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Sample records for alcoholic pancreatitis pathogenesis

  1. Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Pathogenesis, Incidence and Treatment with Special Reference to the Associated Pain

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    Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic pancreatitis continues to stir up controversy. One of the most debated points is whether from onset it is a chronic disease or whether it progresses to a chronic form after repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. Histological studies on patients with alcoholic pancreatitis have shown that the disease is chronic from onset and that alcoholic acute pancreatitis occurs in a pancreas already damaged by chronic lesions. Genetic factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic disease. The incidence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis seems to have decreased in the last twenty years. Finally, recent therapeutic studies which have shown medical or surgical approaches capable of reducing the pain episodes in chronic pancreatitis patients will be described.

  2. Alcohol and the pancreas. II. Pancreatic morphology of advanced alcoholic pancreatitis.

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    Noronha, M; Bordalo, O; Dreiling, D A

    1981-08-01

    The histopathology of advanced chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is dominated by cellular degeneration, atrophy and fibrosis. Sequential changes in the histopathology of alcoholic pancreatic disease has been defined and traced from initial injury to end-stage disease. These sequential histopathologies have been correlated with clinical syndrome and secretory patterns. The data are more consistent with a toxic-metabolic pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis than the previous Big Duct and Small Duct hypotheses.

  3. Sequential changes from minimal pancreatic inflammation to advanced alcoholic pancreatitis.

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    Noronha, M; Dreiling, D A; Bordalo, O

    1983-11-01

    A correlation of several clinical parameters and pancreatitis morphological alterations observed in chronic alcoholics with and without pancreatic is presented. Three groups of patients were studied: asymptomatic chronic alcoholics (24); non-alcoholic controls (10); and cases with advanced chronic pancreatitis (6). Clinical, biochemical and functional studies were performed. Morphological studies were made on surgical biopsy specimens in light and electron microscopy. The results of this study showed: 1) fat accumulates within pancreatic acinar cells in alcoholics drinking more than 80 g of ethanol per day; 2) ultrastructural changes found in acinar cells of the alcoholics are similar to those described for liver cells; 3) the alterations found in alcoholics without pancreatitis are also observed in those with advanced chronic pancreatitis. An attempt to correlate the sequential changes in the histopathology of alcoholic pancreatic disease with the clinical picture and secretory patterns was made. According to these observations, admitting the ultrastructural similarities between the liver and the pancreas and the recently demonstrated abnormalities of lipid metabolism in pancreatic cells in experimental animal research, the authors postulate a toxic-metabolic mechanism as a likely hypothesis for the pathogenesis of chronic alcoholic inflammation of the pancreas.

  4. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

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    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  5. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

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    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  6. New Insights into the Pathogenesis of Pancreatitis

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    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review In this article, we review important advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of pancreatitis. Recent Findings The relative contribution of intra-pancreatic trypsinogen activation and NFκB activation, the two major early independent cellular events in the etiology of pancreatitis, have been investigated using novel genetic models. Trypsinogen activation has traditionally held the spotlight for many decades as it is believed to be the central pathogenic event of pancreatitis However, recent experimental evidence points to the role of trypsin activation in early acinar cell damage but not in the inflammatory response of acute pancreatitis through NFκB activation. Further, chronic pancreatitis in the caerulein model develops independently of typsinogen activation. Sustained activation of the NFκB pathway, but not persistent intra-acinar expression of active trypsin, was shown to result in chronic pancreatitis. Calcineurin-NFAT signaling was shown to mediate downstream effects of pathologic rise in intracellular calcium. IL-6 was identified as a key cytokine mediating pancreatitis-associated lung injury. Summary Recent advances challenge the long-believed trypsin-centered understanding of pancreatitis. It is becoming increasingly clear that activation of intense inflammatory signaling mechanisms in acinar cells is crucial to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, which may explain the strong systemic inflammatory response in pancreatitis. PMID:23892538

  7. [Morphology and pathogenesis of visceral manifestations of chronic alcoholism].

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    Lebedev, S P

    1982-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism is accompanied by systemic involvement of the internal organs. Clinico-morphological forms of chronic alcoholism are distinguished on the basis of the prevailing organ pathology, Morphological data are presented, and pathogenesis of the lesions of the liver, heart, pancreas, and kidneys in patients with chronic alcoholism is analysed. The hepatic form may present alcoholic dystrophy, hepatitis or cirrhosis which are stages of progressing hepatopathy. The toxic and metabolic effect of ethanol is important in the pathogenesis of liver lesion. The cardiac form is characterized by the development of alcoholic myocardiodystrophy. In addition to the toxic influence of ethanol, hormonal and electrolyte changes and microcirculatory disorders play a role in its pathogenesis. Chronic calcifying pancreatitis in chronic alcoholism is associated with the effect of ethanol on the mediatory system. The renal form any present necronephrosis, hepatorenal syndrome, glomerulonephritis or pyelonephritis. Their pathogenesis is determined by toxicity of ethanol, circulation of immune complexes in the blood, or immunosuppression.

  8. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

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    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  9. Genetic Risk for Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis

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    Flair José Carrilho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years many studies have examined the genetic predisposition to pancreatic diseases. Pancreatic disease of an alcoholic etiology was determined to be a multi-factorial disease, where environmental factors interact with the genetic profile of the individual. In this review we discuss the main results from studies examining the frequency of genetic mutations in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Genetic susceptibility factors for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis.

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    Aghdassi, Ali A; Weiss, F Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Simon, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas and frequently associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. Since only a small proportion of alcoholics eventually develop chronic pancreatitis genetic susceptibility factors have long been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Smaller studies in ethnically defined populations have found that not only polymorphism in proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, such as Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, can confer a risk for developing chronic pancreatitis but also mutations that had previously been reported in association with idiopathic pancreatitis, such as SPINK1 mutations. In a much broader approach employing genome wide search strategies the NAPS study found that polymorphisms in the Trypsin locus (PRSS1 rs10273639), and the Claudin 2 locus (CLDN2-RIPPLY1-MORC4 locus rs7057398 and rs12688220) confer an increased risk of developing alcohol-induced pancreatitis. These results from North America have now been confirmed by a European consortium. In another genome wide approach polymorphisms in the genes encoding Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B were not only found in association with higher serum lipase levels in healthy volunteers but also to more than double the risk for developing alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis. These novel genetic associations will allow to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical basis of alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis on a cellular level and in much more detail than previously possible. Copyright © 2015 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

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    Robert Grützmann

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs are rare primary neoplasms of the pancreas and arise sporadically or in the context of genetically determined syndromes. Depending on hormone production and sensing, PNETs clinically manifest due to a hormone-related syndrome (functional PNET or by symptoms related to tumor bulk effects (non-functional PNET. So far, radical surgical excision is the only therapy to cure the disease. Development of tailored non-surgical approaches has been impeded by the lack of experimental laboratory models and there is, therefore, a limited understanding of the complex cellular and molecular biology of this heterogeneous group of neoplasm. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of tumorigenesis of familial and sporadic PNETs on a cellular and molecular level. Open questions in the field of PNET research are discussed with specific emphasis on the relevance of disease management.

  12. Molecular Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehehalt, Florian; Franke, Ellen; Pilarsky, Christian; Grützmann, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare primary neoplasms of the pancreas and arise sporadically or in the context of genetically determined syndromes. Depending on hormone production and sensing, PNETs clinically manifest due to a hormone-related syndrome (functional PNET) or by symptoms related to tumor bulk effects (non-functional PNET). So far, radical surgical excision is the only therapy to cure the disease. Development of tailored non-surgical approaches has been impeded by the lack of experimental laboratory models and there is, therefore, a limited understanding of the complex cellular and molecular biology of this heterogeneous group of neoplasm. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of tumorigenesis of familial and sporadic PNETs on a cellular and molecular level. Open questions in the field of PNET research are discussed with specific emphasis on the relevance of disease management

  13. Chronic Pancreatitis.

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    Stram, Michelle; Liu, Shu; Singhi, Aatur D

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating condition often associated with severe abdominal pain and exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. The underlying cause is multifactorial and involves complex interaction of environmental, genetic, and/or other risk factors. The pathology is dependent on the underlying pathogenesis of the disease. This review describes the clinical, gross, and microscopic findings of the main subtypes of chronic pancreatitis: alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, obstructive chronic pancreatitis, paraduodenal ("groove") pancreatitis, pancreatic divisum, autoimmune pancreatitis, and genetic factors associated with chronic pancreatitis. As pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma may be confused with chronic pancreatitis, the main distinguishing features between these 2 diseases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aetiology and pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease.

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    Lieber, C S

    1993-09-01

    carcinogens and even nutritional factors such as vitamin A. Ethanol causes not only vitamin A depletion but it also enhances its hepatotoxicity. Furthermore, induction of the microsomal pathway contributes to increased acetaldehyde generation, with formation of protein adducts, resulting in antibody production, enzyme inactivation and decreased DNA repair; it is also associated with a striking impairment of the capacity of the liver to utilize oxygen. Moreover, acetaldehyde promotes glutathione depletion, free-radical mediated toxicity and lipid peroxidation. In addition, acetaldehyde affects hepatic collagen synthesis: both in vivo and in vitro (in cultured myofibroblasts and lipocytes), ethanol and its metabolite acetaldehyde were found to increase collagen accumulation and mRNA levels for collagen. This new understanding of the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease may eventually improve therapy with drugs and nutrients.

  15. Etiopathogenic Considerations of Alcohol in Pancreatitis

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    Leonardo Javier Pérez Ponce

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available There is a close relation between alcohol intake and pancreas deleterious effects. Between 80 and 100 grams alcohol daily for more than three or 5 years may damage the pancreas and inflame it. This work was aimed at explaining the alcohol action mechanisms in the pancreas, so as describing the physiopathology of acute and chronic pancreatitis. For that, a total of 24 bibliographic sources were consulted, among them journal articles, books and others, accessed through the main information managers. It was concluded that the pancreas may brake down alcohol either via oxidative or non oxidative way, causing an increase of free radicals, pancreatic edema, intracellular trypsin activation, and the induction of proinflammatory transcription factors, which stimulate the stellate cells leading to a systemic inflammatory response and organic insufficiency.

  16. Alcoholic pancreatitis: A tale of spirits and bacteria

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    Vonlaufen, Alain; Spahr, Laurent; Apte, Minoti V; Frossard, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of chronic pancreatitis. About 5% of alcoholics will ever suffer from pancreatitis, suggesting that additional co-factors are required to trigger an overt disease. Experimental work has implicated lipopolysaccharide, from gut-derived bacteria, as a potential co-factor of alcoholic pancreatitis. This review discusses the effects of alcohol on the gut flora, the gut barrier, the liver-and the pancreas and proposes potential interventional strategies. A better understand...

  17. Chronic alcohol drinking: Liver and pancreatic cancer?

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    Zakhari, Samir

    2015-09-01

    Cancer is a multifactorial disease that results from complex interactions of numerous risk factors - genetic and environmental - over time, eventually leading to the diseased phenotypes. Thus, while epidemiological studies can point to risk factors, they cannot determine cause and effect relationships, and are unable to give biological and clinical insights into carcinogenesis. The link between any risk factor and carcinogenesis needs to be validated in experimental models. This is particularly true in epidemiological studies on alcohol consumption and its consequences. While there is no doubt that heavy alcohol consumption has devastating health effects, the inconsistencies in alcohol-related epidemiological studies and cancer suffer from possible sources of the variability in outcomes, ranging from inaccuracy of self-report of consumption to the problem of correlating cancer that started decades earlier to current or recent alcohol consumption. To further study the interactions between alcohol and cancer, the use of "Molecular Pathological Epidemiology" (MPE) advocated by Ogino et al. for dissecting the interplay between etiological factors, cellular and molecular characteristics, and disease progression in cancer is appropriate. MPE does not consider cancer as a single entity, rather it integrates analyses of epidemiological studies with the macroenvironment and molecular and microenvironment. This approach allows investigating the relationships between potential etiological agents and cancer based on molecular signatures. More research is needed to fully elucidate the link between heavy alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer, and to further investigate the roles of acetaldehyde and FAEEs in pancreatic carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Alcohol and acute pancreatitis. An experimental study in the rat.

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    Jalovaara, P; Apaja, M

    1978-01-01

    The effect of chronic alcohol pretreatment and various pancreatobiliary secretions on the severity of experimental pancreatitis was studied in the rat. 95 rats were pretreated with ethanol (20% w/v, 1.1 ml/100 g body weight) five times weekly for 10 to 12 weeks by gastric intubation. 88 rats served as controls. Pancreatic lesions were produced by retograde injection of different pancreatobiliary secretions into the pancreatic ducts. The secretions were collected from both normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats, and each was used for induction of experimental pancreatitis in the control and alcohol pretreated rats. Bile obtained from normal rats was no more toxic to the pancreas than 0.9% saline solution, while bile obtained from the chronically alcohol-fed rats caused significantly more serious lesions to the pancreas than did normal rat bile. Bile-pancreatic juice (mixture of secretions at papilla of Vater) of normal and chronically alcohol-fed rats was as toxic as the bile of the alcohol-fed rats. Alcohol pretreatment had no significant effect on the severity of pancreatitis when control and alcohol-fed groups separately or the whole material according to pretreatment was examined. These results suggest that the metabolic effects of ethanol on the pancreas as such do not sensitize the pancreas to acute pancreatitis. An exogenous mechanism is required. The reflux of toxic alcoholic bile into the pancreas might act as an induction factor in acute alcohol pancreatitis.

  19. Update on pathogenesis and clinical management of acute pancreatitis

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    Cruz-Santamaría, Dulce M; Taxonera, Carlos; Giner, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP), defined as the acute nonbacterial inflammatory condition of the pancreas, is derived from the early activation of digestive enzymes found inside the acinar cells, with variable compromise of the gland itself, nearby tissues and other organs. So, it is an event that begins with pancreatic injury, elicits an acute inflammatory response, encompasses a variety of complications and generally resolves over time. Different conditions are known to induce this disorder, although the innermost mechanisms and how they act to develop the disease are still unknown. We summarize some well established aspects. A phase sequence has been proposed: etiology factors generate other conditions inside acinar cells that favor the AP development with some systemic events; genetic factors could be involved as susceptibility and modifying elements. AP is a disease with extremely different clinical expressions. Most patients suffer a mild and limited disease, but about one fifth of cases develop multi organ failure, accompanied by high mortality. This great variability in presentation, clinical course and complications has given rise to the confusion related to AP related terminology. However, consensus meetings have provided uniform definitions, including the severity of the illness. The clinical management is mainly based on the disease´s severity and must be directed to correct the underlying predisposing factors and control the inflammatory process itself. The first step is to determine if it is mild or severe. We review the principal aspects to be considered in this treatment, as reflected in several clinical practice guidelines. For the last 25 years, there has been a global increase in incidence of AP, along with many advances in diagnosis and treatment. However, progress in knowledge of its pathogenesis is scarce. PMID:22737590

  20. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: a comprehensive update and a look into the future.

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    Andersson, Roland; Tingstedt, Bobby; Xia, Jinglin

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a relatively frequent condition usually caused by alcoholic abuse but also due to recurrent gallstone disease, metabolic endocrine disorders and haemochromatosis, among others. Specific types such as hereditary and autoimmune pancreatitis should be particularly kept in mind and emphasized, as they require specific treatment and attention. The possibility to identify gene mutations has also increased and this is likely to decrease the overall total number of "idiopathic" chronic pancreatitis cases. Pancreatic stellate cells have been identified as potential key players in the progression of chronic pancreatitis and the development of fibrogenesis, which are activated either during repeated attacks of necro-inflammation or directly by toxic factors. The inhibition or modulation of pancreatic stellate cells could represent a way of potential intervention in patients with chronic pancreatitis in the future.

  1. Alcohol and malnutrition in the pathogenesis of experimental alcoholic cardiomyopathy.

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    Rossi, M A

    1980-02-01

    In this study, the morphology and the catecholamine levels of the myocardium in both well-nourished and malnourished alcohol-fed rats were examined. Alcohol has been administered to rats for 16 weeks. Rats fed a diet containing alcohol corresponding to 40 per cent. of total calorific intake and inadequate amounts of calories and nutrients developed morphological changes in the heart, while the controls did not. In addition, an increase in cardiac noradrenaline concentration and heart: body weight ratio could be observed. There were no differences in myocardial morphology and catecholamine concentration between well-nourished rats fed alcohol as 35 per cent. of the calorific intake and pair-fed controls. A dispute exists about whether alcohol is directly toxic to the heart or indirectly injurious due to associated dietary deficiency. The present results, taken together, make the theory of cardiotoxicity of alcohol an unlikely one, at least in the case of the rat; and they offer considerable support for the hypothesis that the association between chronic consumption of alcoholic beverages and cardiomyopathy is a result of a primary multifactorial nutritional deficiency, resulting from displacement of nutrient-associated calories by the "empty" calories--devoid of protein, vitamins, and minerals--of alcohol, and/or a secondary nutritional deficiency due to injurious effects of alcohol on the liver, pancreas and intestine. It is suggested that continued exposure to high levels of catecholamine, directly related to malnutrition, may play a role in the development of myocardial pathology.

  2. Molecular pathogenesis of precursor lesions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma.

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    Biankin, Andrew V; Kench, James G; Dijkman, Floriaan P; Biankin, Sandra A; Henshall, Susan M

    2003-02-01

    Precursor lesions are assuming greater importance in the study of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. As pancreatic cancer is almost universally fatal due to late clinical presentation and biological aggressiveness, characterisation of its precursor lesions may create scope for early diagnosis and improved outcome with conventional therapies as well as the development of novel therapeutic and preventative strategies. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) and intraductal papillary mucinous tumours (IPMTs) are thought to be precursor lesions of ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. Recent work has focused on the molecular aberrations associated with these lesions leading to the formulation of a progression model for pancreatic cancer. Progressive histopathological changes along the progression model are associated with aberrations of cell cycle regulatory and growth factor signalling molecules that occur in pancreatic cancer at high frequency and are common to many cancers. Characterisation of these molecular aberrations provides scope for the development of novel diagnostic and treatment strategies that will ultimately impact on the outcome for people who develop pancreatic cancer.

  3. Genetic polymorphisms in alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Roelofs, H.M.J.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Peters, W.H.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    AIMS: Alcohol misuse is now regarded as an important risk factor for development of chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, not every alcohol misuser develops CP and it therefore might be suggested that susceptibility could be further influenced by inter-individual variations in the activities of

  4. Pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis: an evidence-based review of past theories and recent developments.

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    Stevens, Tyler; Conwell, Darwin L; Zuccaro, Gregory

    2004-11-01

    In the past several decades, four prominent theories of chronic pancreatitis pathogenesis have emerged: the toxic-metabolic theory, the oxidative stress hypothesis, the stone and duct obstruction theory, and the necrosis-fibrosis hypothesis. Although these traditional theories are formulated based on compelling scientific observations, substantial contradictory data also exist for each. Furthermore, the basic premises of some of these theories are directly contradictory. Because of the recent scientific progress in the underlying genetic, cellular, and molecular pathophysiology, there have been substantial advances in the understanding of chronic pancreatitis pathogenesis. This paper will provide an evidence-based review and critique of the traditional pathogenic theories, followed by a discussion of the new advances in pancreatic fibrogenesis. Moreover, we will discuss plausible pathogenic sequences applied to each of the known etiologies.

  5. The Alcohol Dehydrogenase Isoenzyme as a Potential Marker of Pancreatitis.

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    Jelski, Wojciech; Piechota, Joanna; Orywal, Karolina; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2018-05-01

    Human pancreas parenchyma contains various alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) isoenzymes and also possesses aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity. The altered activities of ADH and ALDH in damaged pancreatic tissue in the course of pancreatitis are reflected in the human serum. The aim of this study was to investigate a potential role of ADH and ALDH as markers for acute (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). Serum samples were collected for routine biochemical investigations from 75 patients suffering from acute pancreatitis and 70 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Fluorometric methods were used to measure the activity of class I and II ADH and ALDH activity. The total ADH activity and activity of class III and IV isoenzymes were measured by a photometric method. There was a significant increase in the activity of ADH III isoenzyme (15.06 mU/l and 14.62 mU/l vs. 11.82 mU/l; ppancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis compared to the control. The diagnostic sensitivity for ADH III was about 84%, specificity was 92 %, positive and negative predictive values were 93% and 87% respectively in acute pancreatitis. Area under the Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) curve for ADH III in AP and CP was 0.88 and 0.86 respectively. ADH III has a potential role as a marker of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  6. Tissue Transglutaminase (TG2)-Induced Inflammation in Initiation, Progression, and Pathogenesis of Pancreatic Cancer

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    Mehta, Kapil, E-mail: kmehta@mdanderson.org; Han, Amy [Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2011-02-25

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is among the deadliest cancers, with a median survival of six months. It is generally believed that infiltrating PC arises through the progression of early grade pancreatic intraepithelial lesions (PanINs). In one model of the disease, the K-ras mutation is an early molecular event during progression of pancreatic cancer; it is followed by the accumulation of additional genetic abnormalities. This model has been supported by animal studies in which activated K-ras and p53 mutations produced metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in mice. According to this model, oncogenic K-ras induces PanIN formation but fails to promote the invasive stage. However, when these mice are subjected to caerulein treatment, which induces a chronic pancreatitis-like state and inflammatory response, PanINs rapidly progress to invasive carcinoma. These results are consistent with epidemiologic studies showing that patients with chronic pancreatitis have a much higher risk of developing PC. In line with these observations, recent studies have revealed elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory protein tissue transglutaminase (TG2) in early PanINs, and its expression increases even more as the disease progresses. In this review we discuss the implications of increased TG2 expression in initiation, progression, and pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the circ...... the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP).......Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate...

  8. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, H.J.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.) [de

  9. Role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

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    Lupia, Enrico; Pigozzi, Luca; Goffi, Alberto; Hirsch, Emilio; Montrucchio, Giuseppe

    2014-11-07

    A large body of experimental and clinical data supports the notion that inflammation in acute pancreatitis has a crucial role in the pathogenesis of local and systemic damage and is a major determinant of clinical severity. Thus, research has recently focused on molecules that can regulate the inflammatory processes, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), a family of lipid and protein kinases involved in intracellular signal transduction. Studies using genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibitors of different PI3K isoforms, in particular the class I PI3Kδ and PI3Kγ, have contributed to a greater understanding of the roles of these kinases in the modulation of inflammatory and immune responses. Recent data suggest that PI3Ks are also involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. Activation of the PI3K signaling pathway, and in particular of the class IB PI3Kγ isoform, has a significant role in those events which are necessary for the initiation of acute pancreatic injury, namely calcium signaling alteration, trypsinogen activation, and nuclear factor-κB transcription. Moreover, PI3Kγ is instrumental in modulating acinar cell apoptosis, and regulating local neutrophil infiltration and systemic inflammatory responses during the course of experimental acute pancreatitis. The availability of PI3K inhibitors selective for specific isoforms may provide new valuable therapeutic strategies to improve the clinical course of this disease. This article presents a brief summary of PI3K structure and function, and highlights recent advances that implicate PI3Ks in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis.

  10. [Advances in the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pár, Alajos; Pár, Gabriella

    2017-06-01

    Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome, and the most common liver disease. Its more aggressive form is the non alcoholic steatohepatitis. Multiple genetic and environmental factors lead to the accumulation of triglicerides and the inflammatory cascade. High fat diet, obesity, adipocyte dysfunction with cytokine production, insulin resistance and increased lipolysis with free fatty acid flux into the liver - all are the drivers of liver cell injury. Activation of inflammasome by damage- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns results in "steril inflammation" and immune response, while the hepatic stellate cells and progenitor cells lead to fibrogenesis. Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth and gut dysbiosis are also of pivotal importance in the inflammation. Among the susceptible genetic factors, mutations of patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 3 and the transmembrane 6 superfamily 2 genes play a role in the development and progression of the disease, similarly as do epigenetic regulators such as microRNAs and extracellular vesicles. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of non alcoholic fatty liver disease may identify novel therapeutic agents that improve the outcome of the disease. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(23): 882-894.

  11. A case control study of possible additional risk factors for chronic alcoholic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Vengadesh Gopal; Ashley Solomon; Jaahnavi Konidala

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by irreversible damage to pancreas leading to endocrine and exocrine insufficiency with considerable morbidity. Etiopathogenesis is multifactorial with interplay between genetics and environmental toxins. Alcoholism is more commonly associated with chronic pancreatitis. But it is not very clear why only certain proportion of the alcoholics develop pancreatitis. So this study was conducted to find the possible additional risk factors inv...

  12. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaphalia, Bhupendra S.; Bhopale, Kamlesh K.; Kondraganti, Shakuntala; Wu Hai; Boor, Paul J.; Ansari, G.A. Shakeel

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH - ) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH - and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH + ) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼ 1.5-fold greater in ADH - vs. ADH + deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH - deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  13. An update on pancreatic pathophysiology (do we have to rewrite pancreatic pathophysiology?).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Heinz F

    2014-02-01

    This review focuses on seven aspects of physiology and pathophysiology of the exocrine pancreas that have been intensively discussed and studied within the past few years: (1) the role of neurohormonal mechanisms like melatonin, leptin, or ghrelin in the stimulation of pancreatic enzyme secretion; (2) the initiation processes of acute pancreatitis, like fusion of zymogen granules with lysosomes leading to intracellular activation of trypsinogen by the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B, or autoactivation of trypsinogen; (3) the role of genes in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (4) the role of alcohol and constituents of alcoholic beverages in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis; (5) the role of pancreatic hypertension, neuropathy, and central mechanisms for the pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis; (6) the relation between exocrine pancreatic function and diabetes mellitus; and (7) pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea.

  14. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis : Clinical significance and pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Knegt, RJ

    2001-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is a form of liver disease resembling alcoholic liver disease in a patient who does not consume significant amounts of alcohol. Since its first description in 1980 it has been recognized with increasing frequency. The natural course is relatively benign, but

  15. Polymorphism of alcohol metabolizing gene ADH3 predisposes to development of alcoholic pancreatitis in North Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya eSingh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim- Genetic factors regulating alcohol metabolism could predispose in developing alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP. Studies revealed that alcohol could be metabolized by both ways, oxidative and non-oxidative. The main oxidative pathway includes alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH and cytochrome P450 enzyme. We investigated whether polymorphism in these alcohol metabolizing enzyme genes could be associated with alcoholic pancreatitis and is the purpose of our study. Method- Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP (n=72, tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP (n=75, alcoholic controls (AC (n=40 and healthy controls (HC (n=100 were included in the study. Blood samples were collected from the subjects in EDTA coated vials. DNA was extracted and genotyping for ADH3, ALDH2 and CYP2E1 was done by PCR-RFLP (polymerase chain reaction- restriction fragment length polymorphism. The products were analyzed by gel electrophoresis. Result- The frequency distribution of ADH3*1/*1 genotype was significantly higher in ACP group (59.7% compared with TCP (38.7%, HC (42% and AC (37.5% and was found to be associated with increased risk of alcoholic pancreatitis. There was no statistically significant difference between the frequency distribution of ADH3*1/*1, ADH3*1/*2 and ADH3*2/*2 genotype between TCP and HC and healthy alcoholics. ALDH2 gene was monomorphic in our population, and the frequencies for CYP2E1 intron 6 Dra I polymorphism were comparable in all four groups. Conclusion- This study shows that carriers of ADH3*1/*1 individuals consuming alcohol are at higher risk for alcoholic pancreatitis than those with other genotypes such as ADH3*1/*2 and ADH3*2/*2.

  16. CASE OF CHRONIC CALCULOSIS PANCREATITIS IN PATIENT WITH ALCOHOLIC CIRRHOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Yakushev

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes clinical features, differential diagnosis and treatment of chronic calculouse pancreatitis (HCP with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (LC. Considered etiologic role of chronic alcohol  intoxication in the development of these diseases. There was long- term use of alcoholic beverages at hepatotoxic doses and smoking in anamnesis. Patient was examined before entering in our clinic.  Сhronic heart failure, nephrotic syndrome, paraneoplastic was  excluded as the cause of hydrops. Patient R. was hospitalized in the  gastroenterology department with ascites of unknown etiology. The  severity of the patient’s condition is caused by malabsorption  syndrome and hepatocellular insufficiency leading to the  development of edema-ascitic syndrome and trophological failure. In patient there was low of proteins (total protein — 38 g / l, low of  albumins (14 g / l. In carrying out endoscopy showed signs of portal hypertension: esophageal varices 1 degree, portal gastropathy; In addition, an increase in the size of the papilla of  Vater. To clarify the nature of the defeat of the pancreas held  endosonography, in which multiple calcifications are found in the  pancreas tissue. To resolve biliary hypertension performed stenting of the common bile duct. Drain the pancreatic duct failed due to the presence of calculus in it at the level of the isthmus. Treatment for  our patient should be considered the imposition Ru’s operation. This  observation demonstrates social importance of problems of  combination HCP with a LC, which lead to reduced quality of life,  early disability, reduced life expectancy, as well as to an increase in treatment costs.

  17. Pathogenic mechanisms of pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok Kumar; Venkateshaiah, Sathisha Upparahalli; Sanders, Nathan L; Mishra, Anil

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatitis is inflammation of pancreas and caused by a number of factors including pancreatic duct obstruction, alcoholism, and mutation in the cationic trypsinogen gene. Pancreatitis is represented as acute pancreatitis with acute inflammatory responses and; chronic pancreatitis characterized by marked stroma formation with a high number of infiltrating granulocytes (such as neutrophils, eosinophils), monocytes, macrophages and pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). These inflammatory cells are known to play a central role in initiating and promoting inflammation including pancreatic fibrosis, i.e., a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer. A number of inflammatory cytokines are known to involve in promoting pancreatic pathogenesis that lead pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis is a dynamic phenomenon that requires an intricate network of several autocrine and paracrine signaling pathways. In this review, we have provided the details of various cytokines and molecular mechanistic pathways (i.e., Transforming growth factor-β/SMAD, mitogen-activated protein kinases, Rho kinase, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators, and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase) that have a critical role in the activation of PSCs to promote chronic pancreatitis and trigger the phenomenon of pancreatic fibrogenesis. In this review of literature, we discuss the involvement of several pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as in interleukin (IL)-1, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 IL-10, IL-18, IL-33 and tumor necrosis factor-α, in the pathogenesis of disease. Our review also highlights the significance of several experimental animal models that have an important role in dissecting the mechanistic pathways operating in the development of chronic pancreatitis, including pancreatic fibrosis. Additionally, we provided several intermediary molecules that are involved in major signaling pathways that might provide target molecules for future therapeutic treatment strategies for

  18. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B

    2004-01-01

    was to evaluate the circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP). METHODS: Twelve male patients with severe CP and 11 matched controls ingested 40 g alcohol. Plasma cytokine concentrations were measured for 24 h and assessed by sandwich ELISA......BACKGROUND: Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study...... techniques. RESULTS: IL-6 was higher in CP at fasting and 1, 4 and 24 h after alcohol intake (P

  19. Prospective Study of Alcohol Drinking, Smoking, and Pancreatitis: The Multiethnic Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setiawan, Veronica Wendy; Pandol, Stephen J; Porcel, Jacqueline; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loïc; Pike, Malcolm C; Monroe, Kristine R

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a prospective analysis of 145,886 participants in the multiethnic cohort to examine the relationship of alcohol drinking and smoking with pancreatitis. Pancreatitis cases were categorized as gallstone-related acute pancreatitis (GSAP) (N = 1,065), non-GSAP (N = 1,222), and recurrent acute (RAP)/chronic pancreatitis (CP) (N = 523). We used the baseline questionnaire to identify alcohol intake and smoking history. Associations were estimated by hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using Cox models. Cigarette smoking was associated with non-GSAP and RAP/CP. Moderate alcohol intake was inversely associated with all types of pancreatitis in women (HRs, 0.66 to 0.81 for risk of non-GS pancreatitis associated with current smoking was highest among men who consumed more than 4 drinks per day (HR, 2.06; 95% CI, 1.28-3.30), whereas among never smokers, moderate drinking was associated with a reduced risk (HR, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.51-0.96). In women, drinking less than 2 drinks per day was associated with a reduced risk of GSAP among never smokers (HR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.46-0.80). Smoking is a risk factor for non-GS pancreatitis. Moderate alcohol intake is protective against all types of pancreatitis in women and against RAP/CP in men.

  20. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-07-01

    Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to January 2015. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). After adjustment for potential confounders, opium use (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06-3.43) and alcohol consumption (OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.86-9.31) were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find an association between ever tobacco smoking and pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.62-1.39). In our study, opium use and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cigarette smoking was not.

  1. Efficacy of camostat mesilate against dyspepsia associated with non-alcoholic mild pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sai, J.K.; Suyama, Masafumi; Kubokawa, Yoshihiro; Matsumura, Yuji; Inami, Koichi; Watanabe, Sumio

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the potential efficacy of camostat mesilate, a protease inhibitor, against dyspepsia associated with non-alcoholic mild pancreatic disease. Patients with upper abdominal pain suggesting pancreatic disease (persistent over hours, pain aggravated by ingestion of food, epigastric pain radiating to the back), without a history of alcohol consumption and who exhibited no abnormalities regarding serum amylase and lipase, ultrasonography, CT and upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, were prescribed 200 mg camostat mesilate three times daily for 2 weeks. The patients were subjected to endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) while under treatment and were distributed into those who had 4 or more suggestive findings of chronic pancreatitis (suspected pancreatic disease group), 2 or 3 (equivalent group) and those with 1 or no findings (control group). Symptom severity was recorded before and after treatment using a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS). Among 95 patients, 40 were in the suspected pancreatic disease group, 30 were in the equivalent group and 25 served as controls. A significant intra- and inter-group improvement of symptoms was observed not only in the suspected pancreatic disease group but also in the equivalent group. Camostat mesilate may serve as a therapeutic agent for patients with dyspepsia associated with mild pancreatic disease, who do not habitually drink alcohol. (author)

  2. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  3. A case of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Hyun Seok; Lee, Se-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is known to be caused by a variety of clinical disorders. The authors encountered a case of PRES associated with acute pancreatitis and chronic alcoholism. A 49-year-old man presented with altered mental status. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) displayed vasogenic edema at the bilateral posterior temporal and parieto-occipital lobes and cerebellum. Laboratory tests and abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed acute pancreatitis. The patient recovered completely, and follow-up brain MRI and abdominal CT exhibited resolution of the previous lesions. We suggest that acute pancreatitis might be an etiology of PRES. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. From Pathogenesis, Clinical Manifestation, and Diagnosis to Treatment: An Overview on Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ou Cai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP is a special type of chronic pancreatitis which is autoimmune mediated. The international consensus diagnostic criteria (ICDC 2011 proposed two types of AIP: type I is associated with histological pattern of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis (LPSP, characterized by serum IgG4 elevation, whereas type 2 is named idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP, with granulocytic epithelial lesion (GEL and immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4 negative. The pathogenic mechanism is unclear now; based on genetic factors, disease specific or related antigens, innate and adaptive immunity may be involved. The most common clinical manifestations of AIP are obstructive jaundice and upper abdominal pain. The diagnosis can be made by a combination of parenchymal and ductal imaging, serum IgG4 concentrations, pancreatic histology, extrapancreatic disease, and glucocorticoid responsiveness according to ICDC 2011. Because of the clinical and imaging similarities with pancreatic cancer, general work-up should be done carefully to exclude pancreatic malignant tumor before empirical trial of glucocorticoid treatment. Glucocorticoid is the most common drug for AIP to induce remission, while there still exists controversy on steroid maintenance and treatment for relapse. Further studies should be done to identify more specific serum biomarkers for AIP, the pathogenic mechanisms, and the treatment for relapse.

  5. Pancreatic Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enzymes become prematurely active and irritate the pancreas (pancreatitis). Pseudocysts can also result from injury to the ... alcohol use and gallstones are risk factors for pancreatitis, and pancreatitis is a risk factor for pseudocysts. ...

  6. Pancreatic Cysts: Current Concepts of Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Diagnostic and Treatment Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.М. Ratchik

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of pancreatic cyst treatment is determined by the increase in the incidence of pancreatitis, a considerable number of complications and high mortality rate. In recent decades, there has been steady growth of destructive forms of pancreatitis, respectively the number of pancreatic cysts increases. Pancreatic cysts in 18–68 % of cases cause various complications (suppuration, perforation, bleeding, internal and external fistulas, malignant transformation that define high mortality — 9.2–53 %. The nature and extent of surgery depend on the etiology, the presence or absence of the cyst connection with ductal system, the presence of complications. Surgical treatment for pancreatic cysts remains the method of choice. Minimally invasive surgical procedures became widely used. High prevalence of cystic lesions of the pancreas, the difficulty of choosing the optimal method of treatment require the creation of a rational, convenient for clinical practice diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm. Dissatisfaction with the results of treatment and a large number of complications lead to the search for a new, so called gold standard for treatment of patients and determine the real place of minimally invasive and open surgical techniques.

  7. Reverse correlation of Jab1 and Smad4 in PANC-1 cells involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Gu, Zhuoyu; Li, Siyuan; Xiao, Zhiwei; Sun, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Steps in the genetic basis of pancreatic cancer (PC) have been recently identified, however, Studies focusing on the relationship between Jab1 and Smad4 in PC are rarely reported. This study was performed to examine the expression patterns and association of Jab1 and Smad4 in PC cells for gaining a further understanding of PC pathogenesis. Human pancreatic cancer cell line PANC-1 cells were infected with retrovirus vector containing GFP, HA-Jab1, siGFP, and siJab1 respectively. The expression of Jab1 and Smad4 in PANC-1 cells was analyzed by Western blot and immunocytochemistry. Subsequently, the effect of overexpression of Jab1 on cell proliferation inhibition mediated by TGF-β was examined with MTT colorimetry. The expression of Smad4 in PANC-1 cells was inhibited after the overexpression of Jab1. Inversely, the expression of Smad4 was increased after the down-regulation of Jab1 silenced by SiRNA. Smad4 expression in PANC-1 cells was negatively correlated with Jab1 expression. In addition, the cell proliferation inhibitory effect induced by TGF-β in PANC-1 cells was attenuated after the overexpression of Jab1. The reverse correlation of Jab1 and Smad4 in PANC-1 cells may be involved in the Pathogenesis of PC. Jab1 can cause degradation of Smad4 via TGF-β signal pathway, consequently contributing to the proliferation of PC cells.

  8. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in an epidemiology study of patients with chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Gregory A.; Yadav, Dhiraj; Slivka, Adam; Hawes, Robert H; Anderson, Michelle A.; Burton, Frank R.; Brand, Randall E; Banks, Peter A.; Lewis, Michele D; DiSario, James A.; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Amann, Stephen T.; Baillie, John; Money, Mary E.; O'Connell, Michael; Whitcomb, David C.; Sherman, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Alcohol has been implicated in the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in 60%–90% patients, although percentages in the United States are not known. We investigated the frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary U.S. referral centers. Methods We studied data from patients with CP (n=539) and controls (n=695) enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2 from 2000 to 2006 at 20 U.S. referral centers. CP was defined by definitive evidence in imaging or histologic analyses. Subjects and physicians each completed a detailed study questionnaire. Using physician-assigned diagnoses, patients were assigned to the following etiology groups: alcohol (with/without other diagnoses), non-alcohol (any etiology of CP from other than alcohol), or idiopathic (no etiology identified). Results The distribution of patients among etiology groups were: alcohol (44.5%), non-alcohol (26.9%), and idiopathic (28.6%). Physicians identified alcohol as the etiology more frequently in men (59.4% in men vs 28.1% in women), but non-alcohol (18% in men vs 36.7% in women) and idiopathic etiologies (22.6% in men vs 35.2% in women) more often in women (P<0.01 for all comparisons). Non-alcohol etiologies were equally divided among obstructive, genetic, and other causes. Compared with controls, patients with idiopathic CP were more likely to have ever smoked (58.6% vs 49.7%, P<0.05) or have a history of chronic renal disease or failure (5.2% vs 1.2%, P<0.01). In multivariate analyses, smoking (ever, current, and amount) was independently associated with idiopathic CP. Conclusions The frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary U.S. referral centers is lower than expected. Idiopathic CP and non-alcohol etiologies represent a large subgroup, particularly among women. Smoking is an independent risk factor for idiopathic CP. PMID:21029787

  9. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan; Assi, Nada; Kyrø, Cecilie; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Rebours, Vinciane; Védié, Anne-Laure; Boeing, Heiner; Kaaks, Rudolf; Katzke, Verena; Bamia, Christina; Naska, Androniki; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Berrino, Franco; Tagliabue, Giovanna; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Peeters, Petra H; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Weiderpass Vainio, Elisabete; Gram, Inger Torhild; Skeie, Guri; Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Barricarte, Aurelio; Quirós, Jose Ramón; Dorronsoro, Miren; Johansson, Ingegerd; Sund, Malin; Sternby, Hanna; Bradbury, Kathryn E; Wareham, Nick; Riboli, Elio; Gunter, Marc; Brennan, Paul; Duell, Eric J; Ferrari, Pietro

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In this study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking.

  10. Polymorphisms at PRSS1-PRSS2 and CLDN2-MORC4 loci associate with alcoholic and non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in a European replication study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derikx, M.H.; Kovacs, P.; Scholz, M.; Masson, E.; Chen, J.M.; Ruffert, C.; Lichtner, P.; Morsche, R.H. Te; Cavestro, G.M.; Ferec, C.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Witt, H.; Rosendahl, J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several genetic risk factors have been identified for non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (NACP). A genome-wide association study reported an association of chronic pancreatitis (CP) with variants in PRSS1-PRSS2 (rs10273639; near the gene encoding cationic trypsinogen) and CLDN2-MORC4 loci

  11. Alcohol and smoking as risk factors in an epidemiology study of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coté, Gregory A; Yadav, Dhiraj; Slivka, Adam; Hawes, Robert H; Anderson, Michelle A; Burton, Frank R; Brand, Randall E; Banks, Peter A; Lewis, Michele D; Disario, James A; Gardner, Timothy B; Gelrud, Andres; Amann, Stephen T; Baillie, John; Money, Mary E; O'Connell, Michael; Whitcomb, David C; Sherman, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    Alcohol has been implicated in the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP) in 60%-90% of patients, although percentages in the United States are unknown. We investigated the epidemiology of alcohol-related CP at tertiary US referral centers. We studied data from CP patients (n = 539) and controls (n = 695) enrolled in the North American Pancreatitis Study-2 from 2000 to 2006 at 20 US referral centers. CP was defined by definitive evidence from imaging or histologic analyses. Subjects and physicians each completed a study questionnaire. Using physician-assigned diagnoses, patients were assigned to an etiology group: alcohol (with/without other diagnoses), nonalcohol (any etiology of CP from other than alcohol), or idiopathic (no etiology identified). The distribution of patients among etiology groups was: alcohol (44.5%), nonalcohol (26.9%), and idiopathic (28.6%). Physicians identified alcohol as the etiology more frequently in men (59.4% men vs 28.1% women), but nonalcohol (18% men vs 36.7% women) and idiopathic etiologies (22.6% men vs 35.2% women) more often in women (P chronic renal disease or failure (5.2% vs 1.2%, P associated with idiopathic CP. The frequency of alcohol-related CP at tertiary US referral centers is lower than expected. Idiopathic CP and nonalcohol etiologies represent a large subgroup, particularly among women. Smoking is an independent risk factor for idiopathic CP. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Chronic pancreatitis: new definition and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti Bellocchi, Maria Cristina; De Pretis, Nicolò; Amodio, Antonio; Zerbi, Alessandro; Frulloni, Luca

    2018-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has been considered over the past years as a single disease, alcohol-induced and different from acute pancreatitis, in terms of etiology and prognosis. Actually, the introduction of a new concept of chronic pancreatitis, now considered as a fibroinflammatory process caused by multiple factors (toxic-metabolic, genetic, immunologic, obstructive), allow to better understand the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Furthermore, the discover of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis (autoimmune, paraduodenal, associated to gene mutations), different in term of clinical aspects, findings at imaging, prognosis and therapy, radically changed the concept of the disease. In this brief review, we described the impact of this new concept in the comprehension of pathogenesis, in the definition of peculiar forms of chronic pancreatitis, and in the clinical and therapeutic approach of chronic pancreatitis.

  13. [Role of the endocrine system in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagymási, Krisztina; Reismann, Péter; Rácz, Károly; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2009-11-29

    The most frequent liver disorder in metabolic syndrome is the nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Its pathogenesis is a complex, multifactorial process, characterized by insulin resistance and involvement of the endocrine system. Hypothyroidism may lead to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis via hyperlipidemia and obesity. Adult patients with growth hormone deficiency have a metabolic syndrome-like phenotype with obesity and many characteristic metabolic alterations. The chronic activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis results in metabolic syndrome as well. Cushing's syndrome has also features of metabolic syndrome. Mild elevation of transaminase activities is commonly seen in patients with adrenal failure. Non-alcoholic steatosis is twice as common in postmenopusal as in premenopausal women and hormonal replacement therapy decreases the risk of steatosis. Insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleeping apnoe syndrome, cardiovascular disorders and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease are more frequent in polycystic ovary syndrome. Hypoandrogenism in males and hyperandrogenism in females may lead to fatty liver via obesity and insulin resistance. Adipokines (leptin, acylation stimulating protein, adiponectin) have a potential role in the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver. The alterations of endocrine system must be considered in the background of cryptogenic liver diseases. The endocrine perspective may help the therapeutic approaches in the future.

  14. Alcohol and the pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, S; Montalvo, R

    1998-01-01

    Alcoholic pancreatitis may be one of the most serious adverse consequences of alcohol abuse. Its diagnosis, as it has for many years, depends primarily on clinical acumen in interpreting properly the symptoms and signs of abdominal distress, buttressed by elevated pancreatic enzymes (amylase and lipase). More recently, the use of computerized tomography (CT) in selected situations has been both of confirmatory and prognostic value. Severity of abnormality by CT correlates reasonably well with a variety of clinical-laboratory clusters (APACHE system, Ranson's criteria, etc.) and aids in therapy. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is not fully defined. The ultimate picture is one of tissue autolysis by activated proteolytic enzymes. The triggers for such activation, however, are still not known. They are represented by three main theories: (1) large duct obstruction and/or increased permeability relative to pancreatic secretion, (2) small duct obstruction due to proteinaceous precipitates, and (3) a direct toxic-metabolic effect of ethanol on pancreatic acinar cells. While not mutually exclusive, we favor the last hypothesis as being most consistent with the effects of ethanol on other organ systems. The direct effects of ethanol and/or its metabolites may be mediated, at least in part, via oxidative stress or the generation of fatty acid ethyl esters. Autolysis (regardless of proximate mechanism(s)) leads to inflammation likely mediated via release of various cytokines. It also should be appreciated that "acute" pancreatitis (the topic of this chapter) likely represents an acute process within a chronic pancreatic exposure and injury from alcoholic abuse. The key question of why pancreatitis develops in only a small number of alcohol abusers is not resolved. Therapy depends on the severity of alcoholic pancreatitis, which is defined by clinical-laboratory and often CT criteria. Mild pancreatitis usually resolves acutely with alcohol abstention and supportive

  15. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  16. Lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naudin, Sabine; Li, Kuanrong; Jaouen, Tristan

    2018-01-01

    Recent evidence suggested a weak relationship between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer (PC) risk. In this study, the association between lifetime and baseline alcohol intakes and the risk of PC was evaluated, including the type of alcoholic beverages and potential interaction with smoking...... alcohol intakes were positively associated with PC risk, with more apparent risk estimates for beer and spirits/liquors than wine intake. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  17. Low Alcohol and Cigarette Use Is Associated to the Risk of Developing Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Leo, Milena; Leandro, Gioacchino; Singh, Satish K; Mariani, Alberto; Bianco, Margherita; Zuppardo, Raffaella Alessia; Goni, Elisabetta; Rogger, Teresa Marzia; Di Mario, Francesco; Guslandi, Mario; De Cobelli, Francesco; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Testoni, Pier Alberto; Cavestro, Giulia Martina

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of smoking and alcohol intake and pancreas divisum on the risk of developing chronic pancreatitis (CP). Consecutive patients with CP who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography were compared with consecutive patients without pancreatic disease who underwent secretin-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography for irritable bowel syndrome. We enrolled 145 consecutive CP patients and 103 irritable bowel syndrome patients from 2010 to 2014. In a univariate analysis, statistically significant differences in sex, mean age, and the duration and amount of cigarette and alcohol use were found. Per a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, thresholds for cigarette and alcohol consumption were, respectively, 5.5 cigarettes and 13.5 g daily. In a multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for CP were male sex (odds ratio [OR], 2.05), smoking more than 5.5 cigarettes per day (OR, 2.72), and drinking more than 13.5 g/d (OR, 6.35). In an Italian population, we confirmed smoking and alcohol as cofactors in the development of CP. This study shows that alcohol intake and smoking habits are 2 of the most important risk factors for the development of CP.

  18. Effect of alcohol on insulin secretion and viability of human pancreatic islets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Dragan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. There are controversial data in the literature on the topic of effects of alcohol on insulin secretion, apoptosis, and necrosis of the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The goal of this research was to determine how alcohol affects the insulin secretion and viability of human adult pancreatic islets in vitro during a seven-day incubation. Methods. Human pancreatic tissue was digested with Collagenase XI, using a non-automated method. Cultures were incubated in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI medium containing alcohol (10 μl of alcohol in 100 ml of medium. Insulin stimulation index (SI and viability of the islets were determined on the first, third, and seventh day of cultivation. Results. Analysis of the viability of the islets showed that there wasn’t significant difference between the control and the test group. In the test group, viability of the cultures declined with the time of incubation. SI of the test group was higher compared to the control group, by 50% and 25% on the first and third day of cultivation, respectively. On the seventh day, insulin secretion was reduced by 25%. The difference was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. In the test group, significant decline in insulin secretion was found on the third and seventh day of incubation (p ≤ 0.05. Conclusion. Alcohol can increase or decrease insulin secretion of islets cultures, which may result in an inadequate response of pancreatic β-cells to blood glucose, leading to insulin resistance, and increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 41002

  19. Non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease pathogenesis: a role for developmental programming and altered circadian rhythms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Carter

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Emerging evidence suggests that maternal obesity (MO predisposes offspring to obesity and the recently described non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD but involved mechanisms remain unclear. Using a pathophysiologically relevant murine model, we here investigated a role for the biological clock--molecular core circadian genes (CCG in the generation of NAFPD. DESIGN: Female C57BL6 mice were fed an obesogenic diet (OD or standard chow (SC for 6 weeks, prior to pregnancy and throughout gestation and lactation: resulting offspring were subsequently weaned onto either OD (Ob_Ob and Con_Ob or standard chow (Ob_Con and Con_Con for 6 months. Biochemical, pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrogenic markers associated with NAFPD were then evaluated and CCG mRNA expression in the pancreas determined. RESULTS: Offspring of obese dams weaned on to OD (Ob_Ob had significantly increased (p≤0.05: bodyweight, pancreatic triglycerides, macrovesicular pancreatic fatty-infiltration, and pancreatic mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-6, α-SMA, TGF-β and increased collagen compared to offspring of control dams weaned on to control chow (Con_Con. Analyses of CCG expression demonstrated a phase shift in CLOCK (-4.818, p<0.01, REV-ERB-α (-1.4,p<0.05 and Per2 (3.27,p<0.05 in association with decreased amplitude in BMAL-1 (-0.914,p<0.05 and PER2 (1.18,p<0.005 in Ob_Ob compared to Con_Con. 2-way ANOVA revealed significant interaction between MO and post-weaning OD in expression of CLOCK (p<0.005, PER1 (p<0.005 and PER2 (p<0.05 whilst MO alone influenced the observed rhythmic variance in expression of all 5 measured CCG. CONCLUSIONS: Fetal and neonatal exposure to a maternal obesogenic environment interacts with a post-natal hyper-calorific environment to induce offspring NAFPD through mechanisms involving perturbations in CCG expression.

  20. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Treutlein

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i AD; (ii chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP; and (iii alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC. Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach (puncorrected = 1.2 × 10−6; pcorrected = 0.020. This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed.

  1. Genetic Contribution to Alcohol Dependence: Investigation of a Heterogeneous German Sample of Individuals with Alcohol Dependence, Chronic Alcoholic Pancreatitis, and Alcohol-Related Cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treutlein, Jens; Streit, Fabian; Juraeva, Dilafruz; Degenhardt, Franziska; Rietschel, Liz; Forstner, Andreas J.; Ridinger, Monika; Dukal, Helene; Foo, Jerome C.; Soyka, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Gaebel, Wolfgang; Dahmen, Norbert; Scherbaum, Norbert; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Lucae, Susanne; Ising, Marcus; Stickel, Felix; Berg, Thomas; Roggenbuck, Ulla; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Scholz, Henrike; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Buch, Stephan; Sommer, Wolfgang H.; Spanagel, Rainer; Brors, Benedikt; Cichon, Sven; Mann, Karl; Kiefer, Falk; Hampe, Jochen; Rosendahl, Jonas; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the genetic contribution to alcohol dependence (AD) using genome-wide association data from three German samples. These comprised patients with: (i) AD; (ii) chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (ACP); and (iii) alcohol-related liver cirrhosis (ALC). Single marker, gene-based, and pathway analyses were conducted. A significant association was detected for the ADH1B locus in a gene-based approach (puncorrected = 1.2 × 10−6; pcorrected = 0.020). This was driven by the AD subsample. No association with ADH1B was found in the combined ACP + ALC sample. On first inspection, this seems surprising, since ADH1B is a robustly replicated risk gene for AD and may therefore be expected to be associated also with subgroups of AD patients. The negative finding in the ACP + ALC sample, however, may reflect genetic stratification as well as random fluctuation of allele frequencies in the cases and controls, demonstrating the importance of large samples in which the phenotype is well assessed. PMID:28714907

  2. Association between alcohol dehydrogenase 1C gene *1/*2 polymorphism and pancreatitis risk: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, F; Pan, J; Su, G H; Xu, L X; Li, G; Li, Z H; Zhao, H; Wang, J

    2015-11-30

    Numerous studies have focused on the relationship be-tween alcohol dehydrogenase 1C gene (ADH1C) *1/*2 polymorphism (Ile350Val, rs698, also known as ADH1C *1/*2) and pancreatitis risk, but the results have been inconsistent. Thus, we conducted a meta-anal-ysis to more precisely estimate this association. Relevant publications were searched in several widely used databases and 9 eligible studies were included in the meta-analysis. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate the strength of the association. Significant associations between ADH1C *1/*2 poly-morphism and pancreatitis risk were observed in both overall meta-analysis for 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.53, 95%CI = 1.12-2.10) and 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.44, 95%CI = 1.07-1.95), and the chronic alcoholic pancre-atitis subgroup for 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.64, 95%CI = 1.17-2.29) and 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.53, 95%CI = 1.11-2.11). Significant pancreatitis risk variation was also detected in Caucasians for 11 + 12 vs 22 (OR = 1.45, 95%CI = 1.07-1.98). In conclusion, the ADH1C *1/*2 polymorphism is likely associated with pancreatitis risk, particularly chronic alcoholic pancreatitis risk, with the *1 allele functioning as a risk factor.

  3. The RON receptor tyrosine kinase in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis and its potential implications for future targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang Moo; Babicky, Michele L; Lowy, Andrew M

    2014-03-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains a devastating disease with a mortality rate that has not changed substantially in decades. Novel therapies are therefore desperately needed. The RON receptor tyrosine kinase has been identified as an important mediator of KRAS oncogene addiction and is overexpressed in the majority of pancreatic cancers. Preclinical studies show that inhibition of RON function decreases pancreatic cancer cell migration, invasion, and survival and can sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to chemotherapy. This article reviews the current state of knowledge regarding RON biology and pancreatic cancer and discusses its potential as a therapeutic target.

  4. Ecophysiological consequences of alcoholism on human gut microbiota: implications for ethanol-related pathogenesis of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruya, Atsuki; Kuwahara, Akika; Saito, Yuta; Yamaguchi, Haruhiko; Tsubo, Takahisa; Suga, Shogo; Inai, Makoto; Aoki, Yuichi; Takahashi, Seiji; Tsutsumi, Eri; Suwa, Yoshihide; Morita, Hidetoshi; Kinoshita, Kenji; Totsuka, Yukari; Suda, Wataru; Oshima, Kenshiro; Hattori, Masahira; Mizukami, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Akira; Shimoyama, Takefumi; Nakayama, Toru

    2016-06-13

    Chronic consumption of excess ethanol increases the risk of colorectal cancer. The pathogenesis of ethanol-related colorectal cancer (ER-CRC) is thought to be partly mediated by gut microbes. Specifically, bacteria in the colon and rectum convert ethanol to acetaldehyde (AcH), which is carcinogenic. However, the effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the human gut microbiome are poorly understood, and the role of gut microbes in the proposed AcH-mediated pathogenesis of ER-CRC remains to be elaborated. Here we analyse and compare the gut microbiota structures of non-alcoholics and alcoholics. The gut microbiotas of alcoholics were diminished in dominant obligate anaerobes (e.g., Bacteroides and Ruminococcus) and enriched in Streptococcus and other minor species. This alteration might be exacerbated by habitual smoking. These observations could at least partly be explained by the susceptibility of obligate anaerobes to reactive oxygen species, which are increased by chronic exposure of the gut mucosa to ethanol. The AcH productivity from ethanol was much lower in the faeces of alcoholic patients than in faeces of non-alcoholic subjects. The faecal phenotype of the alcoholics could be rationalised based on their gut microbiota structures and the ability of gut bacteria to accumulate AcH from ethanol.

  5. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation Involving the Duodenum Embolized with Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Luppi, Giacomo; Faiella, Eliodoro; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Giurazza, Francesco [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy); Borzomati, Domenico; Coppola, Roberto [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of General Surgery (Italy); Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is a rare condition. Most patients are asymptomatic or alternatively may present with a wide spectrum of symptoms. Traditionally, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice; however, alternative approaches, such as transcatheter embolization (TAE), may be proposed. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with a pancreatic head AVM, presenting with upper abdominal pain and slight anemia. The patient refused surgery and underwent TAE by means of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH). At 3 months follow-up, the patient was able to eat regularly, with no residual pain and no signs of anemia.

  6. Alcohol Consumption as a Risk Factor for Acute and Chronic Pancreatitis: A Systematic Review and a Series of Meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samokhvalov, Andriy V; Rehm, Jürgen; Roerecke, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatitis is a highly prevalent medical condition associated with a spectrum of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiencies. While high alcohol consumption is an established risk factor for pancreatitis, its relationship with specific types of pancreatitis and a potential threshold have not been systematically examined. We conducted a systematic literature search for studies on the association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis based on PRISMA guidelines. Non-linear and linear random-effect dose-response meta-analyses using restricted cubic spline meta-regressions and categorical meta-analyses in relation to abstainers were conducted. Seven studies with 157,026 participants and 3618 cases of pancreatitis were included into analyses. The dose-response relationship between average volume of alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis was monotonic with no evidence of non-linearity for chronic pancreatitis (CP) for both sexes (p = 0.091) and acute pancreatitis (AP) in men (p = 0.396); it was non-linear for AP in women (p = 0.008). Compared to abstention, there was a significant decrease in risk (RR = 0.76, 95%CI: 0.60-0.97) of AP in women below the threshold of 40 g/day. No such association was found in men (RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 0.69-1.74). The RR for CP at 100 g/day was 6.29 (95%CI: 3.04-13.02). The dose-response relationships between alcohol consumption and risk of pancreatitis were monotonic for CP and AP in men, and non-linear for AP in women. Alcohol consumption below 40 g/day was associated with reduced risk of AP in women. Alcohol consumption beyond this level was increasingly detrimental for any type of pancreatitis. The work was financially supported by a grant from the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (R21AA023521) to the last author.

  7. Length of Variable Numbers of Tandem Repeats in the Carboxyl Ester Lipase (CEL) Gene May Confer Susceptibility to Alcoholic Liver Cirrhosis but Not Alcoholic Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjeld, Karianne; Beer, Sebastian; Johnstone, Marianne; Zimmer, Constantin; Mössner, Joachim; Ruffert, Claudia; Krehan, Mario; Zapf, Christian; Njølstad, Pål Rasmus; Johansson, Stefan; Bugert, Peter; Miyajima, Fabio; Liloglou, Triantafillos; Brown, Laura J; Winn, Simon A; Davies, Kelly; Latawiec, Diane; Gunson, Bridget K; Criddle, David N; Pirmohamed, Munir; Grützmann, Robert; Michl, Patrick; Greenhalf, William; Molven, Anders; Sutton, Robert; Rosendahl, Jonas

    2016-01-01

    Carboxyl-ester lipase (CEL) contributes to fatty acid ethyl ester metabolism, which is implicated in alcoholic pancreatitis. The CEL gene harbours a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) region in exon 11. Variation in this VNTR has been linked to monogenic pancreatic disease, while conflicting results were reported for chronic pancreatitis (CP). Here, we aimed to investigate a potential association of CEL VNTR lengths with alcoholic CP. Overall, 395 alcoholic CP patients, 218 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC) serving as controls with a comparable amount of alcohol consumed, and 327 healthy controls from Germany and the United Kingdom (UK) were analysed by determination of fragment lengths by capillary electrophoresis. Allele frequencies and genotypes of different VNTR categories were compared between the groups. Twelve repeats were overrepresented in UK ACP patients (P = 0.04) compared to controls, whereas twelve repeats were enriched in German ALC compared to alcoholic CP patients (P = 0.03). Frequencies of CEL VNTR lengths of 14 and 15 repeats differed between German ALC patients and healthy controls (P = 0.03 and 0.008, respectively). However, in the genotype and pooled analysis of VNTR lengths no statistical significant association was depicted. Additionally, the 16-16 genotype as well as 16 repeats were more frequent in UK ALC than in alcoholic CP patients (P = 0.034 and 0.02, respectively). In all other calculations, including pooled German and UK data, allele frequencies and genotype distributions did not differ significantly between patients and controls or between alcoholic CP and ALC. We did not obtain evidence that CEL VNTR lengths are associated with alcoholic CP. However, our results suggest that CEL VNTR lengths might associate with ALC, a finding that needs to be clarified in larger cohorts.

  8. Vitamin D and pancreas: The role of sunshine vitamin in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altieri, Barbara; Grant, William B; Della Casa, Silvia; Orio, Francesco; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Colao, Annamaria; Sarno, Gerardo; Muscogiuri, Giovanna

    2017-11-02

    Increasing evidence suggests that vitamin D exerts multiple effects beyond bone and calcium metabolism. Vitamin D seems to play a role in pancreatic disease, including type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as pancreatic cancer. Vitamin D's immune-modulatory action suggests that it could help prevent type 1 diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, vitamin D may influence β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and systematic inflammation-all characteristic pathways of that disease. Data from observational studies correlated vitamin D deficiency with risk of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Prospective and ecological studies of pancreatic cancer incidence generally support a beneficial effect of higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration as well as inverse correlations between UVB dose or exposure and incidence and/or mortality rate of pancreatic cancer. This review discusses the literature regarding vitamin D's role in risk of diabetes and pancreatic cancer. The results to date generally satisfy Hill's criteria for causality regarding vitamin D and incidence of these pancreatic diseases. However, large randomized, blinded, prospective studies are required to more fully evaluate the potential therapeutic role of vitamin D in preventing pancreatic diseases.

  9. Surgical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Dilip; Natarajan, Sathima

    2015-10-01

    Advances over the past decade have indicated that a complex interplay between environmental factors, genetic predisposition, alcohol abuse, and smoking lead towards the development of chronic pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis is a complex disorder that causes significant and chronic incapacity in patients and a substantial burden on the society. Major advances have been made in the etiology and pathogenesis of this disease and the role of genetic predisposition is increasingly coming to the fore. Advances in noninvasive diagnostic modalities now allow for better diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis at an early stage of the disease. The impact of these advances on surgical treatment is beginning to emerge, for example, patients with certain genetic predispositions may be better treated with total pancreatectomy versus lesser procedures. Considerable controversy remains with respect to the surgical management of chronic pancreatitis. Modern understanding of the neurobiology of pain in chronic pancreatitis suggests that a window of opportunity exists for effective treatment of the intractable pain after which central sensitization can lead to an irreversible pain syndrome in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Effective surgical procedures exist for chronic pancreatitis; however, the timing of surgery is unclear. For optimal treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, close collaboration between a multidisciplinary team including gastroenterologists, surgeons, and pain management physicians is needed.

  10. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas: applications to acute alcoholic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janes, N.; Clemens, J.A.; Glickson, J.D.; Cameron, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The first nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of the canine pancreas is described. Both in-vivo, ex-vivo protocols and NMR observables are discussed. The stability of the ex-vivo preparation based on the NMR observables is established for at least four hours. The spectra obtained from the in-vivo and ex-vivo preparations exhibited similar metabolite ratios, further validating the model. Metabolite levels were unchanged by a 50% increase in perfusion rate. Only trace amounts of phosphocreatine were observed either in the intact gland or in extracts. Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was mimicked by free fatty acid infusion. Injury resulted in hyperamylasemia, edema (weight gain), increased hematocrit and perfusion pressure, and depressed levels of high energy phosphates

  11. [Alcohol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zima, T

    1996-07-14

    Alcohol is one of the most widely used addictive substances. It can be assumed that everybody encounters alcohol--ethanol in various forms and concentrations in the course of their lives. A global and social problem of our civilization is alcohol consumption which has a rising trend. Since 1989 the consumption of alcoholic beverages is rising and the mean annual consumption of concentrated ethanol per head is cea 10 litres. In ethanol abuse the organism is damaged not only by ethanol alone but in particular by substances formed during its metabolism. Its detailed knowledge is essential for the knowledge and investigations of the metabolic and toxic effect of ethanol on the organism. Ingested alcohol is in 90-98% eliminated from the organism by three known metabolic pathways: 1-alcohol dehydrogenase, 2-the microsomal ethanol oxidizing system and 3-catalase. Alcohol is a frequent important risk factor of serious "diseases of civilization" such as IHD, hypertension, osteoporosis, neoplastic diseases. Cirrhosis of the liver and chronic pancreatitis are the well known diseases associated with alcohol ingestion and also their most frequent cause. It is impossible to list all organs and diseases which develop as a result of alcohol consumption. It is important to realize that regular and "relatively" small amounts in the long run damage the organism and may be even fatal.

  12. Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis in recurrent acute and chronic alcoholic pancreatitis is caused by local inflammation and not thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebours, Vinciane; Boudaoud, Larbi; Vullierme, Marie-Pierre; Vidaud, Dominique; Condat, Bertrand; Hentic, Olivia; Maire, Frédérique; Hammel, Pascal; Ruszniewski, Philippe; Lévy, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Extrahepatic portal venous system thrombosis (EPVST) occurs in 13% of patients with either recurrent acute (AP) or chronic (CP) alcoholic pancreatitis. The role of thrombophilia has never been assessed in this entity. All consecutive patients with alcoholic AP or CP were included in a prospective study. All patients underwent a computerized tomography (CT) scan of the pancreas to evaluate EPVST as well as thorough testing for thrombophilia (protein C, S, and antithrombin deficiency, factor II, factor V, and JAK2 gene mutations, homocystein, biological antiphospholipid syndrome). A total of 119 patients (male, n=100 (84%); smokers, n=110 (92%)) were included. EPVST was found in 41 patients (35%). The portal, superior mesenteric, or splenic veins were involved in 34%, 24%, and 93% of patients, respectively. Thrombophilia was identified in 18% (n=22), including the biological antiphospholipid syndrome, factor V Leiden mutation, and factor II G20210A gene mutation in 21 (17.6%), 2 (1.6%), and 1 patient (0.8%), respectively. On univariate analysis, the factors associated with EPVST were smoking (RR=1.6 (1.38-1.85), P=0.03), pseudocysts (RR=2.91 (1.29-6.56), P=0.008), a pseudocyst in the pancreatic tail (P=0.03), a high CT severity index for AP (P=0.007), and pancreatic parenchymal necrosis (P=0.02). The presence of hemostatic risk factors was not associated with an increased risk of EPVST. On multivariate analysis, only pseudocysts were associated with EPVST (hazard ratio: 6.402; 95% confidence interval (1.59-26.54), P=0.009). EPVST is found in 35% of patients with acute/chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Local inflammation appears to be the major predisposing condition. The presence of some form of thrombophilia does not increase the risk of EPVST and should not be systematically searched for in case of EPVST.

  13. The role of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis and treatment of alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogusława Pietrzak

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The lack of satisfactory results of alcohol dependence treatment force us to search for new directions of research. Recent studies concentrate on endocannabinoid transmission. The results show an interplay between the endocannabinoid and dopaminergic signaling in activation of the limbic reward system. The mechanisms leading to development of dependence are very complex and poorly recognized. Endogenous cannabinoids seem to have an important role in the functioning of this system, both directly and indirectly affecting the level of different neurotransmitters. The effect of alcohol on the endocannabinoid system is also complex and involves changes at the molecular level. Experimental studies have demonstrated an important role of the CB1 receptors in the neurochemical mechanism of alcohol consumption and its regulation. SR141716 (rimonabant, a CB1 receptor antagonist, significantly lowers voluntary alcohol intake and motivation for its consumption in various experimental studies. Very encouraging results of preclinical studies were not completely confirmed in the clinical studies. However, further clinical studies are still necessary.

  14. New insights in the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaemers, Ingrid C.; Groen, Albert K.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The hallmark of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is hepatic steatosis. This is mostly a benign condition, but for largely unknown reasons it progresses to liver fibrosis, cirrhosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma in about 10% of patients. In this review we discuss recent

  15. Pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis: the link between hypercortisolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giovanni; Finelli, Carmine

    2013-10-28

    Based on the available literature, non alcoholic fatty liver disease or generally speaking, hepatic steatosis, is more frequent among people with diabetes and obesity, and is almost universally present amongst morbidly obese diabetic patients. Non alcoholic fatty liver disease is being increasingly recognized as a common liver condition in the developed world, with non alcoholic steatohepatitis projected to be the leading cause of liver transplantation. Previous data report that only 20% of patients with Cushing's syndrome have hepatic steatosis. Aiming at clarifying the reasons whereby patients suffering from Cushing's syndrome - a condition characterized by profound metabolic changes - present low prevalence of hepatic steatosis, the Authors reviewed the current concepts on the link between hypercortisolism and obesity/metabolic syndrome. They hypothesize that this low prevalence of fat accumulation in the liver of patients with Cushing's syndrome could result from the inhibition of the so-called low-grade chronic-inflammation, mainly mediated by Interleukin 6, due to an excess of cortisol, a hormone characterized by an anti-inflammatory effect. The Cushing's syndrome, speculatively considered as an in vivo model of the hepatic steatosis, could also help clarify the mechanisms of non alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  16. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  17. Myeloid DLL4 Does Not Contribute to the Pathogenesis of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis in Ldlr-/- Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike L J Jeurissen

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is characterized by liver steatosis and inflammation. Currently, the underlying mechanisms leading to hepatic inflammation are not fully understood and consequently, therapeutic options are poor. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and atherosclerosis share the same etiology whereby macrophages play a key role in disease progression. Macrophage function can be modulated via activation of receptor-ligand binding of Notch signaling. Relevantly, global inhibition of Notch ligand Delta-Like Ligand-4 (DLL4 attenuates atherosclerosis by altering the macrophage-mediated inflammatory response. However, the specific contribution of macrophage DLL4 to hepatic inflammation is currently unknown. We hypothesized that myeloid DLL4 deficiency in low-density lipoprotein receptor knock-out (Ldlr-/- mice reduces hepatic inflammation. Irradiated Ldlr-/- mice were transplanted (tp with bone marrow from wild type (Wt or DLL4f/fLysMCre+/0 (DLL4del mice and fed either chow or high fat, high cholesterol (HFC diet for 11 weeks. Additionally, gene expression was assessed in bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM of DLL4f/fLysMCreWT and DLL4f/fLysMCre+/0 mice. In contrast to our hypothesis, inflammation was not decreased in HFC-fed DLL4del-transplanted mice. In line, in vitro, there was no difference in the expression of inflammatory genes between DLL4-deficient and wildtype bone marrow-derived macrophages. These results suggest that myeloid DLL4 deficiency does not contribute to hepatic inflammation in vivo. Since, macrophage-DLL4 expression in our model was not completely suppressed, it can't be totally excluded that complete DLL4 deletion in macrophages might lead to different results. Nevertheless, the contribution of non-myeloid Kupffer cells to notch signaling with regard to the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis is unknown and as such it is possible that, DLL4 on Kupffer cells promote the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis.

  18. Relationship of coping and patterns of dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis of biliary and alcoholic etiology in aspect of differentiation of its medical and psychological support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Маріанна Владиславівна Маркова

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Choric pancreatitis is an actual medical and psychological problem in Ukraine. The aim of the work was to study the features of coping in patients with chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic and biliary etiology.Methods. For detecting coping-mechanisms the standard method WCQ Р of Lazarus was used. The study of addictive tendencies was carried out with the help of questionnaire AUDIT and UDIT-tests oriented on patterns of dependent behavior.Results. The study of features of coping-mechanisms and an addiction to dependent behavior in patients with chronic pancreatitis revealed intergroup and intragroup differences. Confrontation and low levels of self-control, responsibility and positive assessment were intrinsic for respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis. Women demonstrated the high addiction to the search of social support, men – to distancing. As to an addictive behavior there was revealed that the typical common tendencies were the consumption of coffee, alcohol, internet-dependence, the specific ones for women – TV, shopping-dependencies, for men – workaholism in patients with biliary and computer-addiction in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Intergroup differences were demonstrated by an addiction to disorder of food behavior in patients with biliary and consumption of alcohol and smoking in respondents with alcoholic etiology of pancreatitis.Conclusions. The revealed differences in coping-strategies of patients with different nosological forms of chronic pancreatitis give important information for detecting the targets of medical and psychological influence and constructing of differentiated program of medical and psychological help to patients of this type

  19. Cannabinoid receptor 2 agonist attenuates pain related behavior in rats with chronic alcohol/high fat diet induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liping; Kline, Robert H; McNearney, Terry A; Johnson, Michael P; Westlund, Karin N

    2014-11-17

    Chronic Pancreatitis (CP) is a complex and multifactorial syndrome. Many contributing factors result in development of dysfunctional pain in a significant number of patients. Drugs developed to treat a variety of pain states fall short of providing effective analgesia for patients with chronic pancreatitis, often providing minimal to partial pain relief over time with significant side effects. Recently, availability of selective pharmacological tools has enabled great advances in our knowledge of the role of the cannabinoid receptors in pathophysiology. In particular, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) has emerged as an attractive target for management of chronic pain, as demonstrated in several studies with inflammatory and neuropathic preclinical pain models. In this study, the analgesic efficacy of a novel, highly selective CB2 receptor agonist, LY3038404 HCl, is investigated in a chronic pancreatitis pain model, induced with an alcohol/high fat (AHF) diet. Rats fed the AHF diet developed visceral pain-like behaviors detectable by week 3 and reached a maximum at week 5 that persists as long as the diet is maintained. Rats with AHF induced chronic pancreatitis were treated with LY3038404 HCl (10 mg/kg, orally, twice a day for 9 days). The treated animals demonstrated significantly alleviated pain related behaviors after 3 days of dosing, including increased paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT), prolonged abdominal withdrawal latencies (ABWL), and decreased nocifensive responses to noxious 44°C hotplate stimuli. Terminal histological analysis of pancreatic tissue sections from the AHF chronic pancreatitis animals demonstrated extensive injury, including a global pancreatic gland degeneration (cellular atrophy), vacuolization (fat deposition), and fibrosis. After the LY3038404 HCl treatment, pancreatic tissue was significantly protected from severe damage and fibrosis. LY3038404 HCl affected neither open field exploratory behaviors nor dark/light box preferences as measures

  20. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  1. Mitochondrial function and malfunction in the pathophysiology of pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimenko, Oleg V; Gerasimenko, Julia V

    2012-07-01

    As a primary energy producer, mitochondria play a fundamental role in pancreatic exocrine physiology and pathology. The most frequent aetiology of acute pancreatitis is either gallstones or heavy alcohol consumption. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can result in the development of chronic pancreatitis and increase the lifetime risk of pancreatic cancer 100-fold. Pancreatic cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality with only about 3-4 % of patients surviving beyond 5 years. It has been shown that acute pancreatitis involves Ca²⁺ overload and overproduction of reactive oxygen species in pancreatic acinar cells. Both factors significantly affect mitochondria and lead to cell death. The pathogenesis of inflammation in acute and chronic pancreatitis is tightly linked to the induction of necrosis and apoptosis. There is currently no specific therapy for pancreatitis, but recent findings of an endogenous protective mechanism against Ca²⁺ overload--and particularly the potential to boost this protection--bring hope of new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Long Non-Coding RNA Profiling in a Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Rodent Model: New Insight into Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the most prevalent chronic liver diseases worldwide with an unclear mechanism. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs have recently emerged as important regulatory molecules. To better understand NAFLD pathogenesis, lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA microarrays were conducted in an NAFLD rodent model. Potential target genes of significantly changed lncRNA were predicted using cis/trans-regulatory algorithms. Gene Ontology (GO analysis and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analysis were then performed to explore their function. In the current analysis, 89 upregulated and 177 downregulated mRNAs were identified, together with 291 deregulated lncRNAs. Bioinformatic analysis of these RNAs has categorized these RNAs into pathways including arachidonic acid metabolism, circadian rhythm, linoleic acid metabolism, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway, sphingolipid metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, tryptophan metabolism and tyrosine metabolism were compromised. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR of representative nine mRNAs and eight lncRNAs (named fatty liver-related lncRNA, FLRL was conducted and this verified previous microarray results. Several lncRNAs, such as FLRL1, FLRL6 and FLRL2 demonstrated to be involved in circadian rhythm targeting period circadian clock 3 (Per3, Per2 and aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Arntl, respectively. While FLRL8, FLRL3 and FLRL7 showed a potential role in PPAR signaling pathway through interaction with fatty acid binding protein 5 (Fabp5, lipoprotein lipase (Lpl and fatty acid desaturase 2 (Fads2. Functional experiments showed that interfering of lncRNA FLRL2 expression affected the expression of predicted target, circadian rhythm gene Arntl. Moreover, both FLRL2 and Arntl were downregulated in the NAFLD cellular model. The current study identified lncRNA and corresponding mRNA in NAFLD

  3. Pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Martín-Domínguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD includes a broad spectrum of alterations that go from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2 and obesity are the principle factors associated to NAFLD. A 20-30 % prevalence in general population has been described. The survival of this type of patient is lower than the general population's, showing a higher incidence of hepatic and cardiovascular complications. The aetiopathogenesis is still unclear, but we know the intervention of different factors that produce fatty-acid accumulation in hepatic parenchyma, causing oxidative stress, oxygen-free radicals and the synthesis of an inflammatory cascade, that determine the progression of this disease from steatosis up to advanced fibrosis. The diagnostic gold-standard is still the liver biopsy, even though the development of newer non-invasive techniques, like serological and imaging (radiology, have opened a new field for research that allows bloodless testing of these patients and better study of the natural history of this disease. Nowadays, there is still no specific treatment for NAFLD. The development of healthy life habits and moderate exercise continue to be the pillars of treatment. Different pharmacological approaches have been studied and applied, such as the control of insulin resistance, lowering cholesterol levels, antioxidants, and other alternatives in experimental trials.

  4. Severe Alcoholic Pancreatitis-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Veterans: Risks, Mechanisms, Prediction, and Therapeutic Relevance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Background: Acute pancreatitis is a painful, potentially life -threatening condition of the...pancreas with an unpredictable course. In this study we hope to identify and propose simple and reliable ways to predict and treat acute...time period of 9/30/2016-9/29/2017. Acute pancreatitis is a painful, potentially life -threatening condition of the pancreas with a typically abrupt

  5. Polymorphisms at PRSS1-PRSS2 and CLDN2-MORC4 loci associate with alcoholic and non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis in a European replication study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derikx, Monique H; Kovacs, Peter; Scholz, Markus; Masson, Emmanuelle; Chen, Jian-Min; Ruffert, Claudia; Lichtner, Peter; Te Morsche, Rene H M; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Férec, Claude; Drenth, Joost P H; Witt, Heiko; Rosendahl, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Several genetic risk factors have been identified for non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (NACP). A genome-wide association study reported an association of chronic pancreatitis (CP) with variants in PRSS1-PRSS2 (rs10273639; near the gene encoding cationic trypsinogen) and CLDN2-MORC4 loci (rs7057398 in RIPPLY1 and rs12688220 in MORC4). We aimed to refine these findings in a large European cohort. We studied 3062 patients with alcohol-related CP (ACP) or NACP and 5107 controls. Also, 1559 German patients with alcohol-associated cirrhosis or alcohol dependence were included for comparison. We performed several meta-analyses to examine genotype-phenotype relationships. Association with ACP was found for rs10273639 (OR, 0.63; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.72). ACP was also associated with variants rs7057398 and rs12688220 in men (OR, 2.26; 95% CI 1.94 to 2.63 and OR, 2.66; 95% CI 2.21 to 3.21, respectively) and in women (OR, 1.57; 95% CI 1.14 to 2.18 and OR 1.71; 95% CI 1.41 to 2.07, respectively). Similar results were obtained when German patients with ACP were compared with those with alcohol-associated cirrhosis or alcohol dependence. In the overall population of patients with NACP, association with rs10273639 was absent (OR, 0.93; 95% CI 0.79 to 1.01), whereas rs7057398 of the X chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms was associated with NACP in women only (OR, 1.32; 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs10273639 at the PRSS1-PRSS2 locus and rs7057398 and rs12688220 at the CLDN2-MORC4 locus are associated with CP and strongly associate with ACP, but only rs7057398 with NACP in female patients. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. The enteroinsular axis and endocrine pancreatic function in chronic alcohol consumers: evidence for early beta-cell hypofunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patto, R J; Russo, E K; Borges, D R; Neves, M M

    1993-09-01

    Chronic alcohol consumers may have, as judged by functional criteria, exocrine as well as endocrine pancreatic dysfunction, the latter represented by a decreased insulin response to an oral glucose load. To investigate whether this decreased insulin response was due to an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction or to an ethanol-induced dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis, we determined glucose, insulin, and C-peptide plasma concentrations following an oral and an intravenous glucose load in 16 healthy volunteer nonalcohol consumers and in 10 chronic alcohol consumers. In each group, total integrated response for glucose did not significantly change whether glucose was given orally or intravenously, indicating isoglycemic glucose loads. The total integrated response values for insulin in the alcoholic group following both glucose loads as well as C-peptide plasma concentrations were significantly lower than in the control group. Moreover, in both groups the insulin TIR values following the oral glucose load were significantly greater than the values obtained following the intravenous glucose load, indicating an incretin effect. These results indicate that the decreased insulin response observed in alcoholics was not caused by a dysfunction of the enteroinsular axis because it also occurred following an intravenous glucose load, but by an ethanol-induced beta-cell dysfunction because C-peptide and insulin were proportionally decreased in this group.

  7. Indicators of inflammation and cellular damage in chronic asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic alcoholics: correlation with alteration of bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Borini, Paulo; Guimarães, Romeu Cardoso

    1999-01-01

    Biochemical and hematimetric indicators of inflammation and cell damage were correlated with bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes in 30 chronic male alcoholics admitted into psychiatric hospital for detoxification and treatment of alcoholism. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin were altered, respectively, in 90%, 63%, 87%, 23% and 23% of the cases. None of the indicators of inflammation (lactic dehy...

  8. The epidemiology of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B

    2013-06-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes of hospital admission in the United States. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients' quality of life. Pancreatic cancer is associated with a high mortality rate and is one of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect the black population more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter the progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Epidemiology of Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Dhiraj; Lowenfels, Albert B.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is one of the most frequent gastrointestinal causes for hospital admission in the US. Chronic pancreatitis, although lower in incidence, significantly reduces patients’ quality of life. Pancreatic cancer has high mortality and is 1 of the top 5 causes of death from cancer. The burden of pancreatic disorders is expected to increase over time. The risk and etiology of pancreatitis differ with age and sex, and all pancreatic disorders affect Blacks more than any other race. Gallstones are the most common cause of acute pancreatitis, and early cholecystectomy eliminates the risk of future attacks. Alcohol continues to be the single most important risk factor for chronic pancreatitis. Smoking is an independent risk factor for acute and chronic pancreatitis, and its effects could synergize with those of alcohol. Significant risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking and non-O blood groups. Alcohol abstinence and smoking cessation can alter progression of pancreatitis and reduce recurrence; smoking cessation is the most effective strategy to reduce the risk of pancreatic cancer. PMID:23622135

  10. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  11. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study the endocrine function of pancreas in acute pancreatitis. To define the role of endocrine pancreatic function in the etiology and pathogenesis of the acute pancreatitis. To assess the prospects of the use of pancreatic hormones in the treatment and predicting the outcomes of acute pancreatitis. Materials and methods of the research Survey of publications in specialized periodical medical journals, PubMed sources developed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Search in PubMed was carried out in the following databases: MEDLINE, Pre MEDLINE. Results of the research. In a significant proportion of patients who recovered from acute pancreatitis, exocrine and endocrine functional impairments were found. This finding was not detected only in patients after severe acute pancreatitis. Routine evaluation of pancreatic function after acute pancreatitis should be considered. The comparative analysis of the synthetic analogues (somatostatin, calcitonin, leu-enkefalin-dalargin influence on the glucose metabolism of rats in acute pancreatitis of was made. Physiological reaction of beta-cells is preserved in infusion of somatostatin. However, infusion of calcitonin results in the distortion of counterregulatory action of insulin and glucagon. It was detected that pancreatic renin-angiotensin system is markedly activated in the experimental rat models of chronic hypoxia and acute pancreatitis. The activation of the pancreatic renin-angiotensin system by

  12. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  13. The pain of chronic pancreatitis: a persistent clinical challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The pain of chronic pancreatitis represents a major challenge to those working in the field, including pain specialists, gastroenterologists and surgeons. This article describes the different aetiologies of chronic pancreatitis and lists the models for the pathogenesis of pain, including novel ideas such as the role of the immune system in the modulation of pain. The patient profile in chronic pancreatitis is discussed along with the social impact of the disease in relation to alcohol misuse. The range of treatment strategies including medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches are evaluated. Common analgesic regimes and their limitations are reviewed. The pain of chronic pancreatitis remains refractory to effective treatment in many cases and further study and understanding of the underlying pathophysiology are required. PMID:26516493

  14. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessner, J.

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [de

  15. [Chronic pancreatitis diagnosed after the first attack of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojková, Martina; Dítě, Petr; Uvírová, Magdalena; Dvořáčková, Nina; Kianička, Bohuslav; Kupka, Tomáš; Svoboda, Pavel; Klvaňa, Pavel; Martínek, Arnošt

    2016-02-01

    One of the diseases involving a potential risk of developing chronic pancreatitis is acute pancreatitis. Of the overall number of 231 individuals followed with a diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis, 56 patients were initially treated for acute pancreatitis (24.2 %). Within an interval of 12- 24 months from the first attack of acute pancreatitis, their condition gradually progressed to reached the picture of chronic pancreatitis. The individuals included in the study abstained (from alcohol) following the first attack of acute pancreatitis and no relapse of acute pancreatitis was proven during the period of their monitoring. The etiology of acute pancreatitis identified alcohol as the predominant cause (55.3 %), biliary etiology was proven in 35.7 %. According to the revised Atlanta classification, severe pancreatitis was established in 69.6 % of the patients, the others met the criterion for intermediate form, those with the light form were not included. Significant risk factors present among the patients were smoking, obesity and 18 %, resp. 25.8 % had pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus identified. 88.1 % of the patients with acute pancreatitis were smokers. The majority of individuals with chronic pancreatitis following an attack of acute pancreatitis were of a productive age from 25 to 50 years. It is not only acute alcoholic pancreatitis which evolves into chronic pancreatitis, we have also identified this transition for pancreatitis of biliary etiology.

  16. A review of the role of alcohol in the pathogenesis of oral cancer and the link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reidy, John T

    2011-08-01

    This article will review the most recent literature on the effects of alcohol on the oral mucosa, and the possible mechanisms by which alcohol is thought to act as a carcinogen. The article will also consider the possible link between alcohol-containing mouthrinses and oral cancer. The authors recommend that the use of alcohol-containing mouthrinses in high-risk populations should be restricted, pending the outcome of further research.

  17. Chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Whitcomb, David C; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Esposito, Irene; Lerch, Markus M; Gress, Thomas; Mayerle, Julia; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Rebours, Vinciane; Akisik, Fatih; Muñoz, J Enrique Domínguez; Neoptolemos, John P

    2017-09-07

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a pathological fibro-inflammatory syndrome of the pancreas in individuals with genetic, environmental and/or other risk factors who develop persistent pathological responses to parenchymal injury or stress. Potential causes can include toxic factors (such as alcohol or smoking), metabolic abnormalities, idiopathic mechanisms, genetics, autoimmune responses and obstructive mechanisms. The pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis is fairly complex and includes acinar cell injury, acinar stress responses, duct dysfunction, persistent or altered inflammation, and/or neuro-immune crosstalk, but these mechanisms are not completely understood. Chronic pancreatitis is characterized by ongoing inflammation of the pancreas that results in progressive loss of the endocrine and exocrine compartment owing to atrophy and/or replacement with fibrotic tissue. Functional consequences include recurrent or constant abdominal pain, diabetes mellitus (endocrine insufficiency) and maldigestion (exocrine insufficiency). Diagnosing early-stage chronic pancreatitis is challenging as changes are subtle, ill-defined and overlap those of other disorders. Later stages are characterized by variable fibrosis and calcification of the pancreatic parenchyma; dilatation, distortion and stricturing of the pancreatic ducts; pseudocysts; intrapancreatic bile duct stricturing; narrowing of the duodenum; and superior mesenteric, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis. Treatment options comprise medical, radiological, endoscopic and surgical interventions, but evidence-based approaches are limited. This Primer highlights the major progress that has been made in understanding the pathophysiology, presentation, prevalence and management of chronic pancreatitis and its complications.

  18. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betancur, Jorge

    2002-01-01

    It is presented a case of a man with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, whose marked dilatation of the ducts reasoned the issue. The severe untreatable pain was the surgery indication, which was practiced without complications either during or after the surgery. By the way, a shallow revision of the literature is made, by mentioning classification, physiopatholoy, clinical square, medical, surgical and endoscopic treatment

  19. Incidence of and risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Yujin; Kamisawa, Terumi; Anjiki, Hajime; Takuma, Kensuke; Egawa, Naoto

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer sometimes occurs during the course of chronic pancreatitis. This study aimed to identify risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer associated with chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of pancreatic cancer developing in 218 patients with chronic pancreatitis and clinical features of the chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer were studied. Nine patients developed pancreatic cancer. Average period from the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis to the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer was 9.6 years. All pancreatic cancers were diagnosed at an advanced stage. Only 2 patients had been followed-up periodically. There were no significant differences between chronic pancreatitis patients who developed pancreatic cancer and those who did not in male/female ratio (3.5 vs. 8), average age on diagnosis (65.0 vs. 56.5), alcoholic/non-alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (1.6 vs. 2.6), smoking habits (62.5% vs. 70.7%), diabetes mellitus (77.8% vs. 54.4%), and continued alcohol drinking (37.5% vs. 53.1%). Over the period examined, 4% of chronic pancreatitis patients developed pancreatic cancer. Sex ratio, onset age, etiology, smoking habits, diabetes mellitus, and continued alcohol drinking were not significant risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer in chronic pancreatitis patients. Periodic follow-up due to the possibility of pancreatic cancer is necessary in chronic pancreatitis patients.

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  1. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; Arakura, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-05-21

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung's and Santorini's ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct.

  2. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 in different forms of pancreatitis.

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    Sebastian Weis

    Full Text Available Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells and might thereby prevent the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Transcription of HMOX1 in humans is influenced by a GT-repeat located in the promoter. As such, HMOX1 variants might be of importance in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.The GT-repeat and SNP rs2071746 were investigated with fluorescence labelled primers and by melting curve analysis in 285 patients with acute pancreatitis, 208 patients with alcoholic CP, 207 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and in 289 controls, respectively. GT-repeat analysis was extended to a total of 446 alcoholic CP patients. In addition, we performed DNA sequencing in 145 patients with alcoholic CP, 138 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and 151 controls. Exon 3 screening was extended to additional patients and controls.S- and L-alleles of the GT-repeat, genotypes and alleles of SNP rs2071746 and non-synonymous variants detected by sequencing were found with similar frequencies in all groups.Although functional data implicate a potential influence of HMOX1 variants on the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, we did not find any association. As rare non-synonymous HMOX1 variants were found in patients and controls, it is rather unlikely that they will have functional consequences essential for pancreatitis development.

  3. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Ki Whang; Lee, Jong Tae; Kim, Hee Soo; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Yu, Jeong Sik; Yoon, Sang Wook

    1995-01-01

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  4. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  5. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-11-14

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful.

  6. Pathophysiology of chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Christina; Nielsen, Lecia Møller; Lelic, Dina; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive fibrotic destruction of the pancreatic secretory parenchyma. Despite the heterogeneity in pathogenesis and involved risk factors, processes such as necrosis/apoptosis, inflammation or duct obstruction are involved. This fibrosing process ultimately leads to progressive loss of the lobular morphology and structure of the pancreas, deformation of the large ducts and severe changes in the arrangement and composition of the islets. These conditions lead to irreversible morphological and structural changes resulting in impairment of both exocrine and endocrine functions. The prevalence of the disease is largely dependent on culture and geography. The etiological risk-factors associated with CP are multiple and involve both genetic and environmental factors. Throughout this review the M-ANNHEIM classification system will be used, comprising a detailed description of risk factors such as: alcohol-consumption, nicotine-consumption, nutritional factors, hereditary factors, efferent duct factors, immunological factors and miscellaneous and rare metabolic factors. Increased knowledge of the different etiological factors may encourage the use of further advanced diagnostic tools, which potentially will help clinicians to diagnose CP at an earlier stage. However, in view of the multi factorial disease and the complex clinical picture, it is not surprising that treatment of patients with CP is challenging and often unsuccessful. PMID:24259953

  7. [Pancreatic ultrasonography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rodríguez, T; Segura-Grau, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, A; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2015-04-01

    Despite the recent technological advances in imaging, abdominal ultrasonography continues to be the first diagnostic test indicated in patients with a suspicion of pancreatic disease, due to its safety, accessibility and low cost. It is an essential technique in the study of inflammatory processes, since it not only assesses changes in pancreatic parenchyma, but also gives an indication of the origin (bile or alcoholic). It is also essential in the detection and tracing of possible complications as well as being used as a guide in diagnostic and therapeutic punctures. It is also the first technique used in the study of pancreatic tumors, detecting them with a sensitivity of around 70% and a specificity of 90%. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

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    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  9. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland (Ingo)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are

  10. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - discharge; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - discharge; Acute pancreatitis - discharge ... You were in the hospital because you have pancreatitis. This is a swelling of the pancreas. You ...

  11. Pancreatic Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Pancreatic enzymes Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer ... and see a registered dietitian. What are pancreatic enzymes? Pancreatic enzymes help break down fats, proteins and ...

  12. Hereditary pancreatitis for the endoscopist

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Milan R.; Eppolito, Amanda L.; Willingham, Field F.

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis shares a majority of clinical and morphologic features with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, but may present at an earlier age. The term hereditary pancreatitis has primarily been associated with mutations in the serine protease 1 gene (PRSS1) which encodes for cationic trypsinogen. PRSS1 mutations account for approximately 68–81% of hereditary pancreatitis. Mutations in other genes, primarily serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) and the cystic fibrosis trans...

  13. Etiology, Severity and Recurrence of Acute Pancreatitis in Southern Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Chen

    2006-01-01

    Conclusion: Alcoholic pancreatitis was the major etiology of acute pancreatitis in southern Taiwan, exhibiting a strong male predominance and higher risk of severe CT grading. Abnormal serum triglyceride was independently associated with the severity of acute pancreatitis. Alcoholic pancreatitis had a higher risk of recurrence than other etiologies.

  14. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because that's how many accidents occur. What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  15. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  16. Alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Junior, L.

    1988-01-01

    The alcohol production as a secondary energy source, the participation of the alcohol in Brazilian national economic and social aspects are presented. Statistical data of alcohol demand compared with petroleum by-products and electricity are also included. (author)

  17. JPN Guidelines for the management of acute pancreatitis: epidemiology, etiology, natural history, and outcome predictors in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Sekimoto, Miho; Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Hirata, Koichi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Hirota, Masahiko; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Takeda, Kazunori; Isaji, Shuji; Koizumi, Masaru; Otsuki, Makoto; Matsuno, Seiki

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease with an annual incidence of between 5 and 80 people per 100 000 of the population. The two major etiological factors responsible for acute pancreatitis are alcohol and cholelithiasis (gallstones). The proportion of patients with pancreatitis caused by alcohol or gallstones varies markedly in different countries and regions. The incidence of acute alcoholic pancreatitis is considered to be associated with high alcohol consumption. Although the incidence o...

  18. Involvement of a periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis on the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

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    Yoneda Masato

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome that is closely associated with multiple factors such as obesity, hyperlipidemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, other risk factors for the development of NAFLD are unclear. With the association between periodontal disease and the development of systemic diseases receiving increasing attention recently, we conducted this study to investigate the relationship between NAFLD and infection with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis, a major causative agent of periodontitis. Methods The detection frequencies of periodontal bacteria in oral samples collected from 150 biopsy-proven NAFLD patients (102 with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH and 48 with non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL patients and 60 non-NAFLD control subjects were determined. Detection of P. gingivalis and other periodontopathic bacteria were detected by PCR assay. In addition, effect of P. gingivalis-infection on mouse NAFLD model was investigated. To clarify the exact contribution of P. gingivalis-induced periodontitis, non-surgical periodontal treatments were also undertaken for 3 months in 10 NAFLD patients with periodontitis. Results The detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NAFLD patients was significantly higher than that in the non-NAFLD control subjects (46.7% vs. 21.7%, odds ratio: 3.16. In addition, the detection frequency of P. gingivalis in NASH patients was markedly higher than that in the non-NAFLD subjects (52.0%, odds ratio: 3.91. Most of the P. gingivalis fimbria detected in the NAFLD patients was of invasive genotypes, especially type II (50.0%. Infection of type II P. gingivalis on NAFLD model of mice accelerated the NAFLD progression. The non-surgical periodontal treatments on NAFLD patients carried out for 3 months ameliorated the liver function parameters, such as the serum levels of AST and ALT. Conclusions Infection with high-virulence P

  19. Kill two birds with one stone: making multi-transgenic pre-diabetes mouse models through insulin resistance and pancreatic apoptosis pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyuan Kong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Type 2 diabetes is characterized by insulin resistance accompanied by defective insulin secretion. Transgenic mouse models play an important role in medical research. However, single transgenic mouse models may not mimic the complex phenotypes of most cases of type 2 diabetes. Methods Focusing on genes related to pancreatic islet damage, peripheral insulin resistance and related environmental inducing factors, we generated single-transgenic (C/EBP homology protein, CHOP mice (CHOP mice, dual-transgenic (human islet amyloid polypeptide, hIAPP; CHOP mice (hIAPP-CHOP mice and triple-transgenic (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, 11β-HSD1; hIAPP; CHOP mice (11β-HSD1-hIAPP- CHOP mice. The latter two types of transgenic (Tg animals were induced with high-fat high-sucrose diets (HFHSD. We analyzed the diabetes-related symptoms and histology features of the transgenic animals. Results Comparing symptoms on the spot-checked points, we determined that the triple-transgene mice were more suitable for systematic study. The results of intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT of triple-transgene animals began to change 60 days after induction (p < 0.001. After 190 days of induction, the body weights (p < 0.01 and plasma glucose of the animals in Tg were higher than those of the animals in Negative Control (Nc. After sacrificed, large amounts of lipid were found deposited in adipose (p < 0.01 and ectopically deposited in the non-adipose tissues (p < 0.05 or 0.01 of the animals in the Tg HFHSD group. The weights of kidneys and hearts of Tg animals were significantly increased (p < 0.01. Serum C peptide (C-P was decreased due to Tg effects, and insulin levels were increased due to the effects of the HFHSD in the Tg HFHSD group, indicating that damaged insulin secretion and insulin resistance hyperinsulinemia existed simultaneously in these animals. The serum corticosterone of Tg was slightly higher than those of Nc due to the

  20. Indicators of inflammation and cellular damage in chronic asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic alcoholics: correlation with alteration of bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borini Paulo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and hematimetric indicators of inflammation and cell damage were correlated with bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes in 30 chronic male alcoholics admitted into psychiatric hospital for detoxification and treatment of alcoholism. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin were altered, respectively, in 90%, 63%, 87%, 23% and 23% of the cases. None of the indicators of inflammation (lactic dehydrogenase, altered in 16% of the cases; alpha-1 globulin, 24%; alpha-2 globulin, 88%; leucocyte counts, 28% was correlated with alterations of bilirubin or liver enzymes. Lactic dehydrogenase was poorly sensitive for detection of hepatocytic or muscular damage. Alterations of alpha-globulins seemed to have been due more to alcohol metabolism-induced increase of lipoproteins than to inflammation. Among indicators of cell damage, serum iron, increased in 40% of the cases, seemed to be related to liver damage while creatine phosphokinase, increased in 84% of the cases, related to muscle damage. Hyperamylasemia was found in 20% of the cases and significantly correlated with levels of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase. It was indicated that injuries of liver, pancreas, salivary glands, and muscle occurred in asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic chronic alcoholics.

  1. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obermeyer, Robert J; Fisher, William E; Salameh, Jihad R; Jeyapalan, Manjula; Sweeney, John F; Brunicardi, F Charles

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of the review was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy for operative drainage of symptomatic pancreatic pseudocysts. A retrospective review of all patients who underwent laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy between June 1997 and July 2001 was performed. Data regarding etiology of pancreatitis, size of pseudocyst, operative time, complications, and pseudocyst recurrence were collected and reported as median values with ranges. Laparoscopic pancreatic cystogastrostomy was attempted in 6 patients. Pseudocyst etiology included gallstone pancreatitis (3), alcohol-induced pancreatitis (2), and post-ERCP pancreatitis (1). The cystogastrostomy was successfully performed laparoscopically in 5 of 6 patients. However, the procedure was converted to open after creation of the cystgastrostomy in 1 of these patients. There were no complications in the cases completed laparoscopically and no deaths in the entire group. No pseudocyst recurrences were observed with a median followup of 44 months (range 4-59 months). Laparoscopic pancreatic cystgastrostomy is a feasible surgical treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts with a resultant low pseudocyst recurrence rate, length of stay, and low morbidity and mortality.

  2. Acute Pancreatitis: Etiology, Pathology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidi, Shirin; Golembioski, Adam; Wilson, Stephen L; Thompson, Errington C

    2017-11-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a fascinating disease. In the United States, the two most common etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and excessive alcohol consumption. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is made with a combination of history, physical examination, computed tomography scan, and laboratory evaluation. Differentiating patients who will have a benign course of their pancreatitis from patients who will have severe pancreatitis is challenging to the clinician. C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin, and the Bedside Index for Severity of Acute Pancreatitis appeared to be the best tools for the early and accurate diagnosis of severe pancreatitis. Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is indicated for patients with mild gallstone pancreatitis. For patients who are going to have a prolonged hospitalization, enteral nutrition is preferred. Total parenteral nutrition should be reserved for patients who cannot tolerate enteral nutrition. Prophylactic antibiotics are not indicated for patients with pancreatic necrosis. Surgical intervention for infected pancreatic necrosis should be delayed as long as possible to improve patient outcomes.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis. Some important historical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Salvador

    2018-06-08

    Since ancient times the increase of size and hardness sometimes presented by the abdominal structure known as the pancreas has attracted attention. Portal was the first to describe the clinical signs of chronic pancreatitis in 1803. In 1815, Fleischman speculated about the potential role of excessive alcohol consumption. Comfort coined the term "chronic relapsing pancreatitis" in 1946 and described hereditary pancreatitis 6 years later. Zuidema defined tropical pancreatitis in 1959 and 2 years later Sarles described another form of pancreatitis to which Yoshida gave the name autoimmune pancreatitis in 1995. Groove pancreatitis was described by Potet in 1970. Obstructive pancreatitis was defined in 1984 and Ammann identified idiopathic pancreatitis 3 years later. This article gives a historical account of the pioneers who developed the knowledge of how to assess the characteristics that allowed the different forms of chronic pancreatitis to be defined. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Complement and alcoholic liver disease: role of C1q in the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jessica I; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; McMullen, Megan R; Stavitsky, Abram B; Nagy, Laura E

    2010-08-01

    Complement is involved in the development of alcoholic liver disease in mice; however, the mechanisms for complement activation during ethanol exposure have not been identified. C1q, the recognition subunit of the first complement component, binds to apoptotic cells, thereby activating the classical complement pathway. Because ethanol exposure increases hepatocellular apoptosis, we hypothesized that ethanol-induced apoptosis would lead to activation of complement via the classical pathway. Wild-type and C1qa-/- mice were allowed free access to ethanol-containing diets or pair-fed control diets for 4 or 25 days. Ethanol feeding for 4 days increased apoptosis of Kupffer cells in both wild-type and C1qa-/- mice. Ethanol-induced deposition of C1q and C3b/iC3b/C3c was colocalized with apoptotic Kupffer cells in wild-type, but not C1qa-/-, mice. Furthermore, ethanol-induced increases in tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 expression at this early time point were suppressed in C1q-deficient mice. Chronic ethanol feeding (25 days) increased steatosis, hepatocyte apoptosis, and activity of serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases in wild-type mice. These markers of hepatocyte injury were attenuated in C1qa-/- mice. In contrast, chronic ethanol (25 days)-induced increases in cytochrome P450 2E1 expression and oxidative stress did not differ between wild-type and C1qa-/- mice. For the first time, these data indicate that ethanol activates the classical complement pathway via C1q binding to apoptotic cells in the liver and that C1q contributes to the pathogenesis of ethanol-induced liver injury. Copyright (c) 2010 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Time trends in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Panicker, Suprabha; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2014-01-01

    Recent reports indicate a decline in prevalence of classical tropical chronic pancreatitis (TCP). We studied the etiologies and risk factors over a 14-year period at a tertiary care university hospital. We compared the etiology in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients presenting and followed-up in our Pancreas Clinic over two time periods (2000-06 and 2007-13). Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) was the predominant etiology seen over the two time periods. However an increase in prevalence of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) during the latter time period suggests that it may be emerging as a dominant etiology over recent years. Hypertriglyceridemia and hyperparathyroidism were uncommon causes of non-alcoholic CP. Autoimmune pancreatitis was noted only during 2007-13, but remains a rare cause of CP. There are multiple risk factors for CP in our population. The high prevalence of ICP indicates need closer examination of risk factors and ICP pathogenesis. ACP appears to be emerging as a dominant cause of CP which suggests a need to reorient preventive strategies.

  6. Hereditary chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mössner Joachim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary chronic pancreatitis (HCP is a very rare form of early onset chronic pancreatitis. With the exception of the young age at diagnosis and a slower progression, the clinical course, morphological features and laboratory findings of HCP do not differ from those of patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. As well, diagnostic criteria and treatment of HCP resemble that of chronic pancreatitis of other causes. The clinical presentation is highly variable and includes chronic abdominal pain, impairment of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic function, nausea and vomiting, maldigestion, diabetes, pseudocysts, bile duct and duodenal obstruction, and rarely pancreatic cancer. Fortunately, most patients have a mild disease. Mutations in the PRSS1 gene, encoding cationic trypsinogen, play a causative role in chronic pancreatitis. It has been shown that the PRSS1 mutations increase autocatalytic conversion of trypsinogen to active trypsin, and thus probably cause premature, intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation disturbing the intrapancreatic balance of proteases and their inhibitors. Other genes, such as the anionic trypsinogen (PRSS2, the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR have been found to be associated with chronic pancreatitis (idiopathic and hereditary as well. Genetic testing should only be performed in carefully selected patients by direct DNA sequencing and antenatal diagnosis should not be encouraged. Treatment focuses on enzyme and nutritional supplementation, pain management, pancreatic diabetes, and local organ complications, such as pseudocysts, bile duct or duodenal obstruction. The disease course and prognosis of patients with HCP is unpredictable. Pancreatic cancer risk is elevated. Therefore, HCP patients should strongly avoid environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C; Bakker, Olaf J; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B; Bollen, Thomas L; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J; Brink, Menno A; Schaapherder, Alexander F; Dejong, Cornelis H; Spanier, B W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H; Besselink, Marc G; Gooszen, Hein G; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Boermeester, Marja A

    2016-05-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch hospitals from December 2003 through March 2007. We collected information on disease course, outpatient visits, and hospital readmissions, as well as results from imaging, laboratory, and histology studies. Standardized follow-up questionnaires were sent to all available patients to collect information on hospitalizations and interventions for pancreatic disease, abdominal pain, steatorrhea, diabetes mellitus, medications, and alcohol and tobacco use. Patients were followed up for a median time period of 57 months. Primary end points were recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Risk factors were evaluated using regression analysis. The cumulative risk was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 117 patients (17%), and CP occurred in 51 patients (7.6%). Recurrent pancreatitis developed in 12% of patients with biliary disease, 24% of patients with alcoholic etiology, and 25% of patients with disease of idiopathic or other etiologies; CP occurred in 3%, 16%, and 10% of these patients, respectively. Etiology, smoking, and necrotizing pancreatitis were independent risk factors for recurrent pancreatitis and CP. Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II scores at admission also were associated independently with recurrent pancreatitis. The cumulative risk for recurrent pancreatitis over 5 years was highest among smokers at 40% (compared with 13% for nonsmokers). For alcohol abusers and current smokers, the cumulative risks for CP were similar-approximately 18%. In contrast, the cumulative risk of CP increased to 30% in patients who smoked and abused alcohol. Based on a retrospective analysis of patients admitted to Dutch hospitals, a first

  8. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  9. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis decreases the risk for pancreatic cancer: a multicenter retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Junji; Tanaka, Masao; Ohtsuka, Takao; Tokunaga, Shoji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2013-03-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is suggested to be one of the risk factors for the development of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to confirm the high incidence of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis in Japan and to determine the factors associated with the risk for pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The working group of the Research Committee of Intractable Disease supported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan carried out a nationwide survey to investigate the relationship between chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. This retrospective study included patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis who had had at least 2 years of follow-up. They were contacted through 22 Japanese referral centers experienced in the management of chronic pancreatitis. The standardized incidence ratio (95 CI) of pancreatic cancer was 11.8 (7.1-18.4). The incidence of pancreatic cancer was significantly lower in patients who had received surgery for chronic pancreatitis than in those who had not undergone surgery (hazard ratio estimated by Cox regression 0.11; 95% CI, 0.0014-0.80; P = .03). Patients who continued to drink alcohol after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis showed a significantly higher incidence of pancreatic cancer than those who stopped drinking after diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis (hazard ratio, 5.07; 95% CI, 1.13-22.73; P = .03). This study confirmed that chronic pancreatitis is an important risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer in Japan. Patients who underwent surgery for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis had significantly lower incidences of pancreatic cancer. Surgery for chronic pancreatitis may inhibit the development of pancreatic cancer in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. PKD signaling and pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingzhen; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute pancreatitis is a serious medical disorder with no current therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disorder. Inflammation, inappropriate intracellular activation of digestive enzymes, and parenchymal acinar cell death by necrosis are the critical pathophysiologic processes of acute pancreatitis. Thus, it is necessary to elucidate the key molecular signals that mediate these pathobiologic processes and develop new therapeutic strategies to attenuate the appropriate signaling pathways in order to improve outcomes for this disease. A novel serine/threonine protein kinase D (PKD) family has emerged as key participants in signal transduction, and this family is increasingly being implicated in the regulation of multiple cellular functions and diseases. Methods This review summarizes recent findings of our group and others regarding the signaling pathway and the biological roles of the PKD family in pancreatic acinar cells. In particular, we highlight our studies of the functions of PKD in several key pathobiologic processes associated with acute pancreatitis in experimental models. Results Our findings reveal that PKD signaling is required for NF-κB activation/inflammation, intracellular zymogen activation, and acinar cell necrosis in rodent experimental pancreatitis. Novel small-molecule PKD inhibitors attenuate the severity of pancreatitis in both in vitro and in vivo experimental models. Further, this review emphasizes our latest advances in the therapeutic application of PKD inhibitors to experimental pancreatitis after the initiation of pancreatitis. Conclusions These novel findings suggest that PKD signaling is a necessary modulator in key initiating pathobiologic processes of pancreatitis, and that it constitutes a novel therapeutic target for treatments of this disorder. PMID:26879861

  11. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  12. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases...

  13. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fischer, Iben Wendelboe Deleuran

    2014-01-01

    food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids....... Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases......Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion...

  14. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... created when grains, fruits, or vegetables are fermented . Fermentation is a process that uses yeast or bacteria to change the sugars in the food into alcohol. Fermentation is used to produce many necessary items — everything ...

  15. Astrovirus Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cydney Johnson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Astroviruses are a major cause of diarrhea in the young, elderly, and the immunocompromised. Since the discovery of human astrovirus type 1 (HAstV-1 in 1975, the family Astroviridae has expanded to include two more human clades and numerous mammalian and avian-specific genotypes. Despite this, there is still little known about pathogenesis. The following review highlights the current knowledge of astrovirus pathogenesis, and outlines the critical steps needed to further astrovirus research, including the development of animal models of cell culture systems.

  16. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Role of Endogenous Peptides and Enzymes in the Pathogenesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease with the clinical manifestation of acute abdominal pain. Several factors are involved in the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. The exact mechanism(s) by which diverse etiological factors induce an attack are still unclear. However, one of the proposed mechanisms for induction ...

  18. Food-Induced Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohar, Murli; Verma, Alok K; Upparahalli Venkateshaiah, Sathisha; Goyal, Hemant; Mishra, Anil

    2017-12-01

    Food allergy, a commonly increasing problem worldwide, defined as an adverse immune response to food. A variety of immune-related effector cells such as mast cells, eosinophils, neutrophils, and T cells are involved in food-related allergic responses categorized as IgE mediated, non-IgE mediated, and mixed (IgE and non-IgE) depending upon underlying immunological mechanisms. The dietary antigens mainly target the gastrointestinal tract including pancreas that gets inflamed due to food allergy and leads acute pancreatitis. Reports indicate several food proteins induce pancreatitis; however, detailed underlying mechanism of food-induced pancreatitis is unexplored. The aim of the review is to understand and update the current scenario of food-induced pancreatitis. A comprehensive literature search of relevant research articles has been performed through PubMed, and articles were chosen based on their relevance to food allergen-mediated pancreatitis. Several cases in the literature indicate that acute pancreatitis has been provoked after the consumption of mustard, milk, egg, banana, fish, and kiwi fruits. Food-induced pancreatitis is an ignored and unexplored area of research. The review highlights the significance of food in the development of pancreatitis and draws the attention of physicians and scientists to consider food allergies as a possible cause for initiation of pancreatitis pathogenesis.

  19. Genetic aspects of chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.

    2005-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a progressive inflammatory disorder. A key characteristic of the condition is severe recurrent abdominal pain. The origin of CP is mixed, with about 70% of the cases being attributed to alcohol abuse even though 95% of all alcoholics never develop CP. Approximately half

  20. Constitutional Syndrome, Ascites and Duodenal Thickening Presenting as Groove Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Maria Frutos Perez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Groove pancreatitis (GP is a very infrequent subtype of chronic pancreatitis affecting the pancreatic-duodenal junction. It usually manifests in middle-aged men with a history of chronic alcoholism, though it has also been described in women and in individuals who do not consume alcohol[1]. Even though the underlying etiology is unclear, chronic alcohol consumption is known to increase the viscosity of the pancreatic juice and exacerbate the inflammatory process[2]. We present a case of GP that posed diagnostic difficulties because it manifested as ascites and duodenal thickening, with pancreatic imaging findings initially normal.

  1. An association study between polymorphism of alcohol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... factors which include alcohol metabolizing genes and ... Association research proves that c2 allele is a risk factor for ..... polymorphism in alcohol liver cirrhosis and alcohol chronic pancreatitis among Polish individuals.S cand ...

  2. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to do. Wondering if adding a glass of wine or beer might help lower your blood glucose if it is high? The effects of alcohol can be unpredictable and it is not recommended as a treatment for high blood glucose. The risks likely outweigh any benefit that may be seen in blood glucose alone. ...

  3. Acute Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: A Nationwide Matched-cohort Study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegård, Jakob; Cronin Fenton, Deirdre; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe

    2018-01-01

    . Pancreatic cancer risk was expressed as hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% CIs, calculated using the Cox proportional hazards model. Cox models were stratified by age, sex, and year of pancreatitis diagnosis and adjusted for alcohol- and smoking-related conditions, and Charlson Comorbidity Index score. Results We...... included 41,669 patients diagnosed with incident acute pancreatitis and 208,340 comparison individuals. Patients with acute pancreatitis had an increased risk of pancreatic cancer compared with the age- and sex-matched general population throughout the follow-up period. The risk decreased over time......Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis may be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, findings from studies on this association are conflicting. We investigated the association between acute pancreatitis and increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Methods We conducted a nationwide, population...

  4. Tryptophan-induced pathogenesis of breast cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aims: To investigate the pathogenesis of breast cancer through targeted metabolomics of amino acids ... Furthermore, the biological function of tryptophan was determined through determining the influence ... profiling all the small molecules in the biosamples (e.g., .... is a promising therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer7.

  5. Management of hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis and therapeutic plasmapheresis : Report of nine cases and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyar, S; Harmandar, F; Kök, M; Taș, Z; Dolu, S; Tokuç, A; Köker, G; Görar, S; Çekin, A H

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the rare causes of the acute pancreatitis. The prevalance of hypertriglyceridemia has increased recently due to the changing eating habits, sedentary lifestyle, alcohol consumption, obesity and concomitant diabetes mellitus. Therefore, the frequency of the acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia may increase in coming years. Diagnosis of the acute pancreatitis by hypertriglyceridemia can be overlooked easily and may be very severe if untreated accurately on time. In addition to the standard management of pancreatitis, specific treatment for hypertriglyceridemia that is insulin, heparin and anti-hypertriglyceridemic drugs are used. Therapeutic plasmapheresis is the last treatment option and seems the most effective one in this subject through developing device and membrane technologies when we review the current literature. Not only triglycerides but also proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules that play an active role in pathogenesis are removed by plasmapheresis. So, the effectiveness of treatment appears promising. However, the exact pathophysiology of hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis could not be fully understood and the majority of published experience comes from the case reports and the benefit of randomized clinical trials is not available. Therefore, there are no data about what are the exact indications and when we start therapeutic plasmapheresis in literature. This manuscript describes our hospital experience with treatment options and analyzes reports published recently about plasmapheresis as a treatment modality for hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  6. Pancreatic cancer stromal biology and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Dacheng; Xie, Keping

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal malignancies. Significant progresses have been made in understanding of pancreatic cancer pathogenesis, including appreciation of precursor lesions or premalignant pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanINs), description of sequential transformation from normal pancreatic tissue to invasive pancreatic cancer and identification of major genetic and epigenetic events and the biological impact of those events on malignant behavior. However, the currently used therapeutic strategies targeting tumor epithelial cells, which are potent in cell culture and animal models, have not been successful in the clinic. Presumably, therapeutic resistance of pancreatic cancer is at least in part due to its drastic desmoplasis, which is a defining hallmark for and circumstantially contributes to pancreatic cancer development and progression. Improved understanding of the dynamic interaction between cancer cells and the stroma is important to better understanding pancreatic cancer biology and to designing effective intervention strategies. This review focuses on the origination, evolution and disruption of stromal molecular and cellular components in pancreatic cancer, and their biological effects on pancreatic cancer pathogenesis. PMID:26114155

  7. Etiology of chronic pancreatitis: Has it changed in the last decade?

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele

    2009-01-01

    The evidence from recent surveys on chronic pancreatitis carried out around the world shows that alcohol remains the main factor associated with chronic pancreatitis, even if at a frequency lower than that reported previously. It has further confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. Autoimmune pancreatitis accounts for 2%-4% of all forms of chronic pancreatitis, but this frequency will probably increase over the next few years....

  8. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  9. Some Current Views on Pancreatitis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The past decade has seen few dramatic advances in the diagnosis and ... But there has been a broadening in the understanding of the classifica- tion, diagnostic features, natura:! history and surgical management of the disease. PATHOGENESIS .... as one of the more important diagnostic aids in pancreatic disease, but our ...

  10. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owen, Richard J.; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal; Molinari, Michele; Ashforth, Robert A.; Rajotte, Ray V.; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 μm (Contour SE) and labeled with 99m Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for 99m Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 ± 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with 99m Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-μm particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  11. Studies of the etiology of chronic pancreatitis with special reference to endoscopic manometry of sphincter of Oddi and quantitative cholescintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirabayashi, Yasushi (Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Science)

    1992-04-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the etiology of chronic pancreatitis. In a total of 23 patients with alcoholic (8) or idiopathic (18) pancreatitis, motor activity of the Oddi's sphincter was recorded by endoscopy to measure systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, motor cycle, the area surrounded by phasic waves and the base line for one minute (index A), and the area surrounded by phasic waves and the line connecting each bottom of the waves for one minute (index B). In addition, cholescintigraphy was performed in a total of 27 patients with alcoholic (4) or idiopathic (23) pancreatitis to obtain the time from appearance of common hepatic duct image to that of duodenal image (CD time). Systolic pressure (48.9{+-}16.1 mmHg), diastolic pressure (33.9{+-}14.3 mmHg), index A (10.4{+-}3.2 cm{sup 2}/min), and index B (3.1{+-}0.9 cm{sup 2}/min) were significantly higher than those in controls (28.3{+-}8.3 mmHg, 19.5{+-}7.6 mmHg, 6.1{+-}1.7 cm{sup 2}/min, and 1.7{+-}0.9 cm{sup 2}/min, respectively). Similarly. CD time was significantly longer for chronic pancreatitis than controls (44.1{+-}22.4 min vs 18.5{+-}17.3 min). In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis was associated with increased papillary resistance, resulting in retension of pancreatic juice. Papillary dysfunction has proved to be responsible for pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. (N.K.).

  12. Studies of the etiology of chronic pancreatitis with special reference to endoscopic manometry of sphincter of Oddi and quantitative cholescintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Yasushi

    1992-01-01

    This study was designed to elucidate the etiology of chronic pancreatitis. In a total of 23 patients with alcoholic (8) or idiopathic (18) pancreatitis, motor activity of the Oddi's sphincter was recorded by endoscopy to measure systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, motor cycle, the area surrounded by phasic waves and the base line for one minute (index A), and the area surrounded by phasic waves and the line connecting each bottom of the waves for one minute (index B). In addition, cholescintigraphy was performed in a total of 27 patients with alcoholic (4) or idiopathic (23) pancreatitis to obtain the time from appearance of common hepatic duct image to that of duodenal image (CD time). Systolic pressure (48.9±16.1 mmHg), diastolic pressure (33.9±14.3 mmHg), index A (10.4±3.2 cm 2 /min), and index B (3.1±0.9 cm 2 /min) were significantly higher than those in controls (28.3±8.3 mmHg, 19.5±7.6 mmHg, 6.1±1.7 cm 2 /min, and 1.7±0.9 cm 2 /min, respectively). Similarly. CD time was significantly longer for chronic pancreatitis than controls (44.1±22.4 min vs 18.5±17.3 min). In conclusion, chronic pancreatitis was associated with increased papillary resistance, resulting in retension of pancreatic juice. Papillary dysfunction has proved to be responsible for pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. (N.K.)

  13. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-11-14

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity in tropical calcific pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliwal, Sumit; Bhaskar, Seema; Chandak, Giriraj R

    2014-12-14

    Tropical calcific pancreatitis (TCP) is a form of chronic non-alcoholic pancreatitis initially reported in the developing parts of the tropical world. The clinical phenotype of TCP has undergone marked changes since its first description in 1968. The disease is now seen in relatively older people with less severe symptoms. In addition, there are varying reports on the proportion of cases presenting with imaging abnormalities like calcification, ductal dilation, and glandular atrophy. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the etiopathology of TCP. The role of malnutrition and cassava toxicity in its pathogenesis is disproven and few studies have focused on the role of micronutrient deficiency and oxidative stress in the etiopathogenesis of TCP. Emerging evidence support an important role for genetic risk factors in TCP. Several studies have shown that, rather than mutations in trypsinogens, variants in serine protease inhibitor kazal type 1, cathepsin B, chymotrypsin C, cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator, and carboxypeptidase A1, predict risk of TCP. These studies also provided evidence of mutational heterogeneity between TCP and chronic pancreatitis in Western populations. The current review summarizes recent advances that have implications in the understanding of the pathophysiology and thus, heterogeneity in genotype-phenotype correlations in TCP.

  15. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Natasha; Ahmed, Seema; Shaffer, Lemuel; Cavens, Paula; Blankstein, Josef

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  16. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It has various clinical aspects, ranging from a mild form which is easily treated, to a severe form that causes complications leading to mortality. The pathogenesis of this disease has not been fully elucidated and several theories have been suggested. New scoring systems and laboratory methods such as proteomics have been suggested for both diagnosis and to predict disease severity, and research on these topics is still in progress. Novel therapeutic approaches with technological developments such as ERCP, ES, MRCP, and EUS are also suggested.

  17. Pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, R; Bhattacharya, S

    2013-05-01

    Pancreatic trauma occurs in approximately 4% of all patients sustaining abdominal injuries. The pancreas has an intimate relationship with the major upper abdominal vessels, and there is significant morbidity and mortality associated with severe pancreatic injury. Immediate resuscitation and investigations are essential to delineate the nature of the injury, and to plan further management. If main pancreatic duct injuries are identified, specialised input from a tertiary hepatopancreaticobiliary (HPB) team is advised. A comprehensive online literature search was performed using PubMed. Relevant articles from international journals were selected. The search terms used were: 'pancreatic trauma', 'pancreatic duct injury', 'radiology AND pancreas injury', 'diagnosis of pancreatic trauma', and 'management AND surgery'. Articles that were not published in English were excluded. All articles used were selected on relevance to this review and read by both authors. Pancreatic trauma is rare and associated with injury to other upper abdominal viscera. Patients present with non-specific abdominal findings and serum amylase is of little use in diagnosis. Computed tomography is effective in diagnosing pancreatic injury but not duct disruption, which is most easily seen on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography or operative pancreatography. If pancreatic injury is suspected, inspection of the entire pancreas and duodenum is required to ensure full evaluation at laparotomy. The operative management of pancreatic injury depends on the grade of injury found at laparotomy. The most important prognostic factor is main duct disruption and, if found, reconstructive options should be determined by an experienced HPB surgeon. The diagnosis of pancreatic trauma requires a high index of suspicion and detailed imaging studies. Grading pancreatic injury is important to guide operative management. The most important prognostic factor is pancreatic duct disruption and in these cases

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorin Dajčman

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autoimmune pancreatitis is a recently described type of pancreatitis of presumed autoimmune etiology. Autoimmune pancreatitis is often misdiagnosed as pancreatic cancer difficult, since their clinical presentations are often similar. The concept of autoimmune pancreatitis was first published in 1961. Since then, autoimmune pancreatitis has often been treated not as an independent clinical entity but rather as a manifestation of systemic disease. The overall prevalence and incidence of the disease have yet to be determined, but three series have reported the prevalence as between 5 and 6 % of all patients with chronic pancreatitis. Patient vary widely in age, but most are older than 50 years. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis usually complain of the painless jaundice, mild abdominal pain and weight loss. There is no laboratory hallmark of the disease, even if cholestatic profiles of liver dysfunction with only mild elevation of amylase and lipase levels have been reported.Conclusions: Proposed diagnostic criteria contains: (1 radiologic imaging, diffuse enlargement of the pancreas and diffusely irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct, (2 laboratory data, elevated levels of serum ã-globulin and/or IgG, specially IgG4, or the presence of autoantibodies and (3 histopathologic examination, fibrotic change with dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltration in the pancreas. For correct diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis, criterion 1 must be present with criterion 2 and/or 3. Autoimmune pancreatitis is frequently associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren’s syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, tubulointersticial nephritis, primary sclerosing cholangitis and idiopathic retroperitoneal fibrosis. Pancreatic biopsy using an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy is the most important diagnostic method today. Treatment with corticosteroids leads to the and resolution of pancreatic inflamation, obstruction and

  19. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zen, Yoh; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2011-12-07

    Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP) has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney) and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of regulatory T-cells are assumed

  20. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  1. Hypothermia-Related Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyawzaw Lin

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is an inflammatory disease presenting from mild localized inflammation to severe infected necrotic pancreatic tissue. In the literature, there are a few cases of hypothermia-induced AP. However, the association between hypothermia and AP is still a myth. Generally, mortality from acute pancreatitis is nearly 3–6%. Here, we present a 40-year-old chronic alcoholic female who presented with acute pancreatitis induced by transient hypothermia. A 40-year-old chronic alcoholic female was hypothermic at 81°F on arrival which was improved to 91.7°F with warming blanket and then around 97°F in 8 h. Laboratory tests including complete blood count, lipid panel, and comprehensive metabolic panels were within the normal limit. Serum alcohol level was 0.01, amylase 498, lipase 1,200, ammonia 26, serum carboxyhemoglobin level 2.4, and β-HCG was negative. The entire sepsis workup was negative. During rewarming period, she had one episode of witnessed generalized tonic-clonic seizure. It was followed by transient hypotension. Fluid challenge was successful with 2 L of normal saline. Sonogram (abdomen showed fatty liver and trace ascites. CAT scan (abdomen and pelvis showed evidence of acute pancreatitis without necrosis, peripancreatic abscess, pancreatic mass, or radiopaque gallstones. The patient was managed medically and later discharged from the hospital on the 4th day as she tolerated a normal low-fat diet. In our patient, transient hypothermia from chronic alcohol abuse and her social circumstances might predispose to microcirculatory disturbance resulting in acute pancreatitis. Early and aggressive fluid resuscitation prevents complications.

  2. Juxta-Ampullary Intraluminal Diverticulum and Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Echenique-Elizondo M

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis is usually due to well-known causes, such as biliary lithiasis and alcohol consumption. Anatomic abnormalities may represent a less frequent but important etiological factor. CASE REPORT: The case of a 27 year old women complaining of acute pancreatitis associated with a large duodenal juxta-papillary diverticulum is presented. CONCLUSIONS: Anatomic causes of pancreatitis must be considered in the diagnosis of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  3. Chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis, therapy and follow-up results; Chronische Pankreatitis. Diagnostik, Therapie und Langzeitergebnisse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moessner, J. [Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik 2, Zentrum fuer Innere Medizin, Univ. Leipzig (Germany)

    1996-09-01

    The incidence of chronic pancreatitis is increasing in industrialized countries due to the steady increase of alcohol abuse. The pathogenesis of this disease is still incompletely understood. A cure is not possible. The knowledge of the patients history and a thorough clinical investigation together with the availability of a wide array of laboratory tests and imaging procedures enable the physician to characterize the stage of the disease. Exact knowledge of the present pancreatic morphology, potential complications of the disease, and knowledge about the present exocrine and endocrine function capacity are prerequisites for adequate therapeutic decision making. The therapeutic possibilities include termination of alcohol abuse, various options of treatment of pain according to the various pathogenetic possibilities leading to pain, pancreatic digestive enzyme supplementation, treatment of diabetes, and either endoscopic or surgical treatments of complications of the disease. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Inzidenz der chronischen Pankreatitis nimmt in den Industrienationen aufgrund der Zunahme des Alkoholabusus an Haeufigkeit zu. Die Diagnose der chronischen Pankreatitis wird oft spaet gestellt. Eine Heilung ist noch nicht moeglich. Eine detailierte Anamnese, Beurteilung der Klinik, Laborparameter, Pankreasfunktionsanalysen und eine ganze Palette unterschiedlicher bildgebender Verfahren ermoeglichen eine Charakterisierung des jeweiligen Krankheitszustandes. Dies ist die Voraussetzung zur differenzierten Einleitung einer medikamentoesen und/oder interventionellen endoskopischen und/oder chirurgischen Therapie. Wie bei jedem nicht heilbaren chronischen Krankheitsbild ist eine stadiengerechte Therapie erforderlich. (orig.)

  4. TRAUMATIC PANCREATITIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berne, Clarence J.; Walters, Robert L.

    1953-01-01

    Traumatic pancreatitis should be considered as a diagnostic possibility when trauma to the epigastrium is followed by phenomena suggestive of intra-abdominal injury. The presence or absence of hyperamylasemia should be established immediately. Even when traumatic pancreatitis is believed to exist, any suggestion of injury to other viscera should indicate laparotomy. Retroperitoneal rupture of the duodenum may simulate traumatic pancreatitis in all respects, including hyperamylasemia. X-ray studies may be of value in differentiation. Non-complicated traumatic pancreatitis is best treated conservatively. Gunshot and knife wounds of the pancreas should be drained. PMID:13094537

  5. Pancreatitis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Biradar, Vishnu; Ramaswamy, Ganesh; Srinivas, S; Ashish, B; Sumathi, B; Nirmala, D; Geetha, M

    2016-11-01

    Pancreatic disease in children has a wide clinical spectrum and may present as Acute pancreatitis (AP), Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP), Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and Pancreatic disease without pancreatitis. This article highlights the etiopathogenesis and management of pancreatitis in children along with clinical data from five tertiary care hospitals in south India [Chennai (3), Cochin and Pune].

  6. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. PMID:28404095

  7. Relação lipase/amilase nas pancreatites agudas de causa biliar e nas pancreatites agudas/crônicas agudizadas de causa alcoólica Lipase/amylase ratio in biliary acute pancreatitis and alcoholic acute/acutized chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Custódio Pacheco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Pancreatites agudas de causas alcoólica ou biliar podem necessitar de abordagens terapêuticas diferentes. OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade da relação lipase/amilase em diferenciar as causas alcoólica ou biliar na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes com pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica, todos homens, com idade média (desvio padrão de 39,8 ± 7,0 anos (grupo I e 29 com pancreatite aguda biliar, sendo 8 homens e 21 mulheres, com idade média de 43,6 ± 19,9 anos (grupo II. As amilasemias e lipasemias foram determinadas em pacientes com sintomatologia há, no máximo, 48 horas. A relação lipase/amilase foi calculada utilizando-se valores de amilasemia e lipasemia expressas como múltiplos de seus respectivos valores superiores de referência. RESULTADOS: As médias das lipasemias (4.814 ± 3.670 U/L e amilasemias (1.282 ± 777 U/L no grupo I foram semelhantes às do grupo II (2.697 ± 2.391 e 1.878 ± 1.319 U/L, respectivamente, mas a média das relações lipase/amilase foi significantemente maior no grupo I (4,4 ± 3,6 do que no grupo II (2,2 ± 2,2. Relação lipase/amilase >3 foi significantemente mais freqüente no grupo I (66,7% do que no grupo II (24,1% e diferenciou os dois grupos com sensibilidade de 67% e especificidade de 76%. CONCLUSÕES: 1 as amilasemias e lipasemias não diferenciaram os dois grupos avaliados; 2 relação lipase/amilase >3 é mais freqüente na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica do que na pancreatite aguda biliar, e pode ser útil na diferenciação destas duas causas de pancreatite.BACKGROUND: Alcoholic or biliary acute pancreatitis may need different therapeutic approaches. AIM: Assessing the validity of lipase/amylase ratio in differentiating biliary from alcoholic acute pancreatitis/acutized chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Nine male patients (mean age and standard deviation: 39.8 ± 7.0 years

  8. An Unusual Case of Colon Perforation Complicating Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony A. Aghenta

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications of severe acute pancreatitis occur rarely. Although there have been several theories on how pancreatic pseudocysts rupture into the colon, the exact pathogenesis remains unknown. We report an unusual case of pseudocysts complicating severe acute pancreatitis presenting with colonic perforation in a 71-year-old man with a history of chronic mesenteric ischemia. Pressure effects from a giant pseudocyst and intravascular volume depletion with acute insult on chronic mesenteric ischemia are highlighted as possible etiologic factors.

  9. Proteomics portrait of archival lesions of chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Pan

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the pancreas. The etiology is multi-fold, but all lead to progressive scarring and loss of pancreatic function. Early diagnosis is difficult; and the understanding of the molecular events that underlie this progressive disease is limited. In this study, we investigated differential proteins associated with mild and severe chronic pancreatitis in comparison with normal pancreas and pancreatic cancer. Paraffin-embedded formalin-fixed tissues from five well-characterized specimens each of normal pancreas (NL, mild chronic pancreatitis (MCP, severe chronic pancreatitis (SCP and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC were subjected to proteomic analysis using a "label-free" comparative approach. Our results show that the numbers of differential proteins increase substantially with the disease severity, from mild to severe chronic pancreatitis, while the number of dysregulated proteins is highest in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Important functional groups and biological processes associated with chronic pancreatitis and cancer include acinar cell secretory proteins, pancreatic fibrosis/stellate cell activation, glycoproteins, and inflammatory proteins. Three differential proteins were selected for verification by immunohistochemistry, including collagen 14A1, lumican and versican. Further canonical pathway analysis revealed that acute phase response signal, prothrombin activation pathway, and pancreatic fibrosis/pancreatic stellate cell activation pathway were the most significant pathways involved in chronic pancreatitis, while pathways relating to metabolism were the most significant pathways in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study reveals a group of differentially expressed proteins and the related pathways that may shed light on the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and the common molecular events associated with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  10. Hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma. A clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, R E; Lynch, H T

    2000-05-01

    Although the total number of patients in these various high-risk groups is relatively small, they nevertheless provide excellent models for studying the cause, natural history, pathogenesis, and treatment of pancreatic cancer. These patients would also benefit greatly from procedures capable of detecting cancer at an early stage. This knowledge would be useful for the much commoner sporadic form of pancreatic cancer, in which diagnosis is almost always late and prognosis fatal. With early diagnosis, surgical resection before the cancer's extension beyond the organ's anatomic confines could be curative. The establishment of a National Familial Pancreatic Cancer Registry is essential and would increase the availability of these invaluable families for medical research.

  11. A case of insulinoma with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: Roles of hyperphagia and hyperinsulinemia in pathogenesis of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokutan, Mariyo; Yabe, Daisuke; Komoto, Izumi; Kurose, Takeshi; Kawai, Jun; Nakamura, Takefumi; Imamura, Masayuki; Seino, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a serious health-related condition all over the world; the number of patients is increasing in Asian countries including Japan. Better understanding of its pathophysiology is required to develop effective therapeutics, as patients may go on to develop non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and hepatocellular carcinomas. While NAFLD is believed to be associated with metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes, and dyslipidemia, its etiology remains largely unknown and the development or co-existence of NAFLD in patients with insulinoma has not been investigated. A 33-year-old male with an insulinoma, who had been hypoglycemic during the previous four years, developed abnormally elevated levels of liver enzymes and histological fatty liver characteristic of NAFLD by the time of admission to our hospital for resection of an insulinoma. His medical records for the previous eight years revealed that his bodyweight had increased gradually from 60 kg to 71 kg for seven years and then acutely increased to 79 kg in the latest one-year period. This sudden increase was thought to be due to the patient's self-described overeating of fruits to forestall hypoglycemia. Fresh fruits are rich in fructose, and the patient's triglycerides, alanine and aspartate transaminases showed an acute increase in the previous one-year period. After resection of the insulinoma, the levels of these parameters all were mostly restored, which suggests that hyperinsulinemia and subsequent hyperphagia played a role in the development of NAFLD in this case. This is the first report of patient with NAFLD and an insulinoma.

  12. Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... BACK Contact Us DONATE NOW GENERAL DONATION PURPLESTRIDE Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Home Facing Pancreatic Cancer Living with Pancreatic Cancer Diet and Nutrition Nutrition Following Pancreatic Surgery Ver esta página en ...

  13. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... Acute Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Childhood Inherited Disorders Pancreatic Cancer Pancreatic Cancer Risks and ...

  14. Relationship between the exocrine and endocrine pancreas after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Stephanie L M; Kennedy, James I C; Murphy, Rinki; Phillips, Anthony R J; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-12-07

    . Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency occurs in 40% of individuals with newly diagnosed prediabetes or diabetes mellitus after acute pancreatitis. Further studies are needed to investigate the pathogenesis of diabetes in this setting.

  15. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  16. Radiologic evaluation of pancreatic pseudocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, T. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Hong, I. S.; Kim, M. S.; Sung, K. J. [Yeonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a collection of necrotic tissue, old blood and secretions that escaped from the pancreas damaged by pancreatitis, trauma and chronic alcoholism. There is no epithelial cell lining the cystic wall. With the advent of ultrasound and CT more accurate diagnosis can be made. Our study was carried out to analyse the radiological and clinical findings of 32 cases of pancreatic pseudocysts confirmed at Wonju College of Medicine Yonsei University from Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1986. The results are as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 4.3:1 Incidence was the most common in 4th decades. 2. The most frequent symptom was epigastric pain (100%). 3. In a total of 32 cases, 15 cases had a underlying cause of pancreatitis, 9 cases abdominal trauma. 4. In laboratory findings, serum amylase level was elevated in 23 cases, leucocytosis in 10 cases. 5. On chest films, the lungs were mostly normal. Soft tissue mass density in 12 cases was the most common finding on abdomen films. 6. UGI series were helpful in directing attention by pancreatic pseudocysts' location and size. 7. Ultrasonogram using primary procedure for the detection of pseudocyst (23 cases) disclosed anechoic lesion in 8 cases, mixed echo lesion in 15 cases. Mixed echo patterns, in terms of internal echo patters, were echogenic spots (8 cases), septation and echogenic spots (3 cases), fluid-fluid level (3 cases), etc. 8. CT scanning is the best imaging procedure, providing detailed morphologic information about the pancreatic pseudocyst and surrounding tissue.

  17. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  18. A Suspicious Pancreatic Mass in Chronic Pancreatitis: Pancreatic Actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. de Clerck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a chronic infection of the pancreas caused by the suppurative Gram-positive bacterium Actinomyces. It has mostly been described in patients following repeated main pancreatic duct stenting in the context of chronic pancreatitis or following pancreatic surgery. This type of pancreatitis is often erroneously interpreted as pancreatic malignancy due to the specific invasive characteristics of Actinomyces. Case. A 64-year-old male with a history of chronic pancreatitis and repeated main pancreatic duct stenting presented with weight loss, fever, night sweats, and abdominal pain. CT imaging revealed a mass in the pancreatic tail, invading the surrounding tissue and resulting in splenic vein thrombosis. Resectable pancreatic cancer was suspected, and pancreatic tail resection was performed. Postoperative findings revealed pancreatic actinomycosis instead of neoplasia. Conclusion. Pancreatic actinomycosis is a rare type of infectious pancreatitis that should be included in the differential diagnosis when a pancreatic mass is discovered in a patient with chronic pancreatitis and prior main pancreatic duct stenting. Our case emphasizes the importance of pursuing a histomorphological confirmation.

  19. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  20. [Pancreatic trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvieux, C; Guillon, F; Létoublon, Ch; Oughriss, M

    2003-10-01

    Early diagnosis of pancreatic trauma has always been challenging because of the lack of correlation between the initial clinical symptomatology, radiologic and laboratory findings, and the severity of the injury. Thanks to the improved performance of spiral CT scanning and magnetic resonance pancreatography, it is now often possible to make an early diagnosis of pancreatic contusion, to localize the site of the injury, and (most importantly) to identify injury to the main pancreatic duct which has major implications for the management of the case. When the trauma victim is unstable, radiologic work-up may be impossible and urgent laparotomy is required. Control of hemorrhage is the primary concern here and a damage control approach with packing may be appropriate; if the pancreatic head has been destroyed, a pancreaticoduodenectomy with delayed reconstruction may be required. If the trauma victim is stable, the treatment strategy will be governed by a variety of parameters--age, clinical condition, associated local anatomic findings (pancreatitis, injury to the duodenum or biliary tract), involvement of the pancreatic duct, and localization of the injury within the gland (to right or left of the mesenteric vessels).

  1. Pharmacologic therapy for acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambhampati, Swetha; Park, Walter; Habtezion, Aida

    2014-01-01

    While conservative management such as fluid, bowel rest, and antibiotics is the mainstay of current acute pancreatitis management, there is a lot of promise in pharmacologic therapies that target various aspects of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Extensive review of preclinical studies, which include assessment of therapies such as anti-secretory agents, protease inhibitors, anti-inflammatory agents, and anti-oxidants are discussed. Many of these studies have shown therapeutic benefit and improved survival in experimental models. Based on available preclinical studies, we discuss potential novel targeted pharmacologic approaches that may offer promise in the treatment of acute pancreatitis. To date a variety of clinical studies have assessed the translational potential of animal model effective experimental therapies and have shown either failure or mixed results in human studies. Despite these discouraging clinical studies, there is a great clinical need and there exist several preclinical effective therapies that await investigation in patients. Better understanding of acute pancreatitis pathophysiology and lessons learned from past clinical studies are likely to offer a great foundation upon which to expand future therapies in acute pancreatitis. PMID:25493000

  2. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  3. Extraperitoneal Fluid Collection due to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeo Yasuda

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A 39-year-old man was referred to our hospital for the investigation of abdominal fluid collection. He was pointed out to have alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Laboratory data showed inflammation and slightly elevated serum direct bilirubin and amylase. An abdominal computed tomography demonstrated huge fluid collection, multiple pancreatic pseudocysts and pancreatic calcification. The fluid showed a high level of amylase at 4,490 IU/l. Under the diagnosis of pancreatic ascites, endoscopic pancreatic stent insertion was attempted but was unsuccessful, so surgical treatment (Frey procedure and cystojejunostomy was performed. During the operation, a huge amount of fluid containing bile acid (amylase at 1,474 IU/l and bilirubin at 13.5 mg/dl was found to exist in the extraperitoneal space (over the peritoneum, but no ascites was found. His postoperative course was uneventful and he shows no recurrence of the fluid. Pancreatic ascites is thought to result from the disruption of the main pancreatic duct, the rupture of a pancreatic pseudocyst, or possibly leakage from an unknown site. In our extremely rare case, the pancreatic pseudocyst penetrated into the hepatoduodenal ligament with communication to the common bile duct, and the fluid flowed into the round ligament of the liver and next into the extraperitoneal space.

  4. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun eGong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1, and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy.

  5. Progression from acute to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Becker, Ulrik; Matzen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population....... In Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  6. Targeting pancreatic expressed PAX genes for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro; Lorenzo, Petra I; López-Noriega, Livia; Gauthier, Benoit R

    2017-01-01

    Four members of the PAX family, PAX2, PAX4, PAX6 and PAX8 are known to be expressed in the pancreas. Accumulated evidences indicate that several pancreatic expressed PAX genes play a significant role in pancreatic development/functionality and alterations in these genes are involved in the pathogenesis of pancreatic diseases. Areas covered: In this review, we summarize the ongoing research related to pancreatic PAX genes in diabetes mellitus and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. We dissect the current knowledge at different levels; from mechanistic studies in cell lines performed to understand the molecular processes controlled by pancreatic PAX genes, to in vivo studies using rodent models that over-express or lack specific PAX genes. Finally, we describe human studies associating variants on pancreatic-expressed PAX genes with pancreatic diseases. Expert opinion: Based on the current literature, we propose that future interventions to treat pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and diabetes mellitus could be developed via the modulation of PAX4 and/or PAX6 regulated pathways.

  7. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  8. Pancreatic cancer: any prospects for prevention?

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, A.

    1999-01-01

    Primary prevention of pancreatic cancer and public health measures to reduce its incidence are dependent on data from epidemiological studies. Currently, the only definite risk factor is smoking, although a diet rich in fruit and vegetables may be protective. The K-ras mutation may have a role in diagnosis and screening.


Keywords: pancreatic cancer; epidemiology; risk factors; smoking; diet; alcohol

  9. Pancreatic pseudocysts. Radiological and ultrasonographic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contrera, J.D.; Uemura, L.; Palma, J.K.; Souza, L.P. de; Ferraz, L.R.L.; Magalhaes, P.J.A. (Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    Radiological and ultrasonographic studies of ten patients with surgically confirmed pancreatic pseudocysts were reviewed. All of them were male, with previous story of chronic alcoholism and clinical evidences of pancreatitis. The most important radiological finding consisted of a mass opacifying the epigastrium, displacing the stomach and bowel loops. ultrasound studies showed that the lesions were predominantly cystic, rounded or oval-shaped with smooth or irregular contours and of various sizes.

  10. Short article: Presence, extent and location of pancreatic necrosis are independent of aetiology in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdonk, Robert C; Sternby, Hanna; Dimova, Alexandra; Ignatavicius, Povilas; Koiva, Peter; Penttila, Anne K; Ilzarbe, Lucas; Regner, Sara; Rosendahl, Jonas; Bollen, Thomas L

    2018-03-01

    The most common aetiologies of acute pancreatitis (AP) are gallstones, alcohol and idiopathic. The impact of the aetiology of AP on the extent and morphology of pancreatic and extrapancreatic necrosis (EXPN) has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of aetiology on the presence and location of pancreatic necrosis in patients with AP. We carried out a post-hoc analysis of a previously established multicentre cohort of patients with AP in whom a computed tomography was available for review. Clinical data were obtained from the medical records. All computed tomographies were revised by the same expert radiologist. The impact of aetiology on pancreatic and EXPN was calculated. In total, 159 patients with necrotizing pancreatitis were identified from a cohort of 285 patients. The most frequent aetiologies were biliary (105 patients, 37%), followed by alcohol (102 patients, 36%) and other aetiologies including idiopathic (78 patients, 27%). No relationship was found between the aetiology and the presence of pancreatic necrosis, EXPN, location of pancreatic necrosis or presence of collections. We found no association between the aetiology of AP and the presence, extent and anatomical location of pancreatic necrosis.

  11. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eKolodecik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  12. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-10-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis may be at an increased risk of low bone density because of malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium, poor diet, pain, alcoholism, and smoking. We investigated the rates of osteoporosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis compared to matched controls.

  13. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Endosonography of groove pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tio, T. L.; Luiken, G. J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis. Distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is often difficult. Two cases of groove pancreatitis diagnosed by endosonography are described. A hypoechoic pattern between the duodenal wall and pancreas was clearly imaged in both

  15. Autoimmune Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Shounak; Takahashi, Naoki; Chari, Suresh T

    2017-07-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic fibroinflammatory disease of the pancreas that belongs to the spectrum of immunoglobulin G-subclass4-related diseases (IgG4-RD) and typically presents with obstructive jaundice. Idiopathic duct-centric pancreatitis (IDCP) is a closely related but distinct disease that mimics AIP radiologically but manifests clinically most commonly as recurrent acute pancreatitis in young individuals with concurrent inflammatory bowel disease. IgG4 levels are often elevated in AIP and normal in IDCP. Histologically, lymphoplasmacytic acinar inflammation and storiform fibrosis are seen in both. In addition, the histologic hallmark of IDCP is the granulocyte epithelial lesion: intraluminal and intraepithelial neutrophils in medium-sized and small ducts with or without granulocytic acinar inflammation often associated with destruction of ductal architecture. Initial treatment of both AIP and IDCP is with oral corticosteroids for duration of 4 weeks followed by a gradual taper. Relapses are common in AIP and relatively uncommon in IDCP, a relatively rare disease for which the natural history is not well understood. For patients with relapsing AIP, treatment with immunomodulators and more recently rituximab has been recommended. Although rare instances of pancreaticobiliary malignancy has been reported in patients with AIP, overall the lifetime risk of developing pancreatic cancer does not appear to be elevated.

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavrecka, A.; Bilicky, J.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an ongoing inflammatory process that may over time lead to mal digestion, malabsorption and diabetic syndrome. Identification of risk (etiological) factors based on classifications TIGAR-O or later M-ANNHEIM. These factors (environmental and / or genetic) leads to failure of the stability of the digestive and lysosomal enzymes in the acinar cells, resulting in premature activation of digestive enzymes in the pancreas, and repeated nekroinflamation and fibrosis. The incidence has of the upward trend. Clinically the disease manifests itself in most cases with pain and possibly with nonspecific dyspeptic troubles. Decisive role in the diagnosis playing imaging methods, trans abdominal ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic cholangiopancretography and foremost endoscopic ultrasonography, which has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography is currently regarded as a method for therapy, not for diagnosis. Less importance is now attached to a functional test. Symptomatic treatment is usually conservative. Abstinence is necessary, easily digestible, but calorie-rich diet with reduced fat. Most patients needed treatment with analgesics. In case of insufficient effect of analgesics is necessary to consider endoscopic therapy or surgery. If the external secretory insufficiency is present are served pancreatic extracts. Diabetic syndrome requires insulin delivery. Generally, chronic pancreatitis is a disease treatable but incurable. Proportion of patients are also dying of pancreatic cancer. (author)

  17. Frequency of Tabagism and N34S and P55S Mutations of Serine Peptidase Inhibitor, Kazal Type 1 (SPINK1) and R254W Mutation of Chymotrypsin C (CTRC) in Patients With Chronic Pancreatitis and Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Marianges Zadrozny Gouvêa; Pires, Júlia Glória Lucatelli; Nasser, Paulo Dominguez; Ferreira, Camila da Silva; Teixeira, Ana Cristina de Sá; Paranaguá-Vezozzo, Denise Cerqueira; Guarita, Dulce Reis; Carrilho, Flair José; Ono, Suzane Kioko

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between chronic pancreatitis and smoking or genetic mutations. The study sample comprised 148 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 110 chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatic disease, and 297 volunteer blood donors. Of the patients with chronic pancreatitis, 74% had alcoholic etiology and 26% had idiopathic pancreatitis. The frequency of smoking was 91.4% in patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, higher than 73.3% in alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis (P pancreatitis and blood donors. The N34S mutation of serine peptidase inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) was found in 2.7% of patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, in 5.3% of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.02). The P55S mutation of SPINK1 was found in 2.7% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and in 0.7% of blood donors (P = 0.12). The R254W mutation of chymotrypsin C was found in 0.9% of patients with alcoholic pancreatitis, in 0.9% of chronic alcoholic subjects without pancreatitis, and in 0.4% of blood donors (P = 0.75). In all cases, the mutations were heterozygous. Smoking and the N34S mutation of SPINK1 were positively correlated with chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...

  19. Mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 are strongly associated with chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Drenth, J P H; te Morsche, R; Jansen, J B M J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Although chronic pancreatitis is associated with risk factors such as alcoholism, hyperparathyroidism, and hypertriglyceridaemia, little is known of the actual aetiology of the disease. It is thought that inappropriate activation of trypsinogen causes pancreatitis, and indeed in cases of hereditary pancreatitis mutations of cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) have been described. As serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) is a potent natural inhibitor of pancreatic trypsin activi...

  20. Chronic pancreatitis: a changing etiology or a gap in technological medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Bahajat Barakat

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol is considered the most important risk factor for the development of chronic pancreatitis. The possibility of evaluating CFTR mutations and the discovery of other gene mutations has led to a better evaluation of the familiar/hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis and the identification of autoimmune pancreatitis has further improved our knowledge of the disease. However, recent studies on chronic pancreatitis on a worldwide level reveal an increase in the idiopathic forms of the dise...

  1. An Exploratory Study on the Development of an Animal Model of Acute Pancreatitis Following Nicotine Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhury P

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking is known to be a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer and pancreatitis is believed to be a predisposed condition for pancreatic cancer. As of this date, there is no established experimental animal model to conduct detailed studies on these two deadly diseases. Our aim is to establish a rodent model by which we can systematically study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Methods Adult Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to graded doses of nicotine by various routes for periods of three to 16 weeks. Blood samples were measured for hormonal and metabolic parameters. The pancreas was evaluated for histopathological changes and its function was assessed in isolated pancreatic acini upon stimulation with cholecystokinin (CCK or carbachol (Cch. The pancreatic tissue was evaluated further for oncogene expression. Results Body weight, food and fluid intakes, plasma glucose and insulin levels were significantly reduced in animals with nicotine exposure when compared to control. However, CCK and gastrin levels in the blood were significantly elevated. Pancreatic function was decreased significantly with no alteration in CCK receptor binding. Pancreatic histology revealed vacuolation, swelling, cellular pyknosis and karyorrhexis. Mutant oncogene, H-ras, was overexpressed in nicotine-treated pancreatic tissue. Summary and conclusion The results suggest that alterations in metabolic, hormonal and pathologic parameters following nicotine-treatment appear consistent with diagnostic criteria of human pancreatitis. It is proposed that rats could be considered as a potential animal model to study the pathogenesis of pancreatitis.

  2. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... E-News Sign-Up Home Patient Information Children/Pediatric Chronic Pancreatitis in Children Chronic Pancreatitis in Children What symptoms would my child have? Frequent or chronic abdominal pain is the most common symptom of pancreatitis. The ...

  3. Targeting Trysin-Inflammation Axis for Pancreatitis Therapy in a Humanized Pancreatitis Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing...relatively small portion of patients with alcohol abuse and smoking develop pancreatitis, it is very likely that there are genetic underlying predisposing...factors that have not been discovered that explain why certain individuals develop pancreatitis. A genetic defect in the trypsinogen gene (PRSS1

  4. Management of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency: Australasian Pancreatic Club recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toouli, James; Biankin, Andrew V; Oliver, Mark R; Pearce, Callum B; Wilson, Jeremy S; Wray, Nicholas H

    2010-10-18

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) occurs when the amounts of enzymes secreted into the duodenum in response to a meal are insufficient to maintain normal digestive processes. The main clinical consequence of PEI is fat maldigestion and malabsorption, resulting in steatorrhoea. Pancreatic exocrine function is commonly assessed by conducting a 3-day faecal fat test and by measuring levels of faecal elastase-1 and serum trypsinogen. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy is the mainstay of treatment for PEI. In adults, the initial recommended dose of pancreatic enzymes is 25,000 units of lipase per meal, titrating up to a maximum of 80,000 units of lipase per meal. In infants and children, the initial recommended dose of pancreatic enzymes is 500 units of lipase per gram of dietary fat; the maximum daily dose should not exceed 10,000 units of lipase per kilogram of bodyweight. Oral pancreatic enzymes should be taken with meals to ensure adequate mixing with the chyme. Adjunct therapy with acid-suppressing agents may be useful in patients who continue to experience symptoms of PEI despite high-dose enzyme therapy. A dietitian experienced in treating PEI should be involved in patient management. Dietary fat restriction is not recommended for patients with PEI. Patients with PEI should be encouraged to consume small, frequent meals and to abstain from alcohol. Medium-chain triglycerides do not provide any clear nutritional advantage over long-chain triglycerides, but can be trialled in patients who fail to gain or to maintain adequate bodyweight in order to increase energy intake.

  5. Recurrent acute pancreatitis in anorexia and bulimia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Luc G; Stephenson, Kathryn E; Herring, Sharon; Marti, Jennifer L

    2004-07-01

    Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol for many years. Imaging studies during all three admissions failed to identify any biliary disease, including gallstones or biliary sludge. A cholecystectomy was performed, with a normal intraoperative cholangiogram, and no abnormalities on pathologic examination of the gallbladder and bile. The patient was discharged on hospital day 10 with no pain, and she has begun to return to regular eating habits. Pancreatitis has not recurred after 6 months of follow up. We have identified 14 cases in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with anorexia or bulimia. In the absence of evidence for gallstone, alcohol or metabolic etiologies, eating disorders may contribute to the pathophysiology of some idiopathic cases of pancreatitis.

  6. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... the liver, brain, and other organs. Drinking during pregnancy can harm your baby. Alcohol also increases the ...

  7. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Sang Wook; Kim, Suk; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon; Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2009-01-01

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  8. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Sang Wook [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  9. Acute recurrent pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) refers to a clinical entity characterized by episodes of acute pancreatitis which occurs on more than one occasion. Recurrence of pancreatitis generally occurs in a setting of normal morpho-functional gland, however, an established chronic disease may be found either on the occasion of the first episode of pancreatitis or during the follow-up. The aetiology of ARP can be identified in the majority of patients. Most common causes include common bile duct stones or sludge and bile crystals; sphincter of oddi dysfunction; anatomical ductal variants interfering with pancreatic juice outflow; obstruction of the main pancreatic duct or pancreatico-biliary junction; genetic mutations; alcohol consumption. However, despite diagnostic technologies, the aetiology of ARP still remains unknown in up to 30% of cases: in these cases the term “idiopathic” is used. Because occult bile stone disease and sphincter of oddi dysfunction account for the majority of cases, cholecystectomy, and eventually the endoscopic biliary and/or pancreatic sphincterotomy are curative in most of cases. Endoscopic biliary sphincterotomy appeared to be a curative procedure per se in about 80% of patients. Ursodeoxycholic acid oral treatment alone has also been reported effective for treatment of biliary sludge. In uncertain cases toxin botulin injection may help in identifying some sphincter of oddi dysfunction, but this treatment is not widely used. In the last twenty years, pancreatic endotherapy has been proven effective in cases of recurrent pancreatitis depending on pancreatic ductal obstruction, independently from the cause of obstruction, and has been widely used instead of more aggressive approaches. PMID:25493002

  10. Biliary and pancreatic secretions in abdominal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becciolini, A.; Cionini, L.; Cappellini, M.; Atzeni, G.

    1979-01-01

    The biliary and pancreatic secretions have been determined in patients given pelvic or para-aortic irradiation, with a dose of 50 Gy in the former group and between 36 and 40 Gy in the latter. A test meal containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) as reference substance was used. Each sample of the duodenal content was assayed for volume, PEG content, amylase and trypsin activity, pH and biliary secretion. No significant modifications of biliary and pancreatic secretions were demonstrated after irradiation, suggesting that these functions are not involved in the pathogenesis of the malabsorption radiation syndrome. (Auth.)

  11. PANCREATIC CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alojz Pleskovič

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. The pancreatic cancer is quite common malignant tumor of gastointestinal tract and its incidence is increasing in well developed part of the world. Despite of all advanced diagnostic methods the disease is in most cases recognised too late when the tumor is not resectable.Conclusions. Only in 20–30% of patients with pancreatic cancer surgical resection is possible, and even in this group 5year survival is very low. In the patients where the tumor is not resectable, sometimes only palliative procedures are indicated and sometimes only simptomatic therapy is possible. The average survival period in this group of patients is 12–20 months. Adjuvant chemo and radiotherapy has not shown much of benefit and the prognosis is still very bad.

  12. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant Saraogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swollen and echogenic pancreas, loss of peripancreatic fat plane and pancreatic duct was not dilated. Vildagliptin was stopped and the pancreatits resolved. On Follow up, no secondary cause was not identified. This appears to be the first reported case of acute pancreatitis from India probably attributable to use of vildagliptin, thus raising the possibility that this rare reaction may be a class effect of the DPP-4 inhibitors.

  13. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  14. Issues in Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis - An Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, John; Singh, Vijay; Pitchumoni, C. S; Yadav, Dhiraj

    2014-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well established but underestimated cause of acute (AP) and recurrent AP (RAP). The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis (HTG pancreatitis) is similar to other causes. Pancreatitis secondary to HTG is typically seen in the presence of one or more secondary factors (uncontrolled diabetes, alcoholism, medications, pregnancy) in a patient with an underlying common genetic abnormality of lipoprotein metabolism (Familial combined hyperlipidemia or Familial HTG). Less commonly, a patient with rare genetic abnormality (Familial chylomicronemic syndrome) with or without an additional secondary factor is encountered. The risk of AP in patients with serum triglycerides >1000 mg/dl and >2000 mg/dl is ∼5% and 10-20% respectively. It is not clear whether HTG pancreatitis is more severe than when it is due to other causes. Clinical management of HTG pancreatitis is similar to that of other causes. Insulin infusion in diabetic patients with HTG can rapidly reduce triglyceride levels. Use of apheresis is still experimental and better designed studies are needed to clarify its role in management of HTG pancreatitis. Diet, lifestyle changes, control of secondary factors are key to the treatment and medications are useful adjuncts to long term management of triglyceride levels. Control of triglyceride levels to well below 500 mg/dl can effectively prevent recurrences of pancreatitis. PMID:24172179

  15. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract : Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  16. Incretin-based therapy and risk of acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Pedersen, Lars; Møller, Niels

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of incretin-based drugs (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4] inhibitors) is associated with acute pancreatitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was a nationwide population-based case-control study using medical databases...... in Denmark. Participants were 12,868 patients with a first-time hospitalization for acute pancreatitis between 2005 and 2012 and a population of 128,680 matched control subjects. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for acute pancreatitis associated with different antihyperglycemic drugs. We...... adjusted for history of gallstones, alcoholism, obesity, and other pancreatitis-associated comorbidities and medications. RESULTS: A total of 89 pancreatitis patients (0.69%) and 684 control subjects (0.53%) were ever users of incretins. The crude OR for acute pancreatitis among incretin users was 1.36 (95...

  17. Surgical management of failed endoscopic treatment of pancreatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Kimberly A; Clark, Colby W; Vogel, Stephen B; Behrns, Kevin E

    2008-11-01

    Endoscopic therapy of acute and chronic pancreatitis has decreased the need for operative intervention. However, a significant proportion of patients treated endoscopically require definitive surgical management for persistent symptoms. Our aim was to determine which patients are likely to fail with endoscopic therapy, and to assess the clinical outcome of surgical management. Patients were identified using ICD-9 codes for pancreatic disease as well as CPT codes for endoscopic therapy followed by surgery. Patients with documented acute or chronic pancreatitis treated endoscopically prior to surgical therapy were included (N = 88). The majority of patients (65%) exhibited chronic pancreatitis due to alcohol abuse. Common indicators for surgery were: persistent symptoms, anatomy not amenable to endoscopic treatment and unresolved common bile duct or pancreatic duct strictures. Surgical salvage procedures included internal drainage of a pseudocyst or an obstructed pancreatic duct (46%), debridement of peripancreatic fluid collections (25%), and pancreatic resection (31%). Death occurred in 3% of patients. The most common complications were hemorrhage (16%), wound infection (13%), and pulmonary complications (11%). Chronic pancreatitis with persistent symptoms is the most common reason for pancreatic surgery following endoscopic therapy. Surgical salvage therapy can largely be accomplished by drainage procedures, but pancreatic resection is common. These complex procedures can be performed with acceptable mortality but also with significant risk for morbidity.

  18. Pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Riederer, Peter; Lange, Klaus W.

    1992-01-01

    The importance of genetic aspects, ageing, environmental factors, head trauma, defective mitochondrial respiration, altered iron metabolism, oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity of the basal ganglia in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD) are considered in this review.

  19. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  20. ER Stress and β-Cell Pathogenesis of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes and Islet Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Kataoka, Hitomi Usui; Noguchi, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress affects the pathogenesis of diabetes. ER stress plays important roles, both in type 1 and type 2 diabetes, because pancreatic β-cells possess highly developed ER for insulin secretion. This review summarizes the relationship between ER stress and the pathogenesis of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In addition, the association between islet transplantation and ER stress is discussed.

  1. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance...

  2. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Ulrich Weiss

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic pancreatic inflammation with an early onset, mostly during childhood. Hereditary pancreatitis often starts with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis and the clinical phenotype is not very much different from other etiologies of the disease. The long-lasting inflammation however generates a tumor promoting environment and represents a major risk factor for tumor development This review will reflect our knowledge concerning the specific risk of hereditary pancreatitis patients to develop pancreatic cancer.

  3. Management of pancreatic pseudocysts-A retrospective analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Rasch

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocysts arise mostly in patients with alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis causing various symptoms and complications. However, data on the optimal management are rare. To address this problem, we analysed patients with pancreatic pseudocysts treated at our clinic retrospectively.We searched our clinical database for the diagnosis pancreatitis from 2004 till 2014, selected patients with pseudocysts larger than 10 mm and entered all relevant information in a database for statistical analysis.In total, 129 patients with pancreatic pseudocysts were treated at our institution during the study period. Most patients suffered from alcohol induced chronic pancreatitis (43.4%; 56/129. Pseudocysts were more frequent in female than in male (2:1 and were mainly located in the pancreatic head (47.3%; 61/129. Local complications like obstructive jaundice were associated with the diameter of the cysts (AUC 0.697 in ROC-curve analysis. However, even cysts up to a diameter of 160 mm can regress spontaneously. Besides a lower re-intervention rate in surgically treated patients, endoscopic, percutaneous and surgical drainage are equally effective. Most treatment related complications occur in large pseudocysts located in the pancreatic head.Conservative management of large pseudocysts is successful in many patients. Therefore, indication for treatment should be made carefully considering the presence and risk of local complications. Endoscopic and surgical drainage are equally effective.

  4. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    : Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between......INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic pancreatitis...

  5. Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula: Serial imaging and clinical follow-up from pseudocyst to fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Keun Nahn [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula is an extremely rare complication of pancreatitis. Only 18 such cases have been previously reported in the medical literature. However, a serial process from pancreatic pseudocyst to fistula formation has not been described. The serial clinical and radiological findings in a 52-year-old chronic alcoholic male patient with fistula between pancreatic pseudocyst and main portal vein are presented.

  6. Chronic pancreatitis: a changing etiology or a gap in technological medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is considered the most important risk factor for the development of chronic pancreatitis. The possibility of evaluating CFTR mutations and the discovery of other gene mutations has led to a better evaluation of the familiar/hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis and the identification of autoimmune pancreatitis has further improved our knowledge of the disease. However, recent studies on chronic pancreatitis on a worldwide level reveal an increase in the idiopathic forms of the disease. Clinicians must pay greater attention to identifying the factors associated with chronic pancreatitis.

  7. [Chronic pancreatitis: Retrospective review of 121 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger F, Zoltán; Mancilla A, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a rare disease in Chile, without a clear explanation for this low prevalence. To analyze the characteristics of our patients with pancreatitis. Retrospective analysis of a database of patients with pancreatitis of a clinical hospital. Morphological proof of diagnosis (calcifications/calculi, alterations of ducts, local complication or histology) was obtained for every patient. History of acute pancreatitis was recorded and exocrine-endocrine function was assessed. We retrieved information of 121 patients with pancreatitis (86 males) in a period of 20 years. The number of cases increased markedly every five years. The calculated incidence and prevalence was 0.8/100,000/year and 6/100,000, respectively. Pancreatic calcifications were initially observed in 93 patients and became evident during the follow-up in another six patients. Severe pain or local complications occurred in 27 patients, requiring surgery in 10 or endoscopic treatment in 15. During the years of follow-up, 55 patients were free of symptoms. Exocrine and endocrine insufficiency was demonstrated and treated in 81 and 67 patients, respectively. Alcoholic etiology was evident in 40% of patients. In 29% no etiology was identified. Mapuche origin was exceptional. Late diagnosis of CP is common, since most of our patients presented with advanced stages. Even though CP is increasingly diagnosed in our hospitals, the number of cases is still far fewer when compared to other countries. Underdiagnosis alone cannot explain this difference and genetic factors might be of importance.

  8. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  9. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard-Bohas, C.; Saurin, J.C.; Mornex, F.

    1997-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  10. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... 466 KB] No. 81: Exploring Treatment Options for Alcohol Use Disorders [ PDF - 539K] No. 80: Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: ...

  11. Incidence, risk factors and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections in acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Mei Lan; Kim, Kook Hyun; Kim, Ho Gak; Han, Jimin; Kim, Hyunsoo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jung, Min Kyu; Cho, Chang Min; Kim, Tae Nyeun

    2014-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of other regional tissues or remote organ systems. Acute fluid collections and pseudocyst formation are the most frequent complications of acute pancreatitis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the incidence, risk factors, and clinical course of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst formation following acute pancreatitis. A prospective multicenter study was conducted in five participating centers with 302 patients diagnosed with acute pancreatitis from January 2011 to July 2012. The incidence of pancreatic fluid collections and pseudocyst was 42.7 and 6.3 %, respectively. Patients with fluid collections were significantly younger, compared to those without fluid collections (51.5 ± 15.9 vs. 60.4 ± 16.5 years, P = 0.000). The proportion of alcoholic etiology (54.3 %) in patients with fluid collections was significantly higher compared to other etiologies (P = 0.000). C-reactive protein (CRP) (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with fluid collections, compared to patients without fluid collections (39.2 ± 77.4 vs. 15.1 ± 36.2 mg/dL, P = 0.016). LDH (48 h) was significantly higher in patients with pseudocyst formation, compared to patients with complete resolution (1,317.6 ± 706.4 vs. 478.7 ± 190.5 IU/L, P = 0.000). Pancreatic fluid collections showed spontaneous resolution in 69.8 % (90/129) and 84.2 % of the pseudocysts disappeared or decreased in size during follow up. Age, CRP (48 h), and alcohol etiology are risk factors for pancreatic fluid collections. LDH (48 h) appears to be a risk factor for pseudocyst formation. Most pseudocysts showed a decrease in size or spontaneous resolution with conservative management.

  12. Type 3c (pancreatogenic) diabetes mellitus secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Phil A; Bellin, Melena D; Andersen, Dana K; Bradley, David; Cruz-Monserrate, Zobeida; Forsmark, Christopher E; Goodarzi, Mark O; Habtezion, Aida; Korc, Murray; Kudva, Yogish C; Pandol, Stephen J; Yadav, Dhiraj; Chari, Suresh T

    2016-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases defined by persistent hyperglycaemia. Type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent form, is characterised initially by impaired insulin sensitivity and subsequently by an inadequate compensatory insulin response. Diabetes can also develop as a direct consequence of other diseases, including diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Historically, diabetes due to diseases of the exocrine pancreas was described as pancreatogenic or pancreatogenous diabetes mellitus, but recent literature refers to it as type 3c diabetes. It is important to note that type 3c diabetes is not a single entity; it occurs because of a variety of exocrine pancreatic diseases with varying mechanisms of hyperglycaemia. The most commonly identified causes of type 3c diabetes are chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, haemochromatosis, cystic fibrosis, and previous pancreatic surgery. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical relevance of type 3c diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and highlight several important knowledge gaps. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Combined Medical Treatment Of Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umnova Larisa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the most effective medical treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis, by using either pancreatin alone or in combination with proton pump inhibitor (PPI or PPI and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID. Patients with chronic pancreatitis, who did not require a surgical treatment, received medical treatment for a one–month period: 20 patients received pancreatin monotherapy; 48 patients were given a combination of pancreatin and PPI; 38 patients were treated with a combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID (PNP therapy group. In comparison with other groups, patients in the PNP therapy group showed improvement in body mass index, abdominal pain, bowel movements, chronic pancreatitis severity, as well as their quality of life assessment (p < 0.05. The combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID was the most effective among those applied in chronic pancreatitis patient treatment. A one–month long course of this therapy was safe and did not cause any significant adverse effects. The combination of pancreatin, PPI and NSAID for treatment of chronic pancreatitis can be recommended, as it is based on pathogenesis of the disease, effective, safe and economically advantageous.

  14. Pancreatic islet regeneration: Therapeutic potential, unknowns and controversy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L. Cockburn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glucose homeostasis in mammals is primarily maintained by the insulin-secreting β-cells contained within pancreas-resident islets of Langerhans. Gross disruption of this glucose regulation as a result of pancreatic dysfunction frequently results in diabetes, which is currently a major health concern in South Africa, as well as globally. For many years, researchers have realised that the pancreas, and specifically the islets of Langerhans, have a regenerative capacity, as islet mass has frequently been shown to increase following induced pancreatic injury. Given that gross β-cell loss contributes significantly to the pathogenesis of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, endogenous pancreatic islet regeneration has been investigated extensively as a potential β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. From the extensive research conducted on pancreatic regeneration, opposing findings and opinions have arisen as to how, and more recently even if, pancreatic regeneration occurs following induced injury. In this review, we outline and discuss the three primary mechanisms by which pancreatic regeneration is proposed to occur: neogenesis, β-cell replication and transdifferentiation. We further explain some of the advanced techniques used in pancreatic regeneration research, and conclude that despite the technologically advanced research tools available to researchers today, the mechanisms governing pancreatic regeneration may remain elusive until more powerful techniques are developed to allow for real-time, live-cell assessment of morphology and gene expression within the pancreas.

  15. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Ciećko-Michalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy.

  16. Pathogenesis of Hepatic Encephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciećko-Michalska, Irena; Szczepanek, Małgorzata; Słowik, Agnieszka; Mach, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy can be a serious complication of acute liver failure and chronic liver diseases, predominantly liver cirrhosis. Hyperammonemia plays the most important role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The brain-blood barrier disturbances, changes in neurotransmission, neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, GABA-ergic or benzodiazepine pathway abnormalities, manganese neurotoxicity, brain energetic disturbances, and brain blood flow abnormalities are considered to be involved in the development of hepatic encephalopathy. The influence of small intestine bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) on the induction of minimal hepatic encephalopathy is recently emphasized. The aim of this paper is to present the current views on the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. PMID:23316223

  17. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busireddy, Kiran K; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Ramalho, Miguel; Kalubowila, Janaka; Baodong, Liu; Santagostino, Ilaria; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI. PMID:25133027

  18. Comprehensive Evaluation of Altered Systemic Metabolism and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    09/08/15-08/31/19 0.96 cal. mo. NIH/NCI $168,300 A prospective investigation of the oral microbiome and pancreatic cancer 1.To perform a...and BWHS. 2.To evaluate racial differences in the oral microbiome using 165 AA and 165 EA controls (from the SCCS only), and to identify any racial...risk factors for pancreatic cancer (cigarette smoking, obesity, red meat and processed meat consumption, alcohol consumption, type 2 diabetes) and oral

  19. The alcohol patient and surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønnesen, H

    1999-01-01

    Alcohol abusers have a threefold increased risk of post-operative morbidity after surgery. The most frequent complications are infections, cardiopulmonary insufficiency, and bleeding episodes. Pathogenesis is suppressed immune capacity, subclinical cardiac dysfunction, and haemostatic imbalance....... The economic implications of alcohol abuse in surgical patients are tremendous. Interventional studies are required to reduce future increases in post-operative morbidity....

  20. Molecular Pathogenesis of Spondyloarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Thomas Gelsing

    This dissertation includes a presentation of knowledge on the molecular pathogenesis of spondyloarthritis achieved through a PhD programme at Aalborg University from 1.12.2011 - 1.12.2014. Work was carried out in the Laboratory of Medical Mass Spectrometry, headed by: Professor Svend Birkelund...

  1. Saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibrin, Ismaila; Erinle, Ayodele; Saidi, Abdulfattah; Aliyu, Zakari Y

    2006-06-01

    Saw palmetto is a frequently used botanical agent in benign prostatic enlargement (BPH). Although it has been reported to cause cholestatic hepatitis and many medical conditions, Saw palmetto has not been implicated in acute pancreatitis. We report a case of a probable Saw palmetto induced acute hepatitis and pancreatitis. A 55-year-old reformed alcoholic, sober for greater than 15 years, presented with severe non-radiating epigastric pain associated with nausea and vomiting. His only significant comorbidity is BPH for which he intermittently took Saw palmetto for about four years. Physical examination revealed normal vital signs, tender epigastrium without guarding or rebound tenderness. Cullen and Gray Turner signs were negative. Complete blood count and basic metabolic profile were normal. Additional laboratory values include a serum amylase: 2,152 mmol/L, lipase: 39,346 mmol/L, serum triglyceride: 38 mmol/L, AST: 1265, ALT: 1232 and alkaline phosphatase was 185. Abdominal ultrasound and magnetic resonance cholangiography revealed sludge without stones. A hepatic indole diacetic acid scan was negative. Patient responded clinically and biochemically to withdrawal of Saw palmetto. Two similar episodes of improvements followed by recurrence were noted with discontinuations and reinstitution of Saw Palmetto. Simultaneous and sustained response of hepatitis and pancreatitis to Saw palmetto abstinence with reoccurrence on reinstitution strongly favors drug effect. "Natural" medicinal preparations are therefore not necessarily safe and the importance of detailed medication history (including "supplements") cannot be over emphasized.

  2. Acute pancreatitis in five European countries: etiology and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullo, Lucio; Migliori, Marina; Oláh, Attila; Farkas, Gyula; Levy, Philippe; Arvanitakis, Constantine; Lankisch, Paul; Beger, Hans

    2002-04-01

    In recent years, many advances have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis that have lead to a significant reduction in both morbidity and mortality; however, knowledge of the etiology and of the relation between etiology and mortality is far from complete. To obtain a more comprehensive view of the etiology and mortality of acute pancreatitis in Europe than has been given by previous single-center studies. The study comprised 1,068 patients in five European countries who were admitted to hospitals for acute pancreatitis from January 1990 to December 1994. Data for each patient were collected on a standardized form. Of the 1,068 patients (692 men, 376 women; mean age, 52.8 years; range, 10-95 years), 589 had edematous pancreatitis, and 479 the necrotic form. Cholelithiasis (37.1%) and alcohol (41.0%) were the most frequent etiologic factors. In Germany, cholelithiasis and alcohol occurred with similar frequency (34.9 and 37.9%, respectively); in Hungary, alcohol predominates over cholelithiasis (60.7 vs. 24.0%); in France, a small predominance of alcohol was seen (38.5 vs. 24.6%); and in Greece and Italy, there was a clear predominance of cholelithiasis over alcohol (71.4 vs. 6.0% and 60.3 vs. 13.2%, respectively). The differences in the frequency of cholelithiasis and alcohol between Greece and Italy and the other countries were statistically significant (p relationship between mortality and age.

  3. Genetics and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edenberg, Howard J; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-08-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed; however, excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases. Alcohol use disorders (that is, alcohol dependence and alcohol abuse) are maladaptive patterns of excessive drinking that lead to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcohol dependence (alcoholism) is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting a person's risk of alcoholism. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes involved in the metabolism of alcohol (ADH1B and ALDH2) that have the strongest known affects on the risk of alcoholism. Studies continue to reveal other genes in which variants affect the risk of alcoholism or related traits, including GABRA2, CHRM2, KCNJ6 and AUTS2. As more variants are analysed and studies are combined for meta-analysis to achieve increased sample sizes, an improved picture of the many genes and pathways that affect the risk of alcoholism will be possible.

  4. Role of genetic disorders in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Keim, Volker

    2008-01-01

    There was remarkable progress in the understanding of the role genetic risk factors in chronic pancreatitis. These factors seem to be much more important than thought in the past. The rare autosomal-dominant mutations N29I and R122H of PRSS1 (cationic trypsinogen) as well as the variant N34S of SPINK1 (pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor) are associated to a disease onset in childhood or youth. Compared to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis the progression is slow so that for a long time only ...

  5. Recurrent pancreatitis in a patient with familial hypocalciuric hypercalcaemia treated successfully with cinacalcet

    OpenAIRE

    Gunganah, Kirun; Grossman, Ashley; Druce, Maralyn

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 22-year-old female student presented with a history of recurrent pancreatitis. The commonest causes of pancreatitis, including drugs, gallstones, corticosteroids, excess alcohol and hypertriglyceridaemia, were excluded. She was found to have an elevated serum calcium level that was considered to be the cause of her pancreatitis, with a detectable serum parathyroid hormone (PTH). An initial diagnosis of primary hyperparathyroidism was made. However, two neck explorations failed to re...

  6. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  7. Hepatic Steatosis Following Pancreatic Surgery: A Swedish Centers Experience with Demographics, Risks and Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Tommy Ivanics; Srinivas Sanjeevi; Christoph Ansorge; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2015-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of fatty changes in the liver ranging from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Certain patients may develop hepatic steatosis following pancreatic resections. The aim of our study was to investigate factors possibly associated with steatosis after pancreatic resection and to see if the survival of patients was influenced by its development. Methods 182 consecutive patients that underwent pancreatic surgery (betwe...

  8. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Vujasinovic

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  9. Variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 gene and risk of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Harrison; Diergaarde, Brenda; O'Connell, Michael R; Whitcomb, David C; Brand, Randall E

    2013-07-01

    Individuals with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that genetic variation in the γ-glutamyltransferase 1 (GGT1) gene, which was recently reported associated with pancreatic cancer risk in a genome-wide association study, is also associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis. Associations between common polymorphisms in GGT1 and chronic pancreatitis were evaluated using data and samples from the North American Pancreatitis Study 2. Patients (n = 496) and control subjects (n = 465) were genotyped for 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms: rs4820599, rs2017869, rs8135987, and rs5751901. Odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for chronic pancreatitis risk were calculated using multiple logistic regression models. Interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were explored. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs8135987 and rs4820599 were both statistically significantly associated with risk of chronic pancreatitis; compared with common allele homozygotes, individuals with at least 1 minor allele were at increased risk (rs8135987: OR, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.03-1.80 [P(trend) = 0.01]; rs4820599: OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.04-1.84 [P(trend) = 0.0]; adjusted for age, sex, race, smoking status, and alcohol use). No significant interactions with cigarette smoking and alcohol use were observed. Our results suggest that common variation in the GGT1 gene may also affect risk of chronic pancreatitis.

  10. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.C. Tran; G. van 't Hof; G. Kazemier (Geert); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.J. Pek (Chulja); A.W. van Toorenenbergen (Albert); H. van Dekken (Herman); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Methods: Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and

  11. The role of epoxide hydrolase Y113H gene variant in pancreatic diseases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ockenga, J.; Strunck, S.; Post, C.; Schulz, H.U.; Halangk, J.; Pfutzer, R.H.; Lohr, M.; Oettle, H.; Kage, A.; Rosendahl, J.; Keim, V.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Lochs, H.; Witt, H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (pCA) are associated with risk factors such as alcohol intake and tobacco smoking. Microsomal epoxide hydrolase (EPHX1) is a phase II detoxifying enzyme capable of tobacco-borne toxicant inactivation. We studied the role of the

  12. Update on mucormycosis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Ashraf S; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P

    2013-12-01

    Mucormycosis is an increasingly common fungal infection with unacceptably high mortality. The recent sequencing genome projects of Mucorales and the development of gene manipulation have enabled significant advances in understanding the pathogenesis of mucormycosis. Therefore, we review the pathogenesis of mucormycosis and highlight potential development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities against this lethal disease. Much of the work has been focused on the role of iron uptake in the virulence of Mucorales. Additionally, host receptors and fungal ligands involved in the process of tissue invasion as well as sporangiospore size and sex loci and their contribution to virulence of Mucorales are discussed. Finally, the role of innate and adaptive immunity in protection against Mucorales and new evidence about drug-induced apoptosis in these fungi are discussed. Recent discoveries introduce several potentially novel diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, which are likely to improve management and outcome for mucormycosis. Future preclinical and clinical research is warranted to develop these diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  13. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  14. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho

    1999-01-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  15. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akisada, Masayoshi; Hiramatsu, Yoshihiro; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Tatezawa, Akira; Matsumoto, Kunihiko

    1982-01-01

    There has been no definite examining technique for the early diagnosis of pancreatic diseases, especially small cancers of the pancreas less than 3 cm. Plain abdominal X-rays do not produce reliable roentgenological signs of acute pancreatitis, but the advent of CT has elucidated the condition to some extent. Upper gastrointestinal series are alleged to demonstrate abnormal findings in 80% of cases of pancreatic cancer or cyst. Pancreatic RI scintigraphy expresses the function and anatomy, and the sensitivity with 75 Se is 88%, similar to 87% by US and 80% by CT. Although endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography visualizes extrapancreatic secretory function, as well as the morphology of pancreas, differentiation is not easy in many cases. The greatest indication for US was cysts. The detection rate of pancreatic cancers is similar between plain and contrast CTs, and pancreatic angiography is not specific for pancreatic cancers. (Chiba, N.)

  16. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency following acute pancreatitis: Systematic review and study level meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollemans, Robbert A; Hallensleben, Nora D L; Mager, David J; Kelder, Johannes C; Besselink, Marc G; Bruno, Marco J; Verdonk, Robert C; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C

    2018-04-01

    This study systematically explores the prevalence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) after acute pancreatitis in different subgroups of etiology (biliary/alcoholic/other), disease severity and follow-up time ( 36 months after index admission). PubMed and EMBASE databases were searched, 32 studies were included in this study level meta-analysis. In a total of 1495 patients with acute pancreatitis, tested at a mean of 36 months after index admission, the pooled prevalence of PEI was 27.1% (95%-confidence interval [CI]: 20.3%-35.1%). Patients from seven studies (n = 194) underwent direct tests with pooled prevalence of 41.7% [18.5%-69.2%]. Patients from 26 studies (n = 1305) underwent indirect tests with pooled prevalence of 24.4% [18.3%-31.8%]. In subgroup analyses on patients that underwent fecal elastase-1 tests, PEI occurred more often in alcoholic pancreatitis (22.7% [16.6%-30.1%]) than in biliary pancreatitis (10.2% [6.2%-16.4%]) or other etiology (13.4% [7.7%-22.4%]; P = 0.02). Pooled prevalence of PEI after mild and severe pancreatitis was 19.4% [8.6%-38.2%] and 33.4% [22.6%-46.3%] respectively in studies using fecal elaste-1 tests (P = 0.049). Similar results were seen in patients without (18.9% [9.3%-34.6%]) and with necrotizing pancreatitis (32.0% [18.2%-49.8%]; P = 0.053). Over time, the prevalence of PEI decreased in patients who underwent the fecal elastase-1 test and increased in patients who underwent the fecal fat analysis. After acute pancreatitis, a quarter of all patients develop PEI during follow-up. Alcoholic etiology and severe and necrotizing pancreatitis are associated with higher risk of PEI. The prevalence of PEI may change as time of follow-up increases. Copyright © 2018 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver Pseudoquiste pancreático de localización hepática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Les

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage.

  18. Toxic-metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management, and Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sohail Z; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y; Schwarzenberg, Sarah J; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-04-01

    Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies, and their rationale. We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: hyperlipidemia, hypercalcemia, chronic renal failure, smoking exposure, alcohol, and medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dL or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end-stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and bystander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children.

  19. Zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and its relationship with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, Banavara Narasimhamurthy; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Vaidyanathan, Kannan; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2009-11-05

    A major role of the pancreas in zinc homeostasis has been suggested. To assess erythrocyte zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and to correlate it with pancreatic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. One hundred and one patients with chronic pancreatitis (34 alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 67 tropical chronic pancreatitis) were prospectively studied. Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Erythrocyte zinc was estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Exocrine insufficiency was assessed using polyclonal antibody ELISA for pancreatic stool elastase1. Endocrine insufficiency was assessed by serum glucose levels and insulin requirement. Erythrocyte zinc was significantly lower in chronic pancreatitis patients than in the controls (26.5+/-9.5 microg/g Hb vs. 38.0+/-6.6 microg/g Hb; Ppancreatitis than in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (25.0+/-10.4 microg/g Hb vs. 29.6+/-6.5 microg/g Hb, P=0.001). In chronic pancreatitis patients who had exocrine insufficiency, erythrocyte zinc positively correlated with stool elastase1 (r=0.587, Ppancreatitis patients, and that zinc deficiency correlates with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Further studies may clarify the possible benefits of zinc supplementation in chronic pancreatitis.

  20. Toxic-Metabolic Risk Factors in Pediatric Pancreatitis: Recommendations for Diagnosis, Management and Future Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Sohail Z.; Morinville, Veronique; Pohl, John; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D.; Freedman, Steve; Hegyi, Peter; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Ooi, Chee Y.; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Usatin, Danielle; Uc, Aliye

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Pancreatitis in children can result from metabolic and toxic risk factors, but the evidence linking these factors is sparse. We review the evidence for association or causality of these risk factors in pancreatitis, discuss management strategies and their rationale. Methods We conducted a review of the pediatric pancreatitis literature with respect to the following risk factors: (a) hyperlipidemia, (b) hypercalcemia, (c) chronic renal failure, (d) smoking exposure, (e) alcohol, and (f) medications. Areas of additional research were identified. Results Hypertriglyceridemia of 1000 mg/dl or greater poses an absolute risk for pancreatitis; persistent elevations of calcium are predisposing. Further research is necessary to determine whether end stage renal disease leads to increased pancreatitis in children similar to adults. It is unknown whether cigarette smoking exposure, which clearly increases risk in adults, also increases risk in children. The role of alcohol in pediatric pancreatitis, whether direct or modifying, needs to be elucidated. The evidence supporting most cases of medication-induced pancreatitis is poor. Drug structure, improper handling of drug by host, and by-stander status may be implicated. Other pancreatitis risk factors must be sought in all cases. Conclusions The quality of evidence supporting causative role of various toxic and metabolic factors in pediatric pancreatitis is variable. Careful phenotyping is essential, including search for other etiologic risk factors. Directed therapy includes correction/ removal of any agent identified, and general supportive measures. Further research is necessary to improve our understanding of these pancreatitis risk factors in children. PMID:26594832

  1. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  2. Endocrine pancreatic function changes after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Deqing; Xu, Yaping; Zeng, Yue; Wang, Xingpeng

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impairment of pancreatic endocrine function and the associated risk factors after acute pancreatitis (AP). Fifty-nine patients were subjected to tests of pancreatic function after an attack of pancreatitis. The mean time after the event was 3.5 years. Pancreatic endocrine function was evaluated by fasting blood glucose (FBG), glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide. Homeostasis model assessment was used to evaluate insulin resistance and islet β-cell function. Pancreatic exocrine function was evaluated by fecal elastase 1. Factors that could influence endocrine function were also investigated. Nineteen patients (32%) were found to have elevated FBG, whereas 5 (8%) had abnormal glycosylated hemoglobin levels. The levels of FBG, fasting blood insulin, and C-peptide were higher in patients than in controls (P endocrine insufficiency. Pancreatic exocrine functional impairment was found at the same time. Endocrine functional impairment with insulin resistance was found in patients after AP. Obesity, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes-related symptoms increased the likelihood of developing functional impairment after AP.

  3. Pancreatic Cancer: Multicenter Prospective Data Collection and Analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, Gábor; Balázs, Anita; Kui, Balázs; Gódi, Szilárd; Szücs, Ákos; Szentesi, Andrea; Szentkereszty, Zsolt; Szmola, Richárd; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Vincze, Áron; Czimmer, József; Pár, Gabriella; Bajor, Judit; Szabó, Imre; Izbéki, Ferenc; Halász, Adrienn; Leindler, László; Farkas, Gyula; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Hegyi, Péter; Kahán, Zsuzsanna

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease with poor prognosis. There is very limited information available regarding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of pancreatic cancer in Central Europe. The purpose of the study was to prospectively collect and analyze data of pancreatic cancer in the Hungarian population. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group (HPSG) organized prospective, uniform data collection. Altogether 354 patients were enrolled from 14 Hungarian centers. Chronic pancreatitis was present in 3.7% of the cases, while 33.7% of the patients had diabetes. Family history for pancreatic cancer was positive in 4.8%. The most frequent presenting symptoms included pain (63.8%), weight loss (63%) and jaundice (52.5%). The reported frequency of smoking and alcohol consumption was lower than expected (28.5% and 27.4%, respectively). The majority of patients (75.6%) were diagnosed with advanced disease. Most patients (83.6%) had a primary tumor located in the pancreatic head. The histological diagnosis was ductal adenocarcinoma in 90.7% of the cases, while neuroendocrine tumor was present in 5.3%. Biliary stent implantation was performed in 166 patients, 59.2% of them received metal stents. Primary tumor resection was performed in 60 (16.9%) patients. Enteral or biliary bypass was done in 35 and 49 patients, respectively. In a multivariate Cox-regression model, smoking status and presence of gemcitabine-based chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors for overall survival. We report the first data from a large cohort of Hungarian pancreatic cancer patients. We identified smoking status and chemotherapy as independent predictors in this cohort.

  4. Phospholipids as Biomarkers for Excessive Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    17. Zhou P, Ross RA, Pywell CM, Liangpunsakul S, Duffield GE. Disturbances in the murine hepatic circadian clock in alcohol-induced hepatic steatosis ...liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis , and alcoholic pancreatitis) among returning veterans at the younger age (~31 years old), compared to previously...Fibrosis in Chronic Hepatitis C Patients: A Systemic Review and Meta- Analysis. J Clin Gastroenterol 2016;50:80-84. 7. Gough G, Heathers L, Puckett D

  5. “Puestow modified procedure in the era of advanced endoscopic interventions for the management of chronic lithiasic pancreatitis. A two cases report”

    OpenAIRE

    Georgios P. Fragulidis; Αntonios Vezakis; Dionissios Dellaportas; Ira Sotirova; Vassilis Koutoulidis; Elliseos Kontis; Andreas Polydorou

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Pancreatic duct calculi in chronic pancreatitis (CP) patients are the main cause of intractable pain which is their main symptom. Decompression options of for the main pancreatic duct are both surgical and advanced endoscopic procedures. Presentation of cases: A 64-year-old male with known CP due to alcohol consumption and a 36-year-old female with known idiopathic CP and pancreatic duct calculi were managed recently in our hospital where endoscopic procedures were unsuccessf...

  6. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Yutaka; Kitagawa, Toru; Nakamori, Shoji

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  7. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Hereditary pancreatitis Hereditary pancreatitis Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Hereditary pancreatitis is a genetic condition characterized by recurrent episodes ...

  8. Pancreatic cancer risk in hereditary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Frank U.

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response in order to remove harmful stimuli – like pathogens, irritants or damaged cells - and start the healing process. Recurrent or chronic inflammation on the other side seems a predisposing factor for carcinogenesis and has been found associated with cancer development. In chronic pancreatitis mutations of the cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1) gene have been identified as risk factors of the disease. Hereditary pancreatitis is a rare cause of chronic...

  9. ENDOCRINE PANCREATIC FUNCTION IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    OpenAIRE

    P. V. Novokhatny

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Among the organs of internal secretion pancreas has a special place thanks to active exocrine function and a wide range of physiological actions of produced hormones. Violations of endocrine pancreas arises in 6.5-38 % of patients with acute pancreatitis. However, there is still no clear understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms of hormonal dysfunction of the pancreas in acute pancreatitis, there is no uniform algorithms for its correction. Aim of the research was to study...

  10. Prevention of pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Kuroczycki-Saniutycz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA accounts for 95% of all pancreatic cancers. About 230,000 PDA cases are diagnosed worldwide each year. PDA has the lowest five-year survival rate as compared to others cancers. PDA in Poland is the fifth leading cause of death after lung, stomach, colon and breast cancer. In our paper we have analysed the newest epidemiological research, some of it controversial, to establish the best practical solution for pancreatic cancer prevention in the healthy population as well as treatment for patients already diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. We found that PDA occurs quite frequently but is usually diagnosed too late, at its advanced stage. Screening for PDA is not very well defined except in subgroups of high-risk individuals with genetic disorders or with chronic pancreatitis. We present convincing, probable, and suggestive risk factors associated with pancreatic cancer, many of which are modifiable and should be introduced and implemented in our society.

  11. The incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Stephen E; Morrison-Rees, Sian; John, Ann; Williams, John G; Brown, Tim H; Samuel, David G

    Acute pancreatitis is increasingly one of the most important acute gastrointestinal conditions throughout much of the world, although incidence and aetiology varies across countries and regions. This study investigated regional and national patterns in the incidence and aetiology of acute pancreatitis, demographic patterns in incidence and trends over time in incidence across Europe. A structured review of acute pancreatitis incidence and aetiology from studies of hospitalised patient case series, cohort studies or other population based studies from 1989 to 2015 and a review of trends in incidence from 1970 to 2015 across all 51 European states. The incidence of acute pancreatitis was reported from 17 countries across Europe and ranged from 4.6 to 100 per 100 000 population. Incidence was usually highest in eastern or northern Europe, although reported rates often varied according to case ascertainment criteria. Of 20 studies that reported on trends in incidence, all but three show percentage increases over time (overall median increase = 3.4% per annum; range = -0.4%-73%). The highest ratios of gallstone to alcohol aetiologies were identified in southern Europe (Greece, Turkey, Italy and Croatia) with lowest ratios mainly in eastern Europe (Latvia, Finland, Romania, Hungary, Russia and Lithuania). The incidence of acute pancreatitis varies across Europe. Gallstone is the dominant aetiology in southern Europe and alcohol in eastern Europe with intermediate ratios in northern and western Europe. Acute pancreatitis continues to increase throughout most of Europe. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Long-term high-fat diet induces pancreatic injuries via pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress in rats with hyperlipidemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Mingxian; Li Yanqing; Meng Min; Ren Hongbo; Kou Yi

    2006-01-01

    Relations between hyperlipidemia and chronic pancreatitis remain unclear. Microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress are involved in pathogeneses of a high numbers of diseases. The objective of this study was to induce hyperlipidemia in rats by long-term high-fat diet intake, then investigate the biochemical, microcirculatory, and histological alterations in blood and pancreatic tissues of these animals, and discuss their potential significances. Pancreatic blood flow was detected by intravital microscope; malondialdehyde (MDA) content and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured in pancreatic tissues for assessment of oxidative stress and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression was determined by immunohistochemical staining and RT-PCR. The results showed that the velocity of pancreatic microvascular blood flow of rats with hyperlipidemia decreased significantly as compared to control value (p = 0.008). Pancreatic MDA content increased whereas SOD activity decreased in these rats (p = 0.022; p = 0.039, respectively). Histologically, microvesicles in acinar and islet cells, dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondrion and modified vascular endothelial cells were observed under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. In addition, α-SMA expression was up-regulated significantly (p < 0.05). These results suggest that long-term high-fat diet can induce chronic pancreatic injuries which could be considered as 'nonalcoholic fatty pancreatic disease', and pancreatic microcirculatory disturbances and oxidative stress may play an important part in the underlying pathogenesis

  13. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, J. Edward

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  14. A conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of idiopathic chronic pancreatitis: data from a comprehensive analysis of PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR genes in 253 young French patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Masson

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP has traditionally been defined as chronic pancreatitis in the absence of any obvious precipitating factors (e.g. alcohol abuse and family history of the disease. Studies over the past 15 years have revealed that ICP has a highly complex genetic architecture involving multiple gene loci. Here, we have attempted to provide a conservative assessment of the major genetic causes of ICP in a sample of 253 young French ICP patients. For the first time, conventional types of mutation (comprising coding sequence variants and variants at intron/exon boundaries and gross genomic rearrangements were screened for in all four major pancreatitis genes, PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR. For the purposes of the study, synonymous, intronic and 5'- or 3'-untranslated region variants were excluded from the analysis except where there was persuasive evidence of functional consequences. The remaining sequence variants/genotypes were classified into causative, contributory or neutral categories by consideration of (i their allele frequencies in patient and normal control populations, (ii their presumed or experimentally confirmed functional effects, (iii the relative importance of their associated genes in the pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis and (iv gene-gene interactions wherever applicable. Adoption of this strategy allowed us to assess the pathogenic relevance of specific variants/genotypes to their respective carriers to an unprecedented degree. The genetic cause of ICP could be assigned in 23.7% of individuals in the study group. A strong genetic susceptibility factor was also present in an additional 24.5% of cases. Taken together, up to 48.2% of the studied ICP patients were found to display evidence of a genetic basis for their pancreatitis. Whereas these particular proportions may not be extrapolable to all ICP patients, the approach employed should serve as a useful framework for acquiring a better understanding of the

  15. Acute pancreatitis caused by Mycoplasma pneumoniae: an unusual etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés Lacasa, Teresa; Duarte Borges, María Alejandra; García Marín, Alicia; Gómez Cuervo, Covadonga

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that the most important etiologies of acute pancreatitis are gallstones and alcohol consumption. Once these causes have been ruled out, especially in young adults, it is important to consider less frequent etiologic factors such as drugs, trauma, malformations, autoimmunity or systemic diseases. Other rare and less well studied causes of this pathology are infections, among which Mycoplasma pneumoniae has been reported to cause acute pancreatitis as an unusual extrapulmonary manifestation. Here, we report the case of a 21-year-old patient who had acute idiopathic pancreatitis associated with an upper respiratory tract infection. After an in-depth study, all other causes of pancreatitis were ruled out and Mycoplasma was established as the clinical etiology.

  16. Molecular Pathogenesis of NASH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Caligiuri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH is the main cause of chronic liver disease in the Western world and a major health problem, owing to its close association with obesity, diabetes, and the metabolic syndrome. NASH progression results from numerous events originating within the liver, as well as from signals derived from the adipose tissue and the gastrointestinal tract. In a fraction of NASH patients, disease may progress, eventually leading to advanced fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms leading to NASH and its evolution to cirrhosis is critical to identifying effective approaches for the treatment of this condition. In this review, we focus on some of the most recent data reported on the pathogenesis of NASH and its fibrogenic progression, highlighting potential targets for treatment or identification of biomarkers of disease progression.

  17. Role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 in cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean Louis; Lenglet, Sébastien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine; Galan, Katia; Pelli, Graziano; Spahr, Laurent; Mach, Francois; Hadengue, Antoine

    2011-05-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of variable severity. Leucocytes are thought to play a key role in the development of pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. The interactions between inflammatory cells and their mediators are crucial for determining tissue damage. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (or CCL-2), CCR-2 and CCR-4 are chemokines and chemokine receptors involved in leucocyte trafficking. The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of the CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 chemokine receptors in the pathogenesis of cerulein-induced pancreatitis and pancreatitis-associated lung injury. To address the role of CCL-2, CCR-2 and CCR-4 that attracts leucocytes cells in inflamed tissues, pancreatitis was induced by administering supramaximal doses of cerulein in mice that do not express CCL-2, CCR-2 or CCR-4. The severity of pancreatitis was measured by serum amylase, pancreatic oedema and acinar cell necrosis. Lung injury was quantitated by evaluating lung microvascular permeability and lung myeloperoxidase activity. Chemokine and chemokine-receptor expression were quantitated by real-time PCR. The nature of inflammatory cells invading the pancreas and lungs was studied by immunostaining. The authors have found that pancreas CCL-2 and CCR-2 levels rise during pancreatitis. Both pancreatitis and the associated lung injury are blunted, but not completely prevented, in mice deficient in CCL-2, whereas the deficiency in either CCR-2 or CCR-4 does not reduce the severity of both the pancreatitis and the lung injury. The amounts of neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages (MOMA)-2 cells were significantly lower in mice deficient in CCL-2 compared with their sufficient littermates. These results suggest that CCL-2 plays a key role in pancreatitis by modulating the infiltration by neutrophils and MOMA-2 cells, and that its deficiency may improve the outcome of the disease.

  18. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mai...

  19. Hereditary pancreatitis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael KL

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kara L Raphael, Field F Willingham Division of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA Abstract: Hereditary pancreatitis (HP is a rare cause of acute, recurrent acute, and chronic pancreatitis. It may present similarly to other causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis, and often there has been a protracted evaluation prior to the diagnosis of HP. Since it was first described in 1952, multiple genetic defects that affect the action of digestive enzymes in the pancreas have been implicated. The most common mutations involve the PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC genes. New mutations in these genes and previously unrecognized mutations in other genes are being discovered due to the increasing use of next-generation genomic sequencing. While the inheritance pathways of these genetic mutations may be variable and complex, sometimes involving coinheritance of other mutations, the clinical presentation of patients tends to be similar. Interactions with environmental triggers often play a role. Patients tend to present at an early age (prior to the second decade of life and have a significantly increased risk for the development of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients with HP may develop sequelae of chronic pancreatitis such as strictures and fluid collections as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Management of patients with HP involves avoidance of environmental triggers, surveillance for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, medical therapy for endocrine and exocrine insufficiency, pain management, and endoscopic or surgical treatment for complications. Care for affected patients should be individualized, with an emphasis on early diagnosis and multidisciplinary involvement to develop a comprehensive treatment strategy. Keywords: pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, idiopathic pancreatitis, pancreatitis, familial pancreatitis, genetic mutations

  20. Occult Metabolic Bone Disease in Chronic Pancreatitis | Hari Kumar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) leads to malabsorption and metabolic bone disease (MBD). Alcoholic CP (ACP) and tropical CP (TCP) are the two common types of CP. Objective: We investigated the presence of occult MBD in patients with CP and compared the same between ACP and TCP. Materials and Methods: ...

  1. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients......SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... registries. Factors associated with mortality in AP patients were high age, alcohol and diabetes, whereas female gender, employment, and co-living were associated with better survival. Level of S-amylase had no impact on the mortality. AP can progress to CP not only from alcoholic but also from idiopathic AP...

  2. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in these patients...... registries. Factors associated with mortality in AP patients were high age, alcohol and diabetes, whereas female gender, employment, and co-living were associated with better survival. Level of S-amylase had no impact on the mortality. AP can progress to CP not only from alcoholic but also from idiopathic AP...

  3. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2013-10-01

    The present article analyzes the main presentations on acute pancreatitis (AP) in Digestive Disease Week 2013. Perfusion computed tomography allows early diagnosis of pancreatic necrosis. Neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin predicts the development of acute renal failure, severe AP and death. Factors associated with greater fluid sequestration in AP are alcoholic etiology, an elevated hematocrit, and the presence of criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome; fluid sequestration is associated with a worse outcome. True pseudocysts (fluid collections without necrosis for more than 4 weeks) are a highly infrequent complication in AP. Patients with necrotic collections have a poor prognosis, especially if associated with infection. A meta-analysis on fluid therapy suggests that early aggressive fluid administration is associated with higher mortality and more frequent respiratory complications. According to a meta-analysis, enteral nutrition initiated within 24 hours of admission improves the outcome of AP compared with later initiation of enteral nutrition. Pentoxifylline could be a promising alternative in AP; a double-blind randomized study showed that this drug reduced the length of hospital and intensive care unit stay, as well as the need for intensive care unit admission. The association of octreotide and celecoxib seems to reduce the frequency of organ damage compared with octreotide alone. Mild AP can be managed in the ambulatory setting through hospital-at-home units after a short, 24-hour admission. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Pancreatic fibrosis correlates with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, T C K; van 't Hof, G; Kazemier, G; Hop, W C; Pek, C; van Toorenenbergen, A W; van Dekken, H; van Eijck, C H J

    2008-01-01

    Obstruction of the pancreatic duct can lead to pancreatic fibrosis. We investigated the correlation between the extent of pancreatic fibrosis and the postoperative exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function. Fifty-five patients who were treated for pancreatic and periampullary carcinoma and 19 patients with chronic pancreatitis were evaluated. Exocrine pancreatic function was evaluated by fecal elastase-1 test, while endocrine pancreatic function was assessed by plasma glucose level. The extent of fibrosis, duct dilation and endocrine tissue loss was examined histopathologically. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and elastase-1 level less than 100 microg/g (p pancreatic insufficiency. A strong correlation was found between pancreatic fibrosis and endocrine tissue loss (p pancreatic fibrosis nor endocrine tissue loss were correlated with the development of postoperative diabetes mellitus. Duct dilation alone was neither correlated with exocrine nor with endocrine function loss. The majority of patients develop severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatoduodenectomy. The extent of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is strongly correlated with preoperative fibrosis. The loss of endocrine tissue does not correlate with postoperative diabetes mellitus. Preoperative dilation of the pancreatic duct per se does not predict exocrine or endocrine pancreatic insufficiency postoperatively. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  6. Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Garth L.; Rajotte, Ray V.

    1992-01-01

    Transplantation of insulin-producing tissue offers a physiologic approach to restoration of glycemic control. Whereas transplantation of vascularized pancreatic grafts has recently achieved encouraging results, pancreatic islet cell transplantation holds the promise of low morbidity and reduced requirements for agressive immunosuppression for recipients. Islet cell transplantation was recently demonstrated to induce euglycemia with insulin independence. Imagesp1656-a PMID:21221366

  7. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prassopoulos, P.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  8. Alcohol, smoking and benign hepato-biliary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shabanzadeh, Daniel Mønsted; Novovic, Srdan

    2017-01-01

    through effects on bile cholesterol metabolism, the enterohepatic circulation, and gallbladder function. The impact of smoking on gallstone formation seems minor. Both alcohol intake and smoking do not alter the clinical course of gallstone disease carriers. Cholecystectomy is the preferred treatment...... for symptomatic gallstone disease. Studies about the impact of alcohol and smoking on the post-cholecystectomy state are few and future studies should be performed. Pancreatitis is associated with both excessive alcohol intake and smoking in observational studies. Interpretation of associations with pancreatitis...... is hampered by an incomplete understanding of underlying mechanisms and by the co-existence of excessive alcohol intake and smoking. Smoking cessation and alcohol abstinence is recommended in the treatment of pancreatitis, but higher-level evidence is needed....

  9. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. PMID:27418683

  10. Animal models of gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Animal models of acute and chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Xianbao; Wang, Fan; Bi, Yan; Ji, Baoan

    2016-09-01

    Animal models of pancreatitis are useful for elucidating the pathogenesis of pancreatitis and developing and testing novel interventions. In this review, we aim to summarize the most commonly used animal models, overview their pathophysiology, and discuss their strengths and limitations. We will also briefly describe common animal study procedures and refer readers to more detailed protocols in the literature. Although animal models include pigs, dogs, opossums, and other animals, we will mainly focus on rodent models because of their popularity. Autoimmune pancreatitis and genetically engineered animal models will be reviewed elsewhere. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Chronic pancreatitis: review and update of etiology, risk factors, and management [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Pham

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a syndrome involving inflammation, fibrosis, and loss of acinar and islet cells which can manifest in unrelenting abdominal pain, malnutrition, and exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. The Toxic-Metabolic, Idiopathic, Genetic, Autoimmune, Recurrent and Severe Acute Pancreatitis, Obstructive (TIGAR-O classification system categorizes known causes and factors that contribute to chronic pancreatitis. Although determining disease etiology provides a framework for focused and specific treatments, chronic pancreatitis remains a challenging condition to treat owing to the often refractory, centrally mediated pain and the lack of consensus regarding when endoscopic therapy and surgery are indicated. Further complications incurred include both exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency, pseudocyst formation, bile duct obstruction, and pancreatic cancer. Medical treatment of chronic pancreatitis involves controlling pain, addressing malnutrition via the treatment of vitamin and mineral deficiencies and recognizing the risk of osteoporosis, and administering appropriate pancreatic enzyme supplementation and diabetic agents. Cornerstones in treatment include the recognition of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency and administration of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, support to cease smoking and alcohol consumption, consultation with a dietitian, and a systematic follow-up to assure optimal treatment effect.

  12. The novel cytokine interleukin-33 activates acinar cell proinflammatory pathways and induces acute pancreatic inflammation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duraisamy Kempuraj

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is potentially fatal but treatment options are limited as disease pathogenesis is poorly understood. IL-33, a novel IL-1 cytokine family member, plays a role in various inflammatory conditions but its role in acute pancreatitis is not well understood. Specifically, whether pancreatic acinar cells produce IL-33 when stressed or respond to IL-33 stimulation, and whether IL-33 exacerbates acute pancreatic inflammation is unknown.In duct ligation-induced acute pancreatitis in mice and rats, we found that (a IL-33 concentration was increased in the pancreas; (b mast cells, which secrete and also respond to IL-33, showed degranulation in the pancreas and lung; (c plasma histamine and pancreatic substance P concentrations were increased; and (d pancreatic and pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine concentrations were increased. In isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells, TNF-α stimulation increased IL-33 release while IL-33 stimulation increased proinflammatory cytokine release, both involving the ERK MAP kinase pathway; the flavonoid luteolin inhibited IL-33-stimulated IL-6 and CCL2/MCP-1 release. In mice without duct ligation, exogenous IL-33 administration induced pancreatic inflammation without mast cell degranulation or jejunal inflammation; pancreatic changes included multifocal edema and perivascular infiltration by neutrophils and some macrophages. ERK MAP kinase (but not p38 or JNK and NF-kB subunit p65 were activated in the pancreas of mice receiving exogenous IL-33, and acinar cells isolated from the pancreas of these mice showed increased spontaneous cytokine release (IL-6, CXCL2/MIP-2α. Also, IL-33 activated ERK in human pancreatic tissue.As exogenous IL-33 does not induce jejunal inflammation in the same mice in which it induces pancreatic inflammation, we have discovered a potential role for an IL-33/acinar cell axis in the recruitment of neutrophils and macrophages and the exacerbation of acute pancreatic inflammation

  13. Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Sandra; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), taxonomical name human gammaherpesvirus 8, is a phylogenetically old human virus that co-evolved with human populations, but is now only common (seroprevalence greater than 10%) in sub-Saharan Africa, around the Mediterranean Sea, parts of South America and in a few ethnic communities. KSHV causes three human malignancies, Kaposi sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma, and many cases of the plasmablastic form of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) as well as occasional cases of plasmablastic lymphoma arising from MCD; it has also been linked to rare cases of bone marrow failure and hepatitis. As it has colonized humans physiologically for many thousand years, cofactors are needed to allow it to unfold its pathogenic potential. In most cases, these include immune defects of genetic, iatrogenic or infectious origin, and inflammation appears to play an important role in disease development. Our much improved understanding of its life cycle and its role in pathogenesis should now allow us to develop new therapeutic strategies directed against key viral proteins or intracellular pathways that are crucial for virus replication or persistence. Likewise, its limited (for a herpesvirus) distribution and transmission should offer an opportunity for the development and use of a vaccine to prevent transmission. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893942

  14. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Ge; Wan, Rong; Hu, Yanling; Ni, Jianbo; Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao; Shen, Jie; Tang, Maochun; Chen, Congying; Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Xingpeng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway

  15. Pancreatic acinar cells-derived cyclophilin A promotes pancreatic damage by activating NF-κB pathway in experimental pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Ge [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wan, Rong [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Hu, Yanling [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Ni, Jianbo [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Yin, Guojian; Xing, Miao [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Shen, Jie [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Tang, Maochun [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Chen, Congying [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Fan, Yuting; Xiao, Wenqin; Zhao, Yan [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Wang, Xingpeng, E-mail: wangxingpeng@hotmail.com [Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Department of Gastroenterology, Shanghai First People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); and others

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • CypA is upregulated in experimental pancreatitis. • CCK induces expression and release of CypA in acinar cell in vitro. • rCypA aggravates CCK-induced acinar cell death and inflammatory cytokine production. • rCypA activates the NF-κB pathway in acinar cells in vitro. - Abstract: Inflammation triggered by necrotic acinar cells contributes to the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis (AP), but its precise mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that Cyclophilin A (CypA) released from necrotic cells is involved in the pathogenesis of several inflammatory diseases. We therefore investigated the role of CypA in experimental AP induced by administration of sodium taurocholate (STC). CypA was markedly upregulated and widely expressed in disrupted acinar cells, infiltrated inflammatory cells, and tubular complexes. In vitro, it was released from damaged acinar cells by cholecystokinin (CCK) induction. rCypA (recombinant CypA) aggravated CCK-induced acinar cell necrosis, promoted nuclear factor (NF)-κB p65 activation, and increased cytokine production. In conclusion, CypA promotes pancreatic damage by upregulating expression of inflammatory cytokines of acinar cells via the NF-κB pathway.

  16. Diabetes mellitus and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Daminova

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Currently, an increasing importance is given to the study of the problem of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, which is observed in a significant number of patients with diabetes mellitus (DM type 1 and 2 and can potentially affect the compensation of DM. The mechanism of reducing the external secretion of the pancreas in DM is associated with an imbalance of inhibitory and stimulating pancreatic secretion of hormones, with fibrosis of the gland as a result of diabetic angiopathy. In type 2 DM, the mechanisms that result from the metabolic syndrome are involved in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Enzyme replacement the­rapy should be considered as one of the promising methods of treating DM patients.

  17. [Update on chronic pancreatitis: review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czul, Frank; Coronel, Emmanuel; Donet, Jean A

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive fibro-inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by irreversible fibrosis of the gland with eventual failure of exocrine and endocrine functions and hallmark features of abdominal pain, malabsorption, malnutrition, diabetes mellitus and pancreatic calcifications. In many patients this disease results from a complex mix of environmental (eg, alcohol, cigarettes, and occupational chemicals), genetic factors and a few patients with hereditary or autoimmune disease. The management includes medical, endoscopic and surgical approaches with the need for interaction between various specialties, calling for a concerted multidisciplinary approach. This review provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the studies summarizing the epidemiology, etiology, physiopatology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatments of the disease.

  18. Chronic alcoholism and microbial keratitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Ormerod, L. D.; Gomez, D. S.; Schanzlin, D. J.; Smith, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    In a series of 227 consecutive, non-referred patients with microbial keratitis an analysis of the accumulated hospital records showed that one-third were associated with chronic alcoholism. The diagnosis of alcoholism was usually unsuspected on admission to hospital. The microbial pathogenesis in these patients was distinctive; coagulase-negative staphylococci, alpha- and beta-streptococci, moraxellae, enteric Gram-negative bacilli, and polymicrobial infections were unusually prominent. Pseud...

  19. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-06-28

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down's syndrome and Parkinson's disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus.

  20. Pathogenesis of achalasia cardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Uday C; Daschakraborty, Sunil B; Singh, Renu

    2012-01-01

    Achalasia cardia is one of the common causes of motor dysphagia. Though the disease was first described more than 300 years ago, exact pathogenesis of this condition still remains enigmatic. Pathophysiologically, achalasia cardia is caused by loss of inhibitory ganglion in the myenteric plexus of the esophagus. In the initial stage, degeneration of inhibitory nerves in the esophagus results in unopposed action of excitatory neurotransmitters such as acetylcholine, resulting in high amplitude non-peristaltic contractions (vigorous achalasia); progressive loss of cholinergic neurons over time results in dilation and low amplitude simultaneous contractions in the esophageal body (classic achalasia). Since the initial description, several studies have attempted to explore initiating agents that may cause the disease, such as viral infection, other environmental factors, autoimmunity, and genetic factors. Though Chagas disease, which mimics achalasia, is caused by an infective agent, available evidence suggests that infection may not be an independent cause of primary achalasia. A genetic basis for achalasia is supported by reports showing occurrence of disease in monozygotic twins, siblings and other first-degree relatives and occurrence in association with other genetic diseases such as Down’s syndrome and Parkinson’s disease. Polymorphisms in genes encoding for nitric oxide synthase, receptors for vasoactive intestinal peptide, interleukin 23 and the ALADIN gene have been reported. However, studies on larger numbers of patients and controls from different ethnic groups are needed before definite conclusions can be obtained. Currently, the disease is believed to be multi-factorial, with autoimmune mechanisms triggered by infection in a genetically predisposed individual leading to degeneration of inhibitory ganglia in the wall of the esophagus. PMID:22791940

  1. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  2. Osteoblast role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruotti, Nicola; Corrado, Addolorata; Cantatore, Francesco P

    2017-11-01

    Even if osteoarthritis pathogenesis is still poorly understood, numerous evidences suggest that osteoblasts dysregulation plays a key role in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. An abnormal expression of OPG and RANKL has been described in osteoarthritis osteoblasts, which is responsible for abnormal bone remodeling and decreased mineralization. Alterations in genes expression are involved in dysregulation of osteoblast function, bone remodeling, and mineralization, leading to osteoarthritis development. Moreover, osteoblasts produce numerous transcription factors, growth factors, and other proteic molecules which are involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Physiology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Surgical Approaches to Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Hartmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease resulting in permanent structural damage of the pancreas. It is mainly characterized by recurring epigastric pain and pancreatic insufficiency. In addition, progression of the disease might lead to additional complications, such as pseudocyst formation or development of pancreatic cancer. The medical and surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis has changed significantly in the past decades. With regard to surgical management, pancreatic head resection has been shown to be a mainstay in the treatment of severe chronic pancreatitis because the pancreatic head mass is known to trigger the chronic inflammatory process. Over the years, organ-preserving procedures, such as the duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection and the pylorus-preserving Whipple, have become the surgical standard and have led to major improvements in pain relief, preservation of pancreatic function, and quality of life of patients.

  4. A modern review of the operative management of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jonathan C; Abeywardina, Shannon; Farrell, James J; Reber, Howard A; Hines, O Joe

    2010-10-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a debilitating disease resulting in pain, intestinal malabsorption, endocrine dysfunction, and poor quality of life (QoL). Our aim was to analyze surgical outcomes for patients with chronic pancreatitis. Data for patients undergoing operations for chronic pancreatitis between 1990 and 2009 were reviewed. Demographics, operative and perioperative data, and survival were catalogued. QoL was determined (Short Form 36 and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire + PAN-26) and compared with historical controls. The mean age was 51 +/- 2 years, 38 patients were male (53%), the most common indication was pain (71%), the etiology of pancreatitis often was alcohol, and most patients underwent a Whipple procedure (56%). Operative time was 316 +/- 17 minutes and blood loss was 363 +/- 75 mL. There were 34 complications in 30 patients (42%) and one death. QoL surveys were administered for 25 of 55 (45%) surviving patients at a mean follow-up of 72 +/- 16 months. Mean survival was 99 +/- 9 months, whereas 5- and 10-year survival were 86 and 75 per cent. QoL scores were uniformly better than historical controls. Our data demonstrate that operations for chronic pancreatitis can be performed with acceptable morbidity and mortality. Patients have excellent survival and improved QoL compared with historical controls. Surgery is an effective and durable treatment option for patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  5. Subclassification of autoimmune pancreatitis: a histologic classification with clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Vikram; Gupta, Rajib; Sainani, Nisha; Sahani, Dushyant V; Virk, Renu; Ferrone, Cristina; Khosroshahi, Arezou; Stone, John H; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Examination of pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP has shown that there are 2 subclasses of this disease. However, there is no widely accepted pathologic classification scheme and the clinical significance of such a classification remains to be established. In this study, we revisited the subclassification of AIP and examine whether this provides clinically and prognostically meaningful information. We evaluated 29 pancreatic resection specimens from patients with AIP. Demographic, clinical, and imaging data were recorded, as was evidence of extrapancreatic manifestations. In addition to a detailed and semiquantitative histologic evaluation, immunohistochemistry for IgG4 was performed on pancreatic and extrapancreatic tissues. We also evaluated 48 consecutive cases of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified. The resected specimens could readily be subclassified into 2 subtypes: type 1 (n=11) and type 2 (n=18). In comparison with patients with type 2 disease, patients with type 1 disease were significantly more likely to be males (P=0.09), older (P=0.02), and present with jaundice (P=0.01), and less likely to be associated with abdominal pain (P=0.04). On imaging, the pancreatic tail cut-off sign was exclusively seen in patients with type 2 disease (4 of 10 cases). Hypercellular inflamed interlobular stroma was unique to type 1 pattern (91%), whereas significant ductal injury in the form of microabscesses and ductal ulceration was almost exclusively seen in type 2 pattern (78%). Eight of 10 patients with a type 1 pattern had evidence of a systemic disease. Three patients with type 2 disease had recurrent episodes of pancreatitis after their pancreatic resection. In comparison with the cohort of chronic pancreatitis, not otherwise specified, type 2 AIP cases were less likely to be associated with a history of alcohol abuse, and showed significantly more foci of

  6. Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphris, Jeremy L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J; Johns, Amber L; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K; Miller, David K; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S; Quinn, Michael C J; Bruxner, Timothy J C; Christ, Angelika N; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Stone, Andrew; Wilson, Peter J; Anderson, Matthew; Fink, J Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Mead, Ronald S; Xu, Qinying; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Nagrial, Adnan M; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Chou, Angela; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Jamieson, Nigel B; McKay, Colin J; Carter, C Ross; Dickson, Euan J; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Grützmann, Robert; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Rusev, Borislav; Corbo, Vincenzo; Salvia, Roberto; Cataldo, Ivana; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Hofmann, Oliver; Eshleman, James R; Pilarsky, Christian; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Gill, Anthony J; Pearson, John V; Grimmond, Sean M; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  8. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goff, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  9. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Lanspa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer.

  10. CT diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan Baoqing; Jin Erhu; Zhang Lizhen; Jiang Haibin

    1997-01-01

    To improve the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. The CT findings of 154 cases with pancreatic carcinoma, chronic pancreatitis and mis-diagnosed other pancreatic diseases proven clinically and pathologically were analysed. Slice thickness of 8 mm and slice interval of 8 mm were used and thin-section scan and enhancement study were performed in some cases. The main signs in degassing and differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis included: (1) focal or diffuse enlargement and density abnormality of pancreas; (2) dilated common bile duct was suddenly obstructed, peripancreatic blood vessels were invaded and cancerous thrombus was revealed, enlargement of abdominal lymph nodes and metastasis in the liver were discovered; (3) calcium deposit in the pancreatic duct area and dilated pancreatic duct which passed through the lesion or not; (4) presence and location of pancreatic cyst and its relationship to pancreatic contour. CT is the imaging modality of choice in the diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis at present. The diagnostic accuracy of CT was over 90% in this series

  11. Hypermutation in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Humphris, Jeremy L.; Patch, Ann-Marie; Nones, Katia; Bailey, Peter J.; Johns, Amber L.; McKay, Skye; Chang, David K.; Miller, David K.; Pajic, Marina; Kassahn, Karin S.; Quinn, Michael C.J.; Bruxner, Timothy J.C.; Christ, Angelika N.; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechan...

  12. Management of pancreatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, E; Abba, J; Arvieux, C; Trilling, B; Sage, P Y; Mougin, N; Perou, S; Lavagne, P; Létoublon, C

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic trauma (PT) is associated with high morbidity and mortality; the therapeutic options remain debated. Retrospective study of PT treated in the University Hospital of Grenoble over a 22-year span. The decision for initial laparotomy depended on hemodynamic status as well as on associated lesions. Main pancreatic duct lesions were always searched for. PT lesions were graded according to the AAST classification. Of a total of 46 PT, 34 were grades II or I. Hemodynamic instability led to immediate laparotomy in 18 patients, for whom treatment was always drainage of the pancreatic bed; morbidity was 30%. Eight patients had grade III injuries, six of whom underwent immediate operation: three underwent splenopancreatectomy without any major complications while the other three who had simple drainage required re-operation for peritonitis, with one death related to pancreatic complications. Four patients had grades IV or V PT: two pancreatoduodenectomies were performed, with no major complication, while one patient underwent duodenal reconstruction with pancreatic drainage, complicated by pancreatic and duodenal fistula requiring a hospital stay of two months. The post-trauma course was complicated for all patients with main pancreatic duct involvement. Our outcomes were similar to those found in the literature. In patients with distal PT and main pancreatic duct involvement, simple drainage is associated with high morbidity and mortality. For proximal PT, the therapeutic options of drainage versus pancreatoduodenectomy must be weighed; pancreatoduodenectomy may be unavoidable when the duodenum is injured as well. Two-stage (resection first, reconstruction later) could be an effective alternative in the emergency setting when there are other associated traumatic lesions. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. The Impact of Risk Factors of Chronic Pancreatitis on Secretin Pancreatic Function Testing: Results of a 20-Year Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothari, Darshan; Ketwaroo, Gyanprakash; Freedman, Steven D; Sheth, Sunil G

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of established risk factors on the outcome of secretin pancreatic function testing (sPFT) in patients undergoing work-up for suspected chronic pancreatitis. We completed a retrospective review of patients who underwent sPFT for suspected chronic pancreatitis over 20 years. We compared peak bicarbonate concentrations between groups and completed univariate and multivariate analyses to determine associations between risk factors and positive sPFT results (peak bicarbonate pancreatitis (RAP) and with local complications from acute pancreatitis (AP) (P ≤ 0.05). The bicarbonate concentration in patients with and without other risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol use, and family history of pancreatitis was not significantly different. Female sex, a history of AP, and a history of RAP were associated with positive sPFT results on univariate analysis (P ≤ 0.05). On multivariate analysis, sex and RAP remained significant. Our study demonstrates that female sex, history of AP and RAP, and AP with local complications are associated with positive sPFT results or lower peak bicarbonate concentration. However, other risk factors do not impact the results of sPFT.

  14. Patterns of Pathomorphological Changes in Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kovalska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acinar necrosis is the basic microscopic sign of acute necrotizing pancreatitis (ANP. Microcirculation disorder is one of the major factors in the pathogenesis and morphogenesis of ANP besides free radicals and damage of enzymatic origin. This study is dedicated to the description of microscopic changes in the pancreatic stroma in ANP, which leads to destruction of the exocrine pancreas with a putative mechanism of endocrine function preservation. This study has been carried out on histological samples of pancreas from 224 patients with ANP. Histological staining was performed with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E, Masson, Gomori methods, and PAS. Microscopy was performed with magnifications of 40×, 100×, and 400×. Vascular endothelial desquamation, stasis, and sludge are typical changes in microcirculation observed in early stages of ANP. Initially, parietal circular intravascular microthrombosis accompanied by endothelial desquamation as early as stromal swelling occurs with no detectable necrosis. Residual stroma appears between areas of necrosis and intact pancreatic tissue. Mucoid swelling is first seen in the perivascular spaces extending to the parenchyma and changing into fibrinoid imbibition causing further necrosis. Reticulin argyrophilic backbone surrounding the pancreatic acini and small ducts decompose. Pancreatic structures, which may be preserved in necrotic tissue, include nerves, major ducts, and Langerhans islets.

  15. Prevalence of chronic pancreatitis: Results of a primary care physician-based population study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capurso, Gabriele; Archibugi, Livia; Pasquali, Piera; Aceti, Alessandro; Balducci, Paolo; Bianchi, Patrizia; Buono, Francesco; Camerucci, Stefano; Cantarini, Rosanna; Centofanti, Sergio; Colantonio, Patrizia; Cremaschi, Riccarda; Crescenzi, Sergio; Di Mauro, Caterina; Di Renzi, Davide; Filabozzi, Andrea; Fiorillo, Alfonso; Giancaspro, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Paola; Lanna, Giuseppe; Medori, Claudio; Merletti, Emilio; Nunnari, Enzo; Paris, Francesca; Pavone, Marco; Piacenti, Angela; Rossi, Almerindo; Scamuffa, Maria Cristina; Spinelli, Giovanni; Taborchi, Marco; Valente, Biagio; Villanova, Antonella; Chiriatti, Alberto; Delle Fave, Gianfranco

    2017-05-01

    Data on chronic pancreatitis prevalence are scanty and usually limited to hospital-based studies. Investigating chronic pancreatitis prevalence in primary care. Participating primary care physicians reported the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis among their registered patients, environmental factors and disease characteristics. The data were centrally reviewed and chronic pancreatitis cases defined according to M-ANNHEIM criteria for diagnosis and severity and TIGAR-O classification for etiology. Twenty-three primary care physicians participated in the study. According to their judgment, 51 of 36.401 patients had chronic pancreatitis. After reviewing each patient data, 11 turned out to have definite, 5 probable, 19 borderline and 16 uncertain disease. Prevalence was 30.2/100.000 for definite cases and 44.0/100.000 for definite plus probable cases. Of the 16 patients with definite/probable diagnosis, 8 were male, with mean age of 55.6 (±16.7). Four patients had alcoholic etiology, 5 post-acute/recurrent pancreatitis, 6 were deemed to be idiopathic. Four had pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, 10 were receiving pancreatic enzymes, and six had pain. Most patients had initial stage and non-severe disease. This is the first study investigating the prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in primary care. Results suggest that the prevalence in this context is higher than in hospital-based studies, with specific features, possibly representing an earlier disease stage. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  17. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D.; Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S.

    2006-01-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  18. Epithelial NEMO/IKKγ limits fibrosis and promotes regeneration during pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Kwan; Gerstenlauer, Melanie; Konukiewitz, Björn; Steiger, Katja; Weichert, Wilko; Wirth, Thomas; Maier, Harald Jakob

    2017-11-01

    Inhibitory κB kinase (IKK)/nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) signalling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, but its precise function has remained controversial. Here, we analyse the contribution of IKK/NF-κB signalling in epithelial cells to the pathogenesis of pancreatitis by targeting the IKK subunit NF-κB essential modulator (NEMO) (IKKγ), which is essential for canonical NF-κB activation. Mice with a targeted deletion of NEMO in the pancreas were subjected to caerulein pancreatitis. Pancreata were examined at several time points and analysed for inflammation, fibrosis, cell death, cell proliferation, as well as cellular differentiation. Human samples were used to corroborate findings established in mice. In acute pancreatitis, NEMO deletion in the pancreatic parenchyma resulted in minor changes during the early phase but led to the persistence of inflammatory and fibrotic foci in the recovery phase. In chronic pancreatitis, NEMO deletion aggravated inflammation and fibrosis, inhibited compensatory acinar cell proliferation, and enhanced acinar atrophy and acinar-ductal metaplasia. Gene expression analysis revealed sustained activation of profibrogenic genes and the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis in the absence of epithelial NEMO. In human chronic pancreatitis samples, the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis was activated as well, with CXCR4 expression correlating with the degree of fibrosis. The aggravating effects of NEMO deletion were attenuated by the administration of the CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100. Our results suggest that NEMO in epithelial cells exerts a protective effect during pancreatitis by limiting inflammation and fibrosis and improving acinar cell regeneration. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis is an important mediator of that effect and may also be of importance in human chronic pancreatitis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Fatal hemorrhagic–necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni Laura

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus, or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  20. Fatal hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis in an obese Asian palm civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura, Bongiovanni; Nicola, Di Girolamo; Alessandro, Montani; Leonardo, Della Salda; Paolo, Selleri

    2014-05-01

    Asian palm civets (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus), or toddy cats, belong to the family Viverridae. Little is known about the pathology of these animals and few articles have been published, mainly concerning their important role as wild reservoir hosts for severe infectious diseases of domestic animals and human beings. A 4-year-old, female Asian palm civet was found dead by the owner. At necropsy, large amount of adipose tissue was found in the subcutis and in the peritoneal cavity. Most of the pancreas appeared red, translucent. Hepatomegaly, discoloration of the liver were evident, with multifocal areas of degeneration, characterized by white nodular lesions. Histologically, the pancreas showed severe interstitial and perilobular necrosis and extensive haemorrhages, with separation of the interstitium, mild reactive inflammation at the periphery of the pancreatic lobules. Liver showed multifocal foci of vacuolar degeneration, lipidic accumulation, sometimes associated to hepatocyte necrosis. A diagnosis of acute severe hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis (or acute pancreatic necrosis) associated with pancreatic and hepatic lipidosis was made. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first case report of acute lethal pancreatitis in an Asian palm civet. Although the exact cause of the disease remains undetermined, a hypothesis of the cause and pathogenesis is discussed, pointing out dietary indiscretion and consequent overweight as possible important risk factors.

  1. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function and salivary gland function in autoimmune pancreatitis before and after steroid therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Egawa, Naoto; Inokuma, Shigeko; Tsuruta, Kouji; Okamoto, Atsutake; Kamata, Noriko; Nakamura, Teruo; Matsukawa, Masakatsu

    2003-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a distinct clinical entity in which an autoimmune mechanism may be involved in pathogenesis. To investigate salivary gland function in addition to pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in patients with AIP, and to determine changes occurring after steroid therapy. Fasting serum glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance tests or glycosylated hemoglobin values were examined in 19 patients with AIP. N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid excretion test, sialochemistry and parotid gland scintigraphy were performed in 8 patients. Eight patients had evidence of DM. Steroid therapy subsequently improved insulin secretion and glycemic control in 3 of 5 patients treated. Pancreatic exocrine function was reduced in 88% of patients. Impaired pancreatic exocrine function improved after steroid therapy in 3 of 6 patients treated. The 3 patients also showed treatment-related improvement in endocrine function. Concentration of beta2-microglobulin in saliva was significantly raised in patients with AIP compared with controls (P gland dysfunction improved after steroid therapy in all 5 patients treated. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine and salivary gland function were frequently impaired in patients with AIP, and steroid therapy was occasionally effective for these dysfunctions.

  2. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  3. Genetic inhibition of protein kinase Cε attenuates necrosis in experimental pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yannan; Tan, Tanya; Jia, Wenzhuo; Lugea, Aurelia; Mareninova, Olga; Waldron, Richard T.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the regulation of death pathways, necrosis and apoptosis, in pancreatitis is important for developing therapies directed to the molecular pathogenesis of the disease. Protein kinase Cε (PKCε) has been previously shown to regulate inflammatory responses and zymogen activation in pancreatitis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that ethanol specifically activated PKCε in pancreatic acinar cells and that PKCε mediated the sensitizing effects of ethanol on inflammatory response in pancreatitis. Here we investigated the role of PKCε in the regulation of death pathways in pancreatitis. We found that genetic deletion of PKCε resulted in decreased necrosis and severity in the in vivo cerulein-induced pancreatitis and that inhibition of PKCε protected the acinar cells from CCK-8 hyperstimulation-induced necrosis and ATP reduction. These findings were associated with upregulation of mitochondrial Bak and Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, proapoptotic and prosurvival members in the Bcl-2 family, respectively, as well as increased mitochondrial cytochrome c release, caspase activation, and apoptosis in pancreatitis in PKCε knockout mice. We further confirmed that cerulein pancreatitis induced a dramatic mitochondrial translocation of PKCε, suggesting that PKCε regulated necrosis in pancreatitis via mechanisms involving mitochondria. Finally, we showed that PKCε deletion downregulated inhibitors of apoptosis proteins, c-IAP2, survivin, and c-FLIPs while promoting cleavage/inactivation of receptor-interacting protein kinase (RIP). Taken together, our findings provide evidence that PKCε activation during pancreatitis promotes necrosis through mechanisms involving mitochondrial proapoptotic and prosurvival Bcl-2 family proteins and upregulation of nonmitochondrial pathways that inhibit caspase activation and RIP cleavage/inactivation. Thus PKCε is a potential target for prevention and/or treatment of acute pancreatitis. PMID:25035113

  4. Severe acute pancreatitis and selective decontamination (Results of a Illulticentel' contl'olled clinical trial)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J.T. Luiten (Ernest)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractFrom a mild self-limiting disease, development of multiple organ failure and frequently septic complications towards a fulminant course resistant to any type of treatment, acute pancreatitis is a disorder that has numerous causes, an obscure pathogenesis and an often unpredictable

  5. Modern Achievements of European Pancreatology (Following 44th Meeting of European Pancreatic Club

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Gubergrits

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article represents results of main scientific researches in pancreatology carried out in 2011–2012. There were stated achievements of leading pancreatologists of Europe regarding study of etiology, pathogenesis, diagnostics, treatment of pancreatitis, tumors of the pancreas.

  6. Altered central pain processing after pancreatic surgery for chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwense, S. A.; Ahmed Ali, U.; ten Broek, R. P.; Issa, Y.; van Eijck, C. H.; Wilder-Smith, O. H.; van Goor, H.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain is common in chronic pancreatitis (CP) and may involve altered central pain processing. This study evaluated the relationship between pain processing and pain outcome after pancreatic duct decompression and/or pancreatic resection in patients with CP. Patients with CP

  7. Potential New Pharmacological Agents Derived From Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Haniye; Khakshur, Ali Asghar; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-01-01

    In the present article, we reviewed plants and phytochemical compounds demonstrating beneficial effects in pancreatic cancer to find new sources of pharmaceutical agents. For this purpose, Scopus, PubMed, Web of Science, and Google scholar were searched for plants or herbal components with beneficial effects in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Data were collected up to January 2013. The search terms were "plant," "herb," "herbal therapy," or "phytotherapy" and "pancreatic cancer" or "pancreas." All of the human in vivo and in vitro studies were included. According to studies, among diverse plants and phytochemicals, 12 compounds including apigenin, genistein, quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, benzyl isothiocyanate, sulforaphane, curcumin, thymoquinone, dihydroartemisinin, cucurbitacin B, and perillyl alcohol have beneficial action against pancreatic cancer cells through 4 or more mechanisms. Applying their plausible synergistic effects can be an imperative approach for finding new efficient pharmacological agents in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

  8. CT of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Toshio

    1990-01-01

    One hundred and two cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were studied by computed tomography. Fluid collection was detected by CT in 45 cases, and the common extrapancreatic sites of involvement included the lesser sac (13 cases), anterior pararenal space (9 cases), transverse mesocolon (7 cases) and posterior pararenal space (5 cases). Ten cases of spontaneous resolution of pancreatic pseudocysts were encountered. Cystojejunostomy was done on 6 patients. A 4-to-6-weeks time interval has been currently accepted as necessary for pseudocyst wall maturation. However, the surgery was not possible in two patients in this series since the cyst wall was too thin. It is considered that the time over 3 months is required for surgical anastomosis of the cyst to the gastrointestinal tract. Pancreatic abscess has become the most common cause of death from pancreatitis. In this series pancreatic abscess occurred in 8 patients. Gas collection in the pancreas was observed in only one patient. In the other patients, pseudocysts had become infected and converted to abscesses. The CT number of 4 infected pseudocysts was less than 15 HU. Thus, it was not possible to distinguish infected from noninfected pseudocysts by CT. The author studied 9 patients with focal inflammatory mass of the pancreas with histologically proved severe fibrosis. All masses were small. Angiography showed occlusion or marked stenosis of the splenic vein in 3 cases. The postcontract CT (after intravenous bolus injection) in 7 cases of focal inflammatory mass demonstrated almost equal enhanced effect of the mass as compared with the adjacent normal pancreatic parenchyma. This finding is considered to be useful in distinguishing inflammatory mass from pancreatic carcinoma. (author)

  9. Acute pancreatitis: staging with CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gialeli, E.; Petrocheilou, G.; Georgaki, S.; Tzemailas, I.; Adraktas, A.; Charilas, G.; Patsiogiannis, V.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Computed Tomography (CT) is the imaging modality of choice for the diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis and its complications. Objectives and tasks: The purpose of this presentation is to demonstrate the findings in CT images which are useful for staging acute pancreatitis according to Balthazar, their significance and restrictions. Materials and methods: CT images from patients who were referred to our Department for an abdominal CT scan for the diagnosis or/and staging of acute pancreatitis were retrospectively studied. Results: In acute pancreatitis, CT helps to stage the severity of inflammatory process, to detect pancreatic necrosis and to depict local complications. CT severity index (CTSI), which was proposed by Balthazar et al, combines the grade of pancreatitis with the extent of pancreatic necrosis assigning points to the patients in order to find the severity index which scales from 0-10. More points are given for a higher grade of pancreatitis and for more extensive necrosis. Types of pancreatitis according to CTSI are: interstitial (Balthazar grade A-C), exudative (Balthazar grade D or E), necrotising (Balthazar grade E, CTSI:10) and central gland necrotising. Patients with pancreatitis but no collections or necrosis have an interstitial (mild) pancreatitis. In exudative pancreatitis there is normal enhancement of the entire pancreas associated with extensive peripancreatic collections. Necrotizing (severe) pancreatitis is characterized by protacted clinical course, high incidence of local complications and high mortality rate. Central gland necrosis is a subtype of necrotizing pancreatitis. Conclusions: The combination of CT imaging and clinical and laboratory evaluation allows the early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis may vary from a mild uneventful disease to a severe life-threatening illness with multisystemic organ failure. Thus, it is crucial to identify patients who are at high risk of severe

  10. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Olesen, Anne Estrup; Brokjaer, Anne; Fisher, Iben Wendelboe; Larsen, Isabelle Myriam

    2013-01-01

    Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal ...

  11. Early diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis: understanding the factors associated with the development of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Akane; Irisawa, Atsushi; Shibukawa, Goro; Sato, Ai; Fujisawa, Mariko; Arakawa, Noriyuki; Yoshida, Yoshitsugu; Abe, Yoko; Igarashi, Ryo; Maki, Takumi; Yamamoto, Shogo

    2017-04-28

    The prognosis of advanced chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poor with the mortality rate approximately two-fold higher than the general population according to a survey of the prognosis of CP. From this standpoint, the concept of early CP was propagated in Japan in 2009 to encourage the medical treatment for the earlier stages of CP. That is, picking up the patients suspicious for early CP and then providing medical treatment for them are very important not only for patients, but also for health care economics. In this review, we described some potential factors associated with the development of CP (alcohol, smoking, past history of acute pancreatitis, aging, gallstone, and gender) that are extremely important to discover patients with early-stage CP.

  12. Demographic and clinicopathological profile of patients with chronic pancreatitis in a tertiary referral teaching hospital of West Bengal: Personal experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Prosanta Kumar; Mukerjee, Aishik; Adhikary, Chandranath

    2015-09-01

    There is a paucity of data on the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis from the eastern part of India. This study documents the demographic and clinicopathological profiles of patients with chronic pancreatitis presenting to a general surgery unit of a tertiary referral hospital of Kolkata. The records of 145 patients presenting with chronic pancreatitis over a 5-year period were scrutinized and their demographics, clinical profile, and complications and morphological changes of the pancreas are described. Of the 145 patients, more than 50% were under the age of 30 years. Males were affected more frequently than females (M/F = 3.8:1). While idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis (41.4%), alcohol was found to be the most common etiology (37.9%). Pain was the most common presenting symptom (n = 143; 98.6%). Sixty-five subjects (45%) had diabetes of which 32 subjects were insulin-dependent. On contrast-enhanced computed tomography, ductal dilatation was seen in 80 (55.17%) subjects, while ductal calculi and ductal dilatation in 54 cases (37.2%). Parenchymal calcification was seen in 45 patients of whom 40 patients (89%) were under the age of 30 years. Pseudocyst was the most common complication (n = 16) followed by biliary obstruction (n = 8) and portal hypertension (n = 4). Patients with alcoholic pancreatitis had significantly higher frequency of severe abdominal pain, diabetes, and local complications as compared to the other forms of pancreatitis in our study. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of chronic pancreatitis in this study, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis and then tropical pancreatitis.

  13. A Mini-Review on the Effect of Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA on Cerulein-Induced and Hypertriglyceridemic Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo Kyung Jeong

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis refers to the sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It is associated with premature activation and release of digestive enzymes into the pancreatic interstitium and systemic circulation, resulting in pancreatic tissue autodigestion and multiple organ dysfunction, as well as with increased cytokine production, ultimately leading to deleterious local and systemic effects. Although mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have not been completely elucidated, oxidative stress is regarded as a major risk factor. In human acute pancreatitis, lipid peroxide levels in pancreatic tissues increase. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (C22:6n-3, exerts anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects on various cells. Previous studies have shown that DHA activates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and induces catalase, which inhibits oxidative stress-mediated inflammatory signaling required for cytokine expression in experimental acute pancreatitis using cerulein. Cerulein, a cholecystokinin analog, induces intra-acinar activation of trypsinogen in the pancreas, which results in human acute pancreatitis-like symptoms. Therefore, DHA supplementation may be beneficial for preventing or inhibiting acute pancreatitis development. Since DHA reduces serum triglyceride levels, addition of DHA to lipid-lowering drugs like statins has been investigated to reduce hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis. However, high DHA concentrations increase cytosolic Ca2+, which activates protein kinase C and may induce hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis. In this review, effect of DHA on cerulein-induced and hypertriglyceridemic acute pancreatitis has been discussed. The relation of high concentration of DHA to hyperlipidemic acute pancreatitis has been included.

  14. Genetic basis of chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, JBMJ; Morsche, RT; van Goor, Harry; Drenth, JPH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Pancreatitis has a proven genetic basis in a minority of patients. Methods: Review of the literature on genetics of pancreatitis. Results: Ever since the discovery that in most patients with hereditary pancreatitis a mutation in the gene encoding for cationic trypsinogen (R122H) was

  15. Multidisciplinaire behandeling van chronische pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kempeneers, M. A.; Besselink, M. G.; Issa, Y.; van Hooft, J. E.; van Goor, H.; Bruno, M. J.; van Santvoort, H. C.; Boermeester, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    - Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease, which leads to a severe decrease in quality of life and reduced life expectancy.- 85-90% of patients with chronic pancreatitis consult the doctor because of pain.- Pain in chronic pancreatitis has a multifactorial aetiology, with

  16. Pancreatic Cancer—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancreatic cancer can form in exocrine cells and neuroendocrine cells. The exocrine type is more common and is usually found at an advanced stage. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are less common but have a better prognosis. Start here to find information on pancreatic cancer treatment, research, and statistics.

  17. ALCOHOL I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the increase in alcohol marketing activities by the transnational alcohol corporations in Nigeria .... were recorded with a digital device with ..... era (i.e., before alcohol industry was es- tablished in ..... university student drinking: A na-.

  18. Implications of alcoholic cirrhosis in atherosclerosis of autopsied patients

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Luciano Alves Matias da; Torquato, Bianca Gonçalves Silva; Oliveira, Mariana Silva; Juliano, Guilherme Ribeiro; Oliveira, Lívia Ferreira; Cavellani, Camila Lourencini; Ramalho, Luciana Santos; Espindula, Ana Paula; Teixeira, Vicente de Paula Antunes; Ferraz, Mara Lúcia Fonseca

    2017-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Alcoholism is a major public health problem, which has a high social cost and affects many aspects of human activity. Liver disease is one of the first consequences of alcohol abuse, and steatosis, liver cirrhosis and hepatitis may occur. Other organs are also affected with pathological changes, such as pancreatitis, cardiomyopathies, dyslipidemias and atherosclerosis. Objective: To identify the occurrence and degree of atherosclerosis in alcohol-dependent individuals ...

  19. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration. PMID:28748172

  20. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borran, Mina; Minaiyan, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2017-01-01

    Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris ( T. terrestris ) could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o.) and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p.) to different groups of mice (n=6). Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p.) of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o.) and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p.) reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  1. Protective effect of Tribulus terrestris fruit extract on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Borran

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic and antimicrobial activities of Tribulus terrestris (T. terrestris could be helpful in the treatment of acute pancreatitis; thus, this study was designed to investigate the effects of T. terrestris on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in mice. Materials and Methods: Three doses (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg of T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract were administered both orally (60 minutes before pancreatitis induction, p.o. and intra-peritoneally (30 minutes before pancreatitis induction, i.p. to different groups of mice (n=6. Pancreatitis was induced by five injections (i.p. of cerulein 50μg/kg body weight with 1 hr intervals. Animals were euthanized 5 hr after the last injection of cerulein and tissue injures were assessed biochemically and pathologically. Results: T. terrestris extract 200 and 400mg/kg (p.o. and T. terrestris extract 400 mg/kg (i.p. reduced pancreatic tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and serum amylase and lipase levels and alleviated histological parameters. Conclusion: These data suggest that T. terrestris hydro-alcoholic extract was effective in protecting against experimental acute pancreatitis and possibly the efficacy depends on dose and route of administration.

  2. Association between Smoking and the Progression of Computed Tomography Findings in Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Kim, Ho Gak; Lee, Dong Wook; Han, Jimin; Kwon, Hyuk Yong; Seo, Chang Jin; Oh, Ji Hye; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Kim, Eun Young

    2016-05-23

    Smoking and alcohol intake are two wellknown risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. However, there are few studies examining the association between smoking and changes in computed tomography (CT) findings in chronic pancreatitis. The authors evaluated associations between smoking, drinking and the progression of calcification on CT in chronic pancreatitis. In this retrospective study, 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis who had undergone initial and follow-up CT between January 2002 and September 2010 were included. Progression of calcification among CT findings was compared according to the amount of alcohol intake and smoking. The median duration of followup was 51.6 months (range, 17.1 to 112.7 months). At initial CT findings, there was pancreatic calcification in 35 patients (59.3%). In the follow-up CT, progression of calcification was observed in 37 patients (62.7%). Progression of calcification was more common in smokers according to the multivariate analysis (odds ratio [OR], 9.987; p=0.006). The amount of smoking was a significant predictor for progression of calcification in the multivariate analysis (OR, 6.051 in less than 1 pack per day smokers; OR, 36.562 in more than 1 pack per day smokers; p=0.008). Continued smoking accelerates pancreatic calcification, and the amount of smoking is associated with the progression of calcification in chronic pancreatitis.

  3. Robotic transgastric cystgastrostomy and pancreatic debridement in the management of pancreatic fluid collections following acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirks, Russell C; Sola, Richard; Iannitti, David A; Martinie, John B; Vrochides, Dionisios

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic and peripancreatic fluid collections may develop after severe acute pancreatitis. Organized fluid collections such as pancreatic pseudocyst and walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WOPN) that mature over time may require intervention to treat obstructive or constitutional symptoms related to the size and location of the collection as well as possible infection. Endoscopic, open surgical and minimally invasive techniques are described to treat post-inflammatory pancreatic fluid collections. Surgical intervention may be required to treat collections containing necrotic pancreatic parenchyma or in locations not immediately apposed to the stomach or duodenum. Comprising a blend of the surgical approach and the clinical benefits of minimally invasive surgery, the robot-assisted technique of pancreatic cystgastrostomy with pancreatic debridement is described.

  4. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and reti......In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane......, and reticulin, and the IgG- and IgA-type pancreas-specific antibodies against islet cells, acinus cells, and ductal cells (DA) were estimated blindly. In 23 of the patients chronic pancreatitis was verified, whereas chronic pancreatitis was rejected in 37 patients (control group). IgG and IgA were found...... in significantly higher concentrations in the patients with chronic pancreatitis than in the control group but within the normal range. ANA and DA occurred very frequently in both groups but with no statistical difference. Other autoantibodies only occurred sporadically. The findings of this study do not support...

  5. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  6. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W. Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis admitted to 15 Dutch

  7. an extended pancreatic normal subjects and ~in pancreatItIs In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    function . . patIents. N. H. GILlNSKY, A. S. MEE, I. N. MARKS. Summary. Exocrine pancreatic response was evaluated in patients with varying degrees of pancreatic damage and in control subjects by ... hormones, the Lundh meal and an oral pancreatic function test .... is any different from that of the cells in me normal gland.

  8. Endoscopic versus surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cahen, Djuna L.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Nio, Yung; Rauws, Erik A. J.; Boermeester, Marja A.; Busch, Olivier R.; Stoker, Jaap; Lameris, Johan S.; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G. W.; Huibregtse, Kees; Bruno, Marco J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: For patients with chronic pancreatitis and a dilated pancreatic duct, ductal decompression is recommended. We conducted a randomized trial to compare endoscopic and surgical drainage of the pancreatic duct. METHODS: All symptomatic patients with chronic pancreatitis and a distal

  9. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs.

  10. Imaging in pancreatic transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Matthew T; Bhargava, Puneet

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic transplantation, performed alone or in conjunction with kidney transplantation, is an effective treatment for advanced type I diabetes mellitus and select patients with type II diabetes mellitus. Following advancements in surgical technique, postoperative management, and immunosuppression, pancreatic transplantation has significantly improved the length and quality of life for patients suffering from pancreatic dysfunction. While computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have more limited utility, ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality to evaluate the transplanted pancreas; gray-scale assesses the parenchyma and fluid collections, while Doppler interrogation assesses vascular flow and viability. Ultrasound is also useful to guide percutaneous interventions for the transplanted pancreas. With knowledge of the surgical anatomy and common complications, the abdominal radiologist plays a central role in the perioperative and postoperative evaluation of the transplanted pancreas

  11. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia--an important cause of pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graesdal, Asgeir

    2008-05-01

    Moderate hypertriglyceridaemia is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and serious hypertriglyceridaemia, with triglyceride values above 10 mmol/L, increases the risk of pancreatitis. Gallstones and alcohol abuse are regarded as the two most important causes of acute pancreatitis, but the considerable risk posed by hypertriglyceridaemia has probably been underrated. It is therefore crucial to acquire updated knowledge and awareness of the fact that high levels of triglycerides can cause pancreatitis. This article is based on current literature retrieved though a search on the topic and clinical experience. Serious hypertriglyceridaemia is a relatively rare condition and its usual cause is genetic predisposition combined with obesity, diabetes or alcohol abuse. Certain types of medication, as well as pregnancy, are also well known causes. Current literature suggests that hypertriglyceridaemia is the cause of pancreatitis in 1-38% of the cases--a substantial variation. The condition is often accompanied by low amylase values and may therefore be underrated as a cause. Our case reports illustrate that the etiology is complex. Plasmapheresis or LDL-apheresis may be indicated when conservative treatment proves insufficient.

  12. Chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A variant of PRSS1 gene in a European patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Eszter; Cierna, Iveta; Vavrova, Ludmila; Ilencikova, Denisa; Konecny, Michal; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2014-01-10

    The major etiologic factor of chronic pancreatitis in adults is excessive alcohol consumption, whereas among children structural anomalies, systemic and metabolic disorders, and genetic factors are prevalent. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) cause hereditary pancreatitis, while mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes have been shown to associate with chronic pancreatitis as independent risk factors. We present a case of 13-year-old boy with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis. Given the unexplained attacks of pancreatitis since early childhood and despite the negative family history, molecular-genetic analysis of four pancreatitis susceptibility genes (PRSS1, SPINK1, CTRC and CFTR) was performed. The boy was found to carry the c.623G>C (p.G208A) mutation of the PRSS1 gene and the c.180C>T (p.G60G) mutation of the CTRC gene, both in heterozygous state. These mutations are considered as contributing risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. In children with idiopathic chronic pancreatitis genetic causes should be considered, even in absence of positive family history. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first description of a European patient with chronic pancreatitis associated with the p.G208A mutation of PRSS1 gene. This mutation was previously reported only in Asian subjects and is thought to be a unique genetic cause of pancreatitis in Asia.

  13. Rate of recurrence in Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and identification of chronicity on follow up: Possible risk factors for progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalaria, Rishikesh; Abraham, Philip; Desai, Devendra C; Joshi, Anand; Gupta, Tarun

    2018-03-01

    To study the profile and long-term outcome of Indian patients presenting with acute pancreatitis and the possible risk factors for progression. Consecutive patients with acute or recurrent acute pancreatitis seen in our department during July 2013 to December 2014 were included. Details of past episodes were collected and patients were followed up till March 2015. In the 97 patients included (mean age 47.2 [SD 16.9] years; 74 men), gallstones (37 [38.1%]) and alcohol (19 [19.6%]) were the major identified etiologies; the idiopathic (31 [32%]) group constituted a third of patients. Recurrences were more common with idiopathic etiology (14 patients out of 30 had recurrences [46.7%]) as compared to alcoholic (5 out of 19 [26.3%]) and biliary (4 out of 37 [10.8%]) pancreatitis and with mild index episode. Following the episode of acute pancreatitis, identification of chronic pancreatitis was more common with alcoholic (6 out of 18 [33%]) and idiopathic (9 out of 30 [30%]) etiology as compared to other etiologies. Longer duration of follow up, but not number of recurrent episodes, was associated with identification of chronicity in patients presenting as acute pancreatitis. Out of 97 patients with acute pancreatitis, 27 (27.8%) developed recurrences with risk factors being idiopathic etiology and mild index episode. Eighteen of 97 (18.6%) patients had evidence of chronic pancreatitis on follow up, risk factors being the alcoholic and idiopathic varieties, and longer duration of follow up.

  14. Factors that affect risk for pancreatic disease in the general population: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsamarrai, Ammar; Das, Stephanie L M; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic diseases place significant burdens on health care systems worldwide. However, there is lack of agreement about which factors increase or reduce risk for pancreatic disease. We reviewed high-quality studies of factors that affect risk for pancreatic diseases in the general population. We searched 3 databases (Medline, Embase, and Scopus) for prospective cohort studies of modifiable risk and/or protective factors for acute pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer in adult populations. Factors that were investigated in 2 or more studies were assessed by meta-analysis if the required data were available. Subgroup analyses were performed when appropriate. Outcome measures were relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Our analysis included 51 population-based studies with more than 3 million individuals and nearly 11,000 patients with pancreatic diseases. A total of 31 different factors were investigated. Current tobacco use was the single most important risk factor for pancreatic diseases (RR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.54-2.27), followed by obesity (RR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.15-1.92) and heavy use of alcohol (RR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.19-1.58). Tobacco and heavy use of alcohol had bigger effects on risk of acute pancreatitis and chronic pancreatitis than pancreatic cancer. Vegetable consumption (RR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.57-0.88) and fruit consumption (RR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.60-0.90) provided the greatest degree of protection against pancreatic diseases on the basis of meta-analyses. Vegetable consumption had stronger association with protection against acute pancreatitis and fruit consumption with protection against pancreatic cancer. On the basis of systematic review and meta-analysis, current tobacco use, obesity, and heavy use of alcohol are associated with significant increases in risk for pancreatic diseases. Vegetables and fruit consumption are associated with reduced risk for pancreatic diseases. Prevention strategies for acute pancreatitis, chronic

  15. Cystic pancreatic lymphangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alihan Gurkan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma of the pancreas is a rare benign tumor of lymphatic origin. Retroperitoneal lymphangiomas account for 1% of all lymphangiomas. Herein, we report a case of cystic pancreatic lymphangioma diagnosed in 34 year-old female patient who was hospitalized for a slight pain in the epigastrium and vomiting. Radiological imaging revealed a large multiloculated cystic abdominal mass with enhancing septations involving the upper retroperitoneum. During the laparoscopic surgery, a well circumscribed polycystic tumor was completely excised preserving the pancreatic duct. The patient made a complete recovery and is disease-free 12 months postoperatively.

  16. Functional polymorphisms of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases 1A1, 1A6 and 1A8 are not involved in chronic pancreatitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Pap, A.; Laheij, R.J.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.; Peters, W.H.M.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is associated with alcohol abuse, smoking and other dietary or environmental factors. UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II detoxifying enzymes responsible for glucuronidation of various exogenous and endogenous compounds. Genetic variations,

  17. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankona Raymond

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  18. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruminhent, Jackrapong; Carrera, Perliveh; Li, Zhongzhen; Amankona, Raymond; Roberts, Ingram M

    2011-08-25

    Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  19. Selected medical conditions and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H

    2012-01-01

    We review the current evidence for associations of several medical conditions with risk of pancreatic cancer, including allergies, pancreatitis, gall bladder disease, cholecystectomy, ulcers, gastrectomy, appendectomy, and tonsillectomy. There are consistent findings of reduced risk associated with presence of self-reported allergies, particularly hay fever but not asthma; data on other allergies are limited and inconclusive. Several studies provide evidence that patients with pancreatic cancer are more likely than comparison groups to report pancreatitis. Those studies that investigated the time between onset of pancreatitis and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer found that risk estimates declined with longer periods of time; however, increased risks were noted for long-term pancreatitis, indicating that this condition is both a risk factor and a sign of early disease. Increased risk was reported in association with cholelithiasis, but the few studies that considered time before diagnosis of cancer did not find increased risk for cholelithiasis diagnosed in the more distant past. There is weak evidence that cholecystectomy 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis is related to risk, but this is based on only a few studies. There is no consistent association between ulcers and risk, while gastrectomy may increase risk. Overall, study of these conditions, particularly those that are rare, presents methodologic challenges. Time between diagnoses is likely to be important but is not considered in most studies. Lack of adequate control in several studies for risk factors such as smoking and heavy alcohol use also makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about these results. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Relationship between Plasma Triglyceride Level and Severity of Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Huei Wang

    Full Text Available Hypertriglyceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis, but whether the level of triglyceride (TG is related to severity of pancreatitis is unclear.To evaluate the effect of TG level on the severity of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP.Retrospective cohort study.We reviewed the records of 144 patients with HTGP from 1999 to 2013 at Tri-Service General Hospital. Patients with possible etiology of pancreatitis, such as gallstones, those consuming alcohol or drugs, or those with infections were excluded. The classification of severity of pancreatitis was based on the revised Atlanta classification. We allocated the patients into high-TG and low-TG groups based on the optimal cut-off value (2648 mg/dL, which was derived from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve between TG level and severity of HTGP. We then compared the clinical characteristics, pancreatitis severity, and mortality rates of the groups.There were 66 patients in the low-TG group and 78 patients in the high-TG group. There was no significant difference in the age, sex ratio, body mass index, and comorbidity between the 2 groups. The high-TG group had significantly higher levels of glucose (P = 0.022, total cholesterol (P = 0.002, and blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.037, and lower levels of sodium (P = 0.003 and bicarbonate (P = 0.002 than the low-TG group. The incidences of local complication (P = 0.002 and severe and moderate form of pancreatitis (P = 0.004 were significantly higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group. The mortality rate was higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group (P = 0.07.Higher TG level in patients with HTGP may be associated with adverse prognosis, but randomized and prospective studies are needed in the future verify this relationship.

  1. Relationship between Plasma Triglyceride Level and Severity of Hypertriglyceridemic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Huei; Chou, Yu-Ching; Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Wei, Kuang-Yu; Pan, Yu-Han; Lin, Hung-Che

    2016-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is the third most common cause of acute pancreatitis, but whether the level of triglyceride (TG) is related to severity of pancreatitis is unclear. To evaluate the effect of TG level on the severity of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis (HTGP). Retrospective cohort study. We reviewed the records of 144 patients with HTGP from 1999 to 2013 at Tri-Service General Hospital. Patients with possible etiology of pancreatitis, such as gallstones, those consuming alcohol or drugs, or those with infections were excluded. The classification of severity of pancreatitis was based on the revised Atlanta classification. We allocated the patients into high-TG and low-TG groups based on the optimal cut-off value (2648 mg/dL), which was derived from the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve between TG level and severity of HTGP. We then compared the clinical characteristics, pancreatitis severity, and mortality rates of the groups. There were 66 patients in the low-TG group and 78 patients in the high-TG group. There was no significant difference in the age, sex ratio, body mass index, and comorbidity between the 2 groups. The high-TG group had significantly higher levels of glucose (P = 0.022), total cholesterol (P = 0.002), and blood urea nitrogen (P = 0.037), and lower levels of sodium (P = 0.003) and bicarbonate (P = 0.002) than the low-TG group. The incidences of local complication (P = 0.002) and severe and moderate form of pancreatitis (P = 0.004) were significantly higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group. The mortality rate was higher in the high-TG group than in the low-TG group (P = 0.07). Higher TG level in patients with HTGP may be associated with adverse prognosis, but randomized and prospective studies are needed in the future verify this relationship.

  2. Tests of pancreatic function using /sup 75/Se--Selenomethionine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasner, N; Brodie, M J; Sumner, D J; Thomson, T J

    1976-04-01

    Pancreatic function was investigated in 43 patients using a combination of conventional and subtraction scans of the pancreas and duodenal aspiration of the /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine injected, in the time periods 60 to 150 minutes, 90 to 120 minutes and 105 to 150 minutes after injection. Patients with chronic alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, extrahepatic biliary obstruction and liver disease were included. Seven patients with no evidence of gastro-intestinal disease served as controls. Pancreatic scanning provided eight false positive and two false negative results (23.3 percent) and with /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine excretion at 105 to 150 minutes, six false results were obtained (14 percent). In only one patient was a false positive result obtained with both scans and the /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine test. The performance of conventional and subtraction scans of the pancreas with measurement of /sup 75/Se-Selenomethionine activity in the duodenal aspirate collected from 105 to 150 minutes after injection provides a convenient means of testing pancreatic exocrine function in a single three hour session.

  3. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bendersky VA

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Victoria A Bendersky,1 Mohan K Mallipeddi,2 Alexander Perez,2 Theodore N Pappas,2 1School of Medicine, 2Department of Surgery, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications. Keywords: necrotizing pancreatitis, pancreatic necrosectomy, VARD, pancreatic debridement, pancreatic collections

  4. [Pancreatic serous cystadenoma associated with pancreatic heterotopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hedfi; Dorra, Belghachem; Hela, Bouhafa; Cherif, Abdelhedi; Azza, Sridi; Karim, Sassi; Khadija, Bellil; Adnen, Chouchene

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic heterotopias (HP) are rare. They can occur at any age with a slight male predominance. These lesions are usually asymptomatic and they are often found incidentally during upper or lower GI endoscopy or during the anatomo-pathological examination of an organ which was resected for other reasons; they can be isolated or associated with a digestive pathology. We report, through observation, the association of HP with serous cystadenoma of the pancreas discovered during examinations to identify the etiology of isolated abdominal pain. The aim of this study is to analyse clinical and histological features of this rare pathology.

  5. Multiple small pseudoaneurysms complicating pancreatitis: angiographic diagnosis and transcatheter embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleux, G.; Stockx, L.; Vanbeckevoort, D.; Wilms, G.; Marchal, G.; Steenbergen, W. van

    2000-01-01

    We report a case of retroperitoneal hemorrhage due to multiple, small pseudoaneurysms complicating a chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. Cross-sectional imaging with CT and US could not clearly depict these vascular lesions. Selective arteriography of the superior mesenteric and gastroduodenal arteries clearly showed the small pseudoaneurysms and definitive treatment was performed by transcatheter embolization using coils. Eight months after successful embolization, the patient is asymptomatic without any recurrent bleeding. (orig.)

  6. Case study of pancreatitis in a tertiary hospital between 2013 and 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donavan de Souza Lúcio

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Clinical manifestations of pancreatitis are so varied that if the physician only bear the classic symptoms, he will diagnose just part of the cases. Method: This is a descriptive study of patients diagnosed with acute or chronic pancreatitis in the Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil. We reviewed 39 medical records, which covered all cases of pancreatitis from June 2013 to June 2014. Results: We found 26 cases of acute pancreatitis and 4 of chronic pancreatatis. Biliary etiology accounted for 50,0% of cases, followed by alcoholic (26.7% and idiopathic (13.3%. The classic upper abdominal pain was found in 11 patients, and in 3 of them it irradiates to the back. Several other painful manifestations have been reported. The duration of the pain ranged from 6 hours to 5 months. The etiologies found showed different distribution between genders. The duration of pain was higher among cases of chronic pancreatitis (median 70.5 versus 2 days; p=0.02, and the values of amylase were higher in acute pancreatitis (median 929 versus 52.5 U/L; p=0.00. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis and chronic acutized pancreatitis, when properly diagnosed, have a benign curse, solving in a few days. The characterization of pain and other clinical manifestations are little scrutinized in medical records, perhaps because of the relative ease of classic cases diagnosis and the availability of laboratory tests. de avaliação laboratorial.

  7. On the pathogenesis of IDDM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nerup, J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Helqvist, S

    1994-01-01

    A model of the pathogenesis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, i.e. the initial phase of beta-cell destruction, is proposed: in a cascade-like fashion efficient antigen presentation, unbalanced cytokine, secretion and poor beta-cell defence result in beta-cell destruction by toxic free...

  8. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  9. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and ev...

  10. Oral malodor: A review of etiology and pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Benerji Kotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral malodor or halitosis is a condition characterized by unpleasant odors emanating from the oral cavity. The aim of the present review is to classify and explain the etiology and pathogenesis of oral malodor. Volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs that result from bacterial breakdown of protein are considered to be the main culprits for this foul odor. The etiology of oral malodor can be attributed to both systemic and oral conditions. However, nearly 85% of the cases originate from mouth due to tongue coating (especially posterior third of the dorsal surface, periodontal disease, poor oral hygiene, infections, ulcerations, food debris, dry mouth and faulty restorations. Bad breath can be caused by systemic disorders such as upper and lower respiratory tract infections; hepatic, pancreatic, and nephritic insufficiencies; trimethylaminuria and some medications. In addition, there are very few instances where patients suffer from pseudohalitosis or halitophobia.

  11. Pathogenesis of the Metabolic Syndrome: Insights from Monogenic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinki Murphy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Identifying rare human metabolic disorders that result from a single-gene defect has not only enabled improved diagnostic and clinical management of such patients, but also has resulted in key biological insights into the pathophysiology of the increasingly prevalent metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are linked to obesity and driven by excess caloric intake and reduced physical activity. However, key events in the causation of the metabolic syndrome are difficult to disentangle from compensatory effects and epiphenomena. This review provides an overview of three types of human monogenic disorders that result in (1 severe, non-syndromic obesity, (2 pancreatic beta cell forms of early-onset diabetes, and (3 severe insulin resistance. In these patients with single-gene defects causing their exaggerated metabolic disorder, the primary defect is known. The lessons they provide for current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the common metabolic syndrome are highlighted.

  12. Morphological and functional alterations of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubergrits, Natalya B; Linevskiy, Yuri V; Lukashevich, Galina M; Fomenko, Pavel G; Moroz, Tatyana V; Mishra, Tapan

    2012-09-10

    The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-l-leucine dipeptidase) promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosa samples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal digestion, decrease of absorption, accelerated desquamation of epithelium, fall in local immunity and

  13. The prevalence of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth in non-surgical patients with chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ní Chonchubhair, Hazel M; Bashir, Yasir; Dobson, Mark; Ryan, Barbara M; Duggan, Sinead N; Conlon, Kevin C

    2018-02-24

    Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) is a condition characterised by symptoms similar to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) in chronic pancreatitis patients. SIBO is thought to complicate chronic pancreatitis in up to 92% of cases; however, studies are heterogeneous and protocols non-standardised. SIBO may be determined by measuring lung air-expiration of either hydrogen or methane which are by-products of small bowel bacterial fermentation of intraluminal substrates such as carbohydrates. We evaluated the prevalence of SIBO among a defined cohort of non-surgical chronic pancreatitics with mild to severe PEI compared with matched healthy controls. Thirty-five patients and 31 age-, gender- and smoking status-matched healthy controls were evaluated for SIBO by means of a fasting glucose hydrogen breath test (GHBT). The relationship between SIBO and clinical symptoms in chronic pancreatitis was evaluated. SIBO was present in 15% of chronic pancreatitis patients, while no healthy controls tested positive (P = 0.029). SIBO was more prevalent in those taking pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) (P = 0.016), with proton pump inhibitor use (PPI) (P = 0.022) and in those with alcohol aetiology (P = 0.023). Patients with concurrent diabetes were more often SIBO-positive and this was statistically significant (P = 0.009). There were no statistically significant differences in reported symptoms between patients with and without SIBO, with the exception of 'weight loss', with patients reporting weight loss more likely to have SIBO (P = 0.047). The prevalence of SIBO in this study was almost 15% and consistent with other studies of SIBO in non-surgical chronic pancreatitis patients. These data support the testing of patients with clinically-relevant PEI unresolved by adequate doses of PERT, particularly in those patients with concurrent diabetes. SIBO can be easily diagnosed therefore allowing more specific and more targeted symptom

  14. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  15. Metronidazole-Induced Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. O'Halloran

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion. This case provides the eighth report of Metronidazole induced pancreatitis. All of the cases were reported in females and ran a benign course.Early diagnosis, discontinuation of the drug and supportive care will lead to a successful recovery in the majority of cases.

  16. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... auto-transplantation is performed following total pancreatectomy—the surgical removal of the whole pancreas—in patients with severe and chronic, or long lasting, pancreatitis that cannot be managed by other treatments. This procedure is not considered experimental. Patients with ...

  17. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nooijen, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  18. Pancreatitis del surco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Araújo-Fernández

    2014-03-01

    It is a rare disease, but we must keep it in mind when we make the differential diagnosis of patients with abdominal pain of unknown origin. It is very important to distinguish this pathology from a pancreatic head carcinoma, as both treatments and prognosis differ greatly, so we believe important communication of a new case.

  19. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9{+-}6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42{+-}1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33{+-}0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0{+-}1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal

  20. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9±6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42±1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33±0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0±1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal enlargement and

  1. Surgical Treatment of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Jens; Uhl, Waldemar; Büchler, Markus W.

    2003-10-01

    Patients with predicted severe necrotizing pancreatitis as diagnosed by C-reactive protein (>150 mg/L) and/or contrast-enhanced computed tomography should be managed in the intensive care unit. Prophylactic broad-spectrum antibiotics reduce infection rates and survival in severe necrotizing pancreatitis. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic sphincterotomy is a causative therapy for gallstone pancreatitis with impacted stones, biliary sepsis, or obstructive jaundice. Fine needle aspiration for bacteriology should be performed to differentiate between sterile and infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with sepsis syndrome. Infected pancreatic necrosis in patients with clinical signs and symptoms of sepsis is an indication for surgery. Patients with sterile pancreatic necrosis should be managed conservatively. Surgery in patients with sterile necrosis may be indicated in cases of persistent necrotizing pancreatitis and in the rare cases of "fulminant acute pancreatitis." Early surgery, within 14 days after onset of the disease, is not recommended in patients with necrotizing pancreatitis. The surgical approach should be organ-preserving (debridement/necrosectomy) and combined with a postoperative management concept that maximizes postoperative evacuation of retroperitoneal debris and exudate. Minimally invasive surgical procedures have to be regarded as an experimental approach and should be restricted to controlled trials. Cholecystectomy should be performed to avoid recurrence of gallstone-associated acute pancreatitis.

  2. Eosinophilic Pancreatitis: A Rare Cause of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Reppucci

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic pancreatitis is a rare form of recurrent acute pancreatitis that demonstrates distinct histologic features, including diffuse, periductal, acinar, and septal inflammatory infiltrates comprised of a pure or predominant population of eosinophils, eosinophilic phlebitis and arteritis, and localized eosinophilic infiltrates with pseudocyst formation. It is associated with elevated serum immunoglobulin E levels, an elevated eosinophil count with systemic manifestations, and eosinophilic infiltrates in other organs of the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of eosinophilic pancreatitis in a 44-year-old man who was diagnosed after pancreatic resection for recurrent bouts of acute pancreatitis. While the gross and histologic evaluations matched other reported cases of eosinophilic pancreatitis, our patient had only minimal peripheral eosinophilia, no reported history of symptoms related to elevated eosinophilia or immunoglobulin E, and only mild eosinophilic infiltrates in his gallbladder.

  3. Legumain is activated in macrophages during pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edgington-Mitchell, L.E.; Wartmann, T.; Fleming, A.K.; Gocheva, V.; Linden, W.A. van der; Withana, N.P.; Verdoes, M.; Aurelio, L.; Edgington-Mitchell, D.; Lieu, T.; Parker, B.S.; Graham, B.; Reinheckel, T.; Furness, J.B.; Joyce, J.A.; Storz, P.; Halangk, W.; Bogyo, M.; Bunnett, N.W.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by dysregulated activity of digestive enzymes, necrosis, immune infiltration, and pain. Repeated incidence of pancreatitis is an important risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Legumain, a lysosomal cysteine protease, has been linked

  4. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.C.; Barkin, J.; Isikoff, M.B.; Silver stein, W.; Kalser, M.

    1982-01-01

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  5. Dendritic Cells Promote Pancreatic Viability in Mice with Acute Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Andrea S.; Nguyen, Andrew H.; Hackman, Michael; Connolly, Michael K.; Malhotra, Ashim; Ibrahim, Junaid; Cieza-Rubio, Napoleon E.; Henning, Justin R.; Barilla, Rocky; Rehman, Adeel; Pachter, H. Leon; Medina-Zea, Marco V.; Cohen, Steven M.; Frey, Alan B.; Acehan, Devrim; Miller, George

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Acute pancreatitis increases morbidity and mortality from organ necrosis by mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) can promote or suppress inflammation, depending on their subtype and context. We investigated the roles of DC in development of acute pancreatitis. Methods Acute pancreatitis was induced in CD11c.DTR mice using caerulein or L-arginine; DCs were depleted by administration of diphtheria toxin. Survival was analyzed using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Results Numbers of MHC II+CD11c+DC increased 100-fold in pancreas of mice with acute pancreatitis, to account for nearly 15% of intra-pancreatic leukocytes. Intra-pancreatic DC acquired an immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed higher levels of MHC II and CD86 and increased production of interleukin-6, membrane cofactor protein (MCP)-1, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. However, rather than inducing an organ-destructive inflammatory process, DC were required for pancreatic viability; the exocrine pancreas died in mice that were depleted of DC and challenged with caerulein or L-arginine. All mice with pancreatitis that were depleted of DC died from acinar cell death within 4 days. Depletion of DC from mice with pancreatitis resulted in neutrophil infiltration and increased levels of systemic markers of inflammation. However, the organ necrosis associated with depletion of DC did not require infiltrating neutrophils, activation of NF-κB, or signaling by mitogen-activated protein kinase or TNF-α. Conclusions DC are required for pancreatic viability in mice with acute pancreatitis and might protect organs against cell stress. PMID:21801698

  6. A Case of a Chronic Pancreatic Pseudocyst Causing Atraumatic Splenic Rupture without Evidence of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Moori

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Atraumatic splenic rupture is a rare complication of a pancreatic pseudocyst (PP, described in the setting of chronic pancreatitis. There is common understanding, within the literature, that an inflammatory process at the tail of the pancreas may disrupt the spleen and result in such splenic complications. The authors present a case report of a 29-year-old male with a PP, associated with chronic pancreatitis. The patient had a history of excessive alcohol intake and presented to the emergency department with a short history of abdominal pain and vomiting. He denied any significant history of trauma and serum amylase levels were normal. An admission computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen confirmed the presence of a PP in direct contact with the spleen. The CT also demonstrated a heterogenous hypodense area of the splenic hilum, along with perisplenic fluid. The patient was admitted for observation. His abdominal pain progressed, and he became haemodynamically unstable. An emergency ultrasound scan (USS at this time revealed intra-abdominal haemorrhage. A subsequent CT confirmed splenic rupture, which was managed surgically with a full recovery. Few such cases are documented within the literature and more understanding of preempting such events is needed.

  7. Nutritional rickets: pathogenesis and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettifor, John M

    2013-06-01

    Nutritional rickets remains a public health concern in many areas of the world despite cheap and effective means of preventing the disease. The roles of vitamin D deficiency, low dietary calcium intakes and the interrelationships between the two in the pathogenesis of the disease are discussed. It is now recognized that vitamin D deficiency in the pregnant and lactating mother predisposes to the development of rickets in the breastfed infant, and that cultural and social factors are important in the pathogenesis of the disease during the adolescent growth spurt. Prevention of rickets is dependent on the awareness of the medical profession and the general public of the need to ensure adequate intakes of vitamin D in at-risk populations, and of the importance of increasing dietary intakes of calcium using locally available and inexpensive foods in communities in which dietary calcium deficiency rickets is prevalent.

  8. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... were compared with preoperative endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) morphology. The preoperatively elevated pressure decreased in all patients but one, to normal or slightly elevated values. The median pressure decrease was 50% (range, 0-90%; p = 0.01). The drainage anastomosis (a...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  9. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Szücs

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life.Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions.Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%, CT scan (52%, MRI-MRCP (6%, ERCP (39%, and EUS (7,4%. A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2% than endoscopy (27%; however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002 than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004. The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012 than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical

  10. Chronic pancreatitis: Multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szücs, Ákos; Marjai, Tamás; Szentesi, Andrea; Farkas, Nelli; Párniczky, Andrea; Nagy, György; Kui, Balázs; Takács, Tamás; Czakó, László; Szepes, Zoltán; Németh, Balázs Csaba; Vincze, Áron; Pár, Gabriella; Szabó, Imre; Sarlós, Patrícia; Illés, Anita; Gódi, Szilárd; Izbéki, Ferenc; Gervain, Judit; Halász, Adrienn; Farkas, Gyula; Leindler, László; Kelemen, Dezső; Papp, Róbert; Szmola, Richárd; Varga, Márta; Hamvas, József; Novák, János; Bod, Barnabás; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Hegyi, Péter

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions. Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female) were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%), CT scan (52%), MRI-MRCP (6%), ERCP (39%), and EUS (7,4%). A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2%) than endoscopy (27%); however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002) than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004). The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012) than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical

  11. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  12. Epigenetics and colorectal cancer pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  13. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy

  14. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kebin Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  15. Pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia and ductal adenocarcinoma induced by DMBA in mice: effects of alcohol and caffeine Neoplasia pancreática intraepithelial e adenocarcinoma ductal induzidos pelo DMBA em camundongos: efeitos do álcool e da cafeína

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Roberto Wendt

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the effects of alcohol and caffeine in a pancreatic carcinogenesis mouse model induced by 7,12-dimethylbenzantracene (DMBA, according to the PanIN classification system. METHODS: 120 male, Mus musculus, CF-1 mice were divided into four groups. Animals received either water or caffeine or alcohol or alcohol + caffeine in their drinking water. In all animals, 1 mg of DMBA was implanted into the head of the pancreas. After 30 days, euthanasia was performed; excised pancreata were then fixed in formalin, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and categorized as follows: normal ducts, reactive hyperplasia, PanIN-1A, PanIN-1B, PanIN-2, PanIN-3 or adenocarcinoma. RESULTS: PanIN lesions were verified in all groups. Adenocarcinoma was detected in 15% of animals in the caffeine group, 16.6% in the water group, 23.8% in the alcohol + caffeine group and 52.9% in the alcohol group (POBJETIVO: Avaliar os efeitos do álcool e da cafeína na carcinogênese pancreática induzida pelo 7,12-dimetilbenzantraceno (DMBA em camundongos, descrevendo as lesões de acordo com a classificação das neoplasias pacreáticas intraepiteliais (PanIN. MÉTODOS: 120 camundogos machos, Mus musculus, CF-1 foram divididos em quatro grupos. Animais receberam água ou cafeína ou álcool ou álcool + cafeína para beber. Em todos animais, 1 mg de DMBA foi implantado na cabeça do pâncreas. Após 30 dias, eutanásia foi realizada, o pâncreas foi removido, fixado em formalina e corado com hematoxilina e eosina sendo classificado em: ductos normais, hiperplasia reativa, PanIN-1A, PanIN-1B, PanIN-2, PanIN-3 ou adenocarcinoma. RESULTADOS: Neoplasias pancreáticas intraepiteliais foram encontradas em todos grupos. Adenocarcinoma foi detectado em 15% dos animais do grupo cafeína, 16,6% do grupo água, 23,8% do grupo álcool + cafeína e 52,9% do grupo álcool (P<0,05. CONCLUSÕES: O modelo experimental de carcinogênese pancreática em camundongos utilizando DMBA induz

  16. Management strategies for autoimmune pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamisawa, Terumi; Takuma, Kensuke; Hara, Seiichi; Tabata, Taku; Kuruma, Sawako; Inaba, Yoshihiko; Gopalakrishna, Rajesh; Egawa, Naoto; Itokawa, Fumihide; Itoi, Takao

    2011-10-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a newly developed concept for a peculiar type of pancreatitis, and at present is recognized as a pancreatic lesion reflecting IgG4-related systemic disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. The current management strategies for AIP, including its clinical features, diagnostic criteria, clinical subtypes, steroid therapy and prognosis are discussed, based on our 66 AIP cases and papers searched in PubMed from 1992 to March 2011, using the term 'autoimmune pancreatitis'. A new clinicopathological entity, an 'IgG4-related sclerosing disease' is also mentioned. AIP should be considered in the differential diagnosis in elderly male patients presented with obstructive jaundice and pancreatic mass. Steroids are a standard therapy for AIP, but their regimen including maintenance therapy should be evaluated in prospective trials.

  17. [Robot-assisted pancreatic resection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müssle, B; Distler, M; Weitz, J; Welsch, T

    2017-06-01

    Although robot-assisted pancreatic surgery has been considered critically in the past, it is nowadays an established standard technique in some centers, for distal pancreatectomy and pancreatic head resection. Compared with the laparoscopic approach, the use of robot-assisted surgery seems to be advantageous for acquiring the skills for pancreatic, bile duct and vascular anastomoses during pancreatic head resection and total pancreatectomy. On the other hand, the use of the robot is associated with increased costs and only highly effective and professional robotic programs in centers for pancreatic surgery will achieve top surgical and oncological quality, acceptable operation times and a reduction in duration of hospital stay. Moreover, new technologies, such as intraoperative fluorescence guidance and augmented reality will define additional indications for robot-assisted pancreatic surgery.

  18. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Assef, Mauricio Saab [Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, Rua Dr. Cesário Motta Jr. #61 Cep: 01221-020, São Paulo (Brazil); Raimondo, Massimo, E-mail: raimondo.massimo@mayo.edu [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic Florida, 4500 San Pablo Road, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States)

    2011-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used.

  19. Diagnostic Management of Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabizzi, Emanuele; Assef, Mauricio Saab; Raimondo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most deadly solid tumors, with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Due to a non-specific clinical presentation, it is often diagnosed at an advanced stage and is rarely amenable for curative treatment. Therefore early diagnosis and appropriate staging are still essential to define the best care and to improve patient survival. Several imaging modalities are currently available for the evaluation of pancreatic cancer. This review focuses on different techniques and discusses the diagnostic management of patients with pancreatic cancer. This review was conducted utilizing Pubmed and was limited to papers published within the last 5 years. The search key words pancreatic cancer, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, pancreatic tumors, diagnosis, radiology, imaging, nuclear imaging, endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound and biochemical markers were used

  20. Current knowledge on pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eIovanna

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3-5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes and the deregulation of many signalling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signalling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iovanna, Juan; Mallmann, Maria Cecilia; Gonçalves, Anthony; Turrini, Olivier; Dagorn, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  2. Current Knowledge on Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iovanna, Juan [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France); Mallmann, Maria Cecilia [Centre d’Investigation Clinique de Marseille, Marseille (France); Gonçalves, Anthony [Département d’Oncologie Médicale, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Turrini, Olivier [Département de Chirurgie Oncologique, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (France); Dagorn, Jean-Charles, E-mail: juan.iovanna@inserm.fr [INSERM U624, Stress Cellulaire, Parc Scientifique et Technologique de Luminy, Marseille (France)

    2012-01-31

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death with a median survival of 6 months and a dismal 5-year survival rate of 3–5%. The development and progression of pancreatic cancer are caused by the activation of oncogenes, the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, and the deregulation of many signaling pathways. Therefore, the strategies targeting these molecules as well as their downstream signaling could be promising for the prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, although targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer have yielded encouraging results in vitro and in animal models, these findings have not been translated into improved outcomes in clinical trials. This failure is due to an incomplete understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer and to the selection of poorly efficient or imperfectly targeted agents. In this review, we will critically present the current knowledge regarding the molecular, biochemical, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of pancreatic cancer.

  3. Inhibitors of ORAI1 Prevent Cytosolic Calcium-Associated Injury of Human Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Acute Pancreatitis in 3 Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li; Voronina, Svetlana; Javed, Muhammad A.; Awais, Muhammad; Szatmary, Peter; Latawiec, Diane; Chvanov, Michael; Collier, David; Huang, Wei; Barrett, John; Begg, Malcolm; Stauderman, Ken; Roos, Jack; Grigoryev, Sergey; Ramos, Stephanie; Rogers, Evan; Whitten, Jeff; Velicelebi, Gonul; Dunn, Michael; Tepikin, Alexei V.; Criddle, David N.; Sutton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Sustained activation of the cytosolic calcium concentration induces injury to pancreatic acinar cells and necrosis. The calcium release–activated calcium modulator ORAI1 is the most abundant Ca2+ entry channel in pancreatic acinar cells; it sustains calcium overload in mice exposed to toxins that induce pancreatitis. We investigated the roles of ORAI1 in pancreatic acinar cell injury and the development of acute pancreatitis in mice. Methods Mouse and human acinar cells, as well as HEK 293 cells transfected to express human ORAI1 with human stromal interaction molecule 1, were hyperstimulated or incubated with human bile acid, thapsigargin, or cyclopiazonic acid to induce calcium entry. GSK-7975A or CM_128 were added to some cells, which were analyzed by confocal and video microscopy and patch clamp recordings. Acute pancreatitis was induced in C57BL/6J mice by ductal injection of taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate or intravenous' administration of cerulein or ethanol and palmitoleic acid. Some mice then were given GSK-7975A or CM_128, which inhibit ORAI1, at different time points to assess local and systemic effects. Results GSK-7975A and CM_128 each separately inhibited toxin-induced activation of ORAI1 and/or activation of Ca2+ currents after Ca2+ release, in a concentration-dependent manner, in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells (inhibition >90% of the levels observed in control cells). The ORAI1 inhibitors also prevented activation of the necrotic cell death pathway in mouse and human pancreatic acinar cells. GSK-7975A and CM_128 each inhibited all local and systemic features of acute pancreatitis in all 3 models, in dose- and time-dependent manners. The agents were significantly more effective, in a range of parameters, when given at 1 vs 6 hours after induction of pancreatitis. Conclusions Cytosolic calcium overload, mediated via ORAI1, contributes to the pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis. ORAI1 inhibitors might be developed

  4. [Current alternatives in the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis--a review article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kat'uchová, Jana; Radonak, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterized as an inflammatory process affecting the pancreas that causes progressive destruction of the gland and fibrosis, with subsequent endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. The most common cause of chronic pancreatitis is alcohol use in combination with nicotine. Manifestations are persistent or recurrent painful attacks. The only parameter of successful treatment of chronic pancreatitis is a relieve from long-lasting pain and improvement of the quality of life. Surgical treatment options include drainage operations on the pancreas, pancreatic resection or a combination of both. With optimal surgical treatment performed and good patient's compliance, operations for chronic pancreatitis have low number of post-operative complications and relatively good long-term results. The continued consumption of alcohol and drugs bring about worse outcomes, sometimes even a complete failure of therapy. Chronic pancreatitis also has considerable socio-economic consequences. Due to the persisting pain and frequent hospitalization it can lead to long-term disability and early retirement predominantly in young patients.

  5. CT findings of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Mi Sook; Park, In Sook; Jeon, Doo Sung; Kim, Hong Soo; Rhee, Hak Song; Won, Jong Jin

    1988-01-01

    CT was found to be a reliable, often specific, and noninvasive method for detecting pancreatic diseases. In a study of pancreatic lesions, 37 cases having satisfactory operative and histological proofs were analyzed by CT at PMC from Jan. 1986 to Oct. 1987. The results were as following: 1. Male:female is 26:11. 2. The incidence of pancreatic disease were as follows: 1) Pancreatic cancer:21 cases (56%) a.Head:12 cases b.Body:4 cases c.Tail:1 case d.Body and tail:1 case e.Uncinate process:2 cases f.Entire pancreas: 1 case 2) Acute pancreatitis: 6 cases (16%) 3) Chronic pancreatitis:5 cases (14%) 3. The characteristic CT findings: 1) 100% of pancreatic head cancer showed focal mass or alteration of pancreatic head contour and biliary tree dilatation, and 33% (7/12) fat line obliteration. 2) All of other pancreatic cancer except head appeared as focal mass or contour alteration and fat line obliteration. 3) Total 6 cases of acute pancreatitis showed that 5 cases diffuse enlargement of pancreas, 3 fluid collection (2 cases:left anterior pararenal and posterior pararenal space and lesser sac, 1 case:only pancreas body) and 1 case abscess formation. 4) Total 5 cases of chronic pancreatitis revealed diffuse enlargement 2 cases and atrophy 1 case, pancreatic ductal dilatation 3 cases, calcification 2 cases, and biliary tree dilatation with CBD tapering appearance 1 case. 5) All cases of pseudocysts were well marginated cystic lesions that located at head in 3 cases and tail 3 cases, and 4 cases were well defined pure cystic masses but 1 case was well capsulated cyst with multiple internal septation

  6. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimoto, Norimasa; Sowa, Etsuji; Fujii, Satoru; Seki, Junichi; Wada, Masahisa

    1975-01-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75 Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75 Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75 Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  7. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimoto, N; Sowa, E; Fujii, S; Seki, J; Wada, M [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-09-01

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200..mu..Ci of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arterioscl-erosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions.

  8. A STUDY OF AETIOLOGY, CLINICAL FEATURES AND MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN SOUTHERN ODISHA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Acute pancreatitis is a common condition involving the pancreas. The estimated incidence is about 3% of cases presenting with pain abdomen in the UK. The hospital admission rate for acute pancreatitis is 9.8/100,000 per year in UK and annual incidence may range from 5-50/100,000 worldwide. Gall stone disease and alcohol account for greater than 80% of all patients with acute pancreatitis, with biliary disease accounting for 45% and alcohol found in 35% of patients. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualised. Patients with mild acute pancreatitis generally can be managed with resuscitation and supportive care. Aetiological factors are sought and treated, if possible, but operative therapy essentially has no role in the care of these patients. Those with severe and necrotising pancreatitis require intensive therapy, which may include wide operative debridement of the infected pancreas or surgical management of local complications of the disease. AIM OF THE STUDY 1. To study the age and sex prevalence of acute pancreatitis. 2. To study the various aetiological factors of acute pancreatitis. 3. To study the clinical presentation and management of acute pancreatitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS Patients admitted to the Department of General Surgery at M.K.C.G Medical College and Hospital, Berhampur were taken up for the study. Totally, 49 patients with 53 episodes of acute pancreatitis were studied from September 2013 to August 2015. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS Acute pancreatitis is a common cause of acute abdomen in patients presenting to the surgical emergency department. Alcohol being the most common cause of acute pancreatitis in this part of the country, it has a male preponderance and most commonly presents in the 4th decade of life. It is mainly a clinical diagnosis supplanted with biochemical and radiological findings. The management is mainly conservative, with surgery

  9. Methylation of the SPARC gene promoter and its clinical implication in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Shunli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC plays a pivotal role in regulating cell-matrix interactions and tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, and migration. Detection of SPARC gene methylation may be useful as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Methods Methylation of the SPARC gene transcriptional regulation region (TRR was detected using bisulfite-specific (BSP PCR-based sequencing analysis in 40 cases of pancreatic cancer and the adjacent normal tissues, 6 chronic pancreatitis tissues, and 6 normal pancreatic tissues. BSP cloning-based sequencing analysis was also performed in selected cases. Clinicopathological data from the cancer patients were collected and analyzed. Results Analysis of SPARC gene TRR methylation showed two hypermethylation wave peak regions: CpG Region 1 (CpG site 1-7 and CpG Region 2 (CpG site 8-12. Pancreatic tissues have shown methylation in both regions with gradual increases from normal, chronic pancreatitis, and adjacent normal tissues to cancerous tissues. However, Methylation of CpG Region 2 was more sensitive than CpG Region 1 in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the methylation level of CpG Region 2 was associated with increased tumor size and exposure to the risk factors (tobacco smoke and alcohol consumption for developing pancreatic cancer. Conclusion Methylation of the SPARC gene, specifically CpG Region 2, may be an early event during pancreatic tumorigenesis and should be further evaluated as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  10. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Dionysios J Papachristou; David C Whitcomb; Ferga C Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  11. Conservative treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löhr, J-Matthias; Haas, Stephen L; Lindgren, Fredrik; Enochsson, Lars; Hedström, Aleksandra; Swahn, Fredrik; Segersvärd, Ralf; Arnelo, Urban

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease giving rise to several complications that need to be treated accordingly. Because pancreatic surgery has significant morbidity and mortality, less invasive therapy seems to be an attractive option. This paper reviews current state-of-the-art strategies to treat chronic pancreatitis without surgery and the current guidelines for the medical therapy of chronic pancreatitis. Endoscopic therapy of complications of chronic pancreatitis such as pain, main pancreatic duct strictures and stones as well as pseudocysts is technically feasible and safe. The long-term outcome, however, is inferior to definitive surgical procedures such as resection or drainage. On the other hand, the medical therapy of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency is well established and evidence based. Endoscopic therapy may be an option to bridge for surgery and in children/young adolescents and those unfit for surgery. Pain in chronic pancreatitis as well as treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency follows established guidelines. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. [Acute pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tun-Abraham, Mauro Enrique; Obregón-Guerrero, Gabriela; Romero-Espinoza, Larry; Valencia-Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hypercalcaemia due to primary hyperparathyroidism is a rare cause of acute pancreatitis, with a reported prevalence of 1.5 to 8%. There is no clear pathophysiological basis, but elevated parathyroid hormone and high serum calcium levels could be responsible for calcium deposit in the pancreatic ducts and activation of pancreatic enzymes, which may be the main risk factor for developing acute pancreatitis. The aim of this report is to describe four cases. Four cases are reported of severe pancreatitis associated with hypercalcaemia secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism; three of them with complications (two pseudocysts and one pancreatic necrosis). Cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, studies showed the parathyroid adenoma. Surgical resection was the definitive treatment in all four cases. None of the patients had recurrent acute pancreatitis events during follow-up. Acute pancreatitis secondary to hypercalcaemia of primary hyperparathyroidism is rare; however, when it occurs it is associated with severe pancreatitis. It is suspected in patients with elevated serum calcium and high parathyroid hormone levels. Imaging techniques such as cervical ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy using 99mTc-Sestambi, should be performed, to confirm clinical suspicion. Surgical resection is the definitive treatment with excellent results. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  13. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novotna, T.

    2015-01-01

    Impaired glucose tolerance or frank diabetes mellitus is known to occur more frequently in patients with pancreatic cancer than in the general population. At the time of the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, more than 70% of patients taking the glucose tolerance test show diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (1). Relationship among diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer is vague but sure, although neither the nature nor the sequence of the possible cause – effect relationship has been established. The reason for the high frequency of glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatic cancer remains controversial. (author)

  14. Systemic therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrezalova Vochyanova, I.; Salek, T.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth comment cause of cancer-related death in men. Most patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed at advanced, non-resectable stage. Late detection, early metastases, difficult surgical approached, cancer resistant to systemic chemo and radiotherapy - all contribute to its in faust prognosis. Only about 5 % of patients will live 5 years after diagnosis. Gemcitabine - based combination treatments is the standard for advanced pancreatic cancer. The combination of fluorouracil, folinic acid, irinotecan and oxaliplatin led to median survival of 11 months. No standard second-line treatment exists for pancreatic cancer. (author)

  15. Clinical Study of 224 Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG is the most common etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP after alcohol and gallstone-induced disease. Elevation of serum triglyceride (TG levels to ≥1000 mg/dl in a patient with AP strongly indicates HTG as the cause. The absolute risk of pancreatitis based on serum TG ≤1000 mg/dl has not been clearly defined. The aims of this study were to address the role of elevated TG levels between 500 and 1000 mg/dl in the clinical course of HTG pancreatitis (HTGP; and assess the relationship between the level of serum TG and disease severity. Methods: A total of 224 HTGP patients between 2007 and 2011 were divided into two subgroups. Totally, 122 patients in Group A had serum TG >1000 mg/dl; 102 patients in Group B had maximal TG levels between 500 and 1000 mg/dl accompanied by lactescent serum; 100 patients with biliary AP and 99 patients with alcoholic AP hospitalized during the study period were enrolled as controls. The clinical and biochemical data were analyzed. Results: The clinical presentation of HTG-induced pancreatitis was similar to other causes. Severe form of AP in Group A was higher than Group B (χ2 = 4.002, P = 0.045. The severity with HTGP was significantly higher as compared to biliary AP (χ2 = 33.533, P = 0.000 and alcoholic AP (χ2 = 7.179, P = 0.007. Systemic complications with HTGP were significantly higher than biliary AP (χ2 = 58.763, P = 0.000. Conclusions: The study demonstrated that TG level ≥500 mg/dl should raise a high degree of suspicion, especially if no other etiology of AP is apparent. The severity of HTGP seems to correlate directly with TG level. HTGP seems be more severe than other causes of AP.

  16. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-12-28

    To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful.

  17. Diagnosis of pancreatic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautz, W.; Skalej, M.; Kalender, W.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on CT scanners with continuously rotating measurement systems enable volume scanning of a body section when used with continuous patient transport (spiral CT). Because of its relatively small volume, the complete pancreas can be scanned in a single breathhold. For pancreatic examinations, 1 continuous, 1- second scans with a table feed of 10 mm/sec were obtained on a Siemens SOMATOM Plus. Contrast material (50 mL) was power injected immediately before the start of measurements. CT images were reconstructed from the volume data set at 2-mm intervals. Fifty-six patients with pancreatitis, carcinoma or metastases of the pancreas; endocrine-active tumors; or Echinococcus were examined with both conventional and spiral CT

  18. Imaging of pancreatic tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brambs, Hans-Juergen; Juchems, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Ductal adenocarcinoma is the most frequent solid tumor of the pancreas. This tumor has distinct features including early obstruction of the pancreatic duct, diminished enhancement after administration of contrast material due to desmoplastic growth, high propensity to infiltrate adjacent structures and to metastasize into the liver and the peritoneum. Hormone active endocrine tumors cause specific clinical symptoms. Imaging is aimed at localization of these hypervascular tumors. Non hormone active tumors are most frequently malignant and demonstrate very varying features. Cystic pancreatic tumors are increasingly detected by means of cross sectional imaging. Exact classification can be achieved with knowledge of the macropathology and considering clinical presentation as well as age and gender of the patients. (orig.)

  19. Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Claus; Detlefsen, Sönke; Palnæs Hansen, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    : Death is monitored using data from the Danish Civil Registry. This registry monitors the survival status of the Danish population, and the registration is virtually complete. All data in the database are audited by all participating institutions, with respect to baseline characteristics, key indicators......AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients...... with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations...

  20. A possible case of saw palmetto-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Kurt A; Allman, Elena; Ibrahim, Farrah

    2010-07-01

    A 65-year-old male with a history of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, gout, Barrett esophagitis, and chronic gastritis developed acute pancreatitis after taking one week of the herbal medicine, saw palmetto, for symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Ultrasound and computed tomography ruled out cholelithiasis and obstruction, triglycerides were normal, and he had no recent infection or trauma. He had a history of occasional alcohol consumption, though there was no recent increased intake. The most likely cause of pancreatitis in this case was saw palmetto. Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) is an herbal medication used primarily in the treatment of symptoms related to BPH. It has a high content of fatty acids and phytosterols which are thought to exert their effects by inhibiting the enzyme 5-alpha-reductase, thereby preventing the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT). It has been postulated that saw palmetto directly stimulates estrogenic receptors and inhibits progesterone receptors in the prostate tissue. A previous report implicated the estrogen/antiandrogen properties of saw palmetto as inducing hepatotoxicity in a patient. Additionally, it has also been postulated that stimulation of the estrogenic receptors may lead to increased triglyceride levels or induction of a hypercoagulable state that leads to pancreatic necrosis. Finally, inhibition of cyclooxygenase, a property of saw palmetto, may be linked to acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis, a serious and sometimes fatal disorder may occur secondary to medications. Although the mechanism is not fully known, this is the second case of acute pancreatitis that has been documented secondary to the herbal medication saw palmetto. It is important for clinicians to obtain detailed medication histories, including over-the-counter and herbal medications, in order to prevent further complications from occurring.

  1. Etiology, clinical features and management of acute recurrent pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi Yun; Wang, Rui; Wu, Hao; Tang, Cheng Wei; Chen, Xin Zu

    2014-10-01

    To study the etiology and clinical features of acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) and to determine its optimal management and outcomes. ARP cases among acute pancreatitis patients who were admitted to the West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 2008 to December 2012 were retrospectively collected. Their etiology, clinical features, treatments and outcomes were analyzed. Of all pancreatitis patients, 8.9% were classified as ARP. The proportions of mild and severe diseases were 85.7% and 14.3%, respectively. The common etiological factors were biliogenic (31.0%), alcohol (26.2%), hyperlipidemia (21.4%) and pancreaticobiliary malformation (15.4%). At first 46 cases were cryptogenic and among them 36 were subsequently confirmed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Among the hyperlipidemic ARP patients, 72.2% failed to routinely monitor and control serum lipids. ERCP was performed in 88 cases, and 48 also required an endoscopic sphincterotomy or calculus removal. Twenty-two patients underwent cholangiopancreatic duct stent placement, and pancreatic necrosectomy was performed on eight severe cases. The overall outcomes indicate that 8.3% of the cases progressed to chronic pancreatitis and 33.3% of the cases receiving etiological treatment were recurrence-free. There were no deaths in this study. The etiological factors of ARP are similar to those of acute pancreatitis at the first attack. The management of ARP should be fully considered based on etiological investigation. © 2014 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Thickening of the celiac axis and/or superior mesenteric artery: a sign of pancreatic carcinoma on computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megibow, A.J.; Bosniak, M.A.; Ambos, M.A.; Beranbaum, E.R.

    1981-01-01

    Of 53 patients with carcinoma of the pancreas studied by computed tomography, 20 (37.7%) had apparent thickening of either the celiac axis or superior mesenteric artery. In 6 of them, the pancreatic mass was poorly defined. The frequency of this sign, correlation with angiographic findings, and pathogenesis are discussed

  3. The second case of a young man with L-arginine-induced acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binet, Quentin; Dufour, Inès; Agneessens, Emmanuel; Debongnie, Jean-Claude; Aouattah, Tarik; Covas, Angélique; Coche, Jean-Charles; De Koninck, Xavier

    2018-04-21

    Dietary supplementation of arginine has been used by numerous world-class athletes and professional bodybuilders over the past 30 years. L-Arginine indeed enhances muscular power and general performance via maintaining ATP level. However, L-arginine is also known to induce acute pancreatitis in murine models. We report the case of young man presenting with upper abdominal pain and increased serum lipase levels. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography confirms a mild acute pancreatitis. Common etiologies have been ruled out and toxicological anamnestic screening reveals the intake of protein powder. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the second case in human of arginine-induced acute pancreatitis. This case report suggests that every patient presenting with acute pancreatitis without obvious etiology should be evaluated for the intake of toxics other than alcohol, including L-arginine.

  4. [Severe hypertriglyceridemia induced acute pancreatitis: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Del Águila, Dwight Denis; Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Linarez Medina, Karen; Lizarzaburu Rodríguez, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis occurs in about 1-4% of the cases. It is the third leading cause of pancreatitis after biliary and alcoholic etiology. Hypertriglyceridemia can be caused by primary causes, lipid metabolism disorders and secondary causes. A 32 year old man, born in Huancayo, with a history of diabetes mellitus type 2, severe mixed dyslipidemia with primary hypertriglyceridemia, was admitted to emergency with 10 days of abdominal pain with moderate intensity in epigastrium and left hypochondrium spreading to dorsal region after intake of high-fat meal. 24 hours before admission, pain exacerbates increasing intensity and causing nausea and bilious vomits. Therefore, all laboratory examinations are carried out resulting in hypertriglyceridemia-induced acute pancreatitis. For that reason, an adequate clinical history physical examination associated with laboratory and image examinations are important to consider hypertriglyceridemia as part of the etiology of acute pancreatitis.

  5. CYSTIC DEGENERATION OF THE DUODENUM ASSOCIATED WITH CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kriger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory cystic lesion of the descending part of the duodenum, mainly in the field of small duodenal papilla in chronic pancreatitis (CP is described as “duodenal dystrophy” (DD. The pathogenesis of this condition has not been studied and treatment strategy is not defined.Purpose. Investigation of cystic inflammatory transformation of duodenal wall pathogenesis in patients with CP, described as a DD, and evaluate the clinical ef ficiency of surgical treatment.Material and methods. Eighty two patients with DD were retrospectively included over 12 years. The diagnosis of DD was established by transabdominal ultrasound, CT, MRI and endosonography. Initially, all patients were treated conservatively. 74 patients required surgical treatment subsequently after conservative treatment with a median duration of 2 years. 34 patients underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD, 21 patients underwent duodenum resection, 15 – duodenum preserving pancreatic head resection of (DPPHR. 4 patients underwent palliative operations. Diagnosis of CP and DD was verified by histological study of surgical specimens. Not operated patients (8 are under observation. Long-term results of surgical treatment were evaluated in 47 patients with a median follow-up was 49.9 months.Results. Histological examination resulted that in 69.9% of DD was related with groove pancreatitis, with ectopic pancreatic tissue – in 30.1%. DD was associated with CP in 92.6% of cases. Clinical presentation of DD was not related with etiology and showed typical symptoms of CP: abdominal pain occurred in 98.8% of patients, body weight loss – 61.7%, duodenal obstruction – 35.8%, biliary hypertension – 34.1%. The overall morbidity was 35.1%. Overall postoperative mortality was 1.37% (1 patient. 66% of patients had no clinical symptoms postoperatively, a significantimprovement – 32%, no effect – 2%.Conclusion. The most cases of DD is related with groove pancreatitis, less

  6. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, P; Keller, J; Lankisch, P G

    2001-04-01

    Malabsorption due to severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is one of the most important late features of chronic pancreatitis. Generally, steatorrhea is more severe and occurs several years prior to malabsorption of other nutrients because synthesis and secretion of lipase are impaired more rapidly, its intraluminal survival is shorter, and the lack of pancreatic lipase activity is not compensated for by nonpancreatic mechanisms. Patients suffer not only from nutritional deficiencies but also from increased nutrient delivery to distal intestinal sites, causing symptoms by profound alteration of upper gastrointestinal secretory and motor functions. Adequate nutrient absorption requires delivery of sufficient enzymatic activity into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meal nutrients. The following recommendations are based on modern therapeutic concepts: 25,000 to 40,000 units of lipase per meal using pH-sensitive pancreatin microspheres, with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in case of treatment failure. Still, in most patients, lipid digestion cannot be completely normalized by current standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment.

  7. Transplantable pancreatic acinar carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.R.; Reddy, J.K.

    1981-01-01

    Fragments of the nafenopin-induced pancreatic acinar cell carcinoma of rat have been examined in vitro for patterns of intracellular protein transport and carbamylcholine-induced protein discharge. Continuous incubation of the fragments with [3H]-leucine for 60 minutes resulted in labeling of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi cisternae, and mature zymogen granules, revealed by electron microscope autoradiography. This result indicates transport of newly synthesized protein from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to mature zymogen granules in approximately 60 minutes. The secretagogue carbamylcholine induced the discharge of radioactive protein by carcinoma fragments pulse-chase labeled with [3H]-leucine. A maximal effective carbamylcholine concentration of 10(-5) M was determined. The acinar carcinoma resembles normal exocrine pancreas in the observed rate of intracellular protein transport and effective secretagogue concentration. However, the acinar carcinoma fragments demonstrated an apparent low rate of carbamylcholine-induced radioactive protein discharge as compared with normal pancreatic lobules or acinar cells. It is suggested that the apparent low rate of radioactive protein discharge reflects functional immaturity of the acinar carcinoma. Possible relationships of functional differentiation to the heterogeneous cytodifferentiation of the pancreatic acinar carcinoma are discussed

  8. Smoking as a risk factor for complications in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luaces-Regueira, María; Iglesias-García, Julio; Lindkvist, Björn; Castiñeira-Alvariño, Margarita; Nieto-García, Laura; Lariño-Noia, José; Domínguez-Muñoz, J Enrique

    2014-03-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated the association between smoking and chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, less is known about the role of smoking in the development of CP-related complications. Our aim was to investigate the impact of smoking and alcohol consumption on age of onset and complications at CP diagnosis. A cross-sectional case-case study was performed within a prospectively collected cohort of patients with CP. Alcohol consumption and smoking habits were assessed using a standardized questionnaire. Morphologic severity was defined based on endoscopic ultrasound criteria for CP and classified as mild (3-4 criteria), moderate (5-6 criteria), and severe (≥7 criteria or calcifications). Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed using the C-mixed triglyceride breath test. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CP-related complications were calculated using a case-case design. A total of 241 patients were included. Smoking was associated with PEI (OR [95% CI], 2.4 [1.17-5.16]), calcifications (OR [95% CI], 2.33 [1.10-4.95]), and severe morphologic changes (OR [95% CI], 3.41 [1.31-8.85]) but not with pseudocysts or diabetes. Neither smoking nor alcohol consumption was associated with age of onset. Tobacco, but not alcohol, is associated with PEI, calcifications, and severe morphologic (≥7 criteria or calcifications) CP at diagnosis. Smoking cessation should be encouraged in patients with CP.

  9. Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Kristiansen, Louise; Becker, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alcohol and gallstone disease are the most established risk factors for pancreatitis. Smoking is rarely considered to be a cause despite the fact that a few studies have indicated the opposite. We aimed to assess the independent effects of smoking on the risk of pancreatitis. METHODS......: We used data from an observational, population-based cohort study conducted in Denmark. Participants were 9573 women and 8332 men who were followed up for a mean of 20.2 years. Participants underwent a physical examination and completed self-administered questionnaires about lifestyle habits....... Information on incident cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were obtained by record linkage with the Danish national registries. RESULTS: A total of 235 cases of pancreatitis occurred during follow-up. A dose-response association between smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis was observed...

  10. Alcohol Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Trkovská, Jana

    2017-01-01

    The thesis concerns itself with alcohol advertising. Alcohol is the most widespread habit-forming substance, yet its consumption is permitted in most countries all around the world, possibly restricted by the age of consumers only. Drinking alcohol cannot be either regulated or prohibited today. It has become commonplace for the majority of our lives. Being aware of its apparent risks, however, there is an effort to regulate at least alcohol advertising. The main objective of this work was to...

  11. Chronic Pancreatitis Associated with the p.G208A Variant of PRSS1 Gene in a European Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Eszter Hegyi; Iveta Cierna; Ludmila Vavrova; Denisa Ilencikova; Michal Konecny; Laszlo Kovacs

    2014-01-01

    Context The major etiologic factor of chronic pancreatitis in adults is excessive alcohol consumption, whereas among Children structural anomalies, systemic and metabolic disorders, and genetic factors are prevalent. Mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1) cause hereditary pancreatitis, while mutations in serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1), cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and chymotrypsin C (CTRC) genes have been shown to associate with chron...

  12. Incidence, Prevalence, Etiology, and Prognosis of First-Time Chronic Pancreatitis in Young Patients: A Nationwide Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Maiken Thyregod; Brusgaard, Klaus; Crüger, Dorthe Gylling

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: Publications on etiology of chronic pancreatitis (CP) are infrequent. Etiologies today encompass genetic disorders. We wanted to describe etiologies of today and identify patients with genetic disorders like hereditary pancreatitis (HP), mutations in Serine Protease Inhibitor Kazal......,000 person years in 1980-1984 to 17.0 per 100,000 in 2000-2004 (p alcohol-induced CP decreased over time. OR having idiopathic CP increased in the latter period; 50% of patients...

  13. Total pancreatectomy for recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis: a critical review of patient selection criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faghih, Mahya; Gonzalez, Francisco Garcia; Makary, Martin A.; Singh, Vikesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose of review Critical review of the indications for total pancreatectomy and highlight limitations in current diagnostic criteria for chronic pancreatitis. Recent findings The diagnosis of noncalcific chronic pancreatitis remains controversial because of an overreliance on nonspecific imaging and laboratories findings. Endoscopic ultrasound, s-magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, and/or endoscopic pancreatic function testing are often used to diagnose noncalcific chronic pancreatitis despite the fact that there is no gold standard for this condition. Abdominal pain is not specific for chronic pancreatitis and is more likely to be encountered in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders based on the high incidence of these conditions. The duration of pain and opioid analgesic use results in central sensitization that adversely affects pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. An alcoholic cause is associated with poorer pain outcomes after total pancreatectomy. Summary The lack of a gold standard for noncalcific chronic pancreatitis limits the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and laboratory tests. The pain of chronic pancreatitis is nonspecific and is affected by duration, preoperative opioid use, and cause. These factors will need to be considered in the development of future selection criteria for this morbid surgery. PMID:28700371

  14. A Case of Idiopathic Acute Pancreatitis in the First Trimester of Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Hara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is rare in pregnancy, with an estimated incidence of approximately 1 in 1000 to 1 in 10,000 pregnancies. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy usually occurs in the third trimester. Here, we report a case of acute pancreatitis in the first trimester. A 36-year-old primigravida at 11 weeks of gestation complained of severe lower abdominal pain. The pain gradually worsened and migrated toward the epigastric region. She had no history of chronic alcoholism. Blood investigations showed elevated level of C-reactive protein (9.58 mg/dL, pancreatic amylase (170 IU/L, and lipase (332 IU/L. There was no gallstone and no abnormality in the pancreatic and biliary ducts on ultrasonography. Antinuclear antibody and IgG4 were negative and no evidence of hyperlipidemia or diabetes was found. There was also no evidence of viral infection. On the third day of hospitalization, she was diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on magnetic resonance imaging. Medical interventions were initiated with nafamostat mesilate and ulinastatin, and parenteral nutrition was administered through a central venous catheter. On the eighth day of hospitalization, her condition gradually improved with a decreased level of pancreatic amylase and the pain subsided. After conservative management, she did not have any recurrence during her pregnancy.

  15. The Role of BRCA2 Mutation Status as Diagnostic, Predictive, and Prognosis Biomarker for Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Martinez-Useros

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest cancers worldwide, and life expectancy after diagnosis is often short. Most pancreatic tumours appear sporadically and have been highly related to habits such as cigarette smoking, high alcohol intake, high carbohydrate, and sugar consumption. Other observational studies have suggested the association between pancreatic cancer and exposure to arsenic, lead, or cadmium. Aside from these factors, chronic pancreatitis and diabetes have also come to be considered as risk factors for these kinds of tumours. Studies have found that 10% of pancreatic cancer cases arise from an inherited syndrome related to some genetic alterations. One of these alterations includes mutation in BRCA2 gene. BRCA2 mutations impair DNA damage response and homologous recombination by direct regulation of RAD51. In light of these findings that link genetic factors to tumour development, DNA damage agents have been proposed as target therapies for pancreatic cancer patients carrying BRCA2 mutations. Some of these drugs include platinum-based agents and PARP inhibitors. However, the acquired resistance to PARP inhibitors has created a need for new chemotherapeutic strategies to target BRCA2. The present systematic review collects and analyses the role of BRCA2 alterations to be used in early diagnosis of an inherited syndrome associated with familiar cancer and as a prognostic and predictive biomarker for the management of pancreatic cancer patients.

  16. Factors That Affect Disease Progression After First Attack of Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Swärd, Per; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Little is known about recurrence of pancreatitis after an initial episode, and little is known about how the disease progresses or what factors affect progression. We performed a population-based study of patients with acute pancreatitis (AP) to determine their outcomes and associated factors. We performed a retrospective study of patients with first-time AP from 2003 through 2012 in a well-defined area of Sweden. Data were collected from medical records on disease etiology, severity (according to the Atlanta classification), recurrence of AP, subsequent chronic pancreatitis, and mortality. Patients were followed up for a median time of 4.6 years, until death or the end of 2013. We identified 1457 patients with first-time AP (48% biliary disease, 17% alcohol-associated, 9.9% severe); 23% of patients had 1 or more recurrences. Risk for recurrence was significantly higher among smokers (hazard ratio [HR], 1.42; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.95; P = .03), patients with alcohol-associated AP (HR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.25-2.23; P chronic pancreatitis, although alcohol-associated AP progressed most frequently (2.8/100 patient-years). Patients with recurrent AP were at the highest risk for chronic pancreatitis (HR, 6.74; 95% CI, 4.02-11.3; P associated AP (HR, 3.10; 95% CI, 2.05-5.87; P associated only with organ failure (odds ratio, 71.17; 95% CI, 21.14-239.60; P chronic pancreatitis. Recurrence increases the risk for progression to chronic pancreatitis. Most patients who die upon disease recurrence have biliary AP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, Taylor M; Villafane-Ferriol, Nicole; Shah, Kevin P; Shah, Rohan M; Tran Cao, Hop S; Massarweh, Nader N; Silberfein, Eric J; Choi, Eugene A; Hsu, Cary; McElhany, Amy L; Barakat, Omar; Fisher, William; Van Buren, George

    2017-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL). The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995-2016) addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1) patients with albumin 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2) patients with albumin endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of appropriate treatment to improve the patient's quality of life.

  18. Differential diagnosis of focal pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gulik, T. M.; Moojen, T. M.; van Geenen, R.; Rauws, E. A.; Obertop, H.; Gouma, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    The differentiation of focal, chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic cancer (PAC) poses a diagnostic dilemma. Both conditions may present with the same symptoms and signs. The complexity of differential diagnosis is enhanced because PAC is frequently associated with secondary inflammatory changes

  19. Pathogenesis of oral FIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Miller

    Full Text Available Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV is the feline analogue of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and features many hallmarks of HIV infection and pathogenesis, including the development of concurrent oral lesions. While HIV is typically transmitted via parenteral transmucosal contact, recent studies prove that oral transmission can occur, and that saliva from infected individuals contains significant amounts of HIV RNA and DNA. While it is accepted that FIV is primarily transmitted by biting, few studies have evaluated FIV oral infection kinetics and transmission mechanisms over the last 20 years. Modern quantitative analyses applied to natural FIV oral infection could significantly further our understanding of lentiviral oral disease and transmission. We therefore characterized FIV salivary viral kinetics and antibody secretions to more fully document oral viral pathogenesis. Our results demonstrate that: (i saliva of FIV-infected cats contains infectious virus particles, FIV viral RNA at levels equivalent to circulation, and lower but significant amounts of FIV proviral DNA; (ii the ratio of FIV RNA to DNA is significantly higher in saliva than in circulation; (iii FIV viral load in oral lymphoid tissues (tonsil, lymph nodes is significantly higher than mucosal tissues (buccal mucosa, salivary gland, tongue; (iv salivary IgG antibodies increase significantly over time in FIV-infected cats, while salivary IgA levels remain static; and, (v saliva from naïve Specific Pathogen Free cats inhibits FIV growth in vitro. Collectively, these results suggest that oral lymphoid tissues serve as a site for enhanced FIV replication, resulting in accumulation of FIV particles and FIV-infected cells in saliva. Failure to induce a virus-specific oral mucosal antibody response, and/or viral capability to overcome inhibitory components in saliva may perpetuate chronic oral cavity infection. Based upon these findings, we propose a model of oral FIV pathogenesis

  20. Retrospective Analyses Of The Acute Pancreatitis With Patients In The West Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YAŞAR, Ali Kemal TAŞKIN, İsmet ÖZAYDIN, Yavuz DEMİRARAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In these study patients who were our clinic with an etiology, diagnosis andtreatment methods, morbidity, mortality and effect of Ranson criteria to prognosis wereexamined retrospectively. Material and Method: In the study 44 mild and 18 severe total 62 AP cases among 2003-2008at the General Surgery of Duzce University were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A etiologic factor was 40 (66,7 %, gallstone 11 (17, 7% idiopathic, 4 (6,4 %hyperlipidemia, 3 (4,8% alchol-hyperlipidemia, 2 (3,2 % alcohol, 2 (3,2 % after ERCPcomplications. Patients were followed up with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, the average ageof 59.6 (18 - 84 and 23 (37% were man, 39 (63% were woman. ERCP were performed to 14patients with billiary pancreatitis 2 patients for the persistent billiary pancreatitis and for the 6patients cholecystitis accompanied pancreatitis in the first 48 hours period, 23 patients followingthe acute pancreatitis attack were performed cholecystectomy. Acute pancreatitis patients first6 cases of biliary 3 reputations have been switched to laparoscopic open cholecystectomy isbeing performed. 3 patients peritoneal lavage under local anesthesia, 4 patients’ diagnosticlaparoscopy and 2 patients nerosectomy were performed. Mean hospitalization times were 9.8days for mild and 11.2 days severe. In the severe group idiopathic a etiology 3 (4.8 % patientswere exitus. Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is a disease that can watch a high mortality rate. Biliary factorswere the most common etiological factor. Idiopathic AP played a role in second place and wehave observed that the effect of alcohol is quite low. In biliary acute pancreatitis ERCP is auseful method in the first stage. Overall mortality in severe AP, as observed in patients with thediagnosis, treatment and follow-up was important in these patients.

  1. Medical image of the week: pancreatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurachi-Monjagatta C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 55 year old woman, with a history of alcohol abuse and necrotizing pancreatitis, was readmitted for worsening abdominal pain and acute respiratory failure. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an atrophic pancreas and multiple fluid collections. Along the inferior surface of the pancreas, there is a fluid collection with an evolving loculated rim, which is asymmetric, the larger component measure 2.9 cm x 4.7 cm (Figure 1, large arrow. Anterior to the body of the pancreas, there is an additional 2.2 cm x 2.4 cm with evolving loculated rim (Figure 1, short arrow, both compatible with a pseudocyst. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed a distended pancreatic duct that communicates to the smaller fluid collection (Figure 2. Coronal CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed a 12.4 cm pelvic abscess (Figure 3. CT guided drainage of the pelvic abscess was performed with positive culture of the fluid …

  2. Occupational exposures and risk of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santibanez, Miguel; Vioque, Jesus; Alguacil, Juan; Hera, Manuela Garcia de la; Moreno-Osset, Eduardo; Carrato, Alfredo; Porta, Miquel; Kauppinen, Timo

    2010-01-01

    The objective was to analyze the relationship between occupation (and specific occupational exposures) and risk of exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC). We conducted a multicenter hospital-based case-control study in Eastern Spain. We included 161 incident cases of EPC (59.6% men, 94 with histological confirmation, of whom 80% had ductal adenocarcinoma). Cases were frequency-matched with 455 controls by sex, age and province of residence. Information was elicited using structured questionnaires. Occupations were coded according to the Spanish version of the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988. Occupational exposure to a selection of carcinogenic substances was assessed with the Finnish Job-Exposure Matrix (FINJEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, province, education, alcohol and smoking. A higher risk of EPC was associated with having worked as 'Miners, shotfirers, stone cutters and carvers', 'Machinery mechanics and fitters', 'Building trades workers' and 'Motor vehicle drivers' in men, 'Office Clerks' in women, and 'Waiters' in both sexes. Cases with ductal adenocarcinomas were more likely to have been exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.1-15.2, p-trend = 0.04). We also observed significant associations with exposure to 'synthetic polymer dust exposure' and 'ionizing radiation'. Suggestive increases in risk were observed for 'pesticides', 'diesel and gasoline engine exhaust', and 'hydrocarbon solvents'. Results support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents is associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  3. Emotion modelling towards affective pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, James Le

    2009-12-01

    Objective: There is a need in psychiatry for models that integrate pathological states with normal systems. The interaction of arousal and emotion is the focus of an exploration of affective pathogenesis. Method: Given that the explicit causes of affective disorder remain nascent, methods of linking emotion and disorder are evaluated. Results: A network model of emotional families is presented, in which emotions exist as quantal gradients. Morbid emotional states are seen as the activation of distal emotion sites. The phenomenology of affective disorders is described with reference to this model. Recourse is made to non-linear dynamic theory. Conclusions: Metaphoric emotion models have face validity and may prove a useful heuristic.

  4. Molecular pathogenesis of intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jesper Bøje

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an orphan cancer of the hepatobiliary tract, the incidence of which has increased in the past decade. The molecular pathogenesis of this treatment-refractory disease is poorly understood. Desmoplasia is a key causal feature of CCA; however, a majority of tumors develop...... and individualization for precision therapies. Many questions persevere as to the evolutionary process and cellular origin of the initial transforming event, the context of intratumoral plasticity and the causal driver action. Next-generation sequencing has begun to underline the persistent alterations, which may...

  5. Biology and pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui Ruqaiyyah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acanthamoeba is a free-living protist pathogen, capable of causing a blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis. The factors that contribute to Acanthamoeba infections include parasite biology, genetic diversity, environmental spread and host susceptibility, and are highlighted together with potential therapeutic and preventative measures. The use of Acanthamoeba in the study of cellular differentiation mechanisms, motility and phagocytosis, bacterial pathogenesis and evolutionary processes makes it an attractive model organism. There is a significant emphasis on Acanthamoeba as a Trojan horse of other microbes including viral, bacterial, protists and yeast pathogens.

  6. Alcoholic fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colin, P

    1961-01-04

    The addition of C/sub 6-10/ alcohols to the fermenting sugar solutions, increased the yield of alcohol by 1.5 to 5%. The best additives were (additive, % additive in sugar solution, % increased in yield of alcohol): hexanol, 0.03, 2.5; heptanol, 0.05, 3; nonanol, 0.01, 3; 2-ethylbutanol, 0.05, 4; 2-ethylhexanol, 0.05, 5; a mixture of C/sub 7-9/ alcohols from the Oxo synthesis, 0.05, 4.5, and a mixture of C/sub 10/ alcohols 0.05, 3.

  7. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  8. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... overweight. Having a personal history of diabetes or chronic pancreatitis . Having a family history of pancreatic cancer or ... have not started treatment. Five types of standard treatment are used: Surgery ... Whipple procedure : A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas , ...

  9. [Identifying the severe acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo Tizón, Anais; Targarona Modena, Javier; Málaga Rodríguez, Germán; Barreda Cevasco, Luis

    2011-01-01

    To compare patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis without any additional complications during their hospital stay (Group A) versus patients with Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis with additional complications during their hospital stay (Group B). Data obtained from a pre-existing base from hospitalized patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in the specialized unit of "Unidad de Pancreatitis Aguda Grave del Hospital Nacional Edgardo Rebagliati Martins" between 2000 and 2010. Data included patients with diagnosis of acute necrotizing pancreatitis, of ages 18 and over. Data from 215 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis was included. Patients from Group A represented 32% (68) and from Group B 68% (147). Group A had a average of 39 hospitalized days and Group B had an average of 56 days (p=0.01). From Group A 22% had more than 50% of necrosis while 43% of Group B had this extension of necrosis (p pancreatitis, based on the presence of necrosis, behave likewise. It is an extended necrosis, described as more than 50% of pancreatic necrosis, and not the presence itself which will determine additional complications during the course of disease and a greater mortality.

  10. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in

  11. Splanchnic venous thrombosis and pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Nikhil A; Khanna, Sahil; Vege, Santhi Swaroop

    2013-08-01

    Pancreatitis is an inflammatory process with local and systemic manifestations. One such local manifestation is thrombosis in splanchnic venous circulation, predominantly of the splenic vein. The literature on this important complication is very sparse. This review offers an overview of mechanism of thrombosis, its pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management in the setting of acute as well as chronic pancreatitis.

  12. The Practical Management of Chronic Pancreatitis: A Multidisciplinary Symposium Held at the Annual Meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland, Manchester 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegatheeswaran, Santhalingam; Puleston, Joanne M; Duggan, Sinead; Hart, Andrew; Conlon, Kevin C; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2018-01-16

    This study is about a questionnaire survey of delegates attending the chronic pancreatitis symposium at the 2016 meeting of the Pancreatic Society of Great Britain and Ireland and seeks a multidisciplinary "snapshot" overview of practice. A questionnaire was developed with multidisciplinary input. Questions on access to specialist care, methods of diagnosis and treatment including specific scenarios were incorporated. Eighty-three (66%) of 125 delegates effectively participated in this survey. Twenty-four (29%) had neither a chronic pancreatitis MDT in their hospital nor a chronic pancreatitis referral MDT. Most frequently utilised diagnostic modalities were CT, MR and EUS with no respondents utilising duodenal intubation tests. Initial treatment was provided through non-opiate analgesia by 69 (93%), through the use of opiates by 56 (76%) and through the use of co-analgesics by 49 (66%). Fifty two (68%) routinely referred patients with alcohol-related disease for counselling. Preferred treatment for large duct disease without mass was endoscopic therapy. In older patients with a mass, pancreaticoduodenectomy was preferred. This is a small study likely to be skewed by sampling bias but is thought to be the first multidisciplinary survey of the management of chronic pancreatitis in the United Kingdom and Ireland. The results show a need for comprehensive access to specialist pancreatitis MDT care and there remains substantial variation in management. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Molecular Pathogenesis of Neuromyelitis Optica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Wajih; Barnett, Michael H; Prain, Kerri; Broadley, Simon A

    2012-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is a rare autoimmune disorder, distinct from multiple sclerosis, causing inflammatory lesions in the optic nerves and spinal cord. An autoantibody (NMO IgG) against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), a water channel expressed on astrocytes is thought to be causative. Peripheral production of the antibody is triggered by an unknown process in genetically susceptible individuals. Anti-AQP4 antibody enters the central nervous system (CNS) when the blood brain barrier is made permeable and has high affinity for orthogonal array particles of AQP4. Like other autoimmune diseases, Th17 cells and their effector cytokines (such as interleukin 6) have been implicated in pathogenesis. AQP4 expressing peripheral organs are not affected by NMO IgG, but the antibody causes extensive astrocytic loss in specific regions of the CNS through complement mediated cytotoxicity. Demyelination occurs during the inflammatory process and is probably secondary to oligodendrocyte apoptosis subsequent to loss of trophic support from astrocytes. Ultimately, extensive axonal injury leads to severe disability. Despite rapid advances in the understanding of NMO pathogenesis, unanswered questions remain, particularly with regards to disease mechanisms in NMO IgG seronegative cases. Increasing knowledge of the molecular pathology is leading to improved treatment strategies. PMID:23202933

  14. Pathogenesis of Focal Segmental Glomerulosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Jin Lim

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS is characterized by focal and segmental obliteration of glomerular capillary tufts with increased matrix. FSGS is classified as collapsing, tip, cellular, perihilar and not otherwise specified variants according to the location and character of the sclerotic lesion. Primary or idiopathic FSGS is considered to be related to podocyte injury, and the pathogenesis of podocyte injury has been actively investigated. Several circulating factors affecting podocyte permeability barrier have been proposed, but not proven to cause FSGS. FSGS may also be caused by genetic alterations. These genes are mainly those regulating slit diaphragm structure, actin cytoskeleton of podocytes, and foot process structure. The mode of inheritance and age of onset are different according to the gene involved. Recently, the role of parietal epithelial cells (PECs has been highlighted. Podocytes and PECs have common mesenchymal progenitors, therefore, PECs could be a source of podocyte repopulation after podocyte injury. Activated PECs migrate along adhesion to the glomerular tuft and may also contribute to the progression of sclerosis. Markers of activated PECs, including CD44, could be used to distinguish FSGS from minimal change disease. The pathogenesis of FSGS is very complex; however, understanding basic mechanisms of podocyte injury is important not only for basic research, but also for daily diagnostic pathology practice.

  15. Pathogenesis of varicelloviruses in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouwendijk, Werner J D; Verjans, Georges M G M

    2015-01-01

    Varicelloviruses in primates comprise the prototypic human varicella-zoster virus (VZV) and its non-human primate homologue, simian varicella virus (SVV). Both viruses cause varicella as a primary infection, establish latency in ganglionic neurons and reactivate later in life to cause herpes zoster in their respective hosts. VZV is endemic worldwide and, although varicella is usually a benign disease in childhood, VZV reactivation is a significant cause of neurological disease in the elderly and in immunocompromised individuals. The pathogenesis of VZV infection remains ill-defined, mostly due to the species restriction of VZV that impedes studies in experimental animal models. SVV infection of non-human primates parallels virological, clinical, pathological and immunological features of human VZV infection, thereby providing an excellent model to study the pathogenesis of varicella and herpes zoster in its natural host. In this review, we discuss recent studies that provided novel insight in both the virus and host factors involved in the three elementary stages of Varicellovirus infection in primates: primary infection, latency and reactivation. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Zhenhua [Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medicine, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, Anhui, China 230032 (China); Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A. [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Ke, Zun-ji [Department of Biochemistry, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai 201203 (China); Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin [Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Luo, Jia, E-mail: jialuo888@uky.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Nutritional Sciences, University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  17. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure causes more severe pancreatic injury and inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Zhenhua; Yang, Fanmuyi; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yongchao; Xu, Mei; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Ke, Zun-ji; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol abuse increases the risk for pancreatitis. The pattern of alcohol drinking may impact its effect. We tested a hypothesis that chronic ethanol consumption in combination with binge exposure imposes more severe damage to the pancreas. C57BL/6 mice were divided into four groups: control, chronic ethanol exposure, binge ethanol exposure and chronic plus binge ethanol exposure. For the control group, mice were fed with a liquid diet for two weeks. For the chronic ethanol exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks. In the binge ethanol exposure group, mice were treated with ethanol by gavage (5 g/kg, 25% ethanol w/v) daily for 3 days. For the chronic plus binge exposure group, mice were fed with a liquid diet containing 5% ethanol for two weeks and exposed to ethanol by gavage during the last 3 days. Chronic and binge exposure alone caused minimal pancreatic injury. However, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure induced significant apoptotic cell death. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure altered the levels of alpha-amylase, glucose and insulin. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure caused pancreatic inflammation which was shown by the macrophages infiltration and the increase of cytokines and chemokines. Chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased the expression of ADH1 and CYP2E1. It also induced endoplasmic reticulum stress which was demonstrated by the unfolded protein response. In addition, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure increased protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation, indicating oxidative stress. Therefore, chronic plus binge ethanol exposure is more detrimental to the pancreas. - Highlights: • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking causes more pancreatic injury. • Chronic plus binge alcohol drinking induces more pancreatic inflammation. • Chronic plus binge alcohol causes more endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress.

  18. Management of acute pancreatitis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Lin, Tom K; Nathan, Jaimie D

    2017-10-01

    Pediatric acute pancreatitis has been on the rise in the last decades, with an incidence close to adult pancreatitis. In the majority of cases acute pancreatitis resolves spontaneously, but in a subset of children the disease progresses to severe acute pancreatitis with attendant morbidity and mortality. Pediatric acute pancreatitis in this era is recognized as a separate entity from adult acute pancreatitis given that the causes and disease outcomes are different. There are slow but important advances made in understanding the best management for acute pancreatitis in children from medical, interventional, and surgical aspects. Supportive care with fluids, pain medications, and nutrition remain the mainstay for acute pancreatitis management. For complicated or severe pancreatitis, specialized interventions may be required with endoscopic or drainage procedures. Surgery has an important but limited role in pediatric acute pancreatitis.

  19. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed Ali, Usama; Issa, Yama; Hagenaars, Julia C.; Bakker, Olaf J.; van Goor, Harry; Nieuwenhuijs, Vincent B.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Ramshorst, Bert; Witteman, Ben J.; Brink, Menno A.; Schaapherder, Alexander F.; Dejong, Cornelis H.; Spanier, B. W Marcel; Heisterkamp, Joos; van der Harst, Erwin; van Eijck, Casper H.; Besselink, Marc G.; Gooszen, Hein G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.; Boermeester, Marja A.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  20. Risk of Recurrent Pancreatitis and Progression to Chronic Pancreatitis After a First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, U.A.; Issa, Y.; Hagenaars, J.C.; Bakker, O.J.; Goor, H. van; Nieuwenhuijs, V.B.; Bollen, T.L.; Ramshorst, B. van; Witteman, B.J.; Brink, M.A.; Schaapherder, A.F.; Dejong, C.H.; Spanier, B.W.; Heisterkamp, J.; Harst, E. van der; Eijck, C.H. van; Besselink, M.G.; Gooszen, H.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van; Boermeester, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Patients with a first episode of acute pancreatitis can develop recurrent or chronic pancreatitis (CP). However, little is known about the incidence or risk factors for these events. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study of 669 patients with a first episode of acute

  1. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Yukihiro; Ueda, Noriyuki; Takasago, Noritsugu; Minemoto, Hiromasa; Namiki, Masayoshi

    1981-01-01

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  2. A RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS IN A PERIPHERAL TERTIARY HOSPITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Karunahara

    2016-06-01

    , patients willing to participate in the study. Exclusion Criteria: Paediatric age group, >75 yrs. Age, patients not willing to participate, patients absconded without completing treatment. RESULTS Chronic alcoholism is the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. Male preponderance is more. Usually in the 4 th and 5 th decades. Most patients presented with abdominal pain. CT findings were diagnostic and gold standard. All underwent conservative management of which 7 cases succumbed to the disease and the rest were treated.

  3. Association between pancreatic fat and incidence of metabolic syndrome: a 5-year Japanese cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hajime; Tauchi, Shinichi; Kimachi, Miho; Dohke, Mitsuru; Hanawa, Nagisa; Kodama, Yoshihisa; Katanuma, Akio; Yamamoto, Yosuke; Fukuma, Shingo; Fukuhara, Shunichi

    2018-04-26

    Previous cross-sectional studies showed that pancreatic fat was associated with metabolic syndrome. However, no longitudinal study has evaluated whether people with high pancreatic fat are likely to develop future metabolic syndrome. This study investigated the association between baseline pancreatic fat and metabolic syndrome incidence. In 2008-2009, 320 participants without metabolic syndrome underwent health checks, which included unenhanced computed tomography, and were followed up annually for 4-5 years. Baseline pancreatic fat amounts were evaluated using a histologically validated method that measured differences between pancreas and spleen attenuations on computed tomography. The participants were divided into low (reference), intermediate, and high pancreatic fat groups based on pancreas and spleen attenuation tertiles. Metabolic syndrome incidence was evaluated annually over a median follow-up period of 4.99 (interquartile range, 4.88-5.05) years, in accordance with the 2009 harmonized criteria. Risk ratios (RRs) for the association between baseline pancreatic fat amounts and metabolic syndrome incidence were estimated using Poisson regression models adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, liver fat, pre-metabolic syndrome, cigarette use, alcohol use, and physical activity. Metabolic syndrome incidence was 30.6% (98/320). Pancreatic fat was associated with an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, based on a univariate analysis (RRs [95% confidence interval], 3.14 [1.74-5.67] and 3.96 [2.23-7.03] in the intermediate and high pancreatic fat groups, respectively). The association remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis (RR [95% confidence interval], 2.04 [1.14-3.64] and 2.30 [1.28-4.14] for the same groups, respectively). Pancreatic fat predicts the future risk of metabolic syndrome. © 2018 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  4. Nutritional advice for prevention of acute pancreatitis: review of current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe ME

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mark E Lowe, Wednesday A SevillaDivision of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that can be acute and self-limiting or, in a small percentage of patients, recurrent. Patients with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis (RAP often progress to chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis in all forms causes significant economic and social burdens. Prevention of RAP may decrease those burdens and halt progression to chronic disease. Unfortunately, no therapy has proven effective at altering the course of RAP. While enteral nutritional therapy plays an important role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis during episodes, nutritional advice provided to patients in an attempt to prevent recurrent episodes has not proven effective in most cases. Discontinuing alcohol consumption and treating dyslipidemia with diet and medication can help patients with these issues. In patients whose pancreatitis is associated with celiac disease or eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a gluten-free diet and avoidance of food allergens can be effective in stopping RAP. Advice to take pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lose weight, control diabetes, decrease dietary sucrose, decrease dietary fat or avoid monosodium glutamate has little to no evidence of efficacy. Some studies suggest that an antioxidant cocktail may decrease the frequency of RAP and the intensity of chronic pain, but the evidence is weak. Nutritional therapy may have a role in the treatment of patients with RAP. At present, there are no clear guidelines for nutritional advice to give these patients. More studies are needed to identify nutritional interventions that will benefit patients with RAP.Keywords: pancreatitis, nutrition, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, antioxidants, herbal supplements

  5. Use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis: A case-control study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shih-Wei; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liao, Kuan-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Some cases of acute pancreatitis have been reported to be associated with use of methimazole. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of a systematic analysis. This was a population-based case-control study analyzing the database of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program. There were 5764 individuals aged 20-84 years with a first attack of acute pancreatitis from 1998 to 2011 as the cases and 23,056 randomly selected sex- and age-matched individuals without acute pancreatitis as the controls. Use of methimazole was categorized as "never use" and "ever use." We estimated the relative risk of acute pancreatitis associated with the use of methimazole by calculating the odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) using a multivariable logistic regression model. After adjustment for confounding factors, the OR of acute pancreatitis was 0.91 in individuals with ever use of methimazole, when compared with individuals with never use of methimazole (95% CI, 0.60-1.38). Unlike methimazole use, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, cardiovascular disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and hypertriglyceridemia were factors significantly associated with acute pancreatitis. Our study does not detect a substantial association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis on the basis of systematic analysis. There appears to be a discrepancy between case reports and our systematic analysis about the association between the use of methimazole and risk of acute pancreatitis.

  6. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  7. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar Natarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.

  8. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J., E-mail: christiane.bruns@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Surgery, Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich, Klinikum Grosshadern, Marchioninistr. 15, D-81377, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-19

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Qi; Zhao, Yue; Renner, Andrea; Niess, Hanno; Seeliger, Hendrik; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Bruns, Christiane J.

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24281178

  10. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Walter Jauch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs. Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer.

  11. Colopancreatic Fistula: An Uncommon Complication of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouhanna Abu Ghanimeh

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic complications, including colopancreatic fistulas (CPFs, are uncommon after acute and chronic pancreatitis. However, they have been reported and are serious. CPFs are less likely to close spontaneously and are associated with a higher risk of complications. Therefore, more definitive treatment is required that includes surgical and endoscopic options. We present a case of a 62-year-old male patient with a history of heavy alcohol intake and recurrent acute pancreatitis who presented with a 6-month history of watery diarrhea and abdominal pain. His abdominal imaging showed a possible connection between the colon and the pancreas. A further multidisciplinary workup by the gastroenterology and surgery teams, including endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and colonoscopy, resulted in a diagnosis of CPF. A distal pancreatectomy and left hemicolectomy were performed, and the diagnosis of CPF was confirmed intraoperatively. The patient showed improvement afterward.

  12. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, R.L.; Braasch, J.W.; O' Bryan, E.M.; Watkins, E. Jr.

    1983-03-01

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  13. Pathogenesis of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Paul J.; Collard, Harold R.; Jones, Kirk D.

    2014-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fibrosing interstitial lung disease associated with aging that is characterized by the histopathological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Although an understanding of the pathogenesis of IPF is incomplete, recent advances delineating specific clinical and pathologic features of IPF have led to better definition of the molecular pathways that are pathologically activated in the disease. In this review we highlight several of these advances, with a focus on genetic predisposition to IPF and how genetic changes, which occur primarily in epithelial cells, lead to activation of profibrotic pathways in epithelial cells. We then discuss the pathologic changes within IPF fibroblasts and the extracellular matrix, and we conclude with a summary of how these profibrotic pathways may be interrelated. PMID:24050627

  14. Comparison of regional pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic morphology in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P

    1990-01-01

    The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation. The predrain......The relation between pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measured by the needle method and pancreatic duct morphology was studied in 16 patients with chronic pancreatitis. After preoperative endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) the patients were submitted to a drainage operation...

  15. Multi-platform ’Omics Analysis of Human Ebola Virus Disease Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisfeld, Amie J.; Halfmann, Peter J.; Wendler, Jason P.; Kyle, Jennifer E.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Peralta, Zuleyma; Maemura, Tadashi; Walters, Kevin B.; Watanabe, Tokiko; Fukuyama, Satoshi; Yamashita, Makoto; Jacobs, Jon M.; Kim, Young-Mo; Casey, Cameron P.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Shukla, Anil K.; Tian, Mingyuan; Neumann, Gabriele; Reed, Jennifer L.; van Bakel, Harm; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; N' jai, Alhaji; Sahr, Foday; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-12-01

    The pathogenesis of human Ebola virus disease (EVD) is complex. EVD is characterized by high levels of virus replication and dissemination, dysregulated immune responses, extensive virus- and host-mediated tissue damage, and disordered coagulation. To clarify how host responses contribute to EVD pathophysiology, we performed multi-platform ’omics analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells and plasma from EVD patients. Our results indicate that EVD molecular signatures overlap with those of sepsis, imply that pancreatic enzymes contribute to tissue damage in fatal EVD, and suggest that Ebola virus infection may induce aberrant neutrophils whose activity could explain hallmarks of fatal EVD. Moreover, integrated biomarker prediction identified putative biomarkers from different data platforms that differentiated survivors and fatalities early after infection. This work reveals insight into EVD pathogenesis, suggests an effective approach for biomarker identification, and provides an important community resource for further analysis of human EVD severity.

  16. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Salvador; Pereda, Javier; Sabater, Luis; Sastre, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis. PMID:25778551

  17. Redox signaling in acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Pérez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory process of the pancreatic gland that eventually may lead to a severe systemic inflammatory response. A key event in pancreatic damage is the intracellular activation of NF-κB and zymogens, involving also calcium, cathepsins, pH disorders, autophagy, and cell death, particularly necrosis. This review focuses on the new role of redox signaling in acute pancreatitis. Oxidative stress and redox status are involved in the onset of acute pancreatitis and also in the development of the systemic inflammatory response, being glutathione depletion, xanthine oxidase activation, and thiol oxidation in proteins critical features of the disease in the pancreas. On the other hand, the release of extracellular hemoglobin into the circulation from the ascitic fluid in severe necrotizing pancreatitis enhances lipid peroxidation in plasma and the inflammatory infiltrate into the lung and up-regulates the HIF–VEGF pathway, contributing to the systemic inflammatory response. Therefore, redox signaling and oxidative stress contribute to the local and systemic inflammatory response during acute pancreatitis.

  18. Molecular biology of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavoral, Miroslav; Minarikova, Petra; Zavada, Filip; Salek, Cyril; Minarik, Marek

    2011-06-28

    In spite of continuous research efforts directed at early detection and treatment of pancreatic cancer, the outlook for patients affected by the disease remains dismal. With most cases still being diagnosed at advanced stages, no improvement in survival prognosis is achieved with current diagnostic imaging approaches. In the absence of a dominant precancerous condition, several risk factors have been identified including family history, chronic pancreatitis, smoking, diabetes mellitus, as well as certain genetic disorders such as hereditary pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, and Peutz-Jeghers and Lynch syndromes. Most pancreatic carcinomas, however, remain sporadic. Current progress in experimental molecular techniques has enabled detailed understanding of the molecular processes of pancreatic cancer development. According to the latest information, malignant pancreatic transformation involves multiple oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes that are involved in a variety of signaling pathways. The most characteristic aberrations (somatic point mutations and allelic losses) affect oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes within RAS, AKT and Wnt signaling, and have a key role in transcription and proliferation, as well as systems that regulate the cell cycle (SMAD/DPC, CDKN2A/p16) and apoptosis (TP53). Understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms should promote development of new methodology for early diagnosis and facilitate improvement in current approaches for pancreatic cancer treatment.

  19. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falzon, Miriam, E-mail: mfalzon@utmb.edu; Bhatia, Vandanajay [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  20. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Falzon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pancreatitis (CP, a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  1. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falzon, Miriam; Bhatia, Vandanajay

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation

  2. Diabetic Cataract—Pathogenesis, Epidemiology and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Pollreisz

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract, clinical studies investigating the association between diabetes and cataract development, and current treatment of cataract in diabetics.

  3. Solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of possible biliary origin causing acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparala, Ramakrishna Prasad Chowdary; Patel, Rafiuddin; Guthrie, James Ahsley; Davies, Mervyn Huw; Guillou, Pierre J; Menon, Krishna V

    2005-09-10

    Pancreatic ductal calculi are most often associated with chronic pancreatitis. Radiological features of chronic pancreatitis are readily evident in the presence of these calculi. However, acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. A 59-year-old man presented with a first episode of acute pancreatitis. Contrast enhanced computerized tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) revealed a calculus in the main pancreatic duct in the head of the pancreas causing acute pancreatitis. There were no features suggestive of chronic pancreatitis on CT scanning. The episode acute pancreatitis was managed conservatively. ERCP extraction of the calculus failed as the stone was impacted in the main pancreatic duct resulting in severe acute pancreatitis. Once this resolved, a transduodenal exploration and extraction of the pancreatic ductal calculus was performed successfully. Crystallographic analysis revealed the composition of the calculus was different to that seen in chronic pancreatitis, but more in keeping with a calculus of biliary origin. This could be explained by migration of the biliary calculus via the common channel into the main pancreatic duct. Following the operation the patient made an uneventful recovery and was well at two-year follow up. Acute pancreatitis due to a solitary main pancreatic ductal calculus of biliary origin is rare. Failing endoscopic extraction, transduodenal exploration and extraction is a safe option after resolution of acute pancreatitis.

  4. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts

  5. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  6. Rational drug use in acute pancreatitis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosić Nikola

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of pancreas where its enzymes autodigest the gland. Two main causes of acute pancreatitis are alcoholism and billiar calculosis. Treatment consists of preventing dehydration, analgesia, decrease of pancreatic exocrine function, enteral nutritional support , respiratory and renal function support and surgery. The patient presents with abdominal pain that lasts for few days and is followed by vomiting. Laboratory tests first revealed abnormal values of blood count and pancreas enzymes (leucocytes -19,7 x 109/L, hematocrit - 0,32, amylase - 52569 IU/L, lypase - 4750 IU/L, CRP - 152 IU/L, albumins - 25 g/L, followed by abnormal values of liver enzymes (AST - 80 IU/L, ALT - 127 IU/L, GGT - 362 IU/L. Further diagnostic procedures showed billiary calculosis, pleural effusion and acute pancreatitis with ascites. No surgery was performed, due to the lack of infect ion and the signs of the patient going into recovery. It was observed that not all diagnostic procedures that exist in the protocol of treatment, such as ERCP or biopsy of pancreatic t issue with microbiological investigation, were performed. Considering the rules of rat ional drug therapy, as well as the protocols that are to be applied in Clinical center 'Kragujevac' in Kragujevac, it was observed that some drugs (antibiotics and albumin were not used in a proper manner, i.e. in compliance with the protocol, which increased the cost of the treatment without improving the patient health or shortening the hospital stay.

  7. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, U.C.; Semb, S.; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may...... be useful as prophylaxis against post endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography pancreatitis (PEP). The protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate (GM) is used routinely as treatment to AP in some countries, but randomized clinical trials and a meta-analysis do not support this practice. Nitroglycerin (NGL...

  8. Severe Acute Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahiyah Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a case of a pregnant lady at 8 weeks of gestation, who presented with acute abdomen. She was initially diagnosed with ruptured ectopic pregnancy and ruptured corpus luteal cyst as the differential diagnosis. However she then, was finally diagnosed as acute hemorrhagic pancreatitis with spontaneous complete miscarriage. This is followed by review of literature on this topic. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy is not uncommon. The emphasis on high index of suspicion of acute pancreatitis in women who presented with acute abdomen in pregnancy is highlighted. Early diagnosis and good supportive care by multidisciplinary team are crucial to ensure good maternal and fetal outcomes.

  9. Pancreatic Metastasis from Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The pancreas is an unusual location for metastases from other primary cancers. Rarely, pancreatic metastases from kidney or colorectal cancers have been reported. However, a variety of other cancers may also spread to the pancreas. We report an exceptional case of pancreatic metastasis from prostate cancer. Differences in management between primary and secondary pancreatic tumors make recognition of metastases to the pancreas an objective of first importance. Knowledge of unusual locations for metastatic spread will reduce diagnostic delay and lead to a timely delivery of an appropriate treatment.

  10. Necrotizing pancreatitis: challenges and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendersky, Victoria A; Mallipeddi, Mohan K; Perez, Alexander; Pappas, Theodore N

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease that can progress to gland necrosis, which imposes significant risk of morbidity and mortality. In general, the treatment for pancreatitis is a supportive therapy. However, there are several reasons to escalate to surgery or another intervention. This review discusses the pathophysiology as well as medical and interventional management of necrotizing pancreatitis. Current evidence suggests that patients are best served by delaying interventions for at least 4 weeks, draining as a first resort, and debriding recalcitrant tissue using minimally invasive techniques to promote or enhance postoperative recovery while reducing wound-related complications.

  11. Vitamin D and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.

    2008-01-01

    Sun exposure has been associated with lower death rates for pancreatic cancer in ecological studies. Skin exposure to solar ultra-violet B radiation induces cutaneous production of precursors to 25-hydroxy (OH) vitamin D (D) and is considered the primary contributor to vitamin D status in most populations. Pancreatic islet and duct cells express 25-(OH) D3-1α-hydroxylase that generates the biologically active 1,25-dihydroxy(OH)2 D form. Thus, 25(OH)D concentrations could affect pancreatic fun...

  12. Recent Progress in Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Herman, Joseph M.; Laheru, Daniel A.; Klein, Alison P.; Erdek, Michael A.; Fishman, Elliot K.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is currently one of the deadliest of the solid malignancies. However, surgery to resect neoplasms of the pancreas is safer and less invasive than ever, novel drug combinations have been shown to improve survival, advances in radiation therapy have resulted in less toxicity, and enormous strides have been made in our understanding of the fundamental genetics of pancreatic cancer. These advances provide hope but they also increase the complexity of caring for patients. It is clear that multidisciplinary care that provides comprehensive and coordinated evaluation and treatment is the most effective way to manage patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:23856911

  13. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure and pain in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N

    1992-01-01

    A casual relation between pancreatic pressure and pain has been searched for decades but lack of appropriate methods for pressure measurements has hindered progress. During the 1980's the needle method has been used for direct intraoperative pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements and later...... for percutaneous sonographically-guided pressure measurements. Clinical and experimental evaluation of the method showed comparable results at intraoperative and percutaneous measurements and little week-to-week variation. Furthermore, comparable pressures in duct and adjacent pancreatic tissue were found, i.......e. the needle pressure mirrors the intraductal pressure. Comparisons of pain registrations, morphological and functional parameters with pancreatic tissue fluid pressure measurements have revealed a relation between pressure and pain which probably is causal. In patients with pain the high pressures previously...

  14. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ‘paraduodenal pancreatitis’: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Ankur; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Patidar, Yashwant; Thapar, Shalini; Arora, Asit; Bhatia, Vikram

    2015-01-01

    Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP) is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper). The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were young to middle-aged men (100%) with history of alcohol abuse (93.9%) and/or smoking (42.4%), who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%). Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%); the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form) in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced

  15. Nutritional and Metabolic Derangements in Pancreatic Cancer and Pancreatic Resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor M. Gilliland

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The disease and its treatment can cause significant nutritional impairments that often adversely impact patient quality of life (QOL. The pancreas has both exocrine and endocrine functions and, in the setting of cancer, both systems may be affected. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI manifests as weight loss and steatorrhea, while endocrine insufficiency may result in diabetes mellitus. Surgical resection, a central component of pancreatic cancer treatment, may induce or exacerbate these dysfunctions. Nutritional and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with pancreatic cancer lack characterization, and few guidelines exist for nutritional support in patients after surgical resection. We reviewed publications from the past two decades (1995–2016 addressing the nutritional and metabolic status of patients with pancreatic cancer, grouping them into status at the time of diagnosis, status at the time of resection, and status of nutritional support throughout the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. Here, we summarize the results of these investigations and evaluate the effectiveness of various types of nutritional support in patients after pancreatectomy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC. We outline the following conservative perioperative strategies to optimize patient outcomes and guide the care of these patients: (1 patients with albumin < 2.5 mg/dL or weight loss > 10% should postpone surgery and begin aggressive nutrition supplementation; (2 patients with albumin < 3 mg/dL or weight loss between 5% and 10% should have nutrition supplementation prior to surgery; (3 enteral nutrition (EN should be preferred as a nutritional intervention over total parenteral nutrition (TPN postoperatively; and, (4 a multidisciplinary approach should be used to allow for early detection of symptoms of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency alongside implementation of

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of pancreatitis: An update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manikkavasakar, Sriluxayini; AlObaidy, Mamdoh; Busireddy, Kiran K; Ramalho, Miguel; Nilmini, Viragi; Alagiyawanna, Madhavi; Semelka, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis and staging of acute and chronic pancreatitis and may represent the best imaging technique in the setting of pancreatitis due to its unmatched soft tissue contrast resolution as well as non-ionizing nature and higher safety profile of intravascular contrast media, making it particularly valuable in radiosensitive populations such as pregnant patients, and patients with recurrent pancreatitis requiring multiple follow-up examinations. Additional advantages include the ability to detect early forms of chronic pancreatitis and to better differentiate adenocarcinoma from focal chronic pancreatitis. This review addresses new trends in clinical pancreatic MR imaging emphasizing its role in imaging all types of acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatitis complications and other important differential diagnoses that mimic pancreatitis. PMID:25356038

  17. Groove Pancreatitis – A Mimic of Pancreatic and Periampullary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivakami R Pradheepkumar

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Groove Pancreatitis (GP is a rare form of focal chronic pancreatitis involving the pancreatico-duodenal groove (PDG. GP was first described by Becker in 1973. Though, GP has been described so many years ago, it is still unfamiliar among most physicians because of lack of sufficient case studies and clinical similarity of GP to conventional pancreatitis. Imaging based differentiation of GP from other lesions, like pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma is also not possible in all the cases, unless there are typical findings favoring GP. Since, the line of treatment and outcome is totally different in these two conditions, appreciation of the fine differences between these two entities is very significant. Groove pancreatitis is symptomatically treated with medicines and only for patients with continuous and severe symptoms which are not amenable to medical treatment surgical management is considered. Radiological differentiation of GP from pancreatic and periampullary malignancies will help to avoid unnecessary surgery in the initial stages. We report two cases of GP, one of pure and other of segmental form where we found typical imaging features which pointed to the diagnosis of GP with a small discussion about the Computed tomography (CT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI appearance of this entity as well as its differential diagnosis.

  18. [Pancreatic anastomosis in operative treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, E; Izbicki, J R; Bockhorn, M

    2017-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an irreversible, inflammatory process, which is characterized by progressive fibrosis of the pancreas and leads to abdominal pain, endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. Surgical therapy is indicated by the absence of pain relief and local complications. The target of the surgical approach is to relieve the pancreatic and bile ducts and resection of the fibrotic and calcified parenchyma. Drainage procedures, such as the Partington-Rochelle method, are used in patients with isolated congestion of the pancreatic duct without further organ complications, such as inflammatory processes of the pancreatic head; however, patients with CP often have an inflammatory swelling of the pancreatic head. In this case classical pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) or organ-sparing duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) with its various techniques (e.g. Beger, Frey, Bern and V‑shape) can be applied. Due to similar long-term results PD should be carried out in cases of suspicion or detection of malignancies and DPPHR for treatment of CP.

  19. Pancreatic duct stones in patients with chronic pancreatitis: surgical outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo-Nan; Zhang, Tai-Ping; Zhao, Yu-Pei; Liao, Quan; Dai, Meng-Hua; Zhan, Han-Xiang

    2010-08-01

    Pancreatic duct stone (PDS) is a common complication of chronic pancreatitis. Surgery is a common therapeutic option for PDS. In this study we assessed the surgical procedures for PDS in patients with chronic pancreatitis at our hospital. Between January 2004 and September 2009, medical records from 35 patients diagnosed with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis were retrospectively reviewed and the patients were followed up for up to 67 months. The 35 patients underwent ultrasonography, computed tomography, or both, with an overall accuracy rate of 85.7%. Of these patients, 31 underwent the modified Puestow procedure, 2 underwent the Whipple procedure, 1 underwent simple stone removal by duct incision, and 1 underwent pancreatic abscess drainage. Of the 35 patients, 28 were followed up for 4-67 months. There was no postoperative death before discharge or during follow-up. After the modified Puestow procedure, abdominal pain was reduced in patients with complete or incomplete stone clearance (P>0.05). Steatorrhea and diabetes mellitus developed in several patients during a long-term follow-up. Surgery, especially the modified Puestow procedure, is effective and safe for patients with PDS associated with chronic pancreatitis. Decompression of intraductal pressure rather than complete clearance of all stones predicts postoperative outcome.

  20. The Scandinavian baltic pancreatic club (SBPC) database: design, rationale and characterisation of the study cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Søren S; Poulsen, Jakob L; Drewes, Asbjørn M; Frøkjær, Jens B; Laukkarinen, Johanna; Parhiala, Mikael; Rix, Iben; Novovic, Srdan; Lindkvist, Björn; Bexander, Louise; Dimcevski, Georg; Engjom, Trond; Erchinger, Friedemann; Haldorsen, Ingfrid S; Pukitis, Aldis; Ozola-Zālīte, Imanta; Haas, Stephan; Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Löhr, J Matthias; Gulbinas, Antanas; Jensen, Nanna M; Jørgensen, Maiken T; Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2017-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a multifaceted disease associated with several risk factors and a complex clinical presentation. We established the Scandinavian Baltic Pancreatic Club (SBPC) Database to characterise and study the natural history of CP in a Northern European cohort. Here, we describe the design of the database and characteristics of the study cohort. Nine centres from six different countries in the Scandinavian-Baltic region joined the database. Patients with definitive or probable CP (M-ANNHEIM diagnostic criteria) were included. Standardised case report forms were used to collect several assessment variables including disease aetiology, duration of CP, preceding acute pancreatitis, as well as symptoms, complications, and treatments. The clinical stage of CP was characterised according to M-ANNNHEIM. Yearly follow-up is planned for all patients. The study cohort comprised of 910 patients (608 men: 302 women; median age 58 (IQR: 48-67) years with definite 848 (93%) or probable CP 62 (7%). Nicotine (70%) and alcohol (59%) were the most frequent aetiologies and seen in combination in 44% of patients. A history of recurrent acute pancreatitis was seen in 49% prior to the development of CP. Pain (69%) and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (68%) were the most common complications followed by diabetes (43%). Most patients (30%) were classified as clinical stage II (symptomatic CP with exocrine or endocrine insufficiency). Less than 10% of the patients had undergone pancreatic surgery. The SBPC database provides a mean for future prospective, observational studies of CP in the Northern European continent.