. Therapy is similar to that used in dogs, with added emphasis on early nutritional support to prevent hepatic lipidosis. Less is known about chronic pancreatitis than the acute form, but chronic pancreatitis is more common in cats than it is in dogs and may respond positively to treatment with corticosteroids. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  14. Mortality, Cancer, and Comorbidities Associated With Chronic Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich Christian; Benfield, Thomas; Hyldstrup, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aimed to assess the risk of death, cancer, and comorbidities among patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: We performed a nationwide retrospective cohort study, collecting data from Danish registries from 1995 through 2010. We evaluated...... cases (10.2%) and controls (3.3%). Cancer (particularly pancreatic cancer) was a frequent cause of death among cases; the HR was 6.9 (95% CI, 7.5-11.8). Alcoholic CP did not produce a higher risk for cancer or death than nonalcoholic CP. Cerebrovascular disease (HR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.2-1.4), chronic...... on a Danish nationwide cohort study, individuals with CP are at higher risk for death from cancer (particularly pancreatic cancer) and have a higher incidence of comorbidities than people without CP....

  15. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  16. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis | Hari Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP. Materials and Methods: ...

  17. Targeting Trypsin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    2015. This task required: (a) Preparation and final approval of an MTA between the two institutions; (b) administrative coordination between the...the funding period, we also initiated studies to measure the effects of alcohol and the smoking compounds NNK (a nicotine derivative) and cigarette...trypsinogen activation) using rodent models, human pancreatic primary acinar cells. Overlap: There are no administrative , financial or scientific overlaps

  18. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  19. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  20. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...... parenchymal necrosis, or 3) peripancreatic necrosis alone. The classification also defines four types of collections: 1) Acute peripancreatic fluid collection, 2) pseudocyst, 3) acute post-necrotic collection, and 4) walled-off necrosis. This article summarizes the terminology of the revised Atlanta...

  1. Pancreatitis in Pregnancy: a 10 year retrospective of 15 Midwest hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Jennifer J.; Gideonsen, Mark D.; Song, Jonathan Y.; Grobman, William A.; O’Halloran, Peggy

    2010-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence, etiology and complications of pancreatitis in pregnancy and identify factors associated with adverse outcomes. Methods Chart review of all patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pregnancy from 1992–2001 at 15 participating hospitals. Information was collected on presentation, management and outcome, along with the number of deliveries at each hospital. Results During the 10 years of the study, 101 cases of pancreatitis occurred among 305,101 deliveries, yielding an incidence of one in 3,021 (.03%). There were no maternal deaths; perinatal mortality was 3.6%. Eighty-nine women had acute pancreatitis and twelve women had chronic pancreatitis. The majority (66%) of cases of acute pancreatitis were biliary in origin, and they were associated with better outcomes than non-biliary etiologies. Cases of gallstone pancreatitis that received surgical or endoscopic intervention during pregnancy had lower rates of preterm delivery and recurrence than those that were conservatively managed, but this difference was not significant (p=0.2). Alcohol was responsible for 12.3% of acute pancreatitis and 58% of chronic pancreatitis and was associated with increased rates of recurrence and preterm delivery. A calcium level, triglycerides or both was not obtained in half of cases identified as idiopathic. Conclusion Pancreatitis is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10,000 pregnancies. While it is most often acute and related to gallstones, non-biliary causes should be sought, as they are associated with worse outcomes. PMID:18978108

  2. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy: a comparison of associated conditions, treatments and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Audrey; Patenaude, Valerie; Abenhaim, Haim A

    2014-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a rare condition in pregnancy. The aim of this study is to compare associated conditions, treatments and complications of pancreatitis in pregnant and age-matched non-pregnant controls. We carried out a population-based retrospective cohort study using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS) from 2003 to 2010. A cohort of pregnant women with acute pancreatitis was created and compared to a created age-matched cohort of non-pregnant women with acute pancreatitis at a 1:4 ratio. Comparisons of associated conditions, treatment types, and complications were carried out using unconditional logistic regression. We identified 7725 cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. As compared to non-pregnant controls, pancreatitis in pregnancy was more likely to be associated with cholelithiasis and less likely with hyperlipidemia and alcohol abuse. Pancreatitis in pregnancy was more likely to be treated with parenteral nutrition and less likely to undergo endoscopic sphincterotomy. As compared to non-pregnant controls, pregnant women with pancreatitis were less likely to have pancreatic pseudocysts/hemorrhage/necrosis, generalized peritonitis, adult respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and death. Pancreatitis in pregnancy is predominantly caused by cholelithiasis, and unlike in the non-pregnant state, usually has a milder course.

  3. Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enrique Domínguez-Muñoz, J

    2016-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the definition of the disease, the etiological diagnosis of idiopathic disease, the correlation between fibrosis degree and pancreatic secretion in the early stages of chronic pancreatitis, the treatment of the disease and of pain, the clinical relevance of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, and the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis. A new mechanistic definition of chronic pancreatitis has been proposed. Genetic testing is mainly of help in patients with relapsing idiopathic pancreatitis. A significant correlation has been shown between the degree of pancreatic fibrosis as evaluated by elastography and pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate. New data supports the efficacy of antioxidants and simvastatin for the therapy of chronic pancreatitis. The pancreatoscopy-guided intraductal lithotripsy is an effective alternative to extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis. The presence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in patients with chronic pancreatitis is associated with a significant risk of cardiovascular events. Fine needle biopsy and contrast enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasonography are of help for the diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis and its differential diagnosis with pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown.In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α. Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue.As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation

  5. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempuraj, Duraisamy; Twait, Erik C; Williard, Deborah E; Yuan, Zuobiao; Meyerholz, David K; Samuel, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown. In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a) IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b) mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c) plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d) pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK) and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α). Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue. As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation. IL-33 is

  6. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  7. Pathogenesis of microbial keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhundi, Sahreena; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2017-03-01

    Microbial keratitis is a sight-threatening ocular infection caused by bacteria, fungi, and protist pathogens. Epithelial defects and injuries are key predisposing factors making the eye susceptible to corneal pathogens. Among bacterial pathogens, the most common agents responsible for keratitis include Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumonia and Serratia species. Fungal agents of corneal infections include both filamentous as well as yeast, including Fusarium, Aspergillus, Phaeohyphomycetes, Curvularia, Paecilomyces, Scedosporium and Candida species, while in protists, Acanthamoeba spp. are responsible for causing ocular disease. Clinical features include redness, pain, tearing, blur vision and inflammation but symptoms vary depending on the causative agent. The underlying molecular mechanisms associated with microbial pathogenesis include virulence factors as well as the host factors that aid in the progression of keratitis, resulting in damage to the ocular tissue. The treatment therefore should focus not only on the elimination of the culprit but also on the neutralization of virulence factors to minimize the damage, in addition to repairing the damaged tissue. A complete understanding of the pathogenesis of microbial keratitis will lead to the rational development of therapeutic interventions. This is a timely review of our current understanding of the advances made in this field in a comprehensible manner. Coupled with the recently available genome sequence information and high throughput genomics technology, and the availability of innovative approaches, this will stimulate interest in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-09-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. PMID:27418683

  10. Role of Biomarkers in Diagnosis and Prognostic Evaluation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meher, Susanta; Mishra, Tushar Subhadarshan; Sasmal, Prakash Kumar; Rath, Satyajit; Sharma, Rakesh; Rout, Bikram; Sahu, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a potentially life threatening disease. The spectrum of severity of the illness ranges from mild self-limiting disease to a highly fatal severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite intensive research and improved patient care, overall mortality still remains high, reaching up to 30–40% in cases with infected pancreatic necrosis. Although little is known about the exact pathogenesis, it has been widely accepted that premature activation of digestive enzymes within the pancreatic acinar cell is the trigger that leads to autodigestion of pancreatic tissue which is followed by infiltration and activation of leukocytes. Extensive research has been done over the past few decades regarding their role in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of severe acute pancreatitis. Although many standalone biochemical markers have been studied for early assessment of severity, C-reactive protein still remains the most frequently used along with Interleukin-6. In this review we have discussed briefly the pathogenesis and the role of different biochemical markers in the diagnosis and severity evaluation in acute pancreatitis. PMID:26345247

  11. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  12. [Primary pancreatic plasmacytoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Acevedo, Z; Pomares Rey, B; Alpera Tenza, M R; Andrada Becerra, E

    2014-01-01

    Extramedullary plasmacytomas are uncommon malignant plasma cell tumors that present outside the bone marrow; 80% of extramedullary plasmacytomas are located in the upper respiratory tract, and gastrointestinal plasmacytomas are rare. We present the case of an asymptomatic 65-year-old man in whom a pancreatic mass was found incidentally. The lesion was determined to be a pancreatic plasmacytoma after fine-needle aspiration cytology and surgical resection. No clinical, laboratory, or imaging findings indicative of multiple myeloma or association with other plasmacytomas were found, so the tumor was considered to be a primary pancreatic plasmacytoma. Copyright © 2011 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Uncovering Factors Related to Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Aoife M.; Ryan, Miriam F.; Drummond, Elaine; Gibney, Eileen R.; Gibney, Michael J.; Roche, Helen M.; Brennan, Lorraine

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The incidence of type 2 diabetes has increased rapidly on a global scale. Beta-cell dysfunction contributes to the overall pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. However, factors contributing to beta-cell function are not clear. The aims of this study were (i) to identify factors related to pancreatic beta-cell function and (ii) to perform mechanistic studies in vitro. Methods: Three specific measures of beta-cell function were assessed for 110 participants who completed an oral glucose tolera...

  14. Antioxidant inhibits HMGB1 expression and reduces pancreas injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong Wei; Zhang, Qi Yu; Zhou, Meng Tao; Liu, Na Xin; Chen, Tong Ke; Zhu, Ye Fan; Wu, Liang

    2010-09-01

    Pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis is still unclear, which leads to a lack of proper treatment in severe acute pancreatitis therapeutic strategy. To investigate the effect of treatment with antioxidant pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate on pancreas injury in rats with severe acute pancreatitis and its possible mechanism. A total of 144 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated into a sham operation group (n=48), a severe acute pancreatitis group (n=48), and a pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-treated group (n=48). All the rats were killed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after operation. The pancreas histopathologies were observed and serum amylase levels were tested. Meanwhile, the nuclear factor-kappaB activation, tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels and high-mobility group box protein-1 expression levels in pancreatic tissue were studied. Animals receiving pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate had significantly improved pancreas histopathology and lower serum amylase levels (pacute pancreatitis group, pancreas tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels reached a peak at 6 h after operation and afterwards rapidly declined to normal levels. However, high-mobility group box protein-1 levels in pancreatic tissue increased remarkably at the 12th hour, reached a peak at 24 h, and maintained up to 48 h post-severe acute pancreatitis. Compared to the severe acute pancreatitis group, the pancreas nuclear factor-kappaB activity, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, high-mobility group box protein-1 levels in the pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-treated group all remarkably decreased (pacute pancreatitis. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate might inhibit the activation of nuclear factor-kappaB to blockade tumor necrosis factor-alpha, thereby indirectly suppressing the high-mobility group box protein-1 and reducing pancreatic tissue damage in rats with severe acute pancreatitis.

  15. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  16. Pathogenesis of Candida infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odds, F C

    1994-09-01

    Candida infections of the skin and superficial mucosal sites are the result of an interplay between fungal virulence and host defenses. Epidermal proliferation and T-lymphocyte immune responses are expressed by the host to combat fungal invasion, but inflammatory responses and nonspecific inhibitors also probably play a role. Candida albicans can express at least three types of surface adhesion molecules to colonize epithelial surfaces, plus an aspartyl proteinase enzyme able to facilitate initial penetration of keratinized cells. Deeper penetration of keratinized epithelia is assisted by hypha formation, and C. albicans hyphae may use contact sensing (thigmotropism) as a guiding mechanism. Pathogenesis requires differential expression of virulence factors at each new stage of the process: a propensity for rapid alteration of the expressed phenotype in C. albicans may therefore be a significant factor in establishing the comparatively high pathogenic potential of this species.

  17. Pathogenesis of Takotsubo syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Masarone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Takotsubo syndrome (TTS is an enigmatic disease with a multifactorial and still unresolved pathogenesis. Postulated mechanisms include catecholamine excess, coronary artery spasm, and microvascular dysfunction, however catecholamines seem to play a central role in the pathophysiology of TTS. In facts catecholamines have relevant effects on the vasculature and myocardium. Toxic direct effects of catecholamine on myocardium are mediated by multiple pathway including functional hypoxia, metabolic changes and changes in membrane permeability leading to various electrolytic imbalances. Recently report of familial cases has suggested a genetic component. Further research is required to help clarify the proposed hypotheses and to increase our understanding of the cardiovascular responses to acute stress and the pathophysiology underpinning TTS.

  18. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pobijakova, M.; Scepanovic, D.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the tenth most common cancer in the western world and has become the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death. Surgery remains the only potentially curative treatment modality for pancreatic cancer. However, only a minority of patients are candidates for surgery at diagnosis, and only a minority of patients who undergo surgery are cured. The role of radiation therapy in pancreatic cancer continues to be investigated. Its use in the adjuvant setting remains controversial. Indication of radiotherapy is more generally accepted in borderline resectable disease, but prospective data are sparse. Randomized trials have yielded conflicting data in locally advanced disease. Radiation techniques have improved over time. This article aims to give an overview of the current knowledge regarding the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. (author)

  19. Pancreatic Exocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  20. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Advisory Board Volunteer Advisory Council Survivor Council Influencers of Hope Ambassador Circle Learn about the people ... is registered as a 501©3 nonprofit organization. Contributions to the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network are tax- ...

  1. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  2. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (PNETs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Our signature PurpleStride run/walk events raise spirits, awareness and funds in communities nationwide. FIND YOUR ... two main pancreatic hormones. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels, while glucagon raises blood sugar levels. Together, these ...

  3. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequent meals. Avoid greasy and fried foods. Limit consumption of raw fruits and vegetables, initially. Gradually increase ... pancreatic enzyme replacement products with all meals and snacks. Gradually start adding solid foods. The timing of ...

  4. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  5. Midkine is overexpressed in acute pancreatitis and promotes the pancreatic recovery in L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Li; Qiao, Zhenguo; Xu, Chunfang; Shen, Jiaqing

    2017-06-01

    Midkine (MK) is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous malignancies, but the expression and effect of MK in acute pancreatitis (AP) have not been well studied and documented. In this study, the expression of MK was assayed in mice with L-arginine-induced AP. A recombinant human MK (rhMK) was introduced in this study to test the effect of MK on the L-arginine-induced AP. Serum amylase and lipase were assayed. Pancreas tissue samples were also collected for the evaluation of histological injury. Western blot and immunochemical staining of α-amylase and proliferating cell nuclear antigen were applied for the study of acinar regeneration in the pancreas. The elevation of MK expression was found in mice with AP induced by L-arginine. After rhMK administration, rhMK did not affect the severity of acute pancreatic injury in acute phase in L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice, in accordance with changes of serum amylase and lipase and the histological evaluation. But during the recovery phase, the area of remaining acinar cells was increased and the fibrosis was reduced in rhMK-treated mice. Furthermore, the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and α-amylase was also upregulated after rhMK treatment. Midkine is over-expressed during AP in the animal model. Recombinant MK could promote the recovery of L-arginine-induced pancreatitis in mice. Therefore, MK may be involved in the regeneration of acinar cells in AP, and rhMK may be a possible therapeutic intervention for the repairment of AP. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  7. [Endoscopic treatment of pain in patients with chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledro Cano, D; Catalán Ramírez, J M; González Mariscal, M J; Romero Castro, R; Pellicer Bautista, F J; Herrerías, J M

    2002-02-01

    Chronic Pancreatitis is a recurrent disease, frequently alcohol intake related and tend to occur in the third and the fourth decades. Stenoses and lithiasis in the main pancreatic duct causes obstruction and subsequently pain. Therefore endoscopic or surgical decompression of main pancreatic duct results in pain relief. Review our experience in the endoscopic management in patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. 42 patients underwent ERCP for management of their chronic pancreatitis. Therapeutic options were sphincterotomy alone, prostheses and "do nothing". Follow-up was made by phone call and outpatient office visits. Mean follow-up was 47.8 (27.2) months. 22 patients underwent therapeutic ERCP. In 8 patients we performed sphincterotomy and in 14 patients, a sphincterotomy and prostheses intubation. 8 patients are asymptomatic after a mean follow-up of 10.8 (11.6) months. 2 of them, underwent sphincterotomy and six of them, underwent sphincterotomy and prostheses intubation. Therapeutic ERCP is a tool that relieves pain in a fifth of patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis.

  8. Subclassification of autoimmune pancreatitis: a histologic classification with clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vikram; Gupta, Rajib; Sainani, Nisha; Sahani, Dushyant V; Virk, Renu; Ferrone, Cristina; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Stone, John H; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Examination of pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP has shown that there are 2 subclasses of this disease. However, there is no widely accepted pathologic classification scheme and the clinical significance of such a classification remains to be established. In this study, we revisited the subclassification of AIP and examine whether this provides clinically and prognostically meaningful information. We evaluated 29 pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP. Demographic, clinical, and imaging data were recorded, as was evidence of extrapancreatic manifestations. In addition to a detailed and semiquantitative histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry for IgG4 was performed on pancreatic and extrapancreatic tissues. We also evaluated 48 consecutive cases of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified. The resected specimens could readily be subclassified into 2 subtypes: type 1 (n=11) and type 2 (n=18). In comparison with patients with type 2 disease, patients with type 1 disease were significantly more likely to be males (P=0.09), older (P=0.02), and present with jaundice (P=0.01), and less likely to be associated with abdominal pain (P=0.04). On imaging, the pancreatic tail cut-off sign was exclusively seen in patients with type 2 disease (4 of 10 cases). Hypercellular inflamed interlobular stroma was unique to type 1 pattern (91%), whereas significant ductal injury in the form of microabscesses and ductal ulceration was almost exclusively seen in type 2 pattern (78%). Eight of 10 patients with a type 1 pattern had evidence of a systemic disease. Three patients with type 2 disease had recurrent episodes of pancreatitis after their pancreatic resection. In comparison with the cohort of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified, type 2 AIP cases were less likely to be associated with a history of alcohol abuse, and showed significantly more foci of

  9. Pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheong J; Dosch, Joseph; Simeone, Diane M

    2008-06-10

    Cellular heterogeneity in cancer was observed decades ago by studies in mice which showed that distinct subpopulations of cells within a tumor mass are capable of driving tumorigenesis. Conceptualized from this finding was the stem-cell hypothesis for cancer, which suggests that only a specific subset of cancer cells within each tumor is responsible for tumor initiation and propagation, termed tumor initiating cells or cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data has been provided to support the existence of CSCs in human blood cell-derived cancers and solid organ tumors of the breast, brain, prostate, colon, and skin. Study of human pancreatic cancers has also revealed a specific subpopulation of cancer cells that possess the characteristics of CSCs. These pancreatic cancer stem cells express the cell surface markers CD44, CD24, and epithelial-specific antigen, and represent 0.5% to 1.0% of all pancreatic cancer cells. Along with the properties of self-renewal and multilineage differentiation, pancreatic CSCs display upregulation of important developmental genes that maintain self-renewal in normal stem cells, including Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and BMI-1. Signaling cascades that are integral in tumor metastasis are also upregulated in the pancreatic CSC. Understanding the biologic behavior and the molecular pathways that regulate growth, survival, and metastasis of pancreatic CSCs will help to identify novel therapeutic approaches to treat this dismal disease.

  10. Alcohol, smoking and benign hepato-biliary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Novovic, Srdan

    2017-01-01

    through effects on bile cholesterol metabolism, the enterohepatic circulation, and gallbladder function. The impact of smoking on gallstone formation seems minor. Both alcohol intake and smoking do not alter the clinical course of gallstone disease carriers. Cholecystectomy is the preferred treatment...... for symptomatic gallstone disease. Studies about the impact of alcohol and smoking on the post-cholecystectomy state are few and future studies should be performed. Pancreatitis is associated with both excessive alcohol intake and smoking in observational studies. Interpretation of associations with pancreatitis...... is hampered by an incomplete understanding of underlying mechanisms and by the co-existence of excessive alcohol intake and smoking. Smoking cessation and alcohol abstinence is recommended in the treatment of pancreatitis, but higher-level evidence is needed....

  11. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  12. Patterns of Pathomorphological Changes in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kovalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar necrosis is the basic microscopic sign of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Microcirculation disorder is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of ANP besides free radicals and damage of enzymatic origin. This study is dedicated to the description of microscopic changes in the pancreatic stroma in ANP, which leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas with a putative mechanism of endocrine function preservation. This study has been carried out on histological samples of pancreas from 224 patients with ANP. Histological staining was performed with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E, Masson, Gomori methods, and PAS. Microscopy was performed with magnifications of 40×, 100×, and 400×. Vascular endothelial desquamation, stasis, and sludge are typical changes in microcirculation observed in early stages of ANP. Initially, parietal circular intravascular microthrombosis accompanied by endothelial desquamation as early as stromal swelling occurs with no detectable necrosis. Residual stroma appears between areas of necrosis and intact pancreatic tissue. Mucoid swelling is first seen in the perivascular spaces extending to the parenchyma and changing into fibrinoid imbibition causing further necrosis. Reticulin argyrophilic backbone surrounding the pancreatic acini and small ducts decompose. Pancreatic structures, which may be preserved in necrotic tissue, include nerves, major ducts, and Langerhans islets.

  13. Prevalence of chronic pancreatitis: Results of a primary care physician-based population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Pasquali, Piera; Aceti, Alessandro; Balducci, Paolo; Bianchi, Patrizia; Buono, Francesco; Camerucci, Stefano; Cantarini, Rosanna; Centofanti, Sergio; Colantonio, Patrizia; Cremaschi, Riccarda; Crescenzi, Sergio; Di Mauro, Caterina; Di Renzi, Davide; Filabozzi, Andrea; Fiorillo, Alfonso; Giancaspro, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Paola; Lanna, Giuseppe; Medori, Claudio; Merletti, Emilio; Nunnari, Enzo; Paris, Francesca; Pavone, Marco; Piacenti, Angela; Rossi, Almerindo; Scamuffa, Maria Cristina; Spinelli, Giovanni; Taborchi, Marco; Valente, Biagio; Villanova, Antonella; Chiriatti, Alberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Data on chronic pancreatitis prevalence are scanty and usually limited to hospital-based studies. Investigating chronic pancreatitis prevalence in primary care. Participating primary care physicians reported the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis among their registered patients, environmental factors and disease characteristics. The data were centrally reviewed and chronic pancreatitis cases defined according to M-ANNHEIM criteria for diagnosis and severity and TIGAR-O classification for etiology. Twenty-three primary care physicians participated in the study. According to their judgment, 51 of 36.401 patients had chronic pancreatitis. After reviewing each patient data, 11 turned out to have definite, 5 probable, 19 borderline and 16 uncertain disease. Prevalence was 30.2/100.000 for definite cases and 44.0/100.000 for definite plus probable cases. Of the 16 patients with definite/probable diagnosis, 8 were male, with mean age of 55.6 (±16.7). Four patients had alcoholic etiology, 5 post-acute/recurrent pancreatitis, 6 were deemed to be idiopathic. Four had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, 10 were receiving pancreatic enzymes, and six had pain. Most patients had initial stage and non-severe disease. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in primary care. Results suggest that the prevalence in this context is higher than in hospital-based studies, with specific features, possibly representing an earlier disease stage. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhary M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mudit Chowdhary,1 Ahmad A Kabbani,1 Akansha Chhabra21Department of Internal Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals.Keywords: canagliflozin, Invokana, pancreatitis, drug-induced pancreatitis, SGLT-2 inhibitor

  15. Endoscopic treatment of pancreatic stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M. E.; Rauws, E. A.; Tytgat, G. N.; Huibregtse, K.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the long-term results of endoscopic pancreatic stone removal in patients with chronic pancreatitis. We retrospectively included 53 patients with chronic pancreatitis, in whom an attempt was made at endoscopic stone removal between 1984 and 1993. Patients

  16. Acute pancreatitis secondary to intramural duodenal hematoma: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Kazue; Watanabe, Manabu; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Matsui, Teppei; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2010-07-28

    Nontraumatic intramural duodenal hematoma (IDH) is rare disease and it is generally related to coagulation abnormalities. Reports of nontraumatic IDH associated with pancreatic disease are relatively rare, and various conditions including acute or chronic pancreatitis are thought to be associated with nontraumatic IDH. However, the association between IDH and acute pancreatitis remains unknown. We report the case of a 45-year-old man who presented with vomiting and right hypochondrial pain. He had no medical history, but was a heavy drinker. The diagnosis of IDH was established by computed tomography, ultrasonography and endoscopy, and it was complicated by acute pancreatitis. The lesions resolved with conservative management. We discuss this case in the context of previously reported cases of IDH concomitant with acute pancreatitis. In our patient, acute pancreatitis occurred concurrently with hematoma, probably due to obstruction of the duodenal papilla, or compression of the pancreas caused by the hematoma. The present analysis of the published cases of IDH with acute pancreatitis provides some information on the pathogenesis of IDH and its relationship with acute pancreatitis.

  17. Osteoprotegerin polymorphisms are associated with alcohol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alcohol-induced osteonecrosis of femoral head (ONFH) is one of the most important pathogenesis of nontraumatic ONFH. However, its pathogenesis mechanism is still unknown. Osteoprotegerin (OPG) has been implicated in multiple functions including blocking osteoclast maturation, controlling vascular calcifications, ...

  18. Advances in the cellular immunological pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Song, Lu-Jun; Qin, Xin-Yu

    2014-05-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease caused by the immune-mediated destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β cells. In recent years, the incidence of type 1 diabetes continues to increase. It is supposed that genetic, environmental and immune factors participate in the damage of pancreatic β cells. Both the immune regulation and the immune response are involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes, in which cellular immunity plays a significant role. For the infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocyte, B lymphocytes, natural killer cells, dendritic cells and other immune cells take part in the damage of pancreatic β cells, which ultimately lead to type 1 diabetes. This review outlines the cellular immunological mechanism of type 1 diabetes, with a particular emphasis to T lymphocyte and natural killer cells, and provides the effective immune therapy in T1D, which is approached at three stages. However, future studies will be directed at searching for an effective, safe and long-lasting strategy to enhance the regulation of a diabetogenic immune system with limited toxicity and without global immunosuppression. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  19. Pathogenesis of Mucormycosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellberg, Brad; Walsh, Thomas J.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a life-threatening infection that occurs in patients who are immunocompromised because of diabetic ketoacidosis, neutropenia, organ transplantation, and/or increased serum levels of available iron. Because of the increasing prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cancer, and organ transplantation, the number of patients at risk for this deadly infection is increasing. Despite aggressive therapy, which includes disfiguring surgical debridement and frequently adjunctive toxic antifungal therapy, the overall mortality rate is high. New strategies to prevent and treat mucormycosis are urgently needed. Understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and the host response to invading hyphae ultimately will provide targets for novel therapeutic interventions. In this supplement, we review the current knowledge about the virulence traits used by the most common etiologic agent of mucormycosis, Rhizopus oryzae. Because patients with elevated serum levels of available iron are uniquely susceptible to mucormycosis and these infections are highly angioinvasive, emphasis is placed on the ability of the organism to acquire iron from the host and on its interactions with endothelial cells lining blood vessels. Several promising therapeutic strategies in preclinical stages are identified. PMID:22247441

  20. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariggiò, Giuseppe; Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F

    2017-10-19

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  1. Pathogenesis and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Frank

    2018-01-01

    Metastasis to the brain is an increasing complication of solid cancers. Fortunately, our understanding of its pathogenesis has greatly increased in the last decade, with crucial insights into the molecular and cellular determinants of successful brain colonization; some aspects remain less well understood. The latter include the exact features of brain metastasis-initiating cancer cells, and a potential premetastatic niche. It is clear that a brain-arrested cancer cell has to master a sequence of steps to eventually grow to a clinically relevant brain metastasis. Various brain-specific cell types and molecular niches promote or hinder brain colonization in a dynamic and reciprocal manner. After mandatory extravasation and colonization of a brain-specific perivascular niche, the cancer cell can stay dormant, or further grow by dynamic interactions with cerebral blood vessels. In addition, the activation of certain molecular pathways on site of the cancer cell which are related to growth, motility, survival, and adaptation to the brain environment appears also important, given their characteristic modification in brain metastases of patients. A deeper understanding of the most vulnerable steps of the brain metastatic cascade may foster the development of novel preventive approaches, and that of core biologic mechanisms for macrometastatic growth and persistence will help to develop better therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hereditary pancreatitis: a population-based cohort study in Denmark. Am J Gastroenterol. 2010 Aug;105(8):1876- ... Hammel P, Ruszniewski P, Lévy P. The natural history of hereditary pancreatitis: a national series. Gut. 2009 ...

  3. CT of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  4. CT of pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Toshio (Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-09-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author).

  5. Fatal hemorrhagic–necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni Laura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  6. Fatal hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Bongiovanni; Nicola, Di Girolamo; Alessandro, Montani; Leonardo, Della Salda; Paolo, Selleri

    2014-05-01

    Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus), or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis) associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  7. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function and salivary gland function in autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Egawa, Naoto; Inokuma, Shigeko; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Kamata, Noriko; Nakamura, Teruo; Matsukawa, Masakatsu

    2003-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct clinical entity in which an autoimmune mechanism may be involved in pathogenesis. To investigate salivary gland function in addition to pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in patients with AIP, and to determine changes occurring after steroid therapy. Fasting serum glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests or glycosylated hemoglobin values were examined in 19 patients with AIP. N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid excretion test, sialochemistry and parotid gland scintigraphy were performed in 8 patients. Eight patients had evidence of DM. Steroid therapy subsequently improved insulin secretion and glycemic control in 3 of 5 patients treated. Pancreatic exocrine function was reduced in 88% of patients. Impaired pancreatic exocrine function improved after steroid therapy in 3 of 6 patients treated. The 3 patients also showed treatment-related improvement in endocrine function. Concentration of beta2-microglobulin in saliva was significantly raised in patients with AIP compared with controls (P gland dysfunction improved after steroid therapy in all 5 patients treated. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine and salivary gland function were frequently impaired in patients with AIP, and steroid therapy was occasionally effective for these dysfunctions.

  8. Epithelial NEMO/IKKγ limits fibrosis and promotes regeneration during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Kwan; Gerstenlauer, Melanie; Konukiewitz, Björn; Steiger, Katja; Weichert, Wilko; Wirth, Thomas; Maier, Harald Jakob

    2017-11-01

    Inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but its precise function has remained controversial. Here, we analyse the contribution of IKK/NF-κB signalling in epithelial cells to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis by targeting the IKK subunit NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) (IKKγ), which is essential for canonical NF-κB activation. Mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO in the pancreas were subjected to caerulein pancreatitis. Pancreata were examined at several time points and analysed for inflammation, fibrosis, cell death, cell proliferation, as well as cellular differentiation. Human samples were used to corroborate findings established in mice. In acute pancreatitis, NEMO deletion in the pancreatic parenchyma resulted in minor changes during the early phase but led to the persistence of inflammatory and fibrotic foci in the recovery phase. In chronic pancreatitis, NEMO deletion aggravated inflammation and fibrosis, inhibited compensatory acinar cell proliferation, and enhanced acinar atrophy and acinar-ductal metaplasia. Gene expression analysis revealed sustained activation of profibrogenic genes and the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the absence of epithelial NEMO. In human chronic pancreatitis samples, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was activated as well, with CXCR4 expression correlating with the degree of fibrosis. The aggravating effects of NEMO deletion were attenuated by the administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Our results suggest that NEMO in epithelial cells exerts a protective effect during pancreatitis by limiting inflammation and fibrosis and improving acinar cell regeneration. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is an important mediator of that effect and may also be of importance in human chronic pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  9. Genetic inhibition of protein kinase Cε attenuates necrosis in experimental pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Jia, Wenzhuo; Lugea, Aurelia; Mareninova, Olga; Waldron, Richard T.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of death pathways, necrosis and apoptosis, in pancreatitis is important for developing therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. Protein kinase Cε (PKCε) has been previously shown to regulate inflammatory responses and zymogen activation in pancreatitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ethanol specifically activated PKCε in pancreatic acinar cells and that PKCε mediated the sensitizing effects of ethanol on inflammatory response in pancreatitis. Here we investigated the role of PKCε in the regulation of death pathways in pancreatitis. We found that genetic deletion of PKCε resulted in decreased necrosis and severity in the in vivo cerulein-induced pancreatitis and that inhibition of PKCε protected the acinar cells from CCK-8 hyperstimulation-induced necrosis and ATP reduction. These findings were associated with upregulation of mitochondrial Bak and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, proapoptotic and prosurvival members in the Bcl-2 family, respectively, as well as increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis in pancreatitis in PKCε knockout mice. We further confirmed that cerulein pancreatitis induced a dramatic mitochondrial translocation of PKCε, suggesting that PKCε regulated necrosis in pancreatitis via mechanisms involving mitochondria. Finally, we showed that PKCε deletion downregulated inhibitors of apoptosis proteins, c-IAP2, survivin, and c-FLIPs while promoting cleavage/inactivation of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP). Taken together, our findings provide evidence that PKCε activation during pancreatitis promotes necrosis through mechanisms involving mitochondrial proapoptotic and prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins and upregulation of nonmitochondrial pathways that inhibit caspase activation and RIP cleavage/inactivation. Thus PKCε is a potential target for prevention and/or treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25035113

  10. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  11. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Max

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis. PMID:24490104

  12. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Ifosfamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao-Chiu Hung

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare complication during chemotherapy for pediatric patients with solid tumors. We report a 9-year-old boy with osteosarcoma who experienced 2 episodes of pancreatitis 1 day and 48 days after infusion of ifosfamide (IFOS, respectively. From a MEDLINE search, this is the 3rd reported case and 2nd reported pediatric case of IFOS-induced pancreatitis, and only this case experienced late-onset pancreatitis.

  13. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  14. Progression From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis Prognostic Factors, Mortality, and Natural Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nojgaard, C.; Becker, U.; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  15. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  16. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  17. Vaginal metastasis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhayoune, Khadija; El Fatemi, Hinde; El Ghaouti, Meryem; Bannani, Abdelaziz; Melhouf, Abdelilah; Harmouch, Taoufik

    2015-01-01

    Vaginal metastasis from pancreatic cancer is an extreme case and often indicates a poor prognosis. We present a case of pancreatic carcinoma with metastasis to the vagina that was discovered by vaginal bleeding. To our knowledge, this is the third case in the world of a primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma discovered of symptoms from a vaginal metastasis.

  18. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients....... The study was based on the large prospective cohort study - Copenhagen Pancreatitis Study - of patients in the Copenhagen Municipality admitted with either AP or CP fulfilling specific diagnostic criteria and enrolled in the study during 1977 to 1982 and in 2008 followed up by linkage to the Danish...

  19. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis used to be considered uncommon in dogs, but recent pathological and clinical studies have confirmed that it is in fact a common and clinically significant disease. Clinical signs can vary from low-grade recurrent gastrointestinal signs to acute exacerbations that are indistinguishable from classical acute pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a significant cause of chronic pain in dogs, which must not be underestimated. It also results in progressive impairment of endocrine and exocrine function and the eventual development of diabetes mellitus or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency or both in some affected dogs at end stage. The etiology is unknown in most cases. Chronic pancreatitis shows an increased prevalence in certain breeds, and recent work in English Cocker Spaniels suggests it is part of a polysystemic immune-mediated disease in this breed. The histological and clinical appearance is different in different breeds, suggesting that etiologies may also be different. Diagnosis is challenging because the sensitivities of the available noninvasive tests are relatively low. However, with an increased index of suspicion, clinicians will recognize more cases that will allow them to institute supportive treatment to improve the quality of life of the patient. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  1. [ACUTE PANCREATITIS OF PREGNANCY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvorostukhina, N F; Salov, L A; Novichkov, D A

    2015-01-01

    The study included 78 pregnant women with acute pancreatiis. Group 1 contained 43 4-37 weeks pregnant women and group 2 35 non-pregnant women. Control group was comprised of 30 women with physiological pregnancy. Comparative analysis of peculiarities of the clinical course of acute pancreatitis showed its similar manifestations in all three groups. However pregnancy itself variability of pancreatitis symptoms and their similarity to those of other acute surgical and obstetric pathologies, high (25.6) percent ofpainlessforms, late detection and inadequate treatment pose difficultiesfor diagnostics and delay the onset of pathogenetic therapy. The study of endogenous intoxication markers (leukocytic index, medium molecular weight molecules, circulating immune complexes, total endotoxins) revealed endotoxicosis in the pregnant women with acute pancreatitis that has negative effect on the fetoplacental complex and the development of pregnancy; moreover pancreatitis increases the risk of premature delivery up to 79.21%. The results of the study dictate the necessity of the searchfor new safe treatment and rehabilitation modalities for ptregnant women with acute pancreatitis.

  2. [Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldivar-Rodríguez, D; Treviño-Montemayor, O R; Guzmán-López, A; Treviño-Martínez, G; Flores-Acosta, C C

    2016-02-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease that affects the pancreatic tissue, which have been proposed numerous causes, with unpredictable results, it appears as a complication of rare occurrence, so the information on maternal and fetal complications is limited. Objective: Exposing obstetric and perinatal outcomes of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis complicating pregnancy. A retrospective, observational, transverse and descriptive study; data were obtained and analyzed by reviewing medical records of patients diagnosed with pancreatitis and pregnancy. A total of 9 cases were included, corresponding to an incidence of 39/100,000 live births in the time period analyzed. The median age was 22, the mean gestational age at diagnosis was 31 weeks. 4 patients had cesarean delivery and 2 patients natural delivery. 3 patients had Ranson 3, a 2 and other Ranson Ranson 1 the remaining 4 Ranson 0. All products had adequate evolution. A case of maternal death as a complication of the disease was presented, because of metabolic acidosis and ARDS. Acute pancreatitis is an entity of variable incidence, which increases their appearance with advancing pregnancy, and can lead to serious complications for pregnant women. It is extremely important to pay attention to early symptoms of the disease, and achieve an accurate diagnosis and provide adequate multidisciplinary management for a better prognosis for maternal-fetal binomial.

  3. Pathogenesis of rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eifan, A O; Durham, S R

    2016-09-01

    Rhinitis is a heterogeneous condition that has been associated with inflammatory responses as in allergic rhinitis but can also occur in the absence of inflammation such as in so-called idiopathic (previously 'vasomotor') rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis affects approximately one in four of the population of westernized countries and is characterized by typical symptoms of nasal itching, sneezing, watery discharge and congestion. The intention of this review is to illustrate key concepts of the pathogenesis of rhinitis. Imbalance in innate and adaptive immunity together with environmental factors is likely to play major roles. In allergic rhinitis, initial allergen exposure and sensitization involves antigen-presenting cells, T and B lymphocytes and results in the generation of allergen-specific T cells and allergen-specific IgE antibodies. On re-exposure to relevant allergens, cross-linking of IgE on mast cells results in the release of mediators of hypersensitivity such as histamine and immediate nasal symptoms. Within hours, there is an infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly Th2 T lymphocytes, eosinophils and basophils into nasal mucosal tissue that results in the late-phase allergic response. Evidence for nasal priming and whether or not remodelling may be a feature of allergic rhinitis will be reviewed. The occurrence of so-called local allergic rhinitis in the absence of systemic IgE will be discussed. Non-allergic (non-IgE-mediated) rhinitis will be considered in the context of inflammatory and non-inflammatory disorders. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Pathogenesis of bovine neosporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, J P; Buxton, D; Wouda, W

    2006-05-01

    The protozoan parasite Neospora caninum is a major pathogen of cattle and dogs, being a significant cause of abortion in cattle in many countries. It is one of the most efficiently transmitted parasites, with up to 90% of cattle infected in some herds. The pathogenesis of abortion due to Neospora is complex and only partially understood. Losses occur after a primary infection during pregnancy but more commonly as the result of recrudescence of a persistent infection during pregnancy. Parasitaemia is followed by invasion of the placenta and fetus. It is suggested that abortion occurs when primary parasite-induced placental damage jeopardises fetal survival directly or causes release of maternal prostaglandins that in turn cause luteolysis and abortion. Fetal damage may also occur due to primary tissue damage caused by the multiplication of N. caninum in the fetus or due to insufficient oxygen/nutrition, secondary to placental damage. In addition, maternal immune expulsion of the fetus may occur associated with maternal placental inflammation and the release of maternal pro-inflammatory cytokines in the placenta. Thus N. caninum is a primary pathogen capable of causing abortion either through maternal placental inflammation, maternal and fetal placental necrosis, fetal damage, or a combination of all three. The question of how N. caninum kills the fetus exposes the complex and finely balanced biological processes that have evolved to permit bovine and other mammalian pregnancies to occur. Defining these immunological mechanisms will shed light on potential methods of control of bovine neosporosis and enrich our understanding of the continuity of mammalian and protozoal survival.

  5. Pancreatic pleural effusion: A diagnosis not to be missed!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Kamath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pleural effusion as a consequence of acute pancreatitis is transient, usually left-sided; straw colored and accounts for 1% of all the cases. Rarely, it may be right-sided and hemorrhagic causing difficulty in establishing the diagnosis, especially if the chest symptoms are disproportionately more than the abdominal symptoms. We present a case of a young alcoholic male patient with a history of inadequately treated tuberculosis in the past, who presented with massive right pleural effusion, ascites, and right hydrocele and was overtly symptomatic for 1 week before hospital admission. Evaluation of pleural fluid revealed hemorrhagic, lymphocyte predominant exudate with low Adenosine Deaminase (ADA and high amylase level. Ascitic fluid too showed similar characteristics. His serum amylase level was also elevated which prompted us to make a clinical diagnosis of pancreatic pleural effusion with ascites. Further radiological investigations confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Early pleural fluid amylase testing will certainly avoid a delay in the timely diagnosis.

  6. Interleukin-9 Promotes Pancreatic Cancer Cells Proliferation and Migration via the miR-200a/Beta-Catenin Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bangli; Qiu-Lan, Huang; Lei, Rong-E; Shi, Cheng; Jiang, Hai-Xing; Qin, Shan-Yu

    2017-01-01

    Background . Both IL-9 and miR-200a are involved in the pathogenesis of cancers; however, the role of IL-9 in pancreatic cancer and the possible underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of IL-9 on pancreatic cancer cells and its interaction with miR-200a. Methods . Pancreatic cancer cells (PANC-1 and AsPC-1) were treated with IL-9 and the expression of miR-200a and β -catenin in pancreatic cancer cells was measured. β -Catenin was examined as a target gene of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells. The interaction between IL-9 and miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells was determined by infecting miR-200a mimics prior to IL-9 treatment and then measuring miR-200a and β -catenin expression. Results . IL-9 significantly promoted the proliferation, invasion, and migration of pancreatic cancer cells; however, the effect on pancreatic cancer cell apoptosis was insignificant. β -Catenin was verified as a target gene of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells. Overexpression of miR-200a in pancreatic cancer cells significantly attenuated proliferation and metastasis and reduced β -catenin expression. IL-9 treatment of pancreatic cancer cells decreased miR-200a expression and increased β -catenin expression. The effect of miR-200a on pancreatic cancer cells decreased following IL-9 treatment. Conclusions . IL-9 promotes proliferation and metastasis in pancreatic cancer cells; this effect may partly involve regulation of the miR-200a/ β -catenin axis.

  7. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yoo Kyung; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2017-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3), exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included. PMID:29068376

  8. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included.

  9. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  10. an extended pancreatic normal subjects and ~in pancreatItIs In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    function . . patIents. N. H. GILlNSKY, A. S. MEE, I. N. MARKS. Summary. Exocrine pancreatic response was evaluated in patients with varying degrees of pancreatic damage and in control subjects by ... hormones, the Lundh meal and an oral pancreatic function test .... is any different from that of the cells in me normal gland.

  11. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration. PMID:28748172

  12. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Borran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o. and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p. to different groups of mice (n=6. Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p. of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o. and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p. reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  13. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris ( T. terrestris ) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  14. An Update on Pediatric Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla-Udawatta, Monica; Madani, Shailender; Kamat, Deepak

    2017-05-01

    There has been a rise in the incidence and number of admissions of children with pancreatitis over the past 20 years. Current management practices for pancreatitis in children are adapted from standards of care for adults, and there are a lack of multicenter, prospective research studies on pancreatitis in children. There are inherent differences in the clinical presentation and natural course of pancreatitis between adults and children. This review focuses on the current understanding of the epidemiology, etiologies, evaluation, and management of children with pancreatitis. [Pediatr Ann. 2017;46(5):e207-e211.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Acute hyperlipidemic pancreatitis in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisan, Luminita S; Steidl, Erin T; Rivera-Alsina, Manuel E

    2008-05-01

    Pancreatitis in pregnancy remains a rare event and is most often associated with gallstone disease. Hyperlipidemic gestational pancreatitis usually occurs in women with a preexisting abnormality of the lipid metabolism and poses particular problems in diagnosis and clinical management. We describe 5 patients with acute episodes of pancreatitis during pregnancy caused by hyperlipidemia. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy causes significant morbidity. Even though it is often associated with gallstones, we describe 5 cases in which the etiology of the pancreatitis was maternal hyperlipidemia. Etiology, diagnosis, and management will be discussed.

  16. Pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba Keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panjwani, Noorjahan

    2010-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is a serious infection of the cornea. At present, diagnosis of the disease is not straightforward and treatment is very demanding. While contact lens wear is the leading risk factor for AK, Acanthamoeba parasites are increasingly recognized as an important cause of keratitis in non-contact lens wearers. The first critical step in the pathogenesis of infection is the adhesion of the microbe to the surface of the host tissues. Acanthamoebae express a major virulence protein, the mannose-binding protein (MBP), which mediates the adhesion of amoebae to the surface of the cornea. The MBP is a transmembrane protein with characteristics of a typical cell surface receptor. Subsequent to the MBP-mediated adhesion to host cells, the amoebae produce a contact-dependent metalloproteinase and several contact-independent serine proteinases. These proteinases work in concert to produce a potent cytopathic effect (CPE) involving killing of the host cells, degradation of epithelial basement membrane and underlying stromal matrix, and penetration into the deeper layers of the cornea. In the hamster animal model, oral immunization with the recombinant MBP protects against AK, and this protection is associated with an increased level of anti-MBP IgA in tears of protected animals. Normal human tear fluid contains IgA antibodies against Acanthamoeba MBP that is likely to provide protection by inhibiting the adhesion of parasites to host cells. Indeed, in in vitro CPE assays, even a low concentration of tears (10 [MU]μL of undiluted tears per milliliter of media) almost completely inhibits Acanthamoeba-induced CPE. In addition to adherence-inhibiting, IgA-mediated protection, human tears also contain IgA-independent factors that provide protection against Acanthamoeba-induced CPE by inhibiting the activity of cytotoxic proteinases. Characterization of the CPE-inhibitory factors of human tears should lead to a better understanding of the mechanism by which the

  17. Pancreatic transplant imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuh, W.T.C.; Wiese, J.A.; Abu-Yousef, M.M.; Rezai, K.; Sato, Y.; Kao, S.C.S.; Hunsicker, L.G.; Corry, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two MR studies, 162 radionuclide scintigraphic studies, and 57 sonographic studies were performed on 15 pancreatic transplant patients for evaluation of suspected graft rejection. The results of these studies were correlated with clinical presentations, laboratory data, and pathologic specimens when available. Radionuclide studies provide excellent information for estimating graft size and for evaluation of perfusion. Sonography is valuable for evaluation of the gland texture and peripancreatic abnormalities. MR provides useful information regarding parenchymal changes in rejection and response of the graft to treatment. These three imaging modalities are therefore complementary in the evaluation of pancreatic transplantation

  18. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  19. [Treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesani, C; D'Amato, A; Citone, G; Procacciante, F; Giannoni, F; Narilli, P; Ribotta, G

    1984-04-01

    Based on the results of treatment of a personal series of 13 cases of pseudocyst of the pancreas, between 1974 and the present day, it is suggested that the choice of therapy should be surgical. An internal shunt is preferred for pseudocysts as a result of acute pancreatitis or injury, whereas a wider cysto-wirsung jejunostomy is recommended for cysts developing during the course of chronic pancreatitis. These proposals follow analysis of immediate and long-term (mean: 51 months) follow-up, on the basis of mortality, morbidity, pain symptoms, malabsorption and postoperative diabetes.

  20. Cannabinoid HU210 Protects Isolated Rat Stomach against Impairment Caused by Serum of Rats with Experimental Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ming-hua; Li, Yong-yu; Xu, Jing; Feng, Ya-jing; Lin, Xu-hong; Li, Kun; Han, Tong; Chen, Chang-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), especially severe acute pancreatitis often causes extra-pancreatic complications, such as acute gastrointestinal mucosal lesion (AGML) which is accompanied by a considerably high mortality, yet the pathogenesis of AP-induced AGML is still not fully understood. In this report, we investigated the alterations of serum components and gastric endocrine and exocrine functions in rats with experimental acute pancreatitis, and studied the possible contributions of these alterations in the pathogenesis of AGML. In addition, we explored the intervention effects of cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210 and antagonist AM251 on isolated and serum-perfused rat stomach. Our results showed that the AGML occurred after 5 h of AP replication, and the body homeostasis was disturbed in AP rat, with increased levels of pancreatic enzymes, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), proinflammtory cytokines and chemokines in the blood, and an imbalance of the gastric secretion function. Perfusing the isolated rat stomach with the AP rat serum caused morphological changes in the stomach, accompanied with a significant increment of pepsin and [H+] release, and increased gastrin and decreased somatostatin secretion. HU210 reversed the AP-serum-induced rat pathological alterations, including the reversal of transformation of the gastric morphology to certain degree. The results from this study prove that the inflammatory responses and the imbalance of the gastric secretion during the development of AP are responsible for the pathogenesis of AGML, and suggest the therapeutic potential of HU210 for AGML associated with acute pancreatitis. PMID:23285225

  1. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  2. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  3. TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway mediates HMGB1-induced pancreatic injury in mice with severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Wu, Xuejun; Yang, Le; He, Yuxiang; Liu, Yang; Jin, Xing; Yuan, Hai

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) is an extremely dangerous acute abdominal disorder which causes multiple complications and has a high mortality rate. Previous research has suggested that high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of SAP; however, the mechanisms underlying this strong correlation remain unclear. In this study, to further investigate whether HMGB1 acts as a stimulating factor, and whether Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) acts as its major mediator in the development of pancreatic injury during SAP, recombinant human HMGB1 (rhHMGB1) and TLR4-deficient mice were used. We found that HMGB1 and TLR4 were highly expressed, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) was activated in our mouse model of SAP. We noted that the rhHMGB1 pancreas-targeted injection activated the TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway and induced pancreatic injury in wild-type mice. In TLR4-deficient mice, the rhHMGB1-induced activation of NF-κB and pathological changes in the pancreas were less evident than in wild-type mice. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HMGB1 promotes the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, and its downstream TLR4-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway is a potential important mediator in the development of this form of pancreatic injury.

  4. Alcohol intake and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    Alcohol is used all over the world and in most Western societies, the average intake is high. Alcohol is associated with more than 60 diseases and globally, 4% of all deaths are attributable to alcohol. The aim of the present thesis is to study associations between alcohol intake and risk...... of coronary heart disease (CHD), atrial fibrillation, liver cirrhosis and pancreatitis, and more specifically, to review the data for differential effects of alcohol according to modifying factors on these diseases. The thesis is based on the results from 10 epidemiological studies, conducted...... in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, the Diet, Cancer and Health Study and the Pooling Project of Diet and Coronary Disease. In all study cohorts, a lower risk of CHD was observed in light and moderate alcohol drinkers. In the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we also found that increasing alcohol intake was associated...

  5. Molecular mechanisms of rosacea pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davydova A.M.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents possible molecular mechanisms for rosacea pathogenesis from current domestic and foreign clinical observations and laboratory research: regulation and expression defects of antimicrobial peptides, vascular endothelial growth factor, the effect of serine proteases, oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species and ferritin on the occurrence and course of rosacea. New developments in molecular biology and genetics are advanced for researching the interaction of multiple factors involved in rosacea pathogenesis, as well as providing the bases for potentially new therapies.

  6. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  7. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankona Raymond

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  8. Review: pathogenesis of gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, R H

    2000-05-01

    The aim of this article is to review selected aspects of the pathogenesis of cholesterol-rich, gall-bladder stones (GBS)--with emphasis on recent developments in biliary cholesterol saturation, cholesterol microcrystal nucleation, statis within the gall-bladder and, particularly, on the roles of intestinal transit and altered deoxycholic acid (DCA) metabolism, in GBS development. In biliary cholesterol secretion, transport and saturation, recent developments include evidence in humans and animals, that bile lipid secretion is under genetic control. Thus in mice the md-2 gene, and in humans the MDR-3 gene, encodes for a canalicular protein that acts as a 'flippase' transporting phospholipids from the inner to the outer hemi-leaflet of the canalicular membrane. In the absence of this gene, there is virtually no phospholipid or cholesterol secretion into bile. Furthermore, when inbred strains of mice that have 'lith genes' are fed a lithogenic diet, they become susceptible to high rates of GBS formation. The precipitation/nucleation of cholesterol microcrystals from supersaturated bile remains a critical step in gallstone formation. methods of studying this phenomenon have now been refined from the original 'nucleation time' to measurement of cholesterol appearance/detection times, and crystal growth assays. Furthermore, the results of recent studies indicate that, in addition to classical Rhomboid-shape monohydrate crystals, cholesterol can also crystallize, transiently, as needle-, spiral- and tubule-shaped crystals of anhydrous cholesterol. A lengthy list of promoters, and a shorter list of inhibitors, has now been defined. There are many situations where GB stasis in humans is associated with an increased risk of gallstone formation--including iatrogenic stone formation in acromegalic patients treated chronically with octreotide (OT). As well as GB stasis, however, OT-treated patients all have 'bad' bile which is supersaturated with cholesterol, has excess

  9. MRI of pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studniarek, M.; Deschamps, P.Y.; Finas, B.; Pinet, A.

    1993-01-01

    The value of MRI in assessing pancreatic transplants was studied in 37 patients. Sixty-seven MRI examinations were performed in patients with an uncomplicated transplant, 14 in patients with poorly functioning transplant, and 10 in patients with a non-functioning graft. On the basis of 54 follow-up studies, it was shown that the volume of the graft decreased systematically during the 8 months after transplantation. On T1-weighted images the normal transplant was poorly delineated, with an almost homogeneous isointense or slightly hyperintense structure when compared with either renal transplant cortex or muscle. On T2-weighted images the organ was isointense or slightly hypointense compared with fat and hyperintense compared with muscle. T2-weighted delayed echo time image (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 150-200 ms) showed transplanted pancreas as well-delineated, hypointense and with a lobulated structure. This structure was characteristic of normal whole pancreatic grafts. Patent transplant vessels were seen as tubular structures of low signal intensity on T2-weighted short echo time images (TR = 2000 ms, TE = 50 ms). In the 10 patients with a non-functioning pancreatic transplant there were: 4 cases of focal intraparenchymal abnormalities, 6 cases in which the lobular structure was absent, and 4 cases of absence of patent graft main vessels (3 thromboses). There was no configuration of signal intensity of pancreatic parenchyma on MRI which could be considered typical for normal or non-functioning transplant. (orig.)

  10. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  11. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  12. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  13. Pleuravocht bij chronische pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamme, B.; Boerma, D.; Boermeester, M. A.; Gouma, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    In three patients, a 44-year-old schizophrenic woman and two men aged 54 and 42, who presented with dyspnoea, a pancreaticopleural fistula was diagnosed as a complication of pancreatitis, i.e. a fistulous tract between the pancreas and the pleural cavity. In general, these fistulas have a good

  14. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  15. Promoter hypomethylation of SKI in autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Takeshi; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Nakajima, Tomoyuki; Hamano, Hideaki; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Higuchi, Kayoko; Hosaka, Noriko; Shiozawa, Satoshi; Ishigame, Hiroki; Nakamura, Toshitsugu; Maruyama, Yasuhiro; Nakazawa, Koh; Nakaguro, Masato; Sano, Kenji; Ota, Hiroyoshi

    2018-03-06

    The relationship between methylation abnormality and autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP)-a representative IgG4-related disease-has not yet been elucidated. We identified SKI might have a significant methylation abnormality in AIP through methylation array analysis using the Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450K BeadChip array, and investigated the relationship of SKI with AIP clinicopathological features. The methylation rate of SKI was assessed by quantitative SYBR green methylation-specific PCR, and the degree of SKI expression in tissue specimens was assessed by immunohistochemistry in 10 AIP cases, 14 cases of obstructive pancreatitis area in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) without a history of AIP, and 9 normal pancreas (NP) cases. The SKI methylation ratio was significantly lower in AIP than in PDA and NP. Additionally, the immunohistochemical staining-index (SI) score for SKI was significantly higher in AIP than NP, although there was no significant difference between AIP and PDA. There was a strong negative correlation between SI score and SKI methylation ratio, and between the serum concentrations of IgG4 and the SKI methylation ratio. There was a moderate positive correlation between the serum concentrations of IgG4 and SI. SKI is thought to be an oncogene indicating that SKI hypomethylation and carcinogenesis might be linked to AIP. Furthermore, the correlation between serum concentrations of IgG4 and SKI methylation levels suggest SKI might be involved in the pathogenesis of AIP. However, the role of SKI has not been clearly elucidated. Further studies are needed to understand further the function of SKI. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  17. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-08-28

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to help evaluate the presence and degree of pancreatic necrosis, and is crucial for identifying complications of acute pancreatitis and predicting prognosis. The purpose of this article is to describe MRI techniques for acute pancreatitis, to review the spectrum of pancreatic and peripancreatic patterns, as well as to survey various complications secondary to acute pancreatitis on MRI. The role of MRI in the initial evaluation and staging of acute pancreatitis is emphasized.

  19. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  20. Laparoscopic cystogastrostomy in the management of pancreatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Pancreatic pseudocysts develop following acute or chronic pancreatitis. Majority of the cases resolve spontaneously but some persist beyond six weeks. Active management of pancreatic pseudocysts involves draining of the fluid collection through open surgery, endoscopically, laparoscopically or percutaneously.

  1. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9{+-}6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42{+-}1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33{+-}0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0{+-}1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal

  2. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9±6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42±1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33±0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0±1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal enlargement and

  3. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  4. Endoscopic Treatment of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis and Smoldering Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Rohit; Yadav, Dhiraj; Papachristou, Georgios I

    2015-10-01

    Recurrent acute pancreatitis (RAP) is a challenging condition that can lead to chronic pancreatitis and long-term morbidity. Etiology-based treatment can potentially have an impact on the natural history of RAP and its progression to chronic pancreatitis. In cases of divisum-associated RAP and idiopathic RAP, several studies have been performed to evaluate the efficacy of endoscopic therapy in alleviation of symptoms and frequency of AP events. This review discusses the literature available on these topic as well as touching on the role of endoscopic therapy in smoldering acute pancreatitis. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GAO Fan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is a common digestive disease with a high mortality rate. Clinical physicians often encounter patients with pancreatitis and fatty liver disease. This article investigates the association between pancreatitis and fatty liver disease from the aspects of the prevalence of fatty liver disease in patients with pancreatitis, the influence of fatty liver disease on the prognosis of pancreatitis, and pancreatitis induced by acute fatty liver disease during pregnancy.

  6. [Robot-assisted pancreatic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssle, B; Distler, M; Weitz, J; Welsch, T

    2017-06-01

    Although robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been considered critically in the past, it is nowadays an established standard technique in some centers, for distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic head resection. Compared with the laparoscopic approach, the use of robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous for acquiring the skills for pancreatic, bile duct and vascular anastomoses during pancreatic head resection and total pancreatectomy. On the other hand, the use of the robot is associated with increased costs and only highly effective and professional robotic programs in centers for pancreatic surgery will achieve top surgical and oncological quality, acceptable operation times and a reduction in duration of hospital stay. Moreover, new technologies, such as intraoperative fluorescence guidance and augmented reality will define additional indications for robot-assisted pancreatic surgery.

  7. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  8. Acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct associated with pancreatic ductal obstruction due to pancreas carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Yoshitsugu; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Susumu, Seiya; Tsutsumi, Ryuji; Kitasato, Amane; Adachi, Tomohiko; Mishima, Takehiro; Kanematsu, Takashi

    2006-08-01

    Acute obstructive suppurative cholangitis is a well-known clinical entity; however, acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct in the setting of pancreatic ductal obstruction is an uncommon pancreatic disorder. We report a case of acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct without either a concomitant pancreatic abscess or an infected pseudocyst, presenting as acute relapsing pancreatitis. In this case, the underlying cause of suppuration of the pancreatic duct was pancreatic ductal obstruction and chronic pancreatitis secondary to pancreas head carcinoma along with infection of Escherichia coli. Endoscopic placement of a pancreatic stent resulted in an evacuation of grayish thick pus from the distal pancreatic duct with a dramatic improvement of the disease. This case proposes the concept that acute suppuration of the pancreatic duct is a complex process involving the chronically damaged pancreas, pancreatic outflow obstruction, and subsequent bacterial infection. Antibiotic treatment is effective but temporary; therefore, the immediate drainage of the infected pancreatic duct is mandatory.

  9. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis i...

  10. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Norimasa; Sowa, Etsuji; Fujii, Satoru; Seki, Junichi; Wada, Masahisa

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75 Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75 Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  11. Probiotics and Severe Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lorenzo Fantini

    2006-01-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is frequently associated with necrosis of the gland, and the principal late complication is infection of the necrosis. The gut barrier plays an important role in severe acute pancreatitis; in fact, gut barrier integrity prevents bacteria translocation resulting from an atrophic and leaky gut, and reduces the systemic inflammatory syndrome of the pancreatitis from gut atrophy. The maintenance of gut barrier integrity is one of the goals in the treatment of severe acut...

  12. Alcohol use behaviors, fat intake and the function of pancreatic β-cells in non-obese, healthy Korean males: findings from 2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hye-Kyung; Cho, Yoonsu; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to identify dietary factors related to insulin secretion function especially in healthy, non-obese Korean males. Data were obtained from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V-1 (KNHANES V-1). Nine hundred and twenty male adults aged >30 years of normal weight were included, excluding those with type 2 diabetes mellitus and liver disease. Alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) score which represents alcohol use behaviors and nutrient intakes was used, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-B score) was calculated. HOMA-B score was associated with age (p Korean males. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Neuropathology of alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Greg T; Sheedy, Donna; Kril, Jillian J

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption results in structural changes to the brain. In alcoholics without coexisting thiamine deficiency or liver disease this is largely restricted to a loss of white-matter volume. When it occurs, neuronal loss is limited in anatomic distribution and only detected with quantitative techniques. This relative paucity of neurodegeneration is reflected in studies of gene and protein expression in postmortem brain where findings are subtle and discordant between studies. In alcoholics with coexisting pathologies, neuronal loss is more marked and affects a wider range of anatomic regions, especially subcortical nuclei. Although this more widespread damage may reflect a more severe drinking history, there is evidence linking thiamine deficiency and the consequences of liver disease to the pathogenesis of alcohol-related brain damage. Furthermore, a range of other factors, such as cigarette smoking and mood disorders, that are common in alcoholics, have the potential to influence studies of brain pathology and should be considered in further studies of the neuropathology of alcoholism. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. [Latest advances in chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-09-01

    This article summarizes some of the recent and clinically relevant advances in chronic pancreatitis. These advances mainly concern the early diagnosis of the disease, the prediction of the fibrosis degree of the gland, the evaluation of patients with asymptomatic hyperenzimemia, the medical and surgical treatment of abdominal pain and the knowledge of the natural history of the autoimmune pancreatitis. In patients with indetermined EUS findings of chronic pancreatitis, a new endoscopic ultrasound examination in the follow-up is of help to confirm or to exclude the disease. Smoking, number of relapses, results of pancreatic function tests and EUS findings allow predicting the degree of pancreatic fibrosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Antioxidant therapy has shown to be effective in reducing pain secondary to chronic pancreatitis, although the type and optimal dose of antioxidants remains to be elucidated. Development of intestinal bacterial overgrowth is frequent in patients with chronic pancreatitis, but its impact on symptoms is unknown and deserves further investigations. Finally, autoimmune pancreatitis relapses in about half of the patients with either type 1 or type 2 disease; relapses frequently occur within the first two years of follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Early management of acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepers, Nicolien J; Besselink, Marc G H; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Bakker, Olaf J; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-10-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to prevent or treat organ failure and to reduce infectious complications. This review addresses the management of acute pancreatitis in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms, including fluid therapy, nutrition and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. This review also discusses the recently revised Atlanta classification which provides new uniform terminology, thereby facilitating communication regarding severity and complications of pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  19. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  20. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  1. Huntington disease: pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayalu, Praveen; Albin, Roger L

    2015-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive motor, behavioral, and cognitive decline, culminating in death. It is caused by an expanded CAG repeat in the huntingtin gene. Even years before symptoms become overt, mutation carriers show subtle but progressive striatal and cerebral white matter atrophy by volumetric MRI. Although there is currently no direct treatment of HD, management options are available for several symptoms. A better understanding of HD pathogenesis, and more sophisticated clinical trials using newer biomarkers, may lead to meaningful treatments. This article reviews the current knowledge of HD pathogenesis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients...... with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations....... MAIN VARIABLES: The main registered variables are patient demographics, performance status, diagnostic workup, histological and/or cytological diagnosis, and clinical tumor stage. The following data on treatment are registered: type of operation, date of first adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and first...

  3. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  4. Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drinking to Excess U.S. National Library of Medicine, Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Last Updated: June 27, 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol addiction ...

  5. Pathogenesis of the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Monogenic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Murphy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying rare human metabolic disorders that result from a single-gene defect has not only enabled improved diagnostic and clinical management of such patients, but also has resulted in key biological insights into the pathophysiology of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are linked to obesity and driven by excess caloric intake and reduced physical activity. However, key events in the causation of the metabolic syndrome are difficult to disentangle from compensatory effects and epiphenomena. This review provides an overview of three types of human monogenic disorders that result in (1 severe, non-syndromic obesity, (2 pancreatic beta cell forms of early-onset diabetes, and (3 severe insulin resistance. In these patients with single-gene defects causing their exaggerated metabolic disorder, the primary defect is known. The lessons they provide for current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the common metabolic syndrome are highlighted.

  6. Antioxidative phytoceuticals to ameliorate pancreatitis in animal models: An answer from nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Min; Lee, Sooyeon; Chung, Mi Kyung; Kwon, Sung-Hun; Kim, Eun-Hee; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Kwon, Chang Il; Hahm, Ki Baik

    2014-01-01

    Despite enthusiastic efforts directed at elucidating critical underlying mechanisms towards the identification of novel therapeutic targets for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), the disease remains without a specific therapy to be executed within the first hours to days after onset of symptoms. Although earlier management for SAP should aim to either treat organ failure or reduce infectious complications, the current standard of care for the general management of AP in the first hours to days after onset of symptoms include intravenous fluid replacement, nutritional changes, and the use of analgesics with a close monitoring of vital signs. Furthermore, repeated evaluation of severity is very important, as the condition is particularly unstable in the early stages. In cases where biliary pancreatitis is accompanied by acute cholangitis or in cases where biliary stasis is suspected, an early endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is recommended. However, practice guidelines regarding the treatment of pancreatitis are suboptimal. In chronic pancreatitis, conservative management strategies include lifestyle modifications and dietary changes followed by analgesics and pancreatic enzyme supplementation. Recently, attention has been focused on phytoceuticals or antioxidants as agents that could surpass the limitations associated with currently available therapies. Because oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, antioxidants alone or combined with conventional therapy may improve oxidative-stress-induced organ damage. Interest in phytoceuticals stems from their potential use as simple, accurate tools for pancreatitis prognostication that could replace older and more tedious methods. Therefore, the use of antioxidative nutrition or phytoceuticals may represent a new direction for clinical research in pancreatitis. In this review article, recent advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis are

  7. Pregnancy associated pancreatitis revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Osamuyimen; Poddar, Sameer; Pitchumoni, Capercomorin

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the demographics, risk factors and outcomes of pregnancy associated pancreatitis (PAP). A retrospective chart review was done using ICD-9 Code 577.0 (acute pancreatitis) from January 2005 through December 2009. Women aged 18 to 45 years, who were pregnant and 6 months after delivery were considered for the study. For each case, two women of the same age (± 4 years) with no history of pancreatitis were matched as control. Demographics, etiology, diagnostic modality and intervention were obtained. During the 5 years of study, 29 cases of PAP occurred among 25,600 total hospital deliveries, yielding prevalence of 0.001%: Hispanics 48%, Caucasians 24%, African Americans 17.2%, and Asian/Pacific Islanders 13% (Ppregnancy body mass index (BMI) more than 30 kg/m(2) had PAP, versus 24% with BMI between 25 and 30 kg/m(2) and 10% with BMI less than 25 kg/m(2) (Ppregnancy. Gallstone disease is the most frequent etiology for PAP and tends to occur more often in Hispanics in New Jersey. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Transplantable pancreatic acinar carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Fragments of the nafenopin-induced pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma of rat have been examined in vitro for patterns of intracellular protein transport and carbamylcholine-induced protein discharge. Continuous incubation of the fragments with [3H]-leucine for 60 minutes resulted in labeling of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi cisternae, and mature zymogen granules, revealed by electron microscope autoradiography. This result indicates transport of newly synthesized protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to mature zymogen granules in approximately 60 minutes. The secretagogue carbamylcholine induced the discharge of radioactive protein by carcinoma fragments pulse-chase labeled with [3H]-leucine. A maximal effective carbamylcholine concentration of 10(-5) M was determined. The acinar carcinoma resembles normal exocrine pancreas in the observed rate of intracellular protein transport and effective secretagogue concentration. However, the acinar carcinoma fragments demonstrated an apparent low rate of carbamylcholine-induced radioactive protein discharge as compared with normal pancreatic lobules or acinar cells. It is suggested that the apparent low rate of radioactive protein discharge reflects functional immaturity of the acinar carcinoma. Possible relationships of functional differentiation to the heterogeneous cytodifferentiation of the pancreatic acinar carcinoma are discussed

  9. Methylation of the SPARC gene promoter and its clinical implication in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Shunli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC plays a pivotal role in regulating cell-matrix interactions and tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, and migration. Detection of SPARC gene methylation may be useful as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Methods Methylation of the SPARC gene transcriptional regulation region (TRR was detected using bisulfite-specific (BSP PCR-based sequencing analysis in 40 cases of pancreatic cancer and the adjacent normal tissues, 6 chronic pancreatitis tissues, and 6 normal pancreatic tissues. BSP cloning-based sequencing analysis was also performed in selected cases. Clinicopathological data from the cancer patients were collected and analyzed. Results Analysis of SPARC gene TRR methylation showed two hypermethylation wave peak regions: CpG Region 1 (CpG site 1-7 and CpG Region 2 (CpG site 8-12. Pancreatic tissues have shown methylation in both regions with gradual increases from normal, chronic pancreatitis, and adjacent normal tissues to cancerous tissues. However, Methylation of CpG Region 2 was more sensitive than CpG Region 1 in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the methylation level of CpG Region 2 was associated with increased tumor size and exposure to the risk factors (tobacco smoke and alcohol consumption for developing pancreatic cancer. Conclusion Methylation of the SPARC gene, specifically CpG Region 2, may be an early event during pancreatic tumorigenesis and should be further evaluated as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Dragasevic, Sanja; Zec, Simon; Popovic, Dragan; Milosavljevic, Tomica

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a growing problem worldwide and disorders associated with excess body fat including the metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), cardiovascular disease and malignant neoplasms are becoming a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Over the past decade, a vast amount of research has furthered our understanding of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; however, only recently pancreatic fat infiltration is coming to the forefront of investigation. Termed non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD), it is becoming evident that it has important associations with other diseases of obesity. It appears to arise as obesity progresses and after an initial phase of pancreatic hypertrophy and hyperplasia, fatty infiltration becomes apparent. Various studies have demonstrated that NAFPD may exacerbate the severity of acute pancreatitis, promote pancreatic dysfunction associated with insulin resistance and T2DM, and even have links to the development of pancreatic carcinoma, and therefore, it must be investigated in further detail. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. A STUDY OF AETIOLOGY, CLINICAL FEATURES AND MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute pancreatitis is a common condition involving the pancreas. The estimated incidence is about 3% of cases presenting with pain abdomen in the UK. The hospital admission rate for acute pancreatitis is 9.8/100,000 per year in UK and annual incidence may range from 5-50/100,000 worldwide. Gall stone disease and alcohol account for greater than 80% of all patients with acute pancreatitis, with biliary disease accounting for 45% and alcohol found in 35% of patients. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualised. Patients with mild acute pancreatitis generally can be managed with resuscitation and supportive care. Aetiological factors are sought and treated, if possible, but operative therapy essentially has no role in the care of these patients. Those with severe and necrotising pancreatitis require intensive therapy, which may include wide operative debridement of the infected pancreas or surgical management of local complications of the disease. AIM OF THE STUDY 1. To study the age and sex prevalence of acute pancreatitis. 2. To study the various aetiological factors of acute pancreatitis. 3. To study the clinical presentation and management of acute pancreatitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients admitted to the Department of General Surgery at M.K.C.G Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur were taken up for the study. Totally, 49 patients with 53 episodes of acute pancreatitis were studied from September 2013 to August 2015. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS Acute pancreatitis is a common cause of acute abdomen in patients presenting to the surgical emergency department. Alcohol being the most common cause of acute pancreatitis in this part of the country, it has a male preponderance and most commonly presents in the 4th decade of life. It is mainly a clinical diagnosis supplanted with biochemical and radiological findings. The management is mainly conservative, with surgery

  12. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-12-28

    To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful.

  13. Combined effects of chronic and acute ethanol on pancreatic injury and microcirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Grauvogel, Tanja Daniela; Gebhard, Martha-Maria; Werner, Jens

    2012-07-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate pancreatic microcirculatory and histopathological changes in rats after chronic ethanol liquid diet feeding. To investigate the influence of chronic alcohol exposition (CAE) on the pancreas, rats were fed with either Lieber-DeCarli (LDC) control diet or LDC alcohol diet for 2, 4, or 6 weeks and received additionally an acute ethanol administration (AEA) for 90 minutes. Intravital microscopy was performed at baseline, 45 minutes, and 90 minutes after starting AEA. Pancreatic perfusion and leukocyte adhesion were assessed, and pancreatic damage was evaluated by histology. Capillary perfusion was reduced in all animals after AEA. After previous CAE, there was a significant increase in leukocyte adhesion compared to control groups (P acute bolus was infused (P pancreatic edema and vacuoles, whereas those that received AEA alone did not. Histological changes and cytokine levels correlated with the duration of prior CAE. Long-term alcohol intake activates endothelium and sensitizes the pancreas for inflammatory reactions leading to an increased likelihood of a clinically evident episode of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Pathogenesis of giant colonic diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhletaler, C.A.; Berger, J.L.; Robinette, C.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings of 3 patients with giant colonic diverticula are presented. Although several theories have been proposed for the formation of these diverticula, they have not been fully documented. One of our cases illustrates the evolution of this disorder following typical colonic diverticulitis. The pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of this unusual entity are discussed. (orig.)

  15. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop...

  16. An Unexpected Result of Obesity Treatment: Orlistat-Related Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Murat; Emet, Samim; Akpinar, Timur Selcuk; Ilhan, Mehmet; Gok, Ali Fuat Kaan; Dadashov, Mubariz; Tukek, Tufan

    2015-01-01

    Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor which is used to treat obesity. Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity, orlistat use is thought to rise progressively. We report an interesting case caused by orlistat use caught in the early stages of acute pancreatitis through imaging; in addition, the case had significantly elevated serum amylase levels. A 54-year-old male who had a history of orlistat treatment started 7 days before was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting lasting for 24 h. Abdominal computed tomography revealed peripancreatic fat tissue edema and a heterogeneous appearance of the pancreas. Based on these findings, it was concluded that edematous pancreatitis was in its initial stage. Orlistat is a drug that is increasingly widespread use due to obesity. More attention must be paid when planning to prescribe orlistat to patients if there are risk factors for acute pancreatitis (alcohol use, height, serum calcium and lipid levels).

  17. An Unexpected Result of Obesity Treatment: Orlistat-Related Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Kose

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor which is used to treat obesity. Due to the increasing prevalence of obesity, orlistat use is thought to rise progressively. We report an interesting case caused by orlistat use caught in the early stages of acute pancreatitis through imaging; in addition, the case had significantly elevated serum amylase levels. A 54-year-old male who had a history of orlistat treatment started 7 days before was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting lasting for 24 h. Abdominal computed tomography revealed peripancreatic fat tissue edema and a heterogeneous appearance of the pancreas. Based on these findings, it was concluded that edematous pancreatitis was in its initial stage. Orlistat is a drug that is increasingly widespread use due to obesity. More attention must be paid when planning to prescribe orlistat to patients if there are risk factors for acute pancreatitis (alcohol use, height, serum calcium and lipid levels.

  18. The second case of a young man with L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Quentin; Dufour, Inès; Agneessens, Emmanuel; Debongnie, Jean-Claude; Aouattah, Tarik; Covas, Angélique; Coche, Jean-Charles; De Koninck, Xavier

    2018-04-21

    Dietary supplementation of arginine has been used by numerous world-class athletes and professional bodybuilders over the past 30 years. L-Arginine indeed enhances muscular power and general performance via maintaining ATP level. However, L-arginine is also known to induce acute pancreatitis in murine models. We report the case of young man presenting with upper abdominal pain and increased serum lipase levels. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirms a mild acute pancreatitis. Common etiologies have been ruled out and toxicological anamnestic screening reveals the intake of protein powder. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the second case in human of arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. This case report suggests that every patient presenting with acute pancreatitis without obvious etiology should be evaluated for the intake of toxics other than alcohol, including L-arginine.

  19. Total pancreatectomy for recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: a critical review of patient selection criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Mahya; Gonzalez, Francisco Garcia; Makary, Martin A.; Singh, Vikesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Critical review of the indications for total pancreatectomy and highlight limitations in current diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Recent findings The diagnosis of noncalcific chronic pancreatitis remains controversial because of an overreliance on nonspecific imaging and laboratories findings. Endoscopic ultrasound, s-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and/or endoscopic pancreatic function testing are often used to diagnose noncalcific chronic pancreatitis despite the fact that there is no gold standard for this condition. Abdominal pain is not specific for chronic pancreatitis and is more likely to be encountered in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the high incidence of these conditions. The duration of pain and opioid analgesic use results in central sensitization that adversely affects pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. An alcoholic cause is associated with poorer pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. Summary The lack of a gold standard for noncalcific chronic pancreatitis limits the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and laboratory tests. The pain of chronic pancreatitis is nonspecific and is affected by duration, preoperative opioid use, and cause. These factors will need to be considered in the development of future selection criteria for this morbid surgery. PMID:28700371

  20. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Hara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL, pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L, and lipase (332 IU/L. There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy.

  1. Prospective evaluation of the aetiological profile of acute pancreatitis in young adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culetto, Adrian; Bournet, Barbara; Haennig, Audrey; Alric, Laurent; Peron, Jean-Marie; Buscail, Louis

    2015-07-01

    The aetiologies of acute pancreatitis in young adult patients are poorly known. To prospectively evaluate the causes of acute pancreatitis in patients aged less than 35 years. Overall, 309 consecutive patients admitted to our centre for acute pancreatitis received first-line investigations, including medical history, standard laboratory tests, abdominal ultrasound and computed tomography. If no aetiology was found, second-line investigations were performed, including endoscopic ultrasound, magnetic-resonance cholangiopancreatography and genetic testing in cases of idiopathic pancreatitis. Overall, 66 patients aged between 16 and 35 years were included. After first-line investigations, 49% of cases of acute pancreatitis remained idiopathic. Second-line investigations reduced this rate to 21%. The frequency of aetiologies for acute pancreatitis significantly differed in adults aged ≤ 35 compared to those aged >35 years: biliary aetiology was less frequent (23% versus 43%, p=0.003) as well as alcohol-related (8% versus 24%, p=0.01); drug-induced was more common (16% versus 4%, p=0.0007), as well as cannabis-related (13% versus 1%, pacute pancreatitis significantly differed in adults aged less than 35 years when compared to older patients. Thus, use of medications, exposure to cannabis, and genetic mutations should be actively sought in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...

  3. Treatment options for acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, Olaf J.; Issa, Yama; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Schepers, Nicolien J.; Bruno, Marco J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.

    2014-01-01

    This Review covers the latest developments in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. The Atlanta Classification of acute pancreatitis has been revised, proposing several new terms and abandoning some of the old and confusing terminology. The 2012 Revised Atlanta Classification and the

  4. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  5. Metabolic syndrome and acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikolasevic, I; Milic, S; Orlic, L; Poropat, G; Jakopcic, I; Franjic, N; Klanac, A; Kristo, N; Stimac, D

    2016-07-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on the course of acute pancreatitis determined by disease severity, the presence of local and systemic complications and survival rate. 609 patients admitted to our hospital in the period from January 1, 2008 up to June 31, 2015 with the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis were analyzed. The diagnosis and the severity of acute pancreatitis were made according to the revised Atlanta classification criteria from 2012. Of 609 patients with acute pancreatitis, 110 fulfilled the criteria for metabolic syndrome. Patients with metabolic syndrome had statistically significantly higher incidence of moderately severe (38.2% vs. 28.5%; p=0.05) and severe (22.7% vs. 12.8%; p=0.01) acute pancreatitis in comparison to those without metabolic syndrome, while patients without metabolic syndrome had higher incidence of mild acute pancreatitis in comparison to those patients with metabolic syndrome (58.7% vs. 39.1%; pacute pancreatitis. Comparing survival rates, patients suffering from metabolic syndrome had a higher death rate compared to patients without metabolic syndrome (16% vs. 4.5%; pacute pancreatitis, as well as higher mortality rate. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Early management of acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Nicolien J.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Bruno, Marco J.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the most common gastro-intestinal indication for acute hospitalization and its incidence continues to rise. In severe pancreatitis, morbidity and mortality remains high and is mainly driven by organ failure and infectious complications. Early management strategies should aim to

  7. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  8. Acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducarme, G; Maire, F; Chatel, P; Luton, D; Hammel, P

    2014-02-01

    This article aims to draw together recent thinking on pregnancy and acute pancreatitis (AP), with a particular emphasis on pregnancy complications, birth outcomes and management of AP during pregnancy contingent on the etiology. AP during pregnancy is a rare but severe disease with a high maternal-fetal mortality, which has recently decreased thanks to earlier diagnosis and some maternal and neonatal intensive care improvement. AP usually occurs during the third trimester or the early postpartum period. The most common causes of AP are gallstones (65 to 100%), alcohol abuse and hypertriglyceridemia. Although the diagnostic criteria for AP are not specific for pregnant patients, Ranson and Balthazar criteria are used to evaluate the severity and treat AP during pregnancy. The fetal risks from AP during pregnancy are threatened preterm labor, prematurity and in utero fetal death. In cases of acute biliary pancreatitis during pregnancy, a consensual strategy could be adopted according to the gestational age, and taking in consideration the high risk of recurrence of AP (70%) with conservative treatment and the specific risks of each treatment. This could include: conservative treatment in first trimester and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in second trimester. During the third trimester, conservative treatment or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography with biliary endoscopic sphincterotomy, and laparoscopic cholecystectomy in early postpartum period are recommended. A multidisciplinary approach, including gastroenterologists and obstetricians, seems to be the key in making the best choice for the management of AP during pregnancy.

  9. Pancreatic paracoccidioidomycosis simulating malignant neoplasia: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Talles Bazeia; Domingues, Maria Aparecida Custódio; Caramori, Carlos Antonio; Silva, Giovanni Faria; de Oliveira, Cássio Vieira; Yamashiro, Fábio da Silva; Franzoni, Letícia de Campos; Sassaki, Lígia Yukie; Romeiro, Fernando Gomes

    2013-09-14

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a systemic granulomatous disease caused by fungus, and must be considered in the differential diagnosis of intra-abdominal tumors in endemic areas. We report a rare case of paracoccidioidomycosis in the pancreas. A 45-year-old man was referred to our institution with a 2-mo history of epigastric abdominal pain that was not diet-related, with night sweating, inappetence, weight loss, jaundice, pruritus, choluria, and acholic feces, without signs of sepsis or palpable tumors. Abdominal ultrasonography (US) showed a solid mass of approximately 7 cm × 5.5 cm on the pancreas head. Abdominal computerized tomography showed dilation of the biliary tract, an enlarged pancreas (up to 4.5 in the head region), with dilation of the major pancreatic duct. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy, and the surgical description consisted of a tumor, measuring 7 to 8 cm with a poorly-defined margin, adhering to posterior planes and mesenteric vessels, showing an enlarged bile duct. External drainage of the biliary tract, Roux-en-Y gastroenteroanastomosis, lymph node excision, and biopsies were performed, but malignant neoplasia was not found. Microscopic analysis showed chronic pancreatitis and a granulomatous chronic inflammatory process in the choledochal lymph node. Acid-alcohol resistant bacillus and fungus screening were negative. Fine-needle aspiration of the pancreas was performed under US guidance. The smear was compatible with infection by Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. We report a rare case of paracoccidioidomycosis simulating a malignant neoplasia in the pancreas head.

  10. Occupational exposures and risk of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santibanez, Miguel; Vioque, Jesus; Alguacil, Juan; Hera, Manuela Garcia de la; Moreno-Osset, Eduardo; Carrato, Alfredo; Porta, Miquel; Kauppinen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the relationship between occupation (and specific occupational exposures) and risk of exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC). We conducted a multicenter hospital-based case-control study in Eastern Spain. We included 161 incident cases of EPC (59.6% men, 94 with histological confirmation, of whom 80% had ductal adenocarcinoma). Cases were frequency-matched with 455 controls by sex, age and province of residence. Information was elicited using structured questionnaires. Occupations were coded according to the Spanish version of the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988. Occupational exposure to a selection of carcinogenic substances was assessed with the Finnish Job-Exposure Matrix (FINJEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, province, education, alcohol and smoking. A higher risk of EPC was associated with having worked as 'Miners, shotfirers, stone cutters and carvers', 'Machinery mechanics and fitters', 'Building trades workers' and 'Motor vehicle drivers' in men, 'Office Clerks' in women, and 'Waiters' in both sexes. Cases with ductal adenocarcinomas were more likely to have been exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.1-15.2, p-trend = 0.04). We also observed significant associations with exposure to 'synthetic polymer dust exposure' and 'ionizing radiation'. Suggestive increases in risk were observed for 'pesticides', 'diesel and gasoline engine exhaust', and 'hydrocarbon solvents'. Results support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents is associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  11. Medical image of the week: pancreatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurachi-Monjagatta C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 55 year old woman, with a history of alcohol abuse and necrotizing pancreatitis, was readmitted for worsening abdominal pain and acute respiratory failure. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an atrophic pancreas and multiple fluid collections. Along the inferior surface of the pancreas, there is a fluid collection with an evolving loculated rim, which is asymmetric, the larger component measure 2.9 cm x 4.7 cm (Figure 1, large arrow. Anterior to the body of the pancreas, there is an additional 2.2 cm x 2.4 cm with evolving loculated rim (Figure 1, short arrow, both compatible with a pseudocyst. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed a distended pancreatic duct that communicates to the smaller fluid collection (Figure 2. Coronal CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed a 12.4 cm pelvic abscess (Figure 3. CT guided drainage of the pelvic abscess was performed with positive culture of the fluid …

  12. Retrospective Analyses Of The Acute Pancreatitis With Patients In The West Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YAŞAR, Ali Kemal TAŞKIN, İsmet ÖZAYDIN, Yavuz DEMİRARAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In these study patients who were our clinic with an etiology, diagnosis andtreatment methods, morbidity, mortality and effect of Ranson criteria to prognosis wereexamined retrospectively. Material and Method: In the study 44 mild and 18 severe total 62 AP cases among 2003-2008at the General Surgery of Duzce University were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A etiologic factor was 40 (66,7 %, gallstone 11 (17, 7% idiopathic, 4 (6,4 %hyperlipidemia, 3 (4,8% alchol-hyperlipidemia, 2 (3,2 % alcohol, 2 (3,2 % after ERCPcomplications. Patients were followed up with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, the average ageof 59.6 (18 - 84 and 23 (37% were man, 39 (63% were woman. ERCP were performed to 14patients with billiary pancreatitis 2 patients for the persistent billiary pancreatitis and for the 6patients cholecystitis accompanied pancreatitis in the first 48 hours period, 23 patients followingthe acute pancreatitis attack were performed cholecystectomy. Acute pancreatitis patients first6 cases of biliary 3 reputations have been switched to laparoscopic open cholecystectomy isbeing performed. 3 patients peritoneal lavage under local anesthesia, 4 patients’ diagnosticlaparoscopy and 2 patients nerosectomy were performed. Mean hospitalization times were 9.8days for mild and 11.2 days severe. In the severe group idiopathic a etiology 3 (4.8 % patientswere exitus. Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is a disease that can watch a high mortality rate. Biliary factorswere the most common etiological factor. Idiopathic AP played a role in second place and wehave observed that the effect of alcohol is quite low. In biliary acute pancreatitis ERCP is auseful method in the first stage. Overall mortality in severe AP, as observed in patients with thediagnosis, treatment and follow-up was important in these patients.

  13. Roles of Sphingolipid Metabolism in Pancreatic β Cell Dysfunction Induced by Lipotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Véret

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in order to maintain glucose homeostasis. However, various environmental stresses such as obesity have been shown to induce loss of secretory responsiveness in pancreatic β cells and pancreatic β cell apoptosis which can favor the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Indeed, elevated levels of free fatty acids (FFAs have been shown to induce β cell apoptosis. Importantly, the chronic adverse effects of FFAs on β cell function and viability are potentiated in the presence of hyperglycaemia, a phenomenon that has been termed gluco-lipotoxicity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of gluco-lipotoxicity in pancreatic β cells are not completely understood. Recent studies have shown that sphingolipid metabolism plays a key role in gluco-lipotoxicity induced apoptosis and loss of function of pancreatic β cells. The present review focuses on how the two main sphingolipid mediators, ceramides and sphingoid base-1-phosphates, regulate the deleterious effects of gluco-lipotoxicity on pancreatic β cells. The review highlights the role of a sphingolipid biostat on the dysregulation of β cell fate and function induced by gluco-lipotoxicity, offering the possibility of new therapeutic targets to prevent the onset of T2D.

  14. A rare case of thrombotic microangiopathy triggered by acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kevin; Nadeem, Ahmed Jamal; Doratotaj, Behzad

    2017-05-15

    Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) occurring after acute pancreatitis is rarely described. Without prompt intervention, TMA can be, and often is, lethal, so prompt recognition is important. Here, we present a case of a 61-year-old woman with a history of alcohol misuse who presented with epigastric pain, nausea and vomiting after binge drinking. Elevated serum lipase and imaging were suggestive of acute-on-chronic pancreatitis. Although the patient's symptoms of acute pancreatitis subsided, her anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute kidney injury worsened. A peripheral blood smear revealed schistocytes, prompting suspicion for TMA. Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) was promptly initiated and she completed 10 TPE sessions that improved her anaemia and serum creatinine and resolved the thrombocytopenia. Since TPE was effective and the ADAMTS13 assay revealed 55% activity in the absence of anti-ADAMTS13 IgG prior to initiation of therapy, a confident diagnosis of TMA caused by acute pancreatitis was made. There was no evidence of relapse 2 years later. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  15. Increasing the efficacy of a celiac plexus block in patients with severe pancreatic cancer pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vranken, J. H.; Zuurmond, W. W.; de Lange, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical possibilities of placing a catheter near the celiac plexus for performance of a celiac plexus block, and to study the efficacy of repeated neurolytic celiac plexus blocks with alcohol in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer pain resistant

  16. The Practical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis: A Multidisciplinary Symposium Held at the Annual Meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Manchester 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheeswaran, Santhalingam; Puleston, Joanne M; Duggan, Sinead; Hart, Andrew; Conlon, Kevin C; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2018-01-16

    This study is about a questionnaire survey of delegates attending the chronic pancreatitis symposium at the 2016 meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland and seeks a multidisciplinary "snapshot" overview of practice. A questionnaire was developed with multidisciplinary input. Questions on access to specialist care, methods of diagnosis and treatment including specific scenarios were incorporated. Eighty-three (66%) of 125 delegates effectively participated in this survey. Twenty-four (29%) had neither a chronic pancreatitis MDT in their hospital nor a chronic pancreatitis referral MDT. Most frequently utilised diagnostic modalities were CT, MR and EUS with no respondents utilising duodenal intubation tests. Initial treatment was provided through non-opiate analgesia by 69 (93%), through the use of opiates by 56 (76%) and through the use of co-analgesics by 49 (66%). Fifty two (68%) routinely referred patients with alcohol-related disease for counselling. Preferred treatment for large duct disease without mass was endoscopic therapy. In older patients with a mass, pancreaticoduodenectomy was preferred. This is a small study likely to be skewed by sampling bias but is thought to be the first multidisciplinary survey of the management of chronic pancreatitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The results show a need for comprehensive access to specialist pancreatitis MDT care and there remains substantial variation in management. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Chronic pancreatitis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenoulis, Panagiotis G; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jorg M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatitis is the most common disorder of the exocrine pancreas in dogs and cats. Clinical diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is challenging because the disease is usually mild or subclinical and because its clinical signs are often the same as those of complicating or concurrent diseases. Obtaining a detailed history, performing a thorough physical examination, and conducting tests that are sensitive and specific for pancreatitis are crucial in diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. Initial management of an acute episode of chronic pancreatitis largely involves supportive and dietary measures, while long-term management of chronic pancreatitis is based on dietary modification. Management of complications and concurrent diseases is crucial in animals with chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  19. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Yukihiro; Ueda, Noriyuki; Takasago, Noritsugu; Minemoto, Hiromasa; Namiki, Masayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  20. Clinical trials to reduce pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery-review of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahata, Yuji; Kawai, Manabu; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic fistula is one of severe postoperative complications that occur after pancreatic surgery, such as pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and distal pancreatectomy (DP). Because pancreatic fistula is associated with a higher incidence of life-threatening complications. In order to evaluate procedure or postoperative management to reduce pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery, we summarized some randomized controlled trials (RCTs) regarding pancreaticoenterostomy during PD, pancreatic duct stent during PD, procedure to resect pancreatic parenchyma during DP, and somatostatin and somatostatin analogues after pancreatic surgery. At first, we reviewed nine RCTs to compare pancreaticogastrostomy (PG) with pancreaticojejunostomy (PJ) during PD. Next, we reviewed five RCTs, to evaluate the impact of pancreatic duct stent during PD. Regarding DP, we reviewed six RCTs to evaluate appropriate procedure to reduce pancreatic fistula after DP. Finally, we reviewed eight RCTs to evaluate the impact of somatostatin and somatostatin analogues after pancreatic surgery to reduce pancreatic fistula. The best way to prevent pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery remains still controversial. However, several RCTs clarify a useful procedure to reduce in reducing the incidence of pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery. Further RCTs to study innovative approaches remain a high priority for pancreatic surgeons to prevent pancreatic fistula after pancreatic surgery.

  1. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  2. Coronary heart disease: dietary links and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renaud, S; Lanzmann-Petithory, D

    2001-04-01

    For decades it has been postulated that the main environmental factor for coronary heart disease (CHD) was the intake of saturated fatty acids (SFA). Nevertheless, confirmation of the role of SFA in CHD through intervention trials has been disappointing. It was only when the diet was enriched in n-3 fatty acids that CHD was significantly prevented, especially cardiac death. In addition to n-3 fatty acids, many other foodstuffs or nutrients such as fibers, antioxidants, folic acid, calcium and even alcohol contribute to prevent CHD. Thus the relationship between diet and CHD morbidity and mortality appears to be much more complex than formerly suspected considering as key factors only SFA, linoleic acid, cholesterol and atherosclerosis. Some of the mechanisms are briefly described, but many additional nutrients (or non nutrients) may also play an important role in the pathogenesis of CHD. Finally, as a result of the most recent epidemiologic studies the ideal diet may comprise: 8% energy from SFA, 5% from polyunsaturated fatty acids with a ratio 5/1 of linoleic/alpha-linolenic acid+longer chains n-3, oleic acid as desired, large intake of cereals, vegetables, legumes and fruits, fish twice a week, cheese and yogurt as dairy products, rapeseed and olive oils as edible fat. Without side effects, such a diet can be highly palatable, easily enjoyed by many populations and may prevent effectively and rapidly (within a few weeks or months) CHD.

  3. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  5. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  6. Contrast-enhanced sonography in pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickes, Steffen [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)], E-mail: rickes@medkl.salvator-kh.de; Rauh, Peter; Uhle, Christine; Ensberg, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Moenkemueller, Klaus; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced sonography is a widely available imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. With this procedure, pancreatic tumours can be differentiated better. Furthermore, contrast-enhanced sonography produces good results in the staging of acute pancreatitis severity, especially in the detection of pancreatic necrosis. In this review article the value of contrast-enhanced sonography in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases will be described and discussed.

  7. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy

  8. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  9. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  10. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so they can monitor you for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Prevention Reduce or avoid alcohol. If you have a drinking problem, you should ... team. 02-05-18: Editorial update. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Read more ... HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A. ...

  11. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O' Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  12. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A PERIPHERAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karunahara

    2016-06-01

    , patients willing to participate in the study. Exclusion Criteria: Paediatric age group, >75 yrs. Age, patients not willing to participate, patients absconded without completing treatment. RESULTS Chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. Male preponderance is more. Usually in the 4 th and 5 th decades. Most patients presented with abdominal pain. CT findings were diagnostic and gold standard. All underwent conservative management of which 7 cases succumbed to the disease and the rest were treated.

  13. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. This was a population-based case-control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20-84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as "never use" and "ever use." We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60-1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis.

  14. Nutritional advice for prevention of acute pancreatitis: review of current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe ME

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mark E Lowe, Wednesday A SevillaDivision of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that can be acute and self-limiting or, in a small percentage of patients, recurrent. Patients with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis (RAP often progress to chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis in all forms causes significant economic and social burdens. Prevention of RAP may decrease those burdens and halt progression to chronic disease. Unfortunately, no therapy has proven effective at altering the course of RAP. While enteral nutritional therapy plays an important role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis during episodes, nutritional advice provided to patients in an attempt to prevent recurrent episodes has not proven effective in most cases. Discontinuing alcohol consumption and treating dyslipidemia with diet and medication can help patients with these issues. In patients whose pancreatitis is associated with celiac disease or eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a gluten-free diet and avoidance of food allergens can be effective in stopping RAP. Advice to take pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lose weight, control diabetes, decrease dietary sucrose, decrease dietary fat or avoid monosodium glutamate has little to no evidence of efficacy. Some studies suggest that an antioxidant cocktail may decrease the frequency of RAP and the intensity of chronic pain, but the evidence is weak. Nutritional therapy may have a role in the treatment of patients with RAP. At present, there are no clear guidelines for nutritional advice to give these patients. More studies are needed to identify nutritional interventions that will benefit patients with RAP.Keywords: pancreatitis, nutrition, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, antioxidants, herbal supplements

  15. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation. The predrain......The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation...

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Ke, Zun-ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  18. [Surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Ordaz, José Luis; Toledo-Toral, Carlos; Franco-Guerrero, Norma; Tun-Abraham, Mauro; Souza-Gallardo, Luis Manuel

    2016-01-01

    A pancreatic pseudocyst is the collection of pancreatic secretions surrounded by fibrous tissue caused by pancreatic disease that affects the pancreatic duct. Clinical presentation is variable. Management includes percutaneous, endoscopic or surgical drainage and resection. Review of a cohort of patients with pancreatic pseudocyst in a third level hospital. An analysis was performed on the demographic data, aetiology, clinical presentation, radiological and laboratory findings, type of surgical procedure, complications, recurrence and mortality. The statistical analysis was performed using Chi squared and Student t tests, with a p<0.05. A total of 139 patients were included, of whom 58% were men and 42% were women, with median age of 44.5 years. Chronic pancreatitis was the most common aetiology, present in 74 patients (53%). The main complaint was abdominal pain in 73% of patients. Median size was 18cm (range 7-29) and the most frequent location was body and tail of the pancreas. Internal surgical drainage was selected in 111 (80%) patients, of whom 96 were cystojejunostomy, 20 (14%) had external surgical drainage, and 8 (6%) resection. Complications were, pancreatic fistula (12%), haemorrhage (4%), infection (4%), and other non-surgical complications (4%). Complication rate was higher if the cause was chronic pancreatitis or if the management was external surgical drainage. Recurrence rate was 6%, and a mortality rate of 1%. Surgical management is a viable option for the management of pancreatic pseudocyst with a low complication and recurrence rate. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  19. Colopancreatic Fistula: An Uncommon Complication of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhanna Abu Ghanimeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications, including colopancreatic fistulas (CPFs, are uncommon after acute and chronic pancreatitis. However, they have been reported and are serious. CPFs are less likely to close spontaneously and are associated with a higher risk of complications. Therefore, more definitive treatment is required that includes surgical and endoscopic options. We present a case of a 62-year-old male patient with a history of heavy alcohol intake and recurrent acute pancreatitis who presented with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. His abdominal imaging showed a possible connection between the colon and the pancreas. A further multidisciplinary workup by the gastroenterology and surgery teams, including endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and colonoscopy, resulted in a diagnosis of CPF. A distal pancreatectomy and left hemicolectomy were performed, and the diagnosis of CPF was confirmed intraoperatively. The patient showed improvement afterward.

  20. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  1. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts

  2. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting as acute pancreatitis during pregnancy: clinical and radiologic manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Dinushi; Kandavar, Ramprasad; Palacios, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Only seven cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma diagnosed during pregnancy have been reported. In this article, we describe a case of pancreatic adenocarcinoma presenting clinically as acute pancreatitis in a pregnant patient. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) revealed a pancreatic mass with an inflammatory component and multiple hyperintense metastatic lesions in the liver. The patient was initially treated for biliary pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer was not suspected given her young age and absence of risk factors. A diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in a pregnant patient requires a high index of suspicion, and pancreatitis can be a mode of presentation.

  3. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  4. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Bahiyah; Kathiresan Pillai, Thanikasalam; Cheen, Lim Huay; Ryan, Ray Joshua

    2015-01-01

    This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes. PMID:25628906

  5. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  6. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  7. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  8. Pancreatic infection with Candida parapsilosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez, R; Serrano-Heranz, R

    1999-01-01

    Candida species other than C. albicans have been implicated as pathogens in intravascular (bloodstream, intravascular devices, endocarditis) and extravascular (arthritis, osteomielitis, endophtalmitis) infections. C. parapsilosis, however, is rarely implicated in intra-abdominal infections (peritonitis during peritoneal dialysis, complicating surgery or solid-organ transplantation). We describe a case of a 48-y-old male with acute pancreatitis who had a pancreatic abscess produced by primary C. parapsilosis infection. Although he received adequate treatment with antifungal medication and surgical drainage, the outcome was fatal. Because the clinical findings are indistinguishable from bacterial abscesses, Candida species should be considered in cases of complicated pancreatitis, in order to establish a prompt adequate treatment.

  9. Transcriptomic and CRISPR/Cas9 technologies reveal FOXA2 as a tumor suppressor gene in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorvis, Christina; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Mahurkar-Joshi, Swapna; Koutsioumpa, Marina; Williams, Jennifer; Donahue, Timothy R; Poultsides, George A; Eibl, Guido; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive cancer with low survival rates and limited therapeutic options. Thus elucidation of signaling pathways involved in PDAC pathogenesis is essential for identifying novel potential therapeutic gene targets. Here, we used a systems approach to elucidate those pathways by integrating gene and microRNA profiling analyses together with CRISPR/Cas9 technology to identify novel transcription factors involved in PDAC pathogenesis. FOXA2 transcription factor was found to be significantly downregulated in PDAC relative to control pancreatic tissues. Functional experiments revealed that FOXA2 has a tumor suppressor function through inhibition of pancreatic cancer cell growth, migration, invasion, and colony formation. In situ hybridization analysis revealed miR-199a to be significantly upregulated in pancreatic cancer. Bioinformatics and luciferase analyses showed that miR-199a negatively but directly regulates FOXA2 expression through binding in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). Evaluation of the functional importance of miR-199a on pancreatic cancer revealed that miR-199a acts as an inhibitor of FOXA2 expression, inducing an increase in pancreatic cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Additionally, gene ontology and network analyses in PANC-1 cells treated with a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against FOXA2 revealed an enrichment for cell invasion mechanisms through PLAUR and ERK activation. FOXA2 deletion (FOXA2Δ) by using two CRISPR/Cas9 vectors in PANC-1 cells induced tumor growth in vivo resulting in upregulation of PLAUR and ERK pathways in FOXA2Δ xenograft tumors. We have identified FOXA2 as a novel tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer and it is regulated directly by miR-199a, thereby enhancing our understanding of how microRNAs interplay with the transcription factors to affect pancreatic oncogenesis. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  11. NUPR1 works against the metabolic stress-induced autophagy-associated cell death in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Tewfik; Cano, Carla E; Grasso, Daniel; Garcia, Maria Noé; Sandi, Maria José; Calvo, Ezequiel L; Dagorn, Jean-Charles; Lomberk, Gwen; Goruppi, Sandro; Urrutia, Raul; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Velasco, Guillermo; Iovanna, Juan L

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma is increasing with more than 43,000 predicted new cases in the US and 65,000 in Europe this year. Pancreatic cancer patients have a short life expectancy with less than 3-4% 5-y survival, which results in an equivalent incidence and mortality rate. One of the major challenges in pancreatic cancer is the identification of pharmacological approaches that overcome the resistance of this cancer to therapy. Intensive research in the past decades has led to the classification of pancreatic cancers and the identification of the driver key genetic events. Despite the advances in understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, this knowledge had little impact on significantly improving the treatment for this dismal disease. In particular, we know today that the lack of therapeutic response in pancreatic cancer is due to the intrinsic high resistance of these tumors to chemotherapy and radiation, rather than to the inappropriate design of these therapeutic approaches. Thus, in order to ensure a better outcome for pancreatic cancer patients, there is a strong need for research focused on the mechanism that determines this resistant phenotype and the means that might drive enhanced response to therapy.

  12. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  13. Rational drug use in acute pancreatitis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of pancreas where its enzymes autodigest the gland. Two main causes of acute pancreatitis are alcoholism and billiar calculosis. Treatment consists of preventing dehydration, analgesia, decrease of pancreatic exocrine function, enteral nutritional support , respiratory and renal function support and surgery. The patient presents with abdominal pain that lasts for few days and is followed by vomiting. Laboratory tests first revealed abnormal values of blood count and pancreas enzymes (leucocytes -19,7 x 109/L, hematocrit - 0,32, amylase - 52569 IU/L, lypase - 4750 IU/L, CRP - 152 IU/L, albumins - 25 g/L, followed by abnormal values of liver enzymes (AST - 80 IU/L, ALT - 127 IU/L, GGT - 362 IU/L. Further diagnostic procedures showed billiary calculosis, pleural effusion and acute pancreatitis with ascites. No surgery was performed, due to the lack of infect ion and the signs of the patient going into recovery. It was observed that not all diagnostic procedures that exist in the protocol of treatment, such as ERCP or biopsy of pancreatic t issue with microbiological investigation, were performed. Considering the rules of rat ional drug therapy, as well as the protocols that are to be applied in Clinical center 'Kragujevac' in Kragujevac, it was observed that some drugs (antibiotics and albumin were not used in a proper manner, i.e. in compliance with the protocol, which increased the cost of the treatment without improving the patient health or shortening the hospital stay.

  14. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, Miriam; Bhatia, Vandanajay

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation

  15. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Falzon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP, a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  16. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falzon, Miriam, E-mail: mfalzon@utmb.edu; Bhatia, Vandanajay [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  17. Groove Pancreatitis – A Mimic of Pancreatic and Periampullary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakami R Pradheepkumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Groove Pancreatitis (GP is a rare form of focal chronic pancreatitis involving the pancreatico-duodenal groove (PDG. GP was first described by Becker in 1973. Though, GP has been described so many years ago, it is still unfamiliar among most physicians because of lack of sufficient case studies and clinical similarity of GP to conventional pancreatitis. Imaging based differentiation of GP from other lesions, like pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma is also not possible in all the cases, unless there are typical findings favoring GP. Since, the line of treatment and outcome is totally different in these two conditions, appreciation of the fine differences between these two entities is very significant. Groove pancreatitis is symptomatically treated with medicines and only for patients with continuous and severe symptoms which are not amenable to medical treatment surgical management is considered. Radiological differentiation of GP from pancreatic and periampullary malignancies will help to avoid unnecessary surgery in the initial stages. We report two cases of GP, one of pure and other of segmental form where we found typical imaging features which pointed to the diagnosis of GP with a small discussion about the Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI appearance of this entity as well as its differential diagnosis.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  19. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elmas, Nevra

    2001-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities

  20. The role of diagnostic radiology in pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmas, Nevra E-mail: elmas@med.ege.edu.tr

    2001-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequent inflammatory and necrotic process of pancreas and peripancreatic field. To detect the presence of infected or sterile necrotic components and hemorrhage of the pancreatic paranchyma is important for therapeutic approach. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by irreversible exocrine dysfunction, progressive loss of pancreatic tissue and morphological changes of the pancreatic canal. Imaging modalities play a primary role in the management of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. CT and MR imaging confirm the diagnosis and detect the severity of disease. In chronic pancreatitis, MRCP after Secretin administration, Spiral CT and endoscopic US seems to replace diagnostic ERCP. However differentiation of pseudotumor of chronic pancreatitis from the pancreatic carcinoma is difficult with either imaging modalities.

  1. The MET Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Confers Repair of Murine Pancreatic Acinar Cells following Acute and Chronic Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziova, Ivana; Jackson, Daniel; Boor, Paul J; Carter, Dwayne; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Elferink, Cornelis J; Joshi, Aditya D; Kaphalia, Bhupendra; Logsdon, Craig D; Pereira de Castro, Karen; Soong, Lynn; Tao, Xinrong; Qiu, Suimin; Elferink, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Acinar cells represent the primary target in necroinflammatory diseases of the pancreas, including pancreatitis. The signaling pathways guiding acinar cell repair and regeneration following injury remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the importance of Hepatocyte Growth Factor Receptor/MET signaling as an intrinsic repair mechanism for acinar cells following acute damage and chronic alcohol-associated injury. Here, we generated mice with targeted deletion of MET in adult acinar cells (MET-/-). Acute and repetitive pancreatic injury was induced in MET-/- and control mice with cerulein, and chronic injury by feeding mice Lieber-DeCarli diets containing alcohol with or without enhancement of repetitive pancreatic injury. We examined the exocrine pancreas of these mice histologically for acinar death, edema, inflammation and collagen deposition and changes in the transcriptional program. We show that MET expression is relatively low in normal adult pancreas. However, MET levels were elevated in ductal and acinar cells in human pancreatitis specimens, consistent with a role for MET in an adaptive repair mechanism. We report that genetic deletion of MET in adult murine acinar cells was linked to increased acinar cell death, chronic inflammation and delayed recovery (regeneration) of pancreatic exocrine tissue. Notably, increased pancreatic collagen deposition was detected in MET knockout mice following repetitive injury as well alcohol-associated injury. Finally, we identified specific alterations of the pancreatic transcriptome associated with MET signaling during injury, involved in tissue repair, inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Together, these data demonstrate the importance of MET signaling for acinar repair and regeneration, a novel finding that could attenuate the symptomology of pancreatic injury.

  2. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig; Boegler, Karen; Carver, Scott; MacMillan, Martha; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    2017-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i) saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii) the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii) FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes) is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue); (iv) salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v) saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis and suggest

  3. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  4. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, T.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease, the pathophysiological understanding of which has been greatly improved over the last years. The most common form, type 1 AIP belongs to the IgG4-related diseases and must be distinguished from type 2 AIP, which is a much rarer entity associated with chronic inflammatory bowel disease. Clinically, there is an overlap with pancreatic cancer. Imaging and further criteria, such as serological and histological parameters are utilized for a differentiation between both entities in order to select the appropriate therapy and to avoid the small but ultimately unnecessary number of pancreatectomies. The diagnostics of AIP are complex, whereby the consensus criteria of the International Association of Pancreatology have become accepted as the parameters for discrimination. These encompass five cardinal criteria and one therapeutic criterion. By applying these criteria AIP can be diagnosed with a sensitivity of 84.9 %, a specificity of 100 % and an accuracy of 93.8 %. The diagnosis of AIP is accomplished by applying several parameters of which two relate to imaging. As for the routine diagnostics of the pancreas these are ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Important for the differential diagnosis is the exclusion of signs of local and remote tumor spread for which CT and MRI are established. The essential diagnostic parameter of histology necessitates sufficient sample material, which cannot usually be acquired by a fine needle biopsy. CT or MRI are the reference standard methods for identification of the optimal puncture site and imaging-assisted (TruCut) biopsy. In patients presenting with unspecific upper abdominal pain, painless jaundice combined with the suspicion of a pancreatic malignancy in imaging but a mismatch of secondary signs of malignancy, AIP should also be considered as a differential diagnosis. As the diagnosis of AIP only partially relies on imaging radiologists also

  6. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  7. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens. PMID:22229971

  8. Endoscopic transpapillary stenting or conservative treatment for pancreatic fistulas in necrotizing pancreatitis: multicenter series and literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.; Baal, M.C. van; Santvoort, H.C. van; Besselink, M.G.; Poley, J.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Bollen, T.L.; Gooszen, H.G.; Eijck, C.H. van

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic transpapillary stenting (ETS) of the pancreatic duct facilitates ductal outflow and may reduce time to pancreatic fistula closure. However, data on the feasibility of ETS in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis are scarce. BACKGROUND: Pancreatic fistulas often occur after

  9. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pancreatic cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  10. Valsartan-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Burak; Sali, Mursel; Batman, Adnan; Yilmaz, Hasan; Korkmaz, Ugur; Celebi, Altay; Senturk, Omer; Hulagu, Sadettin

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity is uncommon among patients treated with angiotensin II receptor antagonists. A 58-year-old man presented with nausea, vomiting and constant pain in the epigastrium that radiated to the flanks. He received treatment with valsartan (160 mg daily) for hypertension. The clinical, biochemical and radiological findings were compatible with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. After the patient achieved a clinical and biochemical recovery, the valsartan therapy was started again. Six weeks later, he returned to the hospital with an attack of pancreatitis. Subsequently, he returned with repeated attacks of pancreatitis twice, and the valsartan was discontinued. Ten months after the treatment, the patient had no complaints. When severe abdominal symptoms occur for no apparent reason during treatment with valsartan, a diagnosis of pancreatitis should be considered.

  11. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in the bathroom and prevent falls at home. Wound care Your health care provider will explain how ... Kennedy EP, Yeo CJ. Pancreatic cancer: Clinical aspects, assessment, and management. In: Jarnagin WR, ed. Blumgart's Surgery ...

  12. Pancreatic scintigraphy in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shio, Hiroshi; Ueki, Jyuichi; Nomura, Kozi; Nakamura, Yoshifumi

    1983-01-01

    Pancreatic scintigraphy was performed on 67 diabetic patients (42 males and 25 females) in order to study exocrine pancreatic functions in primary diabetes. Relationships between visualization and the onset age, sex, morbid period, presence or absence of retinitis, good or poor control of blood glucose control and the therapeutic modality of diabetes were examined. Abnormality was detected in 34 cases (50.7%), being frequent among male patients in their 50s. The more serious the diabetes, i.e., with a longer morbid period, poorer blood glucose control and worse retinitis, the higher was the frequency of abnormality in pancreatic visualization. The frequency of abnormality was high in association with insulin treatment, oral tablets and single dietary treatment in that order. The more severe the hypoinsulinism, the higher was the frequency of abnormality. This technique can be used as a screening means for exocrine pancreatic function tests on diabetics. (Chiba, N.)

  13. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced

  14. Parathyroid scintigraphy, histopathology correlation in patients with tropical pancreatitis and coexisting primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga

    2013-01-01

    Tropical pancreatitis (TP) is a juvenile, non-alcoholic type of chronic pancreatitis and is highly prevalent in Kerala, India. Increasing prevalence of TP and its varied manifestations prompted us to undertake this retrospective analysis. We attempted to study the incidence of TP in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and correlate with calcium levels, scintigraphy and histopathology findings. Records of 44 hypercalcemic patients with raised parathormone (PTH) were analyzed. Clinical, biochemical and imaging findings were noted to look for diabetes mellitus and pancreatitis. All patients underwent dual phase 99m Technetium methoxy isobutyl isonitrile parathyroid scintigraphy in our department between January 2007 and 2010. Gamma probe assisted minimally invasive parathyroidectomy was performed. Histopathological correlation was obtained in all patients. Our study shows 18% (8/44 patients) incidence of TP in patients with PHPT (compared to 7% reported in 1970's) in Kerala. Results show involvement of middle aged, non-alcoholic males. No direct association between severity of diabetes, pancreatitis and PHPT was noted in our series. Parathyroid adenoma was the most common underlying pathology. All TP patients’ clinical outcome improved post parathyroidectomy. TP patients with PHPT demonstrated adenomas, mainly composed of oxyphilic cells. Non pancreatitis group interestingly showed a varied picture of adenoma, hyperplasia with predominance of chief cells histologically. There is a 2.6 fold increase in the incidence of TP (18%) in patients with PHPT. Hypercalcemia may be the causative factor leading to TP in PHPT patients in our limited series. The data suggests a causal association between pancreatitis and PHPT. Patients presenting with either one or a combination of hypercalcemia, pancreatic dysfunction or raised PTH need to be thoroughly evaluated as their management is interlinked

  15. Critical evaluation of pancreatic masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John DeWitt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of a patient with a pancreatic mass on a CT or MRI requires consideration of the gender and age of the patient, presenting symptoms, quality of the imaging study performed and relevant medical history. CT is generally preferred over MRI for suspected pancreatic cancer but MRI is best considered for evaluation of ductal anatomy and possible cystic neoplasms. EUS should be considered when further characterization of morphology or tissue sampling is required.

  16. Radiotherapy in pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klautke, G. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy, Univ. of Rostock (Germany); Brunner, T.B. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology and Biology, Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-11-15

    Purpose and approach: to summarize the current knowledge on the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The results of meta-analyses, phase III-studies, and phase II-studies using chemoradiation (CRT) and chemotherapy for resectable and non-resectable PDAC are reviewed. Results and conclusion: the role of CRT is undefined in the adjuvant setting but there may be a role as additive treatment after R1 resection. Locally advanced borderline resectable tumors may shrink down and be subject to potentially curative resections. In locally advanced clearly unresectable cancers the effect of CRT as well as chemotherapy is poorly defined and the sequence of chemotherapy and CRT should be re-evaluated. Patients with PDAC should always be treated within studies to identify optimal treatment results. (orig.)

  17. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakata, Yoshinori (Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Komagome (Japan))

    1983-07-01

    Sixteen inoperable patients with progressive pancreatic carcinoma were treated by external irradiation. In Stage II and III of the carcinoma, irradiation with 6,000 to 7,000 rad prolonged the survival. Conformation radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy was most effective. Intraoperative irradiation was done in 38 patients, and was followed by postoperative irradiation in 15 of these patients. Study of complications and autopsy findings showed that intraoperative irradiation with 2,000 to 3,000 rad followed by conformation radiotherapy of 4,000 rad was adequate. This combined therapy was done in 12 Stage I - III patients. Their survival period was certainly prolonged by the combined intraoperative and postoperative irradiation, and the effect was equivalent to that of interstitial irradiation of /sup 125/I combined with external beam irradiation, and was better than that of pancreatico-duodenalectomy.

  18. Radiotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Tadayoshi; Sugiyama, Akira; Nakata, Yoshinori

    1983-01-01

    Sixteen inoperable patients with porgressive pancreatic carcinoma were treated by external irradiation. In Stage II and III of the carcinoma, irradiation with 6,000 to 7,000 rad prolonged the survival. Conformation radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy was most effective. Intraoperative irradiation was done in 38 patients, and was followed by postoperative irradiation in 15 of these patients. Study of complications and autopsy findings showed that intraoperative irradiation with 2,000 to 3,000 rad followed by conformation radiotherapy of 4,000 rad was adequate. This combined therapy was done in 12 Stage I - III patients. Their survival period was certainly prolonged by the combined intraoperative and postoperative irradiation, and the effect was equivalent to that of interstitial irradiation of 125 I combined with external beam irradiation, and was better than that of pancreatico-duodenalectomy. (Ueda, J.)

  19. Acute pancreatitis induced by mycophenolate mofetil in a kidney transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare life-threatening complication in patients after kidney transplantation. Here we described a 56-year-old man who had received a living related kidney transplant for an end-stage renal disease. In his regular follow-up, his serum creatinine was gradually increased and he underwent an allograft biopsy, which revealed an interstitial nephritis/tubular atrophy grade II. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF was prescribed to control chronic allograft nephropathy. He presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever requiring hospital admission twelve days later. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data and imaging findings during hospital admission. There was no history of alcohol consumption in our patient. Unfortunately he died one week later and autopsy findings demonstrated acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The bladder drainage of this patients was normal. Laboratory findings in this patient did not endorse infections and other possibilities regarding the etiology of acute pancreatitis in this patient. Therefore, we concluded that acute pancreatitis in near the patient was induced by drugs and basis on our evidence, MMF is the most important suspect. This study suggests that acute pancreatitis can be considered as a side effect of MMF.

  20. The Scandinavian baltic pancreatic club (SBPC) database: design, rationale and characterisation of the study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Søren S; Poulsen, Jakob L; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Frøkjær, Jens B; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Parhiala, Mikael; Rix, Iben; Novovic, Srdan; Lindkvist, Björn; Bexander, Louise; Dimcevski, Georg; Engjom, Trond; Erchinger, Friedemann; Haldorsen, Ingfrid S; Pukitis, Aldis; Ozola-Zālīte, Imanta; Haas, Stephan; Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Löhr, J Matthias; Gulbinas, Antanas; Jensen, Nanna M; Jørgensen, Maiken T; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2017-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a multifaceted disease associated with several risk factors and a complex clinical presentation. We established the Scandinavian Baltic Pancreatic Club (SBPC) Database to characterise and study the natural history of CP in a Northern European cohort. Here, we describe the design of the database and characteristics of the study cohort. Nine centres from six different countries in the Scandinavian-Baltic region joined the database. Patients with definitive or probable CP (M-ANNHEIM diagnostic criteria) were included. Standardised case report forms were used to collect several assessment variables including disease aetiology, duration of CP, preceding acute pancreatitis, as well as symptoms, complications, and treatments. The clinical stage of CP was characterised according to M-ANNNHEIM. Yearly follow-up is planned for all patients. The study cohort comprised of 910 patients (608 men: 302 women; median age 58 (IQR: 48-67) years with definite 848 (93%) or probable CP 62 (7%). Nicotine (70%) and alcohol (59%) were the most frequent aetiologies and seen in combination in 44% of patients. A history of recurrent acute pancreatitis was seen in 49% prior to the development of CP. Pain (69%) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (68%) were the most common complications followed by diabetes (43%). Most patients (30%) were classified as clinical stage II (symptomatic CP with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency). Less than 10% of the patients had undergone pancreatic surgery. The SBPC database provides a mean for future prospective, observational studies of CP in the Northern European continent.

  1. Molecular Pathogenesis of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon A Broadley

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuromyelitis optica (NMO is a rare autoimmune disorder, distinct from multiple sclerosis, causing inflammatory lesions in the optic nerves and spinal cord. An autoantibody (NMO IgG against aquaporin-4 (AQP4, a water channel expressed on astrocytes is thought to be causative. Peripheral production of the antibody is triggered by an unknown process in genetically susceptible individuals. Anti-AQP4 antibody enters the central nervous system (CNS when the blood brain barrier is made permeable and has high affinity for orthogonal array particles of AQP4. Like other autoimmune diseases, Th17 cells and their effector cytokines (such as interleukin 6 have been implicated in pathogenesis. AQP4 expressing peripheral organs are not affected by NMO IgG, but the antibody causes extensive astrocytic loss in specific regions of the CNS through complement mediated cytotoxicity. Demyelination occurs during the inflammatory process and is probably secondary to oligodendrocyte apoptosis subsequent to loss of trophic support from astrocytes. Ultimately, extensive axonal injury leads to severe disability. Despite rapid advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis, unanswered questions remain, particularly with regards to disease mechanisms in NMO IgG seronegative cases. Increasing knowledge of the molecular pathology is leading to improved treatment strategies.

  2. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid all alcohol. Protect yourself from hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease caused by a virus. Untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis. If you have hepatitis C and drink alcohol, you're far more likely ...

  3. Diagnosing autoimmune pancreatitis with the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Alexander; Michaely, Henrik; Rückert, Felix; Weiss, Christel; Ströbel, Philipp; Belle, Sebastian; Hirth, Michael; Wilhelm, Torsten J; Haas, Stephan L; Jesenofsky, Ralf; Schönberg, Stefan; Marx, Alexander; Singer, Manfred V; Ebert, Matthias P; Pfützer, Roland H; Löhr, J Matthias

    We had developed the Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria (U-AIP) to diagnose autoimmune pancreatitis (AiP) within the M-ANNHEIM classification of chronic pancreatitis. In 2011, International-Consensus-Diagnostic-Criteria (ICDC) to diagnose AiP have been published. We had applied the U-AIP long before the ICDC were available. The aims of the study were, first, to describe patients with AiP diagnosed by the U-AIP; second, to compare diagnostic accuracies of the U-AIP and other diagnostic systems; third, to evaluate the clinical applicability of the U-AIP. From 1998 until 2008, we identified patients with AiP using U-AIP, Japanese-, Korean-, Asian-, Mayo-HISORt-, Revised-Mayo-HISORt- and Italian-criteria. We retrospectively verified the diagnosis by ICDC and Revised-Japanese-2011-criteria, compared diagnostic accuracies of all systems and evaluated all criteria in consecutive patients with pancreatitis (2009 until 2010, Pancreas-Outpatient-Clinic-Cohort, n = 84). We retrospectively validated our diagnostic approach in consecutive patients with a pancreatic lesion requiring surgery (Surgical-Cohort, n = 98). Overall, we identified 21 patients with AiP. Unifying-Autoimmune-Pancreatitis-Criteria and ICDC presented the highest diagnostic accuracies (each 98.8%), highest Youden indices (each 0.95238), and highest proportions of diagnosed patients (each n = 20/21, U-AIP/ICDC vs. other diagnostic systems, p Pancreatitis-Criteria revealed a satisfactory clinical applicability and offered an additional approach to diagnose AiP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Simultaneous characterization of pancreatic stellate cells and other pancreatic components within three-dimensional tissue environment during chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenyan; Fu, Ling

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and other pancreatic components that play a critical role in exocrine pancreatic diseases are generally identified separately by conventional studies, which provide indirect links between these components. Here, nonlinear optical microscopy was evaluated for simultaneous characterization of these components within a three-dimensional (3-D) tissue environment, primarily based on multichannel detection of intrinsic optical emissions and cell morphology. Fresh rat pancreatic tissues harvested at 1 day, 7 days, and 28 days after induction of chronic pancreatitis were imaged, respectively. PSCs, inflammatory cells, blood vessels, and collagen fibers were identified simultaneously. The PSCs at day 1 of chronic pancreatitis showed significant enlargement compared with those in normal pancreas (ppancreatic components coincidently within 3-D pancreatic tissues. It is a prospect for intravital observation of dynamic events under natural physiological conditions, and might help uncover the key mechanisms of exocrine pancreatic diseases, leading to more effective treatments.

  5. Pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic calcifying pancreatitis: Computed tomography findings – a retrospective analysis of 48 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Amir, E-mail: amir.med87@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Ayav, Ahmet [Department of HPB Surgery, University Hospital of Nancy (France); Belle, Arthur [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Orry, Xavier [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Chevaux, Jean-Baptiste [Department of Hepatogastroenterologie, Brabois Adults Hospital, Unité Inserm U954, Nancy (France); Laurent, Valerie [Department of Radiology, Brabois Adults Hospital, Nancy (France); Laboratory IADI, INSERM u947 (France)

    2017-01-15

    Objective: Chronic calcifying pancreatitis (CCP) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer (PC). Symptoms of PC are non-specific in patients with CCP, and diagnostic imaging can be difficult. Some studies have shown that diagnosis may take several months, leading to delays in treatment (Lin et al., 2015; Lennon et al., 2014) . The aim of this study was to describe the radiological signs of PC in patients with CCP. Methods: This retrospective, single-center study was conducted between January 2004 and December 2014. Patients with CCP who were being monitored for PC were included. Each patient diagnosed with PC was matched with two CCP controls who did not develop PC. Results: We studied 48 patients with CCP (30 men (62%) and 18 women (38%), mean age 69.4 years). Sixteen patients (with 18 tumor sites) who developed PC (1.52%) were compared with 32 controls who did not develop PC. A hypodense mass was observed in all of the patients with PC, predominantly in the pancreatic head (61.2%). No such masses were observed in the controls (p < 0.001). The average mass size was 36.3 mm, and the masses were observed to push aside the calcifications in all patients (p < 0.001). Calcifications were very abundant (>10) in 33.3% of the patients with PC and in 71.9% of the controls (p = 0.0076). The main pancreatic duct (MPD) was dilated in all of the patients with PC (average diameter 8.6 mm; homogeneous in 83.3%) and in only 46.9% of the controls (average 7.4 mm; homogeneous in 37.5%) (p > 0.05). Dilation of the intrahepatic bile ducts and common bile duct was observed in 15 (94.4%) of the patients with PC and in none of the controls (p < 0.0001). The average alcohol consumption was 1 g/day (0–5 g/day) in the PC group and 4.6 g/day (0–20 g/day) in the control group. In addition, the average smoking history was 14.25 pack-years (0–40 PY) in the PC group and 27.70 PY (0–60 PY) in the control group. Conclusion: The presence of a pancreatic mass in a patient with CCP is

  6. Alcohol Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an alcoholic beverage — such as chemicals, grains or preservatives. Combining alcohol with certain medications also can cause reactions. In rare instances, an unpleasant reaction to alcohol can be a sign of a serious underlying health problem that requires diagnosis and treatment. Symptoms Signs ...

  7. Alcohol misuse

    OpenAIRE

    Coulton, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol use is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity internationally, and is ranked by the WHO as one of the top 5 risk factors for disease burden. Without treatment, approximately 16% of hazardous or harmful alcohol users will progress to more dependent patterns of alcohol consumption.

  8. Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma with Severe Dilatation of Pancreatic Duct: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heo, Tae Wook; Heo, Suk Hee; Shin, Sang Soo; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Kang, Heoung Keun; Choi, Yoo Duk [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Woong [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    Primary pancreatic lymphoma is extremely rare and usually consists of a bulky tumor without internal necrosis and severe dilatation of the pancreatic duct. We report the unusual CT and MRI findings of a primary pancreatic lymphoma in a 27-years-old man, associated with severe dilatation of the pancreatic duct, common bile duct, and internal necrosis

  9. Risk of Pancreatic Cancer After a Primary Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijkers, Anton P.; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; Hagenaars, Julia C. J. P.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Besselink, Marc G.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Eijck, Casper H.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Acute pancreatitis may be the first manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the risk of pancreatic cancer after a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Methods Between March 2004 and March 2007, all consecutive patients with a first episode of acute

  10. Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1-associated cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasia and multifocal cholesterol granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Noriko; Komuro, Kazuteru; Uchino, Shinya; Yagihashi, Soroku; Ishidate, Takuzo; Ishizaka, Masanori

    2010-04-01

    A novel combination of tumors was found in a 68 year-old female with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type-1 (MEN 1) that included a cystic pancreatic endocrine neoplasm (CPEN), a pituitary adenoma, and multifocal cholesterol granulomas (MCGs) in the breast, pleura, and the extremities. The pancreatic tumor displayed a single central locule surrounded by a thin rim of neoplastic parenchyma. The tumor showed heterogeneity in the architecture that included glandular, trabecular and solid patterns. The tumor cells of the pancreas were immunohistochemically positive for both endocrine and pancreatic acinar markers including chromogranin A, synaptophysin, glucagon, lipase, and reg protein. Electron microscopy revealed that there were numerous smaller dense-cored neurosecretory granules, larger zymogen-like granules and microvilli on the apical side of the tumor cells. The pancreatic tumor was diagnosed as CPEN with acinar cell features. Analysis of the DNA extracted from the tissues revealed that there is a MEN1 germline mutation in exon 10 codon 527, and somatic mutation in exon 2 codon 32 in the pancreatic tumor, and one base pair deletion in exon 2 codon 79 in the pituitary adenoma. Here, we report the case and discuss possible pathogenesis of CPEN and MCGs in a patient with MEN 1.

  11. Acute Pancreatitis Induced by Methimazole in a Patient With Subclinical Hyperthyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Agito MD

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report here a unique case of methimazole (MMI-induced pancreatitis. To our knowledge, this is the sixth case reported in the literature and the first diagnosed in a patient with toxic multinodular goiter. A 51-year-old Caucasian female with a history of benign multinodular goiter and subclinical hyperthyroidism was started on MMI 10 mg orally daily. Three weeks later, she developed sharp epigastric pain, diarrhea, lack of appetite, and fever. Her lipase was elevated 5 times the upper limit of normal, consistent with acute pancreatitis. There was no history of hypertriglyceridemia, or alcohol abuse. Abdominal computed tomography was consistent with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis, without evidence of gallstones or tumors. MMI was discontinued, and her hyperthyroid symptoms were managed with propranolol. Her acute episode of pancreatitis quickly resolved clinically and biochemically. One year later, she redeveloped mild clinical symptoms of hyperthyroidism with biochemical evidence of subclinical hyperthyroidism. MMI 10 mg orally daily was restarted. Five days later, she experienced progressive abdominal discomfort. Her lipase was elevated 12 times the upper limit of normal, and the abdominal computed tomography was again compatible with acute uncomplicated pancreatitis. MMI was again discontinued, which was followed by rapid resolution of her pancreatitis. The patient is currently considering undergoing definitive therapy with radioactive iodine ablation. Our case as well as previous case reports in the literature should raise awareness about the possibility of pancreatitis in subjects treated with MMI in the presence of suggestive symptoms. If the diagnosis is confirmed by elevated pancreatic enzymes, the drug should be discontinued.

  12. Evaluating pancreatitis in primary care: a population-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazra, Nisha; Gulliford, Martin

    2014-05-01

    Pancreatitis is an important condition with significant mortality. Primary care may have an important role to play in its prevention, early diagnosis, and ongoing management. To evaluate incidence, case fatality, and clinical features of acute and chronic pancreatitis in a large population. Population-based cohort study using a primary care database in the UK from 1990 to 2013. Use of general practice records from 16 491 patients diagnosed with pancreatitis. Age-standardised incidence rates and case fatality were estimated. Clinical features, aetiology, and patterns of recurrence were evaluated. Incidence of pancreatitis increased from 14.8 in 100 000 (1990-1994) to 31.2 in 100 000 (2010-2013) in males, and from 14.5 to 28.3 in 100 000 in females (2010-2013). Overall case fatality after diagnosis was 4.3% (95% CI = 4.0% to 4.6%) at 90 days and 7.9% (95% CI = 7.5% to 8.4%) at 365 days. In 1990-1994, 10% of patients with acute pancreatitis were recorded as heavy drinkers, increasing to 12% in 2010-2012; for patients with chronic pancreatitis the proportions were 13%, rising to 21%. Among patients who died in the 90 days after diagnosis, 92% consulted with their general practice in the 2 months before first diagnosis. The incidence of pancreatitis is increasing over time. Alcohol abuse may now account for at least one in eight cases of acute, and one in five cases of chronic pancreatitis. Consultations among those who subsequently died may have offered potential for earlier diagnosis and intervention.

  13. Novel pancreatic cancer cell lines derived from genetically engineered mouse models of spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma: applications in diagnosis and therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María P Torres

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer (PC remains one of the most lethal human malignancies with poor prognosis. Despite all advances in preclinical research, there have not been significant translation of novel therapies into the clinics. The development of genetically engineered mouse (GEM models that produce spontaneous pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC have increased our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. Although these PDAC mouse models are ideal for studying potential therapies and specific genetic mutations, there is a need for developing syngeneic cell lines from these models. In this study, we describe the successful establishment and characterization of three cell lines derived from two (PDAC mouse models. The cell line UN-KC-6141 was derived from a pancreatic tumor of a Kras(G12D;Pdx1-Cre (KC mouse at 50 weeks of age, whereas UN-KPC-960 and UN-KPC-961 cell lines were derived from pancreatic tumors of Kras(G12D;Trp53(R172H;Pdx1-Cre (KPC mice at 17 weeks of age. The cancer mutations of these parent mice carried over to the daughter cell lines (i.e. Kras(G12D mutation was observed in all three cell lines while Trp53 mutation was observed only in KPC cell lines. The cell lines showed typical cobblestone epithelial morphology in culture, and unlike the previously established mouse PDAC cell line Panc02, expressed the ductal marker CK19. Furthermore, these cell lines expressed the epithelial-mesenchymal markers E-cadherin and N-cadherin, and also, Muc1 and Muc4 mucins. In addition, these cell lines were resistant to the chemotherapeutic drug Gemcitabine. Their implantation in vivo produced subcutaneous as well as tumors in the pancreas (orthotopic. The genetic mutations in these cell lines mimic the genetic compendium of human PDAC, which make them valuable models with a high potential of translational relevance for examining diagnostic markers and therapeutic drugs.

  14. Multi-platform ’Omics Analysis of Human Ebola Virus Disease Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisfeld, Amie J.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Wendler, Jason P.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Maemura, Tadashi; Walters, Kevin B.; Watanabe, Tokiko; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Yamashita, Makoto; Jacobs, Jon M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Shukla, Anil K.; Tian, Mingyuan; Neumann, Gabriele; Reed, Jennifer L.; van Bakel, Harm; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; N' jai, Alhaji; Sahr, Foday; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of human Ebola virus disease (EVD) is complex. EVD is characterized by high levels of virus replication and dissemination, dysregulated immune responses, extensive virus- and host-mediated tissue damage, and disordered coagulation. To clarify how host responses contribute to EVD pathophysiology, we performed multi-platform ’omics analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma from EVD patients. Our results indicate that EVD molecular signatures overlap with those of sepsis, imply that pancreatic enzymes contribute to tissue damage in fatal EVD, and suggest that Ebola virus infection may induce aberrant neutrophils whose activity could explain hallmarks of fatal EVD. Moreover, integrated biomarker prediction identified putative biomarkers from different data platforms that differentiated survivors and fatalities early after infection. This work reveals insight into EVD pathogenesis, suggests an effective approach for biomarker identification, and provides an important community resource for further analysis of human EVD severity.

  15. Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome: complete pancreas transection secondary to acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gámez-del-Castillo, Juan Manuel; Garcés-Albir, Marina; Fernández-Moreno, María Carmen; Morera-Ocón, Francisco Javier; Villagrasa, Rosana; Sabater-Ortí, Luis

    2016-03-01

    Disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome is a serious complication of acute pancreatitis which is defined by a complete discontinuity of the pancreatic duct, such that a viable side of the pancreas remains isolated from the gastrointestinal tract. This pancreatic disruption is infrequently observed in the clinical practice and its diagnostic and therapeutic management are controversial. We present an extreme case of disconnected pancreatic duct syndrome with complete duct disruption and pancreatic transection following acute pancreatitis, as well as the diagnostic and therapeutic processes carried out.

  16. Ion channelopathies and migraine pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albury, Cassie L; Stuart, Shani; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R

    2017-08-01

    Migraine is a common neurological disorder that affects approximately 12-20% of the general adult population. Migraine pathogenesis is complex and not wholly understood. Molecular genetic investigations, imaging and biochemical studies, have unveiled a number of interconnected neurological pathways which seem to have a cause and effect component integral to its cause. Much weight of migraine attack initiation can be placed on the initial trigger and the pathways involved in its neuronal counter reaction. Ion channels play a large role in the generation, portrayal and mitigation of the brains response to external triggers. Several genetic studies have identified and implicated a number of ion channelopathy genes which may contribute to this generalised process. This review will focus on the genetics of migraine with particular emphasis placed on the potentially important role genes HEPH (responsible for iron transport and homeostasis) and KCNK18 (important for the transport and homeostasis of potassium) play in migraine cause.

  17. The pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ping; Christia, Panagiota; Frangogiannis, Nikolaos G

    2014-02-01

    Cardiac fibrosis is characterized by net accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the cardiac interstitium, and contributes to both systolic and diastolic dysfunction in many cardiac pathophysiologic conditions. This review discusses the cellular effectors and molecular pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiac fibrosis. Although activated myofibroblasts are the main effector cells in the fibrotic heart, monocytes/macrophages, lymphocytes, mast cells, vascular cells and cardiomyocytes may also contribute to the fibrotic response by secreting key fibrogenic mediators. Inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, reactive oxygen species, mast cell-derived proteases, endothelin-1, the renin/angiotensin/aldosterone system, matricellular proteins, and growth factors (such as TGF-β and PDGF) are some of the best-studied mediators implicated in cardiac fibrosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests that cardiac fibrotic alterations may be reversible. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for initiation, progression, and resolution of cardiac fibrosis is crucial to design anti-fibrotic treatment strategies for patients with heart disease.

  18. Rosacea: Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainer, Barbara M.; Kang, Sewon; Chien, Anna L.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rosacea is a chronic relapsing inflammatory skin disease with a high prevalence among adults of Northern European heritage with fair skin. Symptoms present in various combinations and severity, often fluctuating between periods of exacerbation and remission. Based on morphological characteristics, rosacea is generally classified into four major subtypes: erythematotelangiectatic, papulopustular, phymatous, and ocular. Diverse environmental and endogenous factors have been shown to stimulate an augmented innate immune response and neurovascular dysregulation; however, rosacea's exact pathogenesis is still unclear. An evidence-based approach is essential in delineating differences between the many available treatments. Because of the diverse presentations of rosacea, approaches to treatment must be individualized based on the disease severity, quality-of-life implications, comorbidities, trigger factors, and the patient's commitment to therapy. PMID:29484096

  19. Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Paul J.; Collard, Harold R.; Jones, Kirk D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease associated with aging that is characterized by the histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Although an understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF is incomplete, recent advances delineating specific clinical and pathologic features of IPF have led to better definition of the molecular pathways that are pathologically activated in the disease. In this review we highlight several of these advances, with a focus on genetic predisposition to IPF and how genetic changes, which occur primarily in epithelial cells, lead to activation of profibrotic pathways in epithelial cells. We then discuss the pathologic changes within IPF fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and we conclude with a summary of how these profibrotic pathways may be interrelated. PMID:24050627

  20. Etiology and Pathogenesis of Psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehncke, Wolf-Henning

    2015-11-01

    Psoriasis is a common, chronic inflammatory skin disease most often appearing in the form of well-demarcated, scaly plaques. These lesions highlight the fundamental processes underlying its pathogenesis, namely, inflammation and epidermal hyperproliferation. Both phenomena are considered consequences of an intimate interplay between the innate and the adaptive immune system. This concept is supported by results of genetic studies, pointing toward the signaling pathways of nuclear factor-κB, interferon-γ, and interleukin (IL)-23 as well as antigen presentation as central axes of the psoriatic inflammation. Efficacy of biologics targeting tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-23, or IL-17 provides further evidence in favor of this model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.