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Sample records for alcoholic pancreatitis lessons

  1. Alcoholic pancreatitis:Lessons from the liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Katrina; J; Mahan

    2010-01-01

    The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatitis has been recognized for over 100 years. Despite the fact that this association is well recognized, the mechanisms by which alcohol abuse leads to pancreatic tissue damage are not entirely clear. Alcohol abuse is the major factor associated with pancreatitis in the Western world. Interestingly, although most cases of chronic pancreatitis and many cases of acute pancreatitis are associated with alcohol abuse, only a small percentage of individuals w...

  2. Pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis: An overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parimal Chowdhury; Priya Gupta

    2006-01-01

    Use of alcohol is a worldwide habit regardless of socioeconomic background. Heavy alcohol consumption is a potential risk factor for induction of pancreatitis. The current review cites the updated literature on the alcohol metabolism, its effects on gastrointestinal and pancreatic function and in causing pancreatic injury, genetic predisposition of alcohol induced pancreatitis. Reports describing prospective mechanisms of action of alcohol activating the signal transduction pathways, induction of oxidative stress parameters through the development of animal models are being presented.

  3. Oral cholecystography after alcoholic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roller, R J; Mallory, A; Caruthers, S B; Schaefer, J W

    1977-08-01

    Retrospective and prospective studies were done to evaluate the efficacy of oral cholecystography (OCG) performed before hospital discharge on alcoholic patients with acute pancreatitis. In the retrospective study, OCG adequately opacified the gallbladder in 21 of 26 patients (81%). Of the 5 patients with inadequate opacification, 1 was jaundiced at the time of OCG; the other 4 had OCG before resumption of solid food. In the prospective study, OCG done in nonjaundiced patients shortly after resumption of food yielded adequate opacification in 19 of 21 patients (90%) without gallstones. We conclude that in nonjaundiced alcoholic patients with acute pancreatitis not caused by gallstones, OCG performed after resumption of a solid diet and before hospital discharge is usually successful in opacifying the gallbladder. PMID:873119

  4. Beer and its Non-Alcoholic Compounds: Role in Pancreatic Exocrine Secretion, Alcoholic Pancreatitis and Pancreatic Carcinoma

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    Peter Feick

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available : In this article we provide an overview of the newest data concerning the effect of non-alcoholic constituents of alcoholic beverages, especially of beer, on pancreatic secretion, and their possible role in alcoholic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. The data indicate that non-alcoholic constituents of beer stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion in humans and rats, at least in part, by direct action on pancreatic acinar cells. Some non-alcoholic compounds of beer, such as quercetin, resveratrol, ellagic acid or catechins, have been shown to be protective against experimentally induced pancreatitis by inhibiting pancreatic secretion, stellate cell activation or by reducing oxidative stress. Quercetin, ellagic acid and resveratrol also show anti-carcinogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. However, beer contains many more non-alcoholic ingredients. Their relevance in beer-induced functional alterations of pancreatic cells leading to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer in humans needs to be further evaluated.

  5. Molecular mechanisms of alcohol associated pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dahn; L; Clemens; Mark; A; Wells; Katrina; J; Schneider; Shailender; Singh

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is commonly associated with the development of both acute and chronic pancreatitis. Despite this close association, the fact that only a small percentage of human beings who abuse alcohol develop pancreatitis indicates that alcohol abuse alone is not sufficient to initiate clinical pancreatitis. This contention is further supported by the fact that administration of ethanol to experimental animals does not cause pancreatitis. Because of these findings, it is widely believed that ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to injury and additional factors trigger the development of overt pancreatitis. How ethanol sensitizes the pancreas to pancreatitis is not entirely known. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ethanol and its metabolites have a number of deleterious effects on acinar cells. Important acinar cells properties that are affected by ethanol include: calcium signaling, secretion of zymogens, autophagy, cellular regeneration, the unfolded protein response, and mitochondrial membrane integrity. In addition to the actions of ethanol on acinar cells, it is apparent that ethanol also affects pancreatic stellatecells. Pancreatic stellate cells have a critical role in normal tissue repair and the pathologic fibrotic response. Given that ethanol and its metabolites affect so many pancreatic functions, and that all of these effects occur simultaneously, it is likely that none of these effects is "THE" effect. Instead, it is most likely that the cumulative effect of ethanol on the pancreas predisposes the organ to pancreatitis. The focus of this article is to highlight some of the important mechanisms by which ethanol alters pancreatic functions and may predispose the pancreas to disease.

  6. Recent developments in the treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

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    Tsujimoto, Tatsuhiro; Kawaratani, Hideto; Yoshiji, Hitoshi; Uemura, Masahito; Fukui, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory condition characterized by repeated attacks of abdominal pain, and the destruction and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma which causes to reduced exocrine and endocrine functions. Alcohol is the most common cause of chronic pancreatitis. Although abstinence is usually considered a prerequisite for successful treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, we often encounter patients who have repeated attacks from the compensated stage through the transitional stage. In alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, continued alcohol consumption causes changes in the digestive hormones and vagal nerve function that induce the pancreatic acinar cells to oversecrete protein, increasing the protein concentration and viscosity of the pancreatic juice. This induces protein sedimentation from the pancreatic juice and formation of protein plugs within the pancreatic duct, triggering repeated attacks of acute pancreatitis. The treatment of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis includes alleviation of symptoms, particularly abdominal pain, elimination of trigger factors, prevention of recurrence and disease progression, adjuvant therapies for pancreatic exocrine and endocrine failure. Recently, the main constituent proteins in these protein plugs have been identified, enabling trials of several therapies, such as the administration of secretin formulations and endoscopic removal. Bromhexine hydrochloride, a bronchial mucolytic, has an affinity for the pancreatic acinar cells, inducing them to secrete pancreatic juice of low viscosity. In this review, we summarize the most recent thoughts about alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, and the new treatments, and in particular, we present our findings concerning the efficacy of bromhexine hydrochloride in the treatment of this disease. PMID:19630718

  7. Polyvinyl alcohol and gelatin sponge particle embolization of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Yong-Song; Sun, Long; Zhou, Xiang-Ping; Li, Xiao; Fei, Ze-Jun; Zheng, Xiao-Hua; He, Qing

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of and complications associated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and gelatin sponge particles embolization of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis.

  8. Alcoholic pancreatitis:A tale of spirits and bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alain; Vonlaufen; Laurent; Spahr; Minoti; V; Apte; Jean-Louis; Frossard

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is a major cause of chronic pancreatitis.About5%of alcoholics will ever suffer from pancreatitis,suggesting that additional co-factors are required to trigger an overt disease.Experimental work has implicated lipopolysaccharide,from gut-derived bacteria,as a potential co-factor of alcoholic pancreatitis.This review discusses the effects of alcohol on the gut flora,the gut barrier,the liver-and the pancreas and proposes potential interventional strategies.A better understanding of the interaction between the gut,the liver and the pancreas may provide valuable insight into the pathophysiology of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  9. Alcohol abuse-related severe acute pancreatitis with rhabdomyolysis complications

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Mao-Sheng; Jiang, Ying; YAN, XIAO-YUAN HU; Zhao, Qing-hua; Liu, Zhi-Wei; Wen-zhi ZHANG; He, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of acute pancreatitis. One of the major risk factors of both acute pancreatitis and rhabdomyolysis is alcohol abuse. However, only a few studies have reported the prognosis and association of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and rhabdomyolysis in alcohol abuse patients. In the present study, we report two cases presenting with SAP complicated by rhabdomyolysis following high-dose alcohol intake. The disease onset, clinical manifestations, lab...

  10. Alcoholic pancreatitis: New insights into the pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Dahn L; Schneider, Katrina J; Arkfeld, Christopher K; Grode, Jaclyn R; Wells, Mark A; Singh, Shailender

    2016-02-15

    Acute pancreatitis is a necro-inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas that is characterized by inappropriate activation of zymogens, infiltration of the pancreas by inflammatory cells, and destruction of the pancreatic exocrine cells. Acute pancreatitis can progress to a severe life-threatening disease. Currently there is no pharmacotherapy to prevent or treat acute pancreatitis. One of the more common factors associated with acute pancreatitis is alcohol abuse. Although commonly associated with pancreatitis alcohol alone is unable to cause pancreatitis. Instead, it appears that alcohol and its metabolic by-products predispose the pancreas to damage from agents that normally do not cause pancreatitis, or to more severe disease from agents that normally cause mild pancreatic damage. Over the last 10 to 20 years, a tremendous amount of work has defined a number of alcohol-mediated biochemical changes in pancreatic cells. Among these changes are: Sustained levels of intracellular calcium, activation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, endoplasmic reticulum stress, impairment in autophagy, alteration in the activity of transcriptional activators, and colocalization of lysosomal and pancreatic digestive enzymes. Elucidation of these changes has led to a deeper understanding of the mechanisms by which ethanol predisposes acinar cells to damage. This greater understanding has revealed a number of promising targets for therapeutic intervention. It is hoped that further investigation of these targets will lead to the development of pharmacotherapy that is effective in treating and preventing the progression of acute pancreatitis. PMID:26909228

  11. Lessons Learnt in Management of Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Deshpande Aparna; Velhal Rishikesh; Thanky Harsh; Soman Sundeep; Shah Ritesh

    2008-01-01

    Objective Acute Pancreatitis continues to be a confounding clinical problem and can pose a formidable challenge in its management. This invited review discusses the various clinical studies done while managing cases of acute pancreatitis and the possible avenues for further studies. Method Clinical studies done on various aspects of pancreatitis viz. severity prediction using bedside index of severity in acute pancreatitis score and its validation in Indian patients, current status of interve...

  12. Genetic susceptibility factors for alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Ali A; Weiss, F Ulrich; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M; Simon, Peter

    2015-07-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is a progressive inflammatory disease of the pancreas and frequently associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. Since only a small proportion of alcoholics eventually develop chronic pancreatitis genetic susceptibility factors have long been suspected to contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease. Smaller studies in ethnically defined populations have found that not only polymorphism in proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, such as Alcohol Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Dehydrogenase, can confer a risk for developing chronic pancreatitis but also mutations that had previously been reported in association with idiopathic pancreatitis, such as SPINK1 mutations. In a much broader approach employing genome wide search strategies the NAPS study found that polymorphisms in the Trypsin locus (PRSS1 rs10273639), and the Claudin 2 locus (CLDN2-RIPPLY1-MORC4 locus rs7057398 and rs12688220) confer an increased risk of developing alcohol-induced pancreatitis. These results from North America have now been confirmed by a European consortium. In another genome wide approach polymorphisms in the genes encoding Fucosyltransferase 2 (FUT2) non-secretor status and blood group B were not only found in association with higher serum lipase levels in healthy volunteers but also to more than double the risk for developing alcohol-associated chronic pancreatitis. These novel genetic associations will allow to investigate the pathophysiological and biochemical basis of alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis on a cellular level and in much more detail than previously possible. PMID:26149858

  13. Alcohol, Inflammation and Gene Modifications in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of chronic pancreatitis in Western countries is associated with chronic alcohol abuse in a high percentage of cases. In fact, we found that, in 190 Italian patients with proven chronic pancreatitis who were studied in the 2005, the etiology was alcohol abuse (more than 80 g/day for at least 5 years in 77.4% of the cases and due to other causes in 5.8% (hereditary pancreatitis in 2.6%, pancreatic malformation in 2.1%, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene mutation in 0.5%, autoimmune pancreatitis in 0.5%; in 16.8% of the cases, a definite etiology of the pancreatitis was not recognized [1]. Although alcohol abuse is the main factor associated with chronic pancreatitis development, the pathological mechanisms involved in the initiation the disease remain obscure. One of the reasons for our difficulty in understanding the trigger mechanism between alcohol abuse and chronic pancreatic damage is the lack of animal and cellular models simulating the lesions such as those observed in humans. Gukovsky et al. [2] have recently found that rats which had been fed ethanol for 8 weeks, which had received cyclosporin A for the last two2 weeks and in which acute pancreatitis had been cerulein-induced had a massive loss of acinar cells, persistent inflammatory infiltration and fibrosis as compared to the control animals. Furthermore, macrophages in the treated rats were prominent in the inflammatory infiltrate and showed a marked increase in pancreatic NF-kappaB activation, cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression, collagen and fibronectin, in the expression and activities of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 and in the activation of pancreatic stellate cells. Therefore, this study shows the possible mechanism by which alcohol sensitizes the pancreas to chronic injury.

  14. Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis: A quality of life study

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    Simone Carla BENINCÁ

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To compare the quality of life between patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and controls, and between diabetic and non-diabetic patients, correlating clinical, sociodemographic, and nutritional factors with their quality of life scores. Methods: Forty-three outpatients of the pancreas and biliary tract clinic diagnosed with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis were assessed. Quality of life was measured by the Brazilian version of the Short Form-36. The control group consisted of 43 healthy companions. Nutritional status was classified according to body mass index and triceps, biceps, suprailiac, and subscapular skinfold thicknesses, using the appropriate methods. The percentage of body fat was given by adding the four skinfold thicknesses and by bioelectrical impedance analysis. The statistical tests included the Chi-square, Mann-Whitney, and Spearman's correlation tests, with the significance level set at p<0.05. Results: The sociodemographic variables of the case and control groups did not differ. Quality of life was lower in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients than in controls. The only quality of life domain that differed between diabetics and non-diabetics was functional capacity, lower in diabetics (p=0.022. Smoking duration, alcohol intake in grams, and time since pancreatic surgery correlated negatively with the quality of life of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients. Old age, skinfold thicknesses, and percentage of body fat correlated positively with quality of life. Conclusion: Quality of life is low in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients because of the negative influence of certain factors, such as smoking duration, amount of alcohol consumed, and time since pancreatic surgery.

  15. Screening for mutations of the cationic trypsinogen gene: are they of relevance in chronic alcoholic pancreatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    TEICH, N; MOSSNER;, J; Keim, V

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND—In hereditary pancreatitis mutations of exons 2 (N21I) and 3 (R117H) of the cationic trypsinogen gene have been described. 
AIMS—To investigate whether the same mutations can also be found in patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. 
METHODS—Leucocyte DNA was prepared from 23 patients with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, 21 with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, 34 individuals from seven independent families with hereditary pancreatitis, and 15 healthy controls. DNA...

  16. Stellate Cell Activation in Tropical Calcific Pancreatitis Compared to Alcoholic Pancreatitis, Adenocarcinoma of Pancreas and Normal Pancreas

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    Johny Cyriac

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ContextPancreatic stellate cell (PSC is known to be the source of fibrosis in pancreatic pathology of various etiologies. However, there is no published data on activation of PSCs in tropical calcific pancreatitis. ObjectivesThe present study was undertaken to estimate the proportion of activated stellate cells, in a semi-quantitative manner, in normal pancreas and pancreatic fibrosis due to, tropical calcific pancreatitis, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PatientsSurgically resected specimen from patients with tropical calcific pancreatitis (n=22, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis(n=16, adenocarcinoma of pancreas (n=20 and normal pancreas (n=20 were included. Main outcome measuresExpression of CD34, and alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Morphometry was performed by a pointcounting procedure and CD34 positive areas were excluded from α-SMA positive areas for estimating activated PSCs. StatisticsThe one-way ANOVA and the Tukey multiple comparison test were used to compare the proportion ofactivated stellate cells among the four categories. ResultsIn all the disease conditions studied, namely, tropical calcific pancreatitis (16.7±14.5%, mean±SD, alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (13.6±12.4% and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (22.8±14.4%, there was highly significant (P<0.001 increased percentage of activated PSCs compared to normal pancreas (-0.9±6.4%. Proportion of activated PSCs in tropical calcific pancreatitis was similar to that in cases of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Such activation is documented for the first time in tropical calcific pancreatitis while it is known for the other causes. ConclusionsThe present study suggests that a final common pathway of PSC activation leads to fibrogenesis in tropical calcific pancreatitis just as in other pancreatic pathologies.

  17. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.)

  18. Polyvinyl alcohol and gelatin sponge particle embolization of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Song Guan; Long Sun; Xiang-Ping Zhou; Xiao Li; Ze-Jun Fei; Xiao-Hua Zheng; Qing He

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To assess the effectiveness of and complications associated with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and gelatin sponge particles embolization of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis.METHODS: A 42-year-old man with splenic artery pseudoaneurysm formation secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis was admitted. We used PVA and gelatin sponge partides embo lization of splenic artery pseudoaneurysm by superselective embolization techniques.RESULTS: The splenic artery pseudoaneurysm was successfully controlled with splenic embolization. The patient was discharged in 9 d with complete recovery. CONCLUSION: This case confirms that superselective transcatheter embolization by PVA and gelatin sponge particles may represent an effective treatment for pseudoaneurysm caused by chronic alcoholic pancreatitis in the absence of other therapeutic alternatives.

  19. Alcohol modulates circulating levels of interleukin-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, N; Larsen, S; Seidelin, J B;

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines are markers of acute pancreatic inflammation and essential for distant organ injury, but they also stimulate pancreatic fibrogenesis and are thus involved in the progression from acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatic injury and fibrosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the...... circulating levels of IL-6, MCP-1, TGF-beta1, IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 in patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (CP)....

  20. Apoptotic Damage of Pancreatic Ductal Epithelia by Alcohol and Its Rescue by an Antioxidant

    OpenAIRE

    Seo, Jong Bae; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Koh, Duk-Su

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major cause of pancreatitis. However alcohol toxicity has not been fully elucidated in the pancreas and little is known about the effect of alcohol on pancreatic ducts. We report the molecular mechanisms of ethanol-induced damage of pancreatic duct epithelial cells (PDEC). Ethanol treatment for 1, 4, and 24 h resulted in cell death in a dose-dependent manner. The ethanol-induced cell damage was mainly apoptosis due to generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), depolarizat...

  1. A Case of Pancreatic Cancer with Formation of a Mass Mimicking Alcoholic or Autoimmune Pancreatitis in a Young Man. Possibility of Diagnosis by Hypermethylation of Pure Pancreatic Juice

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    Koushiro Ohtsubo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Mass-forming pancreatitis can be divided into two distinct types: alcoholic and autoimmune. There have been some cases of an ambiguous diagnosis although care was taken to differentiate between alcoholic massforming pancreatitis, focal type autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.Case report We report a case of pancreatic cancer mimicking alcoholic or autoimmune pancreatitis with the formation of a mass in a 32-year-old man with a history of heavy drinking. Although both serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin G4levels were normal, many serum autoantibodies, including the antinuclear antibody, were detected. After he stopped drinking, abdominal computed tomography showed a pancreatic head mass 28 mm in diameter with little and weak enhancement in the early and delayed phases, respectively. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showedan obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head and marked stenosis of the lower common bile duct. Although a percutaneous ultrasound-guided pancreatic biopsy demonstrated no evidence of autoimmune pancreatitis, he was treated with prednisolone to test the efficacy of steroid therapy. However, the pancreatic mass became enlarged after steroid therapy, and he underwent surgery during which the mass was found to be pancreatic cancer. Although the patient was treated with gemcitabine, he died 5 months after surgery. We retrospectively assessed DNA hypermethylation in the patient’s pure pancreatic juice obtained on admission. We observed hypermethylation of the cancer-specific gene tissue factor pathway inhibitor 2 (TFPI2. Conclusion This finding suggests that if the DNA hypermethylation of pure pancreatic juice had been assayed before steroid therapy, it would have supported the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and steroid therapy could have been avoided.

  2. Alcoholic Pancreatitis: Pathogenesis, Incidence and Treatment with Special Reference to the Associated Pain

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    Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic pancreatitis continues to stir up controversy. One of the most debated points is whether from onset it is a chronic disease or whether it progresses to a chronic form after repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis. Histological studies on patients with alcoholic pancreatitis have shown that the disease is chronic from onset and that alcoholic acute pancreatitis occurs in a pancreas already damaged by chronic lesions. Genetic factors may also play a role in the pathogenesis of alcoholic disease. The incidence of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis seems to have decreased in the last twenty years. Finally, recent therapeutic studies which have shown medical or surgical approaches capable of reducing the pain episodes in chronic pancreatitis patients will be described.

  3. CD14 promoter polymorphism in Chinese alcoholic patients with cirrhosis of liver and acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    You-Chen Chao; Heng-Cheng Chu; Wei-Kuo Chang; Hsin-Hung Huang; Tsai-Yuan Hsieh

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the relationship between genetic polymorphism of the CD14 promoter and the occurrence of alcoholic cirrhosis and alcoholic pancreatitis, and to challenge the conclusion made earlier that the patients with acute alcoholic pancreatitis and patients with alcoholic cirrhosis of liver are two different subpopulations.METHODS: Using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method, we determined the polymorphism of CD14 gene and aldehyde dehydrogenase gene 2 (ALDH 2) in 335 alcoholic patients with different organ complications i.e., cirrhosis of liver (n = 100), acute pancreatitis (n = 100), esophageal cancer (n = 82) and avascular necrosis of hip joint (AVN) (n = 53)and 194 non-alcoholic controls in a Chinese group.RESULTS: The results showed that the carriage of T allele was not different among alcoholic patients with cirrhosis of liver, alcoholic patients with other complication and non-alcoholic controls. On the other hand, the carriage of the C allele was significantly more prevalent for alcoholic pancreatitis than for esophageal cancer (0.79 vs 0.60,P<0.001), alcoholic AVN (0.79 vs 0.65, P<0.025) and nonalcoholic controls (0.79 vs 0.68, P<0.025). Furthermore,when only subjects with ALDH2 1-1 genotype were examined, the C allele frequency was significantly more prevalent for alcoholic pancreatitis than for alcoholic liver cirrhosis (0.82 vs 0.69, P<0.025), esophageal cancer (0.82 vs 0.61, P<0.01), alcoholic AVN (0.82 vs 0.64,P<0.01) and non-alcoholic controls (0.82 vs 0.69, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The C allele may be associated with some mechanism, which is important in the pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis, and that alcoholic patients with acute pancreatitis and cirrhosis of liver are probably two different subpopulations.

  4. Pancreatic adaptive responses in alcohol abuse: Role of the unfolded protein response.

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    Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Pandol, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    The majority of those who drink excessive amounts of alcohol do not develop pancreatic disease. One overarching hypothesis is that alcohol abuse requires additional risk factors, either environmental or genetic, for disease to occur. However, another reason be a result of alcohol-induced activation of adaptive systems that protect the pancreas from the toxic effects of alcohol. We show that mechanisms within the unfolded protein response (UPR) of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can lead to protection of the pancreas from pancreatic diseases with alcohol abuse. The remarkable ability of the pancreas to adapt its machinery to alcohol abuse using UPR systems and continue functioning is the likely reason that pancreatitis from alcohol abuse does not occur in the majority of heavy drinkers. These findings indicate that methods to enhance the protective responses of the UPR can provide opportunities for prevention and treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:25736240

  5. Differences in severity and outcomes between hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol-induced pancreatitis

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    Hemant Goyal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol and hypertriglyceridemia (HTG are among the most common causes of acute pancreatitis (AP after gallstones. However, differences in severity at the time of presentation and outcomes have not been well-studied. Objective: The aim of this study is to assess the differences between severity at presentation and outcomes of AP of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic origins. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 177 patients who were discharged with diagnosis of AP was performed. Severity at presentation was identified by the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, bedside index for severity in AP (BISAP score, and Balthazar index. Outcomes were measured by the length of stay, intensive care unit care, surgical intervention, and mortality. Results: We found 147 patients with alcoholic pancreatitis and 30 patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis. A larger percentage of hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (23.33% had a BISAP score of ≥2 compared to the alcoholic group (12.24%. Only 32.65% of the patients with alcoholic pancreatitis but 60% of the patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis had the presence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS at admission (P = 0.0067. There were 73.34% hypertriglyceridemic pancreatits patients and only 40.28% alcoholic pancreatitis patients with Balthazar index C or greater, suggesting a higher disease burden at admission for hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis patients (P = 0.0047. There was a statistically significant difference in the relative number of hypertriglyceridemic and alcoholic pancreatitis patients receiving intensive care (P = 0.00030 and in receiving surgical interventions related to pancreatitis (P = 0.016. Conclusion: Our study found that patients with hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis have a greater severity of disease and they experience less favorable outcomes than patients with alcoholic pancreatitis.

  6. Pancreatic injury in hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase-deficient deer mice after subchronic exposure to ethanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatitis caused by activation of digestive zymogens in the exocrine pancreas is a serious chronic health problem in alcoholic patients. However, mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis remains obscure due to lack of a suitable animal model. Earlier, we reported pancreatic injury and substantial increases in endogenous formation of fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in the pancreas of hepatic alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-deficient (ADH-) deer mice fed 4% ethanol. To understand the mechanism of alcoholic pancreatitis, we evaluated dose-dependent metabolism of ethanol and related pancreatic injury in ADH- and hepatic ADH-normal (ADH+) deer mice fed 1%, 2% or 3.5% ethanol via Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet daily for 2 months. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) was remarkably increased and the concentration was ∼ 1.5-fold greater in ADH- vs. ADH+ deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. At the end of the experiment, remarkable increases in pancreatic FAEEs and significant pancreatic injury indicated by the presence of prominent perinuclear space, pyknotic nuclei, apoptotic bodies and dilation of glandular ER were found only in ADH- deer mice fed 3.5% ethanol. This pancreatic injury was further supported by increased plasma lipase and pancreatic cathepsin B (a lysosomal hydrolase capable of activating trypsinogen), trypsinogen activation peptide (by-product of trypsinogen activation process) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (endoplasmic reticulum stress marker). These findings suggest that ADH-deficiency and high alcohol levels in the body are the key factors in ethanol-induced pancreatic injury. Therefore, determining how this early stage of pancreatic injury advances to inflammation stage could be important for understanding the mechanism(s) of alcoholic pancreatitis.

  7. Computed tomographic differentiation between alcoholic and gallstone pancreatitis: Significance of distribution of infiltration or fluid collection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Young-Sun Kim; Yongsoo Kim; Sung-Kyu Kim; Hyunchul Rhim

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of various computed tomography (CT) findings including distribution of infiltration or fluid collection in differentiating the major etiologies of acute pancreatitis.METHODS: We reviewed 75 relatively severe cases of acute pancreatitis of alcoholic (n=43) or biliary stone(n=32) etiology having infiltration or fluid collection on CT. We compared the pancreatic size, CT grading,presence or absence of biliary calculi, and dilatation of pancreatic or bile duct. We also evaluated degree and the distribution of infiltration and fluid collection in each group.RESULTS: The sizes of pancreas were not different between alcohol group and stone group. Alcohol group showed higher CT grading than stone group (P<0.05). Presence of biliary stone and duct dilatation was statistically significant in differentiating etiology (P <0.05). Alcohol group showed significantly prominent peripancreatic pathology than stone group only in left peritoneal compartment (P = 0.020).CONCLUSION: Alcoholic pancreatitis tends to form more prominent peripancreatic changes than gallstone pancreatitis in relatively severe cases. This is evident on the anterior aspect of left abdomen. Although clinical history and some CT findings usually are a major determinant of the etiology, this pattern of peripancreatic pathology may have an ancillary role in determining the etiologies of acute pancreatitis in the equivocal cases.

  8. Risk of pancreatitis according to alcohol drinking habits: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Louise; Grønbaek, Morten; Becker, Ulrik;

    2008-01-01

    alcohol intake and risk of pancreatitis. For this purpose, the authors used data on 17,905 men and women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976-1978, 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001-2003 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Alcohol intake and covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Information...

  9. Risk of pancreatitis according to alcohol drinking habits: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, L.; Gronbaek, M.; Tolstrup, J.S.;

    2008-01-01

    The association between alcohol intake and pancreatitis has been examined previously in case-control studies, mostly consisting of men. The significance of beverage type and drinking pattern is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the association between amount, type, and frequency of...... alcohol intake and risk of pancreatitis. For this purpose, the authors used data on 17,905 men and women who participated in the Copenhagen City Heart Study in 1976-1978, 1981-1983, 1991-1994, and 2001-2003 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Alcohol intake and covariates were assessed by questionnaire. Information...

  10. Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakeri, Ramin; Kamangar, Farin; Mohamadnejad, Mehdi; Tabrizi, Reza; Zamani, Farhad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza; Islami, Farhad; Poustchi, Hossein; Boffetta, Paolo; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. Methods: Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to January 2015. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: After adjustment for potential confounders, opium use (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06–3.43) and alcohol consumption (OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.86–9.31) were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find an association between ever tobacco smoking and pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.62–1.39). Conclusion: In our study, opium use and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cigarette smoking was not. PMID:27428185

  11. [Treatment of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis with a new acid-resistant pancreatin product].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempelen, I; Szilárd, M

    1995-09-17

    The authors summarised pathophysiology and therapy possibility of the chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. They introduce a new product of pancreatin use for treatment of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The aim of this prospective study was to asses the efficacy of this new drug in the treatment of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The treatment was carried out by new pancreatin product containing 10,000 FIP U lipase, 9000 FIP U amylase, and 500 FIP E protease. During the study 30 patients--suffering from alcoholic pancreatitis--were treated. They received, two tablets three times daily in a period of two weeks. The following parameters were observed and compared before and after the period of treatment: complaints of the patients, the characteristics of the stool (daily weight, frequency, fat contents, consistency) the change of the body weight and degree of abdominal pain. These parameters were compared using a score-system, before and after the period of treatment. The authors could analyse the data of 21 patients. It was proved that there was a significant decrease in frequency, daily weight and fat contents of the stool and in abdominal pain. There was not significant change in the body weight. The authors concluded that this new product is a good pancreatin preparation which is useful and suitable for effective treatment of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, if the patient keeps abstinence. PMID:7566938

  12. Peculiarities of death and regeneration of pancreas cells at early stages of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Y. Oshmyanska

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The study has been conducted on 39 white laboratory male rats which formed 5 groups: experimental occlusal pancreatitis caused by ligation of the main pancreatic duct (n = 6, experimental alcoholic pancreatitis caused by oral intake of alcohol (n = 6, against the background of an excess (n = 6 or deficiency (n = 6 of nitric oxide, as well as a control group (n = 15. This study provides the detailed description of the processes of death and regeneration in the islets of Langerhans, typical for early stages of the disease. The expression of the proliferation markers (PCNA and Neurogenin-3 has been analyzed using histological and immunohistochemical methods along with the changes of morphological structure, that led to initiation of the alcoholic chronic pancreatitis against the background of imbalance in NO-ergic regulatory system caused by an excess or deficiency of nitric oxide. It has been found that ligation of the pancreatic duct in the experiment reconstructedthe circumstances of chronic pancreatitis in rats and caused the activation of fibrosis and regeneration of endocrine and exocrine tissue. Compared with occlusion, the effects of ethanol on the pancreas also manifested in the activation of fibrogenesis, but the structural changes were negligible and could unlikely lead to advanced fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis in the future. On the other side, an imbalance of NO-system in alcoholic rats leads to disruption of the zymogens secretion in the acinar cells and dilatation of the capillary network in islets. Uneven distribution of zymogen granules may lead to their intracellular activation as evidenced by the deformation of acini and focal apoptosis without inflammatory response. In this case, violation of the key adaptive responses in the pancreas makes it more vulnerable to the effects of ethanol, its metabolites, and other environmental factors, and may increase the probability of chronic pancreatitis development. At the same time

  13. Proinflammatory cytokines in alcohol or gallstone induced acute pancreatitis. A prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: If differences of inflammatory pathways in acute pancreatitis exist for various etiologies, selective and specific antiinflammatory and other modulatory treatment regimens might be indicated. Circulating levels of prominent proinflammatory cytokines IL-6, 8, 18, and TNF-alpha were...... measured in patients having their first attack of either alcohol- or gallstone-induced acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Seventy-five consecutive patients were prospectively included over a 15-month period, sixty of them being either alcohol- or gallstone-induced. All patients were treated according to a...... clinical outcome is independent of the underlying etiology. Revealing the complex spatial and temporal profile of proinflammatory cytokine expression in acute pancreatitis is necessary and important for the development of a more targeted rational therapy....

  14. Alcohol and high fat induced chronic pancreatitis: TRPV4 antagonist reduces hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L P; Kline, R H; Deevska, G; Ma, F; Nikolova-Karakashian, M; Westlund, K N

    2015-12-17

    The pathogenesis of pain in chronic pancreatitis is poorly understood, and its treatment can be a major clinical challenge. Surgical and other invasive methods have variable outcomes that can be unsatisfactory. Therefore, there is a great need for further discovery of the pathogenesis of pancreatitis pain and new therapeutic targets. Human and animal studies indicate a critical role for oxidative stress and activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channel subfamily members TRPV1 and TRPA1 on pancreatic nociceptors in sensitization mechanisms that result in pain. However, the in vivo role of transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily V member 4 (TRPV4) in chronic pancreatitis needs further evaluation. The present study characterized a rat alcohol/high fat diet (AHF)-induced chronic pancreatitis model with hypersensitivity, fibrotic pathology, and fat vacuolization consistent with the clinical syndrome. The rats with AHF-induced pancreatitis develop referred visceral pain-like behaviors, i.e. decreased hindpaw mechanical thresholds and shortened abdominal and hindpaw withdrawal latency to heat. In this study, oxidative stress was characterized as well as the role of TRPV4 in chronic visceral hypersensitivity. Lipid peroxidase and oxidative stress were indicated by increased plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and diminished pancreatic manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). The secondary sensitization associated with AHF-induced pancreatitis was effectively alleviated by the TRPV4 antagonist, HC 067047. Similarity of the results to those with the peripherally restricted μ-opiate receptor agonist, loperamide, suggested TRPV4 channel activated peripheral sensitization. This study using a reliable model that provides pre-clinical correlates of human chronic pancreatitis provides further evidence that TRPV4 channel is a potential therapeutic target for treatment of pancreatitis pain. PMID:26480812

  15. Does an association exist between chronic pancreatitis and liver cirrhosis in alcoholic subjects?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis Aparisi; Luis Sabater; Juan Del-Olmo; Juan Sastre; MigueI-Angel Serra; Ricardo Campello; Daniel Bautista; Abdalla Wassel; José-Manuel Rodrigo

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To study the possible association between chronic pancreatitis (CP) and liver cirrhosis (LC) of alcoholic etiology, after excluding any other causes. METHODS: One hundred and forty consecutive alcoholic patients were subdivided into three groups: CP (η = 53), LC (η = 57), and asymptomatic alcoholic (n = 30). Clinical, biochemical and morphological characteristics, Child-Pugh index, indocyanine green test, and fecal pancreatic elastase-1 test were assessed. RESULTS: In patients with cirrhosis, major clinical manifestations of CP such as pancreatic pain and steatorrhea, as well as imaging alterations of CP such as calcifications, duct dilation and pseudocysts were absent; insulin-dependent diabetes was present in 5.3% of cases, and elastase-1 test was altered in only 7%, and severely altered in none. In patients with CP, clinical characteristics of cirrhosis such as ascites, encephalopathy and gastrointestinal hemorrhage were present in one case, Child-Pugh grade > A in 5.7%, and altered indocyanine green test in 1.9% cases. In asymptomatic alcoholism, there was only a non-coincident alteration of elastase-1 test and indocyanine test in 14.8% and 10%, respectively, but other characteristics of cirrhosis or CP were absent. An inverse correlation (r=-0.746) between elastase-1 test and indocyanine test was found in alcoholic patients. CONCLUSION: There is a scarce coincidence in clinical and morphological alterations among patients with CP or LC of alcoholic etiology, but an inverse correlation between pancreatic and liver function tests. These findings support that these alcoholic diseases evolve in a different manner and have different etiopathogenesis.

  16. Chronic alcohol consumption potentiates the development of diabetes through pancreatic β-cell dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji; Yeon; Kim; Dae; Yeon; Lee; Yoo; Jeong; Lee; Keon; Jae; Park; Kyu; Hee; Kim; Jae; Woo; Kim; Won-Ho; Kim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption is well established as a major risk factor for type-2 diabetes(T2D), which is evidenced by impaired glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. However, the relationships between alcoholconsumption and the development of T2 D remain controversial. In particular, the direct effects of ethanol consumption on proliferation of pancreatic β-cell and the exact mechanisms associated with ethanolmediated β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis remain elusive. Although alcoholism and alcohol consumption are prevalent and represent crucial public health problems worldwide, many people believe that low-tomoderate ethanol consumption may protect against T2 D and cardiovascular diseases. However, the J- or U-shaped curves obtained from cross-sectional and large prospective studies have not fully explained the relationship between alcohol consumption and T2 D. This review provides evidence for the harmful effects of chronic ethanol consumption on the progressive development of T2 D, particularly with respect to pancreatic β-cell mass and function in association with insulin synthesis and secretion. This review also discusses a conceptual framework for how ethanolproduced peroxynitrite contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and metabolic syndrome.

  17. A common variant of PNPLA3 (p.I148M) is not associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosendahl, J.; Tönjes, A.; Schleinitz, D.; Kovacs, P.; Wiegand, J.; Ruffert, C.; Jesinghaus, M.; Schober, R.; Herms, M.; Grützmann, R.; Schulz, H.U.; Stickel, F.; Werner, J.; Bugert, P.; Blüher, M.; Stumvoll, M.; Böhm, S.; Berg, T. van den; Wittenburg, H.; Mössner, J.; Morsche, R.H.M. te; Derikx, M.; Keim, V.; Witt, H.; Drenth, J.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is an inflammatory disease that in some patients leads to exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. In industrialized countries the most common aetiology is chronic alcohol abuse. Descriptions of associated genetic alterations in alcoholic CP are rare. However, a comm

  18. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingest...

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bo-Guang Fan; Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline) addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion....

  20. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas. It happens when digestive enzymes start digesting the pancreas itself. Pancreatitis can be acute or chronic. Either form is ...

  1. Alcohol-induced severe acute pancreatitis followed by hemolytic uremic syndrome managed with continuous renal replacement therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Peng; Yuan, Ai-hong; Wang, Chun-Hua; LI, XIN; Wu, Hai-yang

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury in patients with acute pancreatitis carries a poor prognosis. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by non-immune hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and renal failure caused by platelet thrombi in the microcirculation of the kidney, and though rare in adults it is associated with high mortality and a high rate of chronic renal failure. Case presentation Herein, we report a case of alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis in a 38-year-old Chinese female com...

  2. Oregon Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention Education (ADAPE) Infused Lesson Guide K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielke, Dan; Holstedt, Peggy

    This resource manual and guide provides schools and communities with the most current research-based information available concerning alcohol and drug abuse prevention education. It also provides model lessons, written by Oregon teachers, to infuse into current programs. The document is organized into four sections. The first, an introduction,…

  3. Pancreatic Arteriovenous Malformation Involving the Duodenum Embolized with Ethylene-Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, Rosario Francesco, E-mail: r.grasso@unicampus.it; Cazzato, Roberto Luigi; Luppi, Giacomo; Faiella, Eliodoro; Del Vescovo, Riccardo; Giurazza, Francesco [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy); Borzomati, Domenico; Coppola, Roberto [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of General Surgery (Italy); Beomonte Zobel, Bruno [University ' Campus Bio-Medico of Rome' , Department of Radiology (Italy)

    2012-08-15

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is a rare condition. Most patients are asymptomatic or alternatively may present with a wide spectrum of symptoms. Traditionally, surgery has been considered the treatment of choice; however, alternative approaches, such as transcatheter embolization (TAE), may be proposed. We report a case of a 48-year-old man with a pancreatic head AVM, presenting with upper abdominal pain and slight anemia. The patient refused surgery and underwent TAE by means of ethylene-vinyl alcohol copolymer (EVOH). At 3 months follow-up, the patient was able to eat regularly, with no residual pain and no signs of anemia.

  4. A common variant of PNPLA3 (p.I148M is not associated with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Rosendahl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic pancreatitis (CP is an inflammatory disease that in some patients leads to exocrine and endocrine dysfunction. In industrialized countries the most common aetiology is chronic alcohol abuse. Descriptions of associated genetic alterations in alcoholic CP are rare. However, a common PNPLA3 variant (p.I148M is associated with the development of alcoholic liver cirrhosis (ALC. Since, alcoholic CP and ALC share the same aetiology PNPLA3 variant (p.I148M possibly influences the development of alcoholic CP. METHODS: Using melting curve analysis we genotyped the variant in 1510 patients with pancreatitis or liver disease (961 German and Dutch alcoholic CP patients, 414 German patients with idiopathic or hereditary CP, and 135 patients with ALC. In addition, we included in total 2781 healthy controls in the study. RESULTS: The previously published overrepresentation of GG-genotype was replicated in our cohort of ALC (p-value <0.0001, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.3. Distributions of genotype and allele frequencies of the p.I148M variant were comparable in patients with alcoholic CP, idiopathic and hereditary CP and in healthy controls. CONCLUSIONS: The absence of an association of PNPLA3 p.I148M with alcoholic CP seems not to point to a common pathway in the development of alcoholic CP and alcoholic liver cirrhosis.

  5. The case for stringent alcohol warning labels: lessons from the tobacco control experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-hamdani, Mohammed

    2014-02-01

    Like cigarettes, alcohol is a social drug associated with considerable health and social costs. Relative to cigarettes, regulators worldwide have imposted very modest restrictions in its advertisements. Studies on alcohol health warnings show that they do not have a strong effect on influencing recall, perceptions, and behaviors. Poorly visible and ambiguous health warnings plus the absence of pictorial warnings muddy previous studies. This study takes a different approach, extracting lessons from cigarette health warnings literature for application to the alcohol health warnings' research and practice. I recommend the development of direct health warnings; increase in visibility of the warnings; incorporation of pictorial health warnings; and consideration of plain packaging for alcohol products. A toolkit of these best practices could advance the case for stringent alcohol health warnings policies. PMID:24257632

  6. Endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) in acute alcoholic and biliary pancreatitis. Endoskopische retrograde Pankreatographie (ERP) bei akuter alkoholischer und biliaerer Pankreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambs, H.J. (Heidelberg Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Klinik)

    1991-05-01

    An analysis of the ERP findings in 31 patients with acute pancreatitis enable us to define the terminology of the pancreatogram in these diseases. Irregularities of the ducts indicate previous damage to the organ. A frequent phenomenon is thinning of lateral branches, which can be explained by compression due to oedema. Early parenchymal staining indicates abnormal permeability of the duct epithelium. Cavities are an expression of acute pseudo-cysts. A sign characteristic of alcoholic pancreatitis is the presence of contrast defects due to protein plugs and due to increased viscosity of pancreatic secretions. These observations confirm the theory that protein precipitates due to abnormal secretions play an important role in acute pancreatitis. (orig.).

  7. Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    2010355 Oxymatrine enhances the expression of collagen I and α-SMA in rat chronic pancreatitis. WANG Yuliang(王昱良),et al. Dept Gastroenterol ,Huanghe Hosp,Sanmenxia 472000. World Chin J Digestol 2010;18(13):1331-36. Objective To investigate the treatment effects of oxymatrine (OM) against chronic pancreatitis in rats and to explore the potential

  8. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Froeling, Fieke EM

    2008-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas owing to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects 3–9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  9. Chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M; Kadaba, Raghu

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by long-standing inflammation of the pancreas due to a wide variety of causes, including recurrent acute attacks of pancreatitis. Chronic pancreatitis affects between 3 and 9 people in 100,000; 70% of cases are alcohol-induced.

  10. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims: The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods: We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results: Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions: Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  11. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Acute pancreatitis continues to be a serious illness, and the patients with acute pancreatitis are at risk to develop different complications from ongoing pancreatic inflammation. Aims : The present review is to highlight the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis. Material & Methods : We reviewed the English-language literature (Medline addressing pancreatitis. Results : Acute pancreatitis is frequently caused by gallstone disease or excess alcohol ingestion. There are a number of important issues regarding clinical highlights in the classification, treatment and prognosis of acute pancreatitis, and treatment options for complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic pseudocysts. Conclusions : Multidisciplinary approach should be used for the management of the patient with acute pancreatitis.

  12. Oxidative stress and nitric oxide in rats with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gülnur Andican; Remisa Gelisgen; Gülden Burcak; Ethem Unal; Osman Baran Tortum; Tayfun Karahasanoglu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Oxygen free radical mediated tissue damage is well established in pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis (AP).Whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a deleterious or a protective role is unknown. In alcohol-induced AP, we studied NO, lipooxidative damage and glutathione in pancreas, lung and circulation.METHODS: AP was induced in rats (n = 25) by injection of ethyl alcohol into the common biliary duct. A sham laparatomy was performed in controls (n = 15). After 24 h the animals were killed, blood and tissue sampling were done.RESULTS: Histopathologic evidence confirmed the development of AP. Marked changes were observed in the pulmonary tissue. Compared with controls, the AP group displayed higher values for NO metabolites in pancreas and lungs, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in circulation. Glutathione was lower in pancreas and in circulation. Glutathione and NO were positively correlated in pancreas and lungs of controls but negatively correlated in circulation of experimental group. In the experimental group, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were negatively correlated with pancreas thiobarbituric acid reactive substances but positively correlated with pancreas NO.CONCLUSION: NO increases in both pancreas and lungs in AP and NO contributes to the pathogenesis of AP under oxidative stress.

  13. Hemosuccus pancreaticus caused by rupture of a splenic artery pseudoaneurysm complicating chronic alcoholic pancreatitis: an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiltrop, Nick; Vanhauwaert, Anke; Palmers, Pieter-Jan Liesbeth Herman; Cool, Mike; Deboever, Guido; Lambrecht, Guy

    2015-12-01

    We present a case of a 52-year old female patient with intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding and iron deficiency anaemia. Repeated endoscopic investigation revealed no diagnosis, but contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a splenic artery pseudo-aneurysm secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. A distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy was performed. Hemosuccus pancreaticus is an uncommon cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, most frequently associated with chronic pancreatitis. Erosion of a peripancreatic artery by a pseudocyst can cause a pseudoaneurysm and rupture occurs in up to 10% of the cases. Bleeding from a pseudocyst wall or rupture of an atherosclerotic or traumatic aneurysm is rare. Angiography, contrast-enhanced computed tomography and endoscopic findings can be diagnostic in the majority of cases. Angiographic embolization or surgery are both therapeutic options depending on underlying nonvascular pancreas related indications requiring surgery. We discuss diagnostic pitfalls and current therapeutic strategies in the management of this disease. PMID:26712055

  14. Biopsy-proven drug-induced tubulointerstitial nephritis in a patient with acute kidney injury and alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Wakako; Mori, Takayasu; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Tamura, Teiichi

    2013-01-01

    We report a 49-year-old man with alcoholic severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) complicated by drug-induced acute tubulointerstitial nephritis (DI-AIN). Oliguria persisted and became anuric again on day 17 despite improvement of pancreatitis. He presented rash, fever and eosinophilia from day 20. Renal biopsy was performed for dialysis-dependent acute kidney injury (AKI), DI-AIN was revealed, and prompt use of corticosteroids fully restored his renal function. This diagnosis might be missed because it is difficult to perform renal biopsy in such a clinical situation. If the patient's general condition allows, renal biopsy should be performed and reversible AKI must be distinguished from many cases of irreversible AKI complicated by SAP. This is the first report of biopsy-proven DI-AIN associated with SAP, suggesting the importance of biopsy for distinguishing DI-AIN in persisting AKI of SAP. PMID:23645698

  15. Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cause is heavy alcohol use. Other causes include cystic fibrosis and other inherited disorders, high levels of calcium or fats in the blood, some medicines, and autoimmune conditions. Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and oily stools. Treatment may also be a few days in the ...

  16. Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer-a Defined Future Using Lessons From Other Cancers: A White Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenner, Barbara J; Chari, Suresh T; Maitra, Anirban; Srivastava, Sudhir; Cleeter, Deborah F; Go, Vay Liang W; Rothschild, Laura J; Goldberg, Ann E

    2016-09-01

    The implementation of effective early detection programs has significantly improved treatment, prognosis, and life expectancy in breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Early-detection methods need to be developed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), where progress during the past decades has remained slow. Addressing this need, the forum "Early Detection: Lessons Learned from Other Cancers" was held in November 2015 and presented by the Kenner Family Research Fund in partnership with the American Pancreatic Association. Leading experts from breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers described the development of early detection methods in their respective fields. Emerging opportunities for scientific advancement were subsequently identified that hold the greatest promise for the future of early detection in PDAC, including a 4-part strategic map of necessary actionable items. Knowledge from other fields must be applied to achieve large-scale change within the arena of PDAC. A major breakthrough in early detection of PDAC will occur only through a definitive interdisciplinary collaborative effort involving a critical mass of committed academic research institutions, government agencies, industry leaders, and philanthropies. PMID:27518362

  17. Lessons from an unusual case : malignancy associated hypercalcemia, pancreatitis and respiratory failure due to ARDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, ANM; van der Werf, TS; van der Graaf, WTA; Tulleken, JE; Zijlstra, JG; Ligtenberg, JJM

    1999-01-01

    A 37-year old woman, presenting with severe hypercalcaemia-associated pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation, was admitted to intensive care because she developed ARDS with respiratory failure. Skeletal metastasis from non-small cell bronchial carcinoma were subsequently diagnosed. After she develop

  18. Strongyloides stercoralis Infection Causing Obstructive Jaundice and Refractory Pancreatitis: A Lesson Learned from a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Itoi, Takao; Tonozuka, Ryosuke; Mukai, Shuntaro; Koyama, Yohei; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Mizuno, Yasutaka; Nakamura, Itaru; Hino, Akina; Moriyasu, Fuminori

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old Japanese woman came to our institution because of leg edema and abdominal distention. She had developed acute pancreatitis 5 times in the past 3 years. Dilation of the bile duct and main pancreatic duct without obstruction was observed on computed tomography and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography. The presence of Strongyloides stercoralis was highly suspected from the biopsy sample from the duodenal papilla. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of small subunit rDNA from paraffin-embedded specimens identified the worm as S. stercoralis. All of the symptoms were considered to be associated with S. stercoralis infection. Therefore, the patient was treated with oral administration of ivermectin. Subsequently, symptoms and laboratory data improved. There has been no recurrence of the symptoms to date. PMID:27477420

  19. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, David C.; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M.; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P.; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Lerch, Markus M.; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; Alkaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.; Baillie, John; Banks, Peter A.; Conwell, Darwin; Coté, Gregory A.; Cotton, Peter B.; DiSario, James; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Forsmark, Chris E.; Johnstone, Marianne; Gardner, Timothy B.; Gelrud, Andres; Greenhalf, William; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hartman, Douglas J.; Hawes, Robert A.; Lawrence, Christopher; Lewis, Michele; Mayerle, Julia; Mayeux, Richard; Melhem, Nadine M.; Money, Mary E.; Muniraj, Thiruvengadam; Papachristou, Georgios I.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Romagnuolo, Joseph; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Sherman, Stuart; Simon, Peter; Singh, Vijay K.; Slivka, Adam; Stolz, Donna; Sutton, Robert; Weiss, Frank Ulrich; Wilcox, C. Mel; Zarnescu, Narcis Octavian; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; O'Connell, Michael R.; Kienholz, Michelle L.; Roeder, Kathryn; Barmada, M. Michael; Yadav, Dhiraj; Devlin, Bernie; Albert, Marilyn S.; Albin, Roger L.; Apostolova, Liana G.; Arnold, Steven E.; Baldwin, Clinton T.; Barber, Robert; Barnes, Lisa L.; Beach, Thomas G.; Beecham, Gary W.; Beekly, Duane; Bennett, David A.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bird, Thomas D.; Blacker, Deborah; Boxer, Adam; Burke, James R.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cairns, Nigel J.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Cao, Chuanhai; Carney, Regina M.; Carroll, Steven L.; Chui, Helena C.; Clark, David G.; Cribbs, David H.; Crocco, Elizabeth A.; Cruchaga, Carlos; DeCarli, Charles; Demirci, F. Yesim; Dick, Malcolm; Dickson, Dennis W.; Duara, Ranjan; Ertekin-Taner, Nilufer; Faber, Kelley M.; Fallon, Kenneth B.; Farlow, Martin R.; Ferris, Steven; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Frosch, Matthew P.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Ganguli, Mary; Gearing, Marla; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Ghetti, Bernardino; Gilbert, John R.; Gilman, Sid; Glass, Jonathan D.; Goate, Alison M.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Green, Robert C.; Growdon, John H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Harrell, Lindy E.; Head, Elizabeth; Honig, Lawrence S.; Hulette, Christine M.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jicha, Gregory A.; Jin, Lee-Way; Jun, Gyungah; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Karydas, Anna; Kaye, Jeffrey A.; Kim, Ronald; Koo, Edward H.; Kowall, Neil W.; Kramer, Joel H.; Kramer, Patricia; Kukull, Walter A.; LaFerla, Frank M.; Lah, James J.; Leverenz, James B.; Levey, Allan I.; Li, Ge; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lieberman, Andrew P.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lyketsos, Constantine G.; Mack, Wendy J.; Marson, Daniel C.; Martin, Eden R.; Martiniuk, Frank; Mash, Deborah C.; Masliah, Eliezer; McKee, Ann C.; Mesulam, Marsel; Miller, Bruce L.; Miller, Carol A.; Miller, Joshua W.; Montine, Thomas J.; Morris, John C.; Murrell, Jill R.; Naj, Adam C.; Olichney, John M.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Peskind, Elaine; Petersen, Ronald C.; Pierce, Aimee; Poon, Wayne W.; Potter, Huntington; Quinn, Joseph F.; Raj, Ashok; Raskind, Murray; Reiman, Eric M.; Reisberg, Barry; Reitz, Christiane; Ringman, John M.; Roberson, Erik D.; Rosen, Howard J.; Rosenberg, Roger N.; Sano, Mary; Saykin, Andrew J.; Schneider, Julie A.; Schneider, Lon S.; Seeley, William W.; Smith, Amanda G.; Sonnen, Joshua A.; Spina, Salvatore; Stern, Robert A.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Troncoso, Juan C.; Tsuang, Debby W.; Valladares, Otto; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Vinters, Harry V.; Vonsattel, Jean Paul; Wang, Li-San; Weintraub, Sandra; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Jennifer; Woltjer, Randall L.; Wright, Clinton B.; Younkin, Steven G.; Yu, Chang-En; Yu, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 controls; Stage 2, 910 cases and 4170 controls). The PRSS1 variant affects susceptibility by altering expression of the primary trypsinogen gene. The CLDN2 risk allele is associated with atypical localization of claudin-2 in pancreatic acinar cells. The homozygous (or hemizygous male) CLDN2 genotype confers the greatest risk, and its alleles interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk. These results could partially explain the high frequency of alcohol-related pancreatitis in men – male hemizygous frequency is 0.26, female homozygote is 0.07. PMID:23143602

  20. Common genetic variants in the CLDN2 and PRSS1-PRSS2 loci alter risk for alcohol-related and sporadic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Whitcomb, David C; LaRusch, Jessica; Krasinskas, Alyssa M; Klei, Lambertus; Smith, Jill P; Brand, Randall E.; Neoptolemos, John P; Lerch, Markus M; Tector, Matt; Sandhu, Bimaljit S.; Guda, Nalini M.; Orlichenko, Lidiya; AlKaade, Samer; Amann, Stephen T.; Anderson, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatitis is a complex, progressively destructive inflammatory disorder. Alcohol was long thought to be the primary causative agent, but genetic contributions have been of interest since the discovery that rare PRSS1, CFTR, and SPINK1 variants were associated with pancreatitis risk. We now report two significant genome-wide associations identified and replicated at PRSS1-PRSS2 (1×10-12) and x-linked CLDN2 (p < 1×10-21) through a two-stage genome-wide study (Stage 1, 676 cases and 4507 cont...

  1. Alcohol and Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  2. [Etiological factors of acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicák, J

    2002-09-01

    Acute pancreatitis develops immediately after the causative impulse, while chronic pancreatitis develops after the long-term action of the noxious agent. A typical representative of acute pancreatitis is biliary pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis develops in alcoholism and has a long latency. As alcoholic pancreatitis is manifested at first as a rule by a potent attack, it is classified in this stage as acute pancreatitis. The most frequent etiological factors in our civilization are thus cholelithiasis and alcoholism (both account for 20-50% in different studies). The assumed pathogenetic principles in acute biliary pancreatitis are the common canal of both efferent ducts above the obturated papilla, duodenopancreatic reflux and intrapancreatic hypertension. A detailed interpretation is however lacking. The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is more complicated. Among others some part is played by changes in the calcium concentration and fusion of cellular membranes. Idiopathic pancreatitis occurs in up to 10%, part of the are due to undiagnosed alcoholism and cholelithiasis. Other etiologies are exceptional. Similarly as in cholelithiasis pancreatitis develops also during other pathological processes in the area of the papilla of Vater such as dysfunction of the sphincter of Oddi, ampulloma and juxtapapillary diverticulum, it is however usually mild. The incidence of postoperative pancreatitis is declining. Its lethality is 30% and the diagnosis is difficult. In the pathogenesis changes of the ion concentration are involved, hypoxia and mechanical disorders of the integrity of the gland. Pancreatitis develops in association with other infections--frequently in mumps, rarely in hepatitis, tuberculosis, typhoid and mycoses. Viral pancreatitis is usually mild. In parasitoses pancreatitis develops due to a block of the papilla Vateri. In hyperparathyroidism chronic pancreatitis is more likely to develop, recent data are lacking. As to dyslipoproteinaemias

  3. Loperamide-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Halla Vidarsdottir; Hanna Vidarsdottir; Pall Helgi Moller; Einar Stefan Bjornsson

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease leading to hospitalizations, most often caused by gallstones or alcohol. We present a case of a patient diagnosed with acute pancreatitis considered to be due to loperamide treatment for diarrhea.

  4. Changing the Culture of Alcohol Abuse on Campus: Lessons Learned from Secondhand Smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misch, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is the single greatest public health hazard on American college and university campuses, but the culture of abusive alcohol consumption continues to be highly resistant to change. The author argues that secondhand smoke campaigns can be used as models to change the culture of alcohol abuse on campus. He proposes the implementation of…

  5. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  6. Focal pancreatic enlargement: differentiation between pancreatic adenocarcinoma and focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differentiate the pancreatic adenocarcinoma from focal pancreatitis on CT and ERCP in cases of focal pancreatic enlargement. We analysed CT findings of 66 patients of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (n = 45) or focal pancreatitis (n = 21) with respect to size, density, calcification, pancreatic or biliary duct dilatation, fat plane obliteration around the vessels, direction of retroperitoneal extension, lymphadenopathy, pseudocyst formation and atrophy of pancreas. ERCP available in 48 patients were analysed in respect to morphologic appearance of CBD and pancreatic duct, and distance between the two ducts. The patients in focal pancreatitis were younger with more common history of alcohol drinking. There was no statistical difference in calcifications of the mass (18% in the adenocarcinoma, 33% in the focal pancreatitis), but a tendency of denser, larger number of calcifications was noted in focal pancreatitis. The finding of fat plane obliteration around the vessels were more common in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and fascial thickenings were more prominent in focal pancreatitis, although not statistically significant. On ERCP, there were no differential points of CBD, pancreatic duct morphology, but distance between the two ducts at the lesion center was more wider in focal pancreatitis. Differentiating focal pancreatitis from pancreatic adenocarcinoma is difficult. However, we should consider the possibility of focal pancreatitis in cases of patients with young age, having alcoholic history in association with CT findings of large numbers of and dense calcifications, and ERCP findings of prominent separation of two duct at the lesion center

  7. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol abuse is responsible for 4 percent of global deaths and disability, nearly as much as tobacco and five times the burden of illicit drugs (WHO). In developing countries with low mortality, alcohol is the leading risk factor for males, causing 9.8 percent of years lost to death and disability. Alcohol abuse...

  8. Percutaneous ethanol ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma: Periprocedural onset alcohol toxicity and pancreatitis following conventional percutaneous ethanol ablation treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Burton, Kirsteen Rennie; O’Dwyer, Helena; Scudamore, Charles

    2009-01-01

    A novel case of acute pancreatitis in a patient treated with percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) ablation for hepatocellular carcinoma is described. The most commonly reported adverse effects of PEI are hepatic or peritoneal hemorrhage, hepatic insufficiency or infarction. There are no previous reports of fatal acute pancreatitis as a result of conventional PEI.

  9. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic pancreatitis - chronic; Pancreatitis - chronic - discharge; Pancreatic insufficiency - chronic; Acute pancreatitis - chronic ... abuse over many years. Repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis can lead to chronic pancreatitis. Genetics may be ...

  10. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. Eland

    2003-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are consid

  11. Gadolinium induced recurrent acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco-Perrin, H; Glaser, B; Pienkowski, M; Peron, J M; Payen, J L

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden swelling and inflammation of the pancreas. The two most common causes are alcohol use and biliary stones. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis are rare (1.4-2%). In this present study, we present a case of recurrent acute pancreatitis induced by a specific magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) contrast agent called gadobenate dimeglumine. PMID:23395575

  12. Pancreatic Pseudocyst Pleural Fistula in Gallstone Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sala Abdalla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extra-abdominal complications of pancreatitis such as pancreaticopleural fistulae are rare. A pancreaticopleural fistula occurs when inflammation of the pancreas and pancreatic ductal disruption lead to leakage of secretions through a fistulous tract into the thorax. The underlying aetiology in the majority of cases is alcohol-induced chronic pancreatitis. The diagnosis is often delayed given that the majority of patients present with pulmonary symptoms and frequently have large, persistent pleural effusions. The diagnosis is confirmed through imaging and the detection of significantly elevated amylase levels in the pleural exudate. Treatment options include somatostatin analogues, thoracocentesis, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP with pancreatic duct stenting, and surgery. The authors present a case of pancreatic pseudocyst pleural fistula in a woman with gallstone pancreatitis presenting with recurrent pneumonias and bilateral pleural effusions.

  13. Indicators of inflammation and cellular damage in chronic asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic alcoholics: correlation with alteration of bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borini Paulo

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and hematimetric indicators of inflammation and cell damage were correlated with bilirubin and hepatic and pancreatic enzymes in 30 chronic male alcoholics admitted into psychiatric hospital for detoxification and treatment of alcoholism. Aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, and total bilirubin were altered, respectively, in 90%, 63%, 87%, 23% and 23% of the cases. None of the indicators of inflammation (lactic dehydrogenase, altered in 16% of the cases; alpha-1 globulin, 24%; alpha-2 globulin, 88%; leucocyte counts, 28% was correlated with alterations of bilirubin or liver enzymes. Lactic dehydrogenase was poorly sensitive for detection of hepatocytic or muscular damage. Alterations of alpha-globulins seemed to have been due more to alcohol metabolism-induced increase of lipoproteins than to inflammation. Among indicators of cell damage, serum iron, increased in 40% of the cases, seemed to be related to liver damage while creatine phosphokinase, increased in 84% of the cases, related to muscle damage. Hyperamylasemia was found in 20% of the cases and significantly correlated with levels of bilirubin, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyltransferase. It was indicated that injuries of liver, pancreas, salivary glands, and muscle occurred in asymptomatic or oligosymptomatic chronic alcoholics.

  14. Promoting Bio-Ethanol in the United States by Incorporating Lessons from Brazil's National Alcohol Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yangbo

    2007-01-01

    Current U.S. energy policy supports increasing the use of bio-ethanol as a gasoline substitute, which Brazil first produced on a large scale in response to the 1970s energy crises. Brazil's National Alcohol Program stood out among its contemporaries regarding its success at displacing a third of Brazil's gasoline requirements, primarily due to…

  15. Drug-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Eland, I.A.

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAcute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with sudden onset. The severity of acute pancreatitis may vary from mild to life threatening. There are many risk factors for acute pancreatitis, among which gallstones and alcohol abuse are most widely known. Drugs are considered as potential risk factors for acute pancreatitis, but have received relatively little attention in the medical literature. In this thesis, several epidemiological studies were performed to ass...

  16. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Date reviewed: January 2014 previous 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Word! Alcoholism What You Need to Know About Drugs What You Need to Know About Drugs: Depressants What Kids Say About: Drinking Alcohol Dealing With Peer Pressure Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  17. Endoscopic Ultrasound and Fine Needle Aspiration in Chronic Pancreatitis: Differential Diagnosis between Pseudotumoral Masses and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    José Celso Ardengh; César Vivian Lopes; Antônio Dorival Campos; Luiz Felipe Pereira de Lima; Filadélfio Venco; José Luiz Pimenta Módena

    2007-01-01

    Context Pseudotumoral chronic pancreatitis can be difficult to differentiate from pancreatic carcinoma. Objective To evaluate the role of endoscopic ultrasound and fine needle aspiration in differentiating between inflammatory masses and malignancies in chronic pancreatitis. Design Retrospective study. Setting Tertiary care endoscopy unit. Patients and interventions Between February 1997 and December 2006, 69 pancreatic head masses from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis underwent E...

  18. Study on chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer using MRS and pancreatic juice samples

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Wang; Chao Ma; Zhuan Liao; Bing Tian; Jian-Ping Lu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the markers of pancreatic diseases and provide basic data and experimental methods for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. METHODS: There were 15 patients in the present study, among whom 10 had pancreatic cancer and 5, chronic pancreatitis. In all patients, pancreatic cancer or chronic pancreatitis was located on the head of the p-a-ncreas. Pathology data of all pa tients was confirmed by biopsy and surgery. Among the 10 patients with pancreatic cancer, 3 people had a medical history of longterm alcohol consumption. Of 5 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 4 men suffered from alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic juice samples were obtained from patients by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. Magnetic resonance spectroscopyn was performed on an 11.7-T scanner (Bruker DRX-500) using Call-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill pulse sequences. The parameters were as follows: spectral width, 15 KHz; time domain, 64 K; number of scans, 512; and acquisition time, 2.128 s. RESULTS: The main component of pancreatic juice included leucine, iso-leucine, valine, lactate, alanine, acetate, aspartate, lysine, glycine, threonine, tyrosine, histidine, tryptophan, and phenylalanine. On performing 1D 1H and 2D total correlation spectroscopy, we found a triplet peak at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm, which only appeared in the spectra of pancreatic juice obtained from patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis. This triplet peak was considered the resonance of the methyl of ethoxy group, which may be associated with the metabolism of alcohol in the pancreas. CONCLUSION: The triplet peak, at the chemical shift of 1.19 ppm is likely to be the characteristic metabolite of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

  19. Folate Deficiency in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, While there has been a spurt of interest in genetic alterations associated with pancreatitis in the past few years, interest in the role of environmental factors has largely focused on alcoholism and smoking with insufficient attention being paid to the contributions of nutritional deficiency, and the role of environmental toxins in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. Braganza and Dormandy [1] argue convincingly about the role played by cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (especially CYP1A enzyme induction by xenobiotics and the resultant oxidative stress, as also the now increasingly recognized reductive stress posed by the metabolites in initiating pancreatic injury. Their article underlines the important part played by the deficiency of methyl and thiol molecules in different stages of the progression of pancreatic damage. Furthermore, they attempt to establish a link between environmental and genetic factors and bring in a holistic view on the etiopathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis. We have recently demonstrated lower plasma methionine levels in two cohorts of chronic pancreatitis patients; one of tropical chronic pancreatitis and the other, of alcoholic chronic pancreatitis as compared to healthy controls [2] which suggests that deficiency of methyl groups may be a factor in various forms of pancreatitis. Similarly, we have shown lower red cell glutathione levels in chronic pancreatitis patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, indicating deficiency of thiol molecules. In addition, we have demonstrated significantly higher levels of plasma total homocysteine in chronic pancreatitis patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, our study has shown that there is a deficiency of red cell folate in the majority of chronic pancreatitis patients, more so in tropical chronic pancreatitis; and that folate deficiency appeared to be the key factor in hyperhomocysteinemia in chronic pancreatitis patients

  20. Comparative assessment of efficacy of different methods of treatment of pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus in alcoholic and biliary forms of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunitsyna М.А.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: the study was devoted to the analysis of efficacy of different methods of treatment of pancreatogenic diabetes mellitus (DM in alcoholic and biliary forms of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Material and methods. We have observed 86 patients with CP and first diagnosed DM. The assessment of carbohydrate metabolism compensation via HbA1 с level was done using analyzer IMX «Abbot» (USA. Results. At the 1st step of DM treatment we recommended the lifestyle modification and usage of creon 30-60.000 units daily. At the 2d step of treatment if necessary we added glyclazide. Conclusion. We have detected that irrespective of duration of alcoholic form of CP in case of subsequent DM development the lifestyle modification together with replacement ferment therapy in 90% of cases were non-effective. In the result of the research it was established, in case of 3 and more relapses per year in alcoholic form of CPthe probability of achievement of target HbA1 с level in complex with lifestyle changes and replacement ferment therapy was twice low, in connection with that fact the indication of oral anti-diabetic agents became necessary.

  1. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Mariani, Alberto; Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreatitis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis. There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation, hereditary a...

  2. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in pro...

  3. Biliary Sludge: A Risk Factor for ‘Idiopathic’ Pancreatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Marotta, Paul J.; Gregor, James C; Taves, Donald H.

    1996-01-01

    Idiopathic acute pancreatitis is common. Recent evidence suggests that biliary sludge may be the etiology in many patients with this disorder. In this case-control study, admission ultrasound examinations of patients with idiopathic pancreatitis, patients with acute alcohol-associated pancreatitis and a control group were compared. Biliary sludge was found in seven of 21 patients (33%) with idiopathic pancreatitis, two of 25 (8%) with acute alcohol-associated pancreatitis and one of 63 contro...

  4. Metabolic pancreatitis: Etiopathogenesis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a medical emergency. Alcohol and gallstones are the most common etiologies accounting for 60%-75% cases. Other important causes include postendoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedure, abdominal trauma, drug toxicity, various infections, autoimmune, ischemia, and hereditary causes. In about 15% of cases the cause remains unknown (idiopathic pancreatitis. Metabolic conditions giving rise to pancreatitis are less common, accounting for 5%-10% cases. The causes include hypertriglyceridemia, hypercalcemia, diabetes mellitus, porphyria, and Wilson′s disease. The episodes of pancreatitis tend to be more severe. In cases of metabolic pancreatitis, over and above the standard routine management of pancreatitis, careful management of the underlying metabolic abnormalities is of paramount importance. If not treated properly, it leads to recurrent life-threatening bouts of acute pancreatitis. We hereby review the pathogenesis and management of various causes of metabolic pancreatitis.

  5. Evidence of underage targeting of alcohol advertising on television in the United States: Lessons from the Lockyer v. Reynolds decisions

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, Craig S.; Ostroff, Joshua; Jernigan, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Underage alcohol use is a global public health problem and alcohol advertising has been associated with underage drinking. The alcohol industry regulates itself and is the primary control on alcohol advertising in many countries around the world, advising trade association members to advertise only in adult-oriented media. Despite high levels of compliance with these self-regulatory guidelines, in several countries youth exposure to alcohol advertising on television has grown faster than adul...

  6. Groove Pancreatitis: A Rare form of Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bharivi Jani; Fadi Rzouq; Shreyas Saligram; Atta Nawabi; Marian Nicola; Katie Dennis; Carly Ernst; Ali Abbaszadeh; John Bonino; Mojtaba Olyaee

    2015-01-01

    Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and magnetic resonance chol...

  7. Genetic Susceptibility to Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Alison P

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States. However, it has the poorest prognosis of any major tumor type, with a 5-yr survival rate of approximately 5%. Cigarette smoking, increased body mass index, heavy alcohol consumption, and a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus have all been demonstrated to increase risk of pancreatic cancer. A family history of pancreatic cancer has also been associated with increased risk suggesting inherited g...

  8. Groove pancreatitis and pancreatic heterotopia in the minor duodenal papilla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatelain, Denis; Vibert, Eric; Yzet, Thierry; Geslin, Guillaume; Bartoli, Eric; Manaouil, David; Delcenserie, Richard; Brevet, Marie; Dupas, Jean-Louis; Regimbeau, Jean-Marc

    2005-05-01

    Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of segmental chronic pancreatitis that involves the anatomic space between the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. We report 2 cases of groove pancreatitis with pancreatic heterotopia in the minor papilla. Patients were a 44-year-old woman and a 47-year-old man. Both had a past history of alcohol consumption and presented with abdominal pain, vomiting, and weight loss caused by duodenal stenosis. Abdominal computed tomography revealed thickening of the duodenal wall and enlargement of the pancreatic head in both patients. In 1 patient, ultrasound endoscopy showed a dilated duct in the head of the pancreas. Pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed to rule out pancreatic adenocarcinoma and because of the severity of the symptoms. In both cases, gross and microscopic examinations showed fibrous scar of the groove area. The Santorini duct was dilated and contained protein plugs in both patients, with abscesses in 1 of them. In both cases, there were microscopic foci of heterotopic pancreas with mild fibrosis in the wall of the minor papilla. Groove pancreatitis is often diagnosed in middle-aged alcoholic men presenting with clinical symptoms caused by duodenal stenosis. The pathogenesis of this rare entity could be because of disturbance of the pancreatic secretion through the minor papilla. Pancreatitis in heterotopic pancreas located in the minor papilla and chronic consumption of alcohol seem to be important pathogenic factors. PMID:15841034

  9. Mortality for Alcohol-related Harm by Country of Birth in Scotland, 2000-2004: Potential Lessons for Prevention

    OpenAIRE

    Bhala, Neeraj; Fischbacher, Colin; Bhopal, Raj

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Deaths caused by alcohol have increased in the UK, and Scotland in particular, but the change in the rates of alcohol-related deaths for migrants are uncertain, and could yield insights for the general population. Methods: Alcohol-related mortality in immigrants among Scotland’s residents was assessed using 2001 census data and mortality data from 2000 to 2004. Results: Mortality from direct alcohol-related causes accounted for nearly 1500 deaths per year in Scotland. Age-stand...

  10. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Ayesha Salahuddin; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 relate...

  11. Radiological diagnostic and postherapeutic evaluation of traumatic pancreatic pseudocysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most pancreatic pseudocysts (PC) are caused by an acute or chronic pancreatitis of biliar or alcoholic origin. However, traumatic pancreatic PC are very uncommon and it has been reported only few cases about its radiological diagnosis in the literature. The radiological findings of 12 traumatic pancreatic PC before and after therapy are presented in this study. (Author) 20 refs

  12. Diet and risk of acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Oskarsson, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a sudden inflammation of the pancreas. It has a broad spectrum of clinical outcomes, ranging from mild and self-limiting to severe and potentially fatal, and is often followed by recurrent attacks and/or progression to a chronic disease state (so-called chronic pancreatitis); especially if it is classified as non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. Alcohol abuse is considered to be the most important risk factor for non-gallstone-related acute pancreatitis. Even though...

  13. Drug induced acute pancreatitis: Does it exist?

    OpenAIRE

    Tenner, Scott

    2014-01-01

    As the incidence of acute pancreatitis continues to rise, establishing the etiology in order to prevent recurrence is important. Although the etiology of acute pancreatitis is not difficult in the majority of patients, almost a quarter of patients are initially labeled as having idiopathic acute pancreatitis. When confronted with a patient with acute pancreatitis and no clear etiology defined as an absence alcoholism, gallstones (ultrasound and/or MRI), a normal triglyceride level, and absenc...

  14. Randomized trials of alcohol-use interventions with college students and their parents: lessons from the Transitions Project

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, AC; Wood, MD; Laforge, R; Black, JT

    2011-01-01

    Background Matriculation from high school to college is typified by an increase in alcohol use and related harm for many students. Therefore, this transition period is an ideal time for preventive interventions to target alcohol use and related problems. Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the design and methods used in the Transitions Project, a randomized controlled trial of two interventions designed to prevent and reduce heavy episodic drinking and alcohol-related negative c...

  15. Is acute recurrent pancreatitis a chronic disease?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alberto Mariani; Pier Alberto Testoni

    2008-01-01

    Whether acute recurrent pancreaUtis is a chronic disease is still debated and a consensus is not still reached as demonstrated by differences in the classification of acute recurrent pancreatitis.There is major evidence for considering alcoholic pancreatitis as a chronic disease ab initio while chronic pancreatitis lesions detectable in biliary acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) seem a casual association.Cystic fibrosis transmembrane con ductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation,hereditary and obstructive pancreatitis seem an acute disease that progress to chronic pancreatitis,likely as a consequence of the activation and proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells that produce and activate collagen and therefore fibrosis.From the diagnostic point of view,in patients with acute recurrent pancreatitis Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) seems the more reliable technique for an accurate evaluation and follow-up of some ductal and parenchymal abnormalities suspected for early chronic pancreatitis.

  16. Acute Septal Panniculitis. A Cutaneous Marker of a Very Early Stage of Pancreatic Panniculitis Indicating Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Surendran E; Rajendran S; Jeswanth S; Balachandar TG; Kannan DG; Johnson MA

    2005-01-01

    CONTEXT: Pancreatitis may occasionally be complicated by panniculitis as a result of the release of pancreatic enzymes. Pancreatic panniculitis is rare, occurring in 2-3% of all patients with pancreatic disorders, with a higher incidence among alcoholic males. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male was admitted to our Department with acute abdominal pain one day following alcohol consumption. On physical examination, tender erythematous plaques and nodules were present on the left ankle and the pret...

  17. Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer usually begins in the cells that produce the juices. Some risk factors for developing pancreatic cancer include Smoking Long-term diabetes Chronic pancreatitis Certain ...

  18. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acute Pancreatitis > Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy test Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is ... of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for ...

  19. Evidence of underage targeting of alcohol advertising on television in the United States: lessons from the Lockyer v. Reynolds decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Craig S; Ostroff, Joshua; Jernigan, David H

    2014-02-01

    Underage alcohol use is a global public health problem and alcohol advertising has been associated with underage drinking. The alcohol industry regulates itself and is the primary control on alcohol advertising in many countries around the world, advising trade association members to advertise only in adult-oriented media. Despite high levels of compliance with these self-regulatory guidelines, in several countries youth exposure to alcohol advertising on television has grown faster than adult exposure. In the United States, we found that exposure for underage viewers ages 18-20 grew from 2005 through 2011 faster than any adult age group. Applying a method adopted from a court in the US to identify underage targeting of advertising, we found evidence of targeting of alcohol advertising to underage viewers ages 18-20. The court's rule appeared in Lockyer v. Reynolds (The People ex rel. Bill Lockyer v. R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, GIC764118, 2002). We demonstrated that alcohol companies were able to modify their advertising practices to maintain current levels of adult advertising exposure while reducing youth exposure. PMID:24424494

  20. Environmental risk factors for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich; Fluhr, Gabriele; Weber, Eckhard; Gärtner, Simone; Behn, Claas O; Kraft, Matthias; Ringel, Jörg; Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis has long been thought to be mainly associated with immoderate alcohol consumption. The observation that only ∼10% of heavy drinkers develop chronic pancreatitis not only suggests that other environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, are potent additional risk factors, but also that the genetic component of pancreatitis is more common than previously presumed. Either disease-causing or protective traits have been indentified for mutations in different trypsinogen genes, the gene for the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1, chymotrypsinogen C, and the cystic fibrosis transmembane conductance regulator (CFTR). Other factors that have been proposed to contribute to pancreatitis are obesity, diets high in animal protein and fat, as well as antioxidant deficiencies. For the development of pancreatic cancer, preexisting chronic pancreatitis, more prominently hereditary pancreatitis, is a risk factor. The data on environmental risk factors for pancreatic cancer are, with the notable exception of tobacco smoke, either sparse, unconfirmed or controversial. Obesity appears to increase the risk of pancreatic cancer in the West but not in Japan. Diets high in processed or red meat, diets low in fruits and vegetables, phytochemicals such as lycopene and flavonols, have been proposed and refuted as risk or protective factors in different trials. The best established and single most important risk factor for cancer as well as pancreatitis and the one to clearly avoid is tobacco smoke. PMID:21734390

  1. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 μm (Contour SE) and labeled with 99mTc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for 99mTc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 ± 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with 99mTc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-μm particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  2. Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Celiac Plexus Neurolysis in Pancreatic Cancer: A Prospective Pilot Study of Safety Using 10 mL versus 20 mL Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia K. LeBlanc

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The dose of alcohol used in EUS-CPN is not standardized. The objective was to compare the safety of 20 mL alcohol versus 10 mL alcohol during EUS-CPN for patients with pancreatic cancer-related pain. Methods. 20 patients were selected to receive 10 mL or 20 mL of alcohol during EUS-CPN. Followup was done at baseline, 24 hours, and weekly. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL was assessed at baseline, week 2, week 4, and every 4 weeks thereafter until pain returned. Results. There were no major complications in both groups. Minor self-limited adverse effects were seen in 6 (30% subjects and included lightheadedness in 1 (5%, transient diarrhea in 2 (10%, and transient nausea and vomiting in 3. Pain relief was similar in both groups: 80% in the 10 mL group and 100% in the 20 mL group (. The mean (± SD duration of pain relief in the 10 mL and 20 mL groups was and weeks, respectively. 30% of patients in each group had complete pain relief. Conclusions. EUS-CPN using 20 mL of alcohol is safe. Similar clinical outcomes were seen in both groups. Further investigations to confirm these findings are warranted.

  3. Preventing Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Other Alcohol-Related Birth Defects: Teacher's Manual and Student Text. High School Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Elizabeth; And Others

    This teacher's manual presents lesson plans for a high-school instructional unit on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and its less severe manifestations, Alcohol-Related Birth Defects. The lessons cover alcohol's effects during pregnancy, the history of concern about alcohol's effects, consequences of alcohol use in pregnancy, lifestyle risk reduction, and…

  4. Implementing an Alcohol and Other Drug Use Prevention Program Using University-High School Partnerships: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Jeffrey J.; Orsini, Muhsin Michael; Wyrick, David L.; Fearnow-Kenney, Melodie; Wagoner, Kimberly G.; Caldwell, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Background: School-based alcohol and other drug use prevention remains an important national strategy. Collaborative partnerships between universities and high schools have the potential to enhance prevention programming; however, there are challenges to sustaining such partnerships. Purpose: The purpose of this commentary is to underscore…

  5. [Pancreatic Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöfl, Rainer

    2016-06-22

    The author presents his personal choice of practical relevant papers of pancreatic diseases from 2014 to 2015. Nutritional factors and hypertriglycidemia are discussed as causes of acute pancreatitis. Tools to avoid post-ERCP(endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) pancreatitis are described and the natural course of fluid collections and pseudocysts is demonstrated. The value of secretin-MRCP(magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography) for diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis is illustrated. Data help to choose the minimally effective prednisolone dose in autoimmune pancreatitis. The increased prevalence of fractures in patients with chronic pancreatitis highlights the necessity of screening for bone density loss. The association of vitamin D intake with pancreatic cancer is described. The probability of cancer in IPNM is shown and innovative surgical concepts to reduce the loss of pancreatic function are presented. Finally neoadjuvant concepts for the treatment of pancreatic cancer are highlighted. PMID:27329710

  6. Anorexia nervosa and pancreatic ascites.

    OpenAIRE

    Isaacs, P.; Saunders, A J; Rosen, B. K.; Sladen, G E

    1986-01-01

    Acute alcoholic pancreatitis was undiagnosed in a patient with anorexia nervosa who subsequently developed pancreatic ascites and oedema, wrongly attributed to protein malnutrition alone. She became hyperphagic in an attempt to reverse the malnutrition and hence the abdominal swelling, indicating that the goal of attaining a thin shape was the major determinant of the eating disorder in this patient. Measurement of ascitic fluid amylase concentration should be carried out in all patients with...

  7. Exocrine pancreatic function during the early recovery phase of acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Patrizia Simoni; Riccardo Casadei; Antonio M. Morselli-Labate

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Exocrine pancreatic dysfunction has been reported in humans in the convalescent period after acute pancreatitis, but the data are scarce and conlficting. This study aimed to prospectively assess the exocrine pancreatic function in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of their refeeding. METHODS: Fecal elastase-1 was determined on the day of refeeding in all consecutive acute pancreatitis patients with their ifrst episode of the disease. They were 75 patients including 60 (80.0%) patients with mild acute pancreatitis and 15 (20.0%) patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Etiologically 61 patients (81.3%) had biliary disease, 1 (1.3%) had alcoholic disease and 3 (4.0%) had hypertriglyceridemia. No causes of acute pancreatitis were found in the remaining 10 patients (13.3%). The mean (±SD) refeeding time after the attack of acute panereatitis was 11.2±10.2 days. RESULTS: Pathological values of FE-1 were found in 9 of the 75 patients (12.0%): 7 (9.3%) patients with mild pancreatitis and 2 (2.7%) patients with severe pancreatitis (P=1.000). The frequency of the pathological values of fecal elastase-1 was signiifcantly different from that of various etiologies of the disease (P=0.030). It was signiifcantly lower in patients with biliary pancreatitis (9.8%;P=0.035) than in one patient with alcoholic pancreatitis (P=0.126), one patient with hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis (33.3%;P=0.708), and one patient with idiopathic pancreatitis (10.0%;P=0.227). Pathological fecal elastase-1 was not signiifcantly related to sex, age or day of refeeding.CONCLUSION: Exocrine pancreatic function should be routinely assessed in patients with acute pancreatitis at the time of refeeding in order to supplement their diet with pancreatic extracts.

  8. Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis in Anorexia and Bulimia

    OpenAIRE

    Marti JL; Herring S; Stephenson KE; Morris LG

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: Mild pancreatitis has been reported as a consequence of anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, or what has been termed the "dietary chaos syndrome". Either chronic malnutrition, or refeeding after periods of malnutrition, may precipitate acute pancreatitis through several pathogenetic mechanisms. CASE REPORT: A 26-year-old woman with a ten-year history of anorexia and bulimia presented with a third episode of acute pancreatitis in three months. The patient had been abstinent from alcohol...

  9. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Natasha Gupta; Seema Ahmed; Lemuel Shaffer; Paula Cavens; Josef Blankstein

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term an...

  10. Pharmacological challenges in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Estrup Olesen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug absorption in patients with chronic pancreatitis might be affected by the pathophysiology of the disease. The exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is associated with changes in gastrointestinal intraluminal pH, motility disorder, bacterial overgrowth and changed pancreatic gland secretion. Together these factors can result in malabsorption and may also affect the efficacy of pharmacological intervention. The lifestyle of chronic pancreatitis patients may also contribute to gastrointestinal changes. Many patients limit their food intake because of the pain caused by eating and in some cases food intake is more or less substituted with alcohol, tobacco and coffee. Alcohol and drug interaction are known to influence the pharmacokinetics by altering either drug absorption or by affecting liver metabolism. Since patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis experience severe pain, opioids are often prescribed as pain treatment. Opioids have intrinsic effects on gastrointestinal motility and hence can modify the absorption of other drugs taken at the same time. Furthermore, the increased fluid absorption caused by opioids will decrease water available for drug dissolution and may hereby affect absorption of the drug. As stated above many factors can influence drug absorption and metabolism in patients with chronic pancreatitis. The factors may not have clinical relevance, but may explain inter-individual variations in responses to a given drug, in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  11. Pancreatic Tuberculosis or Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Salahuddin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Isolated pancreatic and peripancreatic tuberculosis is a challenging diagnosis due to its rarity and variable presentation. Pancreatic tuberculosis can mimic pancreatic carcinoma. Similarly, autoimmune pancreatitis can appear as a focal lesion resembling pancreatic malignancy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration provides an effective tool for differentiating between benign and malignant pancreatic lesions. The immune processes involved in immunoglobulin G4 related systemic diseases and tuberculosis appear to have some similarities. Case Report. We report a case of a 59-year-old Southeast Asian male who presented with fever, weight loss, and obstructive jaundice. CT scan revealed pancreatic mass and enlarged peripancreatic lymph nodes. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration confirmed the presence of mycobacterium tuberculosis. Patient also had high immunoglobulin G4 levels suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. He was started on antituberculosis medications and steroids. Clinically, he responded to treatment. Follow-up imaging showed findings suggestive of chronic pancreatitis. Discussion. Pancreatic tuberculosis and autoimmune pancreatitis can mimic pancreatic malignancy. Accurate diagnosis is imperative as unnecessary surgical intervention can be avoided. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration seems to be the diagnostic test of choice for pancreatic masses. Long-term follow-up is warranted in cases of chronic pancreatitis.

  12. Complicated Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis

  13. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... It may also contain tissue from the pancreas, pancreatic enzymes, and blood. ... located behind the stomach. It produces chemicals (called enzymes) ... Pancreatic pseudocysts most often develop after an episode of ...

  14. Hereditary Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... method of medical management. Patients may be prescribed pancreatic enzyme supplements to treat maldigestion, insulin to treat diabetes, ... in carbohydrates and low in protein and fat. Pancreatic enzymes such as Creon, Pancrease, and Violiase are helpful ...

  15. Complicated Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, O.J.

    2015-01-01

    Research questions addressed in this thesis: What is the accuracy of serum blood urea nitrogen as early predictor of complicated pancreatitis? ; What is difference in clinical outcome between patients with pancreatic parenchymal necrosis and patients with extrapancreatic necrosis without necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma? ; What is the impact of organ failure on mortality in necrotizing pancreatitis? ; Based on individual patient data from randomized trials, does early enteral tube feedin...

  16. Acute Pancreatitis. Studies on smoking and protease activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lindkvist, Björn

    2005-01-01

    Background and aims: Activation of pancreatic proteases is considered to be a crucial event in the early phase of acute pancreatitis but the cause of this activation is not known. Most cases of acute pancreatitis can be attributed to either gallstone disease or alcohol abuse. However, little is known about other risk factors. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the mechanisms involved in the initiation of acute pancreatitis, trends in the incidence, and risk factors for the disease. The ...

  17. Type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zen Yoh

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Before the concept of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP was established, this form of pancreatitis had been recognized as lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis or non-alcoholic duct destructive chronic pancreatitis based on unique histological features. With the discovery in 2001 that serum IgG4 concentrations are specifically elevated in AIP patients, this emerging entity has been more widely accepted. Classical cases of AIP are now called type 1 as another distinct subtype (type 2 AIP has been identified. Type 1 AIP, which accounts for 2% of chronic pancreatitis cases, predominantly affects adult males. Patients usually present with obstructive jaundice due to enlargement of the pancreatic head or thickening of the lower bile duct wall. Pancreatic cancer is the leading differential diagnosis for which serological, imaging, and histological examinations need to be considered. Serologically, an elevated level of IgG4 is the most sensitive and specific finding. Imaging features include irregular narrowing of the pancreatic duct, diffuse or focal enlargement of the pancreas, a peri-pancreatic capsule-like rim, and enhancement at the late phase of contrast-enhanced images. Biopsy or surgical specimens show diffuse lymphoplasmacytic infiltration containing many IgG4+ plasma cells, storiform fibrosis, and obliterative phlebitis. A dramatic response to steroid therapy is another characteristic, and serological or radiological effects are normally identified within the first 2 or 3 weeks. Type 1 AIP is estimated as a pancreatic manifestation of systemic IgG4-related disease based on the fact that synchronous or metachronous lesions can develop in multiple organs (e.g. bile duct, salivary/lacrimal glands, retroperitoneum, artery, lung, and kidney and those lesions are histologically identical irrespective of the organ of origin. Several potential autoantigens have been identified so far. A Th2-dominant immune reaction and the activation of

  18. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  20. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Guang Fan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the autoimmune pancreatitis was introduced in 1995, it has been recognized as a form of chronic pancreatitis, which is always associated with autoimmune manifestations. As the improvement of technical and instrumental made in ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, the diagnoses of autoimmune pancreatitis is no longer such difficult. Even though the treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis is available with a conservative therapy, there are many points that are still unclearly. These have stimulated widespread interest in this disease from gastroenterologists, endoscopists, pathologists, and prevalent research. The present article provides with our better understanding of the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune pancreatitis.

  1. Tumour Necrosis Factor Microsatellite Haplotypes Are Associated with Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A O’Reilly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Context :Alcohol is the major aetiological agent for both chronic pancreatitis and alcoholic liver disease. However, as only a minority of alcoholics develop either chronic pancreatitis or alcoholic liver disease, there are clearly genetic or environmental cofactors that determine individual susceptibility to these diseases. Objective: To determine whether polymorphisms of the TNF gene may account for individual susceptibility to develop chronic pancreatitis or alcoholic liver disease. Design: A controlled study. Patients: We analyzed 73 patients with chronic pancreatitis, 103 healthy controls, 39 patients with alcoholic liver disease and 29 alcoholics without liver or pancreatic disease. Results: The intermediate/low TNF secreting haplotype a6b5c1d3e3 was over-represented in chronic pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.07-4.06; P=0.019 and in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (OR=2.08; 95% CI: 1.01-4.29; P=0.029. The high TNF secreting haplotypes, a2b3c1d1e3 and a2b5c2d4e3 were under-represented in chronic pancreatitis compared to healthy controls (OR=0.48; 95% CI: 0.22-1.04; P= 0.043 and in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis compared to alcoholic controls (OR=0.20; 95% CI: 0.05-0.77; P=0.014, respectively. Conclusion :A reduced capacity to produce TNF may be responsible for the induction of chronic pancreatitis.

  2. Hereditary pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard M Charnley

    2003-01-01

    Hereditary pancreatitis is an autosomal dominant condition,which results in recurrent attacks of acute pancreatitis,progressing to chronic pancreatitis often at a young age.The majority of patients with hereditary pancreatitis expressone of two mutations (R122H or N29I) in the cationictrypsinogen gene (PRSS1 gene). It has been hypothesisedthat one of these mutations, the R122H mutation causespancreatitis by altering a trypsin recognition site sopreventing deactivation of trypsin within the pancreas andprolonging its action, resulting in autodigestion. Families withthese two mutations have been identified in many countriesand there are also other rarer mutations, which have alsobeen linked to hereditary pancreatitis.Patients with hereditary pancreatitis present in the sameway as those with sporadic pancreatitis but at an earlierage. It is common for patients to remain undiagnosed formany years, particularly ifthey present with non-specificsymptoms. Hereditary pancreatitis should always beconsidered in patients who present with recurrent pancreatitiswith a family history of pancreatic disease. If patients withthe 2 common mutations are compared, those with theR122H mutation are more likely to present at a younger ageand are more likely to require surgical intervention than thosewith N29I. Hereditary pancreatitis carries a 40 % lifetimerisk of pancreatic cancer with those patients aged between50 to 70 being most at risk in whom screening tests maybecome important.

  3. Relação lipase/amilase nas pancreatites agudas de causa biliar e nas pancreatites agudas/crônicas agudizadas de causa alcoólica Lipase/amylase ratio in biliary acute pancreatitis and alcoholic acute/acutized chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Custódio Pacheco

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: Pancreatites agudas de causas alcoólica ou biliar podem necessitar de abordagens terapêuticas diferentes. OBJETIVO: Verificar a validade da relação lipase/amilase em diferenciar as causas alcoólica ou biliar na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados nove pacientes com pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica, todos homens, com idade média (desvio padrão de 39,8 ± 7,0 anos (grupo I e 29 com pancreatite aguda biliar, sendo 8 homens e 21 mulheres, com idade média de 43,6 ± 19,9 anos (grupo II. As amilasemias e lipasemias foram determinadas em pacientes com sintomatologia há, no máximo, 48 horas. A relação lipase/amilase foi calculada utilizando-se valores de amilasemia e lipasemia expressas como múltiplos de seus respectivos valores superiores de referência. RESULTADOS: As médias das lipasemias (4.814 ± 3.670 U/L e amilasemias (1.282 ± 777 U/L no grupo I foram semelhantes às do grupo II (2.697 ± 2.391 e 1.878 ± 1.319 U/L, respectivamente, mas a média das relações lipase/amilase foi significantemente maior no grupo I (4,4 ± 3,6 do que no grupo II (2,2 ± 2,2. Relação lipase/amilase >3 foi significantemente mais freqüente no grupo I (66,7% do que no grupo II (24,1% e diferenciou os dois grupos com sensibilidade de 67% e especificidade de 76%. CONCLUSÕES: 1 as amilasemias e lipasemias não diferenciaram os dois grupos avaliados; 2 relação lipase/amilase >3 é mais freqüente na pancreatite aguda/pancreatite crônica agudizada alcoólica do que na pancreatite aguda biliar, e pode ser útil na diferenciação destas duas causas de pancreatite.BACKGROUND: Alcoholic or biliary acute pancreatitis may need different therapeutic approaches. AIM: Assessing the validity of lipase/amylase ratio in differentiating biliary from alcoholic acute pancreatitis/acutized chronic pancreatitis. METHODS: Nine male patients (mean age and standard deviation: 39.8 ± 7.0 years

  4. Acute pancreatitis following medical abortion: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Hashem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute pancreatitis rarely complicates pregnancy. Although most pregnant women with acute pancreatitis have associated gallstones, less common causes such as drugs have been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 34-year-old woman who underwent medical abortion with mifepristone and gemeprost and received codeine as pain-relief during the induction of abortion. She developed a severe acute necrotizing pancreatitis which required 14 days of intensive care. Other possible etiological factors, i.e. gallstone, alcohol intake and hyperlipidemia, were excluded. Conclusions The reported case of acute pancreatitis was most likely drug-induced.

  5. Groove pancreatitis: A rare form of chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bharivi Jani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Groove pancreatitis is a rare form of chronic pancreatitis affecting the "groove" of the pancreas among the pancreatic head, duodenum, and common bile duct. The exact cause is unknown, although there are associations with long-term alcohol abuse, smoking, peptic ulcer disease, heterotopic pancreas, gastric resection, biliary disease, and anatomical or functional obstruction of the minor papilla. The diagnosis can be challenging. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS and magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography are the preferred imaging modalities. The treatment of choice is conservative although surgical intervention can sometimes be required. Case Report: A 57-year-old male with a history of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B presented with 4 days of epigastric pain. Abdominal exam revealed absent bowel sounds and epigastric tenderness. He had a creatinine of 1.72 mg/dL, potassium of 2.9 mmol/L, and a normal lipase level of 86 U/L. Liver enzymes and total bilirubin were normal. Computed tomography abdomen showed high-grade obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum without any obvious mass. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy showed a mass at the duodenal bulb causing luminal narrowing, with biopsies negative for malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass in the region of the pancreatic head and descending duodenum. EUS revealed a 3 cm mass in the region of pancreatic head with irregular borders and no vascular invasion. Fine needle aspiration (FNA was nondiagnostic. The patient then underwent a Whipple′s procedure. Pathology of these specimens was negative for malignancy but was consistent with para-duodenal or groove pancreatitis. Conclusion: The low incidence of groove pancreatitis is partly due to lack of familiarity with the disease. Groove pancreatitis should be considered in the differential for patients presenting with pancreatic head lesions and no cholestatic jaundice, especially when a duodenal obstruction

  6. Effects of ethanol and protein deficiency on pancreatic digestive and lysosomal enzymes.

    OpenAIRE

    Apte, M V; Wilson, J. S.; Korsten, M A; McCaughan, G W; Haber, P S; Pirola, R. C.

    1995-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alcoholic pancreatitis is not fully understood. An increase in pancreatic digestive and lysosomal enzyme synthesis because of ethanol consumption could contribute to the development of pancreatic injury in alcoholics. This study aimed, firstly, to determine the effect of ethanol on the content and messenger RNA levels of pancreatic digestive enzymes and on the messenger RNA level of the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin B, and secondly, to examine the influence of concomitant pro...

  7. Ethanol consumption as inductor of pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    José; A; Tapia; Ginés; M; Salido; Antonio; González

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is a major cause of pancreatitis, a condition that can manifest as both acute necroinflammation and chronic damage (acinar atrophy and f ibrosis). Pancreatic acinar cells can metabolize ethanol via the oxidative pathway, which generates acetaldehyde and involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and possibly cytochrome P4502E1. Additionally, ethanol can be metabolized via a nonoxidative pathway involving fatty acid ethyl ester synthases. Metabolism of ethanol by acinar and other pancreatic cells and the consequent generation of toxic metabolites, are postulated to play an important role in the development of alcohol-related acute and chronic pancreatic injury. This current work will review some recent advances in the knowledge about ethanol actions on the exocrine pancreas and its relationship to inflammatory disease and cancer.

  8. Ethanol consumption as inductor of pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Tapia

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse is a major cause of pancreatitis, a condition that can manifest as both acute necroinflammation and chronic damage (acinar atrophy and fibrosis. Pancreatic acinar cells can metabolize ethanol via the oxidative pathway, which generates acetaldehyde and involves the enzymes alcohol dehydrogenase and possibly cytochrome P4502E1. Additionally, ethanol can be metabolized via a nonoxidative pathway involving fatty acid ethyl ester synthases. Metabolism of ethanol by acinar and other pancreatic cells and the consequent generation of toxic metabolites, are postulated to play an important role in the development of alcohol-related acute and chronic pancreatic injury. This current work will review some recent advances in the knowledge about ethanol actions on the exocrine pancreas and its relationship to inflammatory disease and cancer.

  9. Autoimmune pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detlefsen, Sönke; Drewes, Asbjørn M

    2009-01-01

    bile duct. Obstructive jaundice is a common symptom at presentation, and pancreatic cancer represents an important clinical differential diagnosis. In late stages of the disease, the normal pancreatic parenchyma is often replaced by large amounts of fibrosis. Histologically, there seem to be two...... AIP responds to steroid treatment, also a trial with steroids, can help to differentiate AIP from pancreatic cancer. OUTLOOK AND DISCUSSION: This review presents the pathological, radiologic and laboratory findings of AIP. Moreover, the treatment and pathogenesis are discussed.......BACKGROUND: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a relatively newly recognized type of pancreatitis that is characterized by diffuse or focal swelling of the pancreas due to lymphoplasmacytic infiltration and fibrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A PubMed literature search was...

  10. Pancreatic hyperechogenicity on endoscopic ultrasound examination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yucel Ustundag; Guray Ceylan; Koray Hekimoglu

    2011-01-01

    There is an ongoing discussion on how to diagnose a hyperechogenic pancreas and what is the clinical signifi-cance of diffusely hyperechogenic pancreas. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the more appropriate methods to diagnose pancreatic hyper-echogenicity when compared with transcutaneous or en-doscopic ultrasound examination. More importantly, pan-creatic hyperechogenicity may not be a certain indicator of pancreatic fat infiltration. Even if it is true, we do not know the clinical significances of pancreatic fat accumulation. Some suggested that excess fat in the pancreas is associ-ated with chronic pancreatitis. However, several histologi-cal studies on human alcoholic chronic pancreatitis did not prove the presence of fatty pancreas in such cases. Thus, except for aging, it is very rare to have truly steatotic pan-creas in the absence of certain human diseases.

  11. Trypsinogen gene mutations in patients with chronic or recurrent acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Truninger, Kaspar; Köck, Josef; Wirth, Hans-Peter; Muellhaupt, Beat; Arnold, Christian; von Weizsäcker, Fritz; Seifert, Burkhardt; Ammann, Rudolf W.; Blum, Hubert E.

    2001-01-01

    Three-point mutations (R117H, N211, A16V) within the cationic trypsinogen gene have been identified in patients with hereditary pancreatitis (HP). A genetic background has also been discussed for idiopathic juvenile chronic pancreatitis (IJCP), which closely mimicks the clinical pattern of HP, and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis because only a small number of heavy drinkers develop pancreatitis. This prompted us to screen 104 patients in our well-defined pancreatitis cohort for the currently k...

  12. Effect of Non-Alcoholic Compounds of Alcoholic Drinks on the Pancreas

    OpenAIRE

    Feick, Peter; Gerloff, Andreas; Singer, Manfred V.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past 30 years the role of alcohol (ethanol) in the development of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been intensively investigated. However, ethanol is generally consumed in form of alcoholic beverages which contain numerous non-alcoholic compounds. At least on gastric acid secretion it has been convincingly demonstrated that alcohol and alcoholic beverages have markedly different effects. In the present article, we provide an overview about the effect of different non-alcoholic cons...

  13. Differential roles of inflammatory cells in pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayerle, Julia; Dummer, Annegret; Sendler, Mathias; Malla, Sudarshan Ravi; van den Brandt, Cindy; Teller, Steffen; Aghdassi, Ali; Nitsche, Claudia; Lerch, Markus M

    2012-03-01

    The incidence of acute pancreatitis per 100,000 of population ranges from 5 to 80. Patients suffering from hemorrhagic-necrotizing pancreatitis die in 10-24% of cases. 80% of all cases of acute pancreatitis are etiologically linked to gallstone disease immoderate alcohol consumption. As of today no specific causal treatment for acute pancreatitis exists. Elevated C-reactive protein levels above 130,mg/L can also predict a severe course of acute pancreatitis. The essential medical treatment for acute pancreatitis is the correction of hypovolemia. Prophylactic antibiotics should be restricted to patients with necrotizing pancreatitis, infected necrosis or other infectious complications. However, as premature intracellular protease activation is known to be the primary event in acute pancreatitis. Severe acute pancreatitis is characterized by an early inflammatory immune response syndrome (SIRS) and a subsequent compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) contributing to severity as much as protease activation does. CARS suppresses the immune system and facilitates nosocomial infections including infected pancreatic necrosis, one of the most feared complications of the disease. A number of attempts have been made to suppress the early systemic inflammatory response but even if these mechanisms have been found to be beneficial in animal models they failed in daily clinical practice. PMID:22320916

  14. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, J D; Morton, D. G.; Neoptolemos, J. P.

    1997-01-01

    The differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is very important as the management and prognosis of these two diseases is different. In most patients with pancreatic disease, the diagnosis can be established but there is a subgroup of patients in whom it is difficult to differentiate between these conditions because the clinical presentation is often similar and currently available diagnostic tests may be unable to distinguish between an inflammatory or neoplast...

  15. Pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kocher, Hemant M.; Alrawashdeh, Wasfi

    2010-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer death in higher-income countries, with 5-year survival only 10% (range 7%–25%), even in people presenting with early-stage cancer. Risk factors include age, smoking, chronic pancreatitis, a family history, and dietary factors. Diabetes mellitus may also increase the risk.

  16. Pancreatic Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Poras; Bhadana, Utsav; Arora, Mohinder P

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis of the pancreas is extremely rare and in most of the cases mimics pancreatic carcinoma. There are a number of case reports on pancreatic tuberculosis with various different presentations, but only a few case series have been published, and most of our knowledge about this disease comes from individual case reports. Patients of pancreatic tuberculosis may remain asymptomatic initially and manifest as an abscess or a mass involving local lymph nodes and usually present with non-specific features. Pancreatic tuberculosis may present with a wide range of imaging findings. It is difficult to diagnose tuberculosis of pancreas on imaging studies as they may present with masses, cystic lesions or abscesses and mass lesions in most of the cases mimic pancreatic carcinoma. As it is a rare entity, it cannot be recommended but suggested that pancreatic tuberculosis should be considered in cases with a large space occupying lesions associated with necrotic peripancreatic lymph nodes and constitutional symptoms. Ultrasonography/computed tomography/endosonography-guided biopsy is the recommended diagnostic technique. Most patients achieve complete cure with standard antituberculous therapy. The aims of this study are to review clinical presentation, diagnostic studies, and management of pancreatic tuberculosis and to present our experience of 5 cases of pancreatic tuberculosis. PMID:26884661

  17. Pancreatic necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic necrosis is a possible complication of acute pancreatitis. It is characterized by diffuse inflammation associated with exudation or leakage of pancreatic juice with its proteolytic enzymes into the peripancreatic tissues. Colonic complications of acute pancreatitis are uncommon events. Tha main purpose of our study was to correlate radiological findings of pancreatic necrosis as observed during barium enema to CT patterns. A retrospective study was therefore carried out on 40 patients affected with acute pancreatitis with local and systemic complication. The analysis of the results allowed different patterns to be observed, with the two techniques, in the acute and in the chronich phases. In the acute phase, barium enema of the colon showed inflammatory extrinsic processes involving the wall, with a typical localization related to the spread of pancreatic enzymes along mesenteric pathways, as described by Meyers. CT allowed a thorough evaluation of both the pathologic process and its spatial balance. In the chronic phase, barium enema showed fibrotic trictures and fistulas. CT demonstrated pseudoeystic masses and irregular focal areas of decreased attenuation or irregular pancreatic margins. This correlation shows how an extrinsic inflammatory involvement of the colon with a characteristic tomography may help make a diagnosis and plan therapy

  18. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis

  19. Pancreatic Pseudocysts - Proposal for Diagnosis and Surgical Management -

    OpenAIRE

    Shimoyama, Takatoshi; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Teruhisa; Hisano, Hiroshi; HONJO, Seiji; Matsuo, Satoshi; Sumida, Yorihisa; Matsuo, Seiji; Nishikawa, Kiyoomi; Terada, Ryusuke; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Nakagoe, Tohru; Miura, Toshio; Tomita, Masao; Kawaguchi, Akio

    1995-01-01

    To determine the clinical features and problems presented by a pancreatic pseudocyst, eighteen patients managed at our hospitals since 1980 were reviewed. Males predominated with a ratio of 16: 2, and the average age was 36.2 years. Pseudocyst was located in the pancreatic head in 6, in the body in 6, in the tail in 5 and multiple pseudocysts in one case. The cause of pancreatic pseudocyst was chronic pancreatitis in 9 (including 8 patients with histories of alcoholism), acute pancreatitis in...

  20. Pathologic Cellular Events in Smoking-Related Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrower, Edwin [Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Digestive Diseases, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States); Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare, West Haven, CT 06516 (United States)

    2015-04-29

    Pancreatitis, a debilitating inflammatory disorder, results from pancreatic injury. Alcohol abuse is the foremost cause, although cigarette smoking has recently surfaced as a distinct risk factor. The mechanisms by which cigarette smoke and its toxins initiate pathological cellular events leading to pancreatitis, have not been clearly defined. Although cigarette smoke is composed of more than 4000 compounds, it is mainly nicotine and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), which have been extensively studied with respect to pancreatic diseases. This review summarizes these research findings and highlights cellular pathways which may be of relevance in initiation and progression of smoking-related pancreatitis.

  1. Etiology of chronic pancreatitis: Has it changed in the last decade?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2009-01-01

    The evidence from recent surveys on chronic pancreatitis carried out around the world shows that alcohol remains the main factor associated with chronic pancreatitis, even if at a frequency lower than that reported previously. It has further confirmed that heavy alcohol consumption and smoking are independent risk factors for chronic pancreatitis. Autoimmune pancreatitis accounts for 2%-4% of all forms of chronic pancreatitis, but this frequency will probably increase over the next few years. The rise in idiopathic chronic pancreatitis, especially in India, represents a black hole in recently published surveys. Despite the progress made so far regarding the possibility of establishing the hereditary forms of chronic pancreatitis and the recognition of autoimmune pancreatitis, it is possible that we are more inaccurate today than in the past in identifying the factors associated with chronic pancreatitis in our patients.

  2. Surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Dejan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The principal indication for surgical intervention in chronic pancreatitis is intractable pain. Depending upon the presence of dilated pancreatic ductal system, pancreatic duct drainage procedures and different kinds of pancreatic resections are applied. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to show the most appropriate procedure to gain the most possible benefits in dependence of type of pathohistological process in chronic pancreatitis. METHOD: Our study included 58 patients with intractable pain caused by chronic pancreatitis of alcoholic genesis. The first group consisted of 30 patients with dilated pancreatic ductal system more than 10 mm. The second group involved 28 patients without dilated pancreatic ductal system. Pain relief, weight gain and glucose tolerance were monitored. RESULTS: All patients of Group I (30 underwent latero-lateral pancreaticojejunal - Puestow operation. 80% of patients had no pain after 6 month, 13.6% had rare pain and 2 patients, i.e. 6.4%, who continued to consume alcohol, had strong pain. Group II consisting of 28 patients was without dilated pancreatic ductal system. This group was subjected to various types of pancreatic resections. Whipple procedure (W was done in 6 patients, pylorus preserving Whipple (PPW in 7 cases, and duodenum preserving cephalic pancreatectomy (DPCP was performed in 15 patients. Generally, 89.2% of patients had no pain 6 month after the operation. An average weight gain was 1.9 kg in W group, 2.8 kg in PPW group and 4.1 kg in DPCP group. Insulin-dependent diabetes was recorded in 66.6% in W group, 57.1% in PPW group and 0% in DPCP group. CONCLUSION: According to our opinion, DPCP may be considered the procedure of choice for surgical treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis in patients without dilatation of pancreas ductal system because of no serious postoperative metabolic consequences.

  3. Measuring Performance of Brief Alcohol Counseling in Medical Settings: A Review of the Options and Lessons from the Veterans Affairs (VA) Health Care System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Katharine A.; Williams, Emily C.; Achtmeyer, Carol E.; Hawkins, Eric J.; Harris, Alex H. S.; Frey, Madeleine S.; Craig, Thomas; Kivlahan, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01

    Brief alcohol counseling is a top US prevention priority but has not been widely implemented. The lack of an easy performance measure for brief alcohol counseling is one important barrier to implementation. The purpose of this report is to outline important issues related to measuring performance of brief alcohol counseling in health care…

  4. Pancreatitis During Treatment with Liraglutide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Famularo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of nausea, vomiting, and constant pain in the epigastrium which radiated to the sides. Five months before admission, liraglutide (1.2 mg/day had been started in addition to metformin and gliclazide for the treatment of type II diabetes and the dose had been stable. His previous history was otherwise unremarkable; he did not report any acute or chronic pancreatic disease and denied alcohol use, toxic habits or taking any other medications, including over-the-counter medications or herbal remedies, potentially associated with pancreatitis.

  5. Radiologic evaluation of pancreatic pseudocyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a collection of necrotic tissue, old blood and secretions that escaped from the pancreas damaged by pancreatitis, trauma and chronic alcoholism. There is no epithelial cell lining the cystic wall. With the advent of ultrasound and CT more accurate diagnosis can be made. Our study was carried out to analyse the radiological and clinical findings of 32 cases of pancreatic pseudocysts confirmed at Wonju College of Medicine Yonsei University from Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1986. The results are as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 4.3:1 Incidence was the most common in 4th decades. 2. The most frequent symptom was epigastric pain (100%). 3. In a total of 32 cases, 15 cases had a underlying cause of pancreatitis, 9 cases abdominal trauma. 4. In laboratory findings, serum amylase level was elevated in 23 cases, leucocytosis in 10 cases. 5. On chest films, the lungs were mostly normal. Soft tissue mass density in 12 cases was the most common finding on abdomen films. 6. UGI series were helpful in directing attention by pancreatic pseudocysts' location and size. 7. Ultrasonogram using primary procedure for the detection of pseudocyst (23 cases) disclosed anechoic lesion in 8 cases, mixed echo lesion in 15 cases. Mixed echo patterns, in terms of internal echo patters, were echogenic spots (8 cases), septation and echogenic spots (3 cases), fluid-fluid level (3 cases), etc. 8. CT scanning is the best imaging procedure, providing detailed morphologic information about the pancreatic pseudocyst and surrounding tissue.

  6. Radiologic evaluation of pancreatic pseudocyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, T. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Hong, I. S.; Kim, M. S.; Sung, K. J. [Yeonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-12-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst is a collection of necrotic tissue, old blood and secretions that escaped from the pancreas damaged by pancreatitis, trauma and chronic alcoholism. There is no epithelial cell lining the cystic wall. With the advent of ultrasound and CT more accurate diagnosis can be made. Our study was carried out to analyse the radiological and clinical findings of 32 cases of pancreatic pseudocysts confirmed at Wonju College of Medicine Yonsei University from Jan. 1979 to Aug. 1986. The results are as follows: 1. Male to female ratio was 4.3:1 Incidence was the most common in 4th decades. 2. The most frequent symptom was epigastric pain (100%). 3. In a total of 32 cases, 15 cases had a underlying cause of pancreatitis, 9 cases abdominal trauma. 4. In laboratory findings, serum amylase level was elevated in 23 cases, leucocytosis in 10 cases. 5. On chest films, the lungs were mostly normal. Soft tissue mass density in 12 cases was the most common finding on abdomen films. 6. UGI series were helpful in directing attention by pancreatic pseudocysts' location and size. 7. Ultrasonogram using primary procedure for the detection of pseudocyst (23 cases) disclosed anechoic lesion in 8 cases, mixed echo lesion in 15 cases. Mixed echo patterns, in terms of internal echo patters, were echogenic spots (8 cases), septation and echogenic spots (3 cases), fluid-fluid level (3 cases), etc. 8. CT scanning is the best imaging procedure, providing detailed morphologic information about the pancreatic pseudocyst and surrounding tissue.

  7. Metronidazole-induced pancreatitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, E

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old caucasian lady presented to the Accident & Emergency department complaining of acute onset severe epigastric pain radiating through to the back with associated nausea and vomiting. A diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was made. Symptoms commenced after the third dose of Metronidazole therapy prescribed for a recurrent periodontal abscess. The patient described a similar episode 10 months previously. On neither occasion were any other medications being taken, there was no history of alcohol abuse and no other gastro-intestinal aetiology could be identified on imaging. Symptoms resolved quickly upon discontinuation of the antibiotic agent. We conclude therefore that Metronidazole can reasonably be identified as the only potential causative agent.

  8. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T; Jeon, Christie Y; Pandol, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  9. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jun; Robbins, Lori A.; Lugea, Aurelia; Waldron, Richard T.; Jeon, Christie Y.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer carries a poor prognosis as most patients present with advanced disease and preferred chemotherapy regimens offer only modest effects on survival. Risk factors include smoking, obesity, heavy alcohol, and chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatic cancer has a complex relationship with diabetes, as diabetes can be both a risk factor for pancreatic cancer and a result of pancreatic cancer. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and certain hormones play an important role in promoting neoplasia in diabetics. Metformin appears to reduce risk for pancreatic cancer and improve survival in diabetics with pancreatic cancer primarily by decreasing insulin/IGF signaling, disrupting mitochondrial respiration, and inhibiting the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway. Other potential anti-tumorigenic effects of metformin include the ability to downregulate specificity protein transcription factors and associated genes, alter microRNAs, decrease cancer stem cell proliferation, and reduce DNA damage and inflammation. Here, we review the most recent knowledge on risk factors and treatment of pancreatic cancer and the relationship between diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and metformin as a potential therapy. PMID:25426078

  10. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikant Saraogi; Ritwika Mallik; Sujoy Ghosh

    2012-01-01

    Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swolle...

  11. Pancreatic pseudocysts. Radiological and ultrasonographic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contrera, J.D.; Uemura, L.; Palma, J.K.; Souza, L.P. de; Ferraz, L.R.L.; Magalhaes, P.J.A. (Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    Radiological and ultrasonographic studies of ten patients with surgically confirmed pancreatic pseudocysts were reviewed. All of them were male, with previous story of chronic alcoholism and clinical evidences of pancreatitis. The most important radiological finding consisted of a mass opacifying the epigastrium, displacing the stomach and bowel loops. ultrasound studies showed that the lesions were predominantly cystic, rounded or oval-shaped with smooth or irregular contours and of various sizes.

  12. The Differential Diagnosis of Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Gheonea, D.I.; Vilmann, P; SĂFTOIU, A.; Ciurea, T; Pîrvu, D; Ionescu, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas with a physiopathology that is yet to be fully understood, with a multifactorial etiology, of which alcohol abuse causes the majority of cases. PATIENTS AND METHOD We included 80 patients diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis, admitted in the Gastroenterology Clinic of the University of Medicine and Pharmacy Craiova. In each patient, demographic parameters, family and personal history were recorded. All patients were ini...

  13. Imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihashi, H.; Hirose, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Kamikita, Y.; Asano, A. (Asahikawa Medical College, Hokkaido (Japan))

    1981-11-01

    Diagnosing pancreatic diseases using non invasive methods such as ultrasound and computed tomography was reviewed. Images characteristic to pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer were explained. Pancreatic cancer accompanied with pancreatitis was demonstrated on echograms and scintigrams. The necessity of follow-up observation of pancreatitis was stressed.

  14. Incidental intraoperative discovery of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surlin Valeriu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors are a rare entity with an incidence between 2 per million to 5 per 100 000. Association with pancreatitis (acute or chronic is rare and is considered to be determined by the tumoral obstruction of pancreatic ducts, but sometimes occurs without any apparent relationship between them. Non-functional neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors are usually diagnosed when either very large or metastatic. Small ones are occasionally diagnosed when imagery is performed for other diagnostic reasons. Intraoperative discovery is even rarer and poses problems of differential diagnosis with other pancreatic tumors. Association with chronic pancreatitis is rare and usually due to pancreatic duct obstruction by the tumor. We describe the case of a patient with a small non-functioning neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreatic tail accidentally discovered during surgery for delayed traumatic splenic rupture associated with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. The tumor of 1.5cm size was well differentiated and confined to the pancreas, and was resected by a distal splenopancreatectomy. Conclusions Surgeons should be well aware of the rare possibility of a non-functional neuroendocrine tumor in the pancreas, associated with chronic pancreatitis, surgical resection being the optimal treatment for cure. Histopathology is of utmost importance to establish the correct diagnosis, grade of differentiation, malignancy and prognosis. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/2114470176676003.

  15. Planning Lessons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linda Jensen

    2007-01-01

    @@ Jensen's "Lesson Planning"article serves aS a guide fOr novice teachers who need to create formalized lesson plans.The article covers why,when,and how teachers plan lessons,as well aS basic lesson plan principles and a lesson plan template.

  16. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000287.htm Acute pancreatitis To use the sharing features on this page, ... fatty foods after the attack has improved. Outlook (Prognosis) Most cases go away in a week. However, ...

  17. Acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Mofleh Ibrahim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The past few years have witnessed a tremendous progress in our knowledge regarding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and classification of acute pancreatitis. The role of ischemia, lysosomal enzymes, oxygen free radicals, polymorphnuclear cells-byproducts and inflammatory mediators in the pathogenesis of pancreatic necrosis and multiple organ failure has been emphasized. Furthermore, the recent knowledge about agents infecting pancreatic necrosis, routes of infection, bacteriological examination of fine needle aspirate and appropriate antibiotics have changed the concept of acute pancreatitis. New diagnostic tests such as rapid urinary trypsinogen-2 test and inflammatory mediators including polymorphnuclear elastase, C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 contribute to early diagnosis, prognostic evaluation and initiation of an appropriate therapy.

  18. Chronic pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body Blockage of the tubes (ducts) that drain enzymes from the pancreas Cystic fibrosis High levels of a fat, called ... Limiting caffeine The health care provider may prescribe pancreatic enzymes. You must take these medicines with every meal. ...

  19. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rate Lab tests that show the release of pancreatic enzymes will be done. These include: Increased blood amylase level Increased serum blood lipase level Increased urine amylase ... include: Abdominal CT scan Abdominal MRI Abdominal ultrasound

  20. Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Associated with Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pezzilli, Raffaele; Vecchiarelli, Silvia; Di Marco, Maria Cristina; SERRA, CARLA; Santini, Donatella; Calculli, Lucia; Fabbri, Dario; Rojas Mena, Betzabè; Imbrogno, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP), in contrast to other benign chronic pancreatic diseases, can be cured with immunosuppressant drugs, thus the differentiation of AIP from pancreatic cancer is of particular interest in clinical practice. There is the possibility that some patients with AIP may develop pancreatic cancer, and this possibility contributes to increasing our difficulties in differentiating AIP from pancreatic cancer. We herein report the case of a 70-year-old man in whom pancreatic ad...

  1. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In around 30% of patients with necrotising pancreatitis, secondary infection of necrosis occurs, probably due to bacterial translocation from the patient’s own gut. Infected necrosis is an indication for ...

  2. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Hernani, Bruno L; Silva, Pedro C; Nishio, Ricardo T; Mateus, Henrique C; Assef, José C; De Campos, Tercio

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen, the pa...

  3. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis: A case-based review

    OpenAIRE

    Gan, S. Ian; Edwards, Alun L.; Symonds, Christopher J; Beck, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an established cause of pancreatitis. In a case-based approach, we present a review of hypertriglyceridemia and how it can cause pancreatitis. We outline how to investigate and manage such patients. A 35 year old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of acute pancreatitis. There was no history of alcohol consumption and biliary imaging was normal. The only relevant past medical history was that of mild hyperlipidemia, tr...

  4. Dengue Fever Presenting as Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Prasad Seetharam; Gabriel Rodrigues

    2010-01-01

    A 56-year-old non-alcoholic male was admitted with complaints of severe abdominal pain and was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis after blood investigations and a computed tomography scan of the abdomen. He developed a high-grade fever on the third day of admission, and serology tested positive for dengue. Treatment for dengue was instituted, leading to a good response and complete resolution of pancreatitis. The patient has been doing well and has had no recurrence of pancreatitis at the end ...

  5. Acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was performed on the relationship of CT findings to the clinical course of 148 patients with acute pancreatitis. The type of pancreatic inflammation seen on CT was classified into six categories based on an overall assessment of size, contour and density of the gland, and peripancreatic abnormalities. The majority (94%) of patients in whom CT showed mild pancreatic changes (grades A, B and C) had two or less positive clinical indicaters of severe pancreatitis (Ranson's signs). In contrast, 92% of patients in whom CT showed more severe changes of pancreatitis (grades D, E or F) had three or more positive signs. The nine patients who died with pancreatitis-related complications were in grades D, E or F. We wish to draw attention to a CT appearance which we have called 'fat islets' (low density intrapancreatic or peripancreatic areas, the contents of which approach fat in attenuation values); there was a strong correlation between this appearance and subsequent infection. (author). 24 refs.; 7 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Early Detection Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma; Familial Pancreatic Cancer; BRCA 1/2; HNPCC; Lynch Syndrome; Hereditary Pancreatitis; FAMMM; Familial Atypical Multiple Mole Melanoma; Peutz Jeghers Syndrome

  7. Acute pancreatitis : new frontiers in diagnosis and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Santvoort, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammation of the pancreas mostly caused by gallstones and alcohol abuse. Around 15 to 20% of patients show a severe clinical course, which is characterised by multiple organ failure and necrosis of the pancreatic parenchyma and/ or peripancreatic fat tissue. In arou

  8. Patients with chronic pancreatitis are at increased risk for osteoporosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2012-10-01

    Patients with chronic pancreatitis may be at an increased risk of low bone density because of malabsorption of vitamin D and calcium, poor diet, pain, alcoholism, and smoking. We investigated the rates of osteoporosis in patients with chronic pancreatitis compared to matched controls.

  9. Role of genetic disorders in acute recurrent pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Volker Keim

    2008-01-01

    There was remarkable progress in the understanding of the role genetic risk factors in chronic pancreatitis.These factors seem to be much more important than thought in the past.The rare autosomal-dominant mutations N29I and R122H of PRSS1(cationic trypsinogen) as well as the variant N34S of SPINK1(pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor) are associated to a disease onset in childhood or youth.Compared to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis the progression is slow so that for a long time only signs of acute-recurrent pancreatitis are found.Only at later time points(more than 10-15 years) there is evidence for chronic pancreatitis in the majority of patients.Acute recurrent pancreatitis may therefore be regarded as a transition state until definite signs of chronic pancreatitis are detectable.

  10. Chronic Pancreatitis: Landmark Papers, Management Decisions, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMagno, Eugene P; DiMagno, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    On May 16, 2015 at the invitation of the American Gastroenterological Association Institute Council E.P.D. presented a state-of-the-art lecture at Digestive Disease Week 2015. The aims were to discuss a selection of landmark papers in chronic pancreatitis (CP) that influence modern management and to conclude by suggesting some future directions. This is based on that presentation. We will specifically review the following: duct anatomy and pancreas divisum, description of chronic relapsing pancreatitis and its differentiation from recurrent acute pancreatitis and established CP (ECP), natural histories and gene discoveries of alcoholic, idiopathic and hereditary pancreatitis, development of pancreatic cancer in CP, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and calculation of dose and delivery of enzymes, endoscopic ultrasonography, and autoimmune pancreatitis. With some exceptions, we exclude basic science and surgery. PMID:27077713

  11. RISK FACTORS FOR PANCREATIC CANCER: UNDERLYING MECHANISMS AND POTENTIAL TARGETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EdwinCharlesThrower

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the review:Pancreatic cancer is extremely aggressive, forming highly chemo-resistant tumors, and has one of the worst prognoses. The evolution of this cancer is multi-factorial. Repeated acute pancreatic injury and inflammation are important contributing factors in the development of pancreatic cancer. This article attempts to understand the common pathways linking pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer.Recent Findings:Intracellular activation of both pancreatic enzymes and the transcription factor NF-kB are important mechanisms that induce acute pancreatitis. Recurrent pancreatic injury due to genetic susceptibility, environmental factors such as smoking, alcohol intake, and conditions such as obesity lead to increases in oxidative stress, impaired autophagy and constitutive activation of inflammatory pathways. These processes can stimulate pancreatic stellate cells, thereby increasing fibrosis and encouraging chronic disease development. Activation of oncogneic Kras mutations through inflammation, coupled with altered levels of tumor suppressor proteins (p53 and p16 can ultimately lead to development of pancreatic cancer. Summary:Although our understanding of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer has tremendously increased over many years, much remains to be elucidated in terms of common pathways linking these conditions.

  12. CHANGING TRENDS IN CHRONIC PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sreenidhi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AIMS : To determine the demographic profile , to evaluate risk factors of chronic pancreatitis , frequency of complications and therapeutic modalities for management of chronic pancreatitis . METHODS : Data analyzed retrospectively from 177 patients of chronic pancreatitis admitted in the Department of Surgery in our institute between Jan 2003 & Decembe r 2012 . RESULTS : Male predominance , mean age of presentation is 32yrs , 66% with Alcohol consumption was the main risk factor , with associated diabetes and gall stones. Pain abdomen was the commonest mode of presentation , and USG sensitivity rate was 55%. P arenchymal calcification , Ductal calculi , pseudocyst were the commonest complications. Medical line of management was the initial therapy and surgical intervention was done as indicated. Number of readmissions noted. CONCLUSIONS : Although Kerala is known for highest prevalence of chronic pancreatitis in our country , it is a noted di sease & is on the rise in the state of Karnataka. Mean age of onset is older as compared to two decades ago and also a shift of etiology from tropical t o a lcoholic pancreatitis has been noted.

  13. Pancreatic Steatosis: What Should Gastroenterologists Know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varayu PrachayakulVarayu Prachayakul

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When hyperechoic pancreatic parenchyma is observed on endoscopic or transabdominal ultrasound, fat infiltration of the pancreas is suspected. This condition was first reported by Ogilvie in 1993 and is termed fatty pancreas, pancreatic lipomatosis, non-alcoholic fatty pancreas, or pancreatic steatosis. Diagnosis of this condition mostly relies on imaging tools such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, or ultrasonography rather than histology. Although the condition is rare, it has clinical significance. There are multiple hypotheses regarded the etiology of this condition, listing factors such as viral infections, toxins, and congenital syndromes as possible causes. Metabolic syndrome and diabetes mellitus correlated with this condition. However, other etiologies should also be considered to aid specific treatment. In addition to a correlation between pancreatic steatosis and metabolic syndrome, relationships between pancreatic steatosis and worsened severity and prognosis of pancreatic cancer, increased complications after pancreatic surgery, and acute pancreatitis were reported. Gastroenterologists should be well informed about this condition for better care of these patients.

  14. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghdassi Alexander A

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed.

  15. Animal models for investigating chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Alexander A; Mayerle, Julia; Christochowitz, Sandra; Weiss, Frank U; Sendler, Matthias; Lerch, Markus M

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is defined as a continuous or recurrent inflammatory disease of the pancreas characterized by progressive and irreversible morphological changes. It typically causes pain and permanent impairment of pancreatic function. In chronic pancreatitis areas of focal necrosis are followed by perilobular and intralobular fibrosis of the parenchyma, by stone formation in the pancreatic duct, calcifications in the parenchyma as well as the formation of pseudocysts. Late in the course of the disease a progressive loss of endocrine and exocrine function occurs. Despite advances in understanding the pathogenesis no causal treatment for chronic pancreatitis is presently available. Thus, there is a need for well characterized animal models for further investigations that allow translation to the human situation. This review summarizes existing experimental models and distinguishes them according to the type of pathological stimulus used for induction of pancreatitis. There is a special focus on pancreatic duct ligation, repetitive overstimulation with caerulein and chronic alcohol feeding. Secondly, attention is drawn to genetic models that have recently been generated and which mimic features of chronic pancreatitis in man. Each technique will be supplemented with data on the pathophysiological background of the model and their limitations will be discussed. PMID:22133269

  16. Acute pancreatitis and amiodarone: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yen-Yuan Chen; Ching-Yu Chen; Kai-Kuen Leung

    2007-01-01

    Amiodarone, a class m antiarrhythmic drug, is one of the most effective drugs used in the treatment of ventricular and paroxysmal supraventricular tachyarrhythmia. Adverse effects of amiodarone including pulmonary toxicity, hepatotoxicity, aggravation of arrhythmia, and thyroid diseases are well understood. A 66-year old woman with acute pancreatitis was admitted to our hospital with the complaint of epigastralgia radiating to both flanks for two months. Her symptoms and elevation of pancreatic enzymes did not respond to conventional medical treatment of pancreatitis for 18 d. No known causal factors for pancreatitis such as biliary tract stone, hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol consumption could be identified. Under the suspicion of amiodarone-induced acute pancreatitis, amiodarone was substituted by propafenone. Her symptoms soon alleviated and serum lipase level declined. Three months after hospital discharge, the abdominal pain did not recur. Amiodarone was approved to treat recurrent ventricular fibrillation or sustained ventricular tachyarrhythmia that has been resistant to other medications since 1986. Pancreatitis is a very rare adverse effect associated with the use of amiodarone, and only four cases of amiodarone-induced pancreatitis have been reported in literature. We report a patient who developed acute pancreatitis during amiodarone therapy.

  17. CLINICAL STUDY ON ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhaib Rehaman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Early diagnosis and severity evaluation on patients with acute pancreatitis are very important due to its potential morbidity and mortality. Given the wide spectrum of disease seen, the care of patients with pancreatitis must be highly individualized. Sev eral clinical, laboratory and radiologic factors and many scoring systems have been proposed for outcome prediction. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To study the symptomatology, clinical presentation and management in pancreatitis . To study the severity of acute panc reatitis according to Glasgow Scale . METHODS: Present study includes consecutive 38 patients hospitalized in CSI Holdsworth Memorial Hospital over the period of 2 years. All patients were thoroughly investigated and were stratified according to the Glasgow criteria. Data was collected on complications, investigations and interventions undertaken, outcome, duration of stay in hospital and ICU. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Descriptive, Chi square tests, Crosstabs (Contingency coefficient analysis . RESULTS : Mean age of presentation in our study was 43.1 years. There was a male predominance accounting for 68.4% compared to 31.6% females. Alcohol was the main etiological factor in about 50% of the patients. Sensitivity to S. amylase was about 100%. Accuracy of USG abdomen in diagnosing pancreatitis was about 88.5%. Ascitis was the commonest complication seen in 13.2%. Mean duration of hospital stay was 6.2 days. The patient were stratified according to Glasgow scoring system into mild (0 - 3 and severe (>3 panc reatitis. In our study 32 people were graded with mild pancreatitis, all improved and in 6 people who were graded with severe pancreatitis, 83.3 % improved and 2.6% expired because of complications. Test statistics showed Contingency coefficient 0.355 and P 0.019 (NS. CONCLUSION : Glasgow scoring system remains a valid predicting system for the outcome in patients with acute pancreatitis. It is simple easy to apply with

  18. Nitric Oxide Pathways and Evidence-Based Perturbations in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    DiMagno, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a gaseous neurotransmitter, a vasodilator and paracrine regulator. In the pancreas, NO regulates normal pancreatic exocrine secretion, endocrine pancreatic insulin secretion and pancreatic microvascular blood flow. NO has multiple species and is produced de novo by 3 NO synthase enzymes. Endothelial NO synthase reduces the severity of the initial phase of experimental acute pancreatitis (AP). Cigarette smoking and chronic alcohol use disrupt normal NO pathways and are ass...

  19. [Chronic pancreatitis: nutrition and pain therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mössner, J

    1998-11-11

    Therapy of chronic pancreatitis rests on five arms: Avoidance of alcohol, treatment of pain, replacement therapy for exocrine and endocrine insufficiency and adequate nutrition. Alcohol withdrawal improves pain and the patient's compliance. It also seems to retard the chronic inflammatory process. Therapy of pain depends on the pathomechanism of pain. There is a lack of prospective, controlled studies comparing various treatment regimens. Thus, treatment options are partly dependent on the experience of the physician taking care of the patient and include i.e. for pseudocysts: surgical vs percutaneous or endoscopic drainage; for stenosis of the main pancreatic duct close to the papilla: surgical vs endoscopic drainage (stents); for distal bile duct stenosis: endoscopic stents vs biliodigestive anastomosis vs pancreatic head resection; for pancreatic stones: extracorporal shock wave lithotripsy followed by endoscopic stone extraction vs surgery (pancreaticojejunostomy), finally for inflammatory tumor of the pancreatic head combined with pain with or without compression of the distal bile duct or duodenum: duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection vs Whipple resection. Patients with pain resistant to medical treatment may be candidates for a transcutaneous blockade of the plexus coeliacus or for epidural nerve blockade before one choses a surgical procedure. Application of pancreatic enzymes does not seem to have a major beneficial effect on pancreatic pain. Modification of nutrition has become less restrictive. Thanks to improved substitution with acid resistant porcine pancreatic extracts with high lipase activity, fat restriction is no longer of paramount importance. However, supply with sufficient calories is still difficult due to pain, inadequate compliance and hypermetabolism. PMID:9857767

  20. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwak, Sang Wook [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: kimsuk@medigate.net; Lee, Jun Woo; Lee, Nam Kyung; Kim, Chang Won; Yi, Mi Seon [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gwang Ha; Kang, Dae Hwan [Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National College of Medicine and the Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  1. Evaluation of unusual causes of pancreatitis: Role of cross-sectional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are widely diverse causes of pancreatitis. Gallstone and alcohol have been recognized as the most common causes of pancreatitis accounting for 90% of cases. However, acute and chronic pancreatitis may also result from a variety of uncommon causes. The determination of the etiology is important for patient management and prevention of recurrence. Sludge is the most common cause of idiopathic or recurrent acute pancreatitis. Endoscopic ultrasonography is considered as the most accurate diagnostic test for this abnormality. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have only a limited role in the diagnosis of sludge. However, papillitis observed on the contrast-enhanced CT and MR may provide clues to the detection of pancreatitis secondary to sludge, a small stone or a recently passed stone. Radiological studies, clinical presentation and laboratory data can be helpful in determining the etiology of unusual causes of pancreatitis such as anatomic anomalies, autoimmune pancreatitis, groove pancreatitis, and traumatic pancreatitis.

  2. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor as a Possible Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okanoue T

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Acute pancreatitis is not commonly seen in the first presentation of pancreatic neoplasms. Solid pseudopapillary tumor as a cause of acute pancreatitis has not yet been reported. This is the first report of acute pancreatitis resulting from solid pseudopapillary tumor. CASE REPORT: We report the case of a 21-year-old female who presented with a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain associated with elevated serum pancreatic enzyme concentration. The initial diagnosis was acute pancreatitis. However, subsequent ultrasonography and computed tomography showed an abdominal mass in the tail of the pancreas, retroperitoneal fluid and left pleural effusion. There was scarce pain relief even with large doses of analgesics. A distal pancreatectomy was then performed and a final diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor was made histologically. The surrounding pancreatic tissue was characterized as hemorrhagic edematous pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Solid pseudopapillary tumor is generally known as a slow-growing pancreatic neoplasm with few, if any, symptoms. However, solid pseudopapillary tumors should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute pancreatitis, especially in cases of non-alcoholic young women having an acute pancreatitis attack.

  3. Pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleeff, Jorg; Korc, Murray; Apte, Minoti; La Vecchia, Carlo; Johnson, Colin D; Biankin, Andrew V; Neale, Rachel E; Tempero, Margaret; Tuveson, David A; Hruban, Ralph H; Neoptolemos, John P

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a major cause of cancer-associated mortality, with a dismal overall prognosis that has remained virtually unchanged for many decades. Currently, prevention or early diagnosis at a curable stage is exceedingly difficult; patients rarely exhibit symptoms and tumours do not display sensitive and specific markers to aid detection. Pancreatic cancers also have few prevalent genetic mutations; the most commonly mutated genes are KRAS, CDKN2A (encoding p16), TP53 and SMAD4 - none of which are currently druggable. Indeed, therapeutic options are limited and progress in drug development is impeded because most pancreatic cancers are complex at the genomic, epigenetic and metabolic levels, with multiple activated pathways and crosstalk evident. Furthermore, the multilayered interplay between neoplastic and stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment challenges medical treatment. Fewer than 20% of patients have surgically resectable disease; however, neoadjuvant therapies might shift tumours towards resectability. Although newer drug combinations and multimodal regimens in this setting, as well as the adjuvant setting, appreciably extend survival, ∼80% of patients will relapse after surgery and ultimately die of their disease. Thus, consideration of quality of life and overall survival is important. In this Primer, we summarize the current understanding of the salient pathophysiological, molecular, translational and clinical aspects of this disease. In addition, we present an outline of potential future directions for pancreatic cancer research and patient management. PMID:27158978

  4. Pancreatic pseudocyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samir Habashi; Peter V Draganov

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are complications of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Initial diagnosis is accomplished most often by cross-sectional imaging. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration has become the preferred test to help distinguish pseudocyst from other cystic lesions of the pancreas. Most pseudocysts resolve spontaneously with supportive care. The size of the pseudocyst and the length of time the cyst has been present are poor predictors for the potential of pseudocyst resolution or complications, but in general, larger cysts are more likely to be symptomatic or cause complications. The main two indications for some type of invasive drainage procedure are persistent patient symptoms or the presence of complications (infection, gastric outlet or biliary obstruction, bleeding). Three different strategies for pancreatic pseudocysts drainage are available: endoscopic (transpapillary or transmural) drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. To date, no prospective controlled studies have compared directly these approaches. As a result, the management varies based on local expertise, but in general, endoscopic drainage is becoming the preferred approach because it is less invasive than surgery, avoids the need for external drain, and has a high long-term success rate. A tailored therapeutic approach taking into consideration patient preferences and involving multidisciplinary team of therapeutic endoscopist, interventional radiologist and pancreatic surgeon should be considered in all cases.

  5. Pancreatitis - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may ask you to take extra capsules, called pancreatic enzymes. These will help your body absorb fats in ... tell you how many. When you take these enzymes, you may also need to ... stomach. If your pancreas has a lot of damage, you may also ...

  6. Lactoferrin in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Xiang Jin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The present review is focused on the clinical significance of lactoferrin in pancreatic secretions and stone formation in chronic pancreatitis, and of serum anti-lactoferrin antibody in autoimmune pancreatitis. Lactoferrin secretion is increased in pancreatic secretions in calcified and non-calcified chronic pancreatitis. Lactoferrin, pancreatic stone protein and trypsin are present in pancreatic stones. We cannot conclude which protein is more important for the precipitate and stone formation. The presence of antilactoferrin antibody has been reported in serum in autoimmune diseases, such as autoimmune pancreatitis. The coincidental appearance of autoimmune pancreatitis with extrapancreatic autoimmune diseases strongly suggests a common autoimmune mechanism and lactoferrin is a candidate antigen. Lactoferrin may play an important role as a precipitate protein in pancreatic stone formation in chronic pancreatitis and as an autoantigen in autoimmune pancreatitis. Further studies are required to better understand the role of lactoferin.

  7. Is Pancreatic Cancer Hereditary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Board Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer Is pancreatic cancer hereditary? Cancer of the pancreas is a genetic ... found in cigarette smoke. The genetics of hereditary pancreatic cancer is a focus of research at Johns Hopkins. ...

  8. Pancreatic Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diabetes, Gum Disease, and Other Dental Problems Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetes and Pregnancy Financial Help for Diabetes Care Diabetes Statistics Pancreatic Islet Transplantation What are pancreatic islets? Pancreatic islets, also called ...

  9. Pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seung Goun Hong; Jae Seon Kim; Moon Kyung Joo; Kwang Gyun Lee; Key Hyeon Kim; Cho Rong Oh; Jong-Jae Park; Young-Tae Bak

    2009-01-01

    Solitary pancreatic involvement of tuberculosis is rare,especially in an immunocompetent individual, and it may be misdiagnosed as pancreatic cystic neoplasms.Pancreatic cystic neoplasms are being identified in increasing numbers, probably because of the frequent use of radiology and advances in endoscopic techniques.However, they are composed of a variety of neoplasms with a wide range of malignant potential,and it is often difficult to differentiate pancreatic tuberculosis mimicking cystic neoplasms from benign or malignant pancreatic cystic neoplasms. Non-surgical diagnosis of pancreatic tuberculosis is inconclusive and continues to be a challenge in many cases. If so,then laparotomy should be employed to establish the diagnosis. Therefore, pancreatic tuberculosis should be kept in mind during the differential diagnosis of solitary cystic masses in the pancreas. We report a patient who had solitary pancreatic tuberculosis masquerading as pancreatic serous cystadenoma.

  10. Mild acute pancreatitis with vildagliptin use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikant Saraogi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vildagliptin has not been associated with the development of acute pancreatitis in postmarketing reports except one case report from Sydney, Australia. We present the case report of 42 year old male, diabetic, with no historyof alcohol use, on vildagliptin 50 mg and metformin 500 mg daily since 6 months, who presented with severe abdominal pain radiating to back, nausea and fever. On evaluation, serum pancreatic enzymes were elevated, triglycerides were not raised and ultrasound showed swollen and echogenic pancreas, loss of peripancreatic fat plane and pancreatic duct was not dilated. Vildagliptin was stopped and the pancreatits resolved. On Follow up, no secondary cause was not identified. This appears to be the first reported case of acute pancreatitis from India probably attributable to use of vildagliptin, thus raising the possibility that this rare reaction may be a class effect of the DPP-4 inhibitors.

  11. Severe Hypertriglyceridemia Induced Pancreatitis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis caused by severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia is a rare complication of pregnancy. Acute pancreatitis has been well associated with gallstone disease, alcoholism, or drug abuse but rarely seen in association with severe hypertriglyceridemia. Hypertriglyceridemia may occur in pregnancy due to normal physiological changes leading to abnormalities in lipid metabolism. We report a case of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia that caused acute pancreatitis at full term and was successfully treated with postpartum therapeutic plasma exchange. Patient also developed several other complications related to her substantial hypertriglyceridemia including preeclampsia, chylous ascites, retinal detachment, pleural effusion, and chronic pericarditis. This patient had no previous family or personal history of lipid abnormality and had four successful prior pregnancies without developing gestational hypertriglyceridemia. Such a severe hypertriglyceridemia is usually seen in patients with familial chylomicronemia syndromes where hypertriglyceridemia is exacerbated by the pregnancy, leading to fatal complications such as acute pancreatitis.

  12. STUDY ANALYSIS OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS BY CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulabai

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Study analysis of pancreatitis by computed tomography in terms of morphology of pancreas in acute pancreatitis, complications of pancreatitis and duration of hospital stay by grading the severity of disease using Modified CT severity index. MATERIAL AND METHOD: This prospective study of 100 patients suspected of pancreatitis was evaluated with multidetector spiral CT scanner, somatom, (Spirit Siemens at Tertiary care center, for period of one year. The series consists of patients of pancreatitis which were clinically diagnosed and sent directly for CT examination and in the patients in whom abdominal ultrasound examination was suggestive of pancreatitis. Water with iodinated contrast is used as oral contrast so as to distend the stomach and small bowel followed by IV contrast study. All images were viewed at window width-300, window level-40 with a wide and narrow window setting as necessary. RESULT ANALYSIS: Acute Pancreatitis was more common in males than females with alcohol consumption was the commonest etiological factor in 79.5%. In contrary biliary pathology was the commonest factor in females of 41.6%. Among the 100 cases 41 patients (41% developed complications. CONCLUSION: We had documented a statistically significant correlation between the numeric score obtained with the Modified CT Severity index and the presence of infection, the need for surgery and percutaneous interventions, and the length of the hospital stay. Finally the modified CTSI closely indicates with patient outcome in all study parameters, especially with the length of the hospital stay and the development of organ failure.

  13. Pancreatic steatosis: Is it related to either obesity or diabetes mellitus?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raffaele; Pezzilli; Lucia; Calculli

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of fat in the pancreatic gland has been referred to using various synonyms,such as pancreatic lipomatosis,fatty replacement,fatty infiltration,fatty pancreas,lipomatous pseudohypertrophy,non-alcoholic fatty pancreatic disease and pancreatic steatosis We believe that pancreatic steatosis is the best description of fat accumulation in the pancreatic gland without fat replacement,and this term also describes the possibility that the fat accumulation is a reversible process.A review of the existing literature was carried out,and it was found that there was notable evidence from both the pathological and the imaging point of view that pancreatic steatosis is an increasing problem due to the increasing incidence of obesity.The conclusion was that pancreatic steatosis was easily detectable using modern imaging techniques,such as ultrasonography,endoscopic ultrasonography,computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.Pancreatic steatosis was not due to the presence of diabetes mellitus but was highly associated with the metabolic syndrome.The possible presence of steatopancreatitis should be better evaluated,especially regarding the inflammatory cascade,and additional studies are needed which are capable of assessing whether non-alcoholic steatopancreatitis really exists as does non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.Finally,the presence of exocrine pancreatic function should be extensively evaluated in patients with pancreatic steatosis.

  14. Alcoholism and Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jeong Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic use of alcohol is considered to be a potential risk factor for the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, which causes insulin resistance and pancreatic β-cell dysfunction that is a prerequisite for the development of diabetes. However, alcohol consumption in diabetes has been controversial and more detailed information on the diabetogenic impact of alcohol seems warranted. Diabetes, especially T2DM, causes dysregulation of various metabolic processes, which includes a defect in the insulin-mediated glucose function of adipocytes, and an impaired insulin action in the liver. In addition, neurobiological profiles of alcoholism are linked to the effects of a disruption of glucose homeostasis and of insulin resistance, which are affected by altered appetite that regulates the peptides and neurotrophic factors. Since conditions, which precede the onset of diabetes that are associated with alcoholism is one of the crucial public problems, researches in efforts to prevent and treat diabetes with alcohol dependence, receives special clinical interest. Therefore, the purpose of this mini-review is to provide the recent progress and current theories in the interplay between alcoholism and diabetes. Further, the purpose of this study also includes summarizing the pathophysiological mechanisms in the neurobiology of alcoholism.

  15. Clinical study on pancreatic damage in patients with acute dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning%急性敌敌畏中毒合并急性乙醇中毒患者胰腺损害的临床研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰; 瞿海龙; 周英莲; 梁璐; 彭广军

    2012-01-01

    [Objective]To investigate the incidence rate of severe pancreatic damage in patients with acute dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning, in order to guide the clinical early diagnosis and rational treatment. [Methods] 140 acute dichlorvos poisoning cases in Emergency Department of Affiliated Hospital of Hebei University were divided into dichlorvos poisoning group (80 cases) and dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning group (60 cases). The acute pancreatitis was diagnosed through blood and urine amylase detection, and pancreatic CT within 24 hours after admission. The pancreatitis incidence and prognosis of two groups were compared. [Results] There was 20 severe acute pancreatitis cases in dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning group and 14 cases in dichlorvos poisoning group, and the difference between two groups was significant (x2 =4. 67,P<0.05). The incidence rate of complications, operation rate, mortality rate and hospitalization time in dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning group were higher than those in dichlorvos poisoning group [P<0.05). [ Conclusion] Compared with single dichlorvos poisoning group, there is a higher incidence rate of severe pancreatitis in dichlorvos poisoning combined with alcohol poisoning group, and it has high mortality rate and poor prognosis.%目的 探讨急性敌敌畏中毒合并急性乙醇中毒患者重症胰腺炎发生情况,以指导临床早期诊断和合理治疗.方法 将就诊于河北大学附属医院急诊科的140例急性重度敌敌畏中毒患者分为单纯敌敌畏中毒组(80例)、敌敌畏中毒合并乙醇中毒组(60例);于入院后24h内通过血尿中淀粉酶、胰腺CT检查明确胰腺炎诊断;对2组患者胰腺炎发生率及其预后进行比较.结果 急性敌敌畏中毒合并急性乙醇中毒患者20例发生重症胰腺炎,单纯敌敌畏中毒组14例发生重症胰腺炎,两组差异有统计学意义(x2=4.67,P<0.05);

  16. ERCP in acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jijo V Cherian; Joye Varghese Selvaraj; Rajesh Natrayan; Jayanthi Venkataraman

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:The role of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in the management of acute pancreatitis has evolved over years since its introduction in 1968. Its importance in diagnosing the etiology of pancreatitis has steadily declined with the advent of less invasive diagnostic tools. The therapeutic implications of ERCP in acute pancreatitis are many fold and are directed towards management of known etiological factors or its related complications. This article highlights the current status of ERCP in acute pancreatitis. DATA SOURCES:An English literature search using PubMed database was conducted on ERCP in acute pancreatitis, the etiologies and complications of pancreatitis amenable to endotherapy and other related subjects, which were reviewed. RESULTS: ERCP serves as a primary therapeutic modality for management of biliary pancreatitis in speciifc situations, pancreatitis due to microlithiasis, speciifc types of sphincter of Oddi dysfunction, pancreas divisum, ascariasis and malignancy. In recurrent acute pancreatitis and smoldering pancreatitis it has a deifnite therapeutic utility. Complications of acute pancreatitis including pancreatic-duct disruptions or leaks, benign pancreatic-lfuid collections and pancreatic necrosis can be beneifcially dealt with. Intraductal ultrasound and pancreatoscopy during ERCP are useful in detecting pancreatic malignancy. CONCLUSIONS:The role of ERCP in acute pancreatitis is predominantly therapeutic and occasionally diagnostic. Its role in the management continues to evolve and advanced invasive procedures should be undertaken only in centers dedicated to pancreatic care.

  17. Groove Pancreatitis: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallath Balakrishnan

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Groove pancreatitis is a rare type of segmental pancreatitis characterized by fibrous scars of the anatomic space between the dorsocranial part of the head of the pancreas, the duodenum, and the common bile duct. Case report A 40-year-old man, with a past history of chronic alcohol consumption presented with epigastric pain radiating to the back and intermittent vomiting and a weight loss of 9 kg. A CT of the abdomen revealed swelling of the pancreatic head, a hypodense mass and duodenal wall thickening with luminal narrowing. Peripancreatic fluid and dense strands were also seen. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed an edematous, shiny, reddish raised mucosa having a polypoid appearance with narrowing of the second portion of the duodenum. Histological examination of the duodenal biopsy specimens showed preservation of the crypt-villus ratio, and the submucosa showed Brunner gland hyperplasia. These findings appeared consistent with the diagnosis of groove pancreatitis. Presently, the patient is on conservative medical management with analgesics, proton pump inhibitors and a pancreatic enzyme supplement. Conclusions Groove pancreatitis often masquerades as pancreatic head carcinoma. This condition should be kept in mind when making the differential diagnosis between pancreatic masses and duodenal stenosis. In all cases of focal pancreatitis involving the head or uncinate process of the pancreas with involvement of the adjacent duodenum, the possibility of groove pancreatitis should be considered.

  18. Alcohol and pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Paoletti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol exerts teratogenic effects in all the gestation times, with peculiar features in relationship to the trimester of pregnancy in which alcohol is assumed. Alcohol itself and its metabolites modify DNA synthesis, cellular division, cellular migration and the fetal development. The characteristic facies of feto-alcoholic syndrome (FAS-affected baby depends on the alcohol impact on skull facial development during the first trimester of pregnancy. In association there are cerebral damages with a strong defect of brain development up to the life incompatibility. Serious consequences on fetal health also depends on dangerous effects of alcohol exposure in the organogenesis of the heart, the bone, the kidney, sensorial organs, et al. It has been demonstrated that maternal binge drinking is a high factor risk of mental retardation and of delinquent behaviour. Unfortunately, a lower alcohol intake also exerts deleterious effects on fetal health. In several countries of the world there is a high alcohol use, and this habit is increased in the women. Therefore, correct information has to be given to avoid alcohol use by women in the preconceptional time and during the pregnancy. Preliminary results of a study performed by the authors show that over 80% of pregnant and puerperal women are not unaware that more than 2 glasses of alcohol/week ingested during pregnancy can create neurological abnormalities in the fetus. However, after the information provided on alcoholic fetopathy, all women are conscious of the damage caused by the use of alcohol to the fetus during pregnancy. This study confirms the need to provide detailed information on the negative effects of alcohol on fetal health. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  19. Alcoholic pancreatitis: New insights into the pathogenesisand treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a necro-inflammatory disease of theexocrine pancreas that is characterized by inappropriateactivation of zymogens, infiltration of the pancreas byinflammatory cells, and destruction of the pancreaticexocrine cells. Acute pancreatitis can progress to asevere life-threatening disease. Currently there is nopharmacotherapy to prevent or treat acute pancreatitis.One of the more common factors associated withacute pancreatitis is alcohol abuse. Although commonlyassociated with pancreatitis alcohol alone is unableto cause pancreatitis. Instead, it appears that alcoholand its metabolic by-products predispose the pancreasto damage from agents that normally do not causepancreatitis, or to more severe disease from agentsthat normally cause mild pancreatic damage. Over thelast 10 to 20 years, a tremendous amount of work hasdefined a number of alcohol-mediated biochemicalchanges in pancreatic cells. Among these changesare Sustained levels of intracellular calcium, activationof the mitochondrial permeability transition pore,endoplasmic reticulum stress, impairment in autophagy,alteration in the activity of transcriptional activators,and colocalization of lysosomal and pancreatic digestiveenzymes. Elucidation of these changes has led to adeeper understanding of the mechanisms by whichethanol predisposes acinar cells to damage. This greaterunderstanding has revealed a number of promisingtargets for therapeutic intervention. It is hoped thatfurther investigation of these targets will lead to thedevelopment of pharmacotherapy that is effective in treatingand preventing the progression of acute pancreatitis.

  20. Pain management in chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cathia Gachago; Peter V Draganov

    2008-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a major clinical problem in patients with chronic pancreatitis.The cause of pain is usually multifactorial with a complex interplay of factors contributing to a varying degree to the pain in an individual patient and,therefore,a rigid standardized approach for pain control tends to lead to suboptimal results.Pain management usually proceeds in a stepwise approach beginning with general lifestyle recommendations,low fat diet,alcohol and smoking cessation are encouraged.Analgesics alone are needed in almost all patients.Maneuvers aimed at suppression of pancreatic secretion are routinely tried.Patients with ongoing symptoms may be candidates for more invasive options such as endoscopic therapy,and resective or drainage surgery.The role of pain modifying agents (antidepressants,gabapentin,peregabalin),celiac plexus block,antioxidants,octreotide and total pancreatectomy with islet cell auto transplantation remains to be determined.

  1. Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula: Serial imaging and clinical follow-up from pseudocyst to fistula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, Keun Nahn [Dept. of Radiology, Dankook University Hospital, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Pancreatic pseudocyst-portal vein fistula is an extremely rare complication of pancreatitis. Only 18 such cases have been previously reported in the medical literature. However, a serial process from pancreatic pseudocyst to fistula formation has not been described. The serial clinical and radiological findings in a 52-year-old chronic alcoholic male patient with fistula between pancreatic pseudocyst and main portal vein are presented.

  2. Metformin induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alsubaie, Sadeem; Almalki, Mussa H.

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis frequently presents with abdomen pain but may presents with various skin manifestations as rash and rarely, pancreatic panniculitis. Metformin, one of the most effective and valuable oral hypoglycemic agents in the biguanide class was linked to acute pancreatitis in few cases. Here, we report a case of metformin induce acute pancreatitis in young healthy man with normal renal function.

  3. Hydronephrosis as an Unusual Cause of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nata Pratama Hardjo Lugito

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct (38% and alcoholism (36%. There have been a few reports in the literature of acute pancreatitis associated with an obstructed urinary system. This case describes a 38-year-old male with acute pancreatitis occurring in the setting of hydronephrosis. A magnetic resonance cholangiopancreaticography (MRCP showed right-sided severe hydronephrosis pushing the duodenum and head of pancreas anteriorly, thus obliterating distal segment of the common bile duct. There were also multiple right renal stones causing ureteral obstruction and hydronephrosis. Right nephrostomy was performed to release bile duct obstruction. However, sepsis and disseminated intravascular coagulation developed as a complication of acute pancreatitis, and the patient passed away. Although gallstone and alcoholism are the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, other causes should always be considered. Physicians should be aware of right hydronephrosis as one of the possible causes of acute pancreatitis in their workup of patients.

  4. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinking once you've started Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms Tolerance - the need to drink more alcohol to feel the same effect With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still ...

  5. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A retrospective analysis of ultrasonograms of 24 patients with acute pancreatitis and 8 patients with chronic pancreatitis was performed. Nine cases were proven by surgery and 23 cases were diagnosed clinically. Generalized pancreatic enlargement with normal or decreased echogenecity was principal findings in acute pancreatitis, while pancreas was normal in size and echogenecity was normal or slightly altered in chronic pancreatitis. Ultrasonography is considered a simple and accurate method in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis and thus it could be an initial test in patients with suspected acute pancreatitis

  6. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancreatic cancer. It is hoped for the future that the understanding of genetic alterations will lead to the rapid discovery of an effective biomarker of pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this thesis we vis...

  7. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  8. Complications of pancreatic surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases, including pancreatitis benign tumors and cancer, may require pancreas surgery. Pancreatic resection can lead to a prolonged survival in pancreatic cancer and even a potential chance for cure. However, the pancreatic surgery can result in complications, and high postoperative morbidity rates are still presence. This article reviews the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, which involves the more common complications, their prevention and treatment.

  9. Therapeutic management of locally unresectable pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer still have bad prognosis. At the time of diagnosis, less than 10 % of patients can undergo surgery with an overall 5-year survival rate of less than 2 %. For patients with localized pancreatic adenocarcinoma, the combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy has been shown to control symptoms and to enhance patient survival. This treatment should be proposed to all the patients with good performance status and without icterus. Pain management should be optimized and often need morphinic and co-antalgic (anticonvulsants, steroids) consumption. The celiac plexus block with alcohol gives an excellent pain relief and should be more frequently used. (author)

  10. Pancreatic transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A pancreas transplant is a surgical procedure to place a healthy pancreas from a donor into a patient whose pancreas no longer functions properly. Exocrine pancreas transplantation remains the standard treatment of choice for patients with diabetes mellitus complicated by end-stage renal disease. The use of pancreas transplantation for type 2 diabetes mellitus is an emerging concept. A pancreas transplant is often done in conjunction with a kidney transplant. Even if pancreas transplantation provides the best glycemic control option for diabetes mellitus, it is associated with significant morbidities related to infectious disease. The present article provides with a review of pancreatic transplantation.

  11. Unusual tomographic findings of complicated necrotizing pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Maria Silveira Sigrist

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis (AP is a potential life-threatening disease, which originates from inflammatory involvement of the pancreas and surrounding tissues. Serious complications eventuate and treatment is difficult. AP is classified in both interstitial edematous pancreatitis, which occurs in 70-80% of patients, and necrotizing pancreatitis, which occurs in 20-30% of patients. Diagnosis is based on the presence of two of the following criteria: abdominal pain, increased serum determination of amylase and/or lipase more than three times the reference value, and characteristic tomographic findings. Among the latter, there is the pancreatic and surrounding tissue damage as well as that related to distant organ involvement. This case report shows the fatal case of a male patient with a history of heavy alcoholic abuse admitted with the diagnosis of necrotizing pancreatitis. The authors call attention to the unusual tomographic findings; namely, a huge duodenal hematoma and a large hemoperitoneum, ischemic involvement of the spleen and kidneys, as well as pancreatic and peripancreatic necrosis.

  12. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Georgios K; Harissis, Haralampos; Mitsis, Michalis; Batsis, Haralampos; Fatouros, Michalis

    2012-04-28

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation, appendicitis or visceral ischemia. Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported. Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis. This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis, and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis. The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer, since, due to hypertriglyceridemia, serum amylase values appeared within the normal range. Moreover, abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis. Following abdominal lavage and drainage, the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide. PMID:22563182

  13. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Georgios K Georgiou; Haralampos Harissis; Michalis Mitsis; Haralampos Batsis; Michalis Fatouros

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse.The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy,trauma or surgery,and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention.However,when accumulation of "chyle" occurs rapidly,the patient may present with signs of peritonitis.Preoperative diagnosis is difficult since the clinical picture usually suggests hollow organ perforation,appendicitis or visceral ischemia.Less than 100 cases of acute chylous peritonitis have been reported.Pancreatitis is a rare cause of chyloperitoneum and in almost all of the cases chylous ascites is discovered some days (or even weeks) after the onset of symptoms of pancreatitis.This is the second case in the literature where the patient presented with acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis,and the presence of chyle within the abdominal cavity was discovered simultaneously with the establishment of the diagnosis of pancreatitis.The patient underwent an exploratory laparotomy for suspected perforated duodenal ulcer,since,due to hypertriglyceridemia,serum amylase values appeared within the normal range.Moreover,abdominal computed tomography imaging was not diagnostic for pancreatitis.Following abdominal lavage and drainage,the patient was successfully treated with total parenteral nutrition and octreotide.

  14. Development of a Junior High School Module in Alcohol Education and Traffic Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Teachers College.

    Five 45-minute teaching units for junior high school students on alcohol education and traffic safety are presented. Lesson I examines alcohol as a drug. Activities include a question-answer survey, a film, and a game. Assignments are a "find the word" game and an evaluation of an advertisement for an alcoholic beverage. Lesson II considers…

  15. Pancreatic Cancer (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Terms of Use ©2016 UpToDate, Inc. Patient information: Pancreatic cancer (Beyond the Basics) Author David P Ryan, MD ... pancreatic juice to the intestines. This type of pancreatic cancer, called "pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma," is discussed in this ...

  16. Alcohol fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This issue is devoted almost entirely to alcohol fuels, the following topics being presented: A History of Alcohol Fuels; In the Midwest - Focus on Alcohol Fuels; Gasohol - A DOE Priority; Alcohol Fuels Potential; Gasohol - The Nutritious Fuel; Energy from Agriculture; Alcohol and the Price of Food; A New Look at Economics and Energy Balance in Alcohol Production; Economics of small-scale alcohol producers; Get the Lead Out with Alcohol; Biomass and the Carbon Dioxide Buildup; Federal Agency Activity in Alcohol Fuels; Congressional Activity in Alchol Fuels; Licensing a Small Still; Funding Sources for Alcohol Facilities; Safety in Alcohol Production; Alcohol Fuels Information; State-by-State Guide to Alcohol Activity; Alcohol Fuels Glossary; Alcohol Fuels and Your Car; Alcohol Fuels Training Grants Progam; Citizen Action Plan for Gasohol; and Alcohol Fuels - a Path to Reconciliation.

  17. Medical management of chronic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dhiraj Yadav; Jonathan E. Clain

    2003-01-01

    慢性胰腺炎的临床表现包括疼痛、脂肪泻和糖尿病.在西方国家,慢性胰腺炎最常见的病因是酗酒.70%以上的病人在就诊时有疼痛的临床表现,而且,这些患者中又有75%以上会在几年之后出现疼痛减轻或完全消失.对于所有的慢性胰腺炎的病人来说,均应排除非胰源性疼痛和胆道梗阻、胰腺假性囊肿等胰腺局部并发症.应建议所有慢性胰腺炎病人戒烟、戒酒.阿片类镇痛剂仅应用于治疗疼痛严重的病人.尽管有报道认为胰酶替代治疗有助于止痛,但是,对于已经确诊的慢性胰腺炎病人来说,该疗法无效.激素类药物进行腹腔神经丛阻滞术可能有助于病人度过剧烈疼痛期.顽固性疼痛是进行胰液引流或胰腺切除的适应证.建议应用适量胰酶替代联合(或不联合)制酸剂治疗营养不良.慢性胰腺炎导致的糖尿病与原发性糖尿病的治疗原则相似.%The clinical presentation of chronic pancreatitis includes pain, steatorrhea and diabetes. The most common etiology in the western world is excess alcohol use. Pain is present in >70% patients at presentation and decreases in intensity or resolves over several years in up to 75% of patients. Non-pancreatic causes of pain and local complications, chiefly pseudocysts and biliary obstruction should be excluded in all patients. All patients should be advised to abstain from alcohol and smoking and opiates should be used only to control severe exacerbations of pain. Although pancreatic enzyme replacement is reported to be useful in the management of pancreatic pain, it is of little or no benefit in patients with established chronic pancreatitis. Celiac plexus block using steroids may be helpful to tide patients over an episode of severe pain. Intractable pain is an indication for surgery that includes pancreatic drainage procedure or pancreatic resection. For control of malabsorption, adequate pancreatic enzyme replacement with or

  18. Prevention of pancreatic cancer by the beta-blocker propranolol

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Wadei, Hussein A.N.; Al-Wadei, Mohammed H.; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2009-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is among the leading causes of cancer deaths and is unresponsive to existing therapy. Smoking and alcohol-induced pancreatitis are among the risk factors for PDAC. We have previously reported that beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) stimulate the proliferation and migration of human PDAC cells in vitro via cAMP-dependent signaling and that the nicotine-derived nitrosamine NNK activates this pathway directly in vitro while additionally stimulating the rele...

  19. Skin signs in acute pancreatitis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Bassi; Gelorma Belmonte; Paola Billi; Angelo Pasquale; Massimo Reta; Paolo Leandri; Francesco Ferrara; Stefania Ghersi; Nicola D’Imperio; Roberto Nardi

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Subcutaneous manifestations of severe acute pancreatitis (Cullen’s sign, Gray- Turner’s sign, Fox’s sign, and Bryant’s sign) are often discussed in journals and textbooks, but seldom observed. Although historically associated with acute pancreatitis, these clinical signs have been described in various other conditions associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage. Case report: We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with no history of alcohol intake, who was admitted for epigast...

  20. Acute Pancreatitis and Splenic Vein Thrombosis due to Hypertriglyceridemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ercan Gündüz; Recep Dursun; Mustafa İçer; Yılmaz Zengin; Cahfer Güloğlu

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a condition characterised by the activation of the normally inactive digestive enzymes due to an etiological factor and digestion of the pancreatic tissues, resulting in extensive inflammation and leading to local, regional, and systemic complications in the organism. It may vary from the mild edematous to the hemorrhagic and severely necrotising form. The most common causes are biliary stones and alcohol abuse. In this case study, we would like to present a patient...

  1. Autoimmune Pancreatitis: A Succinct Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Putra; Xiaoying Liu

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis is a rare type of chronic pancreatitis with characteristic clinical, radiologic, and histopathologic findings. Diagnosis of autoimmune pancreatitis is often challenging due to its low incidence and nonspecific clinical and radiologic findings. Patients with autoimmune pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer share similar clinical presentations, including obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain and weight loss. Due to these overlapping features, autoimmune pancreatitis patients...

  2. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  3. Nutrition treatment of deficiency and malnutrition in chronic pancreatitis: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duggan, SN

    2010-08-01

    Chronic pancreatitis results in exocrine and endocrine dysfunction, affecting normal digestion and absorption of nutrients. In individuals with chronic pancreatitis, nutrition status may be further affected by poor dietary intake, often related to alcoholism. However, some deficiencies may be overlooked, potentially leading to nutrition-related problems with bone health and fatigue. The aim of this article is to describe the deficiencies that occur and to propose an evidence-based algorithm for the nutrition assessment and treatment of patients with chronic pancreatitis.

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging for local complications of acute pancreatitis: A pictorial review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a common disease characterized by sudden upper abdominal pain and vomiting. Alcoholism and choledocholithiasis are the most common factors for this disease. The choice of treatment for acute pancreatitis might be affected by local complications, such as local hemorrhage in or around the pancreas, and peripancreatic infection or pseudoaneurysm. Diagnostic imaging modalities for acute pancreatitis have a significant role in confirming the diagnosis of the disease, helping detect the exte...

  5. Smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis among women and men: a population-based cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Kristiansen, Louise; Becker, Ulrik;

    2009-01-01

    . Information on incident cases of acute and chronic pancreatitis were obtained by record linkage with the Danish national registries. RESULTS: A total of 235 cases of pancreatitis occurred during follow-up. A dose-response association between smoking and risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis was observed in......BACKGROUND: Alcohol and gallstone disease are the most established risk factors for pancreatitis. Smoking is rarely considered to be a cause despite the fact that a few studies have indicated the opposite. We aimed to assess the independent effects of smoking on the risk of pancreatitis. METHODS...... both men and women. For example, the hazard ratio of developing pancreatitis was 2.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-4.7) among women and 2.6 (95% CI, 1.1-6.2) among men who smoked 15 to 24 grams of tobacco per day. Alcohol intake was associated with an increased risk of pancreatitis (hazard ratio...

  6. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maruyama, Masahiro; Watanabe, Takayuki; Kanai, Keita; Oguchi, Takaya; Asano, Jumpei; Ito, Tetsuya; Ozaki, Yayoi; Muraki, Takashi; Hamano, Hideaki; ARAKURA, Norikazu; Kawa, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into o...

  7. ACUTE PANCREATITIS - THE SEVERE FORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Grigoras

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease. Frequently it is a challenging condition for the surgeon and for the intensive care physician, taking into account that etiology is sometimes obscure, the pathophysiology is complex and incompletely understood, the timing of surgical treatment is still under debate and the general treatment is mostly supportive. The incidence is about 30 – 50 / 100.000 / year. In 80% of cases the disease is associated with interstitial edema, mild infiltration with inflammatory cells and intra- or peripancreatic fat necrosis. Evolution is benign and self-limited with proper treatment. The severe form occurs less frequent (15 - 20%, results in long lasting hospitalization and is associated with high mortality (30 - 40%, due to infected necrosis and multiple organ failure. Alcoholism and biliary disease account for 80% of cases. Rare etiologies of disease include metabolic factors (hypercalcemia, hyperlipoproteinemia, drug ingestion, obstructive factors (abdominal tumors, trauma, endoscopic retrograde cholecistopancreatography, and s.o., infections (viral, parasitic and hemodynamic factors. Postoperative pancreatitis is a complication after major abdominal surgery (abdominal aorta aneurism repair, extensive upper abdominal surgery, hepatic or cardiac transplant, so.. The common pathophysiological mechanism is pancreatic hypoperfusion. Acute pancreatitis is not a stable disease, being characterized by time-dependent stages with specific morphologic and clinical patterns. The terminology used to designate these stages is stated in the Ulm classification. Since the consensus Conference in Atlanta (1992 the severe form of acute pancreatitis is defined by the presence of organ dysfunction/failure or by the presence of local complications. The initiating event is the premature zymogene activation and the impairment of the exocytosis process with local consequences (ongoing tissue necrosis and general consequences

  8. A Rare and Unexpected Side-Effect of Cannabis Use: Abdominal Pain due to Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet Husamettin Akkucuk; Mustafa Erbayrak

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a frequently encountered disorder in patients presenting to emergency units. Biliary system disorders, alcohol consumption, infections, and drugs are among the causes of acute pancreatitis. However, it is sometimes difficult to determine the etiology of this disorder, particularly if the patient does not wish to disclose his consumption of cannabis, the use of which is illegal.

  9. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  10. Pancreatic blood flow in experimental acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The etiology and pathogenesis of acute necrotizing hemorrhagic pancreatitis remain controversial. Recent work has suggested that an early fall in pancreatic blood flow, causing ischemia, may be the initiating factor. Using an established rat model of hemorrhagic pancreatitis and the fractional indicator distribution technique with 86RbCl, pancreatic blood flow and tissue perfusion have been measured at various times in the condition. Six groups of ten rats were studied: control sham operation and pancreatitis groups were sacrificed at 1, 6, and 24 hr. Pancreatic blood flow (% of cardiac output) and perfusion (blood flow/g tissue) were measured. Blood flow was increased by a maximum of 53% at 1 hr (P less than 0.001) and remained elevated for 24 hr, and perfusion was increased by a maximum of 70% (P less than 0.001) at 1 hr and remained elevated at 6 hr. Pancreatic perfusion declines after 6 hr due to increasing gland edema. The results demonstrate a significant increase in pancreatic blood flow and perfusion in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis, suggesting a primary inflammatory response, and refute the ischemic etiological theory

  11. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic......: Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between...

  12. The aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis over time in a hospital in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla; Bendtsen, Flemming; Matzen, Peter;

    2010-01-01

    : Gallstone disease significantly (p = 0.04) increased as the cause of acute pancreatitis over the 22-year period, while alcohol remained the major cause of chronic pancreatitis. The validity of the diagnoses for patients with acute pancreatitis varied between 51% and 73%, and for chronic pancreatitis between......INTRODUCTION: The change in aetiology over time of acute and chronic pancreatitis has been sparsely described, as has also the validity of the diagnostic codes. The aim of the study was 1) to clarify whether the aetiology of acute and chronic pancreatitis changed during the period 1983-2005, and 2......) to validate the diagnostic codes over time for acute and chronic pancreatitis registered in the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) in the same period. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All admissions at Hvidovre Hospital coded in the NPR in 1983, 1994 and 2005 with a diagnosis of either acute or chronic...

  13. CFTR: A New Horizon in the Pathomechanism and Treatment of Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegyi, Péter; Wilschanski, Michael; Muallem, Shmuel; Lukacs, Gergely L; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós; Uc, Aliye; Gray, Michael A; Rakonczay, Zoltán; Maléth, József

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel that conducts chloride and bicarbonate ions across epithelial cell membranes. Mutations in the CFTR gene diminish the ion channel function and lead to impaired epithelial fluid transport in multiple organs such as the lung and the pancreas resulting in cystic fibrosis. Heterozygous carriers of CFTR mutations do not develop cystic fibrosis but exhibit increased risk for pancreatitis and associated pancreatic damage characterized by elevated mucus levels, fibrosis, and cyst formation. Importantly, recent studies demonstrated that pancreatitis causing insults, such as alcohol, smoking, or bile acids, strongly inhibit CFTR function. Furthermore, human studies showed reduced levels of CFTR expression and function in all forms of pancreatitis. These findings indicate that impairment of CFTR is critical in the development of pancreatitis; therefore, correcting CFTR function could be the first specific therapy in pancreatitis. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the field and discuss new possibilities for the treatment of pancreatitis. PMID:26856995

  14. Pancreatitis-imaging approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kiran; K; Busireddy; Mamdoh; AlObaidy; Miguel; Ramalho; Janaka; Kalubowila; Liu; Baodong; Ilaria; Santagostino; Richard; C; Semelka

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatitis is defined as the inflammation of the pancreas and considered the most common pancreatic disease in children and adults. Imaging plays a significant role in the diagnosis, severity assessment, recognition of complications and guiding therapeutic interventions. In the setting of pancreatitis, wider availability and good image quality make multi-detector contrastenhanced computed tomography(MD-CECT) the most used imaging technique. However, magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) offers diagnostic capabilities similar to those of CT, with additional intrinsic advantages including lack of ionizing radiation and exquisite soft tissue characterization. This article reviews the proposed definitions of revised Atlanta classification for acute pancreatitis, illustrates a wide range of morphologic pancreatic parenchymal and associated peripancreatic changes for different types of acute pancreatitis. It also describes the spectrum of early and late chronic pancreatitis imaging findings and illustrates some of the less common types of chronic pancreatitis, with special emphasis on the role of CT and MRI.

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3 Description: Stage III pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas, common hepatic artery, and portal vein. Also shown ... and superior mesenteric artery. Stage III pancreatic cancer. Cancer ... near the pancreas. These include the superior mesenteric artery, celiac axis, ...

  16. Surgery for pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007649.htm Surgery for pancreatic cancer To use the sharing features on this page, ... surgery are used in the surgical treatment of pancreatic cancer. Whipple procedure: This is the most common surgery ...

  17. Acute Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a feeding tube or an IV to prevent malnutrition and improve healing. Does my child have to ... intestines. Can my child die from acute pancreatitis? Death from acute pancreatitis is quite rare in children– ...

  18. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    MUNIRAJ, T.; Chari, S.T.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is complex. Diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is present in more than 2/3rd of pancreatic cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have consistently shown a modest increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes, with an inverse relationship to duration of disease. Additionally, recent studies suggest that anti-diabetic medications may modulate the risk of pancreatic cancer in type 2 diabetes. Subjects >50 years of age ...

  19. Impaired glucose tolerance in acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Masamune, Atsushi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory disease of the exocrine pancreas. In spite of the pivotal role of the endocrine pancreas in glucose metabolism, the impact of impaired glucose tolerance on AP has not been fully elucidated. A meta-analysis of seven observational studies showed that type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) was associated with an increased risk of AP. The increased risk of AP shown in the meta-analysis was independent of hyperlipidemia, alcohol use and gallstones. Anti-diab...

  20. Acute chylous peritonitis due to acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous ascites formation presenting as peritonitis (acute chylous peritonitis) in a patient suffering from acute pancreatitis due to hypertriglyceridemia and alcohol abuse. The development of chylous ascites is usually a chronic process mostly involving malignancy, trauma or surgery, and symptoms arise as a result of progressive abdominal distention. However, when accumulation of “chyle” occurs rapidly, the patient may present with signs of peritonitis. Preoperative...

  1. Pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver Pseudoquiste pancreático de localización hepática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Les

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic pseudocyst is a common complication of acute and chronic pancreatitis. Extrapancreatic locations of pancreatic pseudocyst in the liver, pleura, mediastinum, or pelvis have been described. However, a pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver is an infrequent condition. We present the case of a 46-year-old man with pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver secondary to chronic alcoholic pancreatitis. During admission, the patient underwent an abdominal CT scan that showed a mass located in the head and body of the pancreas, as well as a thrombosis of the splenic vein. A percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy of the pancreas was obtained under CT guidance, which showed no tumoral involvement. Fourty-eight hours after the procedure the patient developed abdominal pain and elevated serum amylase levels. A pancreatic MRI exam showed two pancreatic pseudocysts, one of them located in the left hepatic lobe, the other in the pancreatic tail. Chronic pancreatitis signs also were found. Enteral nutrition via a nasojejunal tube was administered for two weeks. The disappearance of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the pancreatic tail, and a subtotal resolution of the pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver were observed. To date twenty-seven cases of pancreatic pseudocyst located in the liver have been published, most of them managed with percutaneous or surgical drainage.

  2. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Dong Jin; Ha, Hyun Kwon; Lee, Yong Suk; Lee, Jin Hwa; Kim, Pyo Nyun; Lee, Moon Gyu; Auh, Yong Ho [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-11-01

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  3. Mass-forming chronic pancreatitis : CT and ERCP features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. CT and ERCP features were assessed in 13 patients suffering from mass-forming chronic pancreatitis. Diagnosis was on the basis of surgery (n=5), percutaneous needle biopsy (n=3), and clinical follow-up (n=5). Contrast-enhanced CT was available for all patients : five underwent dynamic study and ERCP was performed in 12. On CT and ERCP, both groups were evaluated with regard to the presence and degree of pancreatic ductal dilatation (greater or less than 50 % of total gland width), double duct sign, enhancement pattern, pancreatic parenchymal calcification (site and distribution pattern), mass identification, the direction of infiltration, pancreatic parenchymal atrophy, configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic and common bile duct, lymphadenopathy, vascular encasement, and vascular engorgement or increased collateral vessels in the peripancreatic space. Seven of 13 patients had suffered chronic alcoholism. Serum CA19-9 levels were normal in all patients except one. Common CT and ERCP findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis included pancreatic duct dilatation (92.3%), double duct sign (69.2%), inhomogeneous enhancement of the mass (69.2%), and the presence of calcification (61.5%). Patterns of pancreatic duct dilation were irregular in five patients (38.4%) and smooth in three (23.1%). In all patients, duct dilatation was less than 50% of total gland width. Enhancement patterns of the pancreatic mass were inhomogeneous (69.2%), a nonenhancing low attenuation mass (15.3%), and homogeneous enhancement (15.3%). Configuration at the site of obstruction in the pancreatic duct was abrupt termination in two patients (15.4%) and smooth termination in two (15.4%). The common bile duct teminated abruptly in three patients (23.1%), and in four (30.8%) smooth narrowing was abserved. Common findings of mass-forming chronic pancreatitis were duct dilatation of less than 50% of total

  4. Biomarkers for pancreatic carcinogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hustinx, S.R.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. Most pancreatic cancers (approximately 85%) are diagnosed at a late, incurable stage. The poor prognosis and late presentation of pancreatic cancer patients underscore the importance of early detection, which is the sine qua non for the fight against pancr

  5. Stages of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  6. Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... factors can affect a person’s chance of getting cancer of the pancreas. Most of these are risk factors for exocrine ... Chronic pancreatitis, a long-term inflammation of the pancreas, is linked with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (especially in smokers), but most people with pancreatitis ...

  7. Enzymatic Debridement in Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Cakir, Murat; Tekin, Ahmet; Kucukkartallar, Tevfik; Vatansev, Husamettin; Kartal, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Multiple organ failure and pancreatic necrosis are the factors that determine prognosis in acute pancreatitis attacks. We investigated the effects of collagenase on the debridement of experimental pancreatic necrosis. The study covered 4 groups; each group had 10 rats. Group I was the necrotizing pancreatitis group. Group II was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge by isotonic irrigation following necrotizing pancreatitis. Group III was the collagenase group with pancreatic loge followi...

  8. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Whitney Y; Abreu Lanfranco, Odaliz

    2014-11-15

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been considered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are associated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pancreatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal relationship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classification systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continuously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifactorial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different approach. In this article, we review the potential mechanisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and provide the perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pancreatitis with limited data. PMID:25400984

  9. Contemporary review of drug-induced pancreatitis: A different perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Whitney; Y; Hung; Odaliz; Abreu; Lanfranco

    2014-01-01

    Although gallstone and alcohol use have been consid-ered the most common causes of acute pancreatitis, hundreds of frequently prescribed medications are as-sociated with this disease state. The true incidence is unknown since there are few population based studies available. The knowledge of drug induced acute pan-creatitis is limited by the availability and the quality of the evidence as the majority of data is extrapolated from case reports. Establishing a definitive causal rela-tionship between a drug and acute pancreatitis poses a challenge to clinicians. Several causative agent classifi-cation systems are often used to identify the suspected agents. They require regular updates since new drug induced acute pancreatitis cases are reported continu-ously. In addition, infrequently prescribed medications and herbal medications are often omitted. Furthermore, identification of drug induced acute pancreatitis with new medications often requires accumulation of post market case reports. The unrealistic expectation for a comprehensive list of medications and the multifacto-rial nature of acute pancreatitis call for a different ap-proach. In this article, we review the potential mecha-nisms of drug induced acute pancreatitis and providethe perspective of deductive reasoning in order to allow clinicians to identify potential drug induced acute pan-creatitis with limited data.

  10. Alterations in Plasma Amino Acid Levels in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banavara Narasimhamurthy Girish

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Dietary proteins and amino acids can modulate pancreatic function. Objective Our aim was to estimate the levels of plasma amino acids in chronic pancreatitis patients and study their relationship with disease characteristics as well as exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Patients One hundred and seventy-five consecutive adult patients with chronic pancreatitis: 84 patients with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and 91 patients with tropical chronic pancreatitis. One hundred and thirteen healthy controls were also studied. Design Prospective study. Main outcome measures Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Plasma-free amino acid levels were estimated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Polyclonal antibody ELISA was used to assess pancreatic fecal elastase-1. Results The majority of the plasma free amino acid levels decreased in chronic pancreatitis patients whereas glutamate, glycine, proline and lysine were elevated as compared to the controls. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the decrease in branched chain amino acid concentration was significantly associated with the presence of diabetes and low fecal elastase-1. In addition, a significant positive correlation was observed between branched chain amino acids and pancreatic elastase-1 (rs=0.724, P

  11. 姜黄素对长期摄入酒精和不同量蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤的保护作用研究%Effects of Curcumin on Pancreatic Acinar Cell Injury in Rats with Long-term Alcohol Intake and Different Amount of Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周旭春

    2011-01-01

    目的:研究姜黄素对长期摄入酒精和不同量蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤的保护作用.方法:实验分为5组,即正常对照(正常饲养)、高蛋白、低蛋白、高蛋白+姜黄素、低蛋白+姜黄素(以25%酒精代替饮水自由饮用,高、低蛋白质占总热量供给的32%、6%,喂饲6个月)组.在光镜和电镜下观察大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞结构变化,用比色法检测胰腺组织匀浆淀粉酶和脂肪酶的含量,TUNEL法检测腺泡细胞凋亡情况,免疫组化检测胰腺组织切片中环氧化酶-2(COX-2)的变化.结果:与高、低蛋白组比较,高、低蛋白+姜黄素组大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞髓样结构减少,线粒体肿胀减轻;淀粉酶和脂肪酶含量均显著升高(P<0.05);胰腺腺泡细胞凋亡显著减少(P<0.05);COX-2的表达降低.结论:姜黄素可预防摄入酒精联合过高或过低蛋白质的大鼠胰腺腺泡细胞损伤,延缓酒精性胰腺损伤的进程.%OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective effects of curcumin on pancreatic acinar cell injury in rats with long-term alcohol intake and protein consumption. METHODS: Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups, I.e. Normal control group (the group fed with normal feed) ,high protein group, low protein group, high protein+curcumin group, low protein+curcumin group (those groups fed with diet containing 25% ethanol instead of drinking water for 6 months). High and low protein accounted for 32% and 6 % of total heat quantity. The structure change of pancreatic acinar cell was observed under light microscope and electron microscope. The contents of amylase and lipase in pancreatic tissue homogenate were determined by colorimetry. Apoptosis and expression of cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) in acinar cell were detected by TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with no application of curcumin, myelin figure and enlarged mitochondria were reduced in curcumin treatment groups. Lipase and amylase

  12. PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF CT IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanand S .

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of the pancreas was far better by CT than b y ultrasound. Ultrasound had certain limitation. Due to bowel gas the pancreas may not be visualized. Extra pancreatic spread of inflammation and vascular complications was not always picked up by Ultrasonography. These limitations were overcome with the u se of CT which yielded more diagnostic information in the evaluation of acute pancreatitis. CT is a confirmative investigation in diagnosis and staging of acute pancreatitis. MCTSI is a very useful tool for the screening of patients with acute pancreatitis for the classification of severity accurately and to predict the clinical outcome. OBJECTIVES OF STUDY: To determine the value of computed tomography in evaluation of early diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. To evaluate the complications using computed tom ography severity index. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was conducted on 100 patients with clinical suspicion of acute pancreatitis, altered biochemical parameters (Serum amylase, Serum lipase in favor of acute pancreatitis, ultrasonography suggestive of acute pancreatitis and complications known case of chronic pancreatitis with features of acute symptoms who were referred to the department of Radiodiagnosis, Basaveshwar teaching & General Hospital, Kalaburagi. Before evaluating a patient by CT imaging, i nformed consent was obtained from the patient or guardian. The patient were informed about the radiation exposure in the examination. CT was carried out using Philips 6 slice scanner. Scan was obtained with both plain and contrast study. RESULT: 100 patien ts were included in the study. 83% patients were males and 17% patients were females. Majority of patients belonged to 31 - 40 yrs. of age group. Alcohol was the most common cause of acute pancreatitis. 73 patients had positive ultrasound finding while CT wa s positive in all cases. According to, MCTSI 63 patients had moderate, 26 patients had mild and 11 patients had severe

  13. Lesson on Demand. Lesson Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Sue

    This lesson plan helps students understand the role consumer demand plays in the market system, i.e., how interactions in the marketplace help determine pricing. Students will participate in an activity that demonstrates the concepts of demand, demand schedule, demand curve, and the law of demand. The lesson plan provides student objectives;…

  14. Primary Pancreatic Choriocarcinoma Presenting as Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biggs Saravanan Ramachandran

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancers can present with pancreatitis or its complications. Pancreatic choriocarcinoma is an extremely rare disease to involve pancreas. Case report A 27-year-old married woman presented to our facility with abdominal pain and fullness of 20-day duration. She was clinically diagnosed as acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst as a complication. Serum amylase was elevated with CT scan of abdomen showing a cystic lesion involving the pancreas. We approached the cyst with endoscopic ultrasonography and cyst fluid was aspirated and analyzed. Cyst fluid amylase was elevated and cytology revealed germ cell tumor. Serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin was elevated. She had a swelling over the jaw which also revealed choriocarcinoma in histopathological examination. Patient was started with chemotherapy. Conclusion We report this case of pancreatic choriocarcinoma due to its extreme rarity and the diagnostic dilemma it posed.

  15. Pancreatitis. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acute and chronic pancreatitis are becoming increasingly more severe diseases in the western world with far-reaching consequences for the individual patient as well as the socioeconomic situation. This article gives an overview of the contribution of radiological imaging to the diagnostics and therapy of both forms of the disease. Acute pancreatitis can be subdivided into severe (20 %) and mild manifestations. The diagnostics should be performed with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing necrosis or potential infections only in severe forms of pancreatitis. In chronic pancreatitis transabdominal ultrasound should initially be adequate for assessment of the pancreas. For the differential diagnosis between pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis, MRI with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) followed by an endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration is the method of choice. For the primary diagnosis for acute and chronic pancreatitis ultrasound examination is the modality of first choice followed by radiological CT and MRI with MRCP examinations. (orig.)

  16. Acute pancreatitis at the beginning of the 21st century: The state of the art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alfredo F Tonsi; Matilde Bacchion; Stefano Crippa; Giuseppe Malleo; Claudio Bassi

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas which can lead to a systemic inflammatory response syndrome with significant morbidity and mortality in 20% of patients. Gallstones and alcohol consumption are the most frequent causes of pancreatitis in adults. The treatment of mild acute pancreatitis is conservative and supportive; however severe episodes characterized by necrosis of the pancreatic tissue may require surgical intervention. Advanced understanding of the pathology, and increased interest in assessment of disease severity are the cornerstones of future management strategies of this complex and heterogeneous disease in the 21st century.

  17. Effect of somatostatin on the sphincter of Oddi in patients with acute non-biliary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, K.; Lo, G.; Cheng, J; Fu, M; Wang, E; Chan, H.; Wang, Y.; P. Hsu; Lin, C.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Somatostatin has been used to prevent pancreatitis after endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography but its effect on acute non-biliary pancreatitis is still unclear.
AIM—The purpose of this study was to evaluate the function of the sphincter of Oddi (SO) and the effect of somatostatin on patients with non-biliary pancreatitis.
METHODS—Twenty patients (18 males, two females) with acute pancreatitis (alcoholic 18, idiopathic two) received SO manometry within one week after admis...

  18. Significance of CT severity index in acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ho; Ahn, In Oak; Kim, Young Mi; Na, Jae Boem; Chung, Sung Hoon; You, Jin Jong [Gyeongsang National Univ. College of Medicine, Chinju (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Se June [Inchon Christian Hospital, Inchon (Korea, Republic of); Song, Ik Hoon [Masan Samsung Hospital, Masan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To assess the usefulness of a CT severity index(CTSI) for the evaluation of acute pancreatitis and to correlate it with clinical findings. We retrospectively evaluated contrast enhanced CT in 34 patients with acute pancreatitis. They were categorized into low-score(0-2), middle-socre(3-6), and high-score(7-10) groups according to CTSI points, and those groups were correlated with duration of fasting period, days in hospital morbidity and mortality. We attempted to determine the differences in CTSI between pancreatitis caused by alcohol and by biliary tract disease. Of 34 patients, 11 were placed in the low-score group, 19 in the middle-score group, and 4 in the high-score group. The patients in the middle-score group experienced longer fasting period and stayed longer in hospital than those in the low-score group(p < .05 and p= .08, respectively). Morbidity was 0% in the low-score group, 37% in the middle-score group and 50% in the high-score group. Mortality occurred in two patients in high-score group, only. Alcohol-induced pancreatitis generally showed a higher CTSI and more severe clinical course than pancreatitis caused by biliary tract disease. In the evaluation of acute pancreatitis, CTSI can be a useful predictor of its prognosis.

  19. Significance of CT severity index in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of a CT severity index(CTSI) for the evaluation of acute pancreatitis and to correlate it with clinical findings. We retrospectively evaluated contrast enhanced CT in 34 patients with acute pancreatitis. They were categorized into low-score(0-2), middle-socre(3-6), and high-score(7-10) groups according to CTSI points, and those groups were correlated with duration of fasting period, days in hospital morbidity and mortality. We attempted to determine the differences in CTSI between pancreatitis caused by alcohol and by biliary tract disease. Of 34 patients, 11 were placed in the low-score group, 19 in the middle-score group, and 4 in the high-score group. The patients in the middle-score group experienced longer fasting period and stayed longer in hospital than those in the low-score group(p < .05 and p= .08, respectively). Morbidity was 0% in the low-score group, 37% in the middle-score group and 50% in the high-score group. Mortality occurred in two patients in high-score group, only. Alcohol-induced pancreatitis generally showed a higher CTSI and more severe clinical course than pancreatitis caused by biliary tract disease. In the evaluation of acute pancreatitis, CTSI can be a useful predictor of its prognosis

  20. Alcoholic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  1. Insulinoma presenting as alcoholic stupor.

    OpenAIRE

    Dandona, P; Fonseca, V A; Mikhailidis, D P; Menon, R. K.

    1987-01-01

    We report a case of prolonged loss of consciousness due to hypoglycaemia following ethanol abuse in a non-diabetic. The patient also reported symptoms compatible with hypoglycaemia following heavy manual work. Further investigations revealed a pancreatic insulinoma, which was successfully removed surgically. The patient remains asymptomatic 18 months later, despite occasional episodes of ethanol abuse. This case illustrates how heavy exercise and/or alcohol abuse can aggravate spontaneous hyp...

  2. Therapy of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult diseases to cure. Japan pancreas society guidelines for management of pancreatic cancer indicate therapeutic algorithm according to the clinical stage. For locally limited pancreatic cancer (cStage I, II, III in Japanese classification system), surgical resection is recommended, however prognosis is still poor. Major randomized controlled trials of resected pancreatic cancer indicates that adjuvant chemotherapy is superior to observation and gemcitabine is superior to 5-fluorouracil (FU). For locally advanced resectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in Japanese classification system (JCS)), we perform neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Phase I study established a recommended dose of 800 mg gemcitabine and radiation dose of 36 Gy. For locally advanced nonresectable pancreatic cancer (cStage IVa in JCS), chemoradiotherapy followed by chemotherapy is recommended. Although pancreatic cancer is chemotherapy resistant tumor, systemic chemotherapy is recommended for metastatic pancreatic cancer (cStage IVb in JCS). Single-agent gemcitabine is the standard first line agent for the treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer. Meta-analysis of chemotherapy showed possibility of survival benefit of gemcitabine combination chemotherapy over gemcitabine alone. We hope gemcitabine combination chemotherapy or molecular targeted therapy will improve prognosis of pancreatic cancer in the future. (author)

  3. Retrospective analysis of 88 patients with pancreatic duct stone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Shui Li; Zhao-Da Zhang; Yong Tang; Rong Jiang

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Pancreatic duct stone is a rare disease, but there appears to be a rising trend in its incidence in recent years. Its pathogenesis remains unknown. The causes, diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic duct stone are reviewed through a retrospective analysis of the cases treated in our hospital. METHODS:The medical records of 88 patients with pancreatic duct stone treated in West China Hospital, Sichuan University from January 1, 1998 to November 30, 2004 were analyzed retrospectively in terms of clinical characteristics, diagnosis and treatment. RESULTS:Epigastric pain was the most common symptom in the 88 patients with an average age of 45.44±6.72 years. Various other symptoms were also observed. Eighty-one patients were subjected to B-ultrasonography, 51 to CT, and 47 to magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP). Fifty-six patients (63.64%) were operated on, 25 (28.41%) were treated with Chinese and Western medicine, and 7 (7.95%) abandoned treatment. Chronic pancreatitis was pathologically conifrmed in all patients undergoing operation. CONCLUSIONS: B-ultrasonography is the ifrst choice to check for pancreatic duct stone, while MRCP proves instructively useful for the diagnosis and treatment. Chronic pancreatitis is the most important cause of pancreatic duct stone, but whether there is not a direct correlation between stone formation and alcohol abuse needs further study in China. Surgery is the most curative method for pancreatic duct stone patients with severe symptoms or suspected pancreatic carcinoma, while individual treatment is emphasized, and microtraumatic surgery may be a developing option for treating pancreatic stone.

  4. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2A Description: Stage IIA pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and duodenum. The bile duct and pancreatic duct are also shown. Stage IIA pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby tissue and organs ...

  5. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 2B

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2B Description: Stage IIB pancreatic cancer; drawing shows cancer in the pancreas and in nearby lymph nodes. Also shown are the bile duct, pancreatic duct, and duodenum. Stage IIB pancreatic cancer. Cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes and ...

  6. Pancreatic Panniculitis: A rare manifestation of Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Patel

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic panniculitis is a very rare complication associated with pancreatic disease and perhaps even a presage to pancreatic pathology. Case report We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a 61 year old patient who was treated for sudden onset of abdominal pain associated with nausea and vomiting secondary to acute pancreatitis of unknown etiology. He subsequently developed skin lesions consistent with pancreatic panniculitis which gradually improved after resolution of his acute condition and treatment with topical steroid cream. Conclusion We discuss and review the literature along with highlighting for the readers the important clinical and histopathologic features of acute pancreatitis associated pancreatic panniculitis.

  7. Hereditary Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Ashraf Haddad; Kowdley, Gopal C; Timothy M. Pawlik; Cunningham, Steven C.

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary etiologies of pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers are increasingly recognized. An estimated >10% of pancreatic and increasing number of hepatobiliary cancers are hereditary. The cumulative risk of hereditary pancreatic cancer ranges from measurable but negligible in cystic fibrosis to a sobering 70% in cases of hereditary pancreatitis. Candidates for pancreatic cancer surveillance are those with a risk pancreatic cancer estimated to be >10-fold that of the normal population. Scree...

  8. Advances in the etiology of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Aghdassi, Ali A; Budde, Christoph; Nitsche, Claudia; Sauter, Gabriele; Persike, Maria; Günther, Annett; Simon, Peter; Weiss, F Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the past, chronic pancreatitis has been regarded as a fairly uniform and largely untreatable disorder that most commonly affects patients who both lack gainful employment or adequate insurance coverage and have a tendency to smoke and drink. Large clinical trials suggest that this perception is not only misguided and discriminatory but also not based on facts. We forgot that the perception of chronic liver disease was similar before World War II, and just like liver cirrhosis the fibrosis and cirrhosis of the pancreas--i.e. chronic pancreatitis--is the end result of a range of environmental, inflammatory, infectious and genetic disorders. A growing number of these have only recently been recognized as a distinct entity and several of which are becoming truly treatable. A large proportion of the risk for developing pancreatitis is conveyed by genetic risk factors, and we estimate that less than half of those have been identified so far. The same holds true for protective factors that can prevent pancreatitis, even in the face of excessive alcohol abuse. Various gene mutations and polymorphisms appear to determine an individual's susceptibility for developing pancreatic disease, for the severity of the disease, and for the disease progression. The spectrum of genotype/phenotype associations ranges from straightforward autosomal dominant traits with near-complete penetrance, as for the most common mutations in the cationic trypsinogen gene (PRSS1), to moderate risks factors without mendelian inheritance patterns, as for SPINK1 and CFTR mutations, to very subtle risk associations and disease modifiers that can only be identified in large cohort studies, as for the chymotrypsin C, calcium-sensing receptor and the anionic trypsin (PRSS2) mutations. Only a better understanding of the disease mechanisms that underlie these changes will make an individualized therapy of pancreatic disorders a realistic option. PMID:20814206

  9. Selected medical conditions and risk of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Sara H

    2012-01-01

    We review the current evidence for associations of several medical conditions with risk of pancreatic cancer, including allergies, pancreatitis, gall bladder disease, cholecystectomy, ulcers, gastrectomy, appendectomy, and tonsillectomy. There are consistent findings of reduced risk associated with presence of self-reported allergies, particularly hay fever but not asthma; data on other allergies are limited and inconclusive. Several studies provide evidence that patients with pancreatic cancer are more likely than comparison groups to report pancreatitis. Those studies that investigated the time between onset of pancreatitis and diagnosis of pancreatic cancer found that risk estimates declined with longer periods of time; however, increased risks were noted for long-term pancreatitis, indicating that this condition is both a risk factor and a sign of early disease. Increased risk was reported in association with cholelithiasis, but the few studies that considered time before diagnosis of cancer did not find increased risk for cholelithiasis diagnosed in the more distant past. There is weak evidence that cholecystectomy 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis is related to risk, but this is based on only a few studies. There is no consistent association between ulcers and risk, while gastrectomy may increase risk. Overall, study of these conditions, particularly those that are rare, presents methodologic challenges. Time between diagnoses is likely to be important but is not considered in most studies. Lack of adequate control in several studies for risk factors such as smoking and heavy alcohol use also makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions about these results. PMID:22162233

  10. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Presented as Acute Pancreatitis. Case Report and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulzahra Hussain; Shamsi El-Hasani; Ali Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Context Small cell carcinoma of the lung is an aggressive cancer with gloomy prognosis. Links to acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report We are reporting a 53-year-old patient who was admitted because of acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones, alcohol abuse, medications or any other predisposition for acute pancreatitis. Further investigations of blood, CT of chest abdomen and neck and ultrasound scan of abdomen, bone marrow and neck lymph node biopsies confirmed advan...

  11. Emphysematous Pancreatitis. Radiological Curiosity or a Cause for Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Dev Wig

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Emphysematous pancreatitis is a rare, potentially fatal variant of severe acute pancreatitis with gas in the pancreatic bed. There are isolated case reports describing this condition. Objective This report summarizes our experience with the management of this condition in order to compare its clinical characteristics, microbiological and radiological features, surgical management and the outcome of patients with emphysematous pancreatitis and nonemphysematous infected pancreatic necrosis. Setting The hospital records of the patients who underwent necrosectomy for infected pancreatic necrosis between 2002 and 2006 were reviewed. Patients Fifty-seven patients were identified: 11 of them (19.3% had gas in and around the pancreas on computed tomography and 46 (80.7% had non-emphysematous infected pancreatic necrosis. Main outcome measures The clinical characteristics and the hospital course of the two groups of patients were compared. Results The mean age of 11 patients with emphysematous pancreatitis was 34.0±11.5 years and alcohol was the most common etiology (54.5%. The median computed tomography severity index was 10. All 11 patients with emphysematous pancreatitis had growth of organisms on culture of fine needle aspiration or pancreatic tissue obtained at surgery, with Escherichia coli in all of them. Polymicrobial infection was seen in 5 (45.5% of them. In comparing patients having emphysematous pancreatitis with those having non-emphysematous infected necrosis, there was no significant difference in the severity of the disease (P=0.319, time to surgical intervention (P=0.553, incidence of organ failure (P=0.297, hospital stay (P=0.580 or mortality rate (P=0.739. The total number of locoregional complications was significantly higher in patients with emphysematous pancreatitis (P=0.049. However, when compared separately, the incidence of enteric fistula, bleeding, intraabdominal collections and wound complications were similar in the

  12. Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes in a young Ugandan patient, a rare form of secondary diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige Davis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes is an infrequent type of secondary diabetes due to chronic tropical non alcoholic calcific pancreatitis. It has been widely described exclusively in developing tropical countries. A diagnosis is made basing on the presence of abdominal pain, presence of pancreatic calcifications, steatorrhoea, and diabetes mellitus. Case presentation We report a case of a 20 year old Ugandan female patient who presented with features of chronic tropical calcific pancreatitis complicated by diabetes mellitus, oedematous malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. Conclusion This case report demonstrates that fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes still exists in developing countries like Uganda. Clinicians in such settings should possess a high clinical suspicion of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes especially in presence of malnutrition. Challenges of management of such patients in resource limited settings are comprehensively discussed in the review of literature.

  13. Pancreatic Enzyme Supplementation in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    R. V. Patankar; R. Chand; Johnson, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    This study evaluates the effect of oral pancreatic enzyme supplements on pain, analgesic requirement and the incidence of complications in patients with acute pancreatitis. This double blind, prospectively randomised placebo controlled study included 23 patients. Pain was monitored using a visual analogue scale; the analgesic requirement was assessed with a numerical score. No significant differences were noted between the median (range) pain scores of patients who received placebo: 22 (17.1–...

  14. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Pitchumoni, Capecomorin S; Yegneswaran, Balaji

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy, occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies. The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated wit...

  15. Smoking and Pancreatic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Smoking is a major risk factor for chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. However, the mechanisms through which it causes the diseases remain unknown. In the present manuscript we reviewed the latest knowledge gained on the effect of cigarette smoke and smoking compounds on cell signaling pathways mediating both diseases. We also reviewed the effect of smoking on the pancreatic cell microenvironment including inflammatory cells and stellate cells.

  16. Laparoscopy in pancreatic tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Shrikhande S; Barreto S; Shukla P.

    2007-01-01

    Recently, increasing number of manuscripts - original articles and case reports have attempted to provide evidence of the forays of minimal access surgery into pancreatic diseases. Many, based on the lack of Level I evidence, still believe that laparoscopy in pancreatic surgery is experimental. This article attempts to look into data exploring the existing use of minimally invasive surgery in pancreatic disease to answer a vital question - what does the evidence say on the current status of l...

  17. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Donghui

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer after cigarette smoking and obesity. Epidemiological investigations have found that long-term type 2 diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.0-fold increase in the risk of pancreatic cancer. A causal relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is also supported by findings from prediagnostic evaluations of glucose and insulin levels in prospective studies. Insulin resistance and associat...

  18. Pancreatic Exocrine Function Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Goff, John S.

    1982-01-01

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and par...

  19. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  20. Idiosyncratic Pancreatitis Associated with Perindopril

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Famularo

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors is not associated with an increased risk of acute pancreatitis [1] and, so far, only one case has been linked with the use of perindopril [2]. We report on a second patient with perindopril-induced pancreatitis. A 72-year-old man presented with a 10-day history of nausea, vomiting, and constant pain in the epigastrium which radiated to the sides. Four weeks before admission, perindopril (4 mg/day had been added to the usual regimen of glyburide (5 mg/day, metformin (1 g/day and carvedilol (6.25 mg/day which the patient had been taking for three years for the treatment of diabetes mellitus and moderate hypertension. His previous history was otherwise unremarkable, except for psoriasis; he did not report any acute or chronic pancreatic disease and denied alcohol use, toxic habits or taking any other medications including over-the-counter medications or herbal remedies. Upon admission, the patient was fully alert and oriented, apyrexial and had normal vital parameters; physical examination yielded normal findings apart from a severely tender abdomen with no bowel sounds. Laboratory data showed increased blood amylase (556 IU/L; reference range: 0-115 IU/L and lipase (1,396 IU/L; reference range: 0-190 IU/L levels; electrolytes, hematological variables, cholesterol, triglycerides, liver and renal function tests, and blood gases were normal. The results of serologic tests for the Mycoplasma and Chlamydia species, viral hepatitis, and a wide range of other viral infections were also negative. Abdominal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a moderately enlarged and edematous pancreas; furthermore, at imaging techniques no alterations such as stones or sludge of the gallbladder and of the common bile duct were detected. A chest X-ray was also normal.

  1. Alcohol intake and cardiovascular and gastrointestinal diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann

    of coronary heart disease (CHD), atrial fibrillation, liver cirrhosis and pancreatitis, and more specifically, to review the data for differential effects of alcohol according to modifying factors on these diseases. The thesis is based on the results from 10 epidemiological studies, conducted...... in young adults than in older individuals, hence, for young adults, the absolute beneficial effect of alcohol is small. Alcohol has differential effects on the risk of mortality and CHD according to drinking pattern. In the Diet, Cancer and Health Study, we found that for the same weekly amount of alcohol...... with risk of coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality. The beneficial effect of alcohol on CHD is observed among both young adults, middle-aged and elderly, but the magnitude of the absolute beneficial effect is least among the young adults. Both alcohol and smoking are associated with increased risk...

  2. Acute pancreatitis; Pancreatite aigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdi, M.; Deutsch, J.P.; Arrive, L.; Ayadi, K.; Ladeb, M.F.; Tubiana, J.M. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Antoine, 75 - Paris (France)

    1996-12-31

    The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis is based on clinical examination and basic laboratory tests. The main role of sonography in acute pancreatitis is to evaluate gallstones and small fluid collections. However, sonography is frequently difficult due to intestinal ileus related to pancreatitis. CT is indicated early in the clinical course of acute severe pancreatitis when the diagnosis is uncertain or when complications such as abscess, hemorrhage, or necrosis, are suspected. In addition, CT may be used to assess the prognosis and follow-up of patients. (authors). 20 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Nutritional profile of asymptomatic alcoholic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Beatriz Sobral-Oliveira

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Alcoholism may interfere with nutritional status, but reports are often troubled by uncertainties about ingested diet and organ function, as well as by ongoing abuse and associated conditions. OBJECTIVE: To identify nutritional and body compartment changes in stable alcoholics without confounding clinical and dietetic variables, a prospective observational pilot study was designed. Three well-matched populations were considered: subjects with chronic alcoholic pancreatitis, alcoholics without visceral disease, and healthy never-drinking adults (controls. METHODS: Subjects (n = 60 were asymptomatic males with adequate diet, no superimposed disease or complication, and alcohol-free for at least 6 months. After exclusions, 48 patients were compared. Variables encompassed dietary recall, bioimpedance analysis, biochemical profile and inflammatory markers. Main outcome measures were body fat, lean body mass, serum lipids, C-reactive protein, and selected minerals and vitamins. RESULTS: Both alcoholic populations suffered from reduced lean body mass (P = 0.001, with well-maintained body fat.Magnesium was depleted, and values of vitamin D and B12 correlated with alcohol abuse. LDL and total cholesterol was increased in alcoholics without pancreatitis (P = 0.04, but not in those with visceral damage. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A correlated with duration of excessive drinking (P = 0.01. CONCLUSIONS: Undernutrition (diminished lean body mass, risk of magnesium and vitamin deficiencies contrasted with dyslipidemia and increased cardiovascular risk. This second danger was masked during chronic pancreatitis but not in alcoholics without visceral disease. Further studies should focus special requirements of this population.

  4. Small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung Presented as Acute Pancreatitis. Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulzahra Hussain

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Small cell carcinoma of the lung is an aggressive cancer with gloomy prognosis. Links to acute pancreatitis is extremely rare. Case report We are reporting a 53-year-old patient who was admitted because of acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones, alcohol abuse, medications or any other predisposition for acute pancreatitis. Further investigations of blood, CT of chest abdomen and neck and ultrasound scan of abdomen, bone marrow and neck lymph node biopsies confirmed advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung with hypercalcemia, which was the only definite cause of acute pancreatitis. The patient made good recovery from pancreatitis after controlling the hypercalcemia. She was referred to respiratory team for further management of lung cancer. Conclusion Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia of advanced small cell carcinoma of the lung is an extremely rare condition. Acute pancreatitis due to hypercalcemia should be thoroughly investigated to exclude serious pathology as in our case.

  5. Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The examples of lessons learned comprise an outline of the problems encountered at the nuclear facilities involved. The situations are typical of the difficulties that can arise when planning or implementing a decommissioning project for a small facility. Although the information is not intended to be exhaustive, the reader is encouraged to evaluate the applicability of the lessons learned to a specific decommissioning project. The general categories of problem and the relevant section in which they are discussed are shown. One should also note that in almost all cases the lack/inadequacy of construction or operational records contributed to the seriousness of the reported occurrences.

  6. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS),or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute pancreatitis, recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis,and in the prevention of post-ERCP pancreatitis. These stents are currently routinely placed to reduce intraductal hypertension, bypass obstructing stones, restore lumen patency in cases with dominant, symptomatic strictures,seal main pancreatic duct disruption, drain pseudocysts or fluid collections, treat symptomatic major or minor papilla sphincter stenosis, and prevent procedure-induced acute pancreatitis. The present review aims at updating and discussing techniques, indications, and results of endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement in acute and chronic inflammatory diseases of the pancreas.

  7. Imatinib-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma Mahesh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but serious complication of many drugs, some of which have been well documented. Here we present a case of a middle-aged man with chronic myeloid leukemia who developed acute pancreatitis after being initiated on imatinib mesylate. The case history, the pharmacodynamics, uses, and adverse effects of imatinib mesylate are discussed in detail.

  8. Nutrition, Inflammation, and Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Max Petrov

    2013-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is acute inflammatory disease of the pancreas. Nutrition has a number of anti-inflammatory effects that could affect outcomes of patients with pancreatitis. Further, it is the most promising nonspecific treatment modality in acute pancreatitis to date. This paper summarizes the best available evidence regarding the use of nutrition with a view of optimising clinical management of patients with acute pancreatitis.

  9. Pancreatic panniculitis: a cutaneous manifestation of acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Laureano, A; Mestre, T; Ricardo, L; Rodrigues, AM; Cardoso, J.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  10. Coexistence of Pancreatic Carcinoma and Pancreatic Tuberculosis: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Zhen-Jiang; Zhang, Hao; Xiang, Guang-Ming; Gong, Jun; Mai, Gang; Liu, Xu-Bao

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic tuberculosis (TB) is extremely rare and mimics pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiologically. This paper discusses the occurrence of 2 heterogeneous masses located in the head and tail of the pancreas in an adult male. In this patient, laparotomy was performed because of the high suspicion of pancreatic carcinoma. Intraoperative fine needle aspiration biopsy revealed the coexistence of pancreatic carcinoma with pancreatic TB, and a combined resection of the distal pancrea...

  11. Fatal Pancreatic Panniculitis Associated with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Woo Sun; Kim, Mi Yeon; Kim, Sang Woo; Paik, Chang Nyol; Kim, Hyung Ok; Park, Young Min

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic panniculitis is a rare disease in which necrosis of fat in the panniculus and other distant foci occurs in the setting of pancreatic diseases; these diseases include acute and chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic carcinoma, pseudocyst, and other pancreatic diseases. This malady is manifested as tender erythematous nodules on the legs, buttock, or trunk. Histopathologically, it shows the pathognomonic findings of focal subcutaneous fat necrosis and ghost-like anucleated cells with a thi...

  12. Imaging of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. Mild AP accounts for 75-80% of the cases and it is characterized by interstitial oedema, absent or minimal organ dysfunction, lack of complications and, usually, uneventful recovery. Severe AP is characterized by pancreatic necrosis, protracted clinical course, high incidence of complications, and high mortality rate. The diagnosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) is generally based on clinical and laboratory findings. The role of imaging is to confirm diagnosis, to assess disease severity - especially by detecting pancreatic necrosis-, to reveal complications of the disease and to guide interventions). Contrast- enhanced multidetector CT is the current 'gold standard' imaging modality in the evaluation of patients with AP. The spectrum of findings seen on CT ranges from a normal appearance to diffuse pancreatic enlargement with poorly defined pancreatic contour and heterogeneous attenuation. Stranding of the fat surrounding the pancreas and fluid collections in the anterior pararenal space, the peritoneal cavity or elsewhere, acquiring the form of the anatomic space where they are developed, may also be disclosed. Lack of pancreatic parenchyma enhancement is indicative of the presence of pancreatic necrosis. CT may reveal biliary tract calculi, calcifications in patients with AP combined with chronic pancreatitis- and air in an inflamed pancreas. Pancreatic abscess is usually seen on CT as a focal low attenuation area with a thick wall that may exhibit enhancement following i.v. contrast media administration. Haemorrhage, pseudoaneurysms, renal and splenic parenchyma complications can also be demonstrated by CT. Balthazar et.al have developed CT classification and severity scores based on the presence of fluid collections and pancreatic necrosis. These scores correlate with the incidence of morbidity and

  13. Treatment of acute pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mofleh Ibrahim

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no specific treatment for acute pancreatitis. Majority of patients with acute pancreatitis respond to medical therapy. Supportive measures and close observations represent the cornerstone of the medical therapy. Failure to respond to medical treatment may indicate choledocholithiasis or infected necrosis. Endoscopic papillotomy with stone retrieval is beneficial in patients with severe biliary pancreatitis. Image-guided fine needle aspiration and bacteriological examination of aspirate is reliable in detecting infection and deliniating causative pathogen. Surgical debridement is the method of choice for treatment of infected necrosis. In contrast, in pancreatic abscess, surgery is preserved for those, who do not respond to percutaneous drainage combined with antibiotics. The benefit of antisecretory and antiproteolytic agents is debatable. A combination of antioxidants, calcium channel antagonists and antibiotics may play a major role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis in the future.

  14. Review of idiopathic pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding of pancreatitis and advances in technology have uncovered the veils of idiopathic pancreatitis to a point where a thorough history and judicious use of diagnostic techniques elucidate the cause in over 80% of cases. This review examines the multitude of etiologies of what were once labeled idiopathic pancreatitis and provides the current evidence on each. This review begins with a background review of the current epidemiology of idiopathic pancreatitis prior to discussion of various etiologies. Etiologies of medications, infections, toxins,autoimmune disorders, vascular causes, and anatomic and functional causes are explored in detail. We conclude with management of true idiopathic pancreatitis and a summary of the various etiologic agents. Throughout this review, areas of controversies are highlighted.

  15. Úlcera corneal bilateral como consecuencia de malnutrición calórico-protéica y déficit de vitamina A en un paciente con alcoholismo crónico, pancreatitis crónica y colecistostomía Bilateral corneal ulceration as a result of energy-protein hyponutrition and vitamin A deficit in a patient with chronic alcoholism, chronic pancreatitis and cholecystostomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benítez Cruz

    2005-08-01

    ón o colecistostomia con drenaje biliar percutáneo no debemos olvidar que los déficits de micronutrientes pueden explicar la etiología de otras patologías asociadas en este caso las ulceras cornéales.Since the discovery of vitamins, there has been an increasing interest at relating vitamins with particular diseases. In particular, for vitamin A its singular importance has been determined in multiple vital functions, and its relationship with diseases, both in deficit and in excess, is nowadays completely demonstrated. In developed countries, vitamin deficiency-related diseases have been greatly reduced; however, in some patients with particular features they must be kept in mind. This is the case of a 45 year-old man, with a history of chronic alcoholism, non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and cholecystectomy with a high biliary drainage secondary to emphysematous cholecystitis and perivesicular abscess. He complains of bilateral ocular pain, photophobia, and decreased visual acuity besides a history of pasty, sticky and foul-smelling feces. He is admitted in the Ophthalmology Department and bilateral corneal ulceration is diagnosed. A consultation to the Nutrition Department is made because of cachexia. Severe caloric and mil protein hyponutrition is observed with a BMI of 18.2 and a 23% weight loss for the last 6 months, fat-soluble vitamins (A, D and E deficit, mild fat malabsorption, and macrocytic and hypochromic anemia. The patient's diet is supplemented with a special hyperproteinic and hypercaloric diet for diabetics, deficient vitamins and pancreatic enzymes to improve absorption are administered, and glycemia is controlled with insulin. Four months later, the patient is assessed and has a BMI of 20, anemia has resolved and from an ophthalmologic viewpoint the course is favorable, the ulcers improve and visual acuity is almost completely recovered. In chronic alcoholic patients with a low dietary intake and clinical complications with nutritional

  16. Pancreatic Involvement in Melioidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vui Heng Chong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Context Melioidosis is endemic to tropical regions and, despite the common occurrence of intra-abdominal abscesses, pancreatic involvement in melioidosis has not previously been reported. Objective We report our experience with pancreatic melioidosis. Patients All 65 patients treated for melioidosis who had computed tomography (CT scans were identified from prospective databases and were retrospectively reviewed. Main outcome measures A detailed review of cases with pancreas involvement was carried out. Results There were four cases (three males and one female; median age 29.5 years, range: 25-48 years with pancreatic melioidosis, giving a prevalence of 6.2%. All had predisposing conditions (two had poorly controlled diabetes mellitus and two had thalassemia for melioidosis. Fever (100%, anorexia (100%, weight loss (100%, rigor (75% and abdominal pain (75% were the most common symptoms at presentation and the median duration of symptoms before presentation was six weeks (range: 2-8 weeks. All pancreatic abscesses were detected on CT scan. Multiple foci involvement was common (3 to 6 sites: blood (4 patients, liver (3 patients, psoas muscle (2 patients, spleen (2 patients, infected ascites (2 patients and lung (1 patient. Pancreatic involvement ranged from multi-focal micro-abscesses to focal large abscesses and involved all parts of the pancreas (body 100%, head 75% and tail 50%. Associated pancreatic findings included splenic vein thrombosis, peripancreatic inflammation and peripancreatic fat streaking. All the pancreatic abscesses were resolved with antibiotics without requiring pancreatic abscess drainage (including one patient who died from disseminated melioidosis. Conclusion Pancreatic involvement typically occurs as part of multi-organ involvement and commonly manifests as multifoci micro-abscesses. Associated pancreatic abnormalities were also common. All responded to treatment without requiring drainage

  17. The Course of Genetically Determined Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keim V

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: The clinical course of chronic pancreatitis in patients with mutations of cationic trypsinogen and the trypsin inhibitor SPINK1 has not yet been characterized. SETTING: Cationic trypsinogen (PRSS1 and the serine protease inhibitor, Kazal type 1 (SPINK1, were analyzed in patients with pancreatitis of unclear origin. PATIENTS: Eighty subjects with trypsinogen mutations (21x N29I, 59x R122H and 59 patients with the SPINK1 N34S variant (11 homozygous, 48 heterozygous were included in the study. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In patients with mutations of PRSS1 (N29I, R122H and SPINK1 (N34S the parameters such as calcification, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct, diabetes mellitus, hospital treatments, and surgery were recorded. DESIGN: Case control studies were performed to compare both mutational groups, and the follow-up time served as a matching criterion. The Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to estimate the time course of the symptoms. RESULTS: Ten years after the onset of the disease, the probability (+/-SE of symptoms in patients with PRSS1 mutations was as follows: 1st hospital stay: 86+/-4%; calcification: 21+/-4%; duct dilatation: 26+/-9%; surgery: 19+/-5%; diabetes: 6+/-5%. After 25 years, we found the following data: 1st hospital stay: 96+/-3%; calcification: 38+/-8%; duct dilatation: 38+/-8%; surgery: 37+/-10%; diabetes: 28+/-8%. A case-control-study of 38 pairs of patients with either PRSS1 or SPINK1 mutations showed that the probability of duct dilatation, diabetes and calcification was slightly higher in patients having a SPINK1 mutation. There was no difference between those subjects with a homozygous or heterozygous SPINK1 mutation. In comparison to alcoholic chronic pancreatitis patients, the PRSS1 associated disease revealed a lower frequency of calcification and diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: The progression of chronic pancreatitis was slightly more rapid in patients with SPINK1 mutations than in patients with cationic trypsinogen

  18. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C.M. Sikkens (Edmée)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence

  19. Ny klassifikation af pancreatitis acuta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Benny Østerbye; Schmidt, Palle Nordblad

    2011-01-01

    The course of acute pancreatitis is in the initial phase dominated by a systemic inflammatory response, later by local complications. A new classification defines three specific types of pancreatitis: 1) interstitial oedematous pancreatitis and 2) necrotizing pancreatitis with pancreatic...... parenchymal necrosis, or 3) peripancreatic necrosis alone. The classification also defines four types of collections: 1) Acute peripancreatic fluid collection, 2) pseudocyst, 3) acute post-necrotic collection, and 4) walled-off necrosis. This article summarizes the terminology of the revised Atlanta...

  20. Alcohol Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol. Alcohol is the ingredient that gets you drunk. Hard liquor—such as whiskey, rum, or gin— ... of malt liquor 12 ounces of beer Being drunk can make a person feel very silly, angry, ...

  1. Alcoholics Anonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Banners Site Help What's New Welcome to Alcoholics Anonymous ® NEED HELP WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If you ... drinking problem, wish to learn more about Alcoholics Anonymous or want to find A.A. near you, ...

  2. Hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis: A case-based review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S Ian Gan; Alun L Edwards; Christopher J Symonds; Paul L Beck

    2006-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an established cause of pancreatitis. In a case-based approach, we present a review of hypertriglyceridemia andhow it can cause pancreatitis. We outline how to investigate and manage such patients. A 35 year old man presented to the emergency department with abdominal pain and biochemical evidence of acute pancreatitis. There was no history of alcohol consumption and biliary imaging was normal. The only relevant past medical history was that of mild hyperlipidemia, treated with diet alone. Physical exam revealed epigastric tenderness, right lateral rectus palsy, lipemia retinalis, bitemporal hemianopsia and a delay in the relaxation phase of his ankle reflexes.Subsequent laboratory investigation revealed marked hypertriglyceridemia and panhypopituarism. An enhanced CT scan of the head revealed a large suprasellar mass impinging on the optic chiasm and hypothalamus. The patient was treated supportively; thyroid replacement and lipid lowering agents were started. He underwent a successful resection of a craniopharyngioma. Postoperatively, the patient did well on hormone replacement therapy. He has had no further attacks of pancreatitis.This case highlights many of the factors involved in the regulation of triglyceride metabolism. We review the common causes of hypertriglyceridemia and the proposed mechanisms resulting in pancreatitis. The incidence and management of hypertriglyceridemiainduced pancreatitis are also discussed.

  3. The Role of Endoscopic Ultrasound in Primary Pancreatic Lymphoma Presented with Acute Pancreatitis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hassan Abedi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL is rare but manageable malignant tumor of the pancreas which may be confused with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Case report We report a 38 year-old smoker man with IVDA and history of B (inactive carrier, C (Ia genotype hepatitis and negative for HIV admitted to our hospital because of nausea, vomiting, epigastric and RUQ pain as a result of long period of alcohol consumption. Due to high amount of amylase (480 U/L and lipase (326 U/L Pancreatitis was diagnosed. Four days after admission CT was done that showed enhancement a large tumor of the head of the pancreas. Endoscopic ultrasound (EU revealed diffusely enlarged of pancreas. There was a mixed echoic mass lesion 37-50 mm at the head of pancreas (R/O walled off necrosis with adhesion to portal vein and SMV. On the other hand the CBD was 9 mm. Abdominal MRI and MRCP for patient was done. The intra-hepatic bile ducts, main hepatic ducts, CHD and CBD were mildly dilated and displaced to the right side by a large lobulated mass (160×112×130 mm of pancreatic head with low signal intensity on T1W images and high intensity on T2W images. We did EUS-FNA and there was a mixed echoic lesion (38-40mm adhered to head of pancreas with invasion to portal vein, SMA and SMV. The diagnosis of pancreatic lymphoma was established by immunohistochemical study and the assessment of the neoplastic cells revealed B cell lymphoma phenotypes. Conclusion Herein we present an interesting 38 year- old man with pancreas head tumor. Primary pancreatic lymphoma is almost never suspected clinically. It is usually diagnosed by imaging and histological methods.

  4. Alcoholic hallucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pookala S; Ryali, Vssr; Srivastava, Kalpana; Kumar, Shashi R; Prakash, Jyoti; Singal, Ankit

    2012-07-01

    Alcoholic hallucinosis is a rare complication of chronic alcohol abuse characterized by predominantly auditory hallucinations that occur either during or after a period of heavy alcohol consumption. Bleuler (1916) termed the condition as alcohol hallucinosis and differentiated it from Delirium Tremens. Usually it presents with acoustic verbal hallucinations, delusions and mood disturbances arising in clear consciousness and sometimes may progress to a chronic form mimicking schizophrenia. One such case with multimodal hallucinations in a Defence Service Corps soldier is presented here. PMID:24250051

  5. Chronic Pancreatitis. A Prospective Nationwide Study of 1,086 Subjects from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallath Balakrishnan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Context Chronic pancreatitis is common in India. However, its risk factors are not clear. There is sparse data on the current prevalence of tropical pancreatitis in India. Objective To undertake a prospective nationwide study of the risk factors and clinical profile of chronic pancreatitis. Setting Thirty-two major centers from different regions of India contributed data on 1,086 patients to a common online website (www.ipans.org. Main outcome measures Risk factors, clinical features complications and treatment of chronic pancreatitis. Results Of the 1,086 subjects, complete data on risk factors were available for 1,033 subjects. Idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form of pancreatitis (n=622; 60.2% and alcoholic chronic pancreatitis accounted for about a third of the cases (n=400; 38.7%; the rest (n=11; 1.1% had rare risk factors. Smoking and cassava intake were documented in 292 (28.3% and 189 (18.3% subjects, respectively. Using well-defined criteria, only 39 (3.8%cases could be labeled as ‘tropical pancreatitis’. Pain occurred in 971 patients (94.0%. Four hundred and eighteen (40.5% subjects had diabetes mellitus. Of alcohol consumers, alcoholism and female gender were independent risk factors for diabetes in subjects with chronic pancreatitis (OR=1.48, P=0.003; and OR=1.75, P<0.001, respectively. The most common complications were pseudocysts (15.8% and biliary obstruction (8.2%. Pancreatic cancer occurred in 42 subjects (4.1%. Ultrasound detected calculi in 69.7%, ductal dilatation in 63.4% and atrophy in 27.3%. The majority of patients were on medical therapy (n=849; 82.2%; endotherapy and surgery accounted for the rest. About 50% percent of the patients with diabetes required insulin (198/418. Conclusions In this first nationwide prospective survey of chronic pancreatitis in India, idiopathic pancreatitis was the most common form, followed by alcoholic pancreatitis. The classical form of tropical chronic pancreatitis is

  6. Alcohol misuse

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, W

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol use is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity internationally, and is ranked by the WHO as one of the top five risk factors for disease burden. Without treatment, approximately 16% of hazardous or harmful alcohol users will progress to more dependent patterns of alcohol consumption.

  7. Alcohol Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The recent alcohol tax increase poses a challenge to China’s white spirits makers Alcohol, rather than wine, is an in-dispensable component to Chinese table culture. The financial crisis has failed to affect white spirits sales, but an alcohol tax increase might.

  8. Chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer; the clinical aspects and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Sikkens, Edmée

    2013-01-01

    textabstractIn exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, the pancreas is unable to deliver a sufficient quantity of pancreatic enzymes to the small intestine to digest food. It may occur in several life threatening diseases, including chronic pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Due to this lack or absence of pancreatic enzymes, malabsorption of fat develops, which causes steatorrhea-related symptoms, weight loss, and malnutrition. To reduce morbidity and even mortality, patients should be treated wi...

  9. Progression From Acute to Chronic Pancreatitis Prognostic Factors, Mortality, and Natural Course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nojgaard, C.; Becker, U.; Matzen, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Knowledge of the natural course of acute pancreatitis (AP) and risk of progression to chronic pancreatitis (CP) is limited. The aims were to describe: (1) the incidence of progression from AP to CP, (2) prognostic factors for progression, and (3) the natural course and mortality of.......1%) during follow-up; 48.2% developed from alcoholic AP, 47.0% from idiopathic AP, and 4.8% from other causes. The mortality rate for patients with progressive AP was 2.7 times higher than in patients with nonprogressive acute pancreatitis, and 5.3 to 6.5 times higher than in the background population. In...... Cox regression analyses corrected for age, only smoking was of significance for the progression from AP to CP. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis can progress to CP, not only from alcoholic but also from nonalcoholic AP. Smoking was the strongest risk factor associated with progression. The mortality...

  10. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays (≤ 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study

  11. Influence of radiation and non-radiation factors on pancreatic cancer incidence among Mayak PA workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuntova, G.V.; Tokarskaya, Z.B.; Belyaeva, Z.D. [Southern Ural Biophysics Institute (SUBI), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation); Syrchikov, V.A.; Grigoryeva, E.S. [Mayak Production Association (Mayak PA), Ozyorsk (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-01

    The finding of this nested case-control study suggests that high levels of 239 Pu incorporation (239 Pu body burden > 3.7), alcohol abuse and smoking were associated with increasing the risk of pancreatic cancer among Mayak PA workers chronically exposed to ionizing radiation. The contribution of non radiation factors (alcohol abuse and smoking) to pancreatic tumor incidence is greater (AR=51%) than 239 Pu incorporation kBq; AR = 7%). No significant effect of external gamma rays ({<=} 6.8 Gy), prior exposure to chemical agents, or chronic digestive diseases was found on the incidence of pancreatic tumor. Evaluation of the absorbed alpha-radiation pancreatic dose will permit to make more exact the 239 Pu risk estimation in the further extended study.

  12. Can Pancreatic Cancer Be Found Early?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Signs and symptoms of pancreatic cancer Can pancreatic cancer be found early? Pancreatic cancer is hard to ... Testing: What You Need to Know . Testing for pancreatic cancer in people at high risk For people in ...

  13. Researchers Identify Early Sign of Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of pancreatic cancer Researchers identify early sign of pancreatic cancer September 28, 2014 Tags: PancreaticCancer Brian Wolpin, MD ... discovered a sign of the early development of pancreatic cancer – an upsurge in certain amino acids that occurs ...

  14. Pancreatitis in scrub typhus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Bhatt

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a rickettsial infection prevalent in most parts of India. Acute pancreatitis with pseudocyst formation is a rare complication of this condition. This paper reports acute renal failure, pancreatitis and pseudocyst formation in a 48-year-old female with scrub typhus. Ultrasonography of the abdomen revealed a bulky pancreas with fluid seen along the body of the pancreas in the lesser sac. The infection was successfully treated with doxycycline and supportive treatment. Pancreatitis was managed conservatively. This case report highlights the importance of identifying and managing uncommon complications of a common tropical disease for optimum outcome.

  15. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chowdhary M

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mudit Chowdhary,1 Ahmad A Kabbani,1 Akansha Chhabra21Department of Internal Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine, Macon, GA, USA; 2Department of Internal Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals.Keywords: canagliflozin, Invokana, pancreatitis, drug-induced pancreatitis, SGLT-2 inhibitor

  16. Effect of glycemic control on the risk of pancreatic cancer: A nationwide cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Kian-Ching; Hsu, Chen-Yang; Lee, Yi-Kung; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Su, Yung-Cheng

    2016-06-01

    Although the relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer has been studied, the effects of glycemic control on pancreatic cancer have never been evaluated. This study investigates the relationship between glycemic control and pancreatic cancer.Data from 1 million National Health Insurance beneficiaries were screened. The study cohort consisted of 46,973 diabetic patients and 652,142 nondiabetic subjects. Of the patients with diabetes, 1114 who had been admitted for hyperglycemic crisis episodes were defined as having poorly controlled diabetes. All adult beneficiaries were followed from January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2013, to determine whether pancreatic cancer was diagnosed. The Cox regression model was applied to compare the adjusted hazards for potential confounders.After controlling for age, sex, urbanization level, socioeconomic status, chronic liver disease, hypertension, coronary artery disease, hyperlipidemia, malignancies, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, obesity, history of alcohol intoxication, chronic renal insufficiency, biliary tract disease, chronic pancreatitis, Charlson Comorbidity Index score, and high-dimensional propensity score, the adjusted hazard ratio of pancreatic cancer was 2.53 (95% confidence interval 1.96-3.26) in patients with diabetes. In diabetic patients with poor glycemic control, the hazard ratio of pancreatic cancer was significantly higher (hazard ratio 3.61, 95% confidence interval 1.34-9.78).This cohort study reveals a possible relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Moreover, poorly controlled diabetes may be associated with a higher possibility of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27311001

  17. CLINICAL STUDY OF ACUTE PANCREATITIS AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Siddharth

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND More than a century after its comprehensive description, acute pancreatitis remains a common disorder with devastating consequences. The presentation of wide spectrum of symptoms gives the clinician a heart breaking exercise to bring back the patient from the clutches of the disease process. Pancreatitis by itself is a disease which is unique, protean and extrudes into the diagnostic arena. It cannot be too strongly emphasized that the primary treatment of acute pancreatitis is conservative only, but it is the Pandora’s box of manifestation with its inherent complications from surgery comes into play as diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic endeavour. To study age and sex incidence of acute pancreatitis, to study and analyse the etiopathological factors associated with acute pancreatitis, especially alcohol aetiology in our study. To analyse the prognosis of acute pancreatitis using CT scan abdomen. To analyse the complications, to analyse the role of surgery in acute pancreatitis. METHODS This study was carried out on patients admitted in the General Surgery Department, MGM Hospital, from December 2013 to June 2015. RESULTS The incidence of acute pancreatitis was found to be in a younger age group in our study. Serum amylase and lipase both (80% sensitivity should be used for diagnosis wherever possible. Ideally, all cases should be stratified during the first 48 hours according to one of the scoring systems (Balthazar’s. Scoring systems help to identify patients who are more likely to have a severe attack and they should be referred to higher centres if adequate facilities are not available.

  18. Long-Term Outcome of Self Expandable Metal Stents for Biliary Obstruction in Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Waldthaler; Kerstin Schütte; Jochen Weigt; Peter Malfertheiner; Siegfried Kropf; Stefan Kahl

    2013-01-01

    Context Insertion of a self-expandable metal stent is still controversial for treatment of benign common bile duct stenosis but can be a valuable alternative to surgical treatment. Objective Aim of our study was to analyze the efficacy of covered and uncovered selfexpandable metal stent in patients with chronic pancreatitis and common bile duct stenosis. Material and methods Twenty patients with common bile duct stenosis due to alcoholic chronic pancreatitis were retrospective analyzed. All p...

  19. Parathyroid scintigraphy, histopathology correlation in patients with tropical pancreatitis and coexisting primary hyperparathyroidism

    OpenAIRE

    Padma, Subramanyam; Sundaram, Palaniswamy Shanmuga

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Tropical pancreatitis (TP) is a juvenile, non-alcoholic type of chronic pancreatitis and is highly prevalent in Kerala, India. Increasing prevalence of TP and its varied manifestations prompted us to undertake this retrospective analysis. We attempted to study the incidence of TP in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and correlate with calcium levels, scintigraphy and histopathology findings. Materials and Methods: Records of 44 hypercalcemic patients with raised parath...

  20. Groove Pancreatitis with Biliary and Duodenal Stricture: An Unusual Cause of Obstructive Jaundice

    OpenAIRE

    Marta Gravito-Soares; Elisa Gravito-Soares; Ana Alves; Dário Gomes; Nuno Almeida; Guilherme Tralhão; Carlos Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Groove pancreatitis is an uncommon cause of chronic pancreatitis that affects the groove anatomical area between the head of the pancreas, duodenum, and common bile duct. Clinical case: A 67-year-old man with frequent biliary colic and an alcohol consumption of 30–40 g/day was admitted to the hospital complaining of jaundice and pruritus. Laboratory analysis revealed cholestasis and the ultrasound scan showed intra-hepatic biliary ducts dilatation, middle third cystic dilatat...

  1. ‘A lipaemic mystery’: a patient with hypertriglyceridaemic pancreatitis and cerebral infarction

    OpenAIRE

    King, Patricia; Smith, Philip Joseph; Betteridge, John; Brown, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridaemia (HTG) causes up to 10% of all cases of acute pancreatitis (AP). It is the third most common cause after gallstones and alcohol. Despite this frequency, there are no clear guidelines for its specific management, mainly due to the paucity of evidence. The authors present a case and discussion of hypertriglyceridaemic pancreatitis (HTGP) complicated by an acute cerebral infarct. The patient’s subsequent death secondary to cerebral infarction opens the discussion as to wheth...

  2. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzalo; Guzzo-Merello; Marta; Cobo-Marcos; Maria; Gallego-Delgado; Pablo; Garcia-Pavia

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy(ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM.

  3. Trends in etiologies of chronic pancreatitis within 20 years: analysis of 636 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jing-nan; LAI Ya-min; QIAN Jia-ming; GUO Tao; L(U) Hong; TANG Xiao-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of chronic pancreatitis has increased during recent years in Asia-Pacific areas as well as in China.The etiologies vary in different regions and periods.This study aimed to investigate the changing etiologies of chronic pancreatitis within 20 years at Peking Union Medical College Hospital in China.Methods Retrospective analysis of the etiologies of 636 cases of chronic pancreatitis at Peking Union Medical College Hospital from 1990 to 2010 was performed.Patients were divided into two groups according to two time periods (1990-2000 and 2001-2010).Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test.Results The morbidity rate of chronic pancreatitis in China has recently increased.The main etiology changed from biliary diseases in the 1990s (decreased from 36.8% to 28.1%) to alcohol abuse after the year 2000 (increased from 26.5% to 36.8%).The main etiology of biliary diseases is stones in the cholecyst or bile duct,and the percentage of cholecystitis cases has increased.Autoimmune disease,including autoimmune pancreatitis,has increased quickly and currently accounts for 7.3% of cases because a greater number of autoimmune pancreatitis cases are being diagnosed.Approximately 9.5% of chronic pancreatitis cases are caused by multiple factors such as alcohol abuse and bile duct stones.Other factors include cholecystectomy and acute pancreatitis.Conclusions The main etiology of chronic pancreatitis has changed from biliary disease to alcohol abuse in recent years.Autoimmune factors have also obviously increased.

  4. Prognosis of acute and chronic pancreatitis - a 30-year follow-up of a Danish cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nøjgaard, Camilla

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute and chronic pancreatitis are most frequently caused by a high consumption of alcohol and tobacco but often the aetiology is unknown. The diseases have a high risk of complications, but the long-term prognosis and the natural course of the diseases are only sparsely described. The aims...... of the study were to investigate the long-term prognosis of acute pancreatitis (AP) and chronic pancreatitis (CP), the risk of progression to CP, and the natural course of progressive acute pancreatitis. Hereby, describe the prognostic factors associated with mortality and the causes of death in...... these patients. The study was based on the large prospective cohort study - Copenhagen Pancreatitis Study - of patients in the Copenhagen Municipality admitted with either AP or CP fulfilling specific diagnostic criteria and enrolled in the study during 1977 to 1982 and in 2008 followed up by linkage to...

  5. Genetic analyses of heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 in different forms of pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Weis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1 is the rate limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of inflammatory processes. In animal models the course of pancreatitis was ameliorated by up-regulation of HMOX1 expression. Additionally, carbon monoxide released during heme breakdown inhibited proliferation of pancreatic stellate cells and might thereby prevent the development of chronic pancreatitis (CP. Transcription of HMOX1 in humans is influenced by a GT-repeat located in the promoter. As such, HMOX1 variants might be of importance in the pathogenesis of pancreatitis. METHODS: The GT-repeat and SNP rs2071746 were investigated with fluorescence labelled primers and by melting curve analysis in 285 patients with acute pancreatitis, 208 patients with alcoholic CP, 207 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and in 289 controls, respectively. GT-repeat analysis was extended to a total of 446 alcoholic CP patients. In addition, we performed DNA sequencing in 145 patients with alcoholic CP, 138 patients with idiopathic/hereditary CP, 147 patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis, and 151 controls. Exon 3 screening was extended to additional patients and controls. RESULTS: S- and L-alleles of the GT-repeat, genotypes and alleles of SNP rs2071746 and non-synonymous variants detected by sequencing were found with similar frequencies in all groups. CONCLUSIONS: Although functional data implicate a potential influence of HMOX1 variants on the pathogenesis of pancreatitis, we did not find any association. As rare non-synonymous HMOX1 variants were found in patients and controls, it is rather unlikely that they will have functional consequences essential for pancreatitis development.

  6. Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors and Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, Badalov et al. [1] revised the data in the literature on drug-induced acute pancreatitis on the basis of a new classification system; they suggested the following classification: Class Ia - drugs having at least one case report with positive rechallenge, excluding all other causes, such as alcohol, hypertriglyceridemia, gallstones and other drugs; Class Ib - those drugs having at least one case report with positive rechallenge in whom other causes, such as alcohol, hypertriglyceridemia, gallstones and other drugs were not ruled out; Class II - those drugs with at least four cases in the literature and consistent latency (75% of cases or more; Class III - drugs with at least two cases in the literature, no consistent latency among cases and no rechallenge and, finally, Class IV - the drugs not fitting into the above-mentioned classes, having a single case report published in the medical literature, without rechallenge.

  7. Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Capecomorin S Pitchumoni; Balaji Yegneswaran

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a rare event in pregnancy,occurring in approximately 3 in 10 000 pregnancies.The spectrum of AP in pregnancy ranges from mild pancreatitis to serious pancreatitis associated with necrosis, abscesses, pseudocysts and multiple organ dysfunction syndromes. Pregnancy related hematological and biochemical alterations influence the interpretation of diagnostic tests and assessment of severity of AP. As in any other disease associated with pregnancy, AP is associated with greater concerns as it deals with two lives rather than just one as in the nonpregnant population. The recent advances in clinical gastroenterology have improved the early diagnosis and effective management of biliary pancreatitis. Diagnostic studies such as endoscopic ultrasound,magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography and therapeutic modalities that include endoscopic sphincterotomy, biliary stenting, common bile duct stone extraction and laparoscopic cholecystectomy are major milestones in gastroenterology. When properly managed AP in pregnancy does not carry a dismal prognosis as in the past.

  8. Familial Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen J. Lanspa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer’s high mortality rate equates closely with its incidence, thereby showing the need for development of biomarkers of its increased risk and a better understanding of its genetics, so that high-risk patients can be better targeted for screening and early potential lifesaving diagnosis. Its phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is extensive and requires careful scrutiny of its pattern of cancer associations, such as malignant melanoma associated with pancreatic cancer, in the familial atypical multiple mole melanoma syndrome, due to the CDKN2A germline mutation. This review is designed to depict several of the hereditary pancreatic cancer syndromes with particular attention given to the clinical application of this knowledge into improved control of pancreatic cancer.

  9. Perspectives in Pancreatic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Salim

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available This review describes some of the mechanisms which are thought to be important in the causation of pain in chronic pancreatitis. Both medical and surgical techniques for treating this pain are described.

  10. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Fasting glucose level Gastrin level Glucose tolerance test Secretin stimulation test for pancreas Blood glucagon ... PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Pancreatic Cancer Browse the ...

  11. What Is Pancreatic Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... very important to distinguish between exocrine and endocrine cancers of the pancreas. They have distinct risk factors and causes, have ... are by far the most common type of pancreas cancer. If you are told you have pancreatic cancer, ...

  12. Pancreatic exocrine function testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to understand which pancreatic function tests are available and how to interpret them when evaluating patients with malabsorption. Available direct tests are the secretin stimulation test, the Lundh test meal, and measurement of serum or fecal enzymes. Indirect tests assess pancreatic exocrine function by measuring the effect of pancreatic secretion on various nutrients. These include triglycerides labeled with carbon 14, cobalamin labeled with cobalt 57 and cobalt 58, and para-aminobenzoic acid bound to a dipeptide. Of all these tests the secretin stimulation test is the most accurate and reliable if done by experienced personnel. However, the indirect tests are simpler to do and appear to be comparable to the secretin test at detecting pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. These indirect tests are becoming clinically available and clinicians should familiarize themselves with the strengths and weaknesses of each

  13. Establishment of risk model for pancreatic cancer in Chinese Han population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Hua Lu; Li Wang; Hui Li; Jia-Ming Qian; Rui-Xue Deng; Lu Zhou

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate risk factors for pancreatic cancer and establish a risk model for Han population.METHODS: This population-based case-control study was carried out from January 2002 to April 2004. One hundred and nineteen pancreatic cancer patients and 238 healthy people completed the questionnaire which was used for risk factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to calculate odds ratio (ORs), 95%confidence intervals (Cis) and β value, which were further used to establish the risk model.RESULTS: According to the study, people who have smoked more than 17 pack-years had a higher risk to develop pancreatic cancer compared to non-smokers or light smokers (not more than 17 pack-years) (OR 1.98;95% CI 1.11-3.49, P=0.017). More importantly, heavy smokers in men had increased risk for developing pancreatic cancer (OR 2.11; 95%CI 1.18-3.78, P=0.012)than women. Heavy alcohol drinkers (>20 cup-years)had increased risk for pancreatic cancer (OR 3.68;95%CI 1.60-8.44). Daily diet with high meat intak was also linked to pancreatic cancer. Moreover, 18.5% of the pancreatic cancer patients had diabetes mellitus compared to the control group of 5.8% (P= 0.0003). Typical symptoms of pancreatic cancer were anorexia, upper abdominal pain, bloating, jaundice and weight loss. Each risk factor was assigned a value to represent its impor tance associated with pancreatic cancer. Subsequently by adding all the points together, a risk scoring model was established with a value higher than 45 as being at risk to develop pancreatic cancer.CONCLUSION: Smoking, drinking, high meat diet and diabetes are major risk factors for pancreatic cancer. A risk model for pancreatic cancer in Chinese Hah population has been established with an 88.9% sensitivity and a 97.6% specificity.

  14. Imaging of acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merkle, Elmar M.; Goerich, Johannes [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals of Ulm, Steinhoevel Strasse 9, 89075 Ulm (Germany)

    2002-08-01

    Acute pancreatitis is defined as an acute inflammatory process of the pancreas with variable involvement of peripancreatic tissues or remote organ systems. This article reports the current classification, definition and terminology, epidemiology and etiology, pathogenesis and pathological findings, clinical and laboratory findings, and finally imaging findings of acute pancreatitis with emphasis on cross-sectional imaging modalities such as ultrasound, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  15. Incretin-Based Therapy and Risk of Acute Pancreatitis: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Pedersen, Lars; Møller, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the use of incretin-based drugs (GLP-1 receptor agonists and dipeptidyl peptidase 4 [DPP4] inhibitors) is associated with acute pancreatitis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study was a nationwide population-based case-control study using medical databases in...... Denmark. Participants were 12,868 patients with a first-time hospitalization for acute pancreatitis between 2005 and 2012 and a population of 128,680 matched control subjects. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio (OR) for acute pancreatitis associated with different antihyperglycemic drugs. We...... adjusted for history of gallstones, alcoholism, obesity, and other pancreatitis-associated comorbidities and medications. RESULTS: A total of 89 pancreatitis patients (0.69%) and 684 control subjects (0.53%) were ever users of incretins. The crude OR for acute pancreatitis among incretin users was 1.36 (95...

  16. Mucins and Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Van Seuningen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is characterized by an often dramatic outcome (five year survival < 5% related to a late diagnosis and a lack of efficient therapy. Therefore, clinicians desperately need new biomarkers and new therapeutic tools to develop new efficient therapies. Mucins belong to an ever increasing family of O-glycoproteins. Secreted mucins are the main component of mucus protecting the epithelia whereas membrane-bound mucins are thought to play important biological roles in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, in cell signaling and in modulating biological properties of cancer cells. In this review, we will focus on the altered expression pattern of mucins in pancreatic cancer, from the early neoplastic lesion Pancreatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PanIN to invasive pancreatic carcinomas, and the molecular mechanisms (including genetic and epigenetic regulation and signaling pathways known to control their expression. Moreover, we will discuss the recent advances about the biology of both secreted and membrane-bound mucins and their key roles in pancreatic carcinogenesis and resistance to therapy. Finally, we will discuss exciting opportunities that mucins offer as potential therapeutic targets in pancreatic cancer.

  17. Zinc Status in Chronic Pancreatitis and its Relationship with Exocrine and Endocrine Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishna Rajesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Context A major role of the pancreas in zinc homeostasis has been suggested. Objective To assess erythrocyte zinc status in chronic pancreatitis and to correlate it with pancre atic exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Patients One hundred and one patients with chronic pancreatitis (34 alcoholic chronic pancreatitis, 67 tropical chronic pancreatitis were prospectively studied. Main outcome measure Disease characteristics and imaging features were recorded. Erythrocyte zinc was estimated by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Exocrine insufficiency wa s assessed using polyclonal antibody ELISA for pancreatic stool elastase1. Endocrin e insufficiency was assessed by serum gl ucose levels and insulin requirement. Results Erythrocyte zinc was significantly lower in chronic pancreatitis patients than in the controls (26.5±9.5 μ g/g Hb vs . 38.0±6.6 μ g/g Hb; P<0.001, and in tropical chronic pancreatitis than in alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (25.0±10.4 μ g/g Hb vs . 29.6±6.5 μ g/g Hb, P=0.001. In chronic pancreatitis patients who had exocrine insufficiency, erythrocyte zinc pos itively correlated with stool elastase1 (r=0.587, P<0.001. Erythr ocyte zinc levels were significantly lowe r in diabetic patients as comp ared to non-diabetics (P=0.036. Conclusions This study demonstrates zinc deficiency in chronic pa ncreatitis patients, and that zinc deficiency correlates with exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. Further studies may clarify the possible bene fits of zinc supplementatio n in chronic pancreatitis

  18. Triglyceride levels and apolipoprotein E polymorphism in patients with acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Radka Ivanova; Susana Puerta; Alfonso Garrido; Ignacio Cueto; Ana Ferro; María José Ariza; Andrés Cobos; Pedro González-Santos; Pedro Valdivielso

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertriglyceridemia is an unusual cause of acute pancreatitis and sometimes considered to be an epiphenomenon. This study aimed to investigate the clinical and analytical features and the APOE genotypes in patients with acute pancreatitis and severe hypertriglyceridemia. METHODS: We undertook a one-year, prospective study of patients with acute pancreatitis whose first laboratory analysis on admission to the emergency department included measurement of serum triglycerides. The APOE genotype was determined and the patients answered an established questionnaire within the first 24 hours concerning their alcohol consumption, the presence of co-morbidities and any medications being taken. The patients' progression, etiological diagnosis, hospital stay and clinical and radiological severity were all recorded. RESULTS: Hypertriglyceridemia was responsible for 7 of 133 cases of pancreatitis (5%); the remaining cases were of biliary (53%), idiopathic (26%), alcoholic (11%) or other (5%) origin. Compared with these remaining cases, the patients with hypertriglyceridemia were significantly younger, had more relapses, and more often had diabetes mellitus. They usually consumed alcohol or consumed it excessively on the days before admission. Also, the ε4 allele of the APOE gene was more common in this group (P CONCLUSION: One of 20 episodes of acute pancreatitis is caused by hypertriglyceridemia and it is linked to genetic (ε4 allele) and comorbid factors such as diabetes and, especially, alcohol consumption.

  19. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad Denis Constantin; Alexandru Carȃp; Bogdan Socea; Simona Bobic

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA), from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational...

  20. Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebbehøj, N; Borly, L; Madsen, P; Matzen, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Pancreatic tissue fluid pressure was measured in 10 patients undergoing drainage operations for painful chronic pancreatitis. The pressure was measured by the needle technique in the three anatomic regions of the pancreas before and at different stages of the drainage procedure, and the results...... a decrease in pancreatic tissue fluid pressure during drainage operations for pain in chronic pancreatitis. Regional pressure decrease were apparently unrelated to ERCP findings....

  1. Endoscopic pancreatic duct stent placement for inflammatory pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Testoni, Pier Alberto

    2007-01-01

    The role of endoscopic therapy in the management of pancreatic diseases is continuously evolving; at present most pathological conditions of the pancreas are successfully treated by endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography (ERCP) or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), or both. Endoscopic placement of stents has played and still plays a major role in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis, pseudocysts, pancreas divisum, main pancreatic duct injuries, pancreatic fistulae, complications of acute ...

  2. Influence of treatment with pancreatic extracts on pancreatic enzyme secretion.

    OpenAIRE

    Mössner, J.; Wresky, H P; Kestel, W; Zeeh, J; Regner, U; Fischbach, W

    1989-01-01

    We have evaluated the effects of porcine pancreatic extracts on human pancreatic secretion. Ten male volunteers were intubated with a 4-lumen jejunal tube to collect gastric and duodenal secretions separately via the first and third tube, to infuse PEG 4000 distal the pylorus via the second tube and to apply porcine pancreatic extracts via the fourth tube distal the ligament of Treitz. Pancreatic extracts were given four times at 40 minute intervals; the first two as active enzymes and subseq...

  3. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple resection) in the treatment of chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, J M; Zhang, Z

    1990-01-01

    The armamentarium of the pancreatic surgeon must include multiple operative techniques, to be adapted to the clinical and anatomical findings in the patient with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreaticoduodenectomy is an essential component of this armamentarium. Its indications and limitations require continued refinement. Pancreaticoduodenectomy (Whipple operation) provides excellent results in the relief of the pain of chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of reoperation for control of pain after this procedure is less than after drainage procedures. The postoperative mortality rate in recent report is less than 2%. Whereas resection of pancreatic tissue diminishes pancreatic function, the metabolic deficits are partially compensated by the better nutritional status resulting from pain relief and discontinuation of narcotics. In experienced hands, pancreaticoduodenectomy would appear to be the procedure of choice in patients with small pancreatic ducts. In selected patients, it appears to be a good procedure and, possibly, the operation of choice when the disease is predominantly present in the head of the pancreas and/or the uncinate process, especially when strictures involve the common bile duct and duodenum. The authors prefer the procedure when a hard, chronically-inflamed mass is present in the head of the pancreas. In our experience, if the suspicion of malignancy of the head of the pancreas persists at operation, pancreaticoduodenectomy is the procedure of choice. Before undertaking resection, the individual surgeon must assess his/her own experience; a low risk is essential. The continuing alcoholic is not a candidate for pancreaticoduodenectomy. Those who will not stop drinking should seldom be accepted for resection. The same limitation exists for the narcotic addict, but few such patients are encountered today. In the authors' experience, the operation is excellent for the relief of pain. It is the lifestyle of the continuing alcoholic that poses the more

  4. Lesson Learning at JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhettinger, David

    2011-01-01

    A lessons learned system is a hallmark of a mature engineering organization A formal lessons learned process can help assure that valuable lessons get written and published, that they are well-written, and that the essential information is "infused" into institutional practice. Requires high-level institutional commitment, and everyone's participation in gathering, disseminating, and using the lessons

  5. Diagnosis and management of chronic pancreatitis: current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammann, Rudolf W

    2006-03-18

    This paper reviews the current literature on chronic pancreatitis (CP). Despite marked progress in diagnostic tools, predominately imaging methods, no consensus has been reached on the nomenclature of CP, ie diagnosis, classification, staging, pathomechanisms of pain and its optimal treatment. A major problem is that no single reliable diagnostic test exists for early-stage CP except histopathology (rarely available). This stage is characterised typically by recurrent acute pancreatitis +/- necrosis (eg pseudocysts). Acute pancreatitis is a well-defined condition caused in 80% of cases by gallstones or alcohol abuse. Alcoholic pancreatitis, in contrast to biliary pancreatitis, progresses to CP in the majority of patients. However, a definite CP-diagnosis is often delayed because progressive dysfunction and/or calcification, the clinical markers of CP, develop on average 5 years from disease onset. The progression rate is variable and depends on several factors eg aetiology, smoking, continued alcohol abuse. Repeated function testing eg by the faecal elastase test, is the best alternative for histology to monitor progression (or non-progression) of suspected (probable) to definite CP. The pathomechanism of pain in CP is multifactorial and data from different series are hardly comparable mainly because insufficient data of the various variables ie diagnosis, classification, staging of CP, pain pattern and presumptive pain cause, are provided. Pain in CP is rarely intractable except in the presence of cancer, opiate addiction or extra-pancreatic pain causes. Local complications like pseudocysts or obstructive cholestasis are the most common causes of severe persistent pain which can be relieved promptly by an appropriate drainage procedure. Notably, partial to complete pain relief is a common feature in 50-80% of patients with late-stage CP irrespective of surgery and about 50% of CP-patients never need surgery (or endoscopic intervention). The spontaneous "burn

  6. Genetics Home Reference: hereditary pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Cancer Institute: Pancreatic Cancer National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Educational Resources (9 links) Boston Children's Hospital Cleveland Clinic: Cancer of the Pancreas Cleveland Clinic: Pancreatitis Disease InfoSearch: ...

  7. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Pancreatic Cancer Abraxane (Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation) Afinitor (Everolimus) ...

  8. Alcoholic hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic hallucinosis is a rare complication of chronic alcohol abuse characterized by predominantly auditory hallucinations that occur either during or after a period of heavy alcohol consumption. Bleuler (1916 termed the condition as alcohol hallucinosis and differentiated it from Delirium Tremens. Usually it presents with acoustic verbal hallucinations, delusions and mood disturbances arising in clear consciousness and sometimes may progress to a chronic form mimicking schizophrenia. One such case with multimodal hallucinations in a Defence Service Corps soldier is presented here.

  9. Uncommon pancreatic tumors and pseudotumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalwani, Neeraj; Mannelli, Lorenzo; Ganeshan, Dhakshina Moorthy; Shanbhogue, Alampady K; Dighe, Manjiri K; Tiwari, Hina Arif; Maximin, Suresh; Monti, Serena; Ragucci, Monica; Prasad, Srinivasa R

    2015-01-01

    A heterogeneous group of uncommon neoplastic and non-neoplastic pancreatic pathologies exists that can mimic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These "imitators" are unique and may demonstrate characteristic clinical and imaging features. Imaging characteristics of some of these diverse lesions are not well described in the literature, and erroneous diagnoses of these entities as pancreatic carcinoma may be responsible for unnecessary surgeries. Knowledge of these selected pancreatic pathologies is essential to facilitate optimal patient management. PMID:25063236

  10. Brain Metastasis in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Marko Kornmann; Doris Henne-Bruns; Jan Scheele; Christian Rainer Wirtz; Thomas Kapapa; Johannes Lemke

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a fatal disease with a 5-year survival rate below 5%. Most patients are diagnosed at an advanced tumor stage and existence of distant metastases. However, involvement of the central nervous system is rare in pancreatic cancer. We retrospectively analyzed all cases of brain metastases in pancreatic cancer reported to date focusing on patient characteristics, clinical appearance, therapy and survival. Including our own, 12 cases of brain metastases originating from pancreat...

  11. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer-2014

    OpenAIRE

    Andre Luiz De Souza; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2014-01-01

    Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Most of the patients are diagnosed in the metastatic staging. Consolidated risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, smoking and family history. Although controversial, diabetes mellitus has been increasingly associated with pancreatic cancer as a risk factor as opposed to just a manifestation of the disease. Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients and metformin...

  12. Concurrent Lymphoma and Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Jiun Miin Lai; Mehrdad Nikfarjam; Peter Crowley

    2011-01-01

    Context Retroperitoneal lymph node enlargement in patients with pancreatic cancer is sometimes treated as incurable disease. Nonmetastatic causes of lymphadenopathy should however be considered. Case reports Two cases of significant retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy in the setting of pancreatic cancer, treated by pancreaticoduodenectomy and lymph node dissection are described. Both cases had a final diagnosis of concurrent pancreatic cancer and lymphoma with no evidence of pancreatic lymph node...

  13. Obstructive Jaundice in Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hollands, M. J.; Little, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    Significant obstructive jaundice in chronic pancreatitis is generally considered to be rare. Eleven of 57 consecutive patients with proven chronic pancreatitis have developed significant obstructive jaundice of more than transient duration. Eight presented as jaundice complicating known pancreatitis and three as jaundice of unknown cause. Life table analysis showed a steady rise in the risk of developing jaundice up to the end of 10 years from the onset of chronic pancreatitis. Jaundice was f...

  14. Probing the urinary proteome of severe acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Flint, Richard S.; Phillips, Anthony R.J.; Farrant, Glenn J.; Mckay, Duncan; Buchanan, Christina M.; Cooper, Garth S.J.; Windsor, John A.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Proteinuria is a characteristic feature of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) that may allow unique insights into AP pathophysiology. This study used a proteomic approach to differentiate the abundant urinary proteins in AP patients. Materials and methods. Urine samples were prospectively collected from 4 groups (5 SAP, 10 mild gallstone AP, 7 mild alcohol AP, 7 controls). Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization t...

  15. Acute Pancreatitis Secondary to a Perivaterian Duodenal Diverticular Abscess

    OpenAIRE

    Pastides, P.; Bertaud, S.; Sarker, S. K.; S. Dindyal

    2010-01-01

    A 46-year-old previously fit lady was admitted with acute pancreatitis. She had no history of gallstones. She was not on any medications and consumed minimal amounts of alcohol. On subsequent investigations as to the causative factor, she was found at ultrasound to have an air-fluid filled cystic structure posterior to the head of pancreas which was compressing the common bile duct. Further magnetic resonance imaging and computer tomography scans showed that this cystic lesion was located aro...

  16. Acute pancreatitis and Cushing's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Clague, H W; B. Warren; Krasner, N.

    1984-01-01

    A case of acute necrotizing pancreatitis in a 53-year-old man with an ectopic adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) producing bronchial carcinoma is described. The aetiology of acute pancreatitis in relation to steroid therapy and malignancy is discussed and it is suggested that excess endogenous steroid production may also cause acute pancreatitis.

  17. Treatment Option Overview (Pancreatic Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  18. General Information about Pancreatic Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Pancreatic cancer is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... the cancer cells in the liver are actually pancreatic cancer cells. The disease is metastatic pancreatic cancer, not liver cancer. The ...

  19. Pancreatic ascariasis with periampullary carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Arulprakash, S; Sahu, Manoj Kumar; Dutta, Amit Kumar; Joseph, A; Chandy, George M.

    2015-01-01

    Ascarias lumbricoides infestation is endemic in tropical countries. Most infections are asymptomatic, but it can produce a wide spectrum of manifestations including hepatobiliary and pancreatic complications. There are reports of association of biliary ascariasis with bilary malignancies in the past, but same is not known for pancreatic ascariasis. We report a case of association of periampullary malignancy with pancreatic ascariasis.

  20. Prognostic Factors in Pancreatic Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Åke Andrén-Sandberg

    2012-01-01

    Prognostic factors in pancreatic cancer have been a hot topic for the clinical pancreatology, and many studies have been involved in the field. The author reviewed the pancreatic abstracts of American Pancreas Club 2011, and sumarized "highlight" of all the abstracts in prognostic factors in pancreatic cancer.

  1. Familial pancreatic cancer: genetic advances

    OpenAIRE

    Rustgi, Anil K.

    2014-01-01

    This review by Rustgi elaborates on the known genetic syndromes that underlie familial pancreatic cancer. It aims to delineate the subtypes of syndromic hereditary pancreatic cancer in which germline genetic mutations have been identified and nonsyndromic familial pancreatic cancer in which genetic information is emerging.

  2. Hypocalcemia in acute pancreatitis revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypocalcemia is a frequent finding in acute pancreatitis. Severe hypocalcemia can present with neurological as well as cardiovascular manifestations. Correction of hypocalcemia by parenteral calcium infusion remains a controversial topic as intracellular calcium overload is the central mechanism of acinar cell injury in pancreatitis. The current article deals with the art and science of calcium correction in pancreatitis patients.

  3. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  4. Cytosolic Double-Stranded DNA as a Damage-Associated Molecular Pattern Induces the Inflammatory Response in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells: A Plausible Mechanism for Tissue Injury-Associated Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taichi Nakamura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of unknown causes. There are many triggers causing pancreatitis, such as alcohol, common bile duct stone, virus and congenital or acquired stenosis of main pancreatic duct, which often involve tissue injuries. Pancreatitis often occurs in sterile condition, where the dead/dying pancreatic parenchymal cells and the necrotic tissues derived from self-digested-pancreas were observed. However, the causal relationship between tissue injury and pancreatitis and how tissue injury could induce the inflammation of the pancreas were not elucidated fully until now. This study demonstrates that cytosolic double-stranded DNA increases the expression of several inflammatory genes (cytokines, chemokines, type I interferon, and major histocompatibility complex in rat pancreatic stellate cells. Furthermore, these increase accompanied the multiple signal molecules genes, such as interferon regulatory factors, nuclear factor-kappa B, low-molecular-weight protein 2, and transporter associated with antigen processing 1. We suggest that this phenomenon is a plausible mechanism that might explain how cell damage of the pancreas or tissue injury triggers acute, chronic, and autoimmune pancreatitis; it is potentially relevant to host immune responses induced during alcohol consumption or other causes.

  5. Skin signs in acute pancreatitis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bassi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Subcutaneous manifestations of severe acute pancreatitis (Cullen’s sign, Gray- Turner’s sign, Fox’s sign, and Bryant’s sign are often discussed in journals and textbooks, but seldom observed. Although historically associated with acute pancreatitis, these clinical signs have been described in various other conditions associated with retroperitoneal hemorrhage. Case report: We describe the case of a 61-year-old male with no history of alcohol intake, who was admitted for epigastric pain, vomiting, and increasing serum amylase and lipase levels. Five days after admission, ecchymotic skin discoloration was noted over both flanks (Gray-Turner’s sign and the upper third of the thighs (Fox’s sign. Ten days later, he developed multiorgan failure and was transferred to the ICU for 5 days. Computed tomography revealed a large pancreatic fluid collection, which was subjected to EUS-guided drainage. Cholecystectomy was later performed for persistent obstructive jaundice. After more than 4 months of hospitalization, he died as a result of severe gastrointestinal bleeding. Discussion and conclusions: Skin manifestations of retroperitoneal hemorrhage in a patient with acute pancreatitis indicate a stormy disease course and poor prognosis. The severity of acute pancreatitis is currently estimated with validated scoring systems based on clinical, laboratory, and imaging findings. However, skin signs like the ones discussed above can represent a simple and inexpensive parameter for evaluating the severity and prognosis of this disease.

  6. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankona Raymond

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  7. Role of microRNAs in Alcohol-Induced Multi-Organ Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Kumar Natarajan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption and its abuse is a major health problem resulting in significant healthcare cost in the United States. Chronic alcoholism results in damage to most of the vital organs in the human body. Among the alcohol-induced injuries, alcoholic liver disease is one of the most prevalent in the United States. Remarkably, ethanol alters expression of a wide variety of microRNAs that can regulate alcohol-induced complications or dysfunctions. In this review, we will discuss the role of microRNAs in alcoholic pancreatitis, alcohol-induced liver damage, intestinal epithelial barrier dysfunction, and brain damage including altered hippocampus structure and function, and neuronal loss, alcoholic cardiomyopathy, and muscle damage. Further, we have reviewed the role of altered microRNAs in the circulation, teratogenic effects of alcohol, and during maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.

  8. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an important cause of maldigestion and a major complication in chronic pancreatitis. Normal digestion requires adequate stimulation of pancreatic secretion, sufficient production of digestive enzymes by pancreatic acinar cells, a pancreatic duct system without significant outflow obstruction and adequate mixing of the pancreatic juice with ingested food. Failure in any of these steps may result in pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, which leads to steatorrh...

  9. The clinical assessment of intraductal ultrasonography in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To assess and compare the clinical value of intraductal ultrasonography (IDUS) in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis with conventional imaging methods. Methods: IDUS was carried out in eighteen patients with pancreatic carcinoma and chronic pancreatitis

  10. Morphological and Functional Alterations of Small Intestine in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalya B Gubergrits

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Context The small intestine in chronic pancreatitis has not been investigated yet thoroughly. It would be important to understand fat metabolism in the course of this disease and could be explained if the small intestine has some pathological conditions and, due to this reason, pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work in all patients. Objective To investigate the pathophysiology of small intestine in chronic pancreatitis and to show the reason why in some cases pancreatic enzyme substitution does not work properly. Patients In the process of the study 33 chronic pancreatitis patients have been examined. Controls The control group includes 30 subjects without chronic pancreatitis similar for age, sex and alcohol consumption to the patients with chronic pancreatitis patients. Investigations Aspiration biopsy of jejunum mucosa followed by histological examination and investigation of intestinal enzymes by aspiration has been performed. Main outcome measures Metabolism at membranic level has been studied by enzymatic activity of amylase and lipase in the small intestine. Production of enzymes (monoglyceride lipase, lactase, saccharase, maltase, glycyl-lleucine dipeptidase promoting metabolism in enterocytes has been estimated as to their activity in homogenates of jejunum mucosasamples. Participation of mucosa in intestinal digestion has been assessed by alkaline phosphatase activity in a secretory chyme from proximal portion of jejunum. Absorptive capacity of jejunum was evaluated by D-xylose test results. DNA, lysozyme, immunoglobulin contents of chyme have also been calculated and bacteriological study of chyme has been also performed. Results Secondary enteritis, accompanied by moderate dystrophic changes of mucous membrane, thinning of limbus, and decrease of Paneth cell mitotic index, was found to occur in chronic pancreatitis patients. Enteritis is followed by changes in enzymatic processes in the sphere of membrane and intestinal

  11. Controlled clinical study on pancreatic stenting in the relief of pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the efficacy of pancreatic stenting in the relief of abdominal pain of advanced pancreatic cancer with dilated pancreatic duct.Methods A tolal of 61 patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma companied with dilated pancreatic duct were divided into two groups.Twenty-eight cases(two cases were excluded because of stent loss)in stent group treated with

  12. Atorvastatin-induced pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajapati Samir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Drugs account for 1-2% of all cases of pancreatitis. A 58-year-old man was prescribed atorvastatin 10 mg for 6 months for hyperlipidemia. He developed acute abdominal pain and vomiting with epigastric tenderness. Serum lipase and CT scan of the patient suggested the presence of acute pancreatitis. The patient was hospitalized; atorvastatin was stopped and treated symptomatically. He recovered completely within 10 days of drug withdrawal. The causality of the adverse drug reaction according to Naranjo and WHO-UMC Scale was probable. The exact mechanism of pancreatitis due to atorvastatin is not known. It may be a class effect of HMG CoA reductase inhibitors as it had been reported with other statins too. The definite causal relationship is difficult to establish, as rechallenge with the suspected drug was not done due to ethical consideration.

  13. Drug-induced pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Claudia; Maertin, Sandrina; Scheiber, Jonas; Ritter, Christoph A; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia

    2012-04-01

    Drugs are thought to be a rare cause for acute pancreatitis; however 525 different drugs are listed in the World Health Organization (WHO) database suspected to cause acute pancreatitis as a side effect. Many of them are widely used to treat highly prevalent diseases. The true incidence is not entirely clear since only few systematic population based studies exist. The majority of the available data are derived from case reports or case control studies. Furthermore, the causality for many of these drugs remains elusive and for only 31 of these 525 dugs a definite causality was established. Definite proof for causality is defined by the WHO classification if symptoms reoccur upon rechallenge.In the actual algorithm the diagnosis is confirmed if no other cause of acute pancreatitis can be detected, and the patient is taking one of the suspected drugs. PMID:22314811

  14. Bortezomib-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouraoui Elouni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir, Bortezomib is the first proteasome inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA and indicated for patients with multiple myeloma refractory to at least one prior therapy [1]. The most common adverse effects of bortezomib include hematological toxicities (especially transient thrombocytopenia, gastrointestinal disturbances, peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, fever, dyspnea, rash, and myalgia [2]. We herein present the first case of acute pancreatitis induced by bortezomib. A 58-year-old female was treated with vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone for a myeloma. She had no history of dyslipidemia or alcohol abuse. In relation to the relapse of the myeloma, two doses of bortezomib (1.3 mg/m2 were administered intravenously at a 4-day time interval. Concomitant medications in our patient included dexamethasone, levothyroxine for hypothyroidism, and paracetamol. Two days later, she presented because of abdominal pain of medium intensity localized in the epigastrium for which she was hospitalized. On admission, the patient had normal vital signs without fever. Abdominal examination revealed only mild epigastric tenderness. There was no rigidity or guarding. There were no palpable abdominal masses. The remainder of the examination was normal. A laboratory work-up showed a normal blood cell count and did not demonstrate hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia or hypercalcemia. A liver test, renal function, serum electrolytes and blood sugars were all normal.

  15. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol and Other Drug Effects. A Guide for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New Jersey State Dept. of Education, Trenton. Div. of General Academic Education.

    This curriculum guide on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is intended to help meet New Jersey secondary-level learning objectives in the area of chemical health education. The guide is organized into six sections, each with a conceptual statement, content outline, specific objectives, and lesson plans. The six sections and corresponding major concepts…

  16. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 17728 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  17. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  18. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 14466 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  19. Primary Pancreatic Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Extranodal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHLs represent up to 30-40% of all NHL cases. The gastrointestinal tract is the most commonly involved extranodal site; accounting for about half of such cases [1]. Stomach and the small intestine constitute the most common gastrointestinal sites. Secondary invasion of the pancreas from contiguous, retroperitoneal lymph node disease is the prevalent mode of involvement. Secondary involvement of the pancreas from the duodenum or adjacent peripancreatic lymphadenopathy is well-known. Primary pancreatic lymphoma (PPL is an extremely rare disease [2]. PPL can present as an isolated mass mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. However, unlike carcinomas, PPL are potentially treatable [3].

  20. Congenital pancreatic cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seddighy A

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cyst of the pancreas is an uncommon problem in the pediatric patient. The common symptoms at the time of diagnosis have been abdominal mass and pain or fullness, nausea and vomiting. Despite of various paraclinic methods for diagnosis, ultrasound is now recognized as the most effective and best noninvasive method for diagnosis of pancreatic cyts. Surgical intervention is the best mode of therapy. Upper abdominal cystic mass are seen in the fetus and newborn infants. In Amirkabir Hospital, during 12 years from 1981 to 1993, 8 pancreatic cysts have been operated on and only in this case it was congenital.

  1. Chemoradiotherapy in pancreatic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pathy Sushmita

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer patients present late in their course and surgical resection as a modality of treatment is of limited value. Majority develop loco-regional failure and distant metastasis, therefore, adjuvant therapy comprising of radiotherapy and chemotherapy are useful treatment options to achieve higher loco-regional control. Specialized irradiation techniques like intra-operative radiotherapy that help to increase the total tumor dose have been used, however, controvertible survival benefit was observed. Various studies have shown improved median and overall survival with chemoradiotherapy for advanced unresectable pancreatic carcinoma. The role of new agents such as topoisomerase I inhibitors also needs further clinical investigations.

  2. Unusual complications of pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computed tomography (CT) appearances of varying grades of severity of acute pancreatitis, and its complications, have been described. Body-wall ecchymosis in the periumbilical region (Cullen's sign) and loins (Grey Turner's sign), though rare, are frequently mentioned in the clinical literature. Massive, exclusively retroperitoneal, involvement is also exceedingly rare. Computed tomography depiction of these signs is sparsely documented. The CT documentation, with clinico-surgical correlation, of two cases of severe acute pancreatitis with these unusual complications, is presented. 9 refs., 3 figs

  3. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pai P

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracentesis was found to contain Gram positive cocci. Fluid amylase levels were high. On exploratory laparotomy, haemorrhagic oedematous pancreatitis was noticed. The patient expired on the 2nd post operative day.

  4. MR imaging of pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Katsuyoshi E-mail: itokatsu@po.cc.yamaguchi-u.ac.jp; Koike, Shinji; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2001-05-01

    This article presents current MR imaging techniques for the pancreas, and review a spectrum of MR imaging features of various pancreatic diseases. These include: 1) congenital anomalies such as anomalous union of pancreatobiliary ducts, divisum, and annular pancreas, 2) inflammatory diseases, including acute or chronic pancreatitis with complications, groove pancreatitis, and autoimmune pancreatitis, tumor-forming pancreatitis, 3) pancreatic neoplasms, including adenocarcinoma, islet cell tumors, and cystic neoplasms (microcystic adenoma, mucinous cystic neoplasms, and intraductal mucin-producing pancreatic tumor). Particular attention is paid to technical advances in MR imaging of the pancreas such as fat-suppression, MR pancreatography (single- or multi-slice HASTE), and thin-section 3D multiphasic contrast-enhanced dynamic sequences. Imaging characteristics that may lead to a specific diagnosis or narrow the differential diagnosis are also discussed.

  5. Isoniazid-Induced Recurrent Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Mattioni

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Context Drug induced pancreatitis are rare but potentially serious. Thus, drug withdrawal is warranted. Case report A 79-year-old woman who was treated with antituberculosis therapy for 5 weeks was admitted to our unit for pancreatitis. Usual etiologies of pancreatitis were eliminated. Because of vomiting, antituberculosis therapy was withdrawn and symptoms disappeared. Eight days later, the same treatment was reintroduced and the patient presented recurrent pancreatitis; thus, treatment was withheld again followed by disappearance of clinical and biological abnormalities. Two days later, a treatment without isoniazid was reintroduced and no recurrence of symptoms was observed. Conclusions We have experienced a case of isoniazid induced pancreatitis. This is a rare cause of pancreatitis but potentially fatal thus recognition of drug induced pancreatitis and definitive withdrawal of the drug is required.

  6. Ectopic Cushing syndrome secondary to recurrent pancreatoblastoma in a child: Lessons learnt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajid S Qureshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although rare, pancreatoblastoma is the most common pancreatic tumor in children. Cushing syndrome secondary to ectopic secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH from a pancreatoblastoma is very rare with only two previously reported cases. We present the management and the lesson learnt in a 3-year-old child with recurrent pancreatoblastoma with Cushing syndrome.

  7. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9±6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42±1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33±0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0±1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal enlargement and

  8. CT and ERCP findings of chronic focal pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hee Soo; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Kim, Eun Kyeong [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the major radiologic features of chronic focal pancreatitis in various imaging studies, with special emphasis on CT and ERCP findings. From 1991 to 1995, twelve patients were pathologically proved to be suffering from focal chronic pancreatitis after pancreatico-duodenectomy;for retrospective evaluation, imaging studies were available for eight(seven men, one woman;mean age 58.9{+-}6.6, range 47 to 67). Clinical, surgical, and radiological findings, including CT(n=8), ultrasound(n=7), ERCP(n=8) and UGI(n=3) were analysed. Seven male patients had suffered from chronic alcoholism for between 20 and 50 years. Serum bilirubin levels were normal in eight patients and alkaline phosphatase levels were normal in seven patients. Serum CA 19-9 levels were normal in all five patients who had undergone preoperative evaluation. Seven patients(87.5%) showed focal enlargement without definable margin on CT, and five of the six lesions detectable on ultrasound(83.3%) were ill defined hypoechoic nodules. Dilated side branches within lesions were seen in five of eight patients(83.3%) on CT and ERCP. Double duct signs were observed in siven(87.5%) patients, and dilated intrahepatic ducts in six(75%), with diameters ranging from 5 to 8mm(average:5.42{+-}1.96mm). The average ratio of pancreatic duct caliber to gland width was 0.33{+-}0.19. None of the patients had calcification within the lesion and one case showed intraductal calcification. None showed perivascular fat obliteration around the superior mesenteric artery or celiac axis. The average biductal distance between abnormal common bile duct and the immediately adjacent pancreatic duct was 4.0{+-}1.15mm. One of three cases who under went a UGI examination showed severe luminal narrowing and mucosal thickening in the second protion of the duodenum, another showed double contour, and the other merely showed widening of the C-loop of the duodenum. Chronic focal pancreatitis mostly demonstrated ill defined focal

  9. Neoadjuvant Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer: Review Article

    OpenAIRE

    Moritz Pross; Wellner, Ulrich F.; Kim C Honselmann; Carlo Jung; Steffen Deichmann; Tobias Keck; Dirk Bausch

    2015-01-01

    We performed a literature review for neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer. We divided the results into resectable disease and local advanced pancreatic cancer. Results Neoadjuvant therapy in pancreatic cancer is safe. But currently no standard guidelines exist in neoadjuvant approaches on pancreatic cancer. For local advanced pancreatic cancer the available data tends to show a positive effect on survival rates for neoadjuvant approaches.

  10. Alcoholism (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that interferes with physical or mental health, and social, family or job responsibilities. This addiction can lead to liver, circulatory and neurological problems. Pregnant women who drink alcohol in any amount ...

  11. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts A severe form of alcohol withdrawal called delirium tremens can cause: Agitation Fever Seeing or feeling things ... watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may include: Monitoring of blood pressure, body ...

  12. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Andreas K; Herrmann, Ken; Eckel, Florian; Beer, Ambros J

    2011-01-01

    Morphology-based imaging modalities have replaced classical conventional nuclear medicine modalities for detection of liver or pancreatic lesions. With positron emission tomography and the glucose analog F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), a sensitive and specific modality for the detection of hepatic metastases and extrahepatic tumor deposits from hepatocellular or pancreatic cancer is available. F-18 FDG PET can increase the accuracy of staging primary tumors of the liver or the pancreas, and can be used for response monitoring. Radiopharmaceuticals such as Ga-68 DOTATOC and F-18 DOPA allow the specific detection of neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors and their metastatic deposits. Hybrid scanners such as PET-CT integrate morphologic and metabolic information, and allow to increase the sensitivity and specificity of noninvasive imaging in many tumor entities. The development of specific radiopharmaceuticals and technical innovations such as SPECT-CT has increased the reliability of conventional scintigraphic imaging. This chapter focuses on the use of PET-CT in hepatobiliary and pancreatic cancers. PMID:21331938

  13. Radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents some of the problems and concepts related to the development of a radioimmunoassay of pancreatic glucagon. A specific derivatization of glucagon for raising specific anti-glucagon antisera is introduced, and special procedures for diminishing the non-specific effect are outlined. (G.T.H.)

  14. Chronic Pancreatitis in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fewer than 10 grams of fat. About 20 potato chips contain 10 grams of fat, so it takes discipline to make sure to stay within this range. Patients who have lost the ability to digest food will be prescribed pills containing pancreatic enzymes to help with digestion. They may also be ...

  15. Pancreatic Cancer Stage 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lung, liver, and peritoneal cavity. An inset shows cancer cells spreading from the pancreas, through the blood and lymph system, to another ... abdomen that contains the intestines, stomach, and liver). Cancer may also have spread to ... pancreas or to lymph nodes. Stage IV pancreatic cancer. ...

  16. Hyperamylasaemia: pathognomonic to pancreatitis?

    OpenAIRE

    Burden, Sam; Poon, Anna Sau Kuk; Masood, Kausar; Didi, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    An 82-year-old woman, presented with a history of vomiting, abdominal mass and a significantly raised amylase, but no clinical evidence of pancreatitis. Abdominal ultrasound and CT scans showed an ovarian tumour, and no evidence of pancreatitis—as is often associated with a raised amylase. The patient underwent bilateral ovariectomy and hysterectomy and made a good recovery.

  17. Focal autoimmune pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Maren, N Vander; Everarts, Ph; Nicaise, G.

    2014-01-01

    A 70-year-old man was referred for evaluation of mild epigastric discomfort with tiredness. He had no particular medical history and admitted drinking two glasses of wine a day. Biology showed a small increase in CRP and pancreatic enzymes (lipases and amylases).

  18. Autoantibodies in chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Marner, B; Pedersen, N T;

    1985-01-01

    In 60 consecutive patients clinically suspected of having chronic pancreatitis the serum concentration of the immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), the IgG- and IgA-type non-organ-specific autoantibodies against nuclear material (ANA), smooth and striated muscle, mitochondria, basal membrane, and...

  19. Pancreatic Cancer: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabar, Cinthya S; Winter, Jordan M

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic cancer is now the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States, yet advances in treatment options have been minimal over the past decade. In this review, we summarize the evaluation and treatments for this disease. We highlight molecular advances that hopefully will soon translate into improved outcomes. PMID:27546841

  20. CT-Guided Pancreatic Percutaneous Fine-Needle Biopsy in Differential Diagnosis between Pancreatic Cancer and Chronic Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Carlucci; Alessandro Zerbi; Danilo Parolini; Sandro Sironi; Angelo Vanzulli; Carlo Staudacher; Agostino Faravelli; Paola Garancini; Alessandro del Maschio; Valerio di Carlo

    1989-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis is still difficult to establish. In 63 patients with suspected pancreatic neoplasm we performed: serum CA 19-9 assessment, abdominal ultrasound, CT scan and CT-guided pancreatic percutaneous fine-needle biopsy. The conclusive diagnosis was pancreatic cancer in 40 patients and chronic pancreatitis in 23 patients. With regard to the differential diagnosis, sensitivity and specificity were respectively 80% and ...

  1. Acute pancreatitis: Etiology and common pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-Jun Wang; Chun-Fang Gao; Dong Wei; Cun Wang; Si-Qin Ding

    2009-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease of the pancreas. The etiology and pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis have been intensively investigated for centuries worldwide. Many causes of acute pancreatitis have been discovered, but the pathogenetic theories are controversial. The most common cause of acute pancreatitis is gallstone impacting the distal common bile-pancreatic duct. The majority of investigators accept that the main factors for acute billiary pancreatitis are pancreatic hyperstimulation and bile-pancreatic duct obstruction which increase pancreatic duct pressure and active trypsin reflux. Acute pancreatitis occurs when intracellular protective mechanisms to prevent trypsinogen activation or reduce trypsin activity are overwhelmed. However, little is known about the other acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that acute biliary pancreatitis and other causes of acute pancreatitis possess a common pathogenesis. Pancreatic hyperstimulation and pancreatic duct obstruction increase pancreatic duct pressure, active trypsin reflux, and subsequent unregulated activation of trypsin within pancreatic acinar cells. Enzyme activation within the pancreas leads to auto-digestion of the gland and local inflammation. Once the hypothesis is confirmed, traditional therapeutic strategies against acute pancreatitis may be improved. Decompression of pancreatic duct pressure should be advocated in the treatment of acute pancreatitits which may greatly improve its outcome.

  2. Clinical Study of 224 Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Li Zhang; Fei Li; Ya-Min Zhen; Ang Li; Yu Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Hypertriglyceridenia (HTG) is the most common etiology of acute pancreatitis (AP) after alcohol and gallstone-induced disease.Elevation of serum triglyceride (TG) levels to ≥ 1000 mg/dl in a patient with AP strongly indicates HTG as the cause.The absolute risk of pancreatitis based on serum TG ≤1000 mg/dl has not been clearly defined.The aims of this study were to address the role of elevated TG levels between 500 and 1000 mg/dl in the clinical course of HTG pancreatitis (HTGP);and assess the relationship between the level of serum TG and disease severity.Methods:A total of 224 HTGP patients between 2007 and 2011 were divided into two subgroups.Totally,122 patients in Group A had serum TG >1000 mg/dl;102 patients in Group B had maximal TG levels between 500 and 1000 mg/dl accompanied by lactescent serum;100 patients with biliary AP and 99 patients with alcoholic AP hospitalized during the study period were enrolled as controls.The clinical and biochemical data were analyzed.Results:The clinical presentation ofHTG-induced pancreatitis was similar to other causes.Severe form of AP in Group A was higher than Group B (x2 =4.002,P =0.045).The severity with HTGP was significantly higher as compared to biliaryAP (x2 =33.533,P =0.000) and alcoholic AP (x2 =7.179,P =0.007).Systemic complications with HTGP were significantly higher than biliary AP (x2 =58.763,P =0.000).Conclusions:The study demonstrated that TG level ≥500 mg/dl should raise a high degree of suspicion,especially if no other etiology of AP is apparent.The severity of HTGP seems to correlate directly with TG level.HTGP seems be more severe than other causes of AP.

  3. Diabetes and Pancreatic Cancer-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Luiz De Souza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Context Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Most of the patients are diagnosed in the metastatic staging. Consolidated risk factors include chronic pancreatitis, smoking and family history. Although controversial, diabetes mellitus has been increasingly associated with pancreatic cancer as a risk factor as opposed to just a manifestation of the disease. Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients and metformin as a biologic therapy for pancreatic cancer are herein discussed. Methods Review of the literature and evaluation of two Abstracts (#180 and #253 from the 2014 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium focusing on pancreatic adenocarcinoma and diabetes diagnosis and therapeutics. Results Abstract #180 discusses the role of metabolic biomarkers in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer among diabetic patients, especially recently diagnosed. Abstract #253 debates metformin as a candidate radiosensitizer for pancreatic cancer, although it fails to reject its null hypothesis. Conclusion Search for methods that can identify pancreatic cancer patients among new-onset diabetic patients could result in early diagnosis of this lethal disease. Metformin is a target therapy that increases median overall survival but is not a radiation sensitizer in patients with pancreatic cancer who present with diabetes.

  4. A multi-institute case-control study on the risk factors of developing pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, S; Watanabe, S; Nakamura, K; Omata, M; Oguchi, H; Ohashi, K; Ohyanagi, H; Fujiki, T; Motojima, K

    1992-08-01

    A multi-institute, hospital-based, case-control study on pancreatic cancer was carried out to examine its association with preceding diseases, cigarette smoking, alcohol drinking and dietary factors. Analyses were based on 124 newly diagnosed exocrine pancreatic cancer cases and sex-, age- and institute-matched hospital controls in seven hospitals in Japan. Cigarette smoking showed a positive association with the risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Especially among smokers, a risk enhancing effect of involuntary/passive smoking prior to twenty years of age was observed (P tea or alcohol consumption. Among dietary factors, favoring food of a salty taste and drinking green tea five cups per day or more were positively associated with the risk. Drinking milk and eating fish everyday were inversely associated with the risk. PMID:1434027

  5. Dairy products and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis of 14 cohort studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genkinger, J M; Wang, M; Li, R; Albanes, D; Anderson, K E; Bernstein, L; van den Brandt, P A; English, D R; Freudenheim, J L; Fuchs, C S; Gapstur, S M; Giles, G G; Goldbohm, R A; Håkansson, N; Horn-Ross, P L; Koushik, A; Marshall, J R; McCullough, M L; Miller, A B; Robien, K; Rohan, T E; Schairer, C; Silverman, D T; Stolzenberg-Solomon, R Z; Virtamo, J; Willett, W C; Wolk, A; Ziegler, R G; Smith-Warner, S A

    2014-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer has few early symptoms, is usually diagnosed at late stages, and has a high case-fatality rate. Identifying modifiable risk factors is crucial to reducing pancreatic cancer morbidity and mortality. Prior studies have suggested that specific foods and nutrients, such as dairy products and constituents, may play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis. In this pooled analysis of the primary data from 14 prospective cohort studies, 2212 incident pancreatic cancer cases were identified during follow-up among 862 680 individuals. Adjusting for smoking habits, personal history of diabetes, alcohol intake, body mass index (BMI), and energy intake, multivariable study-specific hazard ratios (MVHR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using the Cox proportional hazards models and then pooled using a random effects model. There was no association between total milk intake and pancreatic cancer risk (MVHR = 0.98, 95% CI = 0.82-1.18 comparing ≥500 with 1-69.9 g/day). Similarly, intakes of low-fat milk, whole milk, cheese, cottage cheese, yogurt, and ice-cream were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. No statistically significant association was observed between dietary (MVHR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.77-1.19) and total calcium (MVHR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.71-1.12) intake and pancreatic cancer risk overall when comparing intakes ≥1300 with vitamin D intake and pancreatic cancer risk. Findings were consistent within sex, smoking status, and BMI strata or when the case definition was limited to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Overall, these findings do not support the hypothesis that consumption of dairy foods, calcium, or vitamin D during adulthood is associated with pancreatic cancer risk. PMID:24631943

  6. Methylation of the SPARC gene promoter and its clinical implication in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lv Shunli

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC plays a pivotal role in regulating cell-matrix interactions and tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, and migration. Detection of SPARC gene methylation may be useful as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer. Methods Methylation of the SPARC gene transcriptional regulation region (TRR was detected using bisulfite-specific (BSP PCR-based sequencing analysis in 40 cases of pancreatic cancer and the adjacent normal tissues, 6 chronic pancreatitis tissues, and 6 normal pancreatic tissues. BSP cloning-based sequencing analysis was also performed in selected cases. Clinicopathological data from the cancer patients were collected and analyzed. Results Analysis of SPARC gene TRR methylation showed two hypermethylation wave peak regions: CpG Region 1 (CpG site 1-7 and CpG Region 2 (CpG site 8-12. Pancreatic tissues have shown methylation in both regions with gradual increases from normal, chronic pancreatitis, and adjacent normal tissues to cancerous tissues. However, Methylation of CpG Region 2 was more sensitive than CpG Region 1 in pancreatic tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the methylation level of CpG Region 2 was associated with increased tumor size and exposure to the risk factors (tobacco smoke and alcohol consumption for developing pancreatic cancer. Conclusion Methylation of the SPARC gene, specifically CpG Region 2, may be an early event during pancreatic tumorigenesis and should be further evaluated as a tumorigenesis marker for early detection of pancreatic cancer.

  7. Acute pancreatitis: clinical vs. CT findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a prospective study of 91 patients with acute pancreatitis, computed tomographic (CT) findings were correlated with the clinical type of acute pancreatitis. In acute edematous pancreatitis (63 patients; 16 with repeat CT), CT was normal (28%) or showed inflammation limited to the pancreas (61%). Phlegmonous changes were present in 11%, including one patient with focal pancreatic hemorrhage, indicating that clinically unsuspected hemorrhagic pancreatitis can occur. In acute necrotizing (hemorrhagic, suppurative) pancreatitis (nine patients; eight with repeat CT), no patient had a normal CT scan and 89% had phlegmonous changes. One patient had hemorrhagic pancreatitis and three had abscesses. In acute exacerbation of chronic pancreatitis (10 patients; three with repeat CT), there were pancreatic calcifications (70%), a focal mass (40%), and pancreatic ductal dilation (30%). On follow-up CT, the findings of acute pancreatitis did not always disappear with resolution of the clinical symptons. This was especialy true of phlegmonous pancreatitis, where the CT findings could persist for months

  8. Acute Pancreatitis: Surgery, Pathophysiology and Probiotic Prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnen, L.P. van

    2006-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is a challenging disease with a clinical course that is often difficult to predict. In severe acute pancreatitis, mortality increases significantly if intestinal bacteria translocate from the intestine and infect pancreatic necrosis. Surgical and prophylactic treatment strategies

  9. Pancreatic panniculitis complicated by infection with Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Omland

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of pancreatic panniculitis in a patient with alcohol abuse where Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum was isolated from a pannicular nodule on the crus. The patient was started on linezolid treatment leading to regression of the patient's symptoms. Upon discontinuation of linezolid treatment progression of the skin symptoms progressed.

  10. Exocrine pancreatic enzyme and calcium secretion in health and pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Clain, J E; Barbezat, G O; Marks, I N

    1981-01-01

    Calcium, enzyme, and total protein secretion were measured in secretin stimulated pancreatic juice in health, "early" chronic pancreatitis, and in chronic calcific pancreatitis. Increased concentrations of trypsin, total protein, and calcium, and increased outputs of calcium and protein were shown to be present in the "early" stages of the disease, indicating that an environment conducive to the formation of protein plugs and possibly later calcification already exists.

  11. Role of pancreatic stellate cells in chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    McCarroll, Joshua A.; Naim, Stephanie; Sharbeen, George; Russia, Nelson; Lee, Julia; Kavallaris, Maria; Goldstein, David; Phillips, Phoebe A.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly chemoresistant. A major contributing factor is the characteristic extensive stromal or fibrotic reaction, which comprises up to 90% of the tumor volume. Over the last decade there has been intensive research into the role of the pro-fibrogenic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and their interaction with pancreatic cancer cells. As a result of the significant alterations in the tumor microenvironment following activation of PSCs, tumor progression, and chemoresistanc...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging for acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Bo; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is characterized by acute chemical injury of the pancreatic parenchyma and peripancreatic tissue. The increased frequency of death in acute pancreatitis is directly correlated with the degree and progress of pancreatic necrosis. Moreover, the occurrence of some local complications in acute pancreatitis, such as pancreatic hemorrhage, peripancreatic abscess or large pseudocyst, and pseudoaneurysm, could influence the choice of treatment for these patients. Magnetic resonance...

  13. Contemporary Management of Acute Biliary Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Orhan Ozkan

    2014-01-01

    Acute biliary pancreatitis is one of the major causes of acute pancreatitis.Gallstones, biliary sludge and microlithiasis, especially in pancreatitis without detectable reason, can be the cause of acute pancreatitis. Acute biliary pancreatitis has many controversions in the literature, and its classification and guidelines are being updated very frequently. Atlanta classifications which determine the definitions and guidelines about acute pancreatitis were renewed and published in 2013. It ha...

  14. Genetic polymorphism of N-acetyltransferases, glutathione S-transferase M1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in relation to malignant and benign pancreatic disease risk. The International Pancreatic Disease Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, H; Malaveille, C; Lowenfels, A B; Maisonneuve, P; Hautefeuille, A; Boyle, P

    1998-06-01

    Carcinogens present in cigarette smoke and diet have been associated with pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that heterocyclic and aromatic amines implicated in these exposures could be involved as causative agents and that therefore genetic variation in enzymes metabolizing these carcinogens could modify the risk of developing malignant and benign pancreatic disease. The effect of the genetic polymorphism of acetyltransferases (NAT1) and NAT2), glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) on the risk of pancreatic diseases (cancer, pancreatitis) was examined in a case-control study. PCR-based assays were used for genotype analysis of genomic DNA from whole blood cells. Samples collected from Caucasian patients with diagnosed pancreatic cancer (n = 81), with non-alcoholic (n = 41) and alcoholic pancreatitis (n = 73) and from asymptomatic control subjects (n = 78) were analysed. The prevalence of GSTM1 null genotype and of NAT2 fast and slow acetylator genotypes and the distribution of frequencies for NQO1 genotypes did not differ in subjects with pancreatic diseases vs controls. For NAT1 slow acetylators a non-significant excess (P = 0.18) was found among pancreatic cancer cases vs controls. There was a significant over-representation of the GSTM1 AB or B genotype in all pancreatic disease cases combined (OR = 2.6; P < 0.05). When concurrent controls were pooled with literature controls (n = 1427), OR was 1.4 (P = 0.08). The results of this study, requiring confirmation, suggest that the polymorphism of GSTM1 and NAT1 enzymes may be associated with a modest increase in susceptibility to pancreatic diseases. PMID:9696930

  15. Pancreatic encephalopathy- a rare complication of severe acute biliary pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Denis Constantin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pancreatic encephalopathy is a rare complication of severe acute pancreatitis, with high mortality, being difficult to diagnose and treat, thus requiring continuous research regarding its management. Materials and Methods. Of 20 patients diagnosed with severe acute pancreatitis on admission at Department of Emergency and Admission (DEA, from January 1st 2010 to March 31st 2014, 5 cases complicated by pancreatic encephalopathy were analyzed using a descriptive observational, retrospective, single-center study. Results. The study shows different types of diagnostic algorithm and therapeutical approaches, in correlation with morbidity and mortality rates. Conclusions. Our study highlighted the fact that speed is critical, early management being the key to outcome.

  16. Antiretroviral drugs and acute pancreatitis in HIV/AIDS patients: is there any association? A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Natalia Mejias; Ferreira, Felipe Augusto Yamauti; Yonamine, Raquel Yumi; Chehter, Ethel Zimberg

    2014-01-01

    In HIV-seropositive individuals, the incidence of acute pancreatitis may achieve 40% per year, higher than the 2% found in the general population. Since 1996, when combined antiretroviral therapy, known as HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy), was introduced, a broad spectrum of harmful factors to the pancreas, such as opportunistic infections and drugs used for chemoprophylaxis, dropped considerably. Nucleotide analogues and metabolic abnormalities, hepatic steatosis and lactic acidosis have emerged as new conditions that can affect the pancreas. To evaluate the role of antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV/AIDS in a scenario of high incidence of acute pancreatitis in this population, a systematic review was performed, including original articles, case reports and case series studies, whose targets were HIV-seropositive patients that developed acute pancreatitis after exposure to any antiretroviral drugs. This association was confirmed after exclusion of other possible etiologies and/or a recurrent episode of acute pancreatitis after re-exposure to the suspected drug. Zidovudine, efavirenz, and protease inhibitors are thought to lead to acute pancreatitis secondary to hyperlipidemia. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors, despite being powerful inhibitors of viral replication, induce a wide spectrum of side effects, including myelotoxicity and acute pancreatitis. Didanosine, zalcitabine and stavudine have been reported as causes of acute and chronic pancreatitis. They pose a high risk with cumulative doses. Didanosine with hydroxyurea, alcohol or pentamidine are additional risk factors, leading to lethal pancreatitis, which is not a frequent event. In addition, other drugs used for prophylaxis of AIDS-related opportunistic diseases, such as sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim and pentamidine, can produce necrotizing pancreatitis. Despite comorbidities that can lead to pancreatic involvement in the HIV/AIDS population, antiretroviral drug-induced pancreatitis

  17. Statin Use and Its Impact on Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Lee, Sang Hoon; Lee, Hyun Jik; Chung, Moon Jae; Park, Jeong Youp; Park, Seung Woo; Song, Si Young; Bang, Seungmin

    2016-05-01

    Statins are cholesterol-lowering medications that are associated with a number of signaling pathways involved in carcinogenesis. Recent observational studies raised the possibility that the use of statins may reduce overall mortality in various types of cancer. We investigated whether statins used after pancreatic cancer diagnosis are associated with longer survival in pancreatic cancer patients.We retrospectively analyzed data from 1761 patients newly diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma between January 1, 2006, and December 31, 2014. We used the time-dependent Cox proportional hazards regression model to estimate mortality among pancreatic cancer patients according to statin use.Among the 1761 pancreatic cancer patients, 118 patients had used statins. During the study period, 1176 patients (66.7%) died. After adjusting for age, sex, location of cancer, cancer stage, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, smoking, alcohol use, body mass index, and CA 19-9, statin use was associated with a lower risk of cancer death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.780; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.617-0.986), especially among simvastatin users (HR, 0.554; 95% CI, 0.312-0.982) and atorvastatin users (HR, 0.636; 95% CI, 0.437-0.927). Subgroup analysis showed that overall survival was statistically significantly longer in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer (log-rank P = 0.024).We found that the use of simvastatin and atorvastatin after cancer diagnosis is associated with longer survival in patients with nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:27175667

  18. Canagliflozin-induced pancreatitis: a rare side effect of a new drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhary, Mudit; Kabbani, Ahmad A; Chhabra, Akansha

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is most commonly attributed to gallstones, alcohol abuse, and metabolic disorders such as hyperlipidemia and hypercalcemia. Medications are an infrequent yet commonly overlooked etiology of pancreatitis. Although several drugs have been implicated, antidiabetic agents are a rare cause for drug-induced pancreatitis. Canagliflozin is a new drug in the class of SGLT-2 inhibitors used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Serious reported side effects include renal impairment, hyperkalemia, and hypotension. Pancreatitis as a result of canagliflozin, however, is exceedingly rare. Here we describe a case of a 33-year old female who presented with severe acute pancreatitis in the setting of recent initiation of canagliflozin. Given the timing of her presentation and after excluding all other possible etiologies, it was determined that canagliflozin was the likely source of her illness. This case highlights the importance of identifying drug-induced pancreatitis, especially in novel drugs, as it is commonly neglected in patients with multiple medical comorbidities and those taking numerous medications. Prompt identification of drug-induced pancreatitis can improve management as well as decrease morbidity and mortality in these individuals. PMID:26170677

  19. Follicular pancreatitis: a distinct form of chronic pancreatitis-an additional mimic of pancreatic neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rajib K; Xie, Bill H; Patton, Kurt T; Lisovsky, Mikhail; Burks, Eric; Behrman, Stephen W; Klimstra, David; Deshpande, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Follicular pancreatitis is a recently described variant of chronic pancreatitis characterized clinically by the formation of a discrete pancreatic mass and histologically by the presence of florid lymphoid aggregates with reactive germinal centers. Our aim was to study the clinical and histologic features of follicular pancreatitis, as well as to critically examine potential overlap with autoimmune pancreatitis. Immunohistochemistry for Bcl-2, CD21, κ and λ light chains as well as IgG4 and IgG were performed. We found a total of 6 patients (male-female ratio, 2:1; mean age, 57 years) who fulfilled the diagnosis of follicular pancreatitis in our institutions. Four had an incidental diagnosis, while two presented with abdominal pain, fatigue, and elevated liver enzymes. On imaging, 3 patients had a discrete solid mass, whereas 2 cases showed a dilated main pancreatic duct, mimicking an intraductal pancreatic mucinous neoplasm on imaging. One patient had a lesion in the intra-pancreatic portion of the common bile duct. On histopathology, all cases showed numerous lymphoid follicles with Bcl-2-negative germinal centers either in a periductal or in a more diffuse (periductal and intra-parenchymal) fashion, but without attendant storiform fibrosis, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. IgG4-to-IgG ratio was <40% in 5 cases. A comparison cohort revealed germinal centers in 25% of type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis and 2% of type 2 autoimmune pancreatitis cases, but none were periductal in location. In conclusion, follicular pancreatitis, an under-recognized mimic of pancreatic neoplasms is characterized by intrapancreatic lymphoid follicles with reactive germinal centers. PMID:26563969

  20. Computed tomography of pancreatic trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey, R.B. Jr.; Federle, M.P.; Crass, R.A.

    1983-05-01

    In a review of over 300 CT scans of abdominal trauma, we encountered 13 patients with surgically proved pancreatic injuries. CT correctly diagnosed pancreatic fractures, contusions, or posttraumatic pseudocysts in 11 of these patients. There were two false positive and two false negative diagnoses. The CT diagnosis of pancreatic trauma may be difficult in selected patients who are scanned soon after injury. Acutely, the actual plane of a pancreatic fracture may be difficult to identify with CT, and the peripancreatic soft-tissue changes of traumatic pancreatitis are often subtle. Eight of 11 correctly diagnosed pancreatic injuries showed thickening of the left anterior renal fascia on CT scans. This sign should prompt a critical evaluation of the pancreas of the traumatized patient.

  1. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of 99/sup m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained in 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  2. Biliary scintigraphy in acute pancreatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A prospective study was carried out in 60 patients to determine the efficacy of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA scintigraphy in differentiating biliary pancreatitis from nonbiliary pancreatitis. Forty patients were classified as having biliary pancreatitis and 20 patients as having the nonbiliary type. Scintigraphic scans were divided into five main types according to the time to visualization of the gallbladder and the time to excretion of /sup 99m/Tc-PIPIDA into the intestinal tract. Normal scans were obtained on 95% of patients (19/20) with nonbiliary pancreatitis; 22.5% of patients (9/40) with biliary pancreatitis had normal scans. It is concluded that elevated amylase levels together with an abnormal biliary scan, as defined by the criteria presented here, indicate biliary pancreatitis, while a normal scan largely excludes such diagnosis

  3. Carbofuran-Induced Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizos E

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Carbamate insecticides are widely used in commercial agriculture and home gardening. A serious side effect of organophosphate and carbamate intoxication is the development of acute pancreatitis. CASE REPORT: A 36-year-old Caucasian woman was admitted to our hospital with cholinergic crisis and pancreatitis soon after the ingestion of a carbamate insecticide (carbofuran. An abdominal CT scan disclosed pancreatic necrosis with intrapancreatic fluid collection, consistent with the development of a pancreatic pseudocyst in a subsequent CT scan. No predisposing factor for pancreatitis was evident. Pseudocholinesterase levels returned to normal 7 days later and the patient was discharged in good physical condition one month after admission. DISCUSSION: Although acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after organophosphate intoxication, it is quite rare after carbamate ingestion and has not been previously reported after carbofuran intoxication.

  4. Retrospective Analyses Of The Acute Pancreatitis With Patients In The West Black Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet YAŞAR, Ali Kemal TAŞKIN, İsmet ÖZAYDIN, Yavuz DEMİRARAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In these study patients who were our clinic with an etiology, diagnosis andtreatment methods, morbidity, mortality and effect of Ranson criteria to prognosis wereexamined retrospectively. Material and Method: In the study 44 mild and 18 severe total 62 AP cases among 2003-2008at the General Surgery of Duzce University were analyzed retrospectively. Results: A etiologic factor was 40 (66,7 %, gallstone 11 (17, 7% idiopathic, 4 (6,4 %hyperlipidemia, 3 (4,8% alchol-hyperlipidemia, 2 (3,2 % alcohol, 2 (3,2 % after ERCPcomplications. Patients were followed up with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis, the average ageof 59.6 (18 - 84 and 23 (37% were man, 39 (63% were woman. ERCP were performed to 14patients with billiary pancreatitis 2 patients for the persistent billiary pancreatitis and for the 6patients cholecystitis accompanied pancreatitis in the first 48 hours period, 23 patients followingthe acute pancreatitis attack were performed cholecystectomy. Acute pancreatitis patients first6 cases of biliary 3 reputations have been switched to laparoscopic open cholecystectomy isbeing performed. 3 patients peritoneal lavage under local anesthesia, 4 patients’ diagnosticlaparoscopy and 2 patients nerosectomy were performed. Mean hospitalization times were 9.8days for mild and 11.2 days severe. In the severe group idiopathic a etiology 3 (4.8 % patientswere exitus. Conclusion: Acute pancreatitis is a disease that can watch a high mortality rate. Biliary factorswere the most common etiological factor. Idiopathic AP played a role in second place and wehave observed that the effect of alcohol is quite low. In biliary acute pancreatitis ERCP is auseful method in the first stage. Overall mortality in severe AP, as observed in patients with thediagnosis, treatment and follow-up was important in these patients.

  5. Rapid Evolution from the First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis to Chronic Pancreatitis in Human Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Elie Aoun; Adam Slivka; Papachristou, Dionysios J.; David C. Whitcomb; Ferga C. Gleeson; Georgios I Papachristou

    2007-01-01

    Context Growing evidence suggests that recurrent acute pancreatitis leads to chronic pancreatitis, but this sequence is seldom reported in human subjects. The sentinel acute pancreatitis event hypothesis suggests that an initial episode of acute pancreatitis is the first step in a complicated series of events ultimately leading to chronic pancreatitis. Objective To identify patients who evolved from recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis. Setting The Severity of Acute Pancreatit...

  6. Acute pancreatitis following paracetamol overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Roland

    2009-01-01

    A 17-year-old woman presented with acute abdominal pain and vomiting 3 h after she attempted to commit suicide by ingesting 30×500 mg paracetamol tablets. The woman was found to have a raised amylase level, and a CT scan confirmed the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. According to the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale, it is likely that the pancreatitis was induced by the paracetamol ingestion. A literature search reported 36 cases of pancreatitis following excessive doses of par...

  7. Approaches Towards Endogenous Pancreatic Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Meenal; Kanitkar, Meghana; Bhonde, Ramesh R.

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of pancreatic regeneration in mammals has been well documented. It has been shown that pancreatic tissue is able to regenerate in several species of mammal after surgical insult. This tissue is also known to have the potential to maintain or increase its β-cell mass in response to metabolic demands during pregnancy and obesity. Since deficiency in β-cell mass is the hallmark of most forms of diabetes, it is worthwhile understanding pancreatic regeneration in the context of this...

  8. Acute pancreatitis complicating severe dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Vishakha Jain; O P Gupta; Tarun Rao; Siddharth Rao

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is an arthropod borne viral infection endemic in tropical and subtropical continent. Severe dengue is life threatening. Various atypical presentations of dengue have been documented. But we present a rare and fatal complication of severe dengue in form of acute pancreatitis. A 27-year-old male had presented with severe dengue in decompensated shock and with pain in abdomen due to pancreatitis. The pathogenesis of acute pancreatitis in dengue is not clearly understood, but various mecha...

  9. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Bulajic, Milutin; Panic, Nikola; Löhr, Johannes Matthias

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and inducing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smoking habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsiste...

  10. Lung Injury in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaele Pezzilli; Lara Bellacosa; Cristina Felicani

    2009-01-01

    Most knowledge has been accumulated on the mechanisms involved in the development of distant organ injuries during the course of severe acute pancreatitis. Among the various distant organ dysfunctions, both the development of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome represent serious complications. In the following paragraphs the pathophysiological mechanisms capable of determining lung injury during the course of acute pancreatitis will be reviewed. Pancreatic Enzymes and...

  11. Nutrition Support in Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Orestis Ioannidis; Athina Lavrentieva; Dimitrios Botsios

    2008-01-01

    The management of acute pancreatitis differs according to its severity. Approximately 75% of patients with acute pancreatitis have mild disease with a mortality rate below 1%. Mortality increases up to 20% if the disease progresses to its severe necrotizing form and, in the most severe cases, mortality can increase to 30-40%. Severe acute pancreatitis is usually accompanied by systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) which results in hypermetabolism with prominent protein catabolism. Ac...

  12. Pancreatic scintiphotography in diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic scintiphotography was performed in 108 cases of patients with diabetes mellitus. Scintiphotos were taken at 30 min. after intravenous injection of approximately 200μCi of 75Se-selenomethionine using a Toshiba gamma camera. The relationship between the degree of pancreatic uptake of 75Se-selenomethionine and the types and duration of diabetes, vascular complications and the average range of fasting blood sugar levels were studied. In some cases, pancreatic scintiphotos were taken at 10, 30 and 50 min. after injection of 75Se-selenomethionine, and the degrees of the pancreatic uptake were compared on each time course. Only two out of 24 cases of insulin-dependent diabetics showed normal pancreatic scintiphotos. On the other hand, two out of 47 cases of mild diabetics treated with diet alone showed no uptake in pancreatic scintiphotos. There was a tendency toward abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos in chronic diabetics. Especially, of the 15 cases who had diabetes for more than eleven years, only one case showed a normal pancreatic scintiphoto. Abnormal pancreatic scintiphotos were found more frequently in the group of poorly controlled diabetics than in the group of well controlled diabetics. In cases showing normal pancreatic scintiphotos, diabetic retinopathy was less frequently found. Out of 36 cases which had sequential pancreatic scintiphotos, hypertension and/or arteriosclerosis were found more frequently in the 20 cases which showed a delay in reaching a plateau of the activity. However, the uptake in sequential pancreatic scintiphotos showed no definite correlation between diabetic retinopathy and other diabetic conditions. (auth.)

  13. [Latest advances in acute pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Madaria, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    The present article analyses the main presentations on acute pancreatitis at Digestive Disease Week 2015. Arterial pseudoaneurysm is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis (incidence 0.7%) and mortality from this cause is currently anecdotal. Diabetes mellitus has little impact on the clinical course of acute pancreatitis, unlike cirrhosis, which doubles the risk of mortality. Intake of unsaturated fat could be associated with an increased severity of acute pancreatitis and is a confounding factor in studies evaluating the relationship between obesity and morbidity and mortality. PET-CT (positron emission tomography-computed tomography) could be a non-invasive tool to detect infection of collections in acute pancreatitis. Peripancreatic fat necrosis is less frequent than pancreatic fat necrosis and is associated with a better clinical course. If the clinical course is poor, increasing the calibre of the percutaneous drains used in the treatment of infected necrosis can avoid surgery in 20% of patients. The use of low molecular-weight heparin in moderate or severe pancreatitis could be associated with a better clinical course, specifically with a lower incidence of necrosis. In acute recurrent pancreatitis, simvastatin is a promising drug for prophylaxis of new episodes of acute pancreatitis. Nutritional support through a nasogastric tube does not improve clinical course compared with oral nutrition. PMID:26520203

  14. Helicobacter pylori and pancreatic diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milutin; Bulajic; Nikola; Panic; Johannes; Matthias; L?hr

    2014-01-01

    A possible role for Helicobacter pylori(H. pylori) infec-tion in pancreatic diseases remains controversial. H. pylori infection with antral predomination leading to an increase in pancreatic bicarbonate output and induc-ing ductal epithelial cell proliferation could contribute to the development of pancreatic cancer via complex interactions with the ABO genotype, dietary and smok-ing habits and N-nitrosamine exposure of the host. Although the individual study data available so far is inconsistent, several meta-analyses have reported an increased risk for pancreatic cancer among H. pylori seropositive individuals. It has been suggested that H. pylori causes autoimmune pancreatitis due to molecu-lar mimicry between H. pylori a-carbonic anhydrase(a-CA) and human CA type Ⅱ, and between H. pylori plasminogen-binding protein and human ubiquitin-protein ligase E3 component n-recognin 2, enzymes that are highly expressed in the pancreatic ductal andacinar cells, respectively. Future studies involving large numbers of cases are needed in order to examine the role of H. pylori in autoimmune pancreatitis more fully. Considering the worldwide pancreatic cancer burden, as well as the association between autoimmune pan-creatitis and other autoimmune conditions, a complete elucidation of the role played by H. pylori in the gen-esis of such conditions could have a substantial impact on healthcare.

  15. Ischemic Acute Necrotizing Pancreatitis in a Marathon Runner. Comment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Matthias Löhr

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Dear Sir we read the contribution by Mast et al. with great interest [1]. They report on this unfortunate gentleman who developed acute pancreatitis after running marathon and taking a sauna. Although this combination of physical activities is not so uncommon in the Nordic countries, particularly during winter time, no such experience or reports exist on pancreatitis. Morbidity and mortality of sauna bathing is rather low [2], despite the fact that there is a readiness to combine sauna with alcohol intake. The more this case report appears worth publishing, even though we should have appreciated some more data on the level of hemoconcentration in this runner and sauna bather Furthermore, as it is routine in our pancreas clinic these days, we would have searched also for one of the known genetic factors contributing to the development of pancreatitis such as mutations in PRSS1, SPINK1, CFTR and CTRC genes [3]. Even more though in a patient who does not have one of the known or obvious causes such as alcohol, gallstones or hyperlipidemia. Further, despite his obvious physical condition, the presence of atherosclerotic microangiopathy would be worth knowing in a 57-year-old man, since most of the ischemic etiologies are thought to be associated with atherosclerotic disease [4].

  16. Occupational exposures and risk of pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective was to analyze the relationship between occupation (and specific occupational exposures) and risk of exocrine pancreatic cancer (EPC). We conducted a multicenter hospital-based case-control study in Eastern Spain. We included 161 incident cases of EPC (59.6% men, 94 with histological confirmation, of whom 80% had ductal adenocarcinoma). Cases were frequency-matched with 455 controls by sex, age and province of residence. Information was elicited using structured questionnaires. Occupations were coded according to the Spanish version of the International Standard Classification of Occupations 1988. Occupational exposure to a selection of carcinogenic substances was assessed with the Finnish Job-Exposure Matrix (FINJEM). Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by multiple logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, province, education, alcohol and smoking. A higher risk of EPC was associated with having worked as 'Miners, shotfirers, stone cutters and carvers', 'Machinery mechanics and fitters', 'Building trades workers' and 'Motor vehicle drivers' in men, 'Office Clerks' in women, and 'Waiters' in both sexes. Cases with ductal adenocarcinomas were more likely to have been exposed to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents (OR = 4.1, 95% CI: 1.1-15.2, p-trend = 0.04). We also observed significant associations with exposure to 'synthetic polymer dust exposure' and 'ionizing radiation'. Suggestive increases in risk were observed for 'pesticides', 'diesel and gasoline engine exhaust', and 'hydrocarbon solvents'. Results support the hypothesis that occupational exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents is associated with exocrine pancreatic cancer.

  17. Medical image of the week: pancreatic abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurachi-Monjagatta C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. A 55 year old woman, with a history of alcohol abuse and necrotizing pancreatitis, was readmitted for worsening abdominal pain and acute respiratory failure. A CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed an atrophic pancreas and multiple fluid collections. Along the inferior surface of the pancreas, there is a fluid collection with an evolving loculated rim, which is asymmetric, the larger component measure 2.9 cm x 4.7 cm (Figure 1, large arrow. Anterior to the body of the pancreas, there is an additional 2.2 cm x 2.4 cm with evolving loculated rim (Figure 1, short arrow, both compatible with a pseudocyst. Ultrasound of the abdomen showed a distended pancreatic duct that communicates to the smaller fluid collection (Figure 2. Coronal CT of the abdomen and pelvis showed a 12.4 cm pelvic abscess (Figure 3. CT guided drainage of the pelvic abscess was performed with positive culture of the fluid …

  18. Acute pancreatitis complicated with splenic rupture: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bruno; L; Hernani; Pedro; C; Silva; Ricardo; T; Nishio; Henrique; C; Mateus; José; C; Assef; Tercio; De; Campos

    2015-01-01

    Atraumatic splenic rupture is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. This report describes the case of a 30-year-old man with acute pancreatitis and splenic vein thrombosis complicated by splenic rupture. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with pain in the upper abdomen that had been present for six hours and was associated with vomiting and sweating. He was diagnosed with acute pancreatitis of alcoholic etiology. Upon computed tomography(CT) of the abdomen, the pancreatitis was scored as Balthazar C grade, and a suspicious area of necrosis affecting 30% of the pancreas with splenic vein thrombosis was revealed. Seventytwo hours after admission, the patient had significant improvement in symptoms. However, he showed clinical worsening on the sixth day of hospitalization, with increasing abdominal distension and reduced hemoglobin levels. A CT angiography showed a large amount of free fluid in the abdominal cavity, along with a large splenic hematoma and contrast extravasation along the spleen artery. The patient subsequently underwent laparotomy, which showed hemoperitoneum due to rupture of the splenic parenchyma. A splenectomy was then performed, followed by ultrasound-guided percutaneous drainage.

  19. Lessons learned bulletin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past four years, the Department of Energy -- Savannah River Operations Office and the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) Environmental Restoration (ER) Program completed various activities ranging from waste site investigations to closure and post closure projects. Critiques for lessons learned regarding project activities are performed at the completion of each project milestone, and this critique interval allows for frequent recognition of lessons learned. In addition to project related lessons learned, ER also performs lessons learned critiques. T'he Savannah River Site (SRS) also obtains lessons learned information from general industry, commercial nuclear industry, naval nuclear programs, and other DOE sites within the complex. Procedures are approved to administer the lessons learned program, and a database is available to catalog applicable lessons learned regarding environmental remediation, restoration, and administrative activities. ER will continue to use this database as a source of information available to SRS personnel

  20. Pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although radical operations can cure resectable cancer of the pancreas or biliary tract, few patients present with resectable disease. Most patients with pancreatic cancer present with lesions in the head of the pancreas that have either spread beyond the local area by hematogenous or peritoneal routes or are technically unresectable because of the local extent of disease. For the latter group the main surgical options are palliative biliary bypass alone or in combination with elective gastroenterostomy. Carcinoma of the biliary tract (gallbladder or bile duct) is uncommon compared to other gastrointestinal malignancies and has a wide range of natural history. Until recently surgery was the only therapy considered in most patients even though most lesions were unresectable and only palliative procedures could be performed. If gains are to be made with the locally unresectable pancreatic or biliary tract lesions, they will have to come through treatment with radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination of both

  1. Pancreatic Cancer in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafim Kaltsas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available 5-FU/LV: 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin; FOLFIRINOX: 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin; FOLFOX: 5-flouorouracil, leucovorin and oxaliplatin; HA: hyaluronic acid; JAK: Janus kinase; MM-398: irinotecan sucrosofate; MPACT: Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Clinical Trial; PARP: poly (ADP-ribose polymerase; PEGPH: pegylated recombinant human hyaluronidase; PSCA: prostate stem cell antigen; SN-38: active metabolite of irinotecan; SPARC: secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine

  2. Sensory nerves and pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Qingfu; PENG, JIE

    2014-01-01

    Sensory nerves are a kind of nerve that conduct afferent impulses from the periphery receptors to the central nervous system (CNS) and are able to release neuromediators from the activated peripheral endings. Sensory nerves are particularly important for microcirculatory response, and stimulation of pancreatic sensory nerves releases a variety of neuropeptides such as substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), etc., leading to neurogenic inflammation characterized as the local ...

  3. Inhibitors of pancreatic lipase

    OpenAIRE

    Lunagariya, Nitin A.; Patel, Neeraj K.; Jagtap, Sneha C.; Bhutani, Kamlesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a disorder of lipid metabolism and continues to be a global problem, ranking fifth for deaths worldwide. It also leads to diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, musculoskeletal disorders and some types of cancer. Obesity is regarded as the output of a long-term imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. Digestion and absorption of dietary lipids by pancreatic lipase, a major source of excess calorie intake, can be targeted for development of anti-obesity agents. Being the...

  4. Post-partum pancreatitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Pai P; Shah H; Samsi A

    1993-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis in pregnancy and post-partum period, rarely encountered in surgical practice, can have a lethal effect on the mother and the foetus. We report here a case of a 35 year old tertigravida who presented with high grade fever, abdominal pain with distension, tachycardia and tachypnoea. Chest examination and X-rays were suggestive of pneumonia. The abdomen was tense and tender. Peristalsis was absent. Ultrasound revealed presence of fluid in the abdominal cavity which on paracent...

  5. [Acute pancreatitis and pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollo, P; Licitra, G

    1993-12-01

    Aetiologic factors (gallstones, hyperlipidemia I-IV, hypertriglyceridaemia) make their occurrence, mainly, in the third trimester of gestation. Two cases of acute pancreatitis in pregnancy are described; in both cases patients referred healthy diet, no habit to smoke and no previous episode of pancreatitis. An obstructive pathology of biliary tract was the aetiologic factor. Vomiting, upper abdominal pain are aspecific symptoms that impose a differential diagnosis with acute appendicitis, cholecystitis and obstructive intestinal pathology. Laboratory data (elevated serum amylase and lipase levels) and ultrasonography carry out an accurate diagnosis. The management of acute pancreatitis is based on the use of symptomatic drugs, a low fat diet alternated to the parenteral nutrition when triglycerides levels are more than 28 mmol/L. Surgical therapy, used only in case of obstructive pathology of biliary tract, is optimally collected in the third trimester or immediately after postpartum. Our patients, treated only medically, delivered respectively at 38th and 40th week of gestation. Tempestivity of diagnosis and appropriate therapy permit to improve prognosis of a pathology that, although really associated with pregnancy, presents high maternal mortality (37%) cause of complications (shock, coagulopathy, acute respiratory insufficiency) and fetal (37.9%) by occurrence of preterm delivery. PMID:8139793

  6. Pancreatic and peri-pancreatic lesions mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in multidetector computed tomography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Hua-dan; LIU Wei; XIAO Yu; SUN Hao; WANG Xuan; LEI Jing; JIN Zheng-yu

    2011-01-01

    Objective This pictorial review aimed to summarize the most possible differential diagnosis of pancreatic islet cell tumor (PICT).Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from Medline and Pubmed in English. And all clinical images in this review were from Department of Radiology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Beijing, China.Study selection Cases of pancreatic cystadenoma, solid pseudo-papillary tumor of the pancreas, pancreatic metastasis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, para-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, Castleman disease, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, splenic artery aneurysm and accessory spleen were selected in this pictorial review for differential diagnosis of PICT.Results Careful analysis of imaging features and correlation with the clinical manifestations may allow a more specific diagnosis. It is also important that the radiologist is familiar with the anatomic variants and disease entities which mimic pancreatic islet cell tumor in order to avoid an improper treatment protocol.Conclusions Many congenital anatomic variants or other pancreatic and peri-pancreatic diseases may mimic MDCT appearance of pancreatic islet cell tumor. Radiological, clinical and pathological characteristics should be considered for the final diagnosis.

  7. Alcohol use disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol dependence; Alcohol abuse; Problem drinking; Drinking problem; Alcohol addiction ... No one knows what causes problems with alcohol. Health experts think that ... Psychology, such as being impulsive or having low self- ...

  8. Alcohol and pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy ... When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the alcohol travels through her blood and into the baby's blood, tissues, and organs. Alcohol breaks down much more slowly in ...

  9. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in a baby born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated by alcohol consumption. A broader term ...

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts in chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghdassi, Ali; Mayerle, Julia; Kraft, Matthias; Sielenkämper, Andreas W; Heidecke, Claus-Dieter; Lerch, Markus M

    2008-03-01

    Pancreatic pseudocysts are a well-known complication of acute or chronic pancreatitis, with a higher incidence in the latter. Diagnosis is accomplished most often by computed tomographic scanning, by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or by ultrasound, and a rapid progress in the improvement of diagnostic tools enables detection with high sensitivity and specificity. Different strategies contribute to the treatment of pancreatic pseudocysts: endoscopic transpapillary or transmural drainage, percutaneous catheter drainage, or open surgery. The feasibility of endoscopic drainage is highly dependent on the anatomy and topography of the pseudocyst, but provides high success and low complication rates. Percutaneous drainage is used for infected pseudocysts. However, its usefulness in chronic pancreatitis-associated pseudocysts is questionable. Internal drainage and pseudocyst resection are frequently used as surgical approaches with a good overall outcome, but a somewhat higher morbidity and mortality compared with endoscopic intervention. We therefore conclude that pseudocyst treatment in chronic pancreatitis can be effectively achieved by both endoscopic and surgical means. This review entails publications referring to the classification of pancreatic pseudocysts, epidemiology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic options for pancreatic pseudocysts. Only full articles were considered for the review. Based on a search in PubMed, the MeSH terms "pancreatic pseudocysts and classification," "diagnosis," and "endoscopic, percutaneous, and surgical treatment" were used either alone or in combination. PMID:18376299

  11. Pancreatic polypepetide inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via a cholinergic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rat pancreatic slices, rat pancreatic polypeptide (PP) or C-terminal hexapeptide of PP [PP-(31-36)] inhibited potassium-stimulated amylase release in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibition was unaffected by addition of hexamethonium but blocked by atropine. In contrast, PP-(31-36) did not have any effect on acetylcholine- or cholecystokinin octapeptide-stimulated amylase release. In addition, when pancreatic slices were incubated with [3H]choline, PP-(31-36) inhibited the potassium-evoked release of synthesized [3H]acetylcholine in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory action of PP was unaffected by adrenergic, dopaminergic, or opioid receptor antagonists. Thus PP inhibits pancreatic enzyme secretion via presynaptic modulation of acetylcholine release. This newly identified pathway provides a novel mechanism for hormonal inhibition of pancreatic enzyme secretion via modulation of the classic neurotransmitter function

  12. Meandering Main Pancreatic Duct in a Case of Recurrent Acute Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Prakash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Meandering main pancreatic duct is an anatomical variant of main pancreatic duct, characterized by abnormal configuration of the duct in pancreatic head region. Meandering pancreatic duct can be underlying cause for recurrent pancreatitis. This less common variant can be easily diagnosed on imaging, particularly magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography.

  13. Nutritional advice for prevention of acute pancreatitis: review of current opinion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lowe ME

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mark E Lowe, Wednesday A SevillaDivision of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Pancreatitis is inflammation of the pancreas that can be acute and self-limiting or, in a small percentage of patients, recurrent. Patients with recurrent episodes of acute pancreatitis (RAP often progress to chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis in all forms causes significant economic and social burdens. Prevention of RAP may decrease those burdens and halt progression to chronic disease. Unfortunately, no therapy has proven effective at altering the course of RAP. While enteral nutritional therapy plays an important role in the treatment of acute pancreatitis during episodes, nutritional advice provided to patients in an attempt to prevent recurrent episodes has not proven effective in most cases. Discontinuing alcohol consumption and treating dyslipidemia with diet and medication can help patients with these issues. In patients whose pancreatitis is associated with celiac disease or eosinophilic gastroenteritis, a gluten-free diet and avoidance of food allergens can be effective in stopping RAP. Advice to take pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, lose weight, control diabetes, decrease dietary sucrose, decrease dietary fat or avoid monosodium glutamate has little to no evidence of efficacy. Some studies suggest that an antioxidant cocktail may decrease the frequency of RAP and the intensity of chronic pain, but the evidence is weak. Nutritional therapy may have a role in the treatment of patients with RAP. At present, there are no clear guidelines for nutritional advice to give these patients. More studies are needed to identify nutritional interventions that will benefit patients with RAP.Keywords: pancreatitis, nutrition, pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy, antioxidants, herbal supplements

  14. Possible Involvement of Pancreatic Fatty Infiltration in Pancreatic Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Hori

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is difficult to diagnose in its early stage and is one of the most lethal human cancers. Thus, it is important to clarify its major risk factors, predictive factors and etiology. Here, we focus on fatty infiltration of the pancreas and suggest that it could be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fatty infiltration of the pancreas is observed as ectopic adipocytes infiltrating the pancreatic tissue and is positively correlated with obesity and the prevalence of diabetes mellitus, which are risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, whether fatty infiltration is a major risk factor for pancreatic cancer has not been established. Recent clinical studies show there is a positive correlation between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas. Animal experimental studies also show an association between fatty infiltration of the pancreas and pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Syrian golden hamsters, which are sensitive to chemical carcinogens in the pancreas, develop fatty infiltration of the pancreas with age. The combination of a high-fat diet and a chemical carcinogen that induces a K-ras mutation increases the severity of fatty infiltration of the pancreas. Thus, fatty infiltration of the pancreas is suggested to promote pancreatic carcinogenesis via a K-ras activating mutation. It is assumed that increased expression of adipokines and of inflammatory and proliferation-associated factors elicited by fatty infiltration of the pancreas may contribute to pancreatic precancerous lesions or ductal adenocarcinomas development. Accumulating evidence suggests that in addition to suppression of Ras activation, methods to modulate fatty infiltration in the pancreas can be considered as a strategy for preventing pancreatic cancer.

  15. Lessons Learned in Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, J. C.; Ryan, R. S.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    2011-01-01

    This Contractor Report (CR) is a compilation of Lessons Learned in approximately 55 years of engineering experience by each James C. Blair, Robert S. Ryan, and Luke A. Schutzenhofer. The lessons are the basis of a course on Lessons Learned that has been taught at Marshall Space Flight Center. The lessons are drawn from NASA space projects and are characterized in terms of generic lessons learned from the project experience, which are further distilled into overarching principles that can be applied to future projects. Included are discussions of the overarching principles followed by a listing of the lessons associated with that principle. The lesson with sub-lessons are stated along with a listing of the project problems the lesson is drawn from, then each problem is illustrated and discussed, with conclusions drawn in terms of Lessons Learned. The purpose of this CR is to provide principles learned from past aerospace experience to help achieve greater success in future programs, and identify application of these principles to space systems design. The problems experienced provide insight into the engineering process and are examples of the subtleties one experiences performing engineering design, manufacturing, and operations.

  16. Interventional Radiology in Acute Pancreatitis: Friend or Foe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Khorsandi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context Peripancreatic fluid collections are known complications of pancreatitis. The majority of fluid collections can be drained percutaneously under radiological guidance. Although radiological percutaneous drainage is regarded as safe, here it resulted in catastrophic haemorrhage from the colon due to an iatrogenic injury. Case report We present a case of a 70-year-old man who presented with acute alcohol-related severe necrotizing pancreatitis and an associated massive peripancreatic fluid collection. The drainage of this collection was attempted under computed tomography (CT scan guidance. During the procedure the splenic artery and the splenic flexure of the colon were inadvertently damaged leading to life threatening per rectal bleeding requiring emergency angiographic embolisation of the splenic artery. Conclusion Radiological drainage of peripancreatic fluid collections is generally regarded as having lower rates of complications compared to surgical necrosectomy. However, in this case it leads to a life threatening per rectal bleed requiring emergency splenic artery embolisation.

  17. Tea drinking and risk of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Junbao; Chen Long; Zhu Xiaodong

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidemiologic studies have reported inconsistent results regarding tea consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.This study aimed to investigate whether tea consumption is related to the risk of pancreatic cancer.Methods We searched Medline,EMBASE,ISI Web of Science,and the Cochrane library for studies published up to November 2013.We used a meta-analytic approach to estimate overall odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for the highest versus the lowest tea consumption categories.Results The summary OR for high versus no/almost never tea drinkers was 1.04 (95% CI:0.91-1.20),with no significant heterogeneity across studies (P=0.751;I2=0.0%).The OR was 0.99 (95% CI:0.77-1.28) in males and 1.01 (95% CI:0.79-1.29) in females.The OR was 1.07 (95% CI:0.85-1.34) in Asian studies,1.05 (95% CI:0.84-1.31) in European studies,and 0.98 (95% CI:0.72-1.34) in the US studies.The OR was 0.87 (95% CI:0.69-1.10) without adjustment for a history of diabetes and 1.16 (95% CI:0.97-0.39) after adjustment for a history of diabetes.The OR was 0.90 (95% CI:0.72-1.12) without adjustment for alcohol drinking and 1.16 (95% CI:0.96-1.39) after adjustment for alcohol drinking.The OR was 0.97 (95% CI:0.76-1.25) without adjustment for BMI and 1.07 (95% CI:0.87-1.31) after adjustment for BMI.Conclusion This systematic meta-analysis of cohort studies dose not provide quantitative evidence that tea consumption is appreciably related to the risk of pancreatic cancer,even at high doses.

  18. Acute necrotizing pancreatitis in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. van Ooijen (Baan)

    1988-01-01

    textabstractThe specific aim of the present study was to investigate whether eicosanoids play a role in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. Because of the limited number of patients with acute pancreatitis admitted to the hospital each year, as well as the practical difficulties encountered in studying

  19. Pharmacological approach to acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Ulrich-Christian; Semb, Synne; Nojgaard, Camilla;

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present review is to summarize the current knowledge regarding pharmacological prevention and treatment of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on experimental animal models and clinical trials. Somatostatin (SS) and octreotide inhibit the exocrine production of pancreatic enzymes and may....... Evidence based pharmacological treatment of AP is limited and studies on the effect of potent anti-inflammatory drugs are warranted....

  20. Diet and Pancreatic Cancer Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Casari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is without any doubt the malignancy with the poorest prognosis and the lowest survival rate. This highly aggressive disease is rarely diagnosed at an early stage and difficult to treat due to its resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Therefore, there is an urgent need to clarify the causes responsible for pancreatic cancer and to identify preventive strategies to reduce its incidence in the population. Some circumstances, such as smoking habits, being overweight and diabetes, have been identified as potentially predisposing factors to pancreatic cancer, suggesting that diet might play a role. A diet low in fat and sugars, together with a healthy lifestyle, regular exercise, weight reduction and not smoking, may contribute to prevent pancreatic cancer and many other cancer types. In addition, increasing evidence suggests that some food may have chemo preventive properties. Indeed, a high dietary intake of fresh fruit and vegetables has been shown to reduce the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, and recent epidemiological studies have associated nut consumption with a protective effect against it. Therefore, diet could have an impact on the development of pancreatic cancer and further investigations are needed to assess the potential chemo preventive role of specific foods against this disease. This review summarizes the key evidence for the role of dietary habits and their effect on pancreatic cancer and focuses on possible mechanisms for the association between diet and risk of pancreatic cancer.

  1. Surgery for pancreatic cancer -- discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Pancreatic surgery is done to treat cancer of the pancreas gland. When You Are in the Hospital All ... Claudius C, Lillemoe KD. Palliative Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. In: Cameron ... Vickers SM. Exocrine Pancreas. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ...

  2. Whipple Procedure for Pancreatic Cancer

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available WHIPPLE PROCEDURE FOR PANCREATIC CANCER UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND MEDICAL CENTER BALTIMORE, MD January 7, 2008 00:00:11 ANNOUNCER: This year, an estimated 37,000 new cases of pancreatic cancer will be diagnosed in this country. Since there ...

  3. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma pathology : changing "landscape"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, Lodewijk A A; Hackeng, Wenzel M; Offerhaus, G Johan; Hruban, Ralph H; Wood, Laura D

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a devastating disease. At time of diagnosis the disease is usually advanced and only a minority of patients are eligible for surgical resection. The overall 5-year survival is 6%. However, survival of patients with early stage pancreatic cancer is significantly better. To improv

  4. Drug-Induced Acute Pancreatitis in a Cohort of 328 Patients. A Single-Centre Experience from Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savio G Barreto

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Context Acute pancreatitis is associated with risk of morbidity and even mortality. Routine prescription drugs have been linked to the causation of acute pancreatitis. Objective To determine the incidence, presentation, course and outcome of drug-induced acute pancreatitis amongst patients admitted to a public hospital. Design/setting A retrospective analysis of patients presenting with acute pancreatitis to the Modbury Hospital, South Australia from January 2006 to April 2011. Main outcome measure Each admission was reviewed within the electronic database for patient details as well as to determine the aetiological factor. In patients with druginduced acute pancreatitis, the WHO Probability Scale was used to evaluate causality relationship. Results Three-hundreds and 28 patients were treated for acute pancreatitis during the study period. Biliary and alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis accounted for 80.8% of cases. Eleven patients (2 male and 9 female patients; median age: 59 years were diagnosed with drug-induced acute pancreatitis. These included 5 cases of codeine-, 2 cases of azathioprine-, and 1 case each of chlorothiazide-, valproic acid-, oestradiol- and rosuvastatin-induced acute pancreatitis. Nine patients had a mild disease while 2 patients had severe acute pancreatitis with a median hospital stay of 4 days. Withdrawal of the drug resulted in cessation of the attacks in all patients over a median follow-up of 24 months. Conclusions Routine prescription drugs, as an aetiological factor, accounted for 3.4% of cases of acute pancreatitis. The disease appeared to be more common in middle-aged women. It is likely that the overall incidence of this entity is under-reported owing to the stringent criteria needed to conclusively determine a causal relationship.

  5. [Long-term results of the surgical treatment of chronic pancreatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padillo Ruiz, F J; Rufián, S; Varo, E; Solorzano, G; Miño, G; Pera Madrazo, C

    1994-08-01

    We analized the long-term results after surgical treatment in 41 patients with chronic pancreatitis. Twenty one of them underwent resection: 19 pancreaticoduodenectomy (11 Whipple procedure and 8 Traverso Longmire); total pancreatectomy (1) and near-total pancreatectomy (1). In the remaining 20 patients a drainage procedure was carried out: Puestow-Duval (5); Partington (7); double derivation: pancreatic and biliar (5); triple derivation: pancreatic, biliar, gastric (2) and Nardi procedure+quisteduodenostomy in one patient. The following were evaluated: persistent pain; chronic alcoholism; nutrition status; exocrine function (syntomatic steatorrea, use of pancreatic enzyme preparation and fecal determination of glucide, protids and lipids) and endocrine function (glucose and insulin levels and glucose oral test). Surgery failed to relieve pain in 15.6% of the patients; failures were associated chronic alcoholism (p < 0.05); 18 patients (44%) required oral pancreatic enzymes. There weren't significant differences between resection and drainage procedures regarding the exocrine function. However, endocrine function was significantly worse (p < 0.05) after pancreaticoduodenectomy than after drainages procedures. Among the late, the endocrine function was better after Partington operation than after the Puestow-Duval. PMID:7946606

  6. Role of Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein Signaling in Chronic Pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falzon, Miriam, E-mail: mfalzon@utmb.edu; Bhatia, Vandanajay [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555 (United States)

    2015-06-18

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP), a progressive inflammatory disease where acini are destroyed and replaced by fibrous tissue, increases the risk for pancreatic cancer. Risk factors include alcohol, smoking, and obesity. The effects of these risk factors are exacerbated in patients with mutations in genes that predispose to CP. The different environmental and genetic factors produce the same clinical phenotype; once CP develops, disease course is the same regardless of etiology. Critical questions still need to be answered to understand what modifies predisposition to develop CP in persons exposed to risk factors. We postulate that risk factors modulate endogenous pathways, with parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) signaling being one such pathway. In support, PTHrP levels are elevated in mice treated with alcohol, and in mouse models of cerulein- and pancreatic duct ligation-induced CP. Disrupting the Pthrp gene in acinar cells exerts protective effects (decreased edema, histological damage, amylase and cytokine release, and fibrosis) in these CP models. PTHrP levels are elevated in human CP. Currently, CP care lacks specific pharmacological interventions. Targeting PTHrP signaling may present a novel therapeutic strategy that inhibits pancreatic inflammation and fibrosis, especially since the risk of developing pancreatic cancer is strongly associated with duration of chronic inflammation.

  7. Acute pancreatitis after a course of clarithromycin.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Deinum, J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a case of acute pancreatitis after a course of clarithromycin. An 84-year-old woman died of suspected pneumonia and cardiac failure. Autopsy surprisingly revealed acute pancreatitis. Except for the use of clarithromycin no other cause for her acute pancreatitis was obvious. Pancreatitis i

  8. Enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaushik, Neeraj; Pietraszewski, Marie; Holst, Jens Juul;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: All forms of commonly practiced enteral feeding techniques stimulate pancreatic secretion, and only intravenous feeding avoids it. In this study, we explored the possibility of more distal enteral infusions of tube feeds to see whether activation of the ileal brake mechanism can result...... in enteral feeding without pancreatic stimulation, with particular reference to trypsin, because the avoidance of trypsin stimulation may optimize enteral feeding in acute pancreatitis. METHODS: The pancreatic secretory responses to feeding were studied in 36 healthy volunteers by standard double...... plasma glucagon-like peptide-1 and peptide YY concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that enteral feeding can be given without stimulating pancreatic trypsin secretion provided it is delivered into the mid-distal jejunum. The mechanism may involve activation of the ileal brake mechanism....

  9. [Prolonged acute pancreatitis after bone marrow transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Singly, B; Simon, M; Bennani, J; Wittnebel, S; Zagadanski, A-M; Pacault, V; Gornet, J-M; Allez, M; Lémann, M

    2008-04-01

    Acute pancreatitis is not infrequent after allogenic marrow transplantation. Several causes can predispose to pancreatitis, including Graft-Versus-Host Disease (GVHD), a condition which is probably underestimated. In the literature, few description of pancreatic GVHD can be found. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis can be difficult if pancreatic involvement occurs without other typical manifestations of GVHD. We report the case of a woman, 54 years old, suffering from prolonged, painful pancreatitis two months after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leucemia. Pancreatic GVHD diagnosis was performed after five weeks on duodenal biopsies despite the absence of diarrheoa. The patient dramatically improved within few days on corticosteroids. PMID:18378104

  10. [Endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation: an alternative option for the treatment of pancreatic insulinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Renáta; Farkas, Klaudia; Bálint, Anita; Molnár, Tamás; Nagy, Ferenc; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Sepp, Krisztián; Tiszlavicz, László; Hamar, Sándor; Szepes, Zoltán

    2014-10-12

    Endoscopic ultrasound is the most accurate imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle injection has already been used for palliative interventions. Surgical resection is currently the standard treatment for pancreatic insulinoma. Medical treatment may be necessary for symptomatic patients with unresectable disease. Case reports have been published about the success of endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation, but it has not been reported previously in Hungarian literature. The authors present the history of an 83-year-old woman who was evaluated because of repeated hypoglycemic coma occurring during the night. Endosonographic image and laboratory findings (elevated serum insulin and chromogranin A) revealed pancreatic insulinoma. Because of severe comorbidities and high risk of surgical resection, the decision was made to ablate the insulinoma by endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcohol injection. A total of 3 mL 95% ethanol was injected into the tumor. Despite the discontinuation of the diazoxide therapy the hypoglycemic episodes disappeared. This case history confirms that endoscopic ultrasound-guided alcoholic ablation is a novel, minimal invasive alternative treatment for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in whom surgery is not feasible. PMID:25282110

  11. NASA Engineering Network Lessons Learned

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Lessons Learned system provides access to official, reviewed lessons learned from NASA programs and projects. These lessons have been made available to the...

  12. Mouse models of pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marta Herreros-Villanueva; Elizabeth Hijona; Angel Cosme; Luis Bujanda

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most lethal of human malignancies ranking 4th among cancer-related death in the western world and in the United States,and potent therapeutic options are lacking.Although during the last few years there have been important advances in the understanding of the molecular events responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer,currently specific mechanisms of treatment resistance remain poorly understood and new effective systemic drugs need to be developed and probed.In vivo models to study pancreatic cancer and approach this issue remain limited and present different molecular features that must be considered in the studies depending on the purpose to fit special research themes.In the last few years,several genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic exocrine neoplasia have been developed.These models mimic the disease as they reproduce genetic alterations implicated in the progression of pancreatic cancer.Genetic alterations such as activating mutations in KRas,or TGFb and/or inactivation of tumoral suppressors such as p53,INK4A/ARF BRCA2 and Smad4 are the most common drivers to pancreatic carcinogenesis and have been used to create transgenic mice.These mouse models have a spectrum of pathologic changes,from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to lesions that progress histologically culminating in fully invasive and metastatic disease and represent the most useful preclinical model system.These models can characterize the cellular and molecular pathology of pancreatic neoplasia and cancer and constitute the best tool to investigate new therapeutic approaches,chemopreventive and/or anticancer treatments.Here,we review and update the current mouse models that reproduce different stages of human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and will have clinical relevance in future pancreatic cancer developments.

  13. Endoscopic transpapillary drainage of infected pancreatic pseudocyst complicating pancreatitis,a report of 18 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-feng ZHAO

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of endoscopic transpapillary drainage in the treatment of infected pancreatic pseudocyst complicating pancreatitis.Methods The data of 18 cases of pancreatitis with infected pancreatic pseudocyst having undergone endoscopic transpapillary drainage from Jan.2004 to Jun.2006 were retrospectively analyzed.All patients were diagnosed and then checked postoperatively by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography(ERCP and CT.All patients were treated by endoscopic sphincterectomy(EST,endoscopic pancreatic sphincterectomy(EPS,or endoscopic nose-pancreatic pseudocysts drainage(ENPPD.Extraction of pancreatic duct stones and dilatation of pancreatic duct stricture were performed selectively.Results During the treatment,removal of pancreatic stones was performed in 6 cases.Pancreatic duct dilatation was performed in 9 cases with pancreatic duct narrowing,and 8 cases received pancreatic stents drainage.Postoperatively,clinical symptoms were evidently alleviated in 18 patients,and with a large amount of purulent pancreatic fluid drained.Symptom of infection,including abdominal pain and fever,were within 48 hours after drainage,and were controlled within 1 week.Pancreatic pseudocysts disappeared in 16 cases,and conspicuously shrank in 2 patients.Pancreatic function recovered gradually following endoscopic transpapillary nose-pancreatic pseudocyst drainage.Conclusions In the treatment of pancreatitis with infected pancreatic pseudocyst,endoscopic transpapillary nose-pancreatic pseudocysts drainage is a preferred method for its safety,less trauma,lower expenditure,convenient and conspicuous curative effect.

  14. Clinicoradiological appraisal of ′paraduodenal pancreatitis′: Pancreatitis outside the pancreas!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Paraduodenal pancreatitis (PP is a unique form of focal chronic pancreatitis that selectively involves the duodenum and aberrant pancreatic tissue located near the minor papilla (beyond the pancreas proper. The pseudotumoral nature of the disease often generates considerable clinical quandary and patient apprehension, and therefore merits a better understanding. The present study appraises the clinicoradiological manifestations of PP in 33 patients. Materials and Methods: Clinical, laboratory, and radiological manifestations of 33 patients of PP treated in gastroenterology/hepatology and hepato-pancreatico-biliary surgery units during June 2010-August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Results: All patients were young to middle-aged men (100% with history of alcohol abuse (93.9% and/or smoking (42.4%, who presented either with acute or gradually worsening abdominal pain (90.9%. Pancreatic enzymes and serum tumor markers remained normal or were mildly/transiently elevated. Cystic variant was detected in 57.6% (solid in 42.4%; the disease remained confined to the groove/duodenum (pure form in 45.4%. Medial duodenal wall thickening with increased enhancement was seen in 87.87 and 81.81%, respectively, and duodenal/paraduodenal cysts were seen in 78.78%. Pancreatic calcifications and biliary stricture were seen 27.3% patients. Peripancreatic arteries were neither infiltrated nor encased. Conclusion: PP has a discrete predilection for middle-aged men with history of longstanding alcohol abuse and/or smoking. Distinguishing imaging findings include thickening of the pancreatic side of duodenum exhibiting increased enhancement with intramural/paraduodenal cysts. This may be accompanied by plate-like scar tissue in the groove region, which may simulate groove pancreatic carcinoma. However, as opposed to carcinoma, the peripancreatic arteries are neither infiltrated nor encased, rather are medially displaced.

  15. Parathyroid scintigraphy, histopathology correlation in patients with tropical pancreatitis and coexisting primary hyperparathyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tropical pancreatitis (TP) is a juvenile, non-alcoholic type of chronic pancreatitis and is highly prevalent in Kerala, India. Increasing prevalence of TP and its varied manifestations prompted us to undertake this retrospective analysis. We attempted to study the incidence of TP in patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and correlate with calcium levels, scintigraphy and histopathology findings. Records of 44 hypercalcemic patients with raised parathormone (PTH) were analyzed. Clinical, biochemical and imaging findings were noted to look for diabetes mellitus and pancreatitis. All patients underwent dual phase 99m Technetium methoxy isobutyl isonitrile parathyroid scintigraphy in our department between January 2007 and 2010. Gamma probe assisted minimally invasive parathyroidectomy was performed. Histopathological correlation was obtained in all patients. Our study shows 18% (8/44 patients) incidence of TP in patients with PHPT (compared to 7% reported in 1970's) in Kerala. Results show involvement of middle aged, non-alcoholic males. No direct association between severity of diabetes, pancreatitis and PHPT was noted in our series. Parathyroid adenoma was the most common underlying pathology. All TP patients’ clinical outcome improved post parathyroidectomy. TP patients with PHPT demonstrated adenomas, mainly composed of oxyphilic cells. Non pancreatitis group interestingly showed a varied picture of adenoma, hyperplasia with predominance of chief cells histologically. There is a 2.6 fold increase in the incidence of TP (18%) in patients with PHPT. Hypercalcemia may be the causative factor leading to TP in PHPT patients in our limited series. The data suggests a causal association between pancreatitis and PHPT. Patients presenting with either one or a combination of hypercalcemia, pancreatic dysfunction or raised PTH need to be thoroughly evaluated as their management is interlinked

  16. Dexamethasone mediates protection against acute pancreatitis via upregulation of pancreatitis-associated proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Kandil, Emad; Lin, Yin-yao; Bluth, Martin H; Zhang, Hong; Levi, Gabriel; Zenilman, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the influence of dexamethasone on pancreatitis-associated protein (PAP) gene expression using both in vitro and in vivo models of acute pancreatitis and to study how PAP gene expression correlates with severity of pancreatitis.

  17. Alteration of chaperonin60 and pancreatic enzyme in pancreatic acinar cell under pathological condition

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yong-Yu; Bendayan, Moise

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the changes of chaperonin60 (Cpn60) and pancreatic enzymes in pancreatic acinar cells, and to explore their roles in the development of experimental diabetes and acute pancreatitis (AP).

  18. Evaluation of pancreatic scintigram in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classification of accumulative patterns with the pancreatic scintigram findings of chronic pancreatitis and carcinoma of the pancreas were compared with endoscopic retrograde pancreatography (ERP) findings and Pancreozymin-Secretin test (P-S test). I) The frequency of pancreatic cancer was 93%, whilst, the chronic pancreatitis was 88% in the abnormal pancreatic scintigram. II) In the scintigram the type II (localyzed defect shadows) of pancreatic cancer was comparatively high and it is proportional to evidence. derived from ERP. Localized diagnostic certainty is helpful, although the two tests are related. The P-S test is only restricted to the carcinoma of head, whilst, scintigram is more useful to detect the carcinoma of the body and tail of the pancreas. III) As for the chronic pancreatitis, there are various accumulative patterns. This is resemblance to that of ERP findings, but in the P-S normal test, it showed discrepancy in part of the result. Particularly, in the type I (slightly generalized low uptake with density silhouette) and type II. Therefore in order to obtain an accurate diagnosis, it is essential to have both the P-S test and scintigram. (author)

  19. Pancreatic microcirculatory impairment in experimental acute pancreatitis in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Guang Zhou; You-Dai Chen; Wei Sun; Zhong Chen

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the feature of pancreatic microcirculatoryimpairment, especially the initial changes, in caerulein-induced experimental acute pancreatitis (AP).METHODS: The pancreatic microcirculation of caerulein-induced AP model was studied by intravital fluorescencemicroscopy with FITC-labeled erythrocytes (FITC-RBC),scanning electron microscopy of vascular corrosion casts,and light microscopy of Chinese ink-injected/cleared tissues.RESULTS: Animals in caerulein-treated group showedhyperamylemia (× 2), pancreatic oedema, infiltration ofinflammatory cells in pancreas. Constrictions of intralobulararteriolar sphincters, presence of vacuoles in all layers ofsphincter, and gross irregularity in capillary network of aciniwere found in the AP specimens. The decrease of pancreaticcapillary blood flow (0.34±0.10 nl @ min-1 vs0.910.06 nl @rain-1 of control, P<0.001), reduction of functional capillarydensity(277± 13 cm-1 vs349±8 cm-1 of control, P<0.001),and irregular intermittent perfusion were observed incaerulein-induced groups.CONCLUSION: Impairment and constriction of pancreaticintralobular arteriolar sphincter are the initial microcirculatorylesions in the early phase of acute pancreatitis, and play akey role in the pancreatic ischaemia and pancreaticmicrovascular failure in acute pancreatitis.

  20. Contrast-enhanced sonography in pancreatic diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rickes, Steffen [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)], E-mail: rickes@medkl.salvator-kh.de; Rauh, Peter; Uhle, Christine; Ensberg, Daniel [Department of Internal Medicine, AMEOS Hospital GmbH, Halberstadt (Germany); Moenkemueller, Klaus; Malfertheiner, Peter [Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Infectious Diseases, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Contrast-enhanced sonography is a widely available imaging modality for the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. With this procedure, pancreatic tumours can be differentiated better. Furthermore, contrast-enhanced sonography produces good results in the staging of acute pancreatitis severity, especially in the detection of pancreatic necrosis. In this review article the value of contrast-enhanced sonography in the diagnosis of pancreatic diseases will be described and discussed.

  1. Cancer Stem Cells in Pancreatic Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignant solid tumor well-known by early metastasis, local invasion, resistance to standard chemo- and radiotherapy and poor prognosis. Increasing evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is initiated and propagated by cancer stem cells (CSCs). Here we review the current research results regarding CSCs in pancreatic cancer and discuss the different markers identifying pancreatic CSCs. This review will focus on metastasis, microRNA regulation and anti-CSC therapy in pancreatic cancer

  2. Pancreas Divisum and Acute or Chronic Pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Pezzilli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of pancreas divisum as a pancreatic ductal anomaly able to induce acute or chronic pancreatitis is still under debate; some authors consider the pancreas as a variant of the pancreatic ductal system able to induce acute or chronic pancreatitis as a result of relative outflow obstruction [1, 2, 3], whereas others consider this finding a simple morphological anomaly of the pancreatic ductal system without any clinical consequence [4, 5, 6].

  3. Imaging in the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Vasile D. Balaban; Andrei M. Lungu; Dragoș Cuzino; Săndica Bucurică; Bogdan Macadon; Mihăiță Pătrășescu; Raluca S. Costache; Petruț Nuță; Constantin Ştefani; Florentina Ioniță-Radu; Mariana Jinga

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis is characterised by progressive and irreversible damage of the pancreatic parenchyma and ductal system, which leads to chronic pain, loss of endocrine and exocrine functions. Clinically, pancreatic exocrine insufficiency becomes apparent only after 90% of the parenchima has been lost. Despite the simple definition, diagnosing chronic pancreatitis remains a challenge, especially for early stage disease. Because pancreatic function tests can be normal until l...

  4. Detecting Early Pancreatic Cancer- Problems and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    Chari, Suresh T.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a poor prognosis. Improving survival will require diagnosis of early pancreatic cancer which can be defined based on resectability, size or curability. Pancreatic cancer progresses from non-invasive precursor lesions to invasive cancer over a variable time period. Retrospective review of CT scans done prior to diagnosis suggests that pancreatic cancer resectability may be significantly improved if detected as few as 6 months before clinical diagnosis. Since pancreatic ca...

  5. Emergency interventioal management of postoperative massive hemorrhage after pancreatic surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of emergency interventional management in the treatment of postoperative massive hemorrhage after pancreatic surgery. Methods: Endovascular interventional management was performed in 13 patients with postoperative massive hemorrhage after pancreatic surgery. The treatment included super-selective arterial embolization alone (n = 11), combination of embolization with stent placement (n = 1) and combination of embolization with superior mesenteric arterial perfusion(n = 1). The embolization materials included microcoils (n = 7), standard stainless steel coils (n = 2), additional polyvinyl alcohol particles (n = 6) and additional gelfoam (n = 4). Results: Selective angiography before the procedure revealed pseudoaneurysm in 6 cases, contrast media extravasation in 3 cases, pseudoaneurysm together with contrast media extravasation in 3 cases and negative finding in one case. The successful rate of hemostasis was 92.3%(12 / 13). One patient died of massive hemorrhage due to stress ulcer. Recurrent bleeding rate was 16.7% (2 / 12). Angiography showed that complete obliteration of diseased vessels was obtained after embolization and the hepatic artery kept patency with stable blood flow after stent placement. The symptoms related to blood loss was immediately relieved in 12 patients. Two patients with pancreatic fistula and intraperitoneal abscess had a recurrence of bleeding in two weeks and died of hemorrhagic shock. No re-bleeding occurred in the remaining ten patients during the follow-up period of 2 weeks to 24 months. A transient rising of ALT was found in 4 patients who had received embolization therapy of proper hepatic artery. No complications, such as intestinal necrosis, pancreatic necrosis, splenic abscess, etc. occurred in other patients. Conclusion: Endovascular interventional management is a safe and effective treatment for postoperative massive hemorrhage after pancreatic surgery. (authors)

  6. Tratamiento nutricional de los enfermos con pancreatitis aguda: cuando el pasado es presente Nutritional management of patients with acute pancreatitis: when the past is present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. García Almansa

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Los pacientes con pancreatitis aguda sufren con frecuencia un acusado deterioro de su estado nutricional. En algunos éste es ya anterior a su ingreso hospitalario, como ocurre en muchos casos de etiología alcohólica. En otras ocasiones la desnutrición se manifiesta posteriormente en el seno de una pancreatitis de larga evolución o complicada, que impide una correcta alimentación por un tiempo prolongado. A todo ello hay que sumar el hipercatabolismo proteico y el estrés que presentan estos enfermos. Es norma habitual en el tratamiento de la pancreatitis aguda mantener al enfermo en ayuno absoluto. En las pancreatitis leves este estado solo es necesario durante muy pocos días, iniciándose la realimentación por vía oral progresivamente, y no se requieren especiales cuidados nutricionales, salvo que presenten una desnutrición previa. Ahora bien, en los pacientes con pancreatitis moderada y/o grave en los que se prevé un ayuno prolongado por más de una semana, debemos siempre recurrir a un soporte nutricional artificial, que preserve el estado nutricional de estos enfermos, ya que no es suficiente la habitual reposición hidroelectrolítica. En este capítulo realizaremos una revisión actualizada del tratamiento nutricional en estas situaciones, intentando responder a diferentes preguntas entre las que se incluyen el tipo de soporte nutricional indicado, cuándo hay que instaurarlo y hasta qué momento.Patients with acute pancreatitis usually present nutritional status impairment. In alcoholic pancreatitis this impairment is usually presented before hospital admission. In patients with long-term complicated pancreatitis, malnutrition develops during the course of the disease. Besides, these patients present an increased stress and protein hypercatabolism. Treatment of acute pancreatitis usually maintains patients in a short period of starvation. In mild pancreatitis, starvation is needed for a few days, beginning progressively oral

  7. Clinical Impact of the KL-6 Concentration of Pancreatic Juice for Diagnosing Pancreatic Masses

    OpenAIRE

    Kazuya Matsumoto; Yohei Takeda; Kenichi Harada; Takumi Onoyama; Soichiro Kawata; Yasushi Horie; Teruhisa Sakamoto; Masaru Ueki; Norimasa Miura; Yoshikazu Murawaki

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim. Pancreatic juice cytology (PJC) is considered optimal for differentially diagnosing pancreatic masses, but the accuracy of PJC ranges from 46.7% to 93.0%. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical impact of measuring the KL-6 concentration of pancreatic juice for diagnosing pancreatic masses. Methods. PJC and the KL-6 concentration measurements of pancreatic juice were performed for 70 consecutive patients with pancreatic masses (39 malignancies and 31 benign). Re...

  8. Is Zinc Concentration in Pancreatic Fluid a Marker for Pancreatic Diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Surakit Pungpapong; James S Scolapio; Timothy A. Woodward; Wallace, Michael B.; Massimo Raimondo

    2005-01-01

    Objectives An imbalance of free radicals and scavenging processes has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pancreatic tissue injury. Gradual decreases in antioxidant enzyme expression in pancreatic cells from normal pancreas to chronic pancreatitis to pancreatic cancer have been reported. Zinc is one of the components of antioxidant enzymes and may play a role in the pathogenesis of pancreatic diseases. A recent report showed a significant decrease in pancreatic zinc output in patients with...

  9. Activation of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Human and Experimental Pancreatic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Haber, Paul S; Keogh, Gregory W.; Apte, Minoti V.; Moran, Corey S.; Stewart, Nancy L.; Crawford, Darrell H.G.; Pirola, Romano C.; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Ramm, Grant A; Wilson, Jeremy S.

    1999-01-01

    The mechanisms of pancreatic fibrosis are poorly understood. In the liver, stellate cells play an important role in fibrogenesis. Similar cells have recently been isolated from the pancreas and are termed pancreatic stellate cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether pancreatic stellate cell activation occurs during experimental and human pancreatic fibrosis. Pancreatic fibrosis was induced in rats (n = 24) by infusion of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) into the pancreatic duc...

  10. Update on Endoscopic Management of Main Pancreatic Duct Stones in Chronic Calcific Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Eun Kwang; Lehman, Glen A.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic duct stones are a common complication during the natural course of chronic pancreatitis and often contribute to additional pain and pancreatitis. Abdominal pain, one of the major symptoms of chronic pancreatitis, is believed to be caused in part by obstruction of the pancreatic duct system (by stones or strictures) resulting in increasing intraductal pressure and parenchymal ischemia. Pancreatic stones can be managed by surgery, endoscopy, or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy. ...

  11. 14.2.Pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    930325 A clinical study on a lipid—based sys-tem of parenteral nutrition in acute pancreati-tis.ZHU Jiangfan (朱江帆),et al.Dept Hepato-bill Surg,lst Teach Hosp,3rd Milit Med Coll.Chin J Digest 1992;12(4):195—197.A controlled prospective study on a lipid-based system of parenteral nutrition has beencarried out in patients with acute pancreatitis.The results show that the patients’ positive ni-trogen balance can be obtained and the visceralproteins can be maintained within normal range

  12. Pancreatic islet transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrêa-Giannella Maria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background No formulation of exogenous insulin available to date has yet been able to mimic the physiological nictemeral rhythms of this hormone, and despite all engineering advancements, the theoretical proposal of developing a mechanical replacement for pancreatic β cell still has not been reached. Thus, the replacement of β cells through pancreas and pancreatic islet transplantation are the only concrete alternatives for re-establishing the endogenous insulin secretion in type 1 diabetic patients. Since only 1 to 1.5% of the pancreatic mass corresponds to endocrine tissue, pancreatic islets transplantation arises as a natural alternative. Data from the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR from 1983 to December 2000 document a total of 493 transplants performed around the world, with progressively worse rates of post-transplant insulin independence. In 2000, the "Edmonton Protocol" introduced several modifications to the transplantation procedure, such as the use of a steroid-free immunosuppression regimen and transplantation of a mean islet mass of 11,000 islet equivalents per kilogram, which significantly improved 1-year outcomes. Although the results of a 5-year follow-up in 65 patients demonstrated improvement in glycemic instability in a significant portion of them, only 7.5% of the patients have reached insulin independence, indicating the need of further advances in the preservation of the function of transplanted islet. In addition to the scarcity of organs available for transplantation, islets transplantation still faces major challenges, specially those related to cell loss during the process of islet isolation and the losses related to the graft site, apoptosis, allorejection, autoimmunity, and immunosuppression. The main strategies to optimize islet transplantation aim at improving all these aspects. Conclusion Human islet transplantation should be regarded as an intervention that can decrease the frequency of

  13. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata, E-mail: mukhopadhyay.debabrata@mayo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Guggenheim 1321C, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

    2011-02-24

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed.

  14. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed

  15. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation for chronic pancreatitis. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient who underwent 95% pancreatectomy with autotransplantation of the body and tail of the gland to the femoral area for chronic pancreatitis is presented. The pain resolved, and the patient's blood glucose level remained within normal limits. High levels of insulin were found in the iliac vein on the transplanted side. Patency of the graft was demonstrated by technetium scan and arteriography and followed by a color-coded Doppler imaging system. Segmental pancreatic autotransplantation offers a method of relieving pain with preservation of endocrine function in selected patients with chronic pancreatitis

  16. Chronic Pancreatitis, Type 3c Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Whitcomb, David C

    2014-01-01

    About half of all patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) develop diabetes mellitus (DM) due to the loss of islet cell mass, not just beta cells as in Type 1 DM (T1DM), or due to insulin resistance, as in Type 2 DM (T2DM). Patients with DM from loss of islets due to pancreatic disease or resection are diagnosed with pancreatogenic or Type 3c DM (T3cDM). Patients with T3cDM also lose counter-regulatory hormones, such as glucagon and pancreatic polypeptide, and experience maldigestion associate...

  17. Acute pancreatitis induced by mycophenolate mofetil in a kidney transplant patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einollahi Behzad

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute pancreatitis is a rare life-threatening complication in patients after kidney transplantation. Here we described a 56-year-old man who had received a living related kidney transplant for an end-stage renal disease. In his regular follow-up, his serum creatinine was gradually increased and he underwent an allograft biopsy, which revealed an interstitial nephritis/tubular atrophy grade II. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF was prescribed to control chronic allograft nephropathy. He presented with complaints of severe abdominal pain, vomiting, loss of appetite and fever requiring hospital admission twelve days later. Acute pancreatitis was diagnosed on the basis of laboratory data and imaging findings during hospital admission. There was no history of alcohol consumption in our patient. Unfortunately he died one week later and autopsy findings demonstrated acute necrotizing pancreatitis. The bladder drainage of this patients was normal. Laboratory findings in this patient did not endorse infections and other possibilities regarding the etiology of acute pancreatitis in this patient. Therefore, we concluded that acute pancreatitis in near the patient was induced by drugs and basis on our evidence, MMF is the most important suspect. This study suggests that acute pancreatitis can be considered as a side effect of MMF.

  18. Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Advertising Bans

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Saffer

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the relationship between alcohol advertising bans and alcohol consumption. Most prior studies have found no effect of advertising on total alcohol consumption. A simple economic model is provided which explains these prior results. The data set used in this study is a pooled time series of data from 20 countries over 26 years. The empirical model is a simultaneous equations system which treats both alcohol consumption and alcohol advertising...

  19. Pancreatic panniculitis associated with acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Yong Suk; Kim, Mi Sung; Park, Chan Sub; Park, Ji Yeon; Park, Noh Hyuck [Kwandong Univ., Myongji Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Pancreatic panniculitis is an inflammation and necrosis of fat at distant foci in patients with pancreatic disorders, most frequently, pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma. Clinically, pancreatic panniculitis is manifested by painless or painful subcutaneous nodules on the legs, buttocks, or trunk. The usual sites are the distal parts of the lower extremities. To the best of our knowledge, there have not been many reports for the radiologic findings of pancreatic panniculitis. In this article, we report a case of pancreatic panniculitis, including radiologic findings of CT and ultrasonography. The patient was presented with painful subcutaneous nodules on the trunk, and had underlying acute pancreatitis and hemorrhagic pseudocysts.

  20. Groove Pancreatitis: Spiral CT Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To describe the spiral CT findings of groove pancreatitis, a little known entity, and to review its differential diagnosis. We present 8 cases of groove pancreatitis. or pancreatitis affecting the groove between pancreatic head, duodenum and common bile duct, all studied with spiral CT. For two cases, in which were performed cephalic duodenopancreatectomies, anatomopathological correlations were available. In the other 6 cases, radiological follow-ups of anywhere between 5 and 36 months were utilized. In all eight cases, spiral CT showed expansion and increasing density of lipids within the groove with poor contrast enhancement indicative of the fibrous nature of this pathology, and associated with cystic areas in its interior and/or the duodenal wall. the pancreatic head was unaffected in pure forms of groove pancreatitis, and hypodense areas were observed in zones of cephalic segmental enhancement. Knowledge of this little known form of chronic pancreatitis, and the radiological findings that permit its diagnosis are important for the radiologist since its differential diagnosis includes neoplasia of the peri-ampullary region. (Author) 6 refs