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Sample records for alcohol withdrawal seizures

  1. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... parts A severe form of alcohol withdrawal called delirium tremens can cause: Agitation Fever Seeing or feeling things ... watched closely for hallucinations and other signs of delirium tremens. Treatment may include: Monitoring of blood pressure, body ...

  2. Inpatient alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Secades, R; Rabuñal-Rey, R; Guerrero-Sande, H

    2015-03-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted for a femur fracture; an alcohol fetor was noted on admission. The following day, the patient began to experience tremors and nervousness. Intravenous haloperidol was administered. Shortly afterwards, the patient experienced two generalized seizures and then began to experience delirium and uncontrollable agitation. The patient was diagnosed with alcohol withdrawal syndrome; high doses of intravenous midazolam were prescribed and infused. A few hours later, the patient presented signs of respiratory depression, requiring a transfer to the intensive care unit. After a review of the medical history, it was determined that the patient had been admitted on 3 previous occasions due to alcohol withdrawal and had progressed to delirium tremens after experiencing seizures. Can the risk of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and the need for prophylactic treatment be assessed on admission? Were appropriate monitoring and treatment measures employed? Would it have been possible to change his outcome? PMID:25559647

  3. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McKeon, A

    2008-08-01

    The alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a common management problem in hospital practice for neurologists, psychiatrists and general physicians alike. Although some patients have mild symptoms and may even be managed in the outpatient setting, others have more severe symptoms or a history of adverse outcomes that requires close inpatient supervision and benzodiazepine therapy. Many patients with AWS have multiple management issues (withdrawal symptoms, delirium tremens, the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, seizures, depression, polysubstance abuse, electrolyte disturbances and liver disease), which requires a coordinated, multidisciplinary approach. Although AWS may be complex, careful evaluation and available treatments should ensure safe detoxification for most patients.

  4. Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Seizure Susceptibility is Associated with an Upregulation of CaV1.3 Channels in the Rat Inferior Colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiresoye, Luli R.; Allard, Joanne S.; Lovinger, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We previously reported increased current density through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV1) channels in inferior colliculus (IC) neurons during alcohol withdrawal. However, the molecular correlate of this increased CaV1 current is currently unknown. Methods: Rats received three daily doses of ethanol every 8 hours for 4 consecutive days; control rats received vehicle. The IC was dissected at various time intervals following alcohol withdrawal, and the mRNA and protein levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits were measured. In separate experiments, rats were tested for their susceptibility to alcohol withdrawal–induced seizures (AWS) 3, 24, and 48 hours after alcohol withdrawal. Results: In the alcohol-treated group, AWS were observed 24 hours after withdrawal; no seizures were observed at 3 or 48 hours. No seizures were observed at any time in the control-treated rats. Compared to control-treated rats, the mRNA level of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit was increased 1.4-fold, 1.9-fold, and 1.3-fold at 3, 24, and 48 hours, respectively. In contrast, the mRNA level of the CaV1.2 α1 subunit increased 1.5-fold and 1.4-fold at 24 and 48 hours, respectively. At 24 hours, Western blot analyses revealed that the levels of the CaV1.3 and CaV1.2 α1 subunits increased by 52% and 32%, respectively, 24 hours after alcohol withdrawal. In contrast, the CaV1.2 and CaV1.3 α1 subunits were not altered at either 3 or 48 hours during alcohol withdrawal. Conclusions: Expression of the CaV1.3 α1 subunit increased in parallel with AWS development, suggesting that altered L-type CaV1.3 channel expression is an important feature of AWS pathogenesis. PMID:25556199

  5. Emergency management of acute alcohol problems. Part 1: Uncomplicated withdrawal.

    OpenAIRE

    Etherington, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Alcohol-related problems are common among patients in emergency departments. Primary care physicians must recognize and treat a variety of alcohol-related and alcohol-induced problems: alcohol withdrawal, alcohol-related seizures, delirium tremens, malnutrition, concomitant illness, poisoning, trauma, and lack of social support. This paper focuses an recognizing and managing acute alcohol withdrawal.

  6. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Choudhary, Mona; Chandra, Mina

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on 'Alcohol withdrawal syndrome' in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  7. Alcohol Dependence, Withdrawal, and Relapse

    OpenAIRE

    Howard C Becker

    2008-01-01

    Continued excessive alcohol consumption can lead to the development of dependence that is associated with a withdrawal syndrome when alcohol consumption is ceased or substantially reduced. This syndrome comprises physical signs as well as psychological symptoms that contribute to distress and psychological discomfort. For some people the fear of withdrawal symptoms may help perpetuate alcohol abuse; moreover, the presence of withdrawal symptoms may contribute to relapse after periods of absti...

  8. Inpatient management of acute alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Elizabeth C

    2014-05-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is a common condition encountered in the hospital setting after abrupt discontinuation of alcohol in an alcohol-dependent individual. Patients may present with mild symptoms of tremulousness and agitation or more severe symptoms including withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Management revolves around early identification of at-risk individuals and symptom assessment using a validated tool such as the revised Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol score. Benzodiazepines remain the mainstay of treatment and can be administered using a front-loading, fixed-dose, or symptom-triggered approach. Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide or diazepam are commonly used and may provide a smoother withdrawal than shorter-acting benzodiazepines, but there are no data to support superiority of one benzodiazepine over another. Elderly patients or those with significant liver disease may have increased accumulation and decreased clearance of the long-acting benzodiazepines, and lorazepam or oxazepam may be preferred in these patients. Patients with symptoms refractory to high doses of benzodiazepines may require addition of a rescue medication such as phenobarbital, propofol or dexmedetomidine. Anticonvulsants (carbamazepine, valproate, gabapentin) may have a role in the management of mild to moderate withdrawal. Other medications such as β-antagonists or neuroleptics may offer additional benefit in select patients but should not be used a monotherapy. PMID:24781751

  9. Clinical management of alcohol withdrawal: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivanand Kattimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol withdrawal is commonly encountered in general hospital settings. It forms a major part of referrals received by a consultation-liaison psychiatrist. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal in humans with no limit on the date of publication. Articles not relevant to clinical management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full-text articles were obtained from this list and the cross-references. There were four meta-analyses, 9 systematic reviews, 26 review articles and other type of publications like textbooks. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a clinical diagnosis. It may vary in severity. Complicated alcohol withdrawal presents with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, followed by anticonvulsants. Clinical institutes withdrawal assessment-alcohol revised is useful with pitfalls in patients with medical comorbidities. Evidence favors an approach of symptom-monitored loading for severe withdrawals where an initial dose is guided by risk factors for complicated withdrawals and further dosing may be guided by withdrawal severity. Supportive care and use of vitamins is also discussed.

  10. Clinical management of alcohol withdrawal: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kattimani, Shivanand; Bharadwaj, Balaji

    2013-07-01

    Alcohol withdrawal is commonly encountered in general hospital settings. It forms a major part of referrals received by a consultation-liaison psychiatrist. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on pharmacological management of alcohol withdrawal in humans with no limit on the date of publication. Articles not relevant to clinical management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full-text articles were obtained from this list and the cross-references. There were four meta-analyses, 9 systematic reviews, 26 review articles and other type of publications like textbooks. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a clinical diagnosis. It may vary in severity. Complicated alcohol withdrawal presents with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, followed by anticonvulsants. Clinical institutes withdrawal assessment-alcohol revised is useful with pitfalls in patients with medical comorbidities. Evidence favors an approach of symptom-monitored loading for severe withdrawals where an initial dose is guided by risk factors for complicated withdrawals and further dosing may be guided by withdrawal severity. Supportive care and use of vitamins is also discussed. PMID:25013309

  11. Alcohol Withdrawal Mimicking Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana Disel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates, which can cause occupational poisoning due to inappropriate personal protective measures, are widely used insecticides in agricultural regions of southern Turkey. Therefore, the classical clinical findings of this cholinergic poisoning are myosis, excessive secretions, bradicardia and fasciculations are easy to be recognized by local medical stuff. Diseases and conditions related to alcoholism such as mental and social impairments, coma, toxicity, withdrawal, and delirium are frequent causes of emergency visits of chronic alcoholic patients. Here we present a case diagnosed and treated as organophosphate poisoning although it was an alcohol withdrawal in the beginning and became delirium tremens, due to similar symptoms.

  12. Clinical profile of patients with nascent alcohol related seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sandeep

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to characterize the clinical profile of patients with alcohol related seizures (ARS and to identify the prevalence of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE in the same. Materials and Methods: 100 consecutive male patients presenting to a tertiary care center in South India with new onset ARS were analyzed with alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT score. All underwent 19 channel digital scalp electroencephalography (EEG and at least computed tomography (CT scan. Results: A total of 27 patients (27% who had cortical atrophy on CT had a mean duration of alcohol intake of 23.62 years compared with 14.55 years in patients with no cortical atrophy (P < 0.001. Twenty-two patients (22% had clustering in the current episode of whom 18 had cortical atrophy. Nearly, 88% patients had generalized tonic clonic seizures while 12% who had partial seizures underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, which identified frontal focal cortical dysplasia in one. Mean lifetime duration of alcohol intake in patients presenting with seizures within 6 hours (6H-gp of intake of alcohol was significantly lower (P = 0.029. One patient in the 6H-gp with no withdrawal symptoms had EEG evidence for IGE and had a lower AUDIT score compared with the rest. Conclusion: CT evidence of cortical atrophy is related to the duration of alcohol intake and portends an increased risk for clustering. Partial seizures can be a presenting feature of ARS and those patients may benefit from MRI to identify underlying symptomatic localization related epilepsy (8.3% of partial seizures. IGE is more likely in patients presenting with ARS within first 6 hours especially if they do not have alcohol withdrawal symptoms and scalp EEG is helpful to identify this small subgroup (~1% who may require long-term anti-epileptic medication.

  13. Improving Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Berl, Kimberly; Collins, Michelle L.; Melson, Jo; Mooney, Ruth; Muffley, Cheryl; Wright-Glover, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Christiana Care Health System implemented a Care Management Guideline for Alcohol Withdrawal Symptom Management, which provided direction for inpatient screening for alcohol withdrawal risk, assessment, and treatment. Nurses educated on its use expressed confusion with the use of the assessment tools, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. Reeducation was provided by nursing professional development specialists. Pre- and postsurveys revealed that nur...

  14. Death from seizures induced by chronic alcohol abuse--does it exist?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, S

    2007-01-01

    In a forensic setting, deaths due to seizures, either epileptic or other, present a well-known problem. Cause of death is rarely established on the basis of physical evidence, but on circumstantial evidence such as tongue biting or discharge of urine or faeces. Seizures have several different...... may die from these seizures. A literature study was performed of deaths due to alcohol-induced seizures, either during withdrawal or as late-onset seizures where the aetiology was established as long time alcohol abuse and a necropsy had shown no other possible cause of death than a seizure. RESULTS......: It was not possible to find any well-documented cases. It is, however, difficult to compare cases in the literature, as there is no generally accepted classification or nomenclature of seizures related to alcohol abuse....

  15. Alcohol Withdrawal and Cerebellar Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Marianna E

    2015-08-01

    Cerebellar disorders trigger the symptoms of movement problems, imbalance, incoordination, and frequent fall. Cerebellar disorders are shown in various CNS illnesses including a drinking disorder called alcoholism. Alcoholism is manifested as an inability to control drinking in spite of adverse consequences. Human and animal studies have shown that cerebellar symptoms persist even after complete abstinence from drinking. In particular, the abrupt termination (ethanol withdrawal) of long-term excessive ethanol consumption has shown to provoke a variety of neuronal and mitochondrial damage to the cerebellum. Upon ethanol withdrawal, excitatory neurotransmitter molecules such as glutamate are overly released in brain areas including cerebellum. This is particularly relevant to the cerebellar neuronal network as glutamate signals are projected to Purkinje neurons through granular cells that are the most populated neuronal type in CNS. This excitatory neuronal signal may be elevated by ethanol withdrawal stress, which promotes an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) level and a decrease in a Ca(2+)-binding protein, both of which result in the excessive entry of Ca(2+) to the mitochondria. Subsequently, mitochondria undergo a prolonged opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore and the overproduction of harmful free radicals, impeding adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-generating function. This in turn provokes the leakage of mitochondrial molecule cytochrome c to the cytosol, which triggers a cascade of adverse cytosol reactions. Upstream to this pathway, cerebellum under the condition of ethanol withdrawal has shown aberrant gene modifications through altered DNA methylation, histone acetylation, or microRNA expression. Interplay between these events and molecules may result in functional damage to cerebellar mitochondria and consequent neuronal degeneration, thereby contributing to motoric deficit. Mitochondria-targeting research may help develop a powerful new

  16. Improving Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Kimberly; Collins, Michelle L.; Melson, Jo; Mooney, Ruth; Muffley, Cheryl; Wright-Glover, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Christiana Care Health System implemented a Care Management Guideline for Alcohol Withdrawal Symptom Management, which provided direction for inpatient screening for alcohol withdrawal risk, assessment, and treatment. Nurses educated on its use expressed confusion with the use of the assessment tools, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. Reeducation was provided by nursing professional development specialists. Pre- and postsurveys revealed that nurses were more confident in caring for patients with alcohol withdrawal. (See CE Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JNPD/A9) PMID:25816126

  17. A 'symptom-triggered' approach to alcohol withdrawal management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdoch, Jay; Marsden, Janet

    In acute hospital settings, alcohol withdrawal often causes significant management problems and complicates a wide variety of concurrent conditions, placing a huge burden on the NHS. A significant number of critical incidents around patients who were undergoing detoxification in a general hospital setting led to the need for a project to implement and evaluate an evidence-based approach to the management of alcohol detoxification-a project that included a pre-intervention case note audit, the implementation of an evidence-based symptom-triggered detoxification protocol, and a post-intervention case note audit. This change in practice resulted in an average reduction of almost 60% in length of hospital stay and a 66% reduction in the amount of chlordiazepoxide used in detoxification, as well as highlighting that 10% of the sample group did not display any signs of withdrawal and did not require any medication. Even with these reductions, no patient post-intervention developed any severe signs of withdrawal phenomena, such as seizures or delirium tremens. The savings to the trust (The Pennine Acute Hospital Trust) are obvious,but the development of a consistent, quality service will lead to fewer long-term negative effects for patients that can be caused by detoxification. This work is a project evaluation of a locally implemented strategy, which, it was hypothesised,would improve care by providing an individualised treatment plan for the management of alcohol withdrawal symptoms. PMID:24809146

  18. Improving Nursing Knowledge of Alcohol Withdrawal: Second Generation Education Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berl, Kimberly; Collins, Michelle L; Melson, Jo; Mooney, Ruth; Muffley, Cheryl; Wright-Glover, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Christiana Care Health System implemented a Care Management Guideline for Alcohol Withdrawal Symptom Management, which provided direction for inpatient screening for alcohol withdrawal risk, assessment, and treatment. Nurses educated on its use expressed confusion with the use of the assessment tools, pharmacokinetics, and pathophysiology of alcohol withdrawal and delirium tremens. Reeducation was provided by nursing professional development specialists. Pre- and postsurveys revealed that nurses were more confident in caring for patients with alcohol withdrawal. PMID:25816126

  19. 27 CFR 19.997 - Withdrawal of fuel alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. 19.997 Section 19.997 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... and Transfers § 19.997 Withdrawal of fuel alcohol. For each shipment or other removal of fuel...

  20. Influence of normal versus slow antiepileptic drugs withdrawal on seizure recurrence in patients with epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王凌玲

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of normal and slow antiepileptic drugs(AEDs) withdrawal on recurrence of epilepsy. Methods Epileptic patients with seizure-free more than 2 years were recruited to the study. They were first divided into normal

  1. Identification and management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirijello, Antonio; D'Angelo, Cristina; Ferrulli, Anna; Vassallo, Gabriele; Antonelli, Mariangela; Caputo, Fabio; Leggio, Lorenzo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Addolorato, Giovanni

    2015-03-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) may develop within 6-24 h after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for AWS is with benzodiazepines (BZDs). Among the BZDs, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed-dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as α2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and β-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptic agents can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for AWS have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents are discussed. PMID:25666543

  2. Oxidative stress during alcohol withdrawal and its relationship with withdrawal severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramamourty Parthasarathy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative parameters are altered during alcohol withdrawal and are said to contribute towards withdrawal symptoms in alcoholic patients. Aims: To study levels of five selected oxidative parameters during alcohol withdrawal state and after treatment of the withdrawal state and to assess the association of the oxidative parameters with the severity of alcohol withdrawal. Materials and Methods: This was a case-control study done in a De-addiction clinic of a tertiary teaching centre, Southern India. 50 persons having alcohol withdrawal symptoms were included. The oxidative stress parameters malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase were assessed in during the withdrawal phase and again after the withdrawal had subsided. The same oxidative stress parameters were measured in the control group. Statistical analysis: Statistical analysis was done using SPSS version 17.0. One way ANOVA and Pearson correlation test were used for finding the association between the oxidative stress parameters levels and the severity of alcohol withdrawal. Multiple linear regression analysis done to predict variables associated with level of oxidative parameters. Results: During alcohol withdrawal the pro-oxidant malondialdehyde was elevated compared to that in the control group. Among the antioxidant enzymes the superoxide dismutase was higher and catalase was lower than the control group levels. After remission of the alcohol withdrawal both malondialdehyde remained higher and superoxide dismutase lower than in the control group. The levels of oxidative stress parameters not correlated with the severity of alcohol withdrawal. Conclusions: oxidative stress parameters show changes during alcohol withdrawal and during the remission of withdrawal. However, levels of oxidative stress parameters not correlated with the severity of withdrawal.

  3. Radiohippuran renography in chronic alcoholics with acute alcohol withdrawal syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Functional changes found in radiohippuran renography in chronic alcoholics with acute alcohol withdrawal syndromes (n=82; AAWS) regressed to normal values with recovery from AAWS (during 4 days on the average) with the exception of the secretory value which increased to a maximum on the 7th day of observation, remaining approximately unchanged for the following 3 days and decreasing more gradually to a normal value on the 23rd day of observation. In various forms of AAWS the same functional changes in the radiohippuran renogram were observed. (author)

  4. Acute coronary ischemia during alcohol withdrawal: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriram Ganeshalingam

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The potential of alcohol withdrawal to cause acute coronary events is an area that needs the urgent attention of clinicians and researchers. Case presentation We report the case of a 52-year-old heavy-alcohol-using Sri Lankan man who developed electocardiogram changes suggestive of an acute coronary event during alcohol withdrawal. Despite the patient being asymptomatic, subsequent echocardiogram showed evidence of ischemic myocardial dysfunction. We review the literature on precipitation of myocardial ischemia during alcohol withdrawal and propose possible mechanisms. Conclusions Alcohol withdrawal is a commonly observed phenomenon in hospitals. However, the number of cases reported in the literature of acute coronary events occurring during withdrawal is few. Many cases of acute ischemia or sudden cardiac deaths may be attributed to other well known complications of delirium tremens. This is an area needing the urgent attention of clinicians and epidemiologists.

  5. Acute coronary ischemia during alcohol withdrawal: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sriram Ganeshalingam; Epa Dhanesha; Rodrigo Chaturaka; Jayasinghe Saroj

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The potential of alcohol withdrawal to cause acute coronary events is an area that needs the urgent attention of clinicians and researchers. Case presentation We report the case of a 52-year-old heavy-alcohol-using Sri Lankan man who developed electocardiogram changes suggestive of an acute coronary event during alcohol withdrawal. Despite the patient being asymptomatic, subsequent echocardiogram showed evidence of ischemic myocardial dysfunction. We review the literatur...

  6. Emergency management of acute alcohol problems. Part 2: Alcohol-related seizures, delirium tremens, and toxic alcohol ingestion.

    OpenAIRE

    Etherington, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    Alcohol-related problems are common in patients frequenting emergency departments. Primary care physicians have to recognize and treat a variety of alcohol-related conditions. This paper outlines one approach to recognizing and managing alcohol-related seizures, delirium tremens, and toxic alcohol ingestion.

  7. Intraoperative Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: A Coincidence or Precipitation?

    OpenAIRE

    Asish Subedi; Balkrishna Bhattarai

    2013-01-01

    As the prevalence of alcohol dependence is approximately half in surgical patients with an alcohol use disorder, anesthetist often encounters such patients in the perioperative settings. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is one of the most feared complications of alcohol dependence and can be fatal if not managed actively. A 61-year-old man, alcoholic with 50 h of abstinence before surgery, received spinal anesthesia for surgery for femoral neck fracture. To facilitate positioning for spinal ...

  8. Phenobarbital compared to benzodiazepines in alcohol withdrawal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Askgaard, Gro; Hallas, Jesper; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Molander, Anna Camilla; Madsen, Kenneth Grønkjær; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-acting benzodiazepines such as chlordiazepoxide are recommended as first-line treatment for alcohol withdrawal. These drugs are known for their abuse liability and might increase alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. Phenobarbital could be an alternative treatment option......, possibly with the drawback of a more pronounced acute toxicity. We evaluated if phenobarbital compared to chlordiazepoxide decreased the risk of subsequent use of benzodiazepines, alcohol recidivism and mortality. METHODS: The study was a register-based cohort study of patients admitted for alcohol...... withdrawal 1998-2013 and treated with either phenobarbital or chlordiazepoxide. Patients were followed for one year. We calculated hazard ratios (HR) for benzodiazepine use, alcohol recidivism and mortality associated with alcohol withdrawal treatment, while adjusting for confounders. RESULTS: A total of...

  9. Adrenergic Inhibition with Dexmedetomidine to Treat Stress Cardiomyopathy during Alcohol Withdrawal: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary M. Harris

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Stress (Takotsubo cardiomyopathy is a form of reversible left ventricular dysfunction with a heightened risk of ventricular arrhythmia thought to be caused by high circulating catecholamines. We report a case of stress cardiomyopathy that developed during severe alcohol withdrawal successfully treated with dexmedetomidine. The case involves a 53-year-old man with a significant history of alcohol abuse who presented to a teaching hospital with new-onset seizures. His symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal were initially treated with benzodiazepines, but the patient later developed hypotension, and stress cardiomyopathy was suspected based on ECG and echocardiographic findings. Adjunctive treatment with the alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine, was initiated to curtail excessive sympathetic outflow of the withdrawal syndrome, thereby targeting the presumed pathophysiology of the cardiomyopathy. Significant clinical improvement was observed within one day of initiation of dexmedetomidine. These findings are consistent with other reports suggesting that sympathetic dysregulation during alcohol withdrawal produces ideal pathobiology for stress cardiomyopathy and leads to ventricular arrhythmogenicity. Stress cardiomyopathy should be recognized as a complication of alcohol withdrawal that significantly increases cardiac-related mortality. By helping to correct autonomic dysregulation of the withdrawal syndrome, dexmedetomidine may be useful in the treatment of stress-induced cardiomyopathy.

  10. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Ajay Kumar Bakhla; Khess, Christoday R.J.; Vijay Verma; Mahesh Hembram; Samir Kumar Praharaj; Subhas Soren

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance), second factor also had four items (24.25% variance...

  11. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhla, Ajay Kumar; Khess, Christoday R J; Verma, Vijay; Hembram, Mahesh; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Soren, Subhas

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance), second factor also had four items (24.25% variance), and the third had two items (10.04% variance). Conclusions. Factor analysis reveals the existence of multidimensionality of alcohol withdrawal as measured with CIWA-Ar and we found three factors that can be named as delirious, autonomic and nonspecific factors. PMID:24826372

  12. Factor Structure of CIWA-Ar in Alcohol Withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar Bakhla

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify the underlying factor structure of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as measured with CIWA-Ar. Methods. Exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the items of CIWA-Ar. On 201 alcohol-dependent male patients seeking treatment for alcohol withdrawal at 36 hours of abstinence. Results. A three-factor solution was obtained that accounted for 68.74% of total variance. First factor had loading from four items (34.34% variance, second factor also had four items (24.25% variance, and the third had two items (10.04% variance. Conclusions. Factor analysis reveals the existence of multidimensionality of alcohol withdrawal as measured with CIWA-Ar and we found three factors that can be named as delirious, autonomic and nonspecific factors.

  13. Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... control with their medication. Seizure triggers include alcohol consumption or alcohol withdrawal, dehydration or missing meals, stress, ... treatment of epilepsy was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ... stimulation or a fast-acting drug to prevent the seizure from occurring. ...

  14. Alcohol significantly lowers the seizure threshold in mice when co-administered with bupropion hydrochloride

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming Rosanna; McMahon Louis; Williams Robert; Silverstone Peter H; Fogarty Siobhan

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Bupropion HCl is a widely used antidepressant that is known to cause seizures in a dose-dependent manner. Many patients taking antidepressants will consume alcohol, even when advised not to. Previous studies have not shown any interactions between bupropion HCl and alcohol. However, there have been no previous studies examining possible changes in seizure threshold induced by a combination of alcohol and bupropion HCl. Methods Experimentally naïve female Swiss albino mice ...

  15. Effects of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal on Stress Responsiveness and Alcohol Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Howard C Becker

    2012-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between alcohol-drinking behavior and stress. Alcohol has anxiety-reducing properties and can relieve stress, while at the same time acting as a stressor and activating the body’s stress response systems. In particular, chronic alcohol exposure and withdrawal can profoundly disturb the function of the body’s neuroendocrine stress response system, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenocortical (HPA) axis. A hormone, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), which is produc...

  16. [Seizure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Ayumi; Terayama, Yasuo

    2013-06-01

    Seizure is defined as "a strong shrinkage state of the skeletal muscle which is involuntary, and occurs spasmodically" and it is often accompanied by disturbance of consciousness. The typical disease which causes seizure is epilepsy. But there is many conditions causing seizure. Therefore, diagnosis of epilepsy should be careful. Seizure among eldery increases in an era of an aging population in Japan. The risk of recurrence of seizure or epilepsy in elderly is higher than that in youth. In considering of the treatment of seizure among elderly, differential diagnosis from various condition must be done. PMID:23855204

  17. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in Critically Ill Patients: Identification, Assessment, and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Lynsey J; Jutel, Annemarie

    2016-02-01

    Management of alcohol withdrawal in critically ill patients is a challenge. The alcohol consumption histories of intensive care patients are often incomplete, limiting identification of patients with alcohol use disorders. Abrupt cessation of alcohol places these patients at risk for alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Typically benzodiazepines are used as first-line therapy to manage alcohol withdrawal. However, if patients progress to more severe withdrawal or delirium tremens, extra adjunctive medications in addition to benzodiazepines may be required. Sedation and mechanical ventilation may also be necessary. Withdrawal assessment scales such as the Clinical Institute of Withdrawal Assessment are of limited use in these patients. Instead, general sedation-agitation scales and delirium detection tools have been used. The important facets of care are the rapid identification of at-risk patients through histories of alcohol consumption, management with combination therapies, and ongoing diligent assessment and evaluation. (Critical Care Nurse. 2016;36[1]:28-39). PMID:26830178

  18. Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... After a seizure — particularly if it is a first or unexplained seizure — call your doctor or emergency medical services for instructions. Your child will usually need to be seen by a doctor as soon as possible. Reviewed by: Rupal Christine Gupta, MD Date reviewed: June ... ON THIS TOPIC Breath-Holding Spells First Aid: Seizures First Aid: Fainting First Aid: Febrile ...

  19. Management of provoked seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misra Usha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A provoked seizure may be due to structural damage (resulting from traumatic brain injury, brain tumor, stroke, tuberculosis, or neurocysticercosis or due to metabolic abnormalities (such as alcohol withdrawal and renal or hepatic failure. This article is a part of the Guidelines for Epilepsy in India. This article reviews the problem of provoked seizure and its management and also provides recommendations based on currently available information. Seizure provoked by metabolic disturbances requires correction of the triggering factors. Benzodiazepines are recommended for treatment of seizure due to alcohol withdrawal; gabapentin for seizure seen in porphyria; and antiepileptic drugs (AED, that are not inducer of hepatic enzymes, in the seizures seen in hepatic dysfunction. In severe traumatic brain injury, with or without seizure, phenytoin (PHT may be given for 7 days. In ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke one may individualize the AED therapy. In cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST, AED may be prescribed if there is seizure or computed tomographic (CT abnormalities or focal weakness; the treatment, in these cases, has to be continued for 1 year. Prophylactic AED is not recommended in cases of brain tumor and neurosurgical procedures and if patient is on an AED it can be stopped after 1 week.

  20. Study on Alcoholic Withdrawal Score, with Questionnaire Based Session Conducted on Acute and Chronic Alcoholic Liver Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandi Navyatha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol liver disease is damage to the Liver and its function due to alcohol abuse. It occurs after years of heavy drinking and by through which cirrhosis can occur and which leads to the final phase of Alcoholic liver disease. It not only occurs in heavy drinkers but also there is a chance of getting liver disease go up the longer of been drinking and more alcohol consumption. A study was observational, prospective and descriptive; and was carried out one hundred and nine patients [n=109] who were with suffering from an Alcoholic liver disease, to determine the alcohol withdrawal score and there symptoms involved after they were kept on alcohol withdrawal therapy. An observational, prospective and randomized study was conducted in the hospital from March 2014-March 2016. Questionnaire based session with 10 scaled questions were framed according to CIWA (assessment and management of alcohol withdrawal and the score was noted with their symptoms occurrence after the alcohol cessation plan. CIWA score with moderate severity were found to be highest. 7 patients out of 33 patients in severe category of CIWA score were admitted in the hospital with alcohol withdrawal syndrome and psychological disturbances. Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale (CIWA helps clinicians assess and treat potential alcohol withdrawal.

  1. Prenatal exposure to cigarettes, alcohol, and coffee and the risk for febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, M; Wisborg, K; Henriksen, TB;

    2005-01-01

    of extensive brain growth and differentiation in this period. We evaluated the association between prenatal exposure to cigarettes, alcohol, and coffee and the risk for febrile seizures in 2 population-based birth cohorts. METHODS: The Aarhus Birth Cohort consisted of 25,196 children of mothers who were...... Birth Cohort, but the corresponding association was weak in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. We found no association between maternal alcohol and coffee consumption and the risk for febrile seizures. The results were similar for simple and complex febrile seizures. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that prenatal...... exposure to low to moderate levels of alcohol and coffee has no impact on the risk for febrile seizures, whereas a modest smoking effect cannot be ruled out....

  2. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P.; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E.; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-01

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol...

  3. Intraoperative Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: A Coincidence or Precipitation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asish Subedi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As the prevalence of alcohol dependence is approximately half in surgical patients with an alcohol use disorder, anesthetist often encounters such patients in the perioperative settings. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS is one of the most feared complications of alcohol dependence and can be fatal if not managed actively. A 61-year-old man, alcoholic with 50 h of abstinence before surgery, received spinal anesthesia for surgery for femoral neck fracture. To facilitate positioning for spinal anesthesia, fascia iliaca compartmental block with 0.25% bupivacaine (30 mL was administered 30 min prior to spinal block. Later, in the intraoperative period the patient developed AWS; however, the features were similar to that of local anesthetic toxicity. The case was successfully managed with intravenous midazolam, esmolol, and propofol infusion. Due to similarity of clinical features of AWS and mild local anesthetic toxicity, an anesthetist should be in a position to differentiate the condition promptly and manage it aggressively.

  4. Intraoperative Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: A Coincidence or Precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Asish

    2013-01-01

    As the prevalence of alcohol dependence is approximately half in surgical patients with an alcohol use disorder, anesthetist often encounters such patients in the perioperative settings. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is one of the most feared complications of alcohol dependence and can be fatal if not managed actively. A 61-year-old man, alcoholic with 50 h of abstinence before surgery, received spinal anesthesia for surgery for femoral neck fracture. To facilitate positioning for spinal anesthesia, fascia iliaca compartmental block with 0.25% bupivacaine (30 mL) was administered 30 min prior to spinal block. Later, in the intraoperative period the patient developed AWS; however, the features were similar to that of local anesthetic toxicity. The case was successfully managed with intravenous midazolam, esmolol, and propofol infusion. Due to similarity of clinical features of AWS and mild local anesthetic toxicity, an anesthetist should be in a position to differentiate the condition promptly and manage it aggressively. PMID:23936683

  5. Attenuation of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and blood cortisol level with forced exercise in comparison with diazepam.

    OpenAIRE

    Majid Motaghinejad; Mohammad Yasan Bangash; Ozra Motaghinejad

    2015-01-01

    Relieving withdrawal and post-abstinence syndrome of alcoholism is one of the major strategies in the treatment of alcohol addicted patients. Diazepam, chlordiazepoxide, and topiramate are the approved medications that were used for this object. To assess the role of non-pharmacologic therapy in the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome, we analyzed effects of forced exercise by treadmill on alcohol dependent mice as an animal model. A total of 60 adult male mice were divided into 5 group...

  6. Alcohol withdrawal – therapeutical management in surgical patients with upper intestinal bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Bălălău Cristian; Cobani Oana Denisa; Trambitasu Gloria; Popescu Bogdan; Carolina Negrei; Scăunașu Răzvan Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Psychological dependence involves a desire to use a drug to avoid the unpleasant withdrawal syndrome that results from cessation of exposure to it. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is one of the most feared complications of alcohol addiction and sometimes can be fatal if not treated properly. Withdrawal syndrome is characterized by neurological hyperexcitability, which can lead to severe psychological and neurological symptoms. A survey was conceived in order to monitor the efficiency of several d...

  7. Alcohol Withdrawal and Brain Injuries: Beyond Classical Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna E. Jung

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17β-estradiol (E2, interferes with the EW-induced alteration of oxidative signaling pathways and thereby protects neurons, mitochondria, and behaviors. The current review attempts to provide integrated information at the levels of oxidative signaling mechanisms by which EW provokes brain injuries and E2 protects against it. Unmanaged sudden withdrawal from the excessive consumption of alcohol (ethanol adversely alters neuronal integrity in vulnerable brain regions such as the cerebellum, hippocampus, or cortex. In addition to well known hyperexcitatory neurotransmissions, ethanol withdrawal (EW provokes the intense generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the activation of stress-responding protein kinases, which are the focus of this review article. EW also inflicts mitochondrial membranes/membrane potential, perturbs redox balance, and suppresses mitochondrial enzymes, all of which impair a fundamental function of mitochondria. Moreover, EW acts as an age-provoking stressor. The vulnerable age to EW stress is not necessarily the oldest age and varies depending upon the target molecule of EW. A major female sex steroid, 17

  8. Alcohol significantly lowers the seizure threshold in mice when co-administered with bupropion hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming Rosanna

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bupropion HCl is a widely used antidepressant that is known to cause seizures in a dose-dependent manner. Many patients taking antidepressants will consume alcohol, even when advised not to. Previous studies have not shown any interactions between bupropion HCl and alcohol. However, there have been no previous studies examining possible changes in seizure threshold induced by a combination of alcohol and bupropion HCl. Methods Experimentally naïve female Swiss albino mice (10 per group received either single doses of bupropion HCl (ranging from 100 mg/kg to 120 mg/kg or vehicle (0.9% NaCl by intraperitoneal (IP injection in a dose volume of 10 ml/kg, and single-dose ethanol alone (2.5 g/kg, or vehicle, 5 min prior to bupropion dosing. The presence or absence of seizures, the number of seizures, the onset, duration and the intensity of seizures were all recorded for 5 h following the administration of ethanol. Results The results show that administration of IP bupropion HCl alone induced seizures in mice in a dose-dependent manner, with the 120 mg/kg dose having the largest effect. The percentage of convulsing mice were 0%, 20%, 30% and 60% in the 0 (vehicle, 100, 110, and 120 mg/kg dose groups, respectively. Pretreatment with ethanol produced a larger bupropion HCl-induced convulsive effect at all the doses (70% each at 100, 110 and 120 mg/kg and a 10% effect in the ethanol + vehicle only group. The convulsive dose of bupropion HCl required to induce seizures in 50% of mice (CD50, was 116.72 mg/kg for bupropion HCl alone (CI: 107.95, 126.20 and 89.40 mg/kg for ethanol/bupropion HCl (CI: 64.92, 123.10. Conclusion These results show that in mice alcohol lowers the seizure threshold for bupropion-induced seizures. Clinical implications are firstly that there may be an increased risk of seizures in patients consuming alcohol, and secondly that formulations that can release bupropion more readily in alcohol may present additional

  9. Propofol for Treatment of Refractory Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Amy L; Hamilton, Eric P; Kloss, H Grace; Hammond, Drayton A

    2016-04-01

    The authors evaluated all available evidence on the use of propofol as an adjuvant for the treatment of resistant alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) in comparison to other therapies. A comprehensive PubMed search (1966-December 2015) was conducted using the search terms propofol, alcohol withdrawal, and drug therapy. Articles were cross-referenced for other citations. Clinical studies, case series, and case reports published in the English language assessing the use of propofol in adult patients for treatment of AWS were reviewed for inclusion. Propofol is a sedative-hypnotic that exerts its actions through agonism of GABAA receptors at a different binding site than benzodiazepines and reduces glutamatergic activity through N-methyl-d-aspartase (NMDA) receptor blockade. Dosages from 5 to 100 μg/kg/minute reduced AWS symptoms with frequent development of hypotension and requirement for mechanical ventilation. Patients on propofol often experienced longer durations of mechanical ventilation and length of stay, which may be attributed to more-resistant cases of AWS. When propofol was compared with dexmedetomidine as adjuncts in AWS, both agents showed similar benzodiazepine- and haloperidol-sparing effects. Dexmedetomidine was associated with more numerical rates of bradycardia, while propofol was associated with more numerical instances of hypotension. Dexmedetomidine was used more frequently in nonintubated patients. The available data assessing the utility of propofol for AWS exhibited significant heterogeneity. Propofol may be useful in a specific population of patients with AWS, limited to those who are not clinically responding to first-line therapy with benzodiazepines. Specifically, propofol should be considered in patients who are refractory to or not candidates for other adjuvant therapies, patients already requiring mechanical ventilation, or those with seizure activity or refractory delirium tremens. In severe, refractory AWS, adjuvant therapy with

  10. Withdrawal symptoms in a long-term model of voluntary alcohol drinking in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölter, S M; Linthorst, A C; Reul, J M; Spanagel, R

    2000-05-01

    Long-term voluntary alcohol drinking with repeated alcohol deprivation episodes has been suggested as animal model for some aspects of alcoholism. Using a radiotelemetric system, the present study investigated the occurrence of withdrawal symptoms in long-term voluntarily alcohol drinking Wistar rats with (repeated alcohol deprivation group) and without (first alcohol deprivation group) prior alcohol deprivation experience. Six days after transmitter implantation, alcohol bottles were removed, and returned 4 days later. Alcohol deprivation induced hyperlocomotion in both groups. In the repeated alcohol deprivation group, hyperlocomotion was increased at the beginning of the alcohol deprivation phase and decreased during the following dark phase, suggesting that removal of the alcohol bottles might have become a conditioned withdrawal stimulus for this group. Both groups showed an enhanced alcohol intake after representation of alcohol bottles compared to preabstinence intakes (alcohol deprivation effect). However, alcohol intake of the repeated alcohol deprivation group was significantly increased compared to the first alcohol deprivation group at the end of the experiment. It is concluded that repeated alcohol deprivation experience might promote the development of alcohol addiction because of its latent stimulating effect on alcohol drinking that can be unveiled by (presumably mildly stressful) experimental situations. PMID:10837854

  11. Similar withdrawal severity in adolescents and adults in a rat model of alcohol dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, S.A.; Kelso, M.L.; Liput, D.J.; Marshall, S A; Nixon, K.

    2010-01-01

    Alcohol use during adolescence leads to increased risk of developing an alcohol use disorder (AUD) during adulthood. Converging evidence suggests that this period of enhanced vulnerability for developing an AUD may be due to the adolescent’s unique sensitivity and response to alcohol. Adolescent rats have been shown to be less sensitive to alcohol intoxication and withdrawal susceptibility; however age differences in ethanol pharmacokinetics may underlie these effects. Therefore, this study i...

  12. The impacts of nitrous oxide gas on sleep quality during alcohol withdrawal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair David

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor quality of sleep among alcoholics and persons undergoing alcohol withdrawal has been described as a possible cause of alcohol relapse. It has been suggested earlier that nitrous oxide gas has a significant effect on the signs of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS and thus might be expected to reduce sleep disturbance during withdrawal. The aim of the present study was to investigate sleep quality during alcohol withdrawal, to evaluate the correlation between sleep quality and the severity of AWS and alcohol craving, and to determine if nitrous oxide treatment does counteract withdrawal's effects on the quality of sleep. Voluntary patients (n = 105 admitted to the A-Clinic detoxification center with AWS were included in the study. The AWS patients were randomly assigned to one of the following 45-minute gas treatments: (1 nitrous oxide/oxygen; (2 normal air/O2; and (3 medical (normal air. The study was single-blind by design. Sleep quality was assessed after these treatments during the inpatient period; sleep time, sleep efficiency and the fragmentation of sleep were recorded by wrist-worn actigraphs. Severity of AWS was evaluated by the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale (CIWA-Ar and that of alcohol dependence and craving by the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale [OCDS] and the Severity of Alcohol Dependence Data (SADD questionnaire. Results The fragmentation index and the time awake while in bed were both much above the reference values for the Finnish population. These values reflect the restless and disturbed night sleep of the subjects. The only statistically significant effects between the treatment groups were found in the correlations of CIWA-Ar (severity of AWS scores, OCDS-scores (alcohol craving and coffee consumption, all of which were positively associated with movement time and negatively with total sleep time and sleep efficiency. The sleep quality of patients treated with nitrous

  13. Cost-effectiveness analysis of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in uncomplicated alcohol-withdrawal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Vikram K.; Girish, K.; Pandit Lakshmi; R Vijendra; Ajay Kumar; Harsha, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are the first-line drugs in alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA B ) agonist, controls withdrawal symptoms without causing significant adverse effects. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in the management of uncomplicated AWS. Materials and Methods : This was a randomized, open label, standard controlled, parallel group study of cost-effectiveness an...

  14. Cost-effectiveness analysis of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in uncomplicated alcohol-withdrawal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Reddy, Vikram K.; Girish, K.; Lakshmi, Pandit; R Vijendra; Kumar, Ajay; Harsha, R.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Benzodiazepines (BZDs) are the first-line drugs in alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS). Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) agonist, controls withdrawal symptoms without causing significant adverse effects. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in the management of uncomplicated AWS. Materials and Methods: This was a randomized, open label, standard controlled, parallel group study of cost-effectiveness analysis (...

  15. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Symptom-Triggered versus Fixed-Schedule Treatment in an Outpatient Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elholm, B.; Larsen, Klaus; Hornnes, N.;

    2011-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether, in the treatment with chlordiazepoxide for outpatient alcohol withdrawal, there are advantages of symptom-triggered self-medication over a fixed-schedule regimen. Methods: A randomized controlled trial in outpatient clinics for people suffering from alcohol dependence...... (AD) and alcohol-related problems; 165 adult patients in an outpatient setting in a specialized alcohol treatment unit were randomized 1:1 to either a symptom-triggered self-medication or tapered dose, using chlordiazepoxide. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms, amount of medication, duration of symptoms...... the 1-year follow-up. Results: We found no differences in the quantity of medication consumed, time to relapse, well being or treatment satisfaction. Conclusion: Symptom-triggered self-medication was as safe as fixed-schedule medication in treating outpatients with AD and mild to moderate symptoms of...

  16. Gender Differences in Associations between Lifetime Alcohol, Depression, Panic Disorder, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Tobacco Withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Weinberger, Andrea H.; Maciejewski, Paul K.; McKee, Sherry A.; Reutenauer, Erin L.; Mazure, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the interaction of gender and lifetime psychiatric status on the experience of nicotine withdrawal using retrospective data from the National Comorbidity Survey (NCS; N = 816). Multiple regression analyses were performed to examine the main and interactive effects of gender and major depression, alcohol abuse/dependence, panic disorder, and PTSD on indices of withdrawal. Major depression and alcohol abuse/dependence were associated with longer duration of withdrawal sympto...

  17. 78 FR 41185 - Denial of Exemption Applications; Epilepsy and Seizure Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... and seizure disorder standard in 49 CFR 391.41(b)(8), which applies to drivers who operate CMVs, as... criteria for evaluating whether an individual with epilepsy or a seizure disorder should be allowed to... driving; by metabolic derangement not likely to recur; and by alcohol or illicit drug withdrawal....

  18. Prevalence and Correlates of Withdrawal-Related Insomnia among Adults with Alcohol Dependence: Results from a National Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Brower, Kirk J.; Perron, Brian E.

    2010-01-01

    Insomnia during acute alcohol withdrawal (AWD) as well as persisting insomnia during post-acute withdrawal is associated with relapse. Rates of insomnia in clinical samples of alcohol-dependent patients range from 36 to 91%, but the prevalence of AWD-related insomnia in the general population is unknown. The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence of insomnia as a symptom of acute AWD and its correlates in a general population of alcohol-dependent individuals. Data were analyzed ...

  19. Downregulation of Gabra4 expression during alcohol withdrawal is mediated by specific microRNAs in cultured mouse cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bekdash, Rola A.; Harrison, Neil L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol abuse and dependence are a serious public health problem. A large number of alcohol-regulated genes, (ARGs) are known to be influenced by alcohol use and withdrawal (AW), and recent evidence suggests that neuroadaptation to alcohol may be due in part to epigenetic changes in the expression of ARGs. Gabra4, which encodes the α4 subunit of GABAA receptors (GABAARs), is one of a number of ARGs that show remarkable plasticity in response to alcohol, being rapidly upregulated by...

  20. A case of mistaken identity: alcohol withdrawal, schizophrenia, or central pontine myelinolysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider P

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Paul Schneider1, Vicki A Nejtek2,3, Cheryl Hurd2,31Green Oaks Behavioral Health Care Services, Dallas, 2University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, 3John Peter Smith Health Network, Fort Worth, Texas, USAAbstract: Demyelination is a hallmark of central pontine myelinolysis (CPM. Neuropsychiatric manifestations of this condition include weakness, quadriplegia, pseudobulbar palsy, mood changes, psychosis, and cognitive disturbances. These psychiatric symptoms are also associated with schizophrenia and alcohol withdrawal. Thus, it is clinically relevant to differentiate between CPM, schizophrenia, and alcohol withdrawal as the treatment and prognostic outcomes for each diagnosis are distinct. We present a series of events that led to a misdiagnosis of a patient admitted to the medical emergency center presenting with confusion, psychomotor agitation, and delirium who was first diagnosed with schizophrenia and alcohol withdrawal by emergency medical physicians and later discovered by the psychiatric consult team to have CPM. With a thorough psychiatric evaluation, a review of the laboratory results first showing mild hyponatremia (127 mmol/L, subsequent hypernatremia (154 mmol/L, and magnetic resonance brain imaging, psychiatrists concluded that CPM was the primary diagnosis underlying the observed neuropsychopathology. This patient has mild impairments in mood, cognition, and motor skills that remain 12 months after her emergency-center admission. This case report reminds emergency clinicians that abnormal sodium metabolism can have long-term and devastating psychopathological and neurological consequences. Differentiating between CPM, schizophrenia, and alcohol withdrawal using neuroimaging techniques and preventing the risks for CPM using slow sodium correction are paramount.Keywords: MRI, alcohol, schizophrenia, central pontine myelinolysis, hyponatremia

  1. How Imaging Glutamate, γ-Aminobutyric Acid, and Dopamine Can Inform the Clinical Treatment of Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmer, Ansel T; Mason, Graeme F; Fucito, Lisa M; O'Malley, Stephanie S; Cosgrove, Kelly P

    2015-12-01

    Neuroimaging studies have dramatically advanced our understanding of the neurochemical basis of alcohol dependence, a major public health issue. In this paper, we review the research generated from neurochemical specific imaging modalities including magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, and single-photon emission computed tomography in studies of alcohol dependence and withdrawal. We focus on studies interrogating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamate, and dopamine, as these are prominent neurotransmitter systems implicated in alcohol dependence. Highlighted findings include diminished dopaminergic functioning and modulation of the GABA system by tobacco smoking during alcohol withdrawal. Then, we consider how these findings impact the clinical treatment of alcohol dependence and discuss directions for future experiments to address existing gaps in the literature, for example, sex differences and smoking comorbidity. These and other considerations provide opportunities to build upon the current neurochemistry imaging literature of alcohol dependence and withdrawal, which may usher in improved therapeutic and relapse prevention strategies. PMID:26510169

  2. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic attenuates alcohol seeking and withdrawal anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schank, Jesse R; Goldstein, Andrea L; Rowe, Kelly E; King, Courtney E; Marusich, Julie A; Wiley, Jenny L; Carroll, F Ivy; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus

    2012-05-01

    The role of kappa-opioid receptors (KOR) in the regulation of alcohol-related behaviors is not completely understood. For example, alcohol consumption has been reported to increase following treatment with KOR antagonists in rats, but was decreased in mice with genetic deletion of KOR. Recent studies have further suggested that KOR antagonists may selectively decrease alcohol self-administration in rats following a history of dependence. We assessed the effects of the KOR antagonist JDTic on alcohol self-administration, reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by alcohol-associated cues or stress, and acute alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety ('hangover anxiety'). JDTic dose-dependently reversed hangover anxiety when given 48 hours prior to testing, a time interval corresponding to the previously demonstrated anxiolytic efficacy of this drug. In contrast, JDTic decreased alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking when administered 2 hours prior to testing, but not at longer pre-treatment times. For comparison, we determined that the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine can suppress self-administration of alcohol at 2 hours pre-treatment time, mimicking our observations with JDTic. The effects of JDTic were behaviorally specific, as it had no effect on stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, self-administration of sucrose, or locomotor activity. Further, we demonstrate that at a 2 hours pre-treatment time JDTic antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the KOR agonist U50,488H but had no effect on morphine-induced behaviors. Our results provide additional evidence for the involvement of KOR in regulation of alcohol-related behaviors and provide support for KOR antagonists, including JDTic, to be evaluated as medications for alcoholism. PMID:22515275

  3. Temporal changes in innate immune signals in a rat model of alcohol withdrawal in emotional and cardiorespiratory homeostatic nuclei

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman Kate; Brureau Anthony; Vadigepalli Rajanikanth; Staehle Mary M; Brureau Melanie M; Gonye Gregory E; Hoek Jan B; Hooper D; Schwaber James S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Chronic alcohol use changes the brain’s inflammatory state. However, there is little work examining the progression of the cytokine response during alcohol withdrawal, a period of profound autonomic and emotional upset. This study examines the inflammatory response in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and dorsal vagal complex (DVC), brain regions neuroanatomically associated with affective and cardiorespiratory regulation in an in vivo rat model of withdrawal follo...

  4. Alcohol withdrawal – therapeutical management in surgical patients with upper intestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bălălău Cristian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychological dependence involves a desire to use a drug to avoid the unpleasant withdrawal syndrome that results from cessation of exposure to it. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is one of the most feared complications of alcohol addiction and sometimes can be fatal if not treated properly. Withdrawal syndrome is characterized by neurological hyperexcitability, which can lead to severe psychological and neurological symptoms. A survey was conceived in order to monitor the efficiency of several drug associations (Clonidine, Midazolam, IV ethanol, which were administered at the beginning of intensive therapy admission of achohol addicts. By comparing the postoperative evolution parameters and complications incidences for these patients (such as the hospitalization duration in AIT department, the tracheobronchitis incidence, complications as sepsis, pneumonia and cardiac complications, we managed to determine which treatment is the most beneficial for these cases. Benzodiazepines are frequently used for pharmacological therapy of alcohol addicted patients. In our study Midazolam was very efficient, compared to other therapies. When administered for a maximum of 7 days, the inccidence of side effects remains minimal.

  5. Cost-effectiveness analysis of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in uncomplicated alcohol-withdrawal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram K Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Benzodiazepines (BZDs are the first-line drugs in alcohol-withdrawal syndrome (AWS. Baclofen, a gamma-aminobutyric acid B (GABA B agonist, controls withdrawal symptoms without causing significant adverse effects. The objective of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in the management of uncomplicated AWS. Materials and Methods : This was a randomized, open label, standard controlled, parallel group study of cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide in 60 participants with uncomplicated AWS. Clinical efficacy was measured by the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for alcohol (CIWA-Ar scores. Lorazepam was used as supplement medication if withdrawal symptoms could not be controlled effectively by the study drugs alone. Both direct and indirect medical costs were considered and the CEA was analyzed in both patient′s perspective and third-party perspective. Results : The average cost-effectiveness ratio (ACER in patient′s perspective of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide was Rs. 5,308.61 and Rs. 2,951.95 per symptom-free day, respectively. The ACER in third-party perspective of baclofen and chlordiazepoxide was Rs. 895.01 and Rs. 476.29 per symptom-free day, respectively. Participants on chlordiazepoxide had more number of symptom-free days when compared with the baclofen group on analysis by Mann-Whitney test (U = 253.50, P = 0.03. Conclusion : Both study drugs provided relief of withdrawal symptoms. Chlordiazepoxide was more cost-effective than baclofen. Baclofen was relatively less effective and more expensive than chlordiazepoxide.

  6. Study of factors responsible for recurrence of seizures in controlled epileptics for more than 1 years after withdrawal of antiepileptic drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamdhade S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available 531 epileptic patients, who had achieved remission mostly for 2 years or more were studied. The mean follow up period was 5 years. Recurrence was noted in 103 patients (19% after gradual withdrawal of AED, over a period of 3-4 months. 424 patients (81% did not have recurrence. The recurrence rate was influenced adversely by factors like adolescent age and later onset seizures, pre-treatment duration of symptoms more than 3 years, pre-treatment precipitating factors like emotional stress, lack of sleep and meals (however, number in each group is small, positive family history of epilepsy, focal neurodeficit, absence and myoclonic plus grandmal type of clinical seizures, paroxysmal generalized spike and wave discharges and generalized short polyspike and wave discharges in the pretreatment EEG, atrophic changes on CT brain scan (in small numbers, head trauma at birth or later and hereditary factors as etiology of epilepsy, and more than 30 number of seizures before achieving the remission. Factors like, sex, frequency of seizures, period of remission i.e. two years or more and number of drugs used to achieve remission, did not have any significant adverse effect. However, in the last parameter 95% remission was achieved by one or a combination of two drugs (72% and 23% respectively.

  7. Cocaine withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may not be as unstable as withdrawal from alcohol. However, the withdrawal from any chronic substance abuse is very serious. There is a risk of suicide or overdose. Symptoms usually disappear over time. People who have cocaine ...

  8. Add on dexmedetomidine in the treatment of severe alcohol withdrawal in a patient of emergency laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Madan Shende

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available According to American statistics 90% of people drink alcohol at some time in life. The estimated prevalence of alcohol abuse among hospitalized in patients is 20 % and 10- 33 % in patients admitted to the ICU. Approximately 18% of these patients will develop alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS whose symptoms can include physical and psychological manifestations that range from mild to life threatening. Although AWS has been reported in literature in post-operative periods and in intensive care unit, there is less information on treatment and preparing of a patient with AWS, coming for emergency surgical procedure. The surgical stress and deranged liver functions possess an additional challenge to the anesthesiologist. Here we are reporting the successful management of a case of delirium tremens by using Dexmedetomidine in pre, intra and post-operative period in a patient with hollow viscous perforation for emergency laparotomy. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(9.000: 2446-2449

  9. Radiotracer transit measurements as an index of regional cerebral blood flow. Pt. 2. Results in acute alcohol withdrawal syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The data obtained in 72 male chronic alcoholics with acute alcohol withdrawal syndroms give evidence that there is a significant correlation between the numerical value of the cerebral radiorheographic index and the severity of the psychopathological syndrome (especially of the clouding of sensorium) in these patients. (author)

  10. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may include: Clammy skin Enlarged (dilated) pupils Headache Insomnia (sleeping difficulty) Loss of appetite Nausea and vomiting ... areas have housing options that provide a supportive environment for those trying to stay sober. Permanent and ...

  11. Temporal changes in innate immune signals in a rat model of alcohol withdrawal in emotional and cardiorespiratory homeostatic nuclei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freeman Kate

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic alcohol use changes the brain’s inflammatory state. However, there is little work examining the progression of the cytokine response during alcohol withdrawal, a period of profound autonomic and emotional upset. This study examines the inflammatory response in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA and dorsal vagal complex (DVC, brain regions neuroanatomically associated with affective and cardiorespiratory regulation in an in vivo rat model of withdrawal following a single chronic exposure. Methods For qRT-PCR studies, we measured the expression of TNF-α, NOS-2, Ccl2 (MCP-1, MHC II invariant chain CD74, and the TNF receptor Tnfrsf1a in CeA and DVC samples from adult male rats exposed to a liquid alcohol diet for thirty-five days and in similarly treated animals at four hours and forty-eight hours following alcohol withdrawal. ANOVA was used to identify statistically significant treatment effects. Immunohistochemistry (IHC and confocal microscopy were performed in a second set of animals during chronic alcohol exposure and subsequent 48-hour withdrawal. Results Following a chronic alcohol exposure, withdrawal resulted in a statistically significant increase in the expression of mRNAs specific for innate immune markers Ccl2, TNF-α, NOS-2, Tnfrsf1a, and CD74. This response was present in both the CeA and DVC and most prominent at 48 hours. Confocal IHC of samples taken 48 hours into withdrawal demonstrate the presence of TNF-α staining surrounding cells expressing the neural marker NeuN and endothelial cells colabeled with ICAM-1 (CD54 and RECA-1, markers associated with an inflammatory response. Again, findings were consistent in both brain regions. Conclusions This study demonstrates the rapid induction of Ccl2, TNF-α, NOS-2, Tnfrsf1a and CD74 expression during alcohol withdrawal in both the CeA and DVC. IHC dual labeling showed an increase in TNF-α surrounding neurons and ICAM-1 on vascular endothelial cells

  12. Effect of topiramate on partial excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus of rats after alcohol withdrawal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Yang; Guang Wu; Haiying Jiang; Yuanzhe Jin; Songbiao Cui

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many researches have indicated that the imbalances of various amino acid transmitters and neurotransmitters in brain are involved in the formation of alcohol withdrawal, especially that glutamic acid is one of the important transmitters for alcohol tolerance in central nervous system.OBJECTIVE: To observe the changes of excitatory amino acids in hippocampal dentate gyrus in rats with long-term alcohol drinking after withdrawal under consciousness, and investigate the therapeutic effect of topiramate on alcohol withdrawal.DESIGN: A randomized control animal experiment.SETTING: Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Yanbian University.MATERIALS: Thirty male Wistar rats of 4 months old, weighing 300-350 g, were purchased from the Experimental Animal Department, Medical College of Yanbian University. Topiramate was produced by Swish Cilag Company, and the batch number was 02CS063.METHODS: The experiments were carried out in the Department of Physiology, Medical College of Yanbian University from August 2005 to February 2006. ① The rats were divided randomly into three groups: control group (n=10), alcohol group (n=10) and topiramate-treated group (n=10). Rats in the alcohol group and topiramate-treated group were given intragastric perfusion of 500 g/L alcohol (10 mL/kg), once a day for 4 weeks successively, and then those in the topiramate-treated group were treated with 80 mg/kg topiramate at 24 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol, once a day for 3 days successively. Rats in the control group were intragastricly given isovolume saline. ② The withdrawal symptoms were assessed at 6, 30, 48 and 72 hours after the last perfusion of alcohol by using the withdrawal rating scale set by Erden et al,which had four observational indexes of stereotyped behaviors, agitation, tail stiffness and abnormal posture,each index was scored by 5 points, the higher the score, the more obvious the symptoms. ③ The contents of aspartic acid and glutamic acid

  13. Pharmacological Activation/Inhibition of the Cannabinoid System Affects Alcohol Withdrawal-Induced Neuronal Hypersensitivity to Excitotoxic Insults

    OpenAIRE

    Rubio, Marina; Villain, Hélène; Docagne, Fabian; Roussel, Benoit D.; Ramos, José Antonio; Vivien, Denis; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier; Ali, Carine

    2011-01-01

    Cessation of chronic ethanol consumption can increase the sensitivity of the brain to excitotoxic damages. Cannabinoids have been proposed as neuroprotectants in different models of neuronal injury, but their effect have never been investigated in a context of excitotoxicity after alcohol cessation. Here we examined the effects of the pharmacological activation/inhibition of the endocannabinoid system in an in vitro model of chronic ethanol exposure and withdrawal followed by an excitotoxic c...

  14. Acute withdrawal: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brust, John C M

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms of alcohol withdrawal range in severity from mild "hangover" to fatal delirium tremens (DTs). Tremor, hallucinosis, and seizures usually occur within 48 hours of abstinence. Seizures tend to be generalized without focality, occurring singly or in a brief cluster, but status epilepticus is not unusual. DTs usually appears after 48 hours of abstinence and consists of marked inattentiveness, agitation, hallucinations, fluctuating level of alertness, marked tremulousness, and sympathetic overactivity. The mainstay of treatment for alcohol withdrawal is benzodiazepine pharmacotherapy, which can be used to control mild early symptoms, to prevent progression to DTs, or to treat DTs itself. Alternative less evidence-based pharmacotherapies include phenobarbital, anticonvulsants, baclofen, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, beta-blockers, alpha-2-agonists, and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor blockers. Treatment of DTs is a medical emergency requiring heavy sedation in an intensive care unit, with close attention to autonomic instability, fever, fluid loss, and electrolyte imbalance. Frequent comorbid disorders include hypoglycemia, liver failure, pancreatitis, sepsis, meningitis, intracranial hemorrhage, and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. PMID:25307572

  15. Alcoholic delirium tremens with hollow viscus perforation scheduled for emergency laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand T Talikoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol is a drug consumed at some time in life by up to 80% of the population according to western statistics. Wide differences in socioeconomic status in India contribute to various degrees and severity of alcoholism and its associated complications. The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal range from such minor ones as insomnia and tremulousness to severe complications such as withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Although alcohol withdrawal syndrome has been reported in the literature in post-operative periods and in Intensive Care Unit, there is paucity of information on treatment and preparation of a patient with alcohol withdrawal syndrome coming for emergency surgical procedures. The surgical stress and deranged liver function in such cases poses an additional challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Here, we report the successful management of a case of acute alcoholic delirium tremens who presented with hollow viscous perforation for emergency exploratory laparotomy.

  16. Alcoholic delirium tremens with hollow viscus perforation scheduled for emergency laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talikoti, Anand T; Sindhu, Bs; Kavyashree, Sp; Kumar, Ks Kishore

    2012-03-01

    Alcohol is a drug consumed at some time in life by up to 80% of the population according to western statistics. Wide differences in socioeconomic status in India contribute to various degrees and severity of alcoholism and its associated complications. The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal range from such minor ones as insomnia and tremulousness to severe complications such as withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens. Although alcohol withdrawal syndrome has been reported in the literature in post-operative periods and in Intensive Care Unit, there is paucity of information on treatment and preparation of a patient with alcohol withdrawal syndrome coming for emergency surgical procedures. The surgical stress and deranged liver function in such cases poses an additional challenge to the anaesthesiologist. Here, we report the successful management of a case of acute alcoholic delirium tremens who presented with hollow viscous perforation for emergency exploratory laparotomy. PMID:22701216

  17. Study on Alcoholic Withdrawal Score, with Questionnaire Based Session Conducted on Acute and Chronic Alcoholic Liver Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bandi Navyatha; Pragada Sneha Pallavi; S. Purna Divya

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol liver disease is damage to the Liver and its function due to alcohol abuse. It occurs after years of heavy drinking and by through which cirrhosis can occur and which leads to the final phase of Alcoholic liver disease. It not only occurs in heavy drinkers but also there is a chance of getting liver disease go up the longer of been drinking and more alcohol consumption. A study was observational, prospective and descriptive; and was carried out one hundred and nine patients [n=109] wh...

  18. Comparative Evaluation of Partial α2 -Adrenoceptor Agonist and Pure α2 -Adrenoceptor Antagonist on the Behavioural Symptoms of Withdrawal after Chronic Alcohol Administration in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Shivani; Vohora, Divya

    2016-08-01

    As an addictive drug, alcohol produces withdrawal symptoms if discontinued abruptly after chronic use. Clonidine (CLN), a partial α2 -adrenergic agonist, and mirtazapine (MRT), an antagonist of α2 -adrenoceptor, both clinically aid alcohol withdrawal. Considering different mechanisms of action of the two drugs, this study was designed to see how far these two mechanistically different drugs differ in their ability to decrease the severity of ethanol withdrawal syndrome. The effect of CLN and MRT on ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety, depression and memory impairment was analysed using EPM, FST and PAR tests, respectively. Animals received distilled water, ethanol and/or either of the drugs (CLN and MRT) in different doses. Relapse to alcohol use was analysed by CPP test. Animals received ethanol as a conditioning drug and distilled water, CLN or MRT as test drug. CLN and MRT both alleviated anxiety in a dose-dependent manner. MRT (4 mg/kg) was more effective than CLN (0.1 mg/kg) in ameliorating the anxiogenic effect of alcohol withdrawal. However, CLN treatment increased depression. It significantly decreased swimming time and increased immobility time, whereas MRT treatment decreased immobility time and increased climbing and swimming time during abstinence. The effect was dose dependent for both drugs. The results of PAR test show that CLN treatment worsens working memory. Significant increase in SDE and TSZ and decrease in SDL were observed in CLN-treated animals. MRT treatment, on the other hand, improved working memory at both doses. Further, both CLN and MRT alleviated craving. A significant decrease in time spent in the ethanol-paired chamber was seen. MRT treatment at both doses showed better effect than CLN in preventing the development of preference in CPP test. These findings indicate a potential therapeutic use and better profile of mirtazapine over clonidine in improving memory, as well as in alleviating depression, anxiety and craving associated

  19. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic attenuates alcohol seeking and withdrawal anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Schank, Jesse R.; Goldstein, Andrea L.; Rowe, Kelly E.; King, Courtney E.; Marusich, Julie A.; Wiley, Jenny L; Carroll, F. Ivy; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus

    2012-01-01

    The role of kappa-opioid receptors (KOR) in regulation of alcohol-related behaviors is not completely understood. For example, alcohol consumption has been reported to increase following treatment with KOR antagonists in rats, but was decreased in mice with genetic deletion of KOR. Recent studies have further suggested that KOR antagonists may selectively decrease alcohol self-administration in rats following a history of dependence. We assessed the effects of the KOR antagonist JDTic on alco...

  20. Symptom-triggered benzodiazepine therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in the emergency department: a comparison with the standard fixed dose benzodiazepine regimen.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Eugene M

    2012-10-01

    The aim of the study was to compare symptom-triggered and standard benzodiazepine regimens for the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome in an emergency department clinical decision unit. The authors found that the symptom-triggered approach reduced cumulative benzodiazepine dose and length of stay.

  1. Epilepsy or seizures - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focal seizure - discharge; Jacksonian seizure - discharge; Seizure - partial (focal) - discharge; TLE - discharge; Seizure - temporal lobe - discharge; Seizure - tonic-clonic - discharge; Seizure - grand mal - discharge; Grand mal seizure - discharge; Seizure - generalized - discharge

  2. Determinants of improvement in quality of life of alcohol-dependent patients during an inpatient withdrawal programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Lahmek, Ivan Berlin, Laurent Michel, Chafia Berghout, Nadine Meunier, Henri-Jean Aubin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To investigate the improvement in quality of life (QoL of alcohol-dependent patients during a 3-week inpatient withdrawal programme, and to identify the sociodemographic, clinical and alcohol-related variables associated with baseline QoL on admission and with improvement of QoL during residential treatment. Methods: This prospective, observational study included 414 alcohol-dependent patients, hospitalised for a period of 3 weeks. QoL was measured on admission and at discharge using the French version of the Medical Outcome Study SF-36. The mean scores for each dimension and for the Physical and Mental Component Summary scores were calculated. Results: The mean scores per dimension and the mean Physical and Mental Component Summary scores were significantly lower on admission than at discharge; the lowest scores being observed for social functioning and role limitations due to emotional problems. At discharge, the mean scores per dimension were similar to those observed in the French general population. Female gender, age >45 years, living alone, working as a labourer or employee, somatic comorbidity, and the existence of at least five criteria for alcohol dependence according to the DSM-IV classification were associated with a low Physical Component Summary score on admission; psychiatric comorbidity, the presence of at least five DSM-IV dependence criteria, smoking and suicidality were associated with a low Mental Component Summary score on admission. The increase in Physical and Mental Component Summary scores during hospitalisation was more marked when the initial scores were low. Apart from the initial score, the greatest improvement in Physical Component Summary score was seen in patients with a high alcohol intake and in those without a somatic comorbidity; the increase in Mental Component Summary score was greatest in patients without psychotic symptoms and in those who abused or were dependent on illegal drugs. Conclusion

  3. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... drinking once you've started Physical dependence - withdrawal symptoms Tolerance - the need to drink more alcohol to feel the same effect With alcohol abuse, you are not physically dependent, but you still ...

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies 5q21 and 9p24.1 (KDM4C) loci associated with alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Liu, Xuefeng; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wu, Long-Yang; Zeng, Min

    2012-04-01

    Several genome-wide association (GWA) studies of alcohol dependence (AD) and alcohol-related phenotypes have been conducted; however, little is known about genetic variants influencing alcohol withdrawal symptoms (AWS). We conducted the first GWA study of AWS using 461 cases of AD with AWS and 408 controls in Caucasian population in the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) sample. Logistic regression analysis of AWS as a binary trait, adjusted for age and sex, was performed using PLINK. We identified 51 SNPs associated with AWS with p GABRA1, GABRG1, and GABRG3 were associated with AWS (p < 10(-2)) in the COGA sample. In conclusion, we identified several loci associated with AWS. These findings offer the potential for new insights into the pathogenesis of AD and AWS. PMID:22072270

  5. Hypnopompic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Amer M; Lüders, Hans O

    2010-12-01

    The relationship between epilepsy and sleep is complex and bidirectional. Ictal awakening is probably a common and well-described phenomenon. In this small observational study we describe arousal from sleep as the only, or at least main, manifestation of some epileptic seizures. We coin the term "hypnopompic seizures" to describe this entity. Five patients with intractable epilepsy were monitored by continuous video-electroencephalogram. Four of them had left temporal lobe epilepsy and one patient had generalised epilepsy. Hypnopompic seizures accounted for 30-100% of their seizure types captured during monitoring. All the seizures occurred during stage II sleep and were brief. Hypnopompic seizures are extremely subtle and may be underdiagnosed and underreported. Future larger studies are needed to shed some light on this unique entity and its neuropathophysiology. Epileptologists should be aware of this type of seizure and careful review of electroencephalograms during the transition from sleep to arousal is imperative to capture these seizures. Physicians, patients and families also need to be aware of such a subtle manifestation of seizures. Improved awareness of hypnopompic seizures and subtle seizures, in general, help guide accurate and early diagnosis, thorough monitoring and appropriate management. PMID:21030341

  6. Alcohol consumption increases locomotion in an open field and induces Fos-immunoreactivity in reward and approach/withdrawal-related neurocircuitries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wscieklica, Tatiana; de Barros Viana, Milena; Le Sueur Maluf, Luciana; Pouza, Kathlein Cristiny Peres; Spadari, Regina Célia; Céspedes, Isabel Cristina

    2016-02-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder characterized by compulsion to seek and take the drug, loss of control in limiting intake and, eventually, the emergence of a negative emotional state when access to the drug is prevented. Both dopamine and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated systems seem to play important roles in the modulation of alcohol abuse and dependence. The present study investigated the effects of alcohol consumption on anxiety and locomotor parameters and on the activation of dopamine and CRF-innervated brain regions. Male Wistar rats were given a choice of two bottles for 31 days, one containing water and the other a solution of saccharin + alcohol. Control animals only received water and a solution of 0.2% saccharin. On the 31st day, animals were tested in the elevated plus-maze and open field, and euthanized immediately after the behavioral tests. An independent group of animals was treated with ethanol and used to measure blood ethanol concentration. Results showed that alcohol intake did not alter behavioral measurements in the plus-maze, but increased the number of crossings in the open field, an index of locomotor activity. Additionally, alcohol intake increased Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-ir) in the prefrontal cortex, in the shell region of the nucleus accumbens, in the medial and central amygdala, in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, in the septal region, and in the paraventricular and dorsomedial hypothalamus, structures that have been linked to reward and to approach/withdrawal behavior. These observations might be relevant to a better understanding of the behavioral and physiological alterations that follow alcohol consumption. PMID:26786746

  7. Motor impairment: a new ethanol withdrawal phenotype in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Philibin, Scott D.; Cameron, Andy J.; Metten, Pamela; Crabbe, John C.

    2008-01-01

    Alcoholism is a complex disorder with genetic and environmental risk factors. The presence of withdrawal symptoms is one criterion for alcohol dependence. Genetic animal models have followed a reductionist approach by quantifying various effects of ethanol withdrawal separately. Different ethanol withdrawal symptoms may have distinct genetic etiologies, and therefore differentiating distinct neurobiological mechanisms related to separate signs of withdrawal would increase our understanding of...

  8. Febrile Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Order Brochures News From NINDS Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Febrile Seizures Fact Sheet See a list of all NINDS Disorders Get Web page suited for printing Email this to a friend ...

  9. Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Mewasingh, Leena D

    1982-01-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder of childhood, and occurs in an age-related manner. FS are classified into simple and complex. FS has a multifactorial inheritance, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors are causative. Various animal models have elucidated the pathophysiological mechanisms of FS. Risk factors for a first FS are a family history of the disorder and a developmental delay. Risk factors for recurrent FS are a family history, age below 18 mon...

  10. Withdrawal-Associated Increases and Decreases in Functional Neural Connectivity Associated with Altered Emotional Regulation in Alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    O'Daly, Owen G; Trick, Leanne; Scaife, Jess; Marshall, Jane; Ball, David; Phillips, Mary L.; Williams, Stephen SC; Stephens, David N.; Duka, Theodora

    2012-01-01

    Alcoholic patients who have undergone multiple detoxifications/relapses show altered processing of emotional signals. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging during performance of implicit and explicit versions of a task in which subjects were presented with morphs of fearful facial emotional expressions. Participants were abstaining, multiply detoxified (MDTx; n=12) or singly detoxified patients (SDTx; n=17), and social drinker controls (n=31). Alcoholic patients were less able th...

  11. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  12. Controlling Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  13. Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifkin, Benjamin G; Inoue, Yushi

    2004-01-01

    Visual reflex seizures induced by complex stimuli may be triggered by patterned and flashing displays that are now ubiquitous. The seizures may be clinically generalized, but unilateral and bilateral myoclonic attacks also may be triggered, especially in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and recently, clearly focal reflex occipital lobe seizures have been described. Some seizure-triggering properties of video displays can be identified, such as perceived brightness, pattern, flicker frequency, and color. Knowledge of these is useful in planning individual treatment and in designing regulations for screen content of television broadcasts or for other video displays. Some subjects will also be sensitive to cognitive or action-programming activation, especially when playing video games, and this can increase the chance of seizure triggering. Nonspecific factors such as sleep deprivation, prolonged exposure, and drug or alcohol use also may play a role in reflex seizure occurrence. PMID:14706042

  14. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol abuse is responsible for 4 percent of global deaths and disability, nearly as much as tobacco and five times the burden of illicit drugs (WHO). In developing countries with low mortality, alcohol is the leading risk factor for males, causing 9.8 percent of years lost to death and disability. Alcohol abuse...

  15. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  16. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Date reviewed: January 2014 previous 1 • 2 For Teens For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Word! Alcoholism What You Need to Know About Drugs What You Need to Know About Drugs: Depressants What Kids Say About: Drinking Alcohol Dealing With Peer Pressure Contact Us Print Resources Send to a friend ...

  17. Phenobarbitone versus phenytoin monotherapy for partial onset seizures and generalized onset tonic-clonic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Catrin Tudur; Williamson, Paula R; Marson, Anthony G

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2001. Worldwide, phenytoin and phenobarbitone are commonly used antiepileptic drugs. They are more likely to be used in the developing world than the developed world, primarily because they are inexpensive. The aim of this review is to summarize data from existing trials comparing phenytoin and phenobarbitone. Objectives To review the effects of phenobarbitone compared to phenytoin when used as monotherapy in patients with partial onset seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalized seizure types. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group trials register (20 October 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009) and MEDLINE (1950 to October week 2, 2009). In addition, we handsearched relevant journals, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and researchers in the field to seek any ongoing or unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials in children or adults with partial onset seizures or generalized onset tonic-clonic seizures. Trials must have included a comparison of phenobarbitone monotherapy with phenytoin monotherapy. Data collection and analysis This was an individual patient data review. Outcomes were time to (a) withdrawal of allocated treatment, (b) 12-month remission and (c) first seizure post randomization. Data were analyzed using a stratified logrank analysis with results expressed as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), where a HR > 1 indicates an event is more likely to occur earlier on phenobarbitone than phenytoin. Main results To date, data have been obtained for four of ten studies meeting the inclusion criteria, amounting to 599 individuals, or approximately 65% of the potential data. The main overall results (HR) were (a) time to treatment withdrawal 1.62 (95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.14); (b) time to 12-month

  18. Cocaine withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocaine withdrawal occurs when someone who has used a lot of cocaine cuts down or quits taking the drug. Symptoms ... even if the user is not completely off cocaine and still has some of the drug in ...

  19. Aspectos neurofarmacológicos do uso crônico e da Síndrome de Abstinência do Alcool Neuropharmacological aspects of chronic alcohol use and withdrawal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Zaleski

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste artigo é o de revisar e descrever as principais alterações neurofarmacológicas causadas pela exposição crônica ao álcool, assim como os fenômenos ocorridos durante o período de abstinência. São apresentados dados referentes às alterações neuroadaptativas e de tolerância ocorridas nos principais sistemas de monoaminas, aminoácidos neurotransmissores e canais de cálcio, o que está relacionado a uma piora no prognóstico de portadores de comorbidades psiquiátricas com o consumo de álcool. São também descritos alguns estudos relevantes que demonstram o envolvimento de outros mecanismos de ação do álcool no sistema nervoso central, como o envolvimento de opióides, entre outras substâncias. O artigo reafirma a importância, para clínicos e pesquisadores, de um sempre maior entendimento do mecanismo de ação central do álcool, pois dele depende a busca por novas opções farmacológicas, tanto para a redução dos danos provocados pelo seu uso crônico, como para o tratamento da síndrome de abstinência a esta substância.The objective of this paper is to review and describe the main neuropharmacological changes caused by the chronic use of alcohol and those observed during its withdrawal period. The results show international data referring to the involvement of monoamine systems, neurotransmitters and calcium channels in both neuroadaptation and tolerance to alcohol effects and withdrawal. Relevant studies showing the participation of other systems in those mechanisms, as opioids and other substances, are also shown. The article reinforces the importance, for both physicians and researchers, of an always growing understanding of alcohol central mechanisms of action. This understanding is necessary to new pharmacological options to alcohol harm reduction as well as to alcohol withdrawal treatment.

  20. Code blue: seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I

    2011-06-01

    Eyewitnesses frequently perceive seizures as life threatening. If an event occurs on the hospital premises, a "code blue" can be called which consumes considerable resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of code blue calls for seizures and seizure mimickers. A retrospective review of a code blue log from 2001 through 2008 identified 50 seizure-like events, representing 5.3% of all codes. Twenty-eight (54%) occurred in inpatients; the other 22 (44%) events involved visitors or employees on the hospital premises. Eighty-six percent of the events were epileptic seizures. Seizure mimickers, particularly psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, were more common in the nonhospitalized group. Only five (17.9%) inpatients had a known diagnosis of epilepsy, compared with 17 (77.3%) of the nonhospitalized patients. This retrospective survey provides insights into how code blues are called on hospitalized versus nonhospitalized patients for seizure-like events. PMID:21546315

  1. Val158Met COMT polymorphism and risk of aggression in alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, Michael; Zill, Peter; Koller, Gabi; Samochowiec, Agnieszka; Grzywacz, Anna; Preuss, Ulrich W

    2015-01-01

    Aggression, violence and antisocial behavior are common in alcoholism, but their biological basis is poorly understood. Several studies and recent meta-analyses indicate that in schizophrenia the catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met genotype may be associated with aggression, most often in methionine allele carriers. We tested this hypothesis in a sample of treatment-seeking alcohol-dependent in-patients (293 German patients and 499 controls, and additional 190 Polish patients as replication sample). As expected, patients with a history of violent or non-violent crime were more often male, had an earlier onset of alcoholism and more withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens, and were more likely to have a history of suicide attempts. COMT genotype was not associated with a history of violent or non-violent crime. More studies are needed on the neurobiological basis of aggression and violence in alcoholism. PMID:24118473

  2. The negative effects of alcohol hangover on high-anxiety phenotype rats are influenced by the glutamate receptors of the dorsal midbrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezequiel Leite, L; Nobre, M J

    2012-06-28

    Alcoholism is a chronic disorder characterized by the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome following the abrupt cessation of alcohol intake that includes symptoms of physical and emotional disturbances, anxiety being the most prevalent symptom. In humans, it was shown that anxiety may increase the probability of relapse. In laboratory animals, however, the use of anxiety to predict alcohol preference has remained difficult. Excitatory amino acids as glutamate have been implicated in alcohol hangover and may be responsible for the seizures and anxiety observed during withdrawal. The dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) is a midbrain region critical for the modulation/expression of anxiety- and fear-related behaviors and the propagation of seizures induced by alcohol withdrawal, the glutamate neurotransmission being one of the most affected. The present study was designed to evaluate whether low- (LA) and high-anxiety rats (HA), tested during the alcohol hangover phase, in which anxiety is the most prevalent symptom, are more sensitive to the reinforcing effects of alcohol when tested in a voluntary alcohol drinking procedure. Additionally, we were interested in investigating the main effects of reducing the excitatory tonus of the dorsal midbrain, after the blockade of the ionotropic glutamate receptors into the DPAG, on the voluntary alcohol intake of HA and LA motivated rats that were made previously experienced with the free operant response of alcohol drinking. For this purpose, we used local infusions of the N-metil D-Aspartato (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-kainate receptors antagonist DL-2-Amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid - DL-AP7 (10 nmol/0.2 μl) and l-glutamic acid diethyl ester - GDEE (160 nmol/0.2 μl), respectively. Alcohol intoxication was produced by 10 daily bolus intraperitonial (IP) injections of alcohol (2.0 g/kg). Peak-blood alcohol levels were determined by gas-chromatography analysis in order to assess blood-alcohol

  3. 27 CFR 19.532 - Withdrawals of spirits for use in wine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... use in wine production. 19.532 Section 19.532 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND... Withdrawals Withdrawal of Spirits Without Payment of Tax § 19.532 Withdrawals of spirits for use in wine production. Wine spirits may be withdrawn to a bonded wine cellar without payment of tax for use in...

  4. : Seizure onset zone imaging

    OpenAIRE

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique,; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    International audience Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we re...

  5. Impact of alcohol intoxication and withdrawal syndrome on social phobia and panic disorder in alcoholic inpatients Impacto das fases de intoxicação e de abstinência de álcool sobre a fobia social e o transtorno de pânico em pacientes alcoolistas hospitalizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Barbosa Terra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the impact of alcohol intoxication and withdrawal on the course of social phobia and panic disorder. METHOD: A group of 41 alcoholic inpatients undergoing detoxification therapy were interviewed using the SCID-I (DSM-IV and questions to detect fluctuations in the course of social phobia and panic disorder as a function of the different phases in alcohol dependence (intoxication, withdrawal, and lucid interval. RESULTS: Only 1 (2.4% patient presented panic disorder throughout life, and 9 (21.9% had panic attacks during alcohol intoxication or during the withdrawal syndrome. Sixteen (39% alcoholic patients showed social phobia with onset prior to drug use. However, drinking eventually became unable to alleviate social phobia symptoms or worsened such symptoms in 31.2% of social-phobic patients. While patients with social phobia reported a significant improvement in psychiatric symptoms during alcohol intoxication, patients experiencing panic attacks worsened significantly during intoxication. In the withdrawal phase, patients with social phobia tended to have more and more intense phobic symptoms. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the impact of alcohol intoxication is different for social phobia as compared to panic disorder, at first decreasing the social-phobic symptoms but later aggravating them. In panic disorder, the impact of intoxication by alcohol is more harmful, at least in the short term.OBJETIVO: Estudar o impacto das fases de intoxicação e de abstinência do uso de álcool sobre o curso da fobia social e do transtorno de pânico. MÉTODO: Um grupo de 41 pacientes hospitalizados por dependência de álcool foi entrevistado com o SCID-I (DSM-IV, adicionado de perguntas para detectar as flutuações no curso da fobia social e do transtorno do pânico em função das diferentes fases do uso da droga (intoxicação, abstinência e intervalo lúcido. RESULTADOS: Apenas um (2,4% paciente, apresentou transtorno

  6. FEBRILE SEIZURE AND ANEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Talebian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveConsidering the controversial results in present day literature regarding the relationship between febrile seizures and anemia and the high rate of such seizures in children, this study was conducted to evaluate the association between pediatric febrile seizures and anemia.Material and MethodsIn this case-control study, conducted in 2003, 60 children with febrile seizure(cases and 60 febrile children without seizure(controls were evaluated in the Kashan Shahid Beheshti hospital; all patients were matched for age, sex, type of feeding, and use of supplemental iron. Thirty-six (60% and 39 (65% of the patients in case and control groups respectively were male, and the remaining female. Levels of hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell indices were determined in all children and Chi-square and Fisher exact tests were used to analyze data.ResultsOf the case group, 13.3% (6 male, 2 female and of controls, 20% (9 male, 3 female of children had anemia (p= 0.327, the condition being more common in male children aged over 6 months. Febrile seizures were found to occur mostly between the ages of 6 to 24 months.ConclusionThe risk of febrile seizure occurrence in anemic children seems to be less than that in children who do not suffer from the condition.Keywords:Febrile seizure, Anemia, Children

  7. Pharmacology of seizure drugs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana

    Vol.2. Oxford : Academic Press, 2009 - (Schwartzkroin, P.), s. 780-786 ISBN 978-0-12-373688-8 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MŠk ME08045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : seizure drug * epileptic seizure * postnataly development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  8. Viruses and febrile seizures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeijl, J.H. van

    2004-01-01

    We conclude that viral infections are the main cause of febrile seizures, with an important role for influenza A, HHV-6 and HHV-7. We showed that several viral infections not only contribute to initial febrile seizures, but also to recurrences. Viruses could not be detected in the CSF of children wi

  9. Complicações psiquiátricas do uso crônico do álcool: síndrome de abstinência e outras doenças psiquiátricas Psychiatric complications of alcoholism: alcohol withdrawal syndrome and other psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Maciel

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de abstinência alcoólica é um quadro agudo, caracterizado por um conjunto de sinais e sintomas autolimitados, com gravidade variada, secundário à interrupção total ou parcial do consumo de álcool, podendo ser associado a inúmeros problemas clínicos e/ou outros transtornos psiquiátricos. O objetivo deste artigo é rever as principais complicações psiquiátricas secundárias à síndrome de abstinência alcoólica, como convulsões e delirium tremens, bem como algumas outras condições psiquiátricas associadas à dependência de álcool, como as síndromes de Wernicke Korsakoff e de Marchiava Bignami. Pretende-se, com isso, auxiliar no diagnóstico precoce e tratamento adequado, minimizando assim a morbidade e a mortalidade associadas a tais complicações.Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is an acute condition secondary to total or partial reduction of alcohol consumption, characterized by self limited signs and symptoms and different degrees of severity. It can be complicated by several clinical and/or other psychiatric related problems. The objective of this article is to review the most important psychiatric complications to alcohol withdrawal syndrome as well as other psychiatric disorders associated with alcohol dependence as Wernicke Korsakoff and Marchiava Bignami syndromes. We aim to promote early diagnosis and treatment of these conditions, minimizing morbidity and mortality associated with them.

  10. Binge Drinking During Pregnancy and Risk of Seizures in Childhood:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yuelian; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Vestergaard, Mogens;

    2009-01-01

    Seizures are often found in children with fetal alcohol syndrome, but it is not known whether binge drinking during pregnancy by nonalcoholic women is associated with an increased risk of seizure disorders in children. The authors conducted a population-based cohort study of 80,526 liveborn...... singletons in the Danish National Birth Cohort (1996-2002). Information on maternal binge drinking (intake of >/=5 drinks on a single occasion) was collected in 2 computer-assisted telephone interviews during pregnancy. Children were followed for up to 8 years. Information on neonatal seizures, epilepsy, and...... febrile seizures was retrieved from the Danish National Hospital Register. Results showed that exposure to binge drinking episodes during pregnancy was not associated with an increased risk of seizure disorders in children, except for those exposed at 11-16 gestational weeks. These children had a 3...

  11. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting. PMID:25902572

  12. Investigations into the behavioural and neurobiological effects of repeated ethanol withdrawal

    OpenAIRE

    Hoang, Leigh

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents a rat model, by which the effects of repeated ethanol withdrawal on withdrawal severity was investigated, in relation to the cognitive and behavioural deficits associated with repeated episodes of withdrawal. Repeated ethanol withdrawal in the rat has been well established to model the effects of repeated episodes of human alcohol detoxification. This model has enabled the study of withdrawal severity and the role of the prefrontal cortex in the form of rat behaviour. ...

  13. Mechanism of Seizure Termination

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms contributing to seizure termination and organized according to membranes, synapses, networks, and circuits are reviewed by researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York.

  14. Fibromyalgia and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatum, William O; Langston, Michael E; Acton, Emily K

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this case-matched study was to determine how frequently fibromyalgia is associated with different paroxysmal neurological disorders and explore the utility of fibromyalgia as a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures. The billing diagnosis codes of 1,730 new, non-selected patient encounters were reviewed over a three-year period for an epileptologist in a neurology clinic to identify all patients with historical diagnoses of fibromyalgia. The frequency with which epileptic seizures, psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and physiological non-epileptic events were comorbid with fibromyalgia was assessed. Age and gender case-matched controls were used for a between-group comparison. Wilcoxon tests were used to analyse interval data, and Chi-square was used to analyse categorical data (pFibromyalgia was retrospectively identified in 95/1,730 (5.5%) patients in this cohort. Females represented 95% of the fibromyalgia sample (age: 53 years; 95% CI: 57, 51). Forty-three percent of those with fibromyalgia had a non-paroxysmal, neurological primary clinical diagnosis, most commonly chronic pain. Paroxysmal events were present in 57% of fibromyalgia patients and 54% of case-matched controls. Among patients with fibromyalgia and paroxysmal disorders, 11% had epileptic seizures, 74% had psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, and 15% had physiological non-epileptic events, compared to case-matched controls with 37% epileptic seizures, 51% psychogenic non-epileptic events, and 12% physiological non-epileptic events (p = 0.009). Fibromyalgia was shown to be a predictor for the diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in patients with undifferentiated paroxysmal spells. However, our results suggest that the specificity and sensitivity of fibromyalgia as a marker for psychogenic non-epileptic seizures in a mixed general neurological population of patients is less than previously described. PMID:27238051

  15. Seizures Induced by Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Ogunyemi

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Musicogenic epilepsy is a rare disorder. Much remains to be learned about the electroclinical features. This report describes a patient who has been followed at our institution for 17 years, and was investigated with long-term telemetered simultaneous video-EEG recordings. She began to have seizures at the age of 10 years. She experienced complex partial seizures, often preceded by elementary auditory hallucination and complex auditory illusion. The seizures occurred in relation to singing, listening to music or thinking about music. She also had occasional generalized tonic clonic seizures during sleep. There was no significant antecedent history. The family history was negative for epilepsy. The physical examination was unremarkable. CT and MRI scans of the brain were normal. During long-term simultaneous video-EEG recordings, clinical and electrographic seizure activities were recorded in association with singing and listening to music. Mathematical calculation, copying or viewing geometric patterns and playing the game of chess failed to evoke seizures.

  16. Discovering Genes Involved in Alcohol Dependence and Other Alcohol Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Kari J.; Milner, Lauren C.; Denmark, Deaunne L.; Grant, Seth G.N.; Kozell, Laura B.

    2012-01-01

    The genetic determinants of alcoholism still are largely unknown, hindering effective treatment and prevention. Systematic approaches to gene discovery are critical if novel genes and mechanisms involved in alcohol dependence are to be identified. Although no animal model can duplicate all aspects of alcoholism in humans, robust animal models for specific alcohol-related traits, including physiological alcohol dependence and associated withdrawal, have been invaluable resources. Using a varie...

  17. [Alcohol and psychiatric disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzyk-Szutkiewicz, Joanna; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Szulc, Agata

    2012-09-01

    Alcohol dependence and abuse is one of the most costly health problems in the world from both a social and an economic point of view. It is a widespread problem, focusing attention not only psychiatrists but also doctors of other specialties. Patterns of drinking appear to be changing throughout the world, with more women and young people drinking heavily. Even risky drinking is a potential health risk, while chronic alcohol abuse contribute to the serious physical and mental complications. Alcohol used disorders associated with alcohol-induced brain damage include: withdrawal state, delirium tremens, alcoholic hallucinosis, alcoholic paranoia, Korsakoffs psychosis, alcoholic dementia, alcoholic depression. On the other hand, mental disorders as panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, personality disorder most frequently comorbid with alcohol abuse or they trigger alcohol. PMID:23157139

  18. Awake seizures after pure sleep-related epilepsy: a systematic review and implications for driving law

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Rhys H.; King, Will H; Johnston, Ann; Smith, Philip EM

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Who with sleep seizures is safe to drive? Driving law is controversial; ineligibility varies between individual US states and EU countries. Current UK driving law is strongly influenced by a single-centre study from 1974 where most participants were not taking antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). However, pure sleep-related epilepsy is often fully controlled on medication, and its withdrawal can provoke awake seizures. This systematic review asked, `What is the risk of awake se...

  19. Effect of medication withdrawal on the interictal epileptiform EEG discharges in presurgical evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.B.; Alving, J.; Beniczky, S.

    2010-01-01

    Medication withdrawal (MW) is an important method of provoking seizures and activating epileptiform EEG activity during the diagnostic work-up of patients evaluated for epilepsy surgery. Previously it was suggested that MW might influence the seizure-type and activate cortical areas otherwise not...... producing epileptiform discharges, leading to a false localization of the irritative zone. In order to investigate this we reviewed 42 consecutive cases of MW, of 36 patients, during a 3-year period. We compared seizure frequency, seizure-types and the localization of interictal epileptiform discharges...

  20. 29 CFR 4219.11 - Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. 4219.11 Section... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.11 Withdrawal liability upon mass withdrawal. (a) Initial withdrawal liability. The plan sponsor of a multiemployer plan that experiences a...

  1. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC EVALUATION OF SEIZURES (EPILEPSY IN PEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The study is aimed to reassess the role of CT in detecting various epileptogenic lesions with multi detector CT imaging, to know the value of CECT is evaluation of various lesions and to know the commonest CNS lesions ca using afebrile se i zures in Paediatric age group is the local population. METHODOLOGY: The study consists of 70 Pediatric patients suffering from afebrile seizures referred to Radio – diagnostic department S.V.R.R. Hospital at Tirupati for C.T. brain invest igation. EXCLUSION CRITERIA : A s our study is to evaluate epilepsy characterized by recurrent (more than two episodes seizures, with no immediate identifiable and avoidable cause (sleep deprivation, known metabolic disorders, alcohol withdrawal, pyrexia. Therefore we excluded patients below one month ago. Febrile convulsions, acute infections, toxic and known metabolic disorders Equipment used is Fourth generation Four slice CT with scan time 0.7 seconds Matrix size 640, gantry tilt 120, KV – 120 MAs – 100 to 200, Slice thickness 5mm and 2mm Auto power injector 3 to 3.5 ml per second. NECT : Continuous axial sections of brain, posterior fossa 3mm and rest of brain 5mm sections and 2mm sections were taken wherever necessary CECT is carried out logically in th ose cases which were inconclusive or ambiguous and NECT excluding more definite cases like congenital anomalies and calcified granulomas without peri lesion edema. IV CONTRAST : Non - ionic contrast medium at 1mg / kg body weight was used whenever indicated, n o adverse reactions were noted after injection of contrast medium and sedation was advised whenever the patient was un co - operative. RESULTS: In the present study we evaluated to cases of Pediatric Se i zures and observed and analyzed our findings with the available relevant clinical data and concluded that ; Out of 70 cases there are a Slight female Predilection 57%. And maximum incidence of Seizures was in the first 3 years, but

  2. Epileptic seizures in supratentorial gliomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tandon P

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred patients with supratentorial glioma; astrocytoma (pilocytic, fibrillary, gemistocytic 82, mixed glioma (oligoastrocytoma 46, oligodendroglioma 8, malignant (anaplastic astrocytoma 33 and glioblastoma multiforme 31, surgically treated for the tumours and followed up for one to sixteen years, were retrospectively analysed for the incidence of pre and postoperative epileptic seizures. 122 patients (61% had seizures preoperatively. 62 (50.8% of them had at least one or more seizures during follow up. Seizures were persistent in 22 patients. Doubtful, or one or two minor seizures occurred in 19 cases. Six patients in this group had seizure only at the time of CT confirmed recurrence, after a seizure free interval of one to nine years. Amongst 78 patients who did not have seizures preoperatively, 24 (30.6% developed seizures during the postoperative follow up period. Recurrent attacks were reported only by 5 patients while 15 patients had seizure(s only at the time of recurrence of tumour. Two patients had a few seizures in the early postoperative period and none thereafter, while doubtful seizures were reported by two patients.

  3. 酒精戒断综合征:机制、评估及药物治疗进展%Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome:Updates on Mechanism, Assessment and Pharmacotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨雪; 盛利霞; 郝伟; 汤宜朗

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To review the updates on mechanism of,and assessment and pharmacotherapy for alcohol Withdrawal syn-drome(AWS). Methods:Literature review and hand-picked literature. Results:We reviewed the time-course,mechanism(espe-cially mechanism related to GABA and NMDA systems),assessment and medications for AWS. Detailed discussions are provided re-garding fixed-dosed and symptom-triggered methods when using benzodiazepines for AWS. Role of other medications is also discussed. Conclusion:AWS is common and of diagnostic value in alcohol dependence. Alterations in GABA/ NMDA system after prolonged ex-posure to alcohol is believed to be the primary mechanism for AWS and long-acting benzodiazepines are the first-line pharmacotherapy, though other medications have been tried. Either fixed-dose or symptom-triggered method can be used,depending on the setting,clini-cians’preference and staff training.%目的:介绍酒精戒断综合征(AWS)的机制、评估及药物治疗方面的进展。方法:对近年相关文献进行复习。结果:本文对 AWS 的时程、机制(尤其是涉及 GABA 及 NMDA 递质系统)、评估及药物治疗进行了介绍。详细讨论了固定剂量法及对症给药法的具体细节。对其他药物的使用也略有介绍。结论:AWS 比较常见且对酒精将具有诊断意义。长期饮酒导致的GABA/ NMDA 系统的改变是 AWS 的主要机制,长效苯二氮□类药是控制 AWS 的一线药物,不过其他药物也有使用。具体是使用固定剂量法还是对症给药法则以治疗环境、医生的偏好以及员工的培训情况而定。

  4. Febrile Seizure: Demographic Features and Causative Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed ESMAILI GOURABI

    2013-01-01

    parental knowledge, attitudes, concerns and practices. J Formos Med Assoc. 2006 Jan;105(1:38-48. Vaswani RK, Dharaskar PG, Kulkarni S, Ghosh K. Iron deficiency as a risk factor for first febrile seizure. Indian Pediatr. 2010 May;47(5:437-9.Sadleir LG, Scheffer IE. Febrile seizures. BMJ. 2007 Feb;334(7588:307-11.Mohebbi MR, Holden KR, Butler IJ. FIRST: a practical approach to the causes and management of febrile seizures. J Child Neurol. 2008 Dec;23(12:1484-9.Salehi Omran M, Khalilian E, Mehdipour E et al. Febrile seizures in North Iranian children: Epidemiology and clinical feature. J Pediatr Neurol. 2008;6(1:39-42.Bidabadi E, Mashouf M. Association between iron deficiency anemia and first febrile convulsion. A case-control study. Seizure. 2009 Jun;18(5:347-51.Vahidnia F, Eskenazi B, Jewell N. Maternal smoking, alcohol drinking, and febrile convulsion. Seizure. 2008 Jun;17(4:320-6.Ashrafzade F, Hashemzadeh A, Malek A. Acute otitis Media in Children with Febrile Convulsion. Iran J Otorhinolaryngol. 2002;16(35:33-9.Millichap JJ, Gordon Millichap J. Methods of investigation and management of infections causing febrile seizures. Pediatr Neurol. 2008 Dec;39(6:381-6.Hosseini Nasab A, Dai pariz M, Alidousti K. Demographic characteristics and predisposing factors of febrile seizures in children admitted to Hospital No. 1 of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. J Med Counc Islam Repub Iran. 2006;24(2:107-12.Keller A, Saucier D, Sheerin A, Yager J. Febrile convulsions affect ultrasonic vocalizations in the rat pup. Epilepsy Behav. 2004 Oct;5(5:649-54.Ogihara M, Shirakawa S, Miyajima T, Takekuma K, Hoshika A. Diurnal variation in febrile convulsions. Pediatr Neurol. 2010 Jun;42(6:409-12.Fallah R, Akhavan S, Mir Sadat Nasseri F. Clinical and demographic characteristics of first febrile seizure in children. J Shaeed Sdoughi Uni Med Sci Yazd. 2009;16(5:61-5.Khodapanahande F, VahidHarandi N, Esmaeli F. Evaluation of seasonal variation and circadian rhythm of febrile seizures in

  5. Seizures and epilepsy in cats

    OpenAIRE

    Moore SA

    2014-01-01

    Sarah A Moore Department of Veterinary Clinical Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, USA Abstract: Seizures are a common presenting complaint in cats, although causes and options for the treatment of seizures in this species have been historically poorly described in the veterinary literature. Seizure manifestation in cats may be different than what is typically seen in dogs, but the underlying causes of seizure activity are the same. These include primary epilepsies, structura...

  6. 27 CFR 19.502 - Withdrawal of spirits on production or filling gauge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... production or filling gauge. 19.502 Section 19.502 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Transfer and Withdrawals General § 19.502 Withdrawal of spirits on production or filling gauge. When the production...

  7. Alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraiyes, Abdul Hamid; Shaheen, Khaldoon; Alraies, M Chadi

    2013-04-01

    Alcohol abuse has been associated with an increased mortality and morbidity due to increased aspiration, delirium tremens, and seizures. The association of pneumococcal lung infections and leukopenia in the setting of alcohol abuse are rarely reported; however, when present, severe lung infections can happen with severe lung injury and poor response to conventional therapy and ultimately, death. We are reporting a case of 55-year-old-man presented with shortness of breath, cough and altered mental status and eventually found with severe pneumococcal lung infection in the setting of leukopenia and long-term alcohol abuse representing alcoholic leukopenic pneumococcal sepsis syndrome. PMID:23930244

  8. Clinical features, pathogenesis and management of drug-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccara, G; Muscas, G C; Messori, A

    1990-01-01

    Many classes of pharmacological agents have been implicated in cases of drug-induced seizures. The list includes antidepressant drugs, lithium salts, neuroleptics, antihistamines (H1-receptor antagonists), anticonvulsants, central nervous system stimulants, general and local anaesthetics, antiarrhythmic drugs, narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antimicrobial agents, antifungal agents, antimalarial drugs, antineoplastic drugs, immunosuppressive drugs, radiological contrast agents and vaccines. For each of these classes of drugs, this article offers a revision of the literature and emphasises in particular the frequency of the adverse reaction, its clinical presentation, its presumed epileptogenic mechanism and the therapeutic strategy for the management of drug-induced seizures. An attempt is also made to distinguish seizures induced by standard dosages from those provoked by accidental or self-induced intoxication. For some classes of drugs such as antidepressants, neuroleptics, central nervous system stimulants (e.g. theophylline, cocaine, amphetamines) and beta-lactam antibiotics, seizures are a well recognised adverse reaction, and a large body of literature has been published discussing exhaustively the major aspects of the issue; sufficient data are available also for the other classes of pharmacological agents mentioned above. In contrast, several other drugs [e.g. allopurinol, digoxin, cimetidine, protirelin (thyrotrophin releasing hormone), bromocriptine, domperidone, insulin, fenformin, penicillamine, probenecid, verapamil, methyldopa] have not been studied thoroughly under this aspect, and the only source of information is the occasional case report. This review does not address the issue of seizures induced by drug withdrawal. PMID:2182049

  9. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... groups. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  10. Seizure prediction and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasemidis, Leon D

    2011-10-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain's normal multitask and multiprocessing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a warning to the patient to avert seizure-associated injuries, to automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus. Seizure prediction could become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  11. Change of depression-like behavior in chronic alcoholism and withdrawal model, and co-mechanism of depression and chronic alcoholism in mice%小鼠慢性酒精中毒及戒断过程中抑郁样行为的改变及其共病机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋曦; 田福荣; 赵应征

    2016-01-01

    目的:研究小鼠慢性酒精中毒及戒断过程中抑郁样行为的改变,进一步探讨酒精中毒与抑郁症的共病机制。方法:构建新型慢性酒精中毒小鼠模型;实验分为正常对照组及慢性酒精7 d、14 d、21 d和28 d组。在第6、13、20和27天分别进行酒精偏好度测试,测试后戒断酒精1 d,随后次日进行抑郁行为学测试,测试结束后处死小鼠取海马与额叶皮层,采用高效液相色谱法测定5-羟色胺(5-HT)及去甲肾上腺素(NE)含量,采用免疫印迹法测定cAMP反应元件结合蛋白( CREB)和脑源性神经营养因子( BDNF)的含量。结果:随着酒精饮酒天数及戒断次数的增加,小鼠表现出明显嗜酒现象,并且在强迫游泳和悬尾测试中,表现出明显的不动时间增加。7d组小鼠额叶皮层内5-HT水平升高(P<0.05),海马与额叶5-HT水平在21 d与28 d组降低(P<0.01);7 d和14 d组小鼠海马与额叶NE水平无明显变化,21 d和28 d组NE水平降低( P<0.05)。21 d和28 d组小鼠海马与额叶内p-CREB/CREB比值及BDNF表达水平明显下降( P<0.05),7 d与14 d组无明显变化。结论:酒精中毒、戒断阶段与抑郁的共病机制涉及5-HT。5-HT-cAMP-CREB-BDNF信号转导通路可能为酒精中毒与抑郁症的共病机制。%AIM: To investigate the behavior of depression in chronic alcoholism and withdrawal model of mice, and to explore the co-mechanism of alcoholism and depression.METHODS: A novel model of chronic alcoholism was constructed in this study.The animals were divided into normal control group, and alcohol 7 d, 14 d, 21 d and 28 d groups.The mice were given alcohol preference test on the 6th, 13th, 20th and 27th days.After the test, alcohol were withdrawn for 1 d, then the next day the mice were given behavior test of depression.After the test, the mice were sacri-ficed.The contents of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and norepinephrine

  12. Sex Differences in Acoustic Startle Responses and Seizure Thresholds between Ethanol-Withdrawn Male and Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, William; Koirala, Bikul; Devaud, Leslie L.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: We have found consistent and significant sex differences in recovery from the increased seizure susceptibility observed during ethanol withdrawal (EW) in our rat model system. The main objective of the present study was to determine if sex differences in EW generalized to an additional behavioral measure startle reactivity. Methods: Acoustic startle or seizure threshold responses were measured in separate groups of rats at 1 day or 3 days of EW. Results: Both pair-fed control and EW mal...

  13. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir; Pinar Tektürk; Zehra Oya Uyguner; Betül Baykan

    2014-01-01

    Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkab...

  14. Factor Analysis of the Aftereffects of Drinking in Alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Charles G.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Performed factor analyses of 100 alcoholics' reports of the effects that they experience after alcohol consumption. Five factors emerged: Hangover, Euphoria, Flushing, Seizures, and Sleepiness. These factors may be helpful in assessing theories on the etiology of alcoholism and in studies of ethanol's effects on subsets of alcohol abusers. (BH)

  15. Hypoglycemia-induced seizures following physical exercise in a man with type 1 diabetes and latent epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Marit R Bjorgaas

    2011-01-01

    A 42 year old solicitor suffered episodes of loss of consciousness in his late twenties before type 1 diabetes was diagnosed at the age of 32. After commencing insulin therapy, he experienced numerous hypoglycemia-induced seizures, all occurring in relation to exercise or consuming alcohol. Rationalization of his treatment with insulin and anticonvulsant medication has almost abolished the hypoglycemia-induced seizures.

  16. Seizures induced by playing music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherling, W W; Hershman, L M; Miller, J Q; Lee, S I

    1980-09-01

    A 67-year-old organist and minister with diabetes mellitus had stereotyped focal seizures of the left lower face, jaw, and neck. Attacks occurred spontaneously or were induced when he played a specific hymn on the organ. The seizures were not induced by reading, singing, hearing, or playing the hymn silently. The patient had interictal weakness of the left lower face and left side of the tongue. Focal seizures were recorded on an electroencephalogram (EEG) at the right temporofrontal area. This patient illustrates partial seizures induced by playing music. PMID:6775246

  17. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

  18. Detection and Prediction of Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas

    monitoring of their brain waves. More specifically, three issues were investigated: The feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, optimization of automatic seizure detection algorithms, and the link between intra- and extracranial EEG. Regarding feasibility of automatic seizure prediction, neither the...

  19. LAUGHING SEIZURES: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deb K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Normal laughter is a human behavioral response to pleasant feeling, whereas pathological laughter is disproportionate to the emotional context. Hypothalamic hamartoma usually presented with laughing seizures. We are presenting a case of laughing seizure with hypothalamic hamartoma detected on MR Imaging in a 21 years female.

  20. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  1. MMR Vaccination and Febrile Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Hviid, Anders; Madsen, Kreesten Meldgaard;

    2004-01-01

    CONTEXT: The rate of febrile seizures increases following measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination but it is unknown whether the rate varies according to personal or family history of seizures, perinatal factors, or socioeconomic status. Furthermore, little is known about the long-term outcome...

  2. Drosophila larvae as a model to study physiological alcohol dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Brooks G.; Khurana, Sukant; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol addiction is a disease that includes a diverse set of phenotypes. Functional alcohol tolerance is an adaptation to the effects of alcohol that restores neuronal homeostatic balance while the drug is present. When the drug is suddenly withheld, these adaptations unbalance the nervous system and are thought to be the origin of some withdrawal symptoms. Withdrawal symptoms, which can be a motivating factor for alcoholics to relapse, are taken as evidence of physiological ethanol dependen...

  3. Children of Alcoholics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at home: Failure in school; truancy Lack of friends; withdrawal from classmates Delinquent behavior, such as stealing or violence Frequent physical complaints, such as headaches or stomachaches Abuse of drugs or alcohol; or Aggression towards other children Risk taking behaviors Depression or ...

  4. Predicting epileptic seizures in advance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negin Moghim

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6-0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling, is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance.

  5. NEONATAL SEIZURES: ETIOLOGY AND FREQUENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Eghbalian

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe aim of the present study was to evaluate the etiology and frequency of neonatal seizure in hospitalized neonates.Materials and MethodsIn this descriptive, cross-sectional study, we evaluated 1295 neonates with seizures admitted to neonatal and NICU wards in our center. Data was collected on age, sex, birth weight, serum levels of calcium, glucose, and sodium, CT scan findings, history of maternal opium abuse, blood and cerebrospinal fluid culture, and analyzed using SPSS 13.ResultsOf a total of 1295 patients, 34 (2.62% had seizure. Mean age was 14.03 ± 10.05 days (range, 1 to 29 days; twenty-five (73.5% neonates were boys and 9 (26.5% were girls. Of 34 neonates with neonatal seizures, 12 (35.3%, 11 (32.4%, 9 (26.5%, 7 (20.6%, and 3 (8.8% had hypocalcemia, asphyxia, hypoglycemia, intracranial hemorrhage, and hypernatremia, respectively.Maternal addiction, meningitis, and sepsis were found in 3 (8.8%, 1 (2.9% and 1 (2.9% of neonates, respectively.ConclusionThe incidence rate of neonatal seizure in the neonates in our NICU and neonatal ward was 2.62%. Common causes of seizure in this study included hypocalcemia, asphyxia, hypoglycemia, intracranial hemorrhage, and hypernatremia. Maternal ddiction, meningitis and sepsis had the lowest prevalence.Keywords:Neonate, Seizure, Etiologies.

  6. CHRONIC ALCOHOL NEUROADAPTATION AND STRESS CONTRIBUTE TO SUSCEPTIBILITY FOR ALCOHOL CRAVING AND RELAPSE

    OpenAIRE

    Breese, George R.; Sinha, Rajita; Heilig, Markus

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholism is a chronic relapsing disorder. Major characteristics observed in alcoholics during an initial period of alcohol abstinence are altered physiological functions and a negative emotional state. Evidence suggests that a persistent, cumulative adaptation involving a kindling/allostasis-like process occurs during the course of repeated chronic alcohol exposures that is critical for the negative symptoms observed during alcohol withdrawal. Basic studies have provided evidence for specif...

  7. CONSUMER'S RIGHT TO WITHDRAW

    OpenAIRE

    ANCA NICOLETA GHEORGHE; CAMELIA SPASICI

    2013-01-01

    The right of withdrawal (of a contract) belongs to the consumer, and is an essential means for the improvement of regulations that protect the consumer.. Right of withdrawal is not a recent creation and is not even specific to the consumer field. He was previously recognized in civil and commercial law (without special regulation). The right to withdraw may even have as ground the parties will. Thus, based on the contractual freedom, the parties may agree that one of them has the right to ter...

  8. Occipital seizures imitating migraine aura.

    OpenAIRE

    Panayiotopoulos, C P; Sharoqi, I A; Agathonikou, A

    1997-01-01

    Three cases are reported in which symptoms of occipital seizures resembled the visual aura of migraine. Careful recording of the characteristics and timing of such visual effects will often resolve the diagnostic dilemma.

  9. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Aydin-Özemir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association.

  10. Galactosemia and phantom absence seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin-Özemir, Zeynep; Tektürk, Pınar; Uyguner, Zehra Oya; Baykan, Betül

    2014-01-01

    Generalized and focal seizures can rarely be seen in galactosemia patients, but absence seizures were not reported previously. An 18-year-old male was diagnosed as galactosemia at the age of 8 months. No family history of epilepsy was present. His absence seizures realized at the age of 9 years. Generalized 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges were identified in his electroencephalography. Homozygous mutation at exon 6 c. 563A > G was identified. The electroencephalogram of his sibling was unremarkable. Our aim was to present the long-term follow-up of a patient diagnosed with galactosemia, who had phantom absence seizures and typical 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharges in his electroencephalogram to draw attention to this rare association. PMID:25624930

  11. The Genetics of Febrile Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Dipak Ram; Richard Newton

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from Virginia Commonwealth University, Norwegian Center for Epilepsy and University of Southern Denmark carried out twin studies to analyse the genetic influence of developing epilepsy after febrile seizures.

  12. Management of Reflex Anoxic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at the Roald Dahl EEG Unit, Alder Hey Children’s NHS Foundation, Liverpool, UK, review the definition, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and management of reflex anoxic seizures (RAS in children.

  13. Ranolazine overdose-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Nour; Bottei, Edward; Kamath, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Ranolazine is a new anti-anginal medication that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 for patients with symptomatic chronic angina despite optimized therapy. This paper presents a case report of a fifteen year old male patient admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after ranolazine overdose ingestion. He had recurrent new onset seizures that are most likely due to ranolazine overdose. Seizures have never been reported with ranolazine use or abuse. PMID:26072257

  14. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J

    2010-05-01

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics. PMID:20463875

  15. Assimilating seizure dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Ullah

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state-the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

  16. Withdrawing Nutrition, Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Module eleven of the EPEC-O Self-Study Original Version discusses the general aspects of withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining therapies, and presents a specific application to artificial nutrition and hydration.

  17. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation. PMID:2529669

  18. Alcohol abuse and related disorders treatment of alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sivolap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are the leading causes of worse health and increased mortality rates. Excessive alcohol consumption is the third leading cause of the global burden of diseases and a leading factor for lower lifespan and higher mortality. Alcohol abuse decreases working capacity and efficiency and requires the increased cost of the treatment of alcohol-induced disorders, which entails serious economic losses. The unfavorable medical and social consequences of excessive alcohol use determine the importance of effective treatment for alcoholism. The goals of rational pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence are to enhance GABA neurotransmission, to suppress glutamate neurotransmission, to act on serotonin neurotransmission, to correct water-electrolyte balance, and to compensate for thiamine deficiency. Alcoholism treatment consists of two steps: 1 the prevention and treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and its complications (withdrawal convulsions and delirium alcoholicum; 2 antirecurrent (maintenance therapy. Benzodiazepines are the drugs of choice in alleviating alcohol withdrawal and preventing its convulsive attacks and delirium alcoholicum. Diazepam and chlordiazepoxide are most commonly used for this purpose; the safer drugs oxazepam and lorazepam are given to the elderly and patients with severe liver lesions. Anticonvulsants having normothymic properties, such as carbamazepine, valproic acid, topiramate, and lamotrigine, are a definite alternative to benzodiazepines. The traditional Russian clinical practice (clearance detoxification has not a scientific base or significant impact on alcohol withdrawal-related states in addicts. Relapse prevention and maintenance therapy for alcohol dependence are performed using disulfiram, acamprosate, and naltrexone; since 2013 the European Union member countries have been using, besides these agents, nalmefene that is being registered in Russia. Memantine and a number of other

  19. Osthole suppresses seizures in the mouse maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luszczki, Jarogniew J; Andres-Mach, Marta; Cisowski, Wojciech; Mazol, Irena; Glowniak, Kazimierz; Czuczwar, Stanislaw J

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the anticonvulsant effects of osthole {[7-methoxy-8-(3-methyl-2-butenyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one]--a natural coumarin derivative} in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. The antiseizure effects of osthole were determined at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min after its systemic (i.p.) administration. Time course of anticonvulsant action of osthole revealed that the natural coumarin derivative produced a clear-cut antielectroshock activity in mice and the experimentally-derived ED(50) values for osthole ranged from 259 to 631 mg/kg. In conclusion, osthole suppresses seizure activity in the mouse maximal electroshock-induced seizure model. It may become a novel treatment option following further investigation in other animal models of epilepsy and preclinical studies. PMID:19236860

  20. 27 CFR 22.113 - Receipt of tax-free alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Receipt of tax-free alcohol. 22.113 Section 22.113 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTRIBUTION AND USE OF TAX-FREE ALCOHOL Withdrawal...

  1. Explosive Blast Neuropathology and Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krisztian eKovacs

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies.

  2. Risk of Seizure Recurrence with Neurocysticercosis

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-01-01

    The risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure due to neurocysticercosis (NC) was evaluated in a prospective study of 77 patients at the School of Medicine and Research Institute, University of Cuenca, Ecuador, and Columbia University, New York.

  3. 27 CFR 19.534 - Withdrawals of spirits for use in production of nonbeverage wine and nonbeverage wine products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawals of spirits for use in production of nonbeverage wine and nonbeverage wine products. 19.534 Section 19.534 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DISTILLED SPIRITS PLANTS Transfer...

  4. Seizures in Corticobasal Degeneration: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Vanja C.; DeArmond, Stephen J.; Aminoff, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Rabinovici, Gil D

    2009-01-01

    Seizures are relatively common in Alzheimer disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. To our knowledge, however, there have been no reports of seizures associated with corticobasal degeneration (CBD). We describe a patient with brain biopsy features suggestive of CBD whose course was complicated by complex partial seizures with secondary generalization. Thus, the occurrence of seizures in a patient with dementia should not exclude the diagnosis of CBD.

  5. Neonatal Seizures. Advances in Mechanisms and Management.

    OpenAIRE

    Glass, HC

    2013-01-01

    Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemor...

  6. Seizures after stroke : a prospective clinical study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhanuka A

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the most common causes of epilepsy in elderly. However, there have been very few prospective studies to define the incidence, pattern and outcome of seizures in stroke. Most studies are based on retrospective analysis of hospital records. Hence, we planned this prospective study to see the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic characteristics of seizures in stroke and their outcome, from a north Indian tertiary care centre. Over a span of approximately 6 years, 269 consecutive patients with stroke were studied and followed up. Thirty-five (13% of these developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, during mean follow up period of 15.9 months. Twenty of these had infarctions while 15 had haemorrhages. Involvement of the cortical region was seen in most of the patients with seizures. In these patients, 86% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas on CT scan of the brain. Twenty-seven (77% developed early seizures, two third of them had immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients with early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 50% of late onset seizures developed epilepsy. No specific EEG pattern was found in those who later developed epilepsy. In the present study, early onset seizures after stroke were rather common and did not affect outcome and did not recur even when not treated with anti-epileptics. Late onset seizures were less common but were associated with recurrent seizures.

  7. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... head from injury. Turn on side to keep airway clear. Reassure when consciousness returns. Time the event If single seizure lasted less than 5 minutes, ask the person if hospital evaluation is wanted. If multiple seizures, or if one seizure lasts ...

  8. A genome-wide association study of alcohol dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Laura J Bierut; Agrawal, Arpana; Bucholz, Kathleen K.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Laurie, Cathy; Pugh, Elizabeth; Fisher, Sherri; Fox, Louis; Howells, William; Bertelsen, Sarah; Hinrichs, Anthony L.; Almasy, Laura; Breslau, Naomi; Culverhouse, Robert C; Dick, Danielle M

    2010-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption is one of the leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Approximately 14% of those who use alcohol meet criteria during their lifetime for alcohol dependence, which is characterized by tolerance, withdrawal, inability to stop drinking, and continued drinking despite serious psychological or physiological problems. We explored genetic influences on alcohol dependence among 1,897 European-American and African-American subjects with alcohol dependenc...

  9. Hypoglycemia-induced seizures following physical exercise in a man with type 1 diabetes and latent epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit R Bjorgaas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 42 year old solicitor suffered episodes of loss of consciousness in his late twenties before type 1 diabetes was diagnosed at the age of 32. After commencing insulin therapy, he experienced numerous hypoglycemia-induced seizures, all occurring in relation to exercise or consuming alcohol. Rationalization of his treatment with insulin and anticonvulsant medication has almost abolished the hypoglycemia-induced seizures.

  10. [Use of tiapride in the anxious alcoholic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lion, A

    1983-02-24

    The alcoholic patient is usually anxious. Anxiety is increased by withdrawal. The anxiety-relieving effect of tiapride was studied in 20 alcoholics, with a mean age of 44 years. 18 patients were male. Alcoholism was chronic in 18 cases and paroxystic in two. At the time of withdrawal each patient was given 3 intramuscular injections daily for 7 days, then 3 tablets per day. Results, which were evaluated according to the Hamilton score, were excellent in 9 cases, good in 10 and poor in 1: no failure was recorded. The symptoms which responded best were fear, somatic and psychic manifestations of anxiety, depressive feelings and sleep disturbances. Concomitantly, digestive disorders, anorexia, tremor and pain were alleviated. Tolerance was excellent: no neurologic, digestive, cardiovascular or biologic manifestations were recorded. In caring for alcoholic patients, the critical time of withdrawal is undeniably facilitated by the use of tiapride. PMID:6302898

  11. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Eisenstadt, M.L. [Knoxville Neurology Clinic, St. Mary`s Medical Center, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  12. Glycolysis in energy metabolism during seizures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Heng Yang; Jiongxing Wu; Ren Guo; Yufen Peng; Wen Zheng; Ding Liu; Zhi Song

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that glycolysis increases during seizures, and that the glycolytic metabolite lactic acid can be used as an energy source. However, how lactic acid provides energy for seizures and how it can participate in the termination of seizures remains unclear. We reviewed possible mechanisms of glycolysis involved in seizure onset. Results showed that lactic acid was involved in seizure onset and provided energy at early stages. As seizures progress, lactic acid reduces the pH of tissue and induces metabolic acidosis, which terminates the seizure. The specific mechanism of lactic acid-induced acidosis involves several aspects, which include lactic acid-induced inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme 6-diphosphate kinase-1, inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor, activation of the acid-sensitive 1A ion channel, strengthening of the receptive mechanism of the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid, and changes in the intra- and extracellular environment.

  13. Epileptic Seizures in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamber Zeqiraj

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The presence of epileptic seizures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS is a well-known phenomenon. The aims of our study, performed in our clinic are to point out the correlation of the mean age/gender and age of MS patients with the onset of seizures, to identify the types of epileptic seizures in MS patients by sex/age, to identify the correlation between relapses and seizures, and to identify the main electrophysiological / imaging changes. Material and Met-hod: The medical records of 300 MS patients observed between January 2000 and December 2009 in the Neurological Clinic of University Clinical Centre of Kosova were reviewed. All patients fulfilled the McDonald MS criteria Epilepsy diagnosis was based on the ILAE (International League against Epilepsy (1983 criteria while epileptic seizures were classified based on the ILAE classification (1981. Results: Out of 300 MS patients enrolled in this study, 49 (16.33% were identified with seizures or epilepsy. In 23 (47% patients out of 49, seizures or epilepsy appeared after the MS diagnosis. In 6 patients (12.2%, epileptic attacks preceded the MS diagnosis, while in 20 patients (40.8%, epilepsy was diagnosed before multiple sclerosis. These patients were treated with antiepileptics. Out of 23 patients (47% in whom the epileptic seizures appeared after the MS diagnosis, 17 (74% had simple partial seizures, and 6 (26% had complex partial seizures. Based to our study, the epileptic seizures in MS patients appeared about 2.2 years after the MS diagnosis. Discussion: Simple partial seizures were 2.8 times more frequent compared to complex partial seizures. In female patients the prevalence of complex partial seizures was higher than in male patients with multiple sclerosis. (Turkish Journal of Neurology 2013; 19: 40-3

  14. Huntington′s disease and alcohol abuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattoo S

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The dopamine, glutamate and GABA systems are known to mediate the effects of alcohol on the movement disorders, though their exact roles are not clear. Thus, use of alcohol has implications for pathogenesis as well as management of the movement disorders. These implications are discussed citing a patient who had a strong family history of Huntington′s disease and in whom movement disorder and behavioral problems were manifest under alcohol use and withdrawal, but not while being abstinent.

  15. Treatment Of Alcoholism In Family Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Bulmer, David R.

    1980-01-01

    Treatment goals and treatment methods for alcoholism are discussed with particular emphasis on the role of the family physician in the management of this extremely common problem. The office treatment of alcoholism of moderate severity is discussed, starting with the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, followed by making a treatment contract with the patient in order to help him remain sober, and to fit the patient to the optimal treatment methods on an individual basis. Office treatment methods...

  16. [Recurrent seizures of unknown aetiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauß, Martha; Berkermann, Heiner; Ghadimi, Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen; Bürger, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    History and admission findings | A 41year old woman presented at our internistic clinic after treatment by an emergency doctor because of confusion and amnesia accompanied by a hypoglycaemic episode while driving her car. Only by giving continuous glucose intravenously a stable clinical state could be achieved. In her medical history she took Lamotrigin for 12 years since she had seizures of unknown aetiology. 16 years ago she had similar sudden attacks with confusion and hypoglycaemia. At that time thorough diagnostics at the clinic for internal medicine did not reveal any evidence for hyperinsulinaemia. While taking Lamotrigin the patient had no seizures or similar symptoms for 12 years. Treatment and course | In the present case we detected a tumor in the pancreas and a two-fold increased insulin secretion. Histopathological work-up of the removed tissue confirmed the suspected diagnosis of insulinoma. Postoperatively, Lamotrigin treatment was terminated. Since then the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:27123728

  17. [Current peculiarities of alcoholic psychosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksin, D S; Egorov, A Iu

    2011-01-01

    The follow-up study of alcoholic psychoses in male patients admitted to a clinical department of a psychiatric hospital in 2005-2007 was carried out. Patients with alcoholic psychoses made up from 15 to 30% of all patients. The number of psychosis had seasonal variations with the elevations in spring and autumn, peaks in January, lune and October. Alcoholic delirium morbidity made up from 69 to 82% of the total number of alcoholic psychoses, alcoholic hallucinosis varied from 14 to 27%. Other forms were presented by single cases. In alcoholic delirium hallucinations had brighter, sated character. The most specific were visual hallucinations in the form of zoohallucinations, hallucinations of an oral cavity ("sensation of threads, hair etc"). The most often observable characters were "extraneous people, animal, demons". In alcoholic hallucinosis, verbal contrast hallucinations, making comment hallucinations, visual illusions were most frequent. The family history of mental disorders and alcoholism was noted in 30% of patients with alcoholic psychosis. The probability of occurrence of alcoholic psychoses depended on the quality of consumed drinks. The presence of a cranial-brain injury in the anamnesis considerably aggravated the disease forecast and increased the risk of seizure syndrome. PMID:22611692

  18. CONSUMER'S RIGHT TO WITHDRAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANCA NICOLETA GHEORGHE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The right of withdrawal (of a contract belongs to the consumer, and is an essential means for the improvement of regulations that protect the consumer.. Right of withdrawal is not a recent creation and is not even specific to the consumer field. He was previously recognized in civil and commercial law (without special regulation. The right to withdraw may even have as ground the parties will. Thus, based on the contractual freedom, the parties may agree that one of them has the right to terminate the contract unilaterally The possibility of unilateral denunciation of the contract, gives the consumer, added protection by being able to reflect the decision and to check how the trader fulfil its obligations. In this context, through its effects, the right of denunciation, forces the professional parties to conduct themselves as fair as possible to the consumer and to execute the contract properly. In the study of the consumer protection, the time of conclusion is essential because in this stage is manifested, the inequality between the consumer and professional. Thus, the lack of information, the major of products and activities, commercial practices, influence the formation of consumer will, preventing the expression of a freely and knowingly consent.

  19. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. PMID:25038202

  20. Alcohol fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    This issue is devoted almost entirely to alcohol fuels, the following topics being presented: A History of Alcohol Fuels; In the Midwest - Focus on Alcohol Fuels; Gasohol - A DOE Priority; Alcohol Fuels Potential; Gasohol - The Nutritious Fuel; Energy from Agriculture; Alcohol and the Price of Food; A New Look at Economics and Energy Balance in Alcohol Production; Economics of small-scale alcohol producers; Get the Lead Out with Alcohol; Biomass and the Carbon Dioxide Buildup; Federal Agency Activity in Alcohol Fuels; Congressional Activity in Alchol Fuels; Licensing a Small Still; Funding Sources for Alcohol Facilities; Safety in Alcohol Production; Alcohol Fuels Information; State-by-State Guide to Alcohol Activity; Alcohol Fuels Glossary; Alcohol Fuels and Your Car; Alcohol Fuels Training Grants Progam; Citizen Action Plan for Gasohol; and Alcohol Fuels - a Path to Reconciliation.

  1. EPSP depression following neocortical seizures in cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nita, Dragos A; Cissé, Youssouf; Timofeev, Igor

    2008-04-01

    To study the possible mechanism(s) underlying unresponsiveness following neocortical seizures, we recorded excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) of cortical neurons evoked by ipsilateral cortical stimulation before and after spontaneous or elicited seizures. Regular-spiking neurons (n = 32) were intracellularly recorded in association area five of cats under ketamine-xylazine or barbiturate anesthesia. Compared with control responses, cortically evoked EPSPs were characterized by decreased amplitude after electrographic seizures. Synaptic responses and intrinsic properties were measured by applying extracellular electrical stimuli followed by intracellular hyperpolarizing current pulses. The input resistance decreased during seizures but quickly recovered to control level after the paroxysms, whereas the amplitude of evoked EPSPs remained lower following seizures, generally for 2-12 min, suggesting that the decreased EPSPs were not due to an alteration of intrinsic response. Data demonstrate a long-lasting decreased synaptic responsiveness following generalized spike-wave seizures slowly recovering in time. PMID:18031546

  2. Channel selection for automatic seizure detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Kjaer, Troels Wesenberg; Madsen, Rasmus Elsborg; Remvig, Line Sofie; Thomsen, Carsten Eckhart; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the performance of epileptic seizure detection using only a few of the recorded EEG channels and the ability of software to select these channels compared with a neurophysiologist. Methods: Fifty-nine seizures and 1419 h of interictal EEG are used for training and testing...... of an automatic channel selection method. The characteristics of the seizures are extracted by the use of a wavelet analysis and classified by a support vector machine. The best channel selection method is based upon maximum variance during the seizure. Results: Using only three channels, a seizure...... recorded directly on the epileptic focus. Conclusions: Based on our dataset, automatic seizure detection can be done using only three EEG channels without loss of performance. These channels should be selected based on maximum variance and not, as often done, using the focal channels. Significance: With...

  3. Moxifloxacin Induced Seizures -A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Jiana Shi; Huimin Xu

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A 73-year-old female patient developed a generalized tonic-clonic seizure on the 6th day after treatment with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily intravenously for appendicitis. This patient had atrial fibrillation and history of a surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage, with impaired renal function and liver function, but without history of seizures. Moxifloxacin was discontinued and switched to cefuroxime. The patient remained seizure-free at discharge four days later. The naranjo adverse drug...

  4. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Holden, Kenton R; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated wi...

  5. Breakthrough seizures after starting vilazodone for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, James; Watts, Hannah; Mokszycki, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Vilazodone is a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin 5-HT1a partial agonist that is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration to treat major depression. SSRI-induced seizures are rare and are more likely to be associated with larger doses and severe symptoms such as those present in serotonin syndrome. Several case reports have implicated SSRIs, buspirone, or the combination of these agents as the cause of seizures, but these reports were confounded with either coingestions or doses that exceeded FDA recommendations. We describe a 22-year-old woman with a history of seizure disorder who had been seizure free for the previous 8 years and experienced two breakthrough seizures shortly after starting vilazodone. Her dose of vilazodone had recently been titrated to 40 mg/day when she experienced the first seizure. She was instructed to taper vilazodone over the next several days, then discontinue the drug, and then follow up with her neurologist. Based on the patient's history, physical examination, and recent dose increase, it was plausible that vilazodone was the cause of the seizures. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a possible relationship (score of 4) between her development of seizures and vilazodone therapy. The pharmacodynamics of this particular class of SSRI has both proconvulsive and anticonvulsive mechanisms. This is of particular concern in patients with a history of seizure disorder who are starting antidepressive therapy. In persons with epilepsy who are taking vilazodone and experience breakthrough seizures, practitioners should consider this drug as a potential cause of these seizures. Thus, until future research and experience with vilazodone can provide a definitive answer, clinicians should be cautious when prescribing this medication to treat depression in patients with a history of seizure disorder. PMID:25809181

  6. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  7. Epileptic Seizures in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kamber Zeqiraj; Nexhat Shatri; Jera Kruja; Afrim Blyta; Enver Isaku; Nazim Dakaj

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The presence of epileptic seizures in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is a well-known phenomenon. The aims of our study, performed in our clinic are to point out the correlation of the mean age/gender and age of MS patients with the onset of seizures, to identify the types of epileptic seizures in MS patients by sex/age, to identify the correlation between relapses and seizures, and to identify the main electrophysiological / imaging changes. Material and Met-hod: The medi...

  8. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Us You are here Home » Alcohol Alert Alcohol Alert The NIAAA Alcohol Alert is a quarterly bulletin that disseminates important research ... text. To order single copies of select Alcohol Alerts, see ordering Information . To view publications in PDF ...

  9. CORRELATION OF THE SERUM LEVEL OF CARBAMAZEPINE WITH SEIZURE CONTROL AND ADVERSE DRUG REACTIONS AMONG EPILEPTICS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph O. Fadare

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Epilepsy is a chronic neurological disorder requiring long-term treatment. Seizure control requires adequate blood levels of anti-seizure drugs. Carbarmazepine is one of the most prescribed antiepileptic drugs in Nigeria. This study was carried out to investigate the correlation between serum levels of carbamazepine and seizure control and adverse drug reactions among epileptics in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, sixty-nine patients with confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy who had been on treatment with carbamazepine alone or in combination with phenytoin for at least one month were enrolled into the study and divided into two groups based on seizure control. Drug level in pre-dose (steady state venous blood was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography. Result: The mean serum concentration of carbamazepine (CBZ and carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-EP was 13.5±9.3ìg/mL and 6.34±12.61ìg/mL respectively. Patients with good seizure control had mean serum CBZ concentration of 12.7 ± 9.2ìg/mL versus 15.02 ± 9.7ìg/mL among patients with poor seizure control (P=0.33. The serum concentration of CBZ-EP in patients with good seizure control was 8.05 ± 15.2ìg/mL while it was 3.11 ± 3.5ìg/mL in the second group (P=0.122. Drowsiness was the commonest adverse drug reaction (26.1% and it did not necessitate withdrawal of the drug. Conclusion The study showed that serum level of carbamazepine does not correlate with seizure control and adverse drug reactions.

  10. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  11. In vivo imaging of seizure activity in a novel developmental seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewapathirane, D Sesath; Dunfield, Derek; Yen, Wesley; Chen, Simon; Haas, Kurt

    2008-06-01

    The immature brain is exceptionally susceptible to seizures. However, it remains unclear whether seizures occurring during development affect critical processes underlying neural circuit formation, leading to long-term functional consequences. Here we characterize a novel in vivo model system of developmental seizures based on the transparent albino Xenopus laevis tadpole, which allows direct examination of seizure activity, and seizure-induced effects on neuronal development within the intact unanesthetized brain. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), kainic acid, bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, and pilocarpine were tested for their ability to induce behavioral seizures in freely swimming tadpoles when bath applied. All six chemoconvulsants consistently induced similar patterns of abnormal behavior in a dose-dependent manner, characterized by convulsive clonus-like motor patterns with periods of behavioral arrest. Extracellular field recordings demonstrated rhythmic synchronous epileptiform electrographic responses induced by convulsants irrespective of mechanism of action, that could be terminated by the anti-epileptic drug valproate. PTZ-induced seizures were further characterized using in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of neuronal calcium dynamics, in unanesthetized immobilized tadpoles. Imaging of calcium dynamics during PTZ-induced seizures revealed waves of neural activity propagating through large populations of neurons within the brain. Analysis of single-cell responses demonstrated distinct synchronized high-amplitude calcium spikes not observed under baseline conditions. Similar to other developmental seizure models, prolonged seizures failed to induce marked neuronal death within the brain, detected by cellular propidium iodide incorporation in vivo or TUNEL labeling. This novel developmental seizure model system has distinct advantages for controlled seizure induction, and direct visualization of both seizure activity and seizure-induced effects on

  12. Effect of Seizure Clustering on Epilepsy Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A prospective, long-term population-based study was performed to determine whether seizure clustering (3 or more afebrile seizures during a 24 hour period is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, in a study at University of Turku, Finland, and the Epilepsy Research Group, Berlin, Germany.

  13. Risk of Seizure Recurrence with Neurocysticercosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The risk of seizure recurrence after a first seizure due to neurocysticercosis (NC was evaluated in a prospective study of 77 patients at the School of Medicine and Research Institute, University of Cuenca, Ecuador, and Columbia University, New York.

  14. Occipital seizures presenting with bilateral visual loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hadjikoutis S; Sawhney I

    2003-01-01

    Transient visual loss may occur with occipital seizures as an ictal or post-ictal phenomenon. Its duration varies from less than one minute to days, or can be permanent. We describe a 61-year-old man presenting with headache, vomiting and bilateral visual loss. EEG revealed persistent spike discharge in the occipital lobes suggesting occipital seizures. His vision improved with carbamazepine.

  15. Diagnosing Functional Seizures in Children and Adolescent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wichaidit, Bianca Taaning; Rask, Charlotte Ulrikka; Ostergaard, John R

    2014-01-01

    Functional seizures (FS) is a condition where the child experiences seizure-like events, without abnormal electrical discharge as measured by EEG, and with high risk of misdiagnosis. Diagnosing FS contains: 1) video-EEG, 2) anamnestic evaluation, focusing on the presence of psychosocial stressors...

  16. ROLE OF MRI IN EVALUATION OF SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avadhesh Pratap Singh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Seizure is a paroxysmal alteration in neurologic function resulting from abnormal excessive neuronal electrical activity. Epilepsy is a chronic condition characterized by recurrent seizures unprovoked by an acute systemic or neurologic insult.1 An epileptic seizure is a clinical manifestation of abnormal, excessive neuronal activity arising in the grey matter of the cerebral cortex. MATERIALS AND METHODS Prospective studies of 100 patients with clinical impression of seizures were examined by 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging. RESULT A total of 100 patients satisfying the inclusion criteria were included in the study. The age range of patients was from neonate to elderly with male predominance, male 64 (64% and female 36 (36%. GTCS was the most common clinical diagnosis constituting (80% cases. The common abnormalities were cerebral infarction with gliosis (16%, infections – NCC (7% and tuberculoma (10%, cerebral atrophy (1%, developmental cortical malformations (2%, venous thrombosis (4%, low-grade glioma (9%, meningioma (3%. CONCLUSION MRI is the investigation of choice in patients with seizure disorder. The sensitivity of MRI in detecting abnormalities in patients with seizure disorder is in part associated to the underlying pathologies and by the MRI techniques and experience of the interpreting physician. Accurate diagnosis of the cause of seizure is crucial for finding an effective treatment. With its high spatial resolution, excellent inherent soft tissue contrast, multiplanar imaging capability and lack of ionizing radiation, MR imaging has emerged as a versatile tool in the evaluation of patients with seizure disorder.

  17. NEURONAL AND NETWORK DYNAMICS PRECEDING EXPERIMENTAL SEIZURES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jiruška, Přemysl; Mormann, F.; Jefferys, J. G. R.

    Singapore : World Scientific Publ, 2013 - (Tetzlaff, R.; Elger, C.; Lehnertz, K.), s. 16-29 ISBN 978-981-4525-35-0. [International Workshop on Seizure Prediction /5./. Dresden (DE), 18.09.2011-23.09.2011] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : seizure prediction * epilepsy * critical transition Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. PMID:26724401

  19. Seizure detection algorithms based on EMG signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    Background: the currently used non-invasive seizure detection methods are not reliable. Muscle fibers are directly connected to the nerves, whereby electric signals are generated during activity. Therefore, an alarm system on electromyography (EMG) signals is a theoretical possibility. Objective......: to show whether medical signal processing of EMG data is feasible for detection of epileptic seizures. Methods: EMG signals during generalised seizures were recorded from 3 patients (with 20 seizures in total). Two possible medical signal processing algorithms were tested. The first algorithm was...... patients, while the frequency-based algorithm was efficient for detecting the seizures in the third patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that EMG signals could be used to develop an automatic seizuredetection system. However, different patients might require different types of algorithms /approaches....

  20. Febrile seizures and risk of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Christensen, Jakob;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Febrile seizure is a benign condition for most children, but experiments in animals and neuroimaging studies in humans suggest that some febrile seizures may damage the hippocampus, a brain area of possible importance in schizophrenia. METHODS: A population-based cohort of all children...... with schizophrenia. A history of febrile seizures was associated with a 44% increased risk of schizophrenia [relative risk (RR)=1.44; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.95] after adjusting for confounding factors. The association between febrile seizures and schizophrenia remained virtually unchanged when...... restricting the analyses to people with no history of epilepsy. A history of both febrile seizures and epilepsy was associated with a 204% increased risk of schizophrenia (RR=3.04; 95% CI, 1.36-6.79) as compared with people with no such history. CONCLUSIONS: We found a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia...

  1. Moxifloxacin Induced Seizures -A Case Report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiana Shi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 73-year-old female patient developed a generalized tonic-clonic seizure on the 6th day after treatment with moxifloxacin 400 mg daily intravenously for appendicitis. This patient had atrial fibrillation and history of a surgery for intracerebral hemorrhage, with impaired renal function and liver function, but without history of seizures. Moxifloxacin was discontinued and switched to cefuroxime. The patient remained seizure-free at discharge four days later. The naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale score was 4, indicating a possible adverse reaction to moxifloxacin. The potential risk factors related to moxifloxacin-induced seizures are discussed. It highlights that preexisting central nervous system disease, elderly female with lower bodyweight and severe renal impairment may be the risk factors involved in moxifloxacin-induced seizures.

  2. 27 CFR 70.227 - Suspension of running of period of limitation; wrongful seizure of property of third party.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suspension of running of... Limitations § 70.227 Suspension of running of period of limitation; wrongful seizure of property of third party. The running of the period of limitations on collection after assessment prescribed in 26...

  3. The Life Time Prevalence of Childhood Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P AlizadehTaheri

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Seizure is the most common pediatric neurologic disorder. Epidemiological studies of childhood epilepsy are of importance to compare incidence and prevalence rates, age distribution, inheritance, seizure types, epilepsy syn­dromes and treatment strategies. Since there is little information about prevalence of childhood seizure in Iran, this study was aimed to determine the life time prevalence of childhood seizure and some of its determining factors in Tehran, Iran."nMethods: In this cross sectional study, 2500 male and female students, aged 12 years or younger, studying in fifth grade of primary schools in district one of Ministry of Education were assessed by filling a preliminary questionnaire. Those who were categorized by the author as having a history of any form of seizure were assessed by a second questionnaire. The clinical form of seizure, the presumptive cause, positive family history and use of anti-convulsant drugs were recorded."nResults: The life time prevalence of seizure was 32/1000 population which was more prevalent in boys .Generalized seizure was the most common clinical form. Approximately 60% of cases reported febrile convulsion as the presumptive cause stated by the physician. Positive family history was reported in 29.6% of cases. Anti epileptic drugs were taken by 54% of students with a positive history of seizure."nConclusion: The results of this study show that the life time prevalence of seizure is relatively high in Iranian community, although the other factors were in concordance with other communities.

  4. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Stuijvenberg (Margriet); G. Derksen-Lubsen (Gerarda); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); J.D.F. Habbema (Dik); H.A. Moll (Henriëtte)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure <6 months, relativ

  5. Atorvastatin withdrawal elicits oxidative/nitrosative damage in the rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Clarissa Vasconcelos; Funck, Vinícius Rafael; Pereira, Letícia Meier; Grigoletto, Jéssica; Rambo, Leonardo Magno; Ribeiro, Leandro Rodrigo; Royes, Luiz Fernando Freire; Furian, Ana Flávia; Oliveira, Mauro Schneider

    2013-05-01

    Statins are inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the rate-limiting step in cholesterol biosynthesis. Statins effectively prevent and reduce the risk of coronary artery disease through lowering serum cholesterol, and also exert anti-thrombotic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects independently of changes in cholesterol levels. On the other hand, clinical and experimental evidence suggests that abrupt cessation of statin treatment (i.e. statin withdrawal) is associated with a deleterious rebound phenomenon. In fact, statin withdrawal increases the risk of thrombotic vascular events, causes impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation and facilitates experimental seizures. However, evidence for statin withdrawal-induced detrimental effects to the brain parenchyma is still lacking. In the present study adult male Wistar rats were treated with atorvastatin for seven days (10mg/kg/day) and neurochemical assays were performed in the cerebral cortex 30 min (atorvastatin treatment) or 24h (atorvastatin withdrawal) after the last atorvastatin administration. We found that atorvastatin withdrawal decreased levels of nitric oxide and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase activity, whereas increased NADPH oxidase activity and immunoreactivity for the protein nitration marker 3-nitrotyrosine in the cerebral cortex. Catalase, glutathione-S-transferase and xanthine oxidase activities were not altered by atorvastatin treatment or withdrawal, as well as protein carbonyl and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal immunoreactivity. Immunoprecipitation of mitochondrial SOD followed by analysis of 3-nitrotyrosine revealed increased levels of nitrated mitochondrial SOD, suggesting the mechanism underlying the atorvastatin withdrawal-induced decrease in enzyme activity. Altogether, our results indicate the atorvastatin withdrawal elicits oxidative/nitrosative damage in the rat cerebral cortex, and that changes in NADPH oxidase activity and mitochondrial superoxide

  6. Inhomogeneous cortical synchronization and partial epileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Carolina Vega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Interictal synchronization clusters have recently been described in several publications using diverse techniques, including neurophysiological recordings and fMRI, in patients suffering from epilepsy. However, little is known about the role of these hyper-synchronous areas during seizures. In this work, we report an analysis of synchronization clusters jointly with several network measures during seizure activity; we then discuss our findings in the context of prior literature. Methods: Subdural activity was recorded by electrocorticography (with sixty electrodes placed at temporal and parietal lobe locations in a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy with partial seizures with and without secondary generalization. Both interictal and ictal activities (during four seizures were investigated and characterized using local synchronization and complex network methodology. The modularity, density of links, average clustering coefficient and average path lengths were calculated to obtain information about the dynamics of the global network. Functional connectivity changes during the seizures were compared with the time-evolution of highly synchronized areas.Results: Our findings reveal temporal changes in local synchronization areas during seizures and a tight relationship between the cortical locations of these areas and the patterns of their evolution over time. Seizure evolution and secondary generalization appear to be driven by two different underlying mechanisms.

  7. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment. PMID:25082395

  8. 5 CFR 1650.11 - Withdrawal elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Withdrawal elections. 1650.11 Section 1650.11 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD METHODS OF WITHDRAWING FUNDS FROM THE THRIFT SAVINGS PLAN Post-Employment Withdrawals § 1650.11 Withdrawal elections....

  9. Neurobiological Basis of Alcohol Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagros Lisset León Regal

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholism is a serious social problem due to its impact on individual and collective health. In order to provide an update on the latest findings that explain the development and symptoms of alcohol addiction, the short and long term changes that this disorder causes in the central nervous system are shown in this paper. A total of 52 information sources were consulted, including 43 journal articles, 4 books and statistical reports. The main network managers were used. The interaction of ethanol with various structures of the neuronal membrane affects the cytoarchitecture and brain function associated with the reward system, motor processing, learning and memory, resulting in the development of alcohol dependence. In addition, ethanol-induced changes in excitation/inhibition explain the phenomena of alcohol tolerance and withdrawal.

  10. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  11. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  12. Alcoholic neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... objects in the shoes Guarding the extremities to prevent injury from pressure Alcohol must be stopped to prevent the damage from ... The only way to prevent alcoholic neuropathy is not to drink excessive amounts of alcohol.

  13. Role of caloric homeostasis and reward in alcohol intake in Syrian golden hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Gulick, Danielle; Green, Alan I.

    2010-01-01

    The Syrian golden hamster drinks alcohol readily, but only achieves moderate blood alcohol levels, and does not go through withdrawal from alcohol. Because the hamster is a model of caloric homeostasis, both caloric content and reward value may contribute to the hamster’s alcohol consumption. The current study examines alcohol consumption in the hamster when a caloric or non-caloric sweet solution is concurrently available and caloric intake in the hamster before, during, and after exposure t...

  14. Withdrawal: Expanding a Key Addiction Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piper, Megan E

    2015-12-01

    Withdrawal is an essential component of classical addiction theory; it is a vital manifestation of dependence and motivates relapse. However, the traditional conceptualization of withdrawal as a cohesive collection of symptoms that emerge during drug deprivation and decline with either the passage of time or reinstatement of drug use, may be inadequate to explain scientific findings or fit with modern theories of addiction. This article expands the current understanding of tobacco withdrawal by examining: (1) withdrawal variability; (2) underlying causes of withdrawal variability, including biological and person factors, environmental influences, and the influence of highly routinized behavioral patterns; (3) new withdrawal symptoms that allow for enhanced characterization of the withdrawal experience; and (4) withdrawal-related cognitive processes. These topics provide guidance regarding the optimal assessment of withdrawal and illustrate the potential impact modern withdrawal conceptualization and assessment could have on identifying treatment targets. PMID:25744958

  15. Pathophysiology of Tonic Muscle Activation During Epileptic Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, S.; Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, P.; Sams, Thomas; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures are defined as a “sustained tonic” muscle contraction. Visual inspection of the surface electromyograms (sEMG) during seizures significantly contributed to a better understanding and diagnosis of several seizure types. However,...

  16. Effects of a Natural Community Intervention Intensifying Alcohol Law Enforcement Combined With a Restrictive Alcohol Policy on Adolescent Alcohol Use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schelleman-Offermans, K.; Knibbe, R.A.; Kuntsche, E.N.; Casswell, S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Determining whether intensified inspections on alcohol retailers, combined with a policy withdrawing liquor licenses if retailers are fined twice per annum, is effective in reducing adolescents' odds to initiate weekly drinking and drunkenness. Causal pathways by which the intervention was a

  17. Neonatal seizures triple the risk of a remote seizure after perinatal ischemic stroke.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, CK; Glass, HC; Sidney, S; Smith, SE; Fullerton, HJ

    2016-01-01

    To determine incidence rates and risk factors of remote seizure after perinatal arterial ischemic stroke.We retrospectively identified a population-based cohort of children with perinatal arterial ischemic stroke (presenting acutely or in a delayed fashion) from a large Northern Californian integrated health care system. We determined incidence and predictors of a remote seizure (unprovoked seizure after neonatal period, defined as 28 days of life) by survival analyses, and measured epilepsy ...

  18. Seizures in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... triggers, such as strong emotions, intense exercise, loud music, or flashing lights. When these triggers are at ... may not believe it because you have no memory of the event. The period following a seizure ...

  19. Seizures associated with Lupus during pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Aoki, Shigeru; KOBAYASHI, Natsuko; Mochimaru, Aya; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki

    2016-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A sudden flare of previously stable SLE may give rise to CNS lupus. During pregnancy, seizures associated with CNS lupus can cause hypoxic‐ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) in the infant.

  20. Serum Prolactin in Diagnosis of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies in databases and references concerning serum prolactin levels (PRL in patients with suspected seizures were rated for quality and analyzed by members of the Therapeutics Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

  1. Seizures and Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence, morbidity and mortality, diagnosis and management of cases of fabricated seizures and child abuse (Munchausen syndrome by proxy (MSbp are assessed by pediatricians at the University of Wales College of Medicine, Cardiff, UK.

  2. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... status epilepticus in children: The FEB- STAT Study. Neurology 2012;79:871– 877. 2. Graves RC, Oehler ... Am J Epidemiol 2007;165:911–918. e82 Neurology 79 August 28, 2012 Febrile seizures: Possible outcomes ...

  3. Partial agonist of benzodiazepine receptors Ro 19-2088 elicits withdrawal symptoms after short-term administration in immature rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 3 (2012), s. 319-323. ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0846; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : Ro 19-2088 * iatrogenic withdrawal * pentylentetrazol-induced seizures * immature rats Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 1.531, year: 2012

  4. Novel bursting mode leads to seizure termination

    OpenAIRE

    Giri Krishnan; Andrey Shilnikov

    2012-01-01

    Many types of seizure manifest themselves in stereotype patterns of electrical activity characterized by alternations of the spike/polyspike and wave (SW/PSW) EEG discharges and fast runs of EEG spikes. This includes absence seizures (typical and atypical), absence status epilepticus, Lennox Gastault syndrome, West syndrome, and posttraumatic epilepsy [Niedermeyer, 2005]. However, the dynamics and the mechanisms of transitions between fast spiking (tonic activity) and SW/PSW complexes (bursti...

  5. Aging Models of Acute Seizures and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Kevin M.

    2010-01-01

    Aged animals have been used by researchers to better understand the differences between the young and the aged brain and how these differences may provide insight into the mechanisms of acute seizures and epilepsy in the elderly. To date, there have been relatively few studies dedicated to the modeling of acute seizures and epilepsy in aged, healthy animals. Inherent challenges to this area of research include the costs associated with the purchase and maintenance of older animals and, at tim...

  6. Seizures and Praziquantel. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime R. Torres R.; Oscar Noya G.; Belkysyolé A. de Noya; Alejandro Mondolfi G.

    1988-01-01

    A 27 year Old male developed seizures after receiving a single 20 mg/kg dose of praziquantel for the treatment of an intestinal Hymenolepis nana infection. On further clinical and laboratorial evaluations, he was found to suffer from an until then asymptomatic parenchymal brain cysticercosis. Praziquantel must be used with caution in those areas where cysticercosis represents a mayor public health problem. The occurrence of unexpected seizures in an individual being treated with the compound,...

  7. [Energy drinks as a cause of seizures--real or possible danger? Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszkiewicz, Eryk; Łukasik-Głębocka, Magdalena; Sommerfeld, Karina; Tezyk, Artur; Zielińska-Psuja, Barbara; Zaba, Czesław

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of energy beverages is increasing, especially among young people. The increasing consumption of these drinks increases the data of side effects. Case report: A 26-year old male was admitted to Toxicology Department suspected of intoxication due to ethyl alcohol and unknown psychoactive substances. The patient lost consciousness during a party in which he drank an unknown amount of ethyl alcohol mixed with an energy beverage ("Red Bull"). The patient and his friends strongly denied the use of psychoactive substances. On admission, the patient was stable, but unconscious (GCS 8 points), pupils wide, symmetric with weak reaction to light, respiratory rate 15/min. Neurological examination did not reveal any abnormalities. During the hospitalization, somnolence slowly disappeared and the patient became restless, with recurrent episodes of seizures not reacting to diazepam, clonazepam and midazolam infusion. The seizures finally abated after administration of barbiturates (Thiopental). This, in turn, caused respiratory insufficiency, requiring patient intubation and mechanical ventilation. The patients mental status and respiratory status slowly improved. After regaining consciousness, the patient strongly denied the use of psychoactive substances or of chronic alcohol use. He confirmed the single use of high, but not clearly defined, caffeine dosage (in the form of "Red Bull") mixed with alcohol. He mentioned that eight months earlier in similar circumstances he was admitted to the neurology department due to an episode of seizures. Ultimately the origin was not established, despite broad diagnostic testing. Thus the origin of the seizures was suggested to be of a toxicological origin. The patient was released home in good condition, without any side effects of the poisoning. The psychological examination doe not reveal any symptoms of alcohol or psychoactive substances addiction. In our case, due to the unclear nature of the history, we preformed broad

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character. PMID:26575850

  9. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Lung-Chang; Lee, Mei-Wen; Wei, Ruey-Chang; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Yang, Rei-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced...

  10. Binge ethanol withdrawal: Effects on post-withdrawal ethanol intake, glutamate-glutamine cycle and monoamine tissue content in P rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sujan C; Althobaiti, Yusuf S; Alshehri, Fahad S; Sari, Youssef

    2016-04-15

    Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a medical emergency situation which appears after abrupt cessation of ethanol intake. Decreased GABA-A function and increased glutamate function are known to exist in the AWS. However, the involvement of glutamate transporters in the context of AWS requires further investigation. In this study, we used a model of ethanol withdrawal involving abrupt cessation of binge ethanol administration (4g/kg/gavage three times a day for three days) using male alcohol-preferring (P) rats. After 48h of withdrawal, P rats were re-exposed to voluntary ethanol intake. The amount of ethanol consumed was measured during post-withdrawal phase. In addition, the expression of GLT-1, GLAST and xCT were determined in both medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc). We also measured glutamine synthetase (GS) activity, and the tissue content of glutamate, glutamine, dopamine and serotonin in both mPFC and NAc. We found that binge ethanol withdrawal escalated post-withdrawal ethanol intake, which was associated with downregulation of GLT-1 expression in both mPFC and NAc. The expression of GLAST and xCT were unchanged in the ethanol-withdrawal (EW) group compared to control group. Tissue content of glutamate was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of glutamine was higher in mPFC but unchanged in NAc in the EW group compared to control group. The GS activity was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. The tissue content of DA was significantly lower in both mPFC and NAc, whereas tissue content of serotonin was unchanged in both mPFC and NAc. These findings provide important information of the critical role of GLT-1 in context of AWS. PMID:26821293

  11. Who withdraws? Psychological individual differences and employee withdrawal behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Ryan D; Swider, Brian W; Woo, Sang Eun; Allen, David G

    2016-04-01

    Psychological individual differences, such as personality, affectivity, and general mental ability, have been shown to predict numerous work-related behaviors. Although there is substantial research demonstrating relationships between psychological individual differences and withdrawal behaviors (i.e., lateness, absenteeism, and turnover), there is no integrative framework providing scholars and practitioners a guide for conceptualizing how, why, and under what circumstances we observe such relationships. In this integrative conceptual review we: (a) utilize the Cognitive-Affective Processing System framework (Mischel & Shoda, 1995) to provide an overarching theoretical basis for how psychological individual differences affect withdrawal behaviors; (b) create a theoretical model of the situated person that summarizes the existing empirical literature examining the effect of psychological differences on withdrawal behavior; and (c) identify future research opportunities based on our review and integrative framework. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26595754

  12. Suicidal Behavior and Alcohol Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Pompili

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Suicide is an escalating public health problem, and alcohol use has consistently been implicated in the precipitation of suicidal behavior. Alcohol abuse may lead to suicidality through disinhibition, impulsiveness and impaired judgment, but it may also be used as a means to ease the distress associated with committing an act of suicide. We reviewed evidence of the relationship between alcohol use and suicide through a search of MedLine and PsychInfo electronic databases. Multiple genetically-related intermediate phenotypes might influence the relationship between alcohol and suicide. Psychiatric disorders, including psychosis, mood disorders and anxiety disorders, as well as susceptibility to stress, might increase the risk of suicidal behavior, but may also have reciprocal influences with alcohol drinking patterns. Increased suicide risk may be heralded by social withdrawal, breakdown of social bonds, and social marginalization, which are common outcomes of untreated alcohol abuse and dependence. People with alcohol dependence or depression should be screened for other psychiatric symptoms and for suicidality. Programs for suicide prevention must take into account drinking habits and should reinforce healthy behavioral patterns.

  13. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  14. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali DELPISHEH

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Delpisheh A, Veisani Y, Sayehmiri K, Fayyazi A. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer; 8(3:30-37. AbstractObjectiveFebrile seizures (FSs are the most common neurological disorder observed in the pediatric age group. The present study provides information about epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as risk factors associated with FS among Iranian children.Materials & MethodsOn the computerized literature valid databases, the FS prevalence and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using a random effects model. A metaregression analysis was introduced to explore heterogeneity between studies. Data manipulation and statistical analyses were performed using Stata10.ResultsThe important viral or bacterial infection causes of FSs were; recent upper respiratory infection 42.3% (95% CI: 37.2%–47.4%, gastroenteritis21.5% (95% CI: 13.6%–29.4%, and otitis media infections15.2% (95% CI: 9.8%- 20.7% respectively. The pooled prevalence rate of FS among other childhood convulsions was 47.9% (95% CI: 38.8–59.9%. The meta–regression analysis showed that the sample size does not significantly affect heterogeneity for the factor ‘prevalence FS’.ConclusionsAlmost half of all childhood convulsions among Iranian children are associated with Febrile seizure. ReferencesFelipe L, Siqueira M. febrile seizures: update on diagnosis and management. Siqueira LFM. 2010;56 (4:489–92.Oka E, Ishida S, Ohtsuka Y, Ohtahara S. Neuroepidemiological Study of Childhood Epilepsy by Application of International Classification of Epilepsies and Epileptic Syndromes (ILAE, 1989. Epilepsia. 1995;36 (7:658–61.Shi X, Lin Z, Ye X, Hu Y, Zheng F, Hu H. An epidemiological survey of febrile convulsions among pupils in the Wenzhou region. Zhongguo Dang Dai Er Ke Za Zhi. 2012 Feb;14 (2:128–30.Waruiru C, Appleton R. Febrile seizures: an update. Arch Dis Child

  15. Prophylaxis with diphenylhydantoin and phenobarbital in alumina-gel monkey model. II. Fourth-month follow-up period: seizure, EEG, blood and behavioral data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockard, J S; DuCharme, L L; Congdon, W C; Franklin, S C

    1976-03-01

    This study, a 4-month follow-up period of a 12-month treatment study by the present authors, was concerned with the permanent effects of treatment with diphenylhydantoin and phenobarbital in the alumina-gel monkey model. Whereas the 8 drug animals during withdrawal increased their seizure frequency, duration, and severity, those 4 animals having received 120 mg/kg/day DPH in weeks 6-12 had one-half the number of seizures of the 4 placebo monkeys in the follow-up period. The other 4 drug animals who had continued to receive 60 mg/kg/day DPH during those weeks had two to four times the number of seizures of the placebo group during posttreatment. (All drug monkeys received 80 mg/kg/day of DPH from weeks 13-52 and 6 mg/kg/day of phenobarbital throughout the 12-month treatment period). The results reaffirm the problems of drug withdrawal and the importance of altering seizure mechanisms with sufficiently high doses of efficacious anticonvulsants rather than merely treating epileptic manifestations at lower doses. PMID:817892

  16. Dependence Induced Increases in Intragastric Alcohol Consumption (IGAC) in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fidler, Tara L.; Powers, Matthew S.; Ramirez, Jason J.; Crane, Andrew; Mulgrew, Jennifer; Smitasin, Phoebe; Cunningham, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments used the Intragastric Alcohol Consumption (IGAC) procedure to examine effects of variations in passive ethanol exposure on withdrawal and voluntary ethanol intake in two inbred mouse strains, C57BL/6J (B6) and DBA/2J (D2). Experimental treatments were selected to induce quantitative differences in ethanol dependence and withdrawal severity by: (a) varying the periodicity of passive ethanol exposure (3, 6 or 9 infusions/day), (b) varying the dose per infusion (Low, Medium or ...

  17. Epileptic Seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    CERN Document Server

    Osorio, Ivan; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The concept of universality proposes that dynamical systems with the same power law behaviors are equivalent at large scales. We test this hypothesis on the Earth's crust and the epileptic brain, and discover that power laws also govern the distributions of seizure energies and recurrence times. This robust correspondence is extended over seven statistics, including the direct and inverse Omori laws. We also verify in an animal seizure model the earthquake-driven hypothesis that power law statistics co-exist with characteristic scales, as coupling between constitutive elements increases towards the synchronization regime. These observations point to the universality of the dynamics of coupled threshold oscillators for systems even as diverse as Earth and brain and suggest a general strategy for forecasting seizures, one of neurosciences' grails.

  18. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhafeez M. Khair

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes.

  19. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. PMID:26875662

  20. S100B proteins in febrile seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkonen, Kirsi; Pekkala, Niina; Pokka, Tytti; Romner, Bertil; Uhari, Matti; Rantala, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    may also give an indication of an ongoing pathological process in the brain with respect to febrile seizures (FS) and the likelihood of their recurrence. To evaluate this, we measured S100B protein concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid from 103 children after their first FS. 33 children with...... the hospital after FS and S100B concentration in serum (r=-0.130, P=0.28) or in cerebrospinal fluid samples (r=-0.091, P=0.52). Our findings indicate that FS does not cause significant blood-brain barrier openings, and increase the evidence that these seizures are relatively harmless for the...

  1. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation

    OpenAIRE

    Delpisheh, Ali; Veisani, Yousef; SAYEHMIRI, Kourosh; FAYYAZI, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Delpisheh A, Veisani Y, Sayehmiri K, Fayyazi A. Febrile Seizures: Etiology, Prevalence, and Geographical Variation. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer; 8(3):30-37. AbstractObjectiveFebrile seizures (FSs) are the most common neurological disorder observed in the pediatric age group. The present study provides information about epidemiological and clinical characteristics as well as risk factors associated with FS among Iranian children.Materials & MethodsOn the comp...

  2. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-12-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  3. Alcohol Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... alcohol. Alcohol is the ingredient that gets you drunk. Hard liquor—such as whiskey, rum, or gin— ... of malt liquor 12 ounces of beer Being drunk can make a person feel very silly, angry, ...

  4. Alcoholics Anonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Banners Site Help What's New Welcome to Alcoholics Anonymous ® NEED HELP WITH A DRINKING PROBLEM? If you ... drinking problem, wish to learn more about Alcoholics Anonymous or want to find A.A. near you, ...

  5. [Causes of the people death from drunkenness and alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, Iu A; Paukov, V S; Kirillov, Iu A

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed causes of 1008 people death, who abused by alcohol. Among them 2 groups were separated out: people died due to drunkenness and due to alcoholism. The structure of the death was similar in the both groups, however depended on alcoholism stages. The major cause of the death in group of drunkenness people was acute heart insufficiency, less commonly--lung pathology, and very rarely--brain vessels pathology and liver cirrhosis. In group of people, who died due to alcoholism, lung pathology was the major cause of these deaths, acute heart insufficiency was occurred less commonly, and very rare brain pathology because of delirium tremens or alcohol withdrawal syndrome, as so liver cirrhosis with complications. Hemorrhagic pancreonecrosis after alcoholic excess was found out in both groups, but it was more often in people, who died due to drunkenness. Obtained results show importance of chronic alcoholism identification as a disease with several stages including drunkenness and alcoholism. PMID:22937578

  6. Discrete Cues Paired with Naloxone-Precipitated Withdrawal from Acute Morphine Dependence Elicit Conditioned Withdrawal Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Amitai, Nurith; Liu, Jian; Schulteis, Gery

    2006-01-01

    Acute bolus doses of morphine induce a state of acute opioid dependence as measured by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. Repeated morphine and precipitated withdrawal experience further enhances naloxone-induced withdrawal severity, in part due to direct neuroadaptation to repeated morphine, and in part due to conditioned associations of context and withdrawal experience. To determine whether a discrete tone/light conditioned stimulus (CS) could elicit conditioned withdrawal responses in acut...

  7. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a... or physical safety of an individual; (ii) Flight from prosecution; (iii) Destruction of or...

  8. Alcoholic hallucinosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Pookala S; Ryali, Vssr; Srivastava, Kalpana; Kumar, Shashi R; Prakash, Jyoti; Singal, Ankit

    2012-07-01

    Alcoholic hallucinosis is a rare complication of chronic alcohol abuse characterized by predominantly auditory hallucinations that occur either during or after a period of heavy alcohol consumption. Bleuler (1916) termed the condition as alcohol hallucinosis and differentiated it from Delirium Tremens. Usually it presents with acoustic verbal hallucinations, delusions and mood disturbances arising in clear consciousness and sometimes may progress to a chronic form mimicking schizophrenia. One such case with multimodal hallucinations in a Defence Service Corps soldier is presented here. PMID:24250051

  9. Alcohol use disorders and current pharmacological therapies: the role of GABAA receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Jing; Olsen, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol use disorders (AUD) are defined as alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence, which create large problems both for society and for the drinkers themselves. To date, no therapeutic can effectively solve these problems. Understanding the underlying mechanisms leading to AUD is critically important for developing effective and safe pharmacological therapies. Benzodiazepines (BZs) are used to reduce the symptoms of alcohol withdrawal syndrome. However, frequent use of BZs causes cross-toleranc...

  10. Alcohol misuse

    OpenAIRE

    Robson, W

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol use is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity internationally, and is ranked by the WHO as one of the top five risk factors for disease burden. Without treatment, approximately 16% of hazardous or harmful alcohol users will progress to more dependent patterns of alcohol consumption.

  11. Alcohol Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The recent alcohol tax increase poses a challenge to China’s white spirits makers Alcohol, rather than wine, is an in-dispensable component to Chinese table culture. The financial crisis has failed to affect white spirits sales, but an alcohol tax increase might.

  12. FACTORS TRIGGERING EPILEPTIC SEIZURES IN PATIENTS OVER 50 YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Demir, Serkan; Rifat Erdem TOGROL; Sonkaya, Ali Riza; Kendirli, Mustafa Tansel; Alay, Semih; Celik, Tugba Yanar; Delil, Sakir; Ozdag, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Objective:In this study the factors that trigger the seizures in epileptic patients over the age of 50 was investigated and the frequency of seizures was analyzed regarding different age, gender, type of seizure and etiological groups. Method:  For this purpose, 387 patients were included in the study who were admitted to neurology outpatient clinic with the diagnosis of epilepsy. The patients are divided into groups based on those characteristics: male / female, generalized seizure / partial...

  13. Psychogenic seizures in brain injury: diagnosis, treatment and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conder, R L; Zasler, N D

    1990-01-01

    Psychogenic seizures are a functional phenomena in which a person experiences a paroxysmal event that may be interpreted as epileptiform in nature. By definition, psychogenic seizures imply a sudden episode of change in behaviour or psychic state that is not associated with an identifiable process, either vasculogenic or neurogenic, and during which there is an absence of characteristic epileptiform changes on the electroencephalogram. Prevalence rates range from 5% to 50% in outpatient populations seen in epilepsy clinics. However, approximately 20% of true seizure patients also have psychogenic seizures. As psychogenic seizures are not a pathophysiological phenomena, pharmacological interventions do not alter their aetiology and can cloud the cognitive skills necessary to ameliorate the psychogenic seizure behaviour. In non-aphasic true seizure patients, as well as psychogenic seizure patients, self-control relaxation paradigms have been successful where pharmacological intervention has failed. This case involved an aphasic brain-injured patient who had both psychogenic and true seizures. For this patient, the self-control paradigm was modified to include use of gesture and prosody to achieve similar psychotherapeutic effects. Additionally, family therapy was instituted to provide a constructive means for the patient's family to participate in the reduction of psychogenic seizures. As seizures are a common sequelae of brain injury, the differential diagnosis of seizures and knowledge of standard and alternative treatment is essential for rehabilitation professionals. PMID:1701326

  14. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce eGreyson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. 55% of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients’ reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time.

  15. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  16. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  17. Seizure-like activity during fentanyl anesthesia. A case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, M. D.

    1990-01-01

    Fentanyl induced seizures have been described previously in the literature. Clinical observations has labeled the movements seen in fentanyl anesthesia as seizure activity but electroencephalographic studies have not supported this. A case of seizure-like activity after the administration of fentanyl in a 20-year-old female is reported.

  18. Drug treatment-related factors of inadequate seizure control.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handoko, K.B.; Rijkom, JE Zwart-van; Visee, H.F.; Hermens, W.A.; Hekster, Y.A.; Egberts, T.C.G.

    2008-01-01

    To optimize seizure control it is important to identify modifiable factors. We conducted a case-control study to explore to what extent drug treatment-related factors are associated with seizures. Eighty-six patients with epilepsy were evaluated: 45 cases (recently experienced a seizure) and 41 cont

  19. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Psyche eLoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG. However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here we describe an algorithm we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determine whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures vs. non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy.

  20. Immunological perspectives of temporal lobe seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liimatainen, Suvi; Lehtimäki, Kai; Kai, Lehtimäki; Palmio, Johanna; Johanna, Palmio; Alapirtti, Tiina; Tiina, Alapirtti; Peltola, Jukka; Jukka, Peltola

    2013-10-15

    The temporal lobes are affected in many different neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases, viral and immunological encephalitides, and epilepsy. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests a different inflammatory response to seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in comparison to those with extra-TLE (XTLE). Proinflammatory cytokines and several autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with TLE compared to other epilepsy types suggesting the specific role and structure of the temporal lobe. Abundant experience suggests that activation of both innate and adaptive immunity is associated with epilepsy, particularly refractory focal epilepsy. Limbic encephalitis often triggers temporal lobe seizures, and a proportion of these disorders are immune-mediated. Histological evidence shows activation of specific inflammatory pathways in resected temporal lobes of epileptic patients, and certain epileptic disorders have shown increased incidence in patients with autoimmune diseases. Rapid activation of proinflammatory cytokines is observed after single seizures, but there is also evidence of chronic overproduction of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in patients with TLE, suggesting a neuromodulatory role of inflammation in epilepsy. In this review we summarize current data on the presence and the role of immunological factors in temporal lobe seizures, and their possible involvement in epileptogenesis. PMID:23998423

  1. Seizures and Epilepsy in Sotos Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Clinicians from the Child Neurology Division, Sapienza University of Rome, and 7 other pediatric neurology centers in Italy report a series of 19 Sotos syndrome (SS) patients with febrile seizures (FS) and/or epilepsy during childhood and a long-term follow-up.

  2. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  3. Electrical stimulation-induced models of seizures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mareš, Pavel; Kubová, Hana

    Burlington: Academic Press, 2006 - (Pitkänen, A.; Schwartzkroin, P.; Moshé, S.), s. 153-159 ISBN 0-12-088554-9 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epilepsy * electroshock seizures Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  4. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures.

  5. Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

    2011-01-01

    Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures. PMID:21949881

  6. Targeting pannexin1 improves seizure outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo F Santiago

    Full Text Available Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1 is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K(+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures.

  7. Alcoholic cardiomyopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gonzalo; Guzzo-Merello; Marta; Cobo-Marcos; Maria; Gallego-Delgado; Pablo; Garcia-Pavia

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol is the most frequently consumed toxic substance in the world. Low to moderate daily intake of alcohol has been shown to have beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. In contrast, exposure to high levels of alcohol for a long period could lead to progressive cardiac dysfunction and heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction associated with chronic and excessive alcohol intake is a specific cardiac disease known as alcoholic cardiomyopathy(ACM). In spite of its clinical importance, data on ACM and how alcohol damages the heart are limited. In this review, we evaluate available evidence linking excessive alcohol consumption with heart failure and dilated cardiomyopathy. Additionally, we discuss the clinical presentation, prognosis and treatment of ACM.

  8. Curcumin inhibits amygdaloid kindled seizures in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Peng; LI Xin; LIN Hao-jie; PENG Wei-feng; LIU Jian-ying; MA Yu; FAN Wei; WANG Xin

    2009-01-01

    Background Curcumin can reduce the severity of seizures induced by kainate acid (KA), but the role of curcumin in amygdaloid kindled models is still unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of curcumin on the development of kindling in amygdaloid kindled rats.Methods With an amygdaloid kindled Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat model and an electrophysiological method, differentdoses of curcumin (10 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 30 mg·kg-1·d-1as low dose groups, 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 as high dose groups) were administrated intraperitoneally during the whole kindling days, by comparison with the course of kindling, afterdischarge (AD) thresholds and the number of Ads to reach the stages of class Ⅰ to Ⅴ seizures in the rats between control and experimental groups. One-way or two-way ANOVA and Fisher's least significant difference post hoc test were used for statistical analyses.Results Curcumin (both 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 and 300 mg·kg-1·d-1) significantly inhibited the behavioral seizure development in the (19.80±9.25) and (21.70±9.21) stimulations respectively required to reach the kindled state. Rats treated with 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin 30 minutes before kindling stimulation showed an obvious increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (703.3±85.9) μA to (960.0±116.5) μA during the progression to class Ⅴ seizures. Rats treated with 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin showed a significant increase in the stimulation current intensity required to evoke AD from (735.0±65.2) μA to (86±7.093.4) μA during the progression to class Ⅴ seizures. Rats treated with 300 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin required much more evoked Ads to reach the stage of class both Ⅳ (as (199.83±12.47) seconds) and Ⅴ seizures (as (210.66±10.68) seconds). Rats treated with 100 mg·kg-1·d-1 curcumin required much more evoked Ads to reach the stage of class V seizures (as (219.56±18.24) seconds). Conclusion Our study suggests that curcumin has a potential

  9. FEBRILE SEIZURE: RECURRENCE AND RISK FACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TALEBIAN

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Febrile Convulsion is the most common convulsive disorder in children,occurring in 2 to 4% of the pediatric population and recurring in 30-50% of cases. Considering the varying recurrence rates reported, thisstudy was conducted at the pediatric ward of the Shaheed BeheshtiGeneral Hospital, between 2000-2001 to determine the frequencyof recurrence and related risk factors in children presenting with theirfirst episode of febrile convulsionMaterials & Methods:A two–year cohort study was performed on 50 children presentingwith the first attack of febrile convulsion. Patient demographic dataincluding age, sex, type and duration of seizure, family history offebrile seizure or epilepsy and the interval between fever onset andoccurrence of seizure were recorded in questionnaires. Those patients,for whom prophylactic medication was not administered, werefollowed at three–month intervals for up to one year. Findings werestatistically analyzed using Fisher’s exact testResults:Recurrence was observed in twelve children (24% out of the fifty,being most common in patients aged less than one year (54.4%.Recurrence rates among children with a positive family history offebrile convulsion, presence of complex febrile seizure and positivefamily history of epilepsy were 42.1%, 42.8% and 25% respectively.From among those children with a “less than one hour” intervalbetween fever onset and occurrence of seizure, recurrence occurredin 43-7% of cases, while in those with a “more than one hourinterval”, 14.7% experienced recurrence.Conclusion:Recurrence rates are increased by certain factors including age-belowone year-, positive family history of febrile convulsion, and a “lessthan one hour” interval between time of fever onset and seizureoccurrence.

  10. Evaluation of Seizure Attacks in Patients with Cerebrovascular Accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Koochaki

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common reason for seizure in elderly duration is the stroke. This study was conducted aiming to assess the frequency of seizure attack occurrence in those patients. Materials and Methods: This investigation was carried out through a cross-sectional method for one year on 330 patients admitted to the neurology ward as diagnosed with stroke. The required data was collected through the researcher-made questionnaire from the patients suffering from stoke which was diagnosed based on clinical findings, CT-Scan and MRI as required. Results: Among 330 patient suffering from stroke (162 men and 168 women, 48 cases (14.5% were suffering from seizure. Six percent of the patients had early seizure and another 8.5% had late seizure. Among 162 men suffering from the stroke, 32 ones were without seizures and 30 men were suffering the seizure. A number of 150 women out of total 168 ones suffering from the stroke, had no seizure and 18 others had seizures; frequency of seizure occurrence was more in male samples (p=0.044. In the people under 60 year, there were mostly early types of seizure (45% and in the age range above 60 year, it was mostly late type (89.3%. A 68.5% of the patients suffering from the seizure had experienced ischemic stroke. However, the frequency of seizure occurrence in the patients with hemorrhagic stroke was statistically greater (p=0.003. Conclusion: This examination showed that occurrence of seizure attacks in the people with stroke is 14.5% and it is seen more in the hemorrhagic strokes than ischemic ones. The frontoparietal area is the most common location involved and tonic clonic was the most common seizure in the patients suffering from it who have experienced the stroke

  11. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww019_video_abstractaww019_video_abstract. PMID:26912639

  12. Method of withdrawing fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To facilitate the withdrawal of fuel rods from a fuel bundle by heating a lower tie plate. Constitution: A lower tie plate for a fuel bundle is disposed within a heating coil. Magnetic fluxes and eddy currents passing through the lower tie plate are induced by applying an alternating current to the heating coil to generate eddy current loss and hysteresis loss in the lower tie plate thereby generating heat to the inside of the lower tie plate per se with no external heating. The lower tie plate is heated in this way. Since the lower tie plate has a greater linear expansion coefficient than that of the lower end plug, a gap is resulted at the engaging portion between the lower tie plate and the lower end plug, by which the fastening of the lower end plug is released to facilitate the withdrawal of the fuel rod. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Neonatal withdrawal syndrome: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radunović-Gojković Tatjana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Maternal drug abuse has increased over the past decade. It has a multiple negative influence on a pregnant woman, as well as her newborn. Practically, every drug taken during pregnancy crosses the placenta, and the developing fetus may also be affected by the effects of a drug. After delivery, an infant of a drug-abusing mother may potentially develop neonatal withdrawal syndrome. Existing studies on the neonatal effects of drug exposure in utero are subject to many factors. Many studies have relied on the history obtained from the mother, which is innacurate. Urine testing for drug abuse does not reflect exposure to a drug through pregnancy and does not provide quantitative information. Social and economic deprivation is common among drug abusers, and this factor has a major effect on long term studies of infant outcome. The purpose of this article is to underline the problems during management of a neonatal withdrawal syndrom, and growing incidence of it in our society. Case report. A case of an infant of a heroin-abusing mother is reported. Conclusion. It is very important to take care of an infant with neonatal withdrawal syndrome, but it is also of a great importance to supervise these children for a long period of time.

  14. SEIZURE SEVERITY AS AN ALTERNATIVE MEASURE OF OUTCOME IN EPILEPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koraliya S. Todorova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Seizure severity emerges as an important aspect of epilepsy. This is most relevant in refractory patients in whom complete remission of seizures is unlikely and reduced seizure severity may be a significant determinant of psychosocial well-being with a consequent improvement in quality of life (QOL. Thus a valid measure of seizure severity can serve both as an indicator of clinical outcome and as an evaluation tool of the interaction between seizures and the psychosocial complications of epilepsy.After a brief review of the most frequently used scales measuring seizure severity in adults with epilepsy we have explored the relationship between seizure severity and QOL in a set of 103 patients. Two self-evaluation questionnaires were applied: the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ and the Quality of Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31. The severity of the coexisting depression, an important confounder in the relationship between seizure severity and QOL, was assessed by the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAMD-17.All domains of the Quality-of-Life in Epilepsy Inventory (QOLIE-31 correlated highly significantly with seizure severity (p≤0.01. The correlation was strong for the Overall score (r=-0.70; p≤0.001 and the Seizure worry domain (r=-0.71; p≤0.001. When the potentially confounding effect of depression was controlled for, the regression of seizure severity with the QOLIE-31 Overall score (P=0.001; R²=0.56 and the Seizure worry domain (P=0.001; R²=0.50 remained significant. These findings indicate that seizure severity is strongly associated with QOL in epilepsy and could be used as an alternative indicator of outcome in clinical research.

  15. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric γ-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their

  16. Alcoholic hallucinosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pookala S Bhat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic hallucinosis is a rare complication of chronic alcohol abuse characterized by predominantly auditory hallucinations that occur either during or after a period of heavy alcohol consumption. Bleuler (1916 termed the condition as alcohol hallucinosis and differentiated it from Delirium Tremens. Usually it presents with acoustic verbal hallucinations, delusions and mood disturbances arising in clear consciousness and sometimes may progress to a chronic form mimicking schizophrenia. One such case with multimodal hallucinations in a Defence Service Corps soldier is presented here.

  17. [Extension of the concept of withdrawal signs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Shin

    2015-12-01

    If the conditions including normal-dose dependence in which withdrawal signs are observed in the absence of definite psychic dependence are classified as dependence, this classification should be regarded as inappropriate extension of the concept of drug dependence. These conditions should be diagnosed as 'withdrawal' as specified by the DSM-5 or ICD-10. Advancements of research have clarified that an increased number of drugs cause withdrawal signs. Some Japanese researchers use the concept of 'withdrawal signs of psychic dependence.' Their definition of drug dependence and concept of withdrawal signs, however, are different from the definition established by the WHO and the researchers specializing in this field. Thus, the concept of 'withdrawal signs of psychic dependence' raises a lot of questions. PMID:26964289

  18. Withdrawal history, private information, and bank runs

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Garriga; Chao Gu

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a simple two-depositor, two-stage model to understand how a bank’s withdrawal history affects an individual’s decision about withdrawals, which could possibly trigger bank runs. Individual depositors have private information about their personal consumption types and receive noisy private signals about the quality of the bank’s portfolio. Depositors make publicly observable withdrawal decisions in sequence. Computed examples indicate that the optimal contract contingent on...

  19. Cannabis withdrawal in adolescent treatment seekers

    OpenAIRE

    Vandrey, Ryan; Budney, Alan J.; Kamon, Jody L.; Stanger, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    A valid cannabis withdrawal syndrome has been demonstrated in controlled studies with adult marijuana abusers, yet few published reports have examined cannabis withdrawal among adolescents. Adolescents presenting for outpatient substance abuse treatment, whose primary substance of abuse was cannabis, completed a questionnaire reporting the presence and severity of withdrawal symptoms during past periods of cannabis abstinence. Nearly two-thirds of the sample indicated that they had experience...

  20. 29 CFR 4219.12 - Employers liable upon mass withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. 4219.12 Section 4219... Redetermination of Withdrawal Liability Upon Mass Withdrawal § 4219.12 Employers liable upon mass withdrawal. (a... experiences successive mass withdrawals, an employer that has been determined to be liable under this...

  1. The Presence of Consciousness in Absence Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Bayne, Tim

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines three respects in which the study of epileptic absence seizures promises to inform our understanding of consciousness. Firstly, it has the potential to bear on debates concerning the behavioural and cognitive functions associated with consciousness. Secondly, it has the potential to illuminate the relationship between background states (or ‘levels’) of consciousness and the contents of consciousness. Thirdly, it has the potential to bear on our understanding of the unity o...

  2. Searches and Seizures in a Networked World

    OpenAIRE

    Zittrain, Jonathan L.

    2006-01-01

    This essay responds to Orin S. Kerr, Searches and Seizures in a Digital World, 119 Harv. L. Rev. 531 (2005), http://ssrn.com/abstract=697541. Professor Kerr has published a thorough and careful article on the application of the Fourth Amendment to searches of computers in private hands - a treatment that has previously escaped the attentions of legal academia. Such a treatment is perhaps so overdue that it has been overtaken by two phenomena: first, the emergence of an overriding concern...

  3. Seizures After Overdoses of Bupropion Intake

    OpenAIRE

    Kara, Hasan; AK, Ahmet; Bayır, Ayşegül; Acar, Demet; İstanbulluoğlu, Rabia; Değirmenci, Selim

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bupropion is a new-generation monocyclic antidepressant that has been accidentally found to have potential effects on reducing nicotine addiction. It is structurally similar to stimulants such as amphetamine and inhibits dopamine and noradrenalin reuptake selectively. Case Reports: We report two cases with no history of epilepsy who took oral bupropion for depression and had generalised tonic-clonic type of seizures in their follow-ups. Conclusion: After an ov...

  4. A gut feeling about insular seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Dionisio, S; A. Koenig; Murray, J.; Somerville, E

    2011-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented to the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, after experiencing his first tonic-clonic seizure. For the previous 2 years he had undergone gastroenterological investigation of episodes of gagging associated with hypersalivation and lachrymation, occurring three or four times per week. EEG showed epileptiform discharges in the right anterior temporal region; brain MRI revealed a lesion in the right insular cortex. Video-EEG telemetry demonstra...

  5. Seizure Following Topical Gammabenzene Hexachloride Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Animesh

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of short-lived, self-limiting major epileptic seizures following an improper application of gammabenzene hexachloride (GBHC lotion in a 15 month old boy suffering from scabies with secondary bacterial infection is reported here due to its rarity in clinical practice and, more particularly, to stress the need of correct instructions on the use of GBHC application for the prevention of iatrogenic neurotoxicity.

  6. Ictal alterations of consciousness during ecstatic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Fabienne; Kurth, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ecstatic epileptic seizures report an altered consciousness, which they describe as a sense of heightened perception of themselves – they “feel very present” – and an increased vividness of sensory perceptions. Recently, the anterior insula has been proposed as the region where these seizures originate, based on the results of ictal nuclear imaging in three patients, the first induction of ecstatic auras by electrical stimulation, and the functional characteristics of the anterior insula in neuroimaging literature. Specifically, the anterior insula is thought to play a key role in integrating information from within the body, the external world, as well as the emotional states. In addition, the anterior insula is thought to convert this integrated information into successive global emotional moments, thus enabling both the construct of a sentient self as well as a mechanism for predictive coding. As part of the salience network, this region is also involved in switching from mind wandering toward attentional and executive processing. In this review, we will summarize previous patient reports and recap how insular functioning may be involved in the phenomenon of ecstatic seizures. Furthermore, we will relate these hypotheses to the results from research on meditation and effects of drug abuse. PMID:24436968

  7. Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauchenzauner, Markus; Luef, Gerhard

    2011-12-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

  8. Perspectives on seizure clusters: Gaps in lexicon, awareness, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buelow, Janice M; Shafer, Patricia; Shinnar, Ruth; Austin, Joan; Dewar, Sandra; Long, Lucretia; O'Hara, Kathryn; Santilli, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Seizure clusters in epilepsy can result in serious outcomes such as missed work or school, postictal psychosis, emergency room visits, or hospitalizations, and yet they are often not included in discussions between health-care professionals (HCPs) and their patients. The purpose of this paper was to describe and compare consumer (patient and caregivers) and professional understanding of seizure clusters and to describe how consumers and HCPs communicate regarding seizure clusters. We reviewed social media discussion sites to explore consumers' understanding of seizure clusters. We analyzed professional (medical) literature to explore the HCPs' understanding of seizure clusters. Major themes were revealed in one or both groups, including: communication about diagnosis; frequency, duration, and time frame; seizure type and pattern; severity; and self-management. When comparing discussions of professionals and consumers, both consumers and clinicians discussed the definition of seizure clusters. Discussions of HCPs were understandably clinically focused, and consumer discussions reflected the experience of seizure clusters; however, both groups struggled with a common lexicon. Seizure cluster events remain a problem associated with serious outcomes. Herein, we outline the lack of a common understanding and recommend the development of a common lexicon to improve communication regarding seizure clusters. PMID:26906403

  9. Post-stroke seizures in consecutive elderly stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Chen; Lufang Chen; Yiqing Tao; Maomao Han; Chunlan Cui; Shichao Liu

    2011-01-01

    This prospective study sought to investigate the clinical, radiological and electroencephalographic (EEG) characteristics of seizures in elderly stroke patients, and their outcomes. Over a 2-year study period, 158 consecutive eldedy patients with stroke were examined and followed up. Of these patients, 32 (20%) developed seizures, primarily related to stroke, within a follow up period between 5 months and 2 years. Of these 32 cases, 20 experienced infarctions, and 12 experienced hemorrhages. Involvement of cortical regions was detected in most of the patients exhibiting seizures. In these patients, 44% of the lesions involved cortical areas exclusively or in addition to subcortical areas observed on computed tomography (CT) images. Twenty-five patients (78%)developed early seizures (within 2 weeks after stroke), and half exhibited immediate post-stroke seizures. None of the patients exhibiting early onset seizures developed recurrent seizures or epilepsy, while 57% of late onset seizures (four cases) developed epilepsy. No specific EEG patterns were apparent in those who later developed epilepsy. Overall, early onset seizures after stroke were found to be relatively common, and did not affect outcome. Late onset seizures were less common, but were associated with chronic epilepsy.

  10. Epileptic seizures in patients with a posterior circulation infarct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kaplan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of seizures and the clinical features of patients with seizures related to a posterior circulation infarct (POCI. METHODS: We reviewed all ischemic stroke patients admitted to our clinic between January 2011 and January 2012. The patients’ database information was retrospectively analyzed. Fifty-five patients with a POCI were included in the study. We reviewed all patients with epileptic seizures related to a POCI. Age, gender, recurrent stroke, risk factors, etiology, radiographic localization, the seizure type and onset time, and the electroencephalographic findings of patients were evaluated. We excluded all patients who had precipitating conditions during seizures such as taking drugs, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalance, and history of epilepsy. RESULTS: Seizures were observed in four patients (3 male, 1 female with a POCI related epileptic seizures (7.2%. The etiology of strokes was cardiac-embolic in 3 patients and vertebral artery dissection in 1 patient. Seizures occurred in 2 patients as presenting finding, in 1 patient within 7 days, and 1 patient within 28 days. Primary generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 3 patients and simple partial seizures with secondary generalization in 1 patient. Three patients had cerebellum infarction at the left hemisphere. One patient had lateral medullary infarction at the right side. The electroencephalographic findings of patients were normal. CONCLUSION: Studies involving patients with seizures related to a POCI are novel and few in number. Three patients with seizure had cerebellum infarction. The cerebellum in these patients may contribute via different mechanisms over seizure activity.

  11. Time-Course Analysis of Brain Regional Expression Network Responses to Chronic Intermittent Ethanol and Withdrawal: Implications for Mechanisms Underlying Excessive Ethanol Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Maren L.; Lopez, Marcelo F; Archer, Kellie J; Wolen, Aaron R.; Howard C Becker; Miles, Michael F.

    2016-01-01

    Long lasting abusive consumption, dependence, and withdrawal are characteristic features of alcohol use disorders (AUD). Mechanistically, persistent changes in gene expression are hypothesized to contribute to brain adaptations leading to ethanol toxicity and AUD. We employed repeated chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) exposure by vapor chamber as a mouse model to simulate the cycles of ethanol exposure and withdrawal commonly seen with AUD. This model has been shown to induce progressive eth...

  12. Treatment of Decompensated Alcoholic Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Menachery

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcoholic liver disease (ALD is a spectrum ranging from simple hepatic steatosis to alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis can have clinical presentation almost similar to those with decompensated cirrhosis. Scoring with models like Maddrey discriminant function, a model for end-stage liver disease, Glasgow alcoholic hepatitis score, and Lille model are helpful in prognosticating patients with ALD. One of the first therapeutic goals in ALD is to induce alcohol withdrawal with psychotherapy or drugs. Most studies have shown that nutritional therapy improves liver function and histology in patients with ALD. The rationale for using glucocorticoids is to block cytotoxic and inflammatory pathways in patients with severe alcoholic hepatitis. Pentoxifylline, a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα suppressor, and infliximab, an anti-TNFα mouse/human chimeric antibody, has been extensively studied in patients with alcoholic hepatitis. Liver transplantation remains the definitive therapy for decompensated cirrhosis/alcoholic hepatitis despite the issues of recidivism, poor compliance with postoperative care, and being a self-inflicted disease.

  13. Irish coffee: Effects of alcohol and caffeine on object discrimination in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luana C; Ruiz-Oliveira, Julia; Oliveira, Jéssica J; Silva, Priscila F; Luchiari, Ana C

    2016-04-01

    Many studies regarding the effects of drugs investigate the acute and chronic use of alcohol, but only a few address the effects of caffeine and alcohol combined to the performance of the zebrafish in cognitive tasks. The zebrafish is an important model for studying the effects of drugs on learning, because it has large genetic similarities to humans and the non-invasive administration of the substances favors translational bias of research. In this study, we observed the effects of alcohol and caffeine on zebrafish cognition through an object discrimination test. We noticed that animals subjected to acute alcohol dose and those under alcohol or caffeine withdrawal did not show discrimination. When fish were treated with associated alcohol and caffeine, those chronically treated with alcohol and subjected to moderate acute dose of caffeine showed learning of the task. Our results reinforce the harmful effects of the alcohol use on cognitive tasks, and suggest that continued use of high doses of caffeine cause cognitive impairment during withdrawal of the substance. However, the acute use of caffeine appears to reverse the harmful effects of alcohol withdrawal, allowing discriminative performance equivalent to control fish. Finally, we reiterate the use of zebrafish as a model for drug effects screening and search for active compounds that modulate the alcohol and caffeine effects. PMID:26850919

  14. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 17728 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  15. Alcohol during Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home > Pregnancy > Is it safe? > Alcohol during pregnancy Alcohol during pregnancy E-mail to a friend Please ... and fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. How does drinking alcohol during pregnancy affect your baby's health? Drinking alcohol ...

  16. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 14466 times font size decrease font size increase font size Print Email Alcohol energy drinks (AEDs) or Caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs) are ...

  17. Montelukast inhibits pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Çevik, Betül; Solmaz, Volkan; Aksoy, Dürdane; Erbaş, Oytun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Montelukast is an antiinflammatory drug with an antioxidant property. In this study, we aimed to reveal whether montelukast has a preventive effect against seizures and post-seizure oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in rats. Material and Methods: Of the 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats used in the study, 24 were assigned to EEG recordings (group A) and 24 were assigned to behavioral studies (group B). In group A, the electrodes were implanted on dura over ...

  18. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice

    OpenAIRE

    Fleck, J.; F.R. Temp; Marafiga, J.R.; A.C. Jesse; Milanesi, L.H.; L.M. Rambo; C.F. Mello

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Mon...

  19. Montelukast Inhibits Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Cevik, Betul; Solmaz, Volkan; Aksoy, Durdane; Erbas, Oytun

    2015-01-01

    Background Montelukast is an antiinflammatory drug with an antioxidant property. In this study, we aimed to reveal whether montelukast has a preventive effect against seizures and post-seizure oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in rats. Material/Methods Of the 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats used in the study, 24 were assigned to EEG recordings (group A) and 24 were assigned to behavioral studies (group B). In group A, the electrodes were implanted on dura over the left ...

  20. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    OpenAIRE

    Mark H Myers; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which...

  1. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    OpenAIRE

    Mark H Myers; Ashay ePadmanabha; Gahangir eHossain; Amy ede Jongh Curry; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a ‘closed-loop’ system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998, Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) whi...

  2. Semistructured Interview for Seizure Classification: Agreement with Physicians’ Diagnoses

    OpenAIRE

    Ottman, Ruth; Hauser, W. Allen; Stallone, Lillian

    1990-01-01

    A semi-structured interview was developed for classification of seizures in accordance with the 1981 International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) criteria. The interview was administered over the telephone by trained lay interviewers. Interview-based diagnoses for 50 patients were compared with independent diagnoses by neurologists who also use the ILAE system for seizure classification. Interview diagnoses agreed with those of physicians for broad seizure-type classifications (i.e., partial ...

  3. Noradrenergic mechanism in the regulation of seizures in GEPR.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwang-HoKo; Dong-OokSeo; Jae-RyunRyu; Chan-YoungShin

    2004-01-01

    Genetically epilepsy prone rat (GEPR) is a model of generalized tonic/clonic epilepsy and a useful tool in the understanding of basic mechanisms of human epilepsy. GEPR is susceptible to audiogenic seizure, hyperthermia induced seizure,and has lower threshold for electrical and chemical stimuli. Several strains of GEPR, from GEPR-3 to GEPR-9, are available depending on the degree of the intensity of audiogenic seizure.

  4. Seizure in later life: an ode to the elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Raminderpal Singh Sibia; Amith Kumar S; Honey Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Background: Seizure disorder and epilepsy are one of the common presenting symptoms to an emergency department for geriatric population. Cerebrovascular accident, metabolic derangement, trauma, neurodegenerative diseases, tumor, infections and psychiatric illnesses add up to the frequent etiological spectrum of seizure in elderly. Objective of current study was to describe clinical and etiological spectrum of seizures in later life. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from medi...

  5. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  6. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    OpenAIRE

    Touran MAHMOUDIAN; Omid YAGHINI; Shirin BAJOGHLI

    2010-01-01

    ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepam in febrile  seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy of intermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age range of 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female) were studied. Children with a history of psychomotor delay, abnormal  neurological examination, a history of antiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excl...

  7. Febrile Seizure Related with Adenovirus Gastroenteritis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Arslan, Müjgan; Ermiştekin, Halime; Güngör, Serdal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common, age-dependant, benign, and fever-related convulsion of childhood. Its pathogenesis is still not clear. Fever causing febrile seizures is usually associated with viral infections, mostly upper respiratory tract infections, otitis media, tonsillitis, or urinary tract infections. The incidence of febrile convulsions during gastroenteritis is lower and gastroenteritis is thought to exert a protective feature in febril seizures. Although the most common pathogen...

  8. Predictive factors for generalized seizures after deliberate citalopram overdose

    OpenAIRE

    Waring, W Stephen; Gray, Julie A; Graham, Ann

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECTCitalopram is a common means of self-poisoning in young adults.Generalized seizures are a recognised complication after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor overdose (including citalopram overdose). WHAT THIS STUDY ADDSThe minimum stated citalopram dose associated with seizures in the absence of co-ingested drugs was 400 mg.Co-ingestion of a tricyclic antidepressant or venlafaxine confers a 15-fold increased risk of seizures.

  9. Mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures among hospitalized elderly

    OpenAIRE

    Telma M.R. de Assis; Aroldo Bacellar; Gersonita Costa; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy and epileptic seizures are common brain disorders in the elderly and are associated with increased mortality that may be ascribed to the underlying disease or epilepsy-related causes. Objective To describe mortality predictors of epilepsy and epileptic seizures in elderly inpatients.Method Retrospective analysis was performed on hospitalized elderly who had epilepsy or epileptic seizures, from January 2009 to December 2010. One hundred and twenty patients were enrolled.Results The mo...

  10. Camphor poisoning: An unusual cause of seizure in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaitali Patra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Camphor is a pleasant-smelling cyclic ketone with propensity to cause neurologic side-effect, especially seizures. We report a case of 1½-year-old child who after inadvertent consumption of camphor, experienced an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure. This case highlights the importance of enquiring any intake of material (medicinal or otherwise in every patient presenting with seizure and notifying presence of typical smell, if any.

  11. Does Naloxone Prevent Seizure in Tramadol Intoxicated Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Nastaran Eizadi-Mood; Dilek Ozcan; Ali Mohammad Sabzghabaee; Parisa Mirmoghtadaee; Mahrang Hedaiaty

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tramadol poisoning has increased in recent years. Seizure is one of the side-effects of tramadol toxicity. There is a controversy about possible preventive effect of naloxone in tramadol poisoning induced seizure. Therefore, this study was performed to compare seizure incidence in tramadol poisoning patients who received and did not receive naloxone, as an opioid antagonist. Methods: This study involved prospective data collection followed by retrospective analysis on 104 tram...

  12. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  13. A missed orthopaedic injury following a seizure: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Connor-Read Laurence

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Numerous orthopaedic injuries can follow a seizure and are often diagnosed late. This is the first documented case of a missed bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a seizure. The possible reasons for the greater incidence of posterior dislocations are examined and why bilateral anterior dislocations following a seizure are so rare. The article discusses the reasons for the delay and highlights potential pitfalls and learning points for junior emergency department doctors.

  14. 42 CFR 457.170 - Withdrawal process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Withdrawal process. 457.170 Section 457.170 Public... Plans for Child Health Insurance Programs and Outreach Strategies § 457.170 Withdrawal process. (a... amendment, or any portion of a proposed State plan or plan amendment, at any time during the review...

  15. 76 FR 14592 - Safety Management System; Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    ..., and 145 RIN 2120-AJ15 Safety Management System; Withdrawal AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration... (``product/ service providers'') to develop a Safety Management System (SMS). The FAA is withdrawing the... proposed rulemaking (ANPRM) published on July 23, 2009 (74 FR 36414) is withdrawn as of March 17, 2011....

  16. The Future of Seizure Prediction and Intervention: Closing the loop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Vivek; Lee, Steven; Krook-Magnuson, Esther; Soltesz, Ivan; Benquet, Pascal; Irazoqui, Pedro; Netoff, Theoden

    2014-01-01

    The ultimate goal of epilepsy therapies is to provide seizure control for all patients while eliminating side effects. Improved specificity of intervention through on-demand approaches may overcome many of the limitations of current intervention strategies. This article reviews progress in seizure prediction and detection, potential new therapies to provide improved specificity, and devices to achieve these ends. Specifically, we discuss 1) potential signal modalities and algorithms for seizure detection and prediction, 2) closed-loop intervention approaches, and 3) hardware for implementing these algorithms and interventions. Seizure prediction and therapies maximize efficacy while minimizing side-effects through improved specificity may represent the future of epilepsy treatments. PMID:26035672

  17. Validation of an automated seizure detection algorithm for term neonates

    OpenAIRE

    Mathieson, Sean R; Stevenson, Nathan J.; Low, Evonne; Marnane, William P.; Rennie, Janet M.; Temko, Andrey; Lightbody, Gordon; Geraldine B. Boylan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate the performance of a seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group, on previously unseen, prolonged, unedited EEG recordings from 70 babies from 2 centres. Methods EEGs of 70 babies (35 seizure, 35 non-seizure) were annotated for seizures by experts as the gold standard. The SDA was tested on the EEGs at a range of sensitivity settings. Annotations from the expert and SDA were compared using event and epoch based metrics. The ef...

  18. Treatment Outcome Of Seizures Associated With Intracranial Cavernous Angiomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nievera Conrad C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures are among the typical presentations of intracranial cavernous angiomas (ICA. Twenty-one patients (age range: 2 to 53 years treated for seizures associated with ICA between 1983 and 1997 were restrospectively studied to evaluate their outcome following medical or surgical intervention. The mean interval between seizure onset and initial presentation at our institution was 7.6 years. Seizures were simple partial in 3 patients, complex partial in 15 and secondarily generalized tonic-clonic in 13. The commonest site of the lesion was the temporal lobe (52%. Multiple angiomas were observed in 5 (24% patients. Seven (32% patients were medically-managed with antiepileptic therapy and 14 (68% underwent either lesionectomy with resection of the epileptogenic zone (9 patients or temporal lobectomy (5 patients. Mean follow-up time was 4 years (range: 3 months to 14 years. Of the medically-managed patients, 3 (43% remained seizure-free whereas 4 (57% continued to have seizures with an average frequency of one per day. Of the surgically-managed patients, 12 (86% became seizure-free and 2 (14% had no more than two seizures per year. Surgery appears to be extremely effective in the management of seizures associated with ICA and should receive a strong and early consideration in patients who fail medical therapy.

  19. Abnormal radionuclide cerebral angiograms and scans due to seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of recent seizures on the brain scan was determined in a retrospective study of patients who had had seizures. All patients who underwent brain scanning within eight days of seizures and who did not have a specific intracranial lesion were included. The /sup 99m/Tc-pertechnetate cerebral angiogram and/or delayed scan was abnormal in 73 percent of 22 patients. The data suggest that if seizures occur within six days of the brain imaging, the image is likely to be abnormal. (auth)

  20. Maternal immune activation increases seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Zhang, Xin-Ting; Li, Jun; Yu, Lin; Wang, Ji-Wen; Lei, Ge-Fei; Sun, Ruo-Peng; Li, Bao-Min

    2015-06-01

    Epidemiological data suggest a relationship between maternal infection and a high incidence of childhood epilepsy in offspring. However, there is little experimental evidence that links maternal infection with later seizure susceptibility in juvenile offspring. Here, we asked whether maternal immune challenge during pregnancy can alter seizure susceptibility and seizure-associated brain damage in adolescence. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or normal saline (NS) on gestational days 15 and 16. At postnatal day 21, seizure susceptibility to kainic acid (KA) was evaluated in male offspring. Four groups were studied, including normal control (NS-NS), prenatal infection (LPS-NS), juvenile seizure (NS-KA), and "two-hit" (LPS-KA) groups. Our results demonstrated that maternal LPS exposure caused long-term reactive astrogliosis and increased seizure susceptibility in juvenile rat offspring. Compared to the juvenile seizure group, animals in the "two-hit" group showed exaggerated astrogliosis, followed by worsened spatial learning ability in adulthood. In addition, prenatal immune challenge alone led to spatial learning impairment in offspring but had no effect on anxiety. These data suggest that prenatal immune challenge causes a long-term increase in juvenile seizure susceptibility and exacerbates seizure-induced brain injury, possibly by priming astroglia. PMID:25982885

  1. Treatment of acute opioid withdrawal with ibogaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alper, K R; Lotsof, H S; Frenken, G M; Luciano, D J; Bastiaans, J

    1999-01-01

    Ibogaine is an alkaloid with putative effect in acute opioid withdrawal. Thirty-three cases of treatments for the indication of opioid detoxification performed in non-medical settings under open label conditions are summarized involving an average daily use of heroin of .64 +/- .50 grams, primarily by the intravenous route. Resolution of the signs of opioid withdrawal without further drug seeking behavior was observed within 24 hours in 25 patients and was sustained throughout the 72-hour period of posttreatment observation. Other outcomes included drug seeking behavior without withdrawal signs (4 patients), drug abstinence with attenuated withdrawal signs (2 patients), drug seeking behavior with continued withdrawal signs (1 patient), and one fatality possibly involving surreptitious heroin use. The reported effectiveness of ibogaine in this series suggests the need for systematic investigation in a conventional clinical research setting. PMID:10506904

  2. Role of endogenous neuropeptides in the pathomechanism of alcohol addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Rudzińska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies with endogenous neuropeptides have indicated their modulating role in the etiology of alcoholism. The role of endogenous opioids is relatively well known and there is growing evidence for a role of the appetite-regulating peptides leptin, ghrelin, neuropeptide Y, galanin, and orexins. It has been demonstrated that these peptides could also be involved in alcohol intake regulation and the occurrence of alcohol craving. Moreover, important significance is attached to corticotrophin-releasing factor, since an increased level of this peptide during alcohol withdrawal is responsible for the occurrence of anxiety behaviors. Knowledge of the processes tied with neuropeptides is needed in the search for more effective therapy for alcohol addiction as their actions could perhaps facilitate the search for new medicines which would adapt the therapy to the individual patient as well as contribute to increasing the effectiveness of alcohol addiction therapy.

  3. Seizure recurrence after a first febrile convulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laditan, A A

    1994-01-01

    In this study, 140 children aged from 6 months to 6 years who presented with a first febrile convulsion at the King Fahad Hofuf Hospital, Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia were retrospectively identified. Information about these children was obtained from their medical records covering a follow-up period of 3 years from July 1989 to June 1992. Recurrent febrile convulsions occurred in 60 of them (43%). Relevant risk factors that were observed to be significantly associated with seizure recurrence included an age of less than 18 months (odds ratio [OR] = 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 9.26, 1.58), an initial febrile convulsion that was complex (OR = 4.41; CI = 9.50, 2.05) and a positive family history of febrile convulsions (OR = 4.12; CI = 10.74; 1.58), while a decreased risk of recurrence occurred with a temperature of over 39 degrees C (OR = 4.60; CI = 9.44; 2.24). There was no association between seizure recurrence and the duration of the initial febrile convulsion (OR = 0.93; CI = 2.33; -2.04) or family history of epilepsy (OR = 0.88; CI = 4.22, -3.27). An important observation in the present study is the close association (ORM-H = 2.36; X2M-H = 9.65) between the development of an afebrile convulsion and seizure recurrence among the group of children with CFC. Anticonvulsant prophylaxis should therefore be considered for children whose initial febrile convulsions are complex in nature. PMID:7880092

  4. Clonidina como droga adjuvante no tratamento da síndrome de abstinência alcoólica em unidade de terapia intensiva: relato de caso Clonidina como droga coadyuvante en el tratamiento de la síndrome de abstinencia alcohólica en unidad de terapia intensiva: relato de un caso Clonidine as adjuvant therapy for alcohol withdrawal syndrome in intensive care unit: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Gobbo Braz

    2003-12-01

    alta de la UTI. CONCLUSIONES: La droga escogida para el tratamiento del síndrome de abstinencia alcohólico es el benzodiazepínico. No obstante, en el presente relato, solamente el uso coadyuvante de clonidina consiguió proporcionar tratamiento adecuado al paciente.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sedation of patients with past history of alcohol and drug abuse in Intensive Care Units (ICU is a challenge due to the high incidence of sedative drugs tolerance and withdrawal syndromes. This report aimed at describing a case of a young patient admitted to the ICU who developed alcohol withdrawal syndrome and tolerance to sedatives, resolved only after clonidine administration. CASE REPORT: Male patient, 18 years old, alcohol, tobacco, cocaine and marijuana abuser, victim of firearm accident, who was admitted to the ICU in the first post-enterectomy day, after gastric content aspiration during tracheal re-intubation. Clinical evolution was: vasoactive drugs up to the 4th day; bilateral bronchopneumonia with pleural effusion and need for artificial ventilation up to the 15th day. Initial sedation scheme was the association of midazolam and fentanyl. As from the 4th day, patient presented with several psychomotor agitation episodes, even after the association of lorazepam in the 6th day. In the 9th day, patient received the largest doses but remained agitated. Dexmedetomidine was associated, which has decreased other drug doses in 35% and has improved agitation. In the 12th day, midazolam and dexmedetomidine were replaced by propofol infusion with worsening of agitation. In the 13th day, clonidine was associated to the sedation scheme with total resolution of agitation. Propofol was withdrawn in the 14th day, fentanyl was maintained and midazolam infusion was restarted, with doses 75% and 65% lower as compared to peak doses of such drugs. Patient was extubated in the 15th day and was discharged from ICU. CONCLUSIONS: Benzodiazepines should remain the drugs of choice for the

  5. Alcoholism (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that interferes with physical or mental health, and social, family or job responsibilities. This addiction can lead to liver, circulatory and neurological problems. Pregnant women who drink alcohol in any amount ...

  6. Carbamazepine Clearance and Seizure Stability during Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Emily L.; Stowe, Zachary N.; Ritchie, James C; Newport, D. Jeffrey; Newman, Melanee L.; Knight, Bettina; Pennell, Page B

    2014-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the alterations in total and free carbamazepine (CBZ) and total and free carbamazepine-epoxide (CBZ-EPO) clearances during pregnancy; to calculate the change in free fractions of CBZ and CBZ-EPO during pregnancy; and to determine whether seizure worsening is associated with a low ratio to non-pregnant baseline concentration of total or free CBZ or CBZ-EPO. Women on CBZ were enrolled before conception or during pregnancy in this prospective, observat...

  7. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups...

  8. Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system - A new approach towards seizure detection based on full body motion measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Wolf, Peter; Terney, Daniella; Sams, Thomas; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    hazards. Today no reliable alarm systems are available. A Multi-modal Intelligent Seizure Acquisition (MISA) system based on full body motion data seems as a good approach towards detection of epileptic seizures. The system is the first to provide a full body description for epilepsy applications. Three......) and audio and video recording. The results showed that a non-subject specific MISA system developed on data from the modalities: accelerometer (ACM), gyroscope and EMG is able to detect 98% of the simulated seizures and at the same time mistakes only 4 of the normal movements for seizures. If the...

  9. SERUM CHEMISTRY ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH UNPROVOKED SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Akhondian MD

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMost children brought to the emergency department (ED for evaluation of seizures undergo an extensive laboratory workup. Since results are usually negative, the value of such routine laboratory workups has been questioned. A group of children with unprovoked seizures was prospectively studied to determine the diagnostic values of routine serum chemistries and to identify risk factors predictive of abnormal findings.Materials & MethodsAll patients evaluated at the ED of the Ghaem hospital during a consecutive 12 months period between Jan 2004 through Jan 2005 were studied. We collected data for patient's demographics, details of the history of present illness (including vomiting, diarrhea, apnea, medication use, past history of seizures, family history of seizures, metabolic disorders or other chronic medical illnesses, neonatal history and neurological examination as well as nutritional status, type and time of seizure. The role of abnormal serum chemistries as a seizure trigger factor was assessed in patients with a history of seizure.ResultsA total of 210 patients (mean age 19.2 months with unprovoked seizures were evaluated. Twenty- three serum abnormalities were noted in the patients (12 cases of hyponatremia, 7 of hypoglycemia, 4 of hypokalemia, 4 of uremia. The incidence of abnormal serum biochemical values was higher in patients with a first seizure, younger patients, and those with gastrointestinal symptoms.ConclusionAccording to the present study, one can conclude that in children younger than 2 years and having no structural CNS abnormality, electrolyte and glucose screening is recommended only for a first unprovoked seizure, when gastrointestinal symptoms or symptoms suggesting electrolyte disturbances are present.Keywords:Unprovoked, Seizure, Biochemistry, Children

  10. Congenital hypothyroidism with seizures: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Vivian Sproul

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital hypothyroidism (CH is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency, present at birth. It is seen in 1:4,000 births and is caused by an anatomical defect, known as thyroid dysgenesis (underdevelopment or unusual location of the thyroid gland, by abnormal biosynthesis of the thyroid hormones (dyshormogenesis, inborn errors of metabolism, genetic mutations or iodine deficiency. If untreated, severe neurological impairment develops. However, newborn screening programs have improved outcomes greatly, through early diagnosis and treatment. Clinical manifestations are often subtle at birth, due to the placental transfer of thyroxine (T4, thus making diagnosis in the first few days of life difficult. Increased levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH and low levels of T4 are confirmatory for this disorder. We describe the case of a baby with CH who presented with neonatal seizures: a rare clinical presentation. Our case highlights the need to eliminate CH, as a cause of seizures, so that treatment can be initiated even more promptly to optimize neurological sequelae and outcome.

  11. Withdrawal from Genetic Counselling for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bleiker Eveline

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial minority of individuals who initially apply for genetic counselling for breast/ovarian cancer withdraw at an early stage from the counselling process. This study investigated the self-reported reasons for early withdrawal and the factors associated significantly with such withdrawal. Methods Self-report questionnaires were mailed to 83 women who had applied for genetic counselling for breast/ovarian cancer but who subsequently withdrew from the counselling process (the "withdrawers". A comparison group of 105 women who had completed the genetic counselling (the "attendees" received a similar questionnaire. The questionnaire assessed sociodemographic characteristics, reasons for applying for genetic counselling, general distress (MHI-5, cancer-specific distress (IES, and cancer worries. For those women who discontinued the counselling, reasons for withdrawal were also assessed. Results The primary reasons given for withdrawing from counselling were difficulties in anticipating the consequences of genetic counselling (28%, and worries about being unable to adequately cope with an unfavourable test result (20%. Compared to the attendees, the withdrawers were significantly younger, more frequently asymptomatic, more often the first and only member of the family to apply for counselling, and less worried about cancer. Current levels of cancer-specific distress and general distress were comparable between the two groups. Conclusion Younger women, those without a history of cancer, and those who are first in their family to apply are more likely to withdraw prematurely from genetic counselling for breast/ovarian cancer. These withdrawers have no elevated levels of distress. However, a substantial percentage of individuals discontinue counselling due to concerns about their (inability to cope with a possible unfavourable test outcome. This suggests that greater attention should be paid to ways of coping with test

  12. Quantifying the clinical significance of cannabis withdrawal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Allsop

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Questions over the clinical significance of cannabis withdrawal have hindered its inclusion as a discrete cannabis induced psychiatric condition in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV. This study aims to quantify functional impairment to normal daily activities from cannabis withdrawal, and looks at the factors predicting functional impairment. In addition the study tests the influence of functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal on cannabis use during and after an abstinence attempt. METHODS AND RESULTS: A volunteer sample of 49 non-treatment seeking cannabis users who met DSM-IV criteria for dependence provided daily withdrawal-related functional impairment scores during a one-week baseline phase and two weeks of monitored abstinence from cannabis with a one month follow up. Functional impairment from withdrawal symptoms was strongly associated with symptom severity (p=0.0001. Participants with more severe cannabis dependence before the abstinence attempt reported greater functional impairment from cannabis withdrawal (p=0.03. Relapse to cannabis use during the abstinence period was associated with greater functional impairment from a subset of withdrawal symptoms in high dependence users. Higher levels of functional impairment during the abstinence attempt predicted higher levels of cannabis use at one month follow up (p=0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Cannabis withdrawal is clinically significant because it is associated with functional impairment to normal daily activities, as well as relapse to cannabis use. Sample size in the relapse group was small and the use of a non-treatment seeking population requires findings to be replicated in clinical samples. Tailoring treatments to target withdrawal symptoms contributing to functional impairment during a quit attempt may improve treatment outcomes.

  13. Using trend templates in a neonatal seizure algorithm improves detection of short seizures in a foetal ovine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seizures below one minute in duration are difficult to assess correctly using seizure detection algorithms. We aimed to improve neonatal detection algorithm performance for short seizures through the use of trend templates for seizure onset and end. Bipolar EEG were recorded within a transiently asphyxiated ovine model at 0.7 gestational age, a common experimental model for studying brain development in humans of 30–34 weeks of gestation. Transient asphyxia led to electrographic seizures within 6–8 h. A total of 3159 seizures, 2386 shorter than one minute, were annotated in 1976 h-long EEG recordings from 17 foetal lambs. To capture EEG characteristics, five features, sensitive to seizures, were calculated and used to derive trend information. Feature values and trend information were used as input for support vector machine classification and subsequently post-processed. Performance metrics, calculated after post-processing, were compared between analyses with and without employing trend information. Detector performance was assessed after five-fold cross-validation conducted ten times with random splits. The use of trend templates for seizure onset and end in a neonatal seizure detection algorithm significantly improves the correct detection of short seizures using two-channel EEG recordings from 54.3% (52.6–56.1) to 59.5% (58.5–59.9) at FDR 2.0 (median (range); p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Using trend templates might therefore aid in detection of short seizures by EEG monitoring at the NICU. (paper)

  14. Effect of berberine on pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Sadeghnia

    2011-09-01

    Results: Intraperitoneal administration of lower doses of berberine (100 and 200 mg/kg had no significant effects on minimal clonic seizures (MCS and generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS latencies, while injection of 400 mg/kg caused significant increase in both MCS and GTCS latencies (p

  15. Seizure Onset Detection based on one sEMG channel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sandor; Hoppe, Karsten; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    We present a new method to detect seizure onsets of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography (sEMG) data. The proposed method is generic and based on a single channel making it ideal for a small detection or monitoring device. The sEMG signal is high-pass filtered with a...

  16. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Mark H; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L; Blaha, Charles D

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a "closed-loop" system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the "CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database" which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  17. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Myers

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a ‘closed-loop’ system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998, Ben-Menachem, 2001, while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between EEG electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the ‘CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database’ which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events.

  18. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  19. Detection of Epileptic Seizures with Multi-modal Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa

    The main focus of this dissertation lies within the area of epileptic seizure detection. Medically refractory epileptic patients suffer from the unawareness of when the next seizure sets in, and what the consequences will be. A wearable device based on uni- or multi-modalities able to detect and ...

  20. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  1. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) of the Act, where the firearm or ammunition intended to be used in such offense is involved in a... firearm or ammunition is intended to be used in such offense by the transferor of such firearm or... Exemptions, Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or...

  2. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  3. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  4. Responding to Seizures (A Cup of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    As traumatic as epilepsy can be for the person experiencing seizures, it can be just as troubling for witnesses who want to try and help. In this podcast, Rosemarie Kobau discusses the appropriate way to help someone who is experiencing a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  5. Responding to Seizures (A Minute of Health with CDC)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-11-26

    When helping someone with a seizure, it’s important to remain calm. This podcast discusses what to do if you witness someone having a seizure.  Created: 11/26/2015 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/26/2015.

  6. Temporal epileptic seizures and occupational exposure to solvents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, M; Bælum, Jesper; Bonde, J P

    1994-01-01

    Long term exposure to organic solvents is usually not considered as a possible cause of chronic epileptic seizures. A case that shows a remarkable coincidence between exposure to organic solvents and occurrence of epileptic seizures is reported. The man was a 58 year old sign writer with lifelong...

  7. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J; Temp, F R; Marafiga, J R; Jesse, A C; Milanesi, L H; Rambo, L M; Mello, C F

    2016-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc) and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc) increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research. PMID:26909785

  8. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Bialonski, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients, and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  9. Seizure in Pregnancy Following Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzi, Farnoush; Abdollahzadeh, Mehrsima; Faraji, Roya; Chavoushi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seizure involves less than 1% of pregnancies; however it is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, but potentially life-threatening cause of seizure during pregnancy, presenting primarily as seizure in 12% - 31.9% of cases. Pregnancy and puerperium are known as the risk factors of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case Presentation: Here is presented a case of seizure after delivery by cesarean section in an otherwise healthy woman. The final diagnosis was cerebral venous sinus thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulable state in pregnancy. Conclusions: If seizure occurs during the peripartum period, along with providing complete cardiovascular and respiratory support, advanced diagnostic measures are needed and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be considered as a possible diagnosis. PMID:26161329

  10. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  11. Inter-modality comparisons of seizure focus lateralization in complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.T.; Cortes-Blanco, A.; Pourdehnad, M.; Desiderio, L.; Jang, S.; Alavi, A. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Radiology; Levy-Reis, I. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Neurology

    2001-10-01

    Anterior temporal lobectomy offers a high chance of seizure-free outcome in patients suffering from drug-refractory complex partial seizure (CPS) originating from the temporal lobe. Other than EEG, several functional and morphologic imaging methods are used to define the spatial seizure origin. The present study was undertaken to compare the merits of fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and single-voxel proton MR spectroscopy (MRS) for the lateralization of temporal lobe seizure foci. The clinical charts and imaging data of 43 consecutive CPS patients were reviewed. Based on surface EEG, 31 patients were classified with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE; 25 lateralized, 6 not lateralized) and 12 with non-temporal lobe epilepsy. All were examined by FDG-PET, MRS and MRI within 6 weeks. FDG-PET and MRI were interpreted visually, while the N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio was used for MRS interpretation. One FDG-PET scan was invalid due to seizure activity post injection. The MR spectra could not be evaluated in five cases bilaterally and three cases unilaterally for technical reasons. A total of 15 patients underwent anterior temporal lobectomy. All showed a beneficial postoperative outcome. When the proportions of agreement between FDG-PET (0.77), MRI (0.58) and MRS (0.56) and surface EEG in TLE cases were compared, there were no significant differences (P>0.10). However, FDG-PET showed a significantly higher agreement (0.93) than MRI (0.60; P=0.03) with the side of successful temporal lobectomy. The concordance of MRS with the side of successful temporal lobectomy was intermediate (0.75). When the results of functional and morphologic imaging were combined, no significant differences were found between the rates of agreement of FDG-PET/MRI and MRS/MRI with EEG (0.80 vs 0.68; P=0.50) and with the side of successful temporal lobectomy (0.87 vs 0.92; P=0.50) in TLE cases. However, MRS/MRI showed

  12. 19 CFR 144.27 - Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. 144.27...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) WAREHOUSE AND REWAREHOUSE ENTRIES AND WITHDRAWALS Transfer of Right To Withdraw Merchandise from Warehouse § 144.27 Withdrawal from warehouse by transferee. At any time...

  13. SERUM CHEMISTRY ABNORMALITIES IN CHILDREN WITH UNPROVOKED SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Akhondian MD,

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveMost children brought to the emergency department (ED for evaluation of seizures undergo an extensive laboratory workup. Since results are usually negative, the value of such routine laboratory workups has been questioned. A group of children with unprovoked seizures was prospectively studied to determine the diagnostic values of routine serum chemistries and to identify risk factors predictive of abnormal findings.Materials & MethodsAll patients evaluated at the ED of the Ghaem hospital during a consecutive 12 months period between Jan 2004 through Jan 2005 were studied. We collected data for patient's demographics, details of the history of present illness (including vomiting, diarrhea, apnea, medication use, past history of seizures, family history of seizures, metabolic disorders or other chronic medical illnesses, neonatal history and neurological examination as well as nutritional status, type and time of seizure. The role of abnormal serum chemistries as a seizure trigger factor was assessed in patients with a history of seizure.ResultsA total of 210 patients (mean age 19.2 months with unprovoked seizures were evaluated. Twenty- three serum abnormalities were noted in the patients (12 cases of hyponatremia, 7 of hypoglycemia, 4 of hypokalemia, 4 of uremia. The incidence of abnormal serum biochemical values was higher in patients with a first seizure, younger patients, and those with gastrointestinal symptoms.ConclusionAccording to the present study, one can conclude that in children younger than 2 years and having no structural CNS abnormality, electrolyte and glucose screening is recommended only for a first unprovoked seizure, when gastrointestinal symptoms or symptoms suggesting electrolyte disturbances are present.

  14. Optogenetically induced seizure and the longitudinal hippocampal network dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ichiro Osawa

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure is a paroxysmal and self-limited phenomenon characterized by abnormal hypersynchrony of a large population of neurons. However, our current understanding of seizure dynamics is still limited. Here we propose a novel in vivo model of seizure-like afterdischarges using optogenetics, and report on investigation of directional network dynamics during seizure along the septo-temporal (ST axis of hippocampus. Repetitive pulse photostimulation was applied to the rodent hippocampus, in which channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2 was expressed, under simultaneous recording of local field potentials (LFPs. Seizure-like afterdischarges were successfully induced after the stimulation in both W-TChR2V4 transgenic (ChR2V-TG rats and in wild type rats transfected with adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors carrying ChR2. Pulse frequency at 10 and 20 Hz, and a 0.05 duty ratio were optimal for afterdischarge induction. Immunohistochemical c-Fos staining after a single induced afterdischarge confirmed neuronal activation of the entire hippocampus. LFPs were recorded during seizure-like afterdischarges with a multi-contact array electrode inserted along the ST axis of hippocampus. Granger causality analysis of the LFPs showed a bidirectional but asymmetric increase in signal flow along the ST direction. State space presentation of the causality and coherence revealed three discrete states of the seizure-like afterdischarge phenomenon: 1 resting state; 2 afterdischarge initiation with moderate coherence and dominant septal-to-temporal causality; and 3 afterdischarge termination with increased coherence and dominant temporal-to-septal causality. A novel in vivo model of seizure-like afterdischarge was developed using optogenetics, which was advantageous in its reproducibility and artifact-free electrophysiological observations. Our results provide additional evidence for the potential role of hippocampal septo-temporal interactions in seizure dynamics in vivo

  15. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Ng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less. We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage.

  16. Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures in children: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Menlove, Leanne; Fenton, Virginia; Das, Krishna B

    2013-10-01

    One of the considerations when a child presents with paroxysmal events is psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). PNES are discernible changes in behavior or consciousness that resemble epileptic seizures but are not accompanied by electrophysiologic changes. They are usually understood as the manifestation of a conversion disorder that reflects underlying psychological distress. There is a lack of population-based data on the prevalence or incidence of PNES in pediatric populations. The prevalence of PNES in children would appear to be lower than that in the adult population, but the prevalence of PNES seems to increase with age, and nonepileptic paroxysmal events are more likely to be PNES in adolescence than earlier in childhood. In terms of manifestation, PNES in childhood have been described using various categorizations and terminology, making comparisons across studies difficult. There is some evidence that events are more likely to involve unresponsiveness in younger children and prominent motor symptoms in older children. The most common precipitating factors would appear to be school-related difficulties and interpersonal conflict within the child's family. In terms of psychopathology, children with PNES are at high risk for symptoms of depression and anxiety. Accurate diagnosis of PNES in children is likely to involve taking a comprehensive description of the episodes, garnering the child's medical/developmental history, video-electroencephalography (video-EEG) to rule out epileptic seizures, and an evaluation of family functioning. The importance of effective and sensitive communication of the diagnosis of PNES has been emphasized and management approaches will typically involve multidisciplinary efforts to safely manage the events at home and at school. Interventions to reduce the effect of precipitating psychosocial stressors and the involvement of a mental health professional to treat comorbid psychopathology will also form part of an effective

  17. 2017-2022 Proposed Program - Withdrawal Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This file represents the areas of the Outer Continental Shelf that have been withdrawn from disposition by leasing. The withdrawal of these areas prevents...

  18. Episodic Withdrawal Promotes Psychomotor Sensitization to Morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Rothwell, Patrick E.; Gewirtz, Jonathan C.; Thomas, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    The relative intermittency or continuity of drug delivery is a major determinant of addictive liability, and also influences the impact of drug exposure on brain function and behavior. Events that occur during the offset of drug action (ie, acute withdrawal) may have an important role in the consequences of intermittent drug exposure. We assessed whether recurrent episodes of acute withdrawal contribute to the development of psychomotor sensitization in rodents during daily morphine exposure....

  19. On Auctions with Withdrawable Winning Bids

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H. Rothkopf

    1991-01-01

    This paper considers sealed bidding in which bidders may submit two or more bids and after the bids are opened may, perhaps at a cost, withdraw bids that are more aggressive than would be necessary to win. Such withdrawal strategies are sometimes followed, but currently are surreptitious. However, legitimization of them would create potentially useful market mechanisms of potential interest to government agencies. These market mechanisms are also of theoretical interest since they are interme...

  20. Alcohol and Hepatitis C

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and Hepatitis: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is one ... related to choices you make about your lifestyle . Alcohol and fibrosis Fibrosis is the medical term for ...

  1. Alcohol use disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol dependence; Alcohol abuse; Problem drinking; Drinking problem; Alcohol addiction ... No one knows what causes problems with alcohol. Health experts think that ... Psychology, such as being impulsive or having low self- ...

  2. Alcohol and pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy ... When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the alcohol travels through her blood and into the baby's blood, tissues, and organs. Alcohol breaks down much more slowly in ...

  3. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in a baby born to a mother whose pregnancy was complicated by alcohol consumption. A broader term ...

  4. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rummel

    Full Text Available Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure.Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels.In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings. The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied.We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent with growing evidence that

  5. Seizure Clustering during Drug Treatment Affects Seizure Outcome and Mortality of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    To provide evidence of whether seizure clustering is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, a prospective, long-term population-based study was performed. One hundred and twenty patients who had been followed since disease onset (average age 37.0 years, SD 7.1, median 40.0, range 11-42; incident cases)…

  6. Body Packing: From Seizures to Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna M. Janczak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Body packing: from seizures to laparotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Joanna M; Beutner, Ulrich; Hasler, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Body packing is a common method for illegal drug trafficking. Complications associated with body packing can be severe and even lead to rapid death. Thus, a timely diagnosis is warranted. As most body packers initially do not show any symptoms, making a correct diagnosis can be rather challenging. We describe a case of a 41-year-old male, who was admitted with an epileptic seizure and who turned out to be a cocaine intoxicated body packer. Due to neurological and cardiovascular deterioration an emergency surgery was performed. Four bags of cocaine could be removed. We discuss the current management regimen in symptomatic and asymptomatic body packers and highlight pearls and pitfalls with diagnosis and treatment. PMID:25883813

  8. Epileptic Seizure Forewarning by Nonlinear Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolet Biomedical Inc. (NBI) is collaborating with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) to convert ORNL's patented technology for forewarning of epileptic seizures to a clinical prototype. This technical report describes the highlights of the first year's effort. The software requirements for the clinical device were specified from which the hardware specifications were obtained. ORNL's research-class FORTRAN was converted to run under a graphical user interface (GUI) that was custom-built for this application by NBI. The resulting software package was cloned to desktop computers that are being tested in five different clinical sites. Two hundred electroencephalogram (EEG) datasets from those clinical sites were provided to ORNL for detailed analysis and improvement of the forewarning methodology. Effort under this CRADA is continuing into the second year as planned

  9. Alcohol-Specific Coping Styles of Adult Children of Individuals with Alcohol Use Disorders and Associations with Psychosocial Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapkin, Michelle L; Eddie, David; Buffington, Angela J; McCrady, Barbara S

    2015-07-01

    Parental alcohol use disorders (AUDs) have been conceptualized as a chronic stressor that can lead to deleterious long-term outcomes in children of individuals with AUDs. Yet, while many individuals are detrimentally affected by their parents' problematic alcohol use, and go on to manifest psychological problems, others do not. How individuals cope with the stress of having a parent with an AUD is believed to be an important moderator of this differential outcome. This study assessed whether individuals' alcohol-specific coping styles predicted alcohol use, positive or negative life events, and depression, using a sample of 465 college students, of whom 20% were adult children of individuals with alcohol use disorders, colloquially known as adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs), and a battery of well-validated, self-report measures. Participant ACOAs reported less 'engaged' and 'total' alcohol-specific coping strategies and more 'withdrawal' alcohol-specific coping strategies than their non adult children of alcoholics (NACOAs) counterparts. Across participants, women reported more 'engaged', 'tolerant/inactive', and 'total' coping than men. Although ACOAs reported significantly more negative life events, which predicted more passive coping styles, they did not differ significantly from NACOAs on measures of problematic alcohol use or depression, supporting theories of resilience in ACOAs regardless of their alcohol-specific coping styles. For NACOAs, 'tolerant' coping predicted greater depression and alcohol-related problems; 'engaged' coping predicted fewer alcohol problems. Results suggest that ACOAs cope differently with problematic alcohol use among relatives and friends compared with NACOAs and are more likely to experience negative life events. Additionally, alcohol-related coping strategies have more predictive utility in NACOAs than ACOAs. PMID:25802055

  10. Cocaine-Associated Seizures and Incidence of Status Epilepticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majlesi, Nima DO

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Acute complications from cocaine abuse are commonly treated in the emergency department (ED; one of the most consequential is status epilepticus. The incidence of this complication is not clearly defined in the prior literature on cocaine-associated sequelae. We evaluated the incidence of status epilepticus in patients with seizures secondary to suspected cocaine use.Methods: We performed a retrospective multi-center study of patients with seizures resulting from cocaine use. We identified study subjects at 15 hospitals by record review and conducted a computer-assisted records search to identify patients with seizures for each institution over a four-year period. We selected subjects from this group on the basis of cocaine use and determined the occurrence of status epilepticus among them. Data were collected on each subject using a standardized data collection form.Results: We evaluated 43 patients in the ED for cocaine-associated seizures. Their age range was 17 to 54, with a mean age was 31 years; 53% were male. Of 43 patients, 42 experienced a single tonic-clonic seizure and one developed status epilepticus. All patients had either a history of cocaine use or positive urine drug screen for cocaine.Conclusion: Despite reported cases of status epilepticus with cocaine-induced seizures, the incidence of this complication was unclear based on prior literature. This study shows that most cocaine-associated seizures are self-limited. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:157-160.

  11. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touran MAHMOUDIAN

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepam in febrile  seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy of intermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age range of 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female were studied. Children with a history of psychomotor delay, abnormal  neurological examination, a history of antiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excluded from the study. Patients received a single dose of prophylactic Clonazepam (0.05 mg/kg/ day on the first day of febrile illness and twice daily during the course of fever.An antipyretic medication (Acetaminophen was advised if fever exceeded 38oC. Patients were followed up for one year after the study inclusion date.ResultsThree patients were excluded from study since they didnot follow the tritment and three patients experienced afebrile seizures. Twenty four patients had 162 febrile episodes during the course of the study and all patients were seizure-free after 1 year.ConclusionClonazepam was 100% effective but lethargy and ataxia were common side effects in patients. Fortunately, their parents continued treatment because they had prior awareness of the  possible side effects of clonazepam. Clonazepam is efficacious as an intermittent therapy for febrile seizures if parents are informed of its side effects.Keywords: recurrent febrile seizures, clonazepam, intermittent prophylaxis

  12. The oxidative and antioxidative status of simple febrile seizure patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the oxidative status following a seizure in children experiencing a simple febrile seizure. Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted at Harran University, Turkey, between January and September 2011. It comprised 32 paediatric patients who, within the preceding 8 hours, had experienced a seizure due to upper respiratory tract infection and had been diagnosed with simple febrile seizure, and 30 healthy children as the control group. Blood was taken from the patients 8 hours after the seizure. Total oxidant level and Total anti-oxidant level were measured according to the Erel technique and the oxidative stress index was calculated. Data was analysed using SPSS 11.5. Results: The mean values of the total oxidant level and the oxidative stress index of the cases were found to be significantly high compared to the controls and the total anti-oxidant level was found to be significantly low (p<0.01, p<0.01, p<0.03 respectively). Conclusion: The increased total oxidant level and decreased total anti-oxidant level resulting in increased oxidative stress associated with febrile seizure patients may increase the risk of experiencing febrile seizures. (author)

  13. Seizure in later life: an ode to the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminderpal Singh Sibia

    2014-08-01

    Methods: This retrospective study was conducted from medical records of 227 cases of elderly subjects presenting with seizure to emergency department, during a period of 3 years (2010-2013. Results: Most common age group involved was 65-75 years. Mean age of subjects included in the study was 68.13 +/- 23.38 years. The most common etiology was cerebrovascular disorders 132 (58.14%, followed by CNS tumor in 16 (07.04%, hypoglycemia in 14 (06.16%, infections 14 (06.16%, substance abuse 12 (05.28% and trauma 10 (04.40%. The most common presentation was with focal seizures, with 119 (52.42% subjects whereas 82 (36.12% presented with generalized tonic clonic seizure, 20 (08.81% with generalized tonic seizure and 05 (02.20% with absence seizures. Conclusion: The present study aims at pointing out the different clinical features and etiologies of geriatric seizures, thereby lets the reader have a head start with the management of an elderly patient presenting with seizure. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(4.000: 1393-1395

  14. A case of seizures induced by abstract reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuzawa, Yasutaka; Yoshino, Aihide; Nomura, Soichiro

    2010-04-01

    We describe a case of reflex seizures induced by abstract reasoning but not other cognitive processes. The patient, a 46-year-old man, experienced myoclonic seizures whenever he played shogi (Japanese chess). To identify the critical thought processes responsible for inducing his seizures, we monitored his clinical seizures and epileptiform discharges while he performed comprehensive neuropsychological tests, including the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised (WAIS-R), spatial working memory, mental rotation, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) tasks. A myoclonic seizure occurred only during the WCST. Generalized 3- to 5-Hz spike-and-slow-wave bursts occurred repeatedly during the Block Design subtest of the WAIS-R and the WCST, whereas no discharges occurred during other subtests of the WAIS-R including the calculation, spatial working memory, and mental rotation tasks. These results indicate that abstract reasoning, independent of other cognitive processes, could induce the patient's epileptiform discharges, suggesting that his reflex seizures might be a distinct subtype of nonverbal thinking-induced seizures. PMID:20171146

  15. Seizure suppression by gain-of-function escargot mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat-Scafe, Daria S; Dang, Kim N; Tanouye, Mark A

    2005-03-01

    Suppressor mutations provide potentially powerful tools for examining mechanisms underlying neurological disorders and identifying novel targets for pharmacological intervention. Here we describe mutations that suppress seizures in a Drosophila model of human epilepsy. A screen utilizing the Drosophila easily shocked (eas) "epilepsy" mutant identified dominant suppressors of seizure sensitivity. Among several mutations identified, neuronal escargot (esg) reduced eas seizures almost 90%. The esg gene encodes a member of the snail family of transcription factors. Whereas esg is normally expressed in a limited number of neurons during a defined period of nervous system development, here normal esg was expressed in all neurons and throughout development. This greatly ameliorated both the electrophysiological and the behavioral epilepsy phenotypes of eas. Neuronal esg appears to act as a general seizure suppressor in the Drosophila epilepsy model as it reduces the susceptibility of several seizure-prone mutants. We observed that esg must be ectopically expressed during nervous system development to reduce seizure susceptibility in adults. Furthermore, induction of esg in a small subset of neurons (interneurons) will reduce seizure susceptibility. A combination of microarray and computational analyses revealed 100 genes that represent possible targets of neuronal esg. We anticipate that some of these genes may ultimately serve as targets for novel antiepileptic drugs. PMID:15654097

  16. A novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Min; Ge, Sunan; Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  17. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART II. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:1-5.Abstract The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject. In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed. References31.Berg AT, Testa FM., Levy SR, Shinnar S. Neuroimaging in children with newly diagnosed epilepsy. A community based study. Pediatrics 2000;106:527-532.32.Shinnar S, Odell C. Treating childhood seizure; when and for how long. In: Shinnar S, Amir N, Branski D (Eds. Childhood seizure. S Karger Basel. 1995. P.100-110.33.Shinnar S, Berg AT, Moshe Sl, et al. Risk of Seizure recurrence following a first unprovoked seizure in childhood; A prospective study. Pediatrics 1990;85:1076-2085.34.Shinnar S, Berg At, Moshe SL, et al. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked febrile seizure in childhood: An extended follow up. Pediatrics 1996:98:216-225.35.Hauser WA, Rich SS, Annegers JF, Anderson VE. Seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure: An extended follow up. Neurology 1990;40:1163-1170.36.Stroink H, Brouwer O F, Arts WF, Greets AT, Peter AC, Van Donselaar CA. The First unprovoked, untreated seizure in childhood: A hospital based study of the accuracy of diagnosis, rate of recurrence, and long term outcome after recurrence. Dutch study of epilepsy in childhood. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1998;64:595-600. 37.Shinnar S, Berg AT, O’Dell C. Newstein D, et al. Predictors of multiple seizure in a cohort of children prospectively followed from the time of their first unprovoked seizure, Ann Neurol 2000; 48:140-147.38.Martinovie Z, Jovic N. Seizure recurrence after a first generalized tonic-clonic seizure in children

  18. Automatic Epileptic Seizure Onset Detection Using Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Thomas Lynggaard; Olsen, Ulrich L.; Conradsen, Isa;

    2010-01-01

    An automatic alarm system for detecting epileptic seizure onsets could be of great assistance to patients and medical staff. A novel approach is proposed using the Matching Pursuit algorithm as a feature extractor combined with the Support Vector Machine (SVM) as a classifier for this purpose. The...... combination of Matching Pursuit and SVM for automatic seizure detection has never been tested before, making this a pilot study. Data from red different patients with 6 to 49 seizures are used to test our model. Three patients are recorded with scalp electroencephalography (sEEG) and three with intracranial...

  19. A new approach towards predictability of epileptic seizures: KLT dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, Rajeshkumar; Narayanan, K; Prasad, Awadhesh; Spanias, A; Sackellares, J C; Iasemidis, L D

    2003-01-01

    This paper proposes a measure of complexity of the epileptic electroencephalogram (EEG) based on the dimensionality of the Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT) in the time domain. We estimate the KLT dimensionality by assuming the same observation noise level in the EEG during the interictal period (between the seizures) as the one during an epileptic seizure (ictal period). Utilizing an optimality criterion based on the T-index [1] and the predictability time, derived from the created KLT dimensionality profiles, we show that 10 out of 15 seizures in one patient with temporal lobe epilepsy were predictable with an average predictability time of about 36 minutes. PMID:12724880

  20. Voltage synchronizations between multichannel electroencephalograms during epileptic seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Tuncay, Caglar

    2010-01-01

    The underlying dynamics for the electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from humans but especially epilepsy patients are usually not completely known. However, the ictal activity is claimed to be characterized by synchronous oscillations in the brain voltages in the literature. These time dependent interdependencies (synchronization, coupling) between the EEG voltages from epileptogenic and non epileptogenic brain sites of nineteen focal epileptic patients are investigated in this work. It is found that strong synchronizationdesynchronization events occur in alternation during most of the investigated seizures. Thus, these seizures are detected with considerable sensitivity (71 of the 79 seizures).

  1. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleni Koutroumanidou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ- induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p. injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil. After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures. Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects.

  2. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  3. Blockade of T-type calcium channels prevents tonic-clonic seizures in a maximal electroshock seizure model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakkaki, Sophie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Lerat, Benoit; Françon, Dominique; Forichon, Luc; Chemin, Jean; Valjent, Emmanuel; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Lory, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    T-type (Cav3) calcium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability, both in normal and pathological activities of the brain. In particular, they contribute to hyper-excitability disorders such as epilepsy. Here we have characterized the anticonvulsant properties of TTA-A2, a selective T-type channel blocker, in mouse. Using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) as a model of tonic-clonic generalized seizures, we report that mice treated with TTA-A2 (0.3 mg/kg and higher doses) were significantly protected against tonic seizures. Although no major change in Local Field Potential (LFP) pattern was observed during the MES seizure, analysis of the late post-ictal period revealed a significant increase in the delta frequency power in animals treated with TTA-A2. Similar results were obtained for Cav3.1-/- mice, which were less prone to develop tonic seizures in the MES test, but not for Cav3.2-/- mice. Analysis of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression revealed a rapid and elevated neuronal activation in the hippocampus following MES clonic seizures, which was unchanged in TTA-A2 treated animals. Overall, our data indicate that TTA-A2 is a potent anticonvulsant and that the Cav3.1 isoform plays a prominent role in mediating TTA-A2 tonic seizure protection. PMID:26456350

  4. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis

    OpenAIRE

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-01-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is kn...

  5. Effect of Immunotherapy on Seizure Outcome in Patients with Autoimmune Encephalitis: A Prospective Observational Registry Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ick Byun

    Full Text Available To evaluate the seizure characteristics and outcome after immunotherapy in adult patients with autoimmune encephalitis (AE and new-onset seizure.Adult (age ≥18 years patients with AE and new-onset seizure who underwent immunotherapy and were followed-up for at least 6 months were included. Seizure frequency was evaluated at 2-4 weeks and 6 months after the onset of the initial immunotherapy and was categorized as "seizure remission", "> 50% seizure reduction", or "no change" based on the degree of its decrease.Forty-one AE patients who presented with new-onset seizure were analysed. At 2-4 weeks after the initial immunotherapy, 51.2% of the patients were seizure free, and 24.4% had significant seizure reduction. At 6 months, seizure remission was observed in 73.2% of the patients, although four patients died during hospitalization. Rituximab was used as a second-line immunotherapy in 12 patients who continued to have seizures despite the initial immunotherapy, and additional seizure remission was achieved in 66.6% of them. In particular, those who exhibited partial response to the initial immunotherapy had a better seizure outcome after rituximab, with low adverse events.AE frequently presented as seizure, but only 18.9% of the living patients suffered from seizure at 6 months after immunotherapy. Aggressive immunotherapy can improve seizure outcome in patients with AE.

  6. Diagnostic decision-making after a first and recurrent seizure in adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askamp, J.; Putten, van M.J.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The role of EEG after a first seizure has been debated. Epileptiform EEG activity is a good predictor of seizure recurrence, but is reported in only 8-50% of first-seizure adult patients. Even if the EEG is abnormal, the opinions about treatment after a first seizure differ. The role of EEG

  7. Relation between stress-precipitated seizures and the stress response in childhood epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Campen, Jolien S.; Jansen, Floor E.; Pet, Milou A.; Otte, Willem M.; Hillegers, Manon H J; Joels, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-01-01

    The majority of patients with epilepsy report that seizures are sometimes triggered or provoked. Stress is the most frequently self-reported seizure-precipitant. The mechanisms underlying stress-sensitivity of seizures are currently unresolved. We hypothesized that stress-sensitivity of seizures rel

  8. Carisoprodol: abuse potential and withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Roy R; Burke, Randy S

    2010-03-01

    Carisoprodol (N-isopropyl-2 methyl-2-propyl-1,3-propanediol dicarbamate; N-isopropylmeprobamate) is a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant whose primary active metabolite is meprobamate, a substance with well established abuse potential similar to that of benzodiazepines. A number of reports show that carisoprodol has been abused for its sedative and relaxant effects, to augment or alter the effects of other drugs, and by the intentional combination of carisoprodol and other noncontrolled medications because of the relative ease (as compared to controlled substances) of obtaining prescriptions. The diversion and abuse of carisoprodol and its adverse health effects appear to have dramatically increased over the last several years. Clinicians have begun to see a withdrawal syndrome consisting of insomnia, vomiting, tremors, muscle twitching, anxiety, and ataxia in patients who abruptly cease intake of large doses of carisoprodol. Hallucinations and delusions may also occur. The withdrawal symptoms are very similar to those previously described for meprobamate withdrawal, suggesting that what may actually be occurring is withdrawal from meprobamate accumulated as a result of intake of excessive amounts of carisoprodol. However carisoprodol itself is capable of modulating GABA(A) function, and this may contribute both to the drugs abuse potential and to the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome with abrupt cessation of intake. Carisoprodol has been classified as a controlled substance in several states in the US and restrictions on the use of the drug have been imposed in some European countries. Carisoprodol is metabolized to a controlled substance, has clear evidence of abuse potential and increasing incidence of abuse, and has shown evidence of a withdrawal syndrome with abrupt cessation from intake. This article will discuss the abuse potential of carisoprodol and the associated withdrawal syndrome, and consider implications for future use of the drug. PMID

  9. Intra-administration associations and withdrawal symptoms: morphine-elicited morphine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert V; Siegel, Shepard

    2004-02-01

    On the basis of a conditioning analysis, some drug "withdrawal symptoms" are conditional responses elicited by stimuli paired with the drug effect. Prior demonstrations of conditional elicitation of withdrawal symptoms evaluated the role of environmental cues; however, pharmacological cues also typically signal a drug effect. Within each administration, early drug onset cues (DOCs) may become associated with the later, larger drug effect (intra-administration associations). This experiment evaluated the contribution of intra-administration associations to withdrawal symptoms. The results indicated that (a). 5 mg/kg morphine elicited behavioral and thermic withdrawal symptoms in rats previously injected on a number of occasions with 50 mg/kg morphine and that (b). DOC-elicited withdrawal symptoms are not a sensitized response to the opiate but rather an associative phenomenon. PMID:14769091

  10. Epileptiform EEG Discharges and Risk of Epilepsy Following Febrile Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at Kangnam and Masan Samsung Changwon Hospitals, Korea, studied the relation between epileptiform discharges on the EEG after febrile seizures (FS) and the risk of developing epilepsy and recurrence of FS.

  11. Disparity in regional cerebral blood flow during electrically induced seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sestoft, D; Meden, P; Hemmingsen, R; Hancke, B; Madsen, P L; Friberg, L

    1993-01-01

    This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on electroencepha......This is a presentation of 2 cases in which the intraictal regional cerebral blood flow distribution was measured with the 99mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computerized tomography technique during an electrically induced seizure. Although the seizure was verified as generalized on...... electroencephalography, the regional neuronal activity expressed as rCBF unexpectedly was markedly asymmetrical in one of the cases. These findings demonstrated that the 99mTc-HMPAO technique makes it possible to discriminate intraictal variation in cortical and subcortical activation between the hemispheres during...

  12. Recurrent seizures: An unusual manifestation of vitamin B12 deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar S

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The present report highlights an unusual presentation of vitamin B12 deficiency— recurrent seizures in a 26-year-old man. His symptoms responded to parenteral vitamin B12 therapy. The relevant literature is reviewed.

  13. Ontology and Knowledge Management System on Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, Pedro; Sales, Francisco; Nogueira, Ana; Dourado, António

    2010-01-01

    A Knowledge Management System developed for supporting creation, capture, storage and dissemination of information about Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures is presented. We present an Ontology on Epilepsy and a Web-based prototype that together create the KMS.

  14. Focal seizure-induced premature myelination: speculation from serial MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local changes in the white matter underlying a focus of cortical thickening were monitored using MRI in an epileptic 2-month-old boy. We hypothesise that these changes reflected seizure-induced premature myelination. (orig.) (orig.)

  15. Appearing and disappearing CT scan abnormalities and seizures.

    OpenAIRE

    P K Sethi; Kumar, B.R.; Madan, V S; Mohan, V

    1985-01-01

    A group of patients presenting with seizures (focal or generalised) and abnormal CT scans who, on follow up, showed complete resolution of the CT scan changes, without any treatment other than anticonvulsants, are described.

  16. Focal inhibitory seizures: a cause of recurrent transient weakness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A; Connor, Steve; Ferner, Rosalie; Leschziner, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Focal seizures are usually manifest with stereotyped positive phenomena. However, seizures may also give negative phenomena, such as paralysis, speech arrest, neglect, atonia and numbness. We report a 39-year-old man with neurofibromatosis 2 who had recurrent stereotyped episodes of weakness affecting his right leg and right arm. His MR scan of brain showed numerous meningiomas, the largest of which was near the vertex, adjacent to the left side of the falx. Interictal electroencephalogram, MR cerebral angiogram and Doppler carotid artery ultrasound scan were normal. He was diagnosed with epilepsy and started on levetiracetam, with no subsequent attacks. We postulate his negative motor seizures related to a meningioma overlying the supplementary negative motor area in the mesial superior frontal gyrus, and discuss diagnostic criteria for inhibitory seizures. PMID:26245512

  17. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno P. Carreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO. In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons.

  18. Maternal thyroid dysfunction and risk of seizure in the child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stine Linding; Laurberg, Peter; Wu, Chun Sen;

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid hormones are essential for brain development, and maternal thyroid disease may affect child neurocognitive development. Some types of seizures may also depend upon early exposure of the developing central nervous system, and we hypothesized that maternal thyroid dysfunction could increase...... the risk of seizure in the child. In a Danish population-based study we included 1,699,693 liveborn singletons, and from the Danish National Hospital Register we obtained information on maternal diagnosis of hyper- or hypothyroidism and neonatal seizure, febrile seizure, and epilepsy in the child....... Maternal diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction before or after birth of the child was registered in two percent of the singleton births. In adjusted analyses, maternal hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism first time diagnosed after birth of the child were associated with a significant increased risk of epilepsy...

  19. Clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with nonepileptic seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Sri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to present a comprehensive profile of clinical and psychosocial characteristics of children with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and to assess the short-term outcome of these patients. Materials and Methods: The subjects were consecutive cases of children with a diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures (N=17, mean age = 10.7 years, S.D. = 1.26 and two groups of control groups matched on age and sex: true seizure group and healthy controls. All the children were recruited from the out-patient services of the Department of Pediatrics of a tertiary care teaching hospital in North India. Detailed history taking and clinical examination was done in the case of every child. A standard 18 channel EEG was done in all the children and a video EEG was done in 12 cases of children with nonepileptic seizures. The Childhood Psychopathology Measurement Schedule (CPMS and Life Events Scale for Indian Children (LESIC were used to measure the children′s emotional and behavioral functioning at home, and the number of life events and the stress associated with these events in the preceding year and the year before that. Short-term outcome was examined three to six months after the diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures was made. Results: Unresponsiveness without marked motor manifestations was the most common "ictal" characteristic of the nonepileptic seizures. Pelvic thrusting, upper and lower limb movements, head movements, and vocalization were observed in less than one-third of the patients. Increased psychosocial stress and significantly higher number of life events in the preceding year were found to characterize children with nonepileptic seizures, as compared to the two control groups. The nonepileptic seizures and true seizures groups had a higher proportion of children with psychopathology scores in the clinically significant maladjustment range, as compared to those in the healthy control group. A majority of the patients

  20. Randomized, controlled trial of ibuprofen syrup administered during febrile illnesses to prevent febrile seizure recurrences

    OpenAIRE

    van Stuijvenberg, Margriet; Derksen-Lubsen, Gerarda; Steyerberg, Ewout; Habbema, Dik; Moll, Henriëtte

    1998-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVES: Febrile seizures recur frequently. Factors increasing the risk of febrile seizure recurrence include young age at onset, family history of febrile seizures, previous recurrent febrile seizures, time lapse since previous seizure /=38.5 degrees C). Parents were instructed to take the child's rectal temperature immediately when the child seemed ill or feverish and to promptly administer the study medication when the temperature was >/=38.5 degrees C. Doses were to be admi...

  1. Unit Activity of Hippocampal Interneurons before Spontaneous Seizures in an Animal Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Toyoda, Izumi; Fujita, Satoshi; Thamattoor, Ajoy K.; Buckmaster, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of seizure initiation are unclear. To evaluate the possible roles of inhibitory neurons, unit recordings were obtained in the dentate gyrus, CA3, CA1, and subiculum of epileptic pilocarpine-treated rats as they experienced spontaneous seizures. Most interneurons in the dentate gyrus, CA1, and subiculum increased their firing rate before seizures, and did so with significant consistency from seizure to seizure. Identification of CA1 interneuron subtypes based on firing characteristi...

  2. Time to First EEG Seizure During Continuous Video/EEG Telemetry

    OpenAIRE

    Hećimović, Hrvoje; Gilliam, Frank

    2005-01-01

    Correlation between time to first scalp EEG seizure during video/EEG telemetry and self-reported seizure frequency was determined in refractory epilepsy patients. Eighty two consecutive epilepsy patients were preoperatively evaluated, as part of a larger study, during their video/EEG monitoring at the Adult Epilepsy Center at Washington University. Self-reported seizure frequency, time to first seizure in the monitoring unit, and clinical variables of age, sex and seizure focus localization w...

  3. Risk factors for developing epilepsy after neonatal seizures

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are the most frequent neurological disorder in the neonatal period. The incidence is reported to be higher than at any other period in life. Because of the unique nature of neonatal brain anatomy, connections and the paradoxical nature of neurotransmitters, seizures in this age group vary in semiology from those in older children. They may cause irreversible changes to the synapses in the immature brain and progress to epilepsy. The aim of the study was to analys...

  4. Copeptin as a serum biomarker of febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Stöcklin

    Full Text Available Accurate diagnosis of febrile seizures in children presenting after paroxysmal episodes associated with fever, is hampered by the lack of objective postictal biomarkers. The aim of our study was to investigate whether FS are associated with increased levels of serum copeptin, a robust marker of arginine vasopressin secretion.This was a prospective emergency-setting cross-sectional study of 161 children between six months and five years of age. Of these, 83 were diagnosed with febrile seizures, 69 had a febrile infection without seizures and nine had epileptic seizures not triggered by infection. Serum copeptin and prolactin levels were measured in addition to standard clinical, neurophysiological, and laboratory assessment.NCT01884766.Circulating copeptin was significantly higher in children with febrile seizures (median [interquartile range] 18.9 pmol/L [8.5-36.6] compared to febrile controls (5.6 pmol/L [4.1-9.4]; p < 0.001, with no differences between febrile and epileptic seizures (21.4 pmol/L [16.1-46.6]; p = 0.728. In a multivariable regression model, seizures were the major determinant of serum copeptin (beta 0.509; p < 0.001, independently of clinical and baseline laboratory indices. The area under the receiver operating curve for copeptin was 0.824 (95% CI 0.753-0.881, significantly higher compared to prolactin (0.667 [0.585-0.742]; p < 0.001. The diagnostic accuracy of copeptin increased with decreasing time elapsed since the convulsive event (at 120 min: 0.879 [0.806-0.932] and at <60 min: 0.975 [0.913-0.997].Circulating copeptin has high diagnostic accuracy in febrile seizures and may be a useful adjunct for accurately diagnosing postictal states in the emergency setting.

  5. A case of Hashimoto's encephalopathy presenting with seizures and psychosis

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Joo Lee; Hae-Sang Lee; Jin-Soon Hwang; Da-Eun Jung

    2012-01-01

    Hashimoto’s encephalopathy (HE) is a rare, poorly understood, autoimmune disease characterized by symptoms of acute or subacute encephalopathy associated with increased anti-thyroid antibody levels. Here, we report a case of a 14-year-old girl with HE and briefly review the literature. The patient presented with acute mental changes and seizures, but no evidence of infectious encephalitis. In the acute stage, the seizures did not respond to conventional antiepileptic drugs, including valproic...

  6. Benign occipital lobe seizures: Natural progression and atypical evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prithika Chary; Bhuvaneshwari Rajendran

    2013-01-01

    Benign occipital seizure syndromes are benign childhood epilepsy syndromes and are mainly of two types, Panayiotopoulos syndrome, an autonomic epilepsy and idiopathic childhood occipital epilepsy of Gastaut (ICOE-G) including the idiopathic photosensitive occipital lobe epilepsy. Although both these types are categorized as occipital seizures, they are distinct in presentation and management. They can also be tricky to diagnose as visual symptoms may not always be the presenting feature and i...

  7. PREVALENCE OF SEIZURE IN PKU:AN ANALYTIC HISTORICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Feisal RAHIMPOUR; AALAEI Mohammad Reza; KARIMZADEH, Parvaneh

    2010-01-01

    ObjectivePhenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive metabolic genetic disorder characterized by a deficiency in the hepatic enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) which can cause problems with brain development, leading to progressive mental retardation, brain damage, and seizures. In this study we evaluated the frequency of seizure, EEG abnormality and behavioral disorders.Materials & Methods In this case study, 94 PKU children aged between 1 month and 23 years who were referred to Mofi...

  8. Robust Deep Network with Maximum Correntropy Criterion for Seizure Detection

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Effective seizure detection from long-term EEG is highly important for seizure diagnosis. Existing methods usually design the feature and classifier individually, while little work has been done for the simultaneous optimization of the two parts. This work proposes a deep network to jointly learn a feature and a classifier so that they could help each other to make the whole system optimal. To deal with the challenge of the impulsive noises and outliers caused by EMG artifacts in EEG signals,...

  9. Automated differentiation between epileptic and non-epileptic convulsive seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beniczky, Sándor; Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai;

    2015-01-01

    algorithm: 25 generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs) from 11 patients, and 19 episodes of convulsive PNES from 13 patients. The gold standard was the interpretation of the video-electroencephalographic recordings by experts blinded to the EMG results. The algorithm correctly classified 24 GTCSs (96%) and...... 18 PNESs (95%). The overall diagnostic accuracy was 95%. This algorithm is useful for distinguishing between epileptic and psychogenic convulsive seizures....

  10. A Spectral Based Forecasting Tool of Epileptic Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Khammari

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to recognize and predict succedent epileptic seizure by using single channel electroencephalogram (EEG analysis is proposed. Spectral analysis of a brain time series of the left frontal FP1-F7 (LF scalp location signal is devoted for seizure prediction and analysis. Important findings showing the presence of preictal spectral changes in studied brain signal are described. Spectral features occurring during the preictal epoch are extracted from the application of sliding spectral windows of raw EEG at different moments in time preceding the seizure onset. The same method is then applied to a couple of Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMF1 and IMF2 of the raw EEG (FP1-F7 decomposed by the algorithm of empirical mode decomposition. The main prediction features are derived from the changes of amplitudes, frequency and the number of spikes which are of diagnostic values. The sliding spectral windows were computed to trace the amplitude changes of higher harmonics during time interval preceding the seizure onset. Choosing different moments in time aims to identify the best prediction time of seizure onset. Obviously an early prediction time is always desirable but the seizure may result from an abrupt change and so the spectral 'signs of an imminent seizure occur during a very short prediction time. From another viewpoint, it may be advantageous to consider a successive prediction times showing the increase of spike numbers and the predominance of certain waves rather than others when approaching seizure onset. The common prediction features extracted from the analysis of FP1-F7 signal for both patients were mainly the increasing number of spikes of low frequency waves namely delta and theta waves.

  11. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Rezende Vilela; Lindisley Ferreira Gomides; Bruna Araújo David; Maísa Mota Antunes; Ariane Barros Diniz; Fabrício de Araújo Moreira; Gustavo Batista Menezes

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hyd...

  12. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-11-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R(2) = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  13. ASPM mutations identified in patients with primary microcephaly and seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, J; Eyaid, W; Mochida, G; Al-Moayyad, F; Bodell, A; Woods, C; Walsh, C

    2005-01-01

    Background: Human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a heterogeneous disorder with at least six genetic loci (MCPH1–6), with MCPH5, caused by ASPM mutation, being the most common. Despite the high prevalence of epilepsy in microcephaly patients, microcephaly with frequent seizures has been excluded from the ascertainment of MCPH. Here, we report a pedigree with multiple affected individuals with microcephaly and seizures.

  14. Characterization of an alcohol addiction-prone phenotype in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwanska, Kasia; Kaczmarek, Leszek

    2012-05-01

    Human studies indicate that high impulsivity, novelty seeking and anxiety predispose individuals to alcohol abuse. Unclear, however, is whether the same phenotypes can be observed in laboratory animals prone to uncontrolled alcohol drinking. To characterize a novelty-seeking trait, anxiety, impulsivity, compulsivity and the motivation for natural rewards in mice, numerous tests were performed in the automated IntelliCage learning system. The same mice then had extended access to alcohol for 70 days, followed by the evaluation of addiction-like behaviors, including (1) the motivation for alcohol in a progressive-ratio schedule of reinforcement; (2) persistent and compulsive alcohol seeking and taking during signaled 'no alcohol' periods and (3) when subjected to punishment; and (4) the intensity of relapse after alcohol withdrawal. Our data suggest that high levels of anxiety-related traits (i.e. low novelty seeking, low resistance to punishment and a high level of compulsive behaviors) and high impulsivity predict addiction-like alcohol drinking in mice. Future studies are, however, warranted to create a valid model of alcohol addiction in mice in the IntelliCage system. PMID:22017485

  15. Alcohol Consumption and Alcohol Advertising Bans

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Saffer

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to empirically examine the relationship between alcohol advertising bans and alcohol consumption. Most prior studies have found no effect of advertising on total alcohol consumption. A simple economic model is provided which explains these prior results. The data set used in this study is a pooled time series of data from 20 countries over 26 years. The empirical model is a simultaneous equations system which treats both alcohol consumption and alcohol advertising...

  16. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Rezende Vilela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD, protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse.

  17. INTERMITTENT CLONAZEPAM IN THE PREVENTION OF RECURRENT FEBRILE SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAJOGHLI Shirin MD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo evaluate the efficacy and common side effects of intermittent clonazepamin febrile seizures.Materials & MethodsThis study was an experimental trial designed to determine the efficacy ofintermittent clonazepam in febrile seizures .Thirty patients with an age rangeof 6 months to 5 years (60% male, 40% female were studied. Children with ahistory of psychomotor delay, abnormal neurological examination, a history ofantiepileptic drug consumption, and afebrile seizures were excluded from thestudy. Patients received a single dose of prophylactic Clonazepam (0.05 mg/kg/day on the first day of febrile illness and twice daily during the course of fever.An antipyretic medication (Acetaminophen was advised if fever exceeded38oC. Patients were followed up for one year after the study inclusion date.ResultsThree patients were excluded from study since they didnot follow the tritmentand three patients experienced afebrile seizures. Twenty four patients had 162febrile episodes during the course of the study and all patients were seizure-freeafter 1 year.ConclusionClonazepam was 100% effective but lethargy and ataxia were common sideeffects in patients. Fortunately, their parents continued treatment because theyhad prior awareness of the possible side effects of clonazepam. Clonazepam isefficacious as an intermittent therapy for febrile seizures if parents are informedof its side effects.

  18. A Novel Dynamic Update Framework for Epileptic Seizure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Han

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients’ daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients’ physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures’ arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient’s preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices.

  19. A physiology-based seizure detection system for multichannel EEG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ping Shen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. METHODOLOGY: This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn, statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. CONCLUSION: We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system.

  20. School involvement in the treatment of seizure disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, K D

    1982-04-01

    In has long been recognized that school personnel can play an important role in the treatment of seizure disorders. In order to better understand their involvement in the treatment process, two state-wide studies of special education programs were conducted. Teachers completed questionnaires for 315 pupils in their classrooms who were receiving drug therapy for a seizure disorder, and the mothers of 130 of these children were interviewed by telephone. The two investigations yielded similar results. Teachers were often not informed about the overt features of the seizures, side effects of the medication, or seizure management, even in the case of students who experienced seizures and/or side effects in school. In 70% of the cases, teachers were involved in either evaluating the response to treatment, administering medication, or managing (coping with) seizures in the classroom. They usually interacted with parents or other school personnel; direct communication with the physician was virtually nonexistent. Over one-third of the students were rated as more drowsy or sleepy than their peers, and, according to teachers, drug-induced impairments in adaptive behavior were a common problem. Collectively, these data suggest that in many cases, no one has assumed responsibility for coordinating the delivery of services for psychosocial treatment needs. PMID:7075574

  1. Cannabidiol rescues acute hepatic toxicity and seizure induced by cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0 mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30 mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  2. Long-term effects of febrile convulsion on seizure susceptibility in P77PMC rat--resistant to acoustic stimuli but susceptible to kainate-induced seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D Y; Wu, X R; Pei, Y Q; Zuo, Q H

    1985-06-01

    A new audiogenic seizure (AGS)-susceptible strain of rats (P77PMC) was evaluated as a possible model of human febrile seizures. The long-term effects of experimental febrile seizures were observed. All 30-day-old rat pups exhibited clonic seizures during exposure to an ambient temperature of 45 +/- 0.5 degree C. The mean latency from the beginning of the hyperthermic stimulus to the onset of convulsion was 16.9 +/- 2.2 min. The rats survived this hyperthermic seizure, developed a resistance to acoustic stimulations, but were more susceptible at the age of 50 to 60 days to kainate-induced limbic seizures than controls. The results of this study imply that febrile seizures of developing P77PMC rats can change later seizure susceptibility, and there may be some correlation between febrile convulsion and temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:3996515

  3. Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on pattern separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Maria; Grahm, Matilda; Ekstrand, Joakim; Movahed-Rad, Pouya; Johansson, Mikael; Tingström, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Strategies employing different techniques to inhibit or stimulate neurogenesis have implicated a role for adult-born neurons in the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs, as well as a role in memory formation. Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, robustly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis, but it is not known how this relates to either therapeutic efficacy or unwanted cognitive side effects. We hypothesized that the ECS-derived increase in adult-born neurons would manifest in improved pattern separation ability, a memory function that is believed to be both hippocampus-dependent and coupled to neurogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated neurogenesis in adult rats by treating them with a series of ECS and compared their performances in a trial-unique delayed nonmatching-to-location task (TUNL) to a control group. TUNL performance was analyzed over a 12-week period, during which newly formed neurons differentiate and become functionally integrated in the hippocampal neurocircuitry. Task difficulty was manipulated by modifying the delay between sample and choice, and by varying the spatial similarity between target and distracter location. Although animals learned the task and improved the number of correct responses over time, ECS did not influence spatial pattern separation ability. PMID:25850383

  4. Cyclosporine alters opiate withdrawal in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafny, N; Wagle, V G; Drath, D B

    1985-05-01

    Opiates exert numerous effects on all levels of the central nervous system with tolerance, physical dependence and withdrawal being characteristics of this drug class. The degree of dependence is directly correlated to the intensity of withdrawal. Therefore, success in modifying the withdrawal syndrome may shed light on the dynamics of opiate addiction. The present study demonstrates that cyclosporine, a widely used immunosuppressive drug, considerably modified the behavioral signs of a naloxone-induced abstinence syndrome in morphine-addicted rats. In previous experiments, alpha-interferon has shown similar results. The similarity in actions of these two immunomodulator drugs is discussed and we suggest that opiate addiction may involve the immune system. PMID:4039025

  5. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Eleni Koutroumanidou; Athanasios Kimbaris; Alexandros Kortsaris; Eugenia Bezirtzoglou; Moschos Polissiou; Konstantinos Charalabopoulos; Olga Pagonopoulou

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) inject...

  6. ANALYSIS OF MAIN REASONS FOR MISTAKES IN DIAGNOSTICS OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES AND EPILEPTIC SYNDROMES (CLINICAL PECULIARITIES OF EPILEPTIC SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Mironov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic brain disease that requires long therapy and continuous careful supervision of the status of the patient. In connection with this, both overdiagnosis and underdiagnosis of this disease is extremely dangerous. Overdiagnosis causes ungrounded social "label", limitation in rights, significant decreasing quality of life of the patient, family problems, prescription of long-term anti-epileptic therapy that may cause potential side effects. Underdiagnosis of epilepsy frequently causes further resistance of seizures to therapy, they become more frequent, there appears the possibility of development of epileptic status, life threatening situations, possibility of development of cognitive disorders associated with the disease. A significant progress in epileptology and medical technologies (video electroencephalographic (EEG monitoring, neuroimaging methods, genetic studies that has been marked in recent decades has allowed minimizing errors of physicians. Despite this, certain difficulties still remain in diagnostics of epilepsy. In the author's opinion, there is a range of epileptic seizures visual assessment of which is extremely difficult and is literally impossible without video EEG monitoring. Short, phantom, atypical absences, absences on the outside, epileptic myoclonus of the eyelids with or without absences, myoclonic, tonic, gelastic, focal hyperkinetic seizures, epileptic aura, reversing focal seizures, epileptic spasms, ictal syncopes, negative myoclonus, focal epileptic myoclonus, epileptic seizures arising when closing the eyes, and self-induced seizures can be attributed to such seizures with difficulties in diagnosis. The author reviews each of these types epileptic seizures in details focusing the attention on their diagnostic criteria and characteristics of the clinical and the EEF features that are of utmost importance in the course of performance of differential diagnostics. Own experience of the

  7. Children's judgements of social withdrawal behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watling, Dawn

    2015-06-01

    Ding et al. (Brit. J. Dev. Psychol., 2015; 33, 159-173) demonstrated that Chinese children discriminate between the three subtypes of social withdrawal: Shyness, unsociability, and social avoidance. This commentary on the Ding et al.'s paper highlights the need to further explore the following: (1) children's understanding of the implications of being shy, unsociable, or socially avoidant, including assessing these which we know are associated with outcomes for socially withdrawn children; (2) what additional subtypes might exist naturally within the Chinese culture; and (3) consider the implications of social withdrawal on children's developing social skills. PMID:25853224

  8. Predictive factors of seizure control in childhood onset epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Shahar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Prediction of the long-term outcomes of childhood-onset epilepsy remains crucial for the future well-being of the affected children and their families and for planning proper therapeutic and educational programs. Objective: To identify and analyze the early predictive factors of seizure control in childhood-onset epilepsies referred at the age of 1 month up to the age of 18 years to the Epilepsy Service at the Meyer Children Hospital, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. Materials and Methods: In this study, children who were newly diagnosed with epileptic disorders and treated with antiepileptic drug therapy - who became either completely controlled for at least twelve months or those remaining intractable - were included. Partially responding children were excluded from the analysis. The etiology was segregated into either symptomatic or nonsymptomatic epilepsy, referred to as idiopathic epilepsy. Results: Overall, 74 children (mean age: 4.27 ± 4 years at the first seizure were found eligible for analysis followed for a mean period of 4.5 years. Fifty-three (72% children became seizure-free for a mean period of 20 months on antiepileptic drug (AED therapy and 21 (28% remained uncontrolled. Sixty out of 74 children (81% had idiopathic epilepsy and 14 (19% had symptomatic epilepsy. In those with idiopathic epilepsy, 46 (77% children gained complete seizure control in comparison to 7 out of 14 (50% children in the symptomatic group ( P < 0.01. Thirty-nine out of 47 (83% children who had normal cognition became seizure-free, and 14 (52% out of 27 mentally retarded children also became seizure-free ( P < 0.01. The outcome of seizure control was not affected by age at onset and seizure type itself during the presentation. Conclusion: The present study reveals that the single most predictive factor of a favorable seizure control is preserved cognitive function in accordance with idiopathic epilepsy. However, a fairly high number of

  9. 17 CFR 41.47 - Withdrawal of margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... PRODUCTS Customer Accounts and Margin Requirements § 41.47 Withdrawal of margin. (a) By the customer... after such withdrawal is sufficient to satisfy the required margin for the security futures and...

  10. 48 CFR 14.303 - Modification or withdrawal of bids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES SEALED BIDDING Submission of Bids 14.303 Modification or withdrawal of... for the bid. (c) Upon withdrawal of an electronically transmitted bid, the data received shall not...

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE RANGE OF MEDICINES FOR THE PHARMACEUTICAL CORRECTION OF THE ALCOHOL TREMOR IN THE STRUCTURE OF ABSTINENT ALCOHOL DEPENDENCE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapovalov V.V. (Jr.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Established that the use of psychoactive substances may lead to premature death. The most commonly used psychoactive substance is alcohol. The authors had previously been justified and suggested for implementation in the practice of medicine cupping method alcoholic tremor in the structure of withdrawal symptoms in alcohol dependence. The article presents an analysis of drugs for the pharmaceutical correction of the alcoholic tremor in the structure of withdrawal symptoms, which are included in the patent of the pharmaceutical correction for the alcohol dependence. According to the international ATC classification included 5 ATC codes clinical and pharmacological groups: "A", "B", "C», «N», «S». The analysis found that in circulation in the pharmaceutical market of Ukraine for the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence are mainly domestic remedies (23 pharmaceutical manufacturer that provide the range of nosology at 88.0%. The next step in the analysis was to determine the types of dosage forms used for the pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence. Found that the dosage means presented in the form of injection solutions and infusion (36.0%, powders for the preparation of solution (suspension for ingestion (36.0% in the form of tablets or capsules (28.0%. At the last stage analyzed registration certificates and found that the registration for the medicines for pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence are 2015 four international nonproprietary names (8 drugs until 2019 in 4 international nonproprietary names (11 drugs.

  12. Zinc Status in Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MohammadReza SALEHIOMRAN

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Salehiomran MR, Mahzari M. Zinc Status in Febrile Seizure: A Case-Control Study. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Autumn; 7(4:20-23.ObjectiveFebrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc and febrile seizure. Zinc, asa major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serumzinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure.Materials & MethodsThis case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years.This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case and 50 febrile children without seizures (control, that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the northof Iran. Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method.ResultsThe mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001. The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to thecontrol groups.  ConclusionOur findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children. ReferencesVarma RR. Febrile seizures. Indian J Pediatr 2002; 69(8; 697-700.Talebian A, Vakili Z, Talar SA, Kazemi M, Mousavi GA. Assessment of the relation between serum zinc and magnesium levels in children with febrile

  13. [Eslicarbazepine acetate: a novel therapeutic alternative in the treatment of focal seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri-Llerda, José A

    2012-05-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological diseases. In recent years an important number of drugs have been added to the therapeutic options we have available to us. With the aim of offering an optimal clinical effectiveness, the mechanisms of action or chemical structures of the antiepileptic drugs recently introduced onto the market have been modified with respect to the first, so-called classical or conventional, antiepileptics. Eslicarbazepine acetate belongs to this group of recently incorporated pharmaceuticals and is a novel single daily dose voltage-gated sodium channel blocker, which acts selectively in groups of rapid-activation neurons. It has been approved for indication in associated therapy in adults with partial onset seizures, with or without secondary generalisation. It is widely metabolised to eslicarbazepine and, to a lesser extent, to R-licarbazepine and oxcarbazepine. In 800 mg and 1200 mg doses it has been shown to bring about a significant reduction in a high percentage of patients with refractory epilepsy in simultaneous treatment with up to three antiepileptic drugs, and this effectiveness is maintained in open follow-up studies lasting up to a year. It is generally speaking well-tolerated; most of the adverse side-effects range in intensity from mild to moderate, and the percentage of patients who withdraw from treatment for this reason is low. Eslicarbazepine acetate is an alternative treatment in associated therapy in patients with partial epilepsy who do not respond adequately to treatment in monotherapy. PMID:22532219

  14. Tobacco Withdrawal Symptoms Mediate Motivation to Reinstate Smoking During Abstinence

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre, Claudia; Madrid, Jillian; Leventhal, Adam M.

    2015-01-01

    Withdrawal-based theories of addiction hypothesize that motivation to reinstate drug use following acute abstinence is mediated by withdrawal symptoms. Experimental tests of this hypothesis in the tobacco literature are scant and may be subject to methodological limitations. This study utilized a robust within-subject laboratory experimental design to investigate the extent to which composite tobacco withdrawal symptomatology level and three unique withdrawal components (i.e., low positive af...

  15. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Kaushik; Fernandes, Austin B; Goyal, Sunil; Shanker, Sunitha

    2015-01-01

    Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens. PMID:27212829

  16. Central pontine myelinolysis in a case of alcohol dependence syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome includes Central Pontine Myelinolysis and Extrapontine Myelinolysis. This condition has been described in cases of chronic Alcohol Dependence Syndrome and in rapid correction of hyponatremia. Though we frequently see patients with Alcohol Dependence Syndrome presenting with complicated withdrawal, Central Pontine Myelinolysis remains largely undetected and under-reported in literature. We present here a case of protracted Delirium Tremens where MRI brain revealed Central Pontine Myelinolysis. Subsequently cognitive assessment revealed significant dysfunction and brain SPECT showed hypo-perfusion of the frontal lobes. Osmotic Demyelination Syndrome should be suspected in protracted Delirium Tremens.

  17. The Long-term Risk of Epilepsy after Febrile Seizures in susceptible subgroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Mogens; Pedersen, Carsten Bøcker; Sidenius, Per Christian; Olsen, Jørn; Christensen, Jakob

    2007-01-01

    A family history of seizures, preexisting brain damage, or birth complications may modify the long-term risk of epilepsy after febrile seizures. The authors evaluated the association between febrile seizures and epilepsy in a population-based cohort of 1.54 million persons born in Denmark (1978......-2002), including 49,857 persons with febrile seizures and 16,481 persons with epilepsy. Overall, for children with febrile seizures compared with those without such seizures, the rate ratio for epilepsy was 5.43 (95% confidence interval: 5.19, 5.69). The risk remained high during the entire follow-up but was...... particularly high shortly after the first febrile seizure, especially in children who experienced early (<1 year of age) or late (>3 years of age) onset of febrile seizures. At 23 years of follow-up, the overall cumulative incidence of epilepsy after febrile seizures was 6.9% (95% confidence interval: 6.5, 7...

  18. Patterns of muscle activation during generalized tonic and tonic–clonic epileptic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing; Beniczky, Sándor

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Tonic seizures and the tonic phase of tonic–clonic epileptic seizures are defined as “sustained tonic” muscle contraction lasting a few seconds to minutes. Visual inspection of the surface electromyogram (EMG) during seizures contributed considerably to a better understanding and accurate...... diagnosis of several seizure types. However, quantitative analysis of the surface EMG during the epileptic seizures has received surprisingly little attention until now. The aim of our study was to elucidate the pathomechanism of the tonic muscle activation during epileptic seizures. Methods: Surface EMG...... was recorded from the deltoid muscles, on both sides, during 63 seizures from 20 patients with epilepsy (10 with generalized tonic and 10 with tonic–clonic seizures). Twenty age‐ and gender‐matched normal controls simulated 100 generalized tonic seizures. To characterize the signal properties we...

  19. Thalamus lesions in chronic and acute seizure disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschampa, Henriette J.; Greschus, Susanne; Urbach, Horst [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology (Neuroradiology), Bonn (Germany); Sassen, Robert; Bien, Christian G. [University of Bonn, Department of Epileptology, Bonn (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Transient signal changes in the pulvinar have been described following status epilepticus. However, we observed persistent thalamus changes after seizures. The purpose of this study was to characterize thalamus changes in patients with seizure disorders and to correlate imaging findings with clinical features. We searched among 5,500 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed in patients with seizures and identified 43 patients. The MRI scans of these patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical data. We identified four patterns of thalamus lesions: (a) fluid attenuated inversion recovery-hyperintense pulvinar lesions (20 patients), as known from status epilepticus. Ten patients in this group had a status epilepticus. Among the remaining patients, three had frequent seizures and seven had sporadic seizures. Twelve patients had follow-up exams for a median of 11 months. The lesions had persisted in 11/12 cases in the last available exam and were reversible in one case only. In seven cases, cone-shaped thalamus atrophy resulted, (b) linear defects in the medial and anterior thalamus (five patients), accompanied by atrophy of the mamillary body and the fornix in patients with chronic epilepsy, (c) extensive bilateral thalamus lesions in two patients with a syndrome caused by mutation in the mitochondrial polymerase gamma, and (d) other thalamus lesions not associated with the seizure disorder (16 patients). The spectrum of thalamus lesions in patients with seizure disorders is wider than previously reported. Postictal pulvinar lesions can persist and may result in thalamic atrophy. Linear defects in the anterior thalamus are associated with limbic system atrophy. (orig.)

  20. Thalamus lesions in chronic and acute seizure disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transient signal changes in the pulvinar have been described following status epilepticus. However, we observed persistent thalamus changes after seizures. The purpose of this study was to characterize thalamus changes in patients with seizure disorders and to correlate imaging findings with clinical features. We searched among 5,500 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) exams performed in patients with seizures and identified 43 patients. The MRI scans of these patients were reviewed and correlated with clinical data. We identified four patterns of thalamus lesions: (a) fluid attenuated inversion recovery-hyperintense pulvinar lesions (20 patients), as known from status epilepticus. Ten patients in this group had a status epilepticus. Among the remaining patients, three had frequent seizures and seven had sporadic seizures. Twelve patients had follow-up exams for a median of 11 months. The lesions had persisted in 11/12 cases in the last available exam and were reversible in one case only. In seven cases, cone-shaped thalamus atrophy resulted, (b) linear defects in the medial and anterior thalamus (five patients), accompanied by atrophy of the mamillary body and the fornix in patients with chronic epilepsy, (c) extensive bilateral thalamus lesions in two patients with a syndrome caused by mutation in the mitochondrial polymerase gamma, and (d) other thalamus lesions not associated with the seizure disorder (16 patients). The spectrum of thalamus lesions in patients with seizure disorders is wider than previously reported. Postictal pulvinar lesions can persist and may result in thalamic atrophy. Linear defects in the anterior thalamus are associated with limbic system atrophy. (orig.)

  1. A novel genetic programming approach for epileptic seizure detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Arpit; Tiwari, Aruna; Krishna, Ramesh; Varma, Vishaal

    2016-02-01

    The human brain is a delicate mix of neurons (brain cells), electrical impulses and chemicals, known as neurotransmitters. Any damage has the potential to disrupt the workings of the brain and cause seizures. These epileptic seizures are the manifestations of epilepsy. The electroencephalograph (EEG) signals register average neuronal activity from the cerebral cortex and label changes in activity over large areas. A detailed analysis of these electroencephalograph (EEG) signals provides valuable insights into the mechanisms instigating epileptic disorders. Moreover, the detection of interictal spikes and epileptic seizures in an EEG signal plays an important role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Automatic seizure detection methods are required, as these epileptic seizures are volatile and unpredictable. This paper deals with an automated detection of epileptic seizures in EEG signals using empirical mode decomposition (EMD) for feature extraction and proposes a novel genetic programming (GP) approach for classifying the EEG signals. Improvements in the standard GP approach are made using a Constructive Genetic Programming (CGP) in which constructive crossover and constructive subtree mutation operators are introduced. A hill climbing search is integrated in crossover and mutation operators to remove the destructive nature of these operators. A new concept of selecting the Globally Prime offspring is also presented to select the best fitness offspring generated during crossover. To decrease the time complexity of GP, a new dynamic fitness value computation (DFVC) is employed to increase the computational speed. We conducted five different sets of experiments to evaluate the performance of the proposed model in the classification of different mixtures of normal, interictal and ictal signals, and the accuracies achieved are outstandingly high. The experimental results are compared with the existing methods on same datasets, and these results affirm the potential use of

  2. Eslicarbazepine Acetate Monotherapy: A Review in Partial-Onset Seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley, Matt; Dhillon, Sohita

    2016-04-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (Aptiom(®)) is a once-daily, orally administered antiepileptic drug (AED) approved previously in the EU, USA and several other countries for use as adjunctive therapy for the treatment of partial-onset seizures. Based on the findings of two randomized, dose-blinded, conversion-to-monotherapy phase III trials in patients with uncontrolled partial epilepsy, the US license for eslicarbazepine acetate has recently been expanded to include use as monotherapy for partial-onset seizures. The pivotal trials demonstrated that seizure control following conversion from other AEDs was superior for eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy (1200 or 1600 mg once daily) compared with a pseudo-placebo historical control. Other efficacy outcomes appeared to support the benefit of treatment, with up to 10 % of patients remaining seizure free and up to 46 % of patients experiencing a ≥50 % reduction from baseline in standardized seizure frequency during the monotherapy periods of the trials. Eslicarbazepine acetate monotherapy was generally well tolerated, with most treatment-emergent adverse events being mild to moderate in severity. Its tolerability profile was generally consistent with the established profile of the drug based on its use as adjunctive therapy. Thus, once-daily eslicarbazepine acetate, either as monotherapy or adjunctive therapy, represents a useful option for the treatment of patients with partial-onset seizures. The recent licensing of the drug in the USA as monotherapy expands the range of treatment options for patients with partial-onset seizures and increases the opportunity to tailor therapy to the individual patient. PMID:27055527

  3. Communicating the diagnosis of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: The patient perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Amir; Tammaa, Maamoon; Chaudhary, Faria; Gill, Shazil; Yousuf, Syed; Bangalore-Vittal, Nandakumar; Singh, Pradumna; Jabeen, Shagufta; Ali, Shahid; Song, Yanna; Azar, Nabil J

    2016-06-01

    Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) are a common cause of refractory seizures. Video-electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring has allowed PNES to be effectively distinguished from epileptic seizures. Once the diagnosis of PNES is established, neurologists face the challenge of explaining it to patients. Patients may not always receive the diagnosis well. The aim of this study is to evaluate how effectively patients receive and perceive the diagnosis of PNES. This prospective study was conducted in an eight-bed epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU). Adult patients with newly confirmed PNES were included. After receiving written consent, a self-administered questionnaire was given to patients after the attending physician had communicated the diagnosis of PNES. A total of 75 patients were recruited. All patients had their typical seizures recorded on video-EEG (range 1-12, mean 2.18). Seventy patients were satisfied with the diagnosis of PNES. Nine patients did not agree that PNES has a psychological cause. Nineteen patients thought that the EMU doctors had no clue as to the cause of their seizures and 20 thought that there was no hope for a cure of their seizures. A significant number of patients with PNES feel that there is no hope for cure of their seizures. Thorough education about PNES, properly preparing patients before discussing the diagnosis of PNES, and preferably earlier diagnosis may prevent this miscommunication and result in better outcomes. A comprehensive approach including psychological counseling and psychiatric input, evaluation and treatment, in order to bring the illness from the subconscious to the conscious level, and effective follow-up may be helpful. PMID:26860851

  4. Descriptions of clinical semiology of seizures in literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Literary texts are an important part of the cultural history of many fields of medicine. Accounts of epilepsy are frequent, and descriptions of seizure semiology are often included with varying detail. This review looks at these, and considers the authors' background knowledge of epilepsy. The first group of writers suffered seizures themselves. Some of them provide remarkable and novel insights into the subjective symptoms and experiences in and around seizures.A second group draws from their own observations of seizures in others who may have been close relatives or fortuitous strangers. Here, the outside view prevails, and seizures may be described with clinical objectiveness. Commonly, the reactions of onlookers become part of the narrative beyond the seizure description. The third group writes from second-hand knowledge, which may be other observer reports, interviews with people with epilepsy or with experts, information being available in dictionaries, medical textbooks and the like. The professional standard of most writers means that the resulting descriptions are quite accurate, but there are also examples of poor use of such information. Many authors' sources are not known, but can be assumed to belong to one of the above categories, and we can sometimes guess. It appears that even authors with no first-hand knowledge are often aware of seizure types other than the most widely known, generalised tonic-clonic, and there is a widespread interest in warnings and how the afflicted respond to them. The quality of an author's fictional account of epilepsy should not be judged from a translation, because specific aspects and the language involved in the description may have been misunderstood by the translator. PMID:16567320

  5. 19 CFR 144.36 - Withdrawal for transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Withdrawal for transportation. 144.36 Section 144... § 144.36 Withdrawal for transportation. (a) Time limit. Merchandise may be withdrawn from warehouse for transportation to another port of entry if withdrawal for consumption or exportation can be accomplished at...

  6. Teachers' Withdrawal Behaviors and Their Relationship with Work Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemli, Özge

    2015-01-01

    Problem Situation: People experience ups and downs in their job satisfaction and motivation levels at different points of their work lives for various reasons. One of the outputs of low job satisfaction and motivation is defined as "withdrawal behaviors" in the literature. Withdrawal behaviors are any employee behavior of withdrawal from…

  7. Alcohol Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this Section Genetics of Alcohol Use Disorder Alcohol Use Disorder Problem drinking that becomes severe is given the medical diagnosis of “alcohol use disorder” or AUD. Approximately 7.2 percent or ...

  8. Breath alcohol test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol test - breath ... There are various brands of breath alcohol tests. Each one uses a different method to test the level of alcohol in the breath. The machine may be electronic or manual. One ...

  9. Alcoholic liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liver disease due to alcohol; Cirrhosis or hepatitis - alcoholic; Laennec's cirrhosis ... Alcoholic liver disease occurs after years of heavy drinking. Over time, scarring and cirrhosis can occur. Cirrhosis is the ...

  10. Fetal alcohol syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcohol in pregnancy; Alcohol-related birth defects; Fetal alcohol effects; FAS ... the baby is in the womb and after birth Decreased muscle tone and ... Heart defects such as ventricular septal defect (VSD) or atrial ...

  11. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad GHOFRANI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Ghofrani M. Approach To The First Unprovoked Seizure- PART I. Iran J Child Neurol. 2013 Summer; 7(3: 1- 5. The approach to a child who has experienced a first unprovoked generalized tonic-clonic seizure is challenging and at the same time controversial.How to establish the diagnosis, ways and means of investigation and whether treatment is appropriate, are different aspects of this subject.In this writing the above mentioned matters are discussed.References1. Bluvstein JS, Moshe SL. First unprovoked seizure CurrentManagement in child Neurology, third ed. 2005.P.89-92.2. Hirtz D, Berg A, Bettis D, et al. Practice Parameter: treatment of the child with a first unprovoked seizure. American Academy of Neurology 2003;60:166-175.3. Verity GM, Ross EN, Golding J. Epilepsy in the first ten years of life: finding of the child health and education study. Br Med J 1992;305:857-861.4. Camfiled CS, Camfield PB, Gordon K, et al. Incidence of epilepsy in childhood and adolescence: A populationbasedstudy in Nova Scotia from 1977 to 1985. Epilepsia 1996;37:19-23.5. Hauser W, Annegers J, Kurland L. Incidence of epilepsy and unprovoked seizure in Rochester, Minnisota, 1935- 1984. Epilepsia 1993;34:453-468.6. Jallon P, Goumaz M, Haenggeli G, Morabia A. Incidenceof first epileptic seizure in the canton of Geneve Switzerland. Epilepsia 1997;38:547-552.7. Camfiled PR, Camfiled CS. Pediatric Epilepsy: An overview. Swaiman’s pediatric Neurology, 5th ed, 2012. P.703-710.8. Gowers WB. Epilepsy and other chronic convulsive diseases; their causes, symptoms and treatment. London: J&A Churchill,1881. P.242.9. Goddard GV, Mc Intyre DC, Leech CK. A permanent change in brain function resulting from daily electrical stimulation- Exp Neural 1969;25:295-330.10. Berg AT, Shinnar S. Do seizures beget seizure? An assessment of the clinical evidence in human. J ClinicalNeurophysiol 1993: 14: 102-110.11. Wasterlain CG. Recurrent seizures in developing brain

  12. Sodium Valproate Withdrawal Correlates with Reduced Aggression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Duncan; Hoerger, Marguerite; Dyer, Tim; Graham, Nicola; Penney, Heather; Mace, F. Charles

    2014-01-01

    People with learning disabilities are sometimes prescribed psychotropic medication to help manage their challenging behaviour. This case study describes how a multicomponent behavioural intervention in conjunction with the systematic withdrawal of sodium valproate was strongly correlated with reduced aggression. No symptoms of bipolar disorder or…

  13. Design of withdrawal-weighted SAW filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Seunghee; Roh, Yongrae

    2002-03-01

    This paper presents a new design algorithm for a withdrawal-weighted surface acoustic wave (SAW) transversal filter. The proposed algorithm is based on the effective transmission loss theory and a delta function model of a SAW transversal filter. The design process consists of three steps, which eventually determine eight geometrical design parameters for the filter in order to satisfy given performance specifications. First, the number of fingers in the input and output interdigital transducers (IDTs), plus their geometrical sizes is determined using the insertion loss specification. Second, the number and positions of the polarity reverses in the output IDT are determined using the bandwidth and ripple specifications. Third, the number and position for withdrawing and switching specific fingers in the output IDT and attached electrode area are determined to achieve the desired sidelobe level. The efficiency of the technique is illustrated using a sample design of an IF filter consisting of a uniform input IDT and withdrawal-weighted output IDT. The proposed algorithm is distinct from conventional techniques in that it can optimize the structural geometry of a withdrawal-weighted SAW filter in a direct manner by considering all the performance specifications simultaneously. PMID:12322883

  14. 31 CFR 103.84 - Withdrawing requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Withdrawing requests. 103.84 Section 103.84 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance FINANCIAL RECORDKEEPING AND REPORTING OF CURRENCY AND FOREIGN TRANSACTIONS Administrative Rulings § 103.84...

  15. Genetics and alcoholism

    OpenAIRE

    Edenberg, Howard J.; Foroud, Tatiana

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol is widely consumed, but excessive use creates serious physical, psychological and social problems and contributes to many diseases. Alcoholism (alcohol dependence, alcohol use disorders) is a maladaptive pattern of excessive drinking leading to serious problems. Abundant evidence indicates that alcoholism is a complex genetic disease, with variations in a large number of genes affecting risk. Some of these genes have been identified, including two genes of alcohol me...

  16. ALCOHOL AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the questions of the relationship between the amount of the consumed alcohol, the type of alcoholic beverage, pattern of alcohol consumption and the blood pressure level. The article presents data on the positive effect of alcohol intake restrictions and recommendations for permissible limits of alcohol consumption. New possibilities of drug therapy aimed at limiting alcohol consumption are being reported.

  17. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne; Rasmussen, Søren;

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism are partly genetically determined. Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may...... be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking...... and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence interval (CI): 9.1-11) among men with the ADH1B.1/1 genotype compared to 7.5 drinks (95% CI: 6.4-8.7) among men with the ADH1B.1/2 genotype, and the odds ratio (OR) for heavy drinking was 3.1 (95% CI: 1.7-5.7) among men...

  18. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... begins January 23 Event registration opens today; new teacher resources... New & Noteworthy August 22, 2016 Fact Sheet: ... Events Sep 15 National Advisory Council on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Nov 11 Frontiers in Addiction Research ...

  19. Montelukast reduces seizures in pentylenetetrazol-kindled mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fleck

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs have been implicated in seizures and kindling; however, the effect of CysLT receptor antagonists on seizure frequency in kindled animals and changes in CysLT receptor expression after pentylenetetrazol (PTZ-induced kindling have not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated whether the CysLT1 inverse agonist montelukast, and a classical anticonvulsant, phenobarbital, were able to reduce seizures in PTZ-kindled mice and alter CysLT receptor expression. Montelukast (10 mg/kg, sc and phenobarbital (20 mg/kg, sc increased the latency to generalized seizures in kindled mice. Montelukast increased CysLT1 immunoreactivity only in non-kindled, PTZ-challenged mice. Interestingly, PTZ challenge decreased CysLT2 immunoreactivity only in kindled mice. CysLT1 antagonists appear to emerge as a promising adjunctive treatment for refractory seizures. Nevertheless, additional studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical implications of this research.

  20. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh KARIMZADEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available How to Cite This Article: Karimzadeh P, Rezayi A, Togha M, Ahmadabadi F, Derakhshanfar H, Azargashb E, Khodaei F. The Best Time for EEG Recording in Febrile Seizure. Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Winter; 8(1:20-25.ObjectiveSome studies suggest that detection of epileptic discharge is unusual during the first postictal week of febrile seizure and others believe that EEGs carried out on the day of the seizure are abnormal in as many as 88% of the patients. In thisstudy, we intend to compare early and late EEG abnormalities in febrile seizure.Materials & Methods EEG was recorded during daytime sleep, 24-48 hours (early EEG and 2 weeks (late EEG after the seizure in 36 children with febrile seizure (FS, aged between 3 months and 6 years. EEGs that showed generalized or focal spikes, sharp, spike wave complex, and slowing were considered as abnormal EEG.Abnormalities of the first EEG were compared with those of second EEG.ResultsThe most common abnormal epileptiform discharges recorded in the early EEG were slow waves (27.6% and sharp waves in late EEG (36%. Distribution of abnormalities in early and late EEG showed no significant statistical difference.ConclusionThe early and late EEG recording had the same results in patient with febrile seizure. Reference:Hauser WA, Kurland LT. The epidemiology of epilepsy in Rochester, Minnesota, 1935 through 1967. Epilepsia 1975;16(1:1-66.Freeman JM. Febrile seizures: a consensus of their significance, evaluation, and treatment. Pediatrics 1980;66(6:1009.Waruiru C, Appleton R. Febrile seizures: an update. Arch Dis Child 2004;89(8:751-6.ILAE. Guidelines for epidemiologic studies on epilepsy, International League against Epilepsy. Epilepsia 1993;34(4:592-6.Annegers JF, Hauser WA, Shirts SB, Kurland LT. Factors prognostic of unprovoked seizures after febrile convulsions. N Engl J Med 1987;316(9:493-8.Berg AT, Shinnar S, Darefsky AS, Holford TR, Shapiro ED, Salomon ME, et al. Predictors of recurrent febrile

  1. Refractory Seizures in Tramadol Poisoning: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Majidi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol, an analgesic drug abused by opioid addicts, is also abused accidentally or for suicidal purposes. Tramadol poisoning can induce CNS depression, seizures, coma, and ultimately death. Case: In this report, a 30-year-old male was admitted to the emergency department due to suicidal attempt with ingestion of 14000 mg (140 tablet 100 mg of tramadol. He had history of suicidal attempts in past years as well as depression in his past medical history, but he had not abused tramadol and other drugs in his history. There was no history of epilepsy or head trauma in. He presented with generalized seizures two hours post ingestion, and, then, he was referred to hospital four hours later. Generalized seizures were poorly controlled by multiple medications. Due to respiratory arrest, endotracheal tube was inserted and he was admitted to the ICU immediately. At admission, he experienced hypovolemic shock, hypoglycemia, coma, apnea, refractory seizures, muscle spasms, acute respiratory distress syndrome, coagolative disorder, rhabdomyolysis, and acute renal failure. Despite medical managements, he died 38 days after ingestion. Conclusion: In this report, despite using inhalational anesthetic drugs, seizures continued and were very poorly controlled. Cause of death in this patient can be seen as the side effects of tramadol poisoning.

  2. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable [3H]AMPA [(RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid] binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in [3H]AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine] were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the [3H]AMPA binding data

  3. Health risks of alcohol use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking ... Beer, wine, and liquor all contain alcohol. If you are drinking any of these, you are using alcohol. Your drinking patterns may vary, depending on who you are with ...

  4. Health risks of alcohol use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcoholism - risks; Alcohol abuse - risks; Alcohol dependence - risks; Risky drinking - risks ... Beer, wine, and liquor all contain alcohol. If you are drinking any of these, you are using alcohol. Your drinking patterns may vary, depending on who you are with ...

  5. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Rasmussen, S.;

    2008-01-01

    Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white...... men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence......, individuals with ADH1C slow vs fast alcohol degradation had a higher risk of heavy and excessive drinking. For example, the OR for heavy drinking was 1.4 (95% CI: 1.1-1.8) among men with the ADH1C.1/2 genotype and 1.4 (95% CI: 1.0-1.9) among men with the ADH1B.2/2 genotype, compared with men with the ADH1C.1...

  6. Absence of seizures in Rasmussen encephalitis with active inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Debopam; Gokden, Murat; Albert, Gregory W

    2016-06-01

    Severe focal motor epilepsy is considered a clinical hallmark of Rasmussen encephalitis (RE). The authors report a 6-year-old girl with progressive right sided hemiparesis, loss of language skills, left sided hemispheric atrophy, and brain pathologic features characteristic for RE. The patient did not experience seizures over a 2year period after symptom onset and for several months during follow-up. This report expands the clinical spectrum of RE and suggests that seizures are not a universal symptom of RE. Our patient's quite remarkable neurologic deficits along with active inflammation in the absence of epilepsy supports that, at least in some individuals, unilateral hemispheric progressive inflammation can occur without active seizure activity. PMID:26775150

  7. Seizure prediction using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbi, Ahmed F; Azinfar, Leila; Fazel-Rezai, Reza

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present a neuro-fuzzy approach of seizure prediction from invasive Electroencephalogram (EEG) by applying adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). Three nonlinear seizure predictive features were extracted from a patient's data obtained from the European Epilepsy Database, one of the most comprehensive EEG database for epilepsy research. A total of 36 hours of recordings including 7 seizures was used for analysis. The nonlinear features used in this study were similarity index, phase synchronization, and nonlinear interdependence. We designed an ANFIS classifier constructed based on these features as input. Fuzzy if-then rules were generated by the ANFIS classifier using the complex relationship of feature space provided during training. The membership function optimization was conducted based on a hybrid learning algorithm. The proposed method achieved highest sensitivity of 80% with false prediction rate as low as 0.46 per hour. PMID:24110134

  8. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul;

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS...... consisted of a sequence of phases best described quantitatively by dynamics of the low frequency (LF) wavelet component (2-8Hz). Contrary to the traditional view, the tonic phase started with a gradual increase in muscle activity. A longer clonic phase was associated with a shorter onset of the tonic phase......) of exponentially increasing duration - features that could not be reproduced voluntarily. The last SP was longer in seizures with higher EMG peak frequency whereas the energy of the last clonus was higher in seizures with a short clonic phase. We found specific features of muscle activation dynamics...

  9. SERUM ZINC LEVELS IN CHILDREN WITH FEBRILE SEIZURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Febrile seizures are the most common cause of convulsions in children and a frequent cause of emergency hospital admissions. Indian studies suggested that up to 10% of children experience a febrile seizure. Febrile seizures are defined as an event in infancy or childhood usually occurring between 6 months to 6 years of age associated with fever but without evidence of intracranial infection or defined cause. OBJECTIVES: To determine the frequency of low serum zinc level in children presenting with febrile seizures at tertiary care hospital, Bangalore. METHOD: This is an observational cross sectional study conducted at the Department of Pediatric Medicine, tertiary care hospital, Bangalore, from January 2013 to January 2014. Children (6 months to 6 years of age presenting with febrile seizures who satisfied inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled for the study. Cause of fever was determined after detailed history, physical examination and relevant investigations. Three milliliters centrifuged blood sample was preserved in acid washed test tube. Separated serum was used to measure serum zinc level by calorimetric method. RESULTS: Out of 100 children enrolled, male to female ratio was 1.4:1, 56% of children were below the age of 2 years with mean age of the children was 24 months. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most frequent cause of fever apparent in 70 children (70%, followed by dengue fever 11 children (11%, acute gastroenteritis 6 (6%, urinary tract infection and otitis media in 4 children each (8%, Viral fever in 5 child (5%. Frequency of low serum zinc level was 62% in children with febrile seizures. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSION: This study reveals that there is positive correlation between low serum zinc levels and febrile convulsions.

  10. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Hardwick, J Marie

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes. PMID:26054437

  11. Imaging the seizure onset zone with stereo-electroencephalography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Olivier; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Job, Anne-Sophie; Chabardès, Stéphan; Hoffmann, Dominique; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

    2011-10-01

    Stereo-electroencephalography is used to localize the seizure onset zone and connected neuronal networks in surgical candidates suffering from intractable focal epilepsy. The concept of an epileptogenicity index has been proposed recently to represent the likelihood of various regions being part of the seizure onset zone. It quantifies low-voltage fast activity, the electrophysiological signature of seizure onset usually assessed visually by neurologists. Here, we revisit epileptogenicity in light of neuroimaging tools such as those provided in statistical parametric mapping software. Our goal is to propose a robust approach, allowing easy exploration of patients' brains in time and space. The procedure is based upon statistical parametric mapping, which is an established framework for comparing multi-dimensional image data that allows one to correct for inherent multiple comparisons. Statistics can also be performed at the group level, between seizures in the same patient or between patients suffering from the same type of epilepsy using normalization of brains to a common anatomic atlas. Results are obtained from three case studies (insular reflex epilepsy, cryptogenic frontal epilepsy and lesional occipital epilepsy) where tailored resection was performed, and from a group of 10 patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. They illustrate the basics of the technique and demonstrate its very good reproducibility and specificity. Most importantly, the proposed approach to the quantification of the seizure onset zone allows one to summarize complex signals in terms of a time-series of statistical parametric maps that can support clinical decisions. Quantitative neuroimaging of stereo-electroencephalographic features of seizures might thus help to provide better pre-surgical assessment of patients undergoing resective surgery. PMID:21975587

  12. Evaluation of Risk Factors Associated with First Episode Febrile Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharawat, Indar Kumar; Singh, Jitender; Singh, Amitabh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Febrile seizure (FS) is the single most common type of seizure seen in children between 6 months to 5 years of age. The purpose of our study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures, which would help in the better management and preventive measures in children at risk for FS episodes. Aim To evaluate the risk factors associated with the first episode of febrile seizures in Indian children. Materials and Methods This was a hospital based, case control study. The purpose of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with the first FS episode in children. Seventy (70) children between age 6 months to 5 years with their first episode of FS were compared with 70 children with fever but without seizures based on various risk factors. Results The mean age was 24.90±16.11 months in cases and 26.34±16.93 months in controls. Male: female ratio was 2:1. A positive family history was found in 31.4% of first degree and 11.4% in second degree relatives. Mean maximum temperature was 102.06±1.1°F and URI (upper respiratory infection) was most common cause of fever. Antenatal complication was significantly higher in the case group. RBC (Red Blood Cells) indices like lower mean haemoglobin, MCV (Mean Corpuscular Volume), MCH (Mean Corpuscular Haemoglobin concentration) and higher RDW (Red Cell Distribution Width) values were seen in patients. Serum sodium, Serum calcium and random blood sugar values of the cases were significantly lower than those of controls (pblood sugar and microcytic hypochromic anaemia are the risk factors associated with the occurrence of first episode of febrile seizure and, thus, preventive measures in removing these risk factors could lead to a decrease in incidence of FS.

  13. Crowdsourcing reproducible seizure forecasting in human and canine epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Wagenaar, Joost; Abbot, Drew; Adkins, Phillip; Bosshard, Simone C; Chen, Min; Tieng, Quang M; He, Jialune; Muñoz-Almaraz, F J; Botella-Rocamora, Paloma; Pardo, Juan; Zamora-Martinez, Francisco; Hills, Michael; Wu, Wei; Korshunova, Iryna; Cukierski, Will; Vite, Charles; Patterson, Edward E; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    SEE MORMANN AND ANDRZEJAK DOI101093/BRAIN/AWW091 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE  : Accurate forecasting of epileptic seizures has the potential to transform clinical epilepsy care. However, progress toward reliable seizure forecasting has been hampered by lack of open access to long duration recordings with an adequate number of seizures for investigators to rigorously compare algorithms and results. A seizure forecasting competition was conducted on kaggle.com using open access chronic ambulatory intracranial electroencephalography from five canines with naturally occurring epilepsy and two humans undergoing prolonged wide bandwidth intracranial electroencephalographic monitoring. Data were provided to participants as 10-min interictal and preictal clips, with approximately half of the 60 GB data bundle labelled (interictal/preictal) for algorithm training and half unlabelled for evaluation. The contestants developed custom algorithms and uploaded their classifications (interictal/preictal) for the unknown testing data, and a randomly selected 40% of data segments were scored and results broadcasted on a public leader board. The contest ran from August to November 2014, and 654 participants submitted 17 856 classifications of the unlabelled test data. The top performing entry scored 0.84 area under the classification curve. Following the contest, additional held-out unlabelled data clips were provided to the top 10 participants and they submitted classifications for the new unseen data. The resulting area under the classification curves were well above chance forecasting, but did show a mean 6.54 ± 2.45% (min, max: 0.30, 20.2) decline in performance. The kaggle.com model using open access data and algorithms generated reproducible research that advanced seizure forecasting. The overall performance from multiple contestants on unseen data was better than a random predictor, and demonstrates the feasibility of seizure forecasting in canine and human

  14. Diazepam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diazepam is used to relieve anxiety, muscle spasms, and seizures and to control agitation caused by alcohol withdrawal. ... Inderal); ranitidine (Zantac); rifampin (Rifadin); sedatives; sleeping pills; theophylline (Theo-Dur); tranquilizers; valproic acid (Depakene); and vitamins. ...

  15. Ginkgotoxin Induced Seizure Caused by Vitamin B6 Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Soon; Roh, Sook Young; Jeong, Eun Hye; Kim, Byung-Su; Sunwoo, Mun Kyung

    2015-12-01

    Although ginkgo is commonly used as an alternative treatment for memory loss, Alzheimer's dementia and peripheral circulatory disturbances, it is also known to cause neuronal symptoms due to ginkgotoxin (4'-methoxypyridoxine or B6 antivitamin). We experienced a case of a 51-year-old female patient with generalized tonic clonic seizure and postictal confusion after eating large amounts of ginkgo nuts. Blood vitamin B6 level was decreased. After conservative treatment and pyridoxine medication, her mental symptoms were resolved completely and no seizures recurred. PMID:26819944

  16. Risk of epileptic seizures onset during acute period of stroke

    OpenAIRE

    I. G. Rudakova; E. Yu. Djachkova; I. G. Kolchu

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is one of the chief cause adults epilepsy. Screening study was performed. Risk factors of early and late after stroke epileptic seizures was studied. It were included 300 patient with different types of stroke, et the age of 41–94. Data of medical history and brain imaging were studied. Results of research were showed: risk of early seizures increase by patients with hemorrhagic stroke, with heart embolic type of ischemic stroke, with combination of cardiac fibrillation and arterial hy...

  17. The management of drug resistant seizures in tuberous sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina MOAVERO

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC is a multisystem autosomal dominant genetic disorder resulting from mutations in one of two genes, TSC1 and TSC2. Pathologically TSC is characterized by abnormal cellular differentiation and proliferation, as well as abnormal neuronal migration. The majority of patients with TSC have epilepsy, although the mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis remain unknown. Seizures onset is frequently during the first year of life, and in a sizable proportion of individuals tend to be refractory to antiepileptic drug treatment. This article reviews the progress in understanding drug resistant seizures in TSC, from molecular pathogenesis to the pathophysiological mechanisms of epileptogenesis, and the rationale for appropriate medical and surgical treatment.

  18. Generic Single-Channel Detection of Absence Seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Eline B.; Duun-Henriksen, Jonas; Mazzaretto, Andrea; Kjær, Troels W.; Thomsen, Carsten E.; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2011-01-01

    A long-term EEG-monitoring system, which automatically marks seizure events, is useful for diagnosing and treating epilepsy. A generic method utilizing the low interand intra-patient variabilities in EEG-characteristics during absence seizures is proposed. This paper investigates if the spike...... obtained for the derivation F7-FP1. Using this channel a sensitivity of 99.1 %, positive predictive value of 94.8 %, mean detection latency of 3.7 s, and false detection rate value of 0.5/h was obtained. The topographical visualization of the results clearly shows that the frontal, midline, and parietal...

  19. A RARE CAUSE OF RESISTANT SEIZURES: DYKE DAVIDOFF MASSON SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswadev Basu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT : Dyke – Davidoff – Masson Syndrome (DDMS, is a rare clinical condition characterized by clinical triad of seizures, contralateral spastic hemiplegia or hemiparesis, with or without mental retardation. Diagnosis requires presence of cerebral hemiatrophy with homolateral hypertrophy of the skull and sinuses on brain imaging. Here we report a case of DDMS in a 16 year old girl who presented with seizures and hemiparesis.MRI of her brain showed hemiatrophy involving the left cerebral hemisphere with enlargement of ipsilateral sinuses and ventricles

  20. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Mahyar, Abolfazl; AYAZI, Parviz; DALIRANI, Reza; Nargess GHOLAMI; Daneshi-Kohan, Mohammad Mahdi; Mohammadi, Navid; AHMADI, Mohammad Hossein; Ahmad Ali SAHMANI

    2014-01-01

    How to Cite This Article: Mahyar A, Ayazi P, Dalirani R, Gholami N, Daneshi-Kohan MM, Mohammadi N, Ahmadi MM, Sahmani AA. Melatonin’s Effect in Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy Iran J Child Neurol. 2014 Summer;8(3): 24-29. AbstractObjectiveRecognition of risk factors for febrile seizures (FS) and epilepsy is essential. Studies regarding the role of melatonin in these convulsive disorders are limited.This study determines the relationship between serum melatonin levels and FS and epilepsy in chil...

  1. Evidence Based Approach to Children with Fever and Seizure

    OpenAIRE

    M.Mohammadi

    2002-01-01

    How could we actually find the answers to our every day’s practice queries in the era of information overload? We could find the answers thanks to evidence-based practice (EBM). In the following review article I have tried to illustrate an EBM model of approach to one of the greatest concerns of everyday practice of pediatricians (i.e., seizure and fever and febrile seizure). After a case presentation, I have listed some common questions of every day’s practice; Then I have tried to find the ...

  2. Anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects of Rosa damascena hydro-alcoholic extract on rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Homayoun

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previously, analgesic, hypnotic, and anticonvulsant effects have been suggested for Rosa damascena (R. damascena. In the present study, possible anti-seizure and neuro-protective effects of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has been investigated after inducing seizures in rats by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided to five groups: (1 Control: received saline, (2 PTZ: 100 mg/kg, i.p., (3 PTZ-Extract 50 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 50, (4 PTZ- Extract 100 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 100, and (5 PTZ- Extract 200 mg/kg(PTZ-Ext 200 groups which were treated with 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg respectively of hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena for one week before PTZ injection. The animals were examined for electrocorticography (ECoG recording and finally, the brains were removed for histological study. Results: The hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena significantly prolonged the latency of seizure attacks and reduced the frequency and amplitude of epileptiform burst discharges induced by PTZ injection. Moreover, all three doses of the extract significantly inhibited production of dark neurons in different regions of the hippocampus in the mentioned animal model. Conclusion: The present study showed that the hydro-alcoholic extract of R. damascena has anticonvulsant and neuroprotective effects. More investigations are needed to be done in order to better understand the responsible compound(s as well as the possible mechanism(s.

  3. Turning to alcohol?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil is examining whether turning to alcohol could solve its problems. The fuel alcohol producers are lobbying hard for the government to increase the use of alcohol to fuel the country's cars. Not only does using alcohol reduce CO2, runs the argument, but the Kyoto agreement might just attract international financing for the project. (author)

  4. One-a-Day Anti-Seizure Drug Shows Promise for People with Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anti-Seizure Drug Shows Promise for People With Epilepsy Eslicarbazepine may make management easier, safer for people ... April 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A once-daily epilepsy drug may control seizures just as well as ...

  5. Mapping brain activity on the verge of a photically induced generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeller, Friederike; Siebner, Hartwig R; Wolff, Stephan; Muhle, Hiltrud; Granert, Oliver; Jansen, Olav; Stephani, Ulrich; Siniatchkin, Michael

    2009-01-01

    In a photosensitive patient intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) accidentally provoked a generalized tonic-clonic seizure during simultaneous recordings of electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Before seizure onset, IPS consistently induced generalized ph...

  6. Internet Alcohol Marketing and Underage Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Auden C.; Tanski, Susanne E.; Li, Zhigang; Jackson, Kristina; Morgenstern, Matthis; Li, Zhongze; Sargent, James D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE Internet alcohol marketing is not well studied despite its prevalence and potential accessibility and attractiveness to youth. The objective was to examine longitudinal associations between self-reported engagement with Internet alcohol marketing and alcohol use transitions in youth. METHODS A US sample of 2012 youths aged 15 to 20 was surveyed in 2011. An Internet alcohol marketing receptivity score was developed, based on number of positive responses to seeing alcohol advertising on the Internet, visiting alcohol brand Web sites, being an online alcohol brand fan, and cued recall of alcohol brand home page images. We assessed the association between baseline marketing receptivity and both ever drinking and binge drinking (≥6 drinks per occasion) at 1-year follow-up with multiple logistic regression, controlling for baseline drinking status, Internet use, sociodemographics, personality characteristics, and peer or parent drinking. RESULTS At baseline, ever-drinking and binge-drinking prevalence was 55% and 27%, respectively. Many (59%) reported seeing Internet alcohol advertising, but few reported going to an alcohol Web site (6%) or being an online fan (3%). Higher Internet use, sensation seeking, having family or peers who drank, and past alcohol use were associated with Internet alcohol marketing receptivity, and a score of 1 or 2 was independently associated with greater adjusted odds of initiating binge drinking (odds ratio 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.13–2.78 and odds ratio 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–4.37 respectively) but not with initiation of ever drinking. CONCLUSIONS Although high levels of engagement with Internet alcohol marketing were uncommon, most underage youths reported seeing it, and we found a prospective association between receptivity to this type of alcohol marketing and future problem drinking, making additional research and ongoing surveillance important. PMID:26738886

  7. Voluntary alcohol consumption and plasma beta-endorphin levels in alcohol preferring rats chronically treated with lamotrigine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska-Kaszubska, Jadwiga; Bajer, Bartosz; Gorska, Dorota; Andrzejczak, Dariusz; Dyr, Wanda; Bieńkowski, Przemysław

    2015-02-01

    Several recent studies have indicated that lamotrigine, similarly to other antiepileptic drugs, may be useful in the therapy of alcohol dependence. The rationale for using lamotrigine in the treatment of alcohol addiction is based on its multiple mechanisms of action which include inhibition of voltage-sensitive sodium channels, modulation voltage-gated calcium currents and transient potassium outward current. However, the known mechanism of lamotrigine does not fully explain its efficacy in alcohol addiction therapy. For this reason we have decided to examine the effect of lamotrigine on the opioid system. Our previous studies showed that topiramate and levetiracetam (antiepileptic drugs) as well as the most effective drugs in alcohol addiction therapy i.e. naltrexone and acamprosate, when given repeatedly, all increased plasma beta endorphin (an endogenous opioid peptide) level, despite operating through different pharmacological mechanisms. It is known that low beta-endorphin level is often associated with alcohol addiction and also that alcohol consumption elevates the level of this peptide. This study aims to assess the effect of repeated treatment with lamotrigine on voluntary alcohol intake and beta-endorphin plasma level in alcohol preferring rats (Warsaw high preferring (WHP) rats). We observed a decrease in alcohol consumption in rats treated with lamotrigine. However we didn't observe significant changes in beta-endorphin level during withdrawal of alcohol, which may indicate that the drug does not affect the opioid system. We suppose that lamotrigine may be useful in alcohol dependence therapy and presents a potential area for further study. PMID:25449391

  8. Opiate withdrawal behavior after focal brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D A; Thorn, B E

    1984-11-01

    Electrical stimulation of the brainstem abolishes pain, while continued stimulation induces tolerance to the analgesic effect. Analgesic drugs producing tolerance also induce physical dependence, suggesting that the phenomenon of tolerance is associated with addiction. There is evidence that the neural mechanism for stimulation-produced analgesia is related to the release of opiate substances within the brain. We therefore propose that repeated or protracted brain stimulation elicits dependence upon the endorphins released by electrical stimulation of the neurons themselves. To investigate this possibility, rats were given repetitive bursts of analgesic electrical brain stimulation for two hours. Immediately thereafter, they were injected with the opiate antagonist, naloxone. Behaviors associated with low grade opiate withdrawal were observed. These data suggest that prolonged analgesic stimulation can result in naloxone-precipitated behaviors similar to the behaviors exhibited during opiate withdrawal. PMID:6542676

  9. Alcohol and Breastfeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Maija Bruun; Pottegård, Anton; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    While the harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy are well-established, the consequences of alcohol intake during lactation have been far less examined. We reviewed available data on the prevalence of alcohol intake during lactation, the influence of alcohol on breastfeeding......, the pharmacokinetics of alcohol in lactating women and nursing infants and the effects of alcohol intake on nursing infants. A systematic search was performed in PubMed from origin to May 2013, and 41 publications were included in the review. Approximately half of all lactating women in Western countries consume...... alcohol while breastfeeding. Alcohol intake inhibits the milk ejection reflex, causing a temporary decrease in milk yield. The alcohol concentrations in breast milk closely resemble those in maternal blood. The amount of alcohol presented to nursing infants through breast milk is approximately 5...

  10. Will seizure control improve by switching from the Modified Atkins Diet to the traditional Ketogenic Diet?

    OpenAIRE

    Kossoff, Eric H.; Dorward, Jennifer L.; Miranda, Maria J.; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Kang, Hoon Chul; Kim, Heung Dong

    2010-01-01

    It has been reported that children can maintain seizure control when the ketogenic diet (KD) is transitioned to the less restrictive modified Atkins diet (MAD). What is unknown, however, is the likelihood of additional seizure control from a switch from the MAD to the KD. Retrospective information was obtained from 27 patients who made this dietary change from 4 different institutions. Ten (37%) had ≥10% additional seizure reduction with the KD above the MAD, of which 5 became seizure-free. T...

  11. The ictal wavefront is the spatiotemporal source of discharges during spontaneous human seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Elliot H.; Liou, Jyun-you; Davis, Tyler S.; Merricks, Edward M.; Kellis, Spencer S.; Weiss, Shennan A.; Greger, Bradley; House, Paul A.; McKhann II, Guy M.; Goodman, Robert R.; Emerson, Ronald G.; Bateman, Lisa M.; Trevelyan, Andrew J.; Schevon, Catherine A.

    2016-01-01

    The extensive distribution and simultaneous termination of seizures across cortical areas has led to the hypothesis that seizures are caused by large-scale coordinated networks spanning these areas. This view, however, is difficult to reconcile with most proposed mechanisms of seizure spread and termination, which operate on a cellular scale. We hypothesize that seizures evolve into self-organized structures wherein a small seizing territory projects high-intensity electrical signals over a b...

  12. A Multi-stage System for the Automated Detection of Epileptic Seizures in Neonatal EEG

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Joyeeta; Glover, John R.; Ktonas, Periklis Y.; Thitai Kumar, Arun; Mukherjee, Amit; Karayiannis, Nicolaos B.; Frost, James D.; Hrachovy, Richard A.; Mizrahi, Eli M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and test results of a 3-stage automated system for neonatal EEG seizure detection. Stage I of the system is the initial detection stage, and identifies overlapping 5-s segments of suspected seizure activity in each EEG channel. In Stage II, the detected segments from Stage I are spatiotemporally clustered to produce multi-channel candidate seizures. In Stage III, the candidate seizures are processed further using measures of quality and context-based rules to e...

  13. Seizures caused by pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency in adults: A case report and literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Tong, Yisha

    2014-01-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency is a recognised cause of intractable seizures in neonates. However, pyridoxine deficiency related seizures in adults were rarely reported. This article reports a case of a 79 year old lady who suffered from new-onset seizures and was successfully treated with vitamin B6. The patient had chronic renal disease and weight loss due to anepithymia following a pelvic fracture. This article also reviews literatures of seizures caused by pyridoxine deficiency in adu...

  14. Alcoholic liver disease: Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Suk, Ki Tae; Kim, Moon Young; Baik, Soon Koo

    2014-01-01

    The excess consumption of alcohol is associated with alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). ALD is a major healthcare problem, personal and social burden, and significant reason for economic loss worldwide. The ALD spectrum includes alcoholic fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The diagnosis of ALD is based on a combination of clinical features, including a history of significant alcohol intake, evidence of liver disease, and laboratory findi...

  15. Alcohol and pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Maria Paoletti; Ileana Atzeni; Marisa Orrù; Monica Pilloni; Alessandro Loddo; Martina Zirone; Maria Francesca Marotto; Pierina Zedda; Maria Francesca Fais; Emanuela Stochino Loi; Graziella Boi; Gian Benedetto Melis

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol exerts teratogenic effects in all the gestation times, with peculiar features in relationship to the trimester of pregnancy in which alcohol is assumed. Alcohol itself and its metabolites modify DNA synthesis, cellular division, cellular migration and the fetal development. The characteristic facies of feto-alcoholic syndrome (FAS)-affected baby depends on the alcohol impact on skull facial development during the first trimester of pregnancy. In association there are cerebral damages ...

  16. Antioxidants and free radical scavengers do not consistently delay seizure onset in animal models of acute seizures

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Kaiping; Stringer, Janet L.

    2008-01-01

    A number of herbal compounds with direct antioxidant activity slow the onset, or completely block, the appearance of seizures. This increase in latency has been proposed to be due to the antioxidant activity. This hypothesis was directly tested by determining the effects of Trolox®, a vitamin E analog, vitamin C, melatonin, and α-lipoic acid on the latency to acute seizures induced with pilocarpine, kainic acid or pentylenetetrazol (PTZ sc) in adult rats. Trolox®, vitamin C, and α-lipoic acid...

  17. Expression Profiling after Prolonged Experimental Febrile Seizures in Mice Suggests Structural Remodeling in the Hippocampus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongbloets, Bart C; van Gassen, Koen L I; Kan, Anne A; Olde Engberink, Anneke H O; de Wit, Marina; Wolterink-Donselaar, Inge G; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; van Nieuwenhuizen, Onno; Holstege, Frank C P; de Graan, Pierre N E

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most prevalent type of seizures among children up to 5 years of age (2-4% of Western-European children). Complex febrile seizures are associated with an increased risk to develop temporal lobe epilepsy. To investigate short- and long-term effects of experimental febrile seiz

  18. Diurnal rhythms in seizures detected by intracranial electrocorticographic monitoring : An observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Wytske A.; Spetgens, Willy P. J.; Leijten, Frans S. S.; van Rijen, Peter C.; Gosselaar, Peter; van der Palen, Job; de Weerd, Al W.

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated human seizure occurrence over the 24-hour day, and only one group has employed intracranial electrocorticography monitoring to record seizures. Circadian patterns in seizures may have important implications in diagnosis and therapy and provide opportunities in research. We

  19. Downregulated GABA and BDNF-TrkB Pathway in Chronic Cyclothiazide Seizure Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Kong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclothiazide (CTZ has been reported to simultaneously enhance glutamate receptor excitation and inhibit GABAA receptor inhibition, and in turn it evokes epileptiform activities in hippocampal neurons. It has also been shown to acutely induce epileptic seizure behavior in freely moving rats. However, whether CTZ induced seizure rats could develop to have recurrent seizure still remains unknown. In the current study, we demonstrated that 46% of the CTZ induced seizure rats developed to have recurrent seizure behavior as well as epileptic EEG with a starting latency between 2 weeks and several months. In those chronic seizure rats 6 months after the seizure induction by the CTZ, our immunohistochemistry results showed that both GAD and GAT-1 were significantly decreased across CA1, CA3, and dentate gyrus area of the hippocampus studied. In addition, both BDNF and its receptor TrkB were also decreased in hippocampus of the chronic CTZ seizure rats. Our results indicate that CTZ induced seizure is capable of developing to have recurrent seizure, and the decreased GABA synthesis and transport as well as the impaired BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway may contribute to the development of the recurrent seizure. Thus, CTZ seizure rats may provide a novel animal model for epilepsy study and anticonvulsant drug testing in the future.

  20. Predictors and characteristics of seizures in survivors of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskin, Dhanashri P; Herman, Susan T; Ngo, Long H; Koralnik, Igor J

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to determine the risk factors for epileptogenesis and characteristics of seizures in patients with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) who survive more than 1 year from onset of neurological symptoms (PML survivors). We reviewed clinical data including seizure history and MR imaging studies from PML survivors evaluated at our institution between 1997 and 2014. PML progressors who passed away within 1 year and patients with a history of seizures prior to PML diagnosis were excluded from the analysis. Of 64 PML survivors, 28 (44 %) developed seizures. The median time from the onset of PML symptoms to the first seizure was 5.4 months (range 0-159) and 64 % of patients with seizures had them within the first year. The presence of juxtacortical PML lesions was associated with a relative risk of seizures of 3.5 (p < 0.02; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.3-9.4) in multivariate analyses. Of all seizure types, 86 % were focal and 60 % most likely originated from the frontal lobes. Among seizure patients, 89 % required treatment, including one (54 %), two (25 %), or three (10.5 %) antiepileptic drugs. Seizures are a frequent complication in PML and can develop throughout the entire course of the disease. However, late onset seizures did not signify PML relapse. Seizures may require treatment with multiple antiepileptic medications and are a significant co-morbidity in PML. PMID:26676826