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Sample records for alcohol decreased serotonin

  1. Individual vulnerability to escalated aggressive behavior by a low dose of alcohol: decreased serotonin receptor mRNA in the prefrontal cortex of male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatto, S; Quadros, I M H; Ambar, G; Miczek, K A

    2010-02-01

    Low to moderate doses of alcohol consumption induce heightened aggressive behavior in some, but not all individuals. Individual vulnerability for this nonadaptive behavior may be determined by an interaction of genetic and environmental factors with the sensitivity of alcohol's effects on brain and behavior. We used a previously established protocol for alcohol oral self-administration and characterized alcohol-heightened aggressive (AHA) mice as compared with alcohol non-heightened (ANA) counterparts. A week later, we quantified mRNA steady state levels of several candidate genes in the serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] system in different brain areas. We report a regionally selective and significant reduction of all 5-HT receptor subtype transcripts, except for 5-HT(3), in the prefrontal cortex of AHA mice. Comparable gene expression profile was previously observed in aggressive mice induced by social isolation or by an anabolic androgenic steroid. Additional change in the 5-HT(1B) receptor transcripts was seen in the amygdala and hypothalamus of AHA mice. In both these areas, 5-HT(1B) mRNA was elevated when compared with ANA mice. In the hypothalamus, AHA mice also showed increased transcripts for 5-HT(2A) receptor. In the midbrain, 5-HT synthetic enzyme, 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors mRNA levels were similar between groups. Our results emphasize a role for postsynaptic over presynaptic 5-HT receptors in mice which showed escalated aggression after the consumption of a moderate dose of alcohol. This gene expression profile of 5-HT neurotransmission components in the brain of mice may suggest a vulnerability trait for alcohol-heightened aggression.

  2. Decreased Serotonin Levels and Serotonin-Mediated Osteoblastic Inhibitory Signaling in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klavdianou, Kalliopi; Liossis, Stamatis-Nick; Papachristou, Dionysios J; Theocharis, Georgios; Sirinian, Chaido; Kottorou, Anastasia; Filippopoulou, Alexandra; Andonopoulos, Andrew P; Daoussis, Dimitrios

    2016-03-01

    Evidence suggests that serotonin is an inhibitor of bone formation. We aimed to assess: 1) serum serotonin levels in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), a prototype bone-forming disease, compared with patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and healthy subjects; 2) the effect(s) of TNFα blockers on serum serotonin levels in patients with AS and RA; and 3) the effect(s) of serum of AS patients on serotonin signaling. Serum serotonin levels were measured in 47 patients with AS, 28 patients with RA, and 40 healthy subjects by radioimmunoassay; t test was used to assess differences between groups. The effect of serum on serotonin signaling was assessed using the human osteoblastic cell line Saos2, evaluating levels of phospho-CREB by Western immunoblots. Serotonin serum levels were significantly lower in patients with AS compared with healthy subjects (mean ± SEM ng/mL 122.9 ± 11.6 versus 177.4 ± 24.58, p = 0.038) and patients with RA (mean ± SEM ng/mL 244.8 ± 37.5, p = 0.0004). Patients with AS receiving TNFα blockers had significantly lower serotonin levels compared with patients with AS not on such treatment (mean ± SEM ng/mL 95.8 ± 14.9 versus 149.2 ± 16.0, p = 0.019). Serotonin serum levels were inversely correlated with pCREB induction in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Serotonin levels are low in patients with AS and decrease even further during anti-TNFα treatment. Differences in serotonin levels are shown to have a functional impact on osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. Therefore, serotonin may be involved in new bone formation in AS. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  3. Brain serotonin 2A receptor binding: Relations to body mass index, tobacco and alcohol use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, D.; Frokjaer, V. G.; Haugbol, S.

    2009-01-01

    Manipulations of the serotonin levels in the brain can affect impulsive behavior and influence our reactivity to conditioned reinforcers. Eating, tobacco smoking, and alcohol consumption are reinforcers that are influenced by serotonergic neurotransmission; serotonergic hypofunction leads...... to increased food and alcohol intake, and conversely, stimulation of the serotonergic system induces weight reduction and decreased food/alcohol intake as well as tobacco smoking. To investigate whether body weight, alcohol intake and tobacco smoking were related to the regulation of the cerebral serotonin 2A...... receptor (5-HT(2A)) in humans, we tested in 136 healthy human subjects if body mass index (BMI), degree of alcohol consumption and tobacco smoking was associated to the cerebral in vivo 5-HT(2A) receptor binding as measured with (18)F-altanserin PET. The subjects' BMI's ranged from 18.4 to 42.8 (25...

  4. Decreased uptake of 3H-serotonin and endogenous content of serotonin in blood platelets in hypertensive patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, L.A.; Le Quan-Bui, K.H.; Meyer, P.

    1984-01-01

    The uptake and content of serotonin in blood platelets were studied in patients with essential hypertension and in five families in which at least one member was hypertensive. Blood was obtained from male and female normotensive volunteers and hypertensive patients who were free of medication. Lineweaver-Burk plots of 3H-serotonin uptake from both control subjects and hypertensive patients were linear, which suggested simple Michaelis-Menten uptake kinetics. The maximal uptake velocity (Vmax) in hypertensive patients was significantly lower than in control subjects (control . 41.7 +/- 3.3 pmol/min/10(8) platelets, n . 17; hypertensive . 26.6 +/- 3.0 pmol/min/10(8) platelets, n . 16; p less than 0.005). The affinity constant (Km) was slightly but significantly lower in hypertensive patients (control . 0.70 +/- 0.08 microM; hypertensive . 0.46 +/- 0.08 microM; p less than 0.05). The serotonin content in blood platelets determined by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection was significantly lower in hypertensive patients (control . 165.0 +/- 12.9 nmol/10(11) platelets, n . 29; hypertensive . 105.9 +/- 10.4 nmol/10(11) platelets, n . 27; p less than 0.001). In the five families investigated, the lowered serotonin content was observed in some normotensive members. The reduced number of carriers of serotonin uptake and the slight decrease in the affinity constant observed in platelets of patients with essential hypertension suggest that serotonin metabolism is altered in essential hypertension and that blood platelets may be a useful model in studying the serotonergic modifications at the molecular level

  5. Decreased prefrontal cortical dopamine transmission in alcoholism.

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    Narendran, Rajesh; Mason, Neale Scott; Paris, Jennifer; Himes, Michael L; Douaihy, Antoine B; Frankle, W Gordon

    2014-08-01

    Basic studies have demonstrated that optimal levels of prefrontal cortical dopamine are critical to various executive functions such as working memory, attention, inhibitory control, and risk/reward decisions, all of which are impaired in addictive disorders such as alcoholism. Based on this and imaging studies of alcoholism that have demonstrated less dopamine in the striatum, the authors hypothesized decreased dopamine transmission in the prefrontal cortex in persons with alcohol dependence. To test this hypothesis, amphetamine and [11C]FLB 457 positron emission tomography were used to measure cortical dopamine transmission in 21 recently abstinent persons with alcohol dependence and 21 matched healthy comparison subjects. [11C]FLB 457 binding potential, specific compared to nondisplaceable uptake (BPND), was measured in subjects with kinetic analysis using the arterial input function both before and after 0.5 mg kg-1 of d-amphetamine. Amphetamine-induced displacement of [11C]FLB 457 binding potential (ΔBPND) was significantly smaller in the cortical regions in the alcohol-dependent group compared with the healthy comparison group. Cortical regions that demonstrated lower dopamine transmission in the alcohol-dependent group included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, medial prefrontal cortex, orbital frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and medial temporal lobe. The results of this study, for the first time, unambiguously demonstrate decreased dopamine transmission in the cortex in alcoholism. Further research is necessary to understand the clinical relevance of decreased cortical dopamine as to whether it is related to impaired executive function, relapse, and outcome in alcoholism.

  6. Serotonin Decreases the Gain of Visual Responses in Awake Macaque V1.

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    Seillier, Lenka; Lorenz, Corinna; Kawaguchi, Katsuhisa; Ott, Torben; Nieder, Andreas; Pourriahi, Paria; Nienborg, Hendrikje

    2017-11-22

    Serotonin, an important neuromodulator in the brain, is implicated in affective and cognitive functions. However, its role even for basic cortical processes is controversial. For example, in the mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), heterogenous serotonergic modulation has been observed in anesthetized animals. Here, we combined extracellular single-unit recordings with iontophoresis in awake animals. We examined the role of serotonin on well-defined tuning properties (orientation, spatial frequency, contrast, and size) in V1 of two male macaque monkeys. We find that in the awake macaque the modulatory effect of serotonin is surprisingly uniform: it causes a mainly multiplicative decrease of the visual responses and a slight increase in the stimulus-selective response latency. Moreover, serotonin neither systematically changes the selectivity or variability of the response, nor the interneuronal correlation unexplained by the stimulus ("noise-correlation"). The modulation by serotonin has qualitative similarities with that for a decrease in stimulus contrast, but differs quantitatively from decreasing contrast. It can be captured by a simple additive change to a threshold-linear spiking nonlinearity. Together, our results show that serotonin is well suited to control the response gain of neurons in V1 depending on the animal's behavioral or motivational context, complementing other known state-dependent gain-control mechanisms. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Serotonin is an important neuromodulator in the brain and a major target for drugs used to treat psychiatric disorders. Nonetheless, surprisingly little is known about how it shapes information processing in sensory areas. Here we examined the serotonergic modulation of visual processing in the primary visual cortex of awake behaving macaque monkeys. We found that serotonin mainly decreased the gain of the visual responses, without systematically changing their selectivity, variability, or covariability. This

  7. Interaction between serotonin transporter and serotonin receptor 1 B genes polymorphisms may be associated with antisocial alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yun; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Chen, Shiou-Lan; Chang, Yun-Hsuan; Chen, Shih-Heng; Chu, Chun-Hsien; Huang, San-Yuan; Tzeng, Nian-Sheng; Wang, Chen-Lin; Lee, I Hui; Yeh, Tzung Lieh; Yang, Yen Kuang; Lu, Ru-Band

    2012-07-11

    Several studies have hypothesized that genes regulating the components of the serotonin system, including serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) and serotonin 1 B receptor (5-HT1B), may be associated with alcoholism, but their results are contradictory because of alcoholism's heterogeneity. Therefore, we examined whether the 5-HTTLPR gene and 5-HT1B gene G861C polymorphism are susceptibility factors for a specific subtype of alcoholism, antisocial alcoholism in Han Chinese in Taiwan. We recruited 273 Han Chinese male inmates with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) [antisocial alcoholism (AS-ALC) group (n=120) and antisocial non-alcoholism (AS-N-ALC) group (n=153)] and 191 healthy male controls from the community. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. There were no significant differences in the genotypic frequency of the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism between the 3 groups. Although AS-ALC group members more frequently carried the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes than controls, the difference became non-significant after controlling for the covarying effects of age. However, the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes may have interacted with the 5-HT1B G861C C/C polymorphism and increased the risk of becoming antisocial alcoholism. Our study suggests that neither the 5-HTTLPR gene nor the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism alone is a risk factor for antisocial alcoholism in Taiwan's Han Chinese population, but that the interaction between both genes may increase susceptibility to antisocial alcoholism.

  8. Interaction between Serotonin Transporter and Serotonin Receptor 1 B genes polymorphisms may be associated with antisocial alcoholism

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    Wang Tzu-Yun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several studies have hypothesized that genes regulating the components of the serotonin system, including serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR and serotonin 1 B receptor (5-HT1B, may be associated with alcoholism, but their results are contradictory because of alcoholism’s heterogeneity. Therefore, we examined whether the 5-HTTLPR gene and 5-HT1B gene G861C polymorphism are susceptibility factors for a specific subtype of alcoholism, antisocial alcoholism in Han Chinese in Taiwan. Methods We recruited 273 Han Chinese male inmates with antisocial personality disorder (ASPD [antisocial alcoholism (AS-ALC group (n = 120 and antisocial non-alcoholism (AS-N-ALC group (n = 153] and 191 healthy male controls from the community. Genotyping was done using PCR-RFLP. Results There were no significant differences in the genotypic frequency of the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism between the 3 groups. Although AS-ALC group members more frequently carried the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes than controls, the difference became non-significant after controlling for the covarying effects of age. However, the 5-HTTLPR S/S, S/LG, and LG/LG genotypes may have interacted with the 5-HT1B G861C C/C polymorphism and increased the risk of becoming antisocial alcoholism. Conclusion Our study suggests that neither the 5-HTTLPR gene nor the 5-HT1B G861C polymorphism alone is a risk factor for antisocial alcoholism in Taiwan’s Han Chinese population, but that the interaction between both genes may increase susceptibility to antisocial alcoholism.

  9. The serotonin transporter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR and alcohol problems in heavy drinkers: moderation by depressive symptoms

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    Molly eTartter

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Heavy alcohol use in young adults has been prospectively associated with a host of psychosocial and alcohol-related problems. Recent studies have supported the interaction between serotonin transporter polymorphism and adverse environmental factors, as a predictor of alcohol use and the development of alcohol dependence. The current study examined the role of depressive symptoms in combination with the serotonin transporter polymorphism as a predictor of alcohol use and alcohol-related problems. Results revealed a significant genotype by depressive symptom interaction, such that heavier alcohol use was associated with depressive symptoms in L allele homozygotes but not among S allele carriers. These results remained significant after controlling for ethnicity and gender effects. These findings extend the emerging literature supporting 5-HTTLPR genotype as a risk factor for alcohol-related problems in the context of co-occurring symptoms of depression.

  10. Exaggerated aggression and decreased anxiety in mice deficient in brain serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosienko, V; Bert, B; Beis, D; Matthes, S; Fink, H; Bader, M; Alenina, N

    2012-05-29

    Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Dysregulation of serotonin transmission in the CNS is reported to be related to different psychiatric disorders in humans including depression, impulsive aggression and anxiety disorders. The most frequently prescribed antidepressants and anxiolytics target the serotonergic system. However, these drugs are not effective in 20-30% of cases. The causes of this failure as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the origin of psychological disorders are poorly understood. Biosynthesis of serotonin in the CNS is initiated by tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2). In this study, we used Tph2-deficient (Tph2(-/-)) mice to evaluate the impact of serotonin depletion in the brain on mouse behavior. Tph2(-/-) mice exhibited increased depression-like behavior in the forced swim test but not in the tail suspension test. In addition, they showed decreased anxiety-like behavior in three different paradigms: elevated plus maze, marble burying and novelty-suppressed feeding tests. These phenotypes were accompanied by strong aggressiveness observed in the resident-intruder paradigm. Despite carrying only one copy of the gene, heterozygous Tph2(+/-) mice showed only 10% reduction in brain serotonin, which was not sufficient to modulate behavior in the tested paradigms. Our findings provide unequivocal evidence on the pivotal role of central serotonin in anxiety and aggression.

  11. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-01-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression

  12. Ethanol intake and 3H-serotonin uptake II: A study in alcoholic patients using platelets 3H-paroxetine binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daoust, M.; Boucly, P.; Ernouf, D.; Breton, P.; Lhuintre, J.P.

    1991-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of 3 H-paroxetine binding and 3 H-serotonin uptake were studied in platelets of alcoholic patients. There was no difference between alcoholic and non alcoholic subjects in 3 H-paroxetine binding. When binding and 3 H-serotonin uptake were studied, in the same plasma of the same subjects, the Vmax of serotonin uptake was increased in alcoholics. The data confirm the involvement of serotonin uptake system in alcohol dependance and suggest that serotonin uptake and paroxetine binding sites may be regulated independently in this pathology

  13. Effects of the serotonin transporter gene, sensitivity of response to alcohol, and parental monitoring on risk for problem alcohol use.

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    Cope, Lora M; Munier, Emily C; Trucco, Elisa M; Hardee, Jillian E; Burmeister, Margit; Zucker, Robert A; Heitzeg, Mary M

    2017-03-01

    The serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4) has been previously associated with alcohol-related risk. Most findings point to short (S) allele carriers being at increased risk for negative alcohol outcomes relative to long allele homozygotes, although some work indicates a more complex relationship. The current prospective study aimed to clarify how and under what circumstances variations in 5-HTTLPR transmit risk for various alcohol-related outcomes. Participants were 218 adolescents and young adults (29% female) enrolled in the Michigan Longitudinal Study. We tested a moderated mediation model with 5-HTTLPR as the predictor, Self-Rating of the Effects of Alcohol (SRE) score as the mediator, alcohol-related outcomes as the dependent variables, parental monitoring as the moderator of the SRE to alcohol outcomes path, and prior drinks, sex, age, and body mass index as covariates. Four alcohol-related outcomes were tested. The S allele was associated with higher SRE scores (i.e., lower response to alcohol). Parental monitoring was a significant moderator: At low levels of parental monitoring, higher SRE scores predicted more drinks consumed and binge drinking episodes. At high levels of monitoring, higher SRE scores were significantly related to fewer alcohol-related problems. Findings suggest that one mechanism by which 5-HTTLPR variation transmits alcohol-related risk is through level of response to alcohol. Furthermore, the strength and direction of this effect varied by level of parental monitoring, indicating that even in the presence of genetic and physiological vulnerability, parents can influence the likelihood of offspring developing problematic alcohol-related behaviors. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Decreased NT-3 plasma levels and platelet serotonin content in patients with hypochondriasis.

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    Brondino, Natascia; Lanati, Niccolò; Barale, Francesco; Martinelli, Valentina; Politi, Pierluigi; Geroldi, Diego; Emanuele, Enzo

    2008-11-01

    Neurotrophins (NT) are a family of closely related proteins, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5). NTs are deemed to regulate several aspects of neuronal survival, development, and function. Although NTs have been associated to a variety of mental disorders, the potential role of NT alterations in hypochondriasis (HC) has never been investigated. In the present study, plasma concentrations of NTs were evaluated in 23 adult patients meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision criteria for HC and 22 healthy controls. Platelet serotonin (5-HT) content was chosen as a measure of serotonergic function. Hypochondriacal symptoms were assessed using the Whiteley Index of Hypochondriasis (WIH). Plasma NT-3 level (P=.004) and platelet 5-HT (P=.008) were significantly lower in patients with HC compared with controls. Correlation analyses showed that the WIH score was significantly and inversely associated with both NT-3 values (r=-.60, P=.002) and platelet serotonin content (r=-.53, P=.009). We used a multivariate regression model to determine independent predictors of the WIH score. After allowance for potential confounders, plasma NT-3 levels remained the unique independent predictor of the WIH (beta=.003, t=-3.5, P=.003). Decreased NT-3 concentration, alongside with serotonin dysfunction, may represent a biological correlate of HC.

  15. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

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    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  16. Alcohol and caffeine consumption and decreased fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, R B; Gray, R H; Zacur, H

    1998-10-01

    To examine the effects of alcohol and caffeine on conception. Prospective observational study. Healthy volunteers in two manufacturing facilities. One hundred twenty-four women who provided daily urine samples for measurement of steroid hormones and hCG, and prospective information about alcohol and caffeine consumption. Probability of conception per 100 menstrual cycles. There was >50% reduction in the probability of conception during a menstrual cycle during which participants consumed alcohol. Caffeine consumption did not independently affect the probability of conception but may enhance alcohol's negative effect. Women who abstained from alcohol and consumed less than one cup of coffee or its equivalent per day conceived 26.9 pregnancies per 100 menstrual cycles compared with 10.5 per 100 menstrual cycles among those who consumed any alcohol and more than one cup of coffee per day. This study revealed an independent dose-related negative effect of alcohol consumption on the ability to conceive. Our results suggest that women who are attempting to conceive should abstain from consuming alcohol.

  17. Decreased frontal serotonin 5-HT2a receptor binding index in deliberate self-harm patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audenaert, K.; Laere, K. van; Dierckx, R.A.; Dumont, F.; Slegers, G.; Mertens, J.; Heeringen, C. van

    2001-01-01

    Studies of serotonin metabolites in body fluids in attempted suicide patients and of post-mortem brain tissue of suicide victims have demonstrated the involvement of the serotonergic neurotransmission system in the pathogenesis of suicidal behaviour. Recently developed neuroimaging techniques offer the unique possibility of investigating in vivo the functional characteristics of this system. In this study the 5-HT 2a receptor population of patients who had recently attempted suicide was studied by means of the highly specific radio-iodinated 5-HT 2a receptor antagonist 4-amino-N-[1-[3-(4-fluorophenoxy)propyl]-4-methyl-4-piperidinyl] -5-iodo-2-methox ybenzamide or 123 I-5-I-R91150. Nine patients who had recently (1-7 days) attempted suicide and 12 age-matched healthy controls received an intravenous injection of 185 MBq 123 I-5-I-R91150 and were scanned with high-resolution brain single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Stereotactic realigned images were analysed semi-quantitatively using predefined volumes of interest. Serotonin binding capacity was expressed as the ratio of specific to non-specific activity. The cerebellum was used as a measure of non-specific activity. An age-dependent 5-HT 2a binding index was found, in agreement with previous literature. Deliberate self-harm patients had a significantly reduced mean frontal binding index after correction for age (P=0.002) when compared with controls. The reduction was more pronounced among deliberate self-injury patients (DSI) (P 2a serotonin receptor system in attempted suicide patients who are free of drugs influencing the serotonergic system shows in vivo evidence of a decreased frontal binding index of the 5-HT 2a receptor, indicating a decrease in the number and/or in the binding affinity of 5-HT 2a receptors. (orig.)

  18. Estradiol Valerate and Remifemin ameliorate ovariectomy-induced decrease in a serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway in rats.

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    Wang, Wenjuan; Cui, Guangxia; Jin, Biao; Wang, Ke; Chen, Xing; Sun, Yu; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2016-11-01

    Perimenopausal syndromes begin as ovarian function ceases and the most common symptoms are hot flushes. Data indicate that the projections of serotonin to hypothalamus may be involved in the mechanism of hot flushes. Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate the potential role of the serotonin dorsal raphe-preoptic hypothalamus pathway for hot flushes in an animal model of menopause. We determined the changes in serotonin expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and preoptic anterior hypothalamus (POAH) in ovariectomized rats. We also explored the therapeutical effects of estradiol valerate and Remifemin in this model. Eighty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-operated (SHAM) group, ovariectomy (OVX) group with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate treatment (OVX+E) group and ovariectomy with Remifemin (OVX+ICR) group. Serotonin expression was evaluated in the DR and POAH using immunofluorescence and quantified in the DR using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Apoptosis was analyzed in the DR by TUNEL assay. The number of serotonin immunoreactive neurons and the level of serotonin expression in the DR decreased significantly following OVX compared to the SHAM group. No TUNEL-positive cells were detected in the DR in any group. In addition, following OVX, the number of serotonin-positive fibers decreased significantly in the ventromedial preoptic nucleus (VMPO), especially in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO). Treatment with either estradiol or Remifemin for 4 weeks countered the OVX-induced decreases in serotonin levels in both the DR and the hypothalamus, with levels in the treated rats similar to those in the SHAM group. A fluorescently labeled retrograde tracer was injected into the VLPO at the 4-week time point. A significantly lower percentage of serotonin with CTB double-labeled neurons in CTB-labeled neurons was demonstrated after ovariectomy, and both estradiol and Remifemin countered this OVX

  19. Decreased serotonin transporter immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus of overweight subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, Anke J.; Koopman, Karin E.; Bisschop, Peter H.; Serlie, Mireille J.; Swaab, Dick F.; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E.; Alkemade, Anneke

    2014-01-01

    Context: That serotonin plays a role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism has been known for a long time. Serotonin transporters (SERT) play a crucial role in serotonin signaling by regulating its availability in the synaptic cleft. The neuroanatomy underlying serotonergic

  20. Decreased serotonin transporter immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus of overweight subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgers, A.J.; Koopman, K.E.; Bisschop, P.H.; Serlie, M.J.; Swaab, D.F.; Fliers, E.; la Fleur, S.E.; Alkemade, A.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: That serotonin plays a role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism has been known for a long time. Serotonin transporters (SERT) play a crucial role in serotonin signaling by regulating its availability in the synaptic cleft. The neuroanatomy underlying serotonergic

  1. Depressed patients have decreased binding of tritiated imipramine to platelet serotonin ''transporter''

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    Paul, S.M.; Rehavi, M.; Skolnick, P.; Ballenger, J.C.; Goodwin, F.K.

    1981-12-01

    The high-affinity tritiated (3H) imipramine binding sites are functionally (and perhaps structurally) associated with the presynaptic neuronal and platelet uptake sites for serotonin. Since there is an excellent correlation between the relative potencies of a series of antidepressants in displacing 3H-imipramine from binding sites in human brain and platelet, we have examined the binding of 3H-imipramine to platelets from 14 depressed patients and 28 age- and sex-matched controls. A highly significant decrease in the number of 3H-imipramine binding sites, with no significant change in the apparent affinity constants, was observed in platelets from the depressed patients compared with the controls. These results, coupled with previous studies showing a significant decrease in the maximal uptake of serotonin in platelets from depressed patients, suggest that an inherited or acquired deficiency of the serotonin transport protein or proteins may be involved in the pathogenesis of depression.

  2. Exaggerated aggression and decreased anxiety in mice deficient in brain serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Mosienko, V; Bert, B; Beis, D; Matthes, S; Fink, H; Bader, M; Alenina, N

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is a major neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS). Dysregulation of serotonin transmission in the CNS is reported to be related to different psychiatric disorders in humans including depression, impulsive aggression and anxiety disorders. The most frequently prescribed antidepressants and anxiolytics target the serotonergic system. However, these drugs are not effective in 20-30% of cases. The causes of this failure as well as the molecular mechanisms involved in the o...

  3. Variation in the Gene Encoding the Serotonin Transporter is Associated with a Measure of Sociopathy in Alcoholics

    OpenAIRE

    Herman, Aryeh I.; Conner, Tamlin S.; Anton, Raymond F.; Gelernter, Joel; Kranzler, Henry R.; Covault, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the association between a measure of sociopathy and 5-HTTLPR genotype in a sample of individuals from Project MATCH, a multi-center alcohol treatment trial. 5-HTTLPR, an insertion/deletion polymorphism in SLC6A4, the gene encoding the serotonin transporter protein, results in functionally distinct long (L) and short (S) alleles. The S allele has been associated with a variety of psychiatric disorders and symptoms including alcohol dependence, but it is unknown wheth...

  4. Alcoholic Hepatitis Markedly Decreases the Capacity for Urea Synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Glavind

    Full Text Available Data on quantitative metabolic liver functions in the life-threatening disease alcoholic hepatitis are scarce. Urea synthesis is an essential metabolic liver function that plays a key regulatory role in nitrogen homeostasis. The urea synthesis capacity decreases in patients with compromised liver function, whereas it increases in patients with inflammation. Alcoholic hepatitis involves both mechanisms, but how these opposite effects are balanced remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate how alcoholic hepatitis affects the capacity for urea synthesis. We related these findings to another measure of metabolic liver function, the galactose elimination capacity (GEC, as well as to clinical disease severity.We included 20 patients with alcoholic hepatitis and 7 healthy controls. The urea synthesis capacity was quantified by the functional hepatic nitrogen clearance (FHNC, i.e., the slope of the linear relationship between the blood α-amino nitrogen concentration and urea nitrogen synthesis rate during alanine infusion. The GEC was determined using blood concentration decay curves after intravenous bolus injection of galactose. Clinical disease severity was assessed by the Glasgow Alcoholic Hepatitis Score and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD score.The FHNC was markedly decreased in the alcoholic hepatitis patients compared with the healthy controls (7.2±4.9 L/h vs. 37.4±6.8 L/h, P<0.01, and the largest decrease was observed in those with severe alcoholic hepatitis (4.9±3.6 L/h vs. 9.9±4.9 L/h, P<0.05. The GEC was less markedly reduced than the FHNC. A negative correlation was detected between the FHNC and MELD score (rho = -0.49, P<0.05.Alcoholic hepatitis markedly decreases the urea synthesis capacity. This decrease is associated with an increase in clinical disease severity. Thus, the metabolic failure in alcoholic hepatitis prevails such that the liver cannot adequately perform the metabolic up-regulation observed in other stressful

  5. The flavanone homoeriodictyol increases SGLT-1-mediated glucose uptake but decreases serotonin release in differentiated Caco-2 cells.

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    Barbara Lieder

    Full Text Available Flavanoids and related polyphenols, among them hesperitin, have been shown to modulate cellular glucose transport by targeting SGLT-1 and GLUT-2 transport proteins. We aimed to investigate whether homoeriodictyol, which is structurally related to hesperitin, affects glucose uptake in differentiated Caco-2 cells as a model for the intestinal barrier. The results revealed that, in contrast to other polyphenols, the flavanon homoeriodictyol promotes glucose uptake by 29.0 ± 3.83% at a concentration of 100 μM. The glucose uptake stimulating effect was sensitive to phloridzin, but not to phloretin, indicating an involvement of the sodium-coupled glucose transporter SGLT-1, but not of sodium-independent glucose transporters (GLUT. In addition, in contrast to the increased extracellular serotonin levels by stimulation with 500 mM D-(+-glucose, treatment with 100 μM homoeriodictyol decreased serotonin release by -48.8 ± 7.57% in Caco-2 cells via a phloridzin-sensitive signaling pathway. Extracellular serotonin levels were also reduced by -57.1 ± 5.43% after application of 0.01 μM homoeriodictyol to human neural SH-SY5Y cells. In conclusion, we demonstrate that homoeriodictyol affects both the glucose metabolism and the serotonin system in Caco-2 cells via a SGLT-1-meditated pathway. Furthermore, the results presented here support the usage of Caco-2 cells as a model for peripheral serotonin release. Further investigations may address the value of homoeriodictyol in the treatment of anorexia and malnutrition through the targeting of SGLT-1.

  6. Do alcohol compliance checks decrease underage sales at neighboring establishments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Darin J; Smolenski, Derek J; Toomey, Traci L; Carlin, Bradley P; Wagenaar, Alexander C

    2013-11-01

    Underage alcohol compliance checks conducted by law enforcement agencies can reduce the likelihood of illegal alcohol sales at checked alcohol establishments, and theory suggests that an alcohol establishment that is checked may warn nearby establishments that compliance checks are being conducted in the area. In this study, we examined whether the effects of compliance checks diffuse to neighboring establishments. We used data from the Complying with the Minimum Drinking Age trial, which included more than 2,000 compliance checks conducted at more than 900 alcohol establishments. The primary outcome was the sale of alcohol to a pseudo-underage buyer without the need for age identification. A multilevel logistic regression was used to model the effect of a compliance check at each establishment as well as the effect of compliance checks at neighboring establishments within 500 m (stratified into four equal-radius concentric rings), after buyer, license, establishment, and community-level variables were controlled for. We observed a decrease in the likelihood of establishments selling alcohol to underage youth after they had been checked by law enforcement, but these effects quickly decayed over time. Establishments that had a close neighbor (within 125 m) checked in the past 90 days were also less likely to sell alcohol to young-appearing buyers. The spatial effect of compliance checks on other establishments decayed rapidly with increasing distance. Results confirm the hypothesis that the effects of police compliance checks do spill over to neighboring establishments. These findings have implications for the development of an optimal schedule of police compliance checks.

  7. Decreased serotonin transporter immunoreactivity in the human hypothalamic infundibular nucleus of overweight subjects

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    Anke eBorgers

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Context: That serotonin plays a role in the regulation of feeding behavior and energy metabolism has been known for a long time. Serotonin transporters (SERT play a crucial role in serotonin signalling by regulating its availability in the synaptic cleft. The neuroanatomy underlying serotonergic signalling in humans is largely unknown, and until now, SERT immunoreactivity in relation to body weight has not been investigated.Objective: To clarify the distribution of SERT immunoreactivity throughout the human hypothalamus and to compare SERT immunoreactivity in the infundibular nucleus (IFN, the human equivalent of the arcuate nucleus, in lean and overweight subjects. Design: First, we investigated the distribution of serotonin transporters (SERT over the rostro-caudal axis of six postmortem hypothalami by means of immunohistochemistry. Second, we estimated SERT immunoreactivity in the IFN of lean and overweight subjects. Lastly, double-labelling of SERT with Neuropeptide Y (NPY and melanocortin cell populations was performed to further identify cells showing basket-like SERT staining. Results: SERT-immunoreactivity was ubiquitously expressed in fibers throughout the hypothalamus and was the strongest in the IFN. Immunoreactivity in the IFN was lower in overweight subjects (p=0.036. Basket-like staining in the IFN was highly suggestive of synaptic innervation. A very small minority of cells showed SERT double labelling with NPY, agouti-related protein and α−melanocyte stimulating hormone. Conclusions: SERT is ubiquitously expressed in the human hypothalamus. Strong SERT immunoreactivity, was observed in the IFN a region important for appetite regulation, in combination with lower SERT immunoreactivity in the IFN of overweight and obese subjects, may point towards a role for hypothalamic SERT in human obesity.

  8. Osteoprotegerin Levels Decrease in Abstinent Alcohol-Dependent Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Peter; von Gleissenthall, Gabriele; Gasser, Rudolf W; Moncayo, Roy; Giesinger, Johannes M; Mechtcheriakov, Sergei

    2016-06-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a parameter of increasing interest in the search for pathophysiological mechanisms of reduced bone mineral density (BMD). It has been shown to be increased in alcohol-dependent subjects. In our study, we wanted to examine whether changes in OPG and receptor activator of the nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL) levels during an 8-week abstinence period in alcohol-dependent patients treated in an alcohol rehabilitation clinic would occur and whether alcohol-related variables, smoking, status, or physical activity prior to the study served as an influence on BMD and on OPG/RANKL levels. Forty-three patients, who were abstinent not longer than a week, were included in the study. OPG and RANKL as well as other markers of bone metabolism were measured at baseline, and after 8 weeks of treatment, BMD was measured once. OPG levels decreased significantly, while osteocalcin, a marker of bone formation, increased significantly. RANKL as well as RANKL/OPG ratio, Serum CrossLaps, and all examined hormones showed no significant changes over time. Inflammatory parameters showed a significant reduction after 8 weeks. We detected no influence of potentially confounding variables of alcohol dependency on the course of OPG or other laboratory values. Our results could point to the well-known risk for reduced BMD in these patients being reversible with abstinence through an excess of bone formation. We also confirmed earlier findings that inflammatory processes play a role in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced disturbances in bone metabolism. Copyright © 2016 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  9. A novel serotonin transporter ligand: (5-Iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol

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    Zhuang, Z.-P.; Choi, S.-R.; Hou, Catherine; Mu Mu; Kung, M.-P. E-mail: kunghf@sunmac.spect.upenn.edu; Acton, Paul D.; Kung, Hank F

    2000-02-01

    The serotonin transporters (SERT) are the primary binding sites for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, commonly used antidepressants such as fluoxetine, sertraline, and paroxetine. Imaging of SERT with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography in humans would provide a useful tool for understanding how alterations of this system are related to depressive illnesses and other psychiatric disorders. In this article the synthesis and characterization of [{sup 125}I]ODAM [(5-iodo-2-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenoxy)-benzyl alcohol, 9)] as an imaging agent in the evaluation of central nervous system SERT are reported. A new reaction scheme was developed for the preparation of compound 9, ODAM, and the corresponding tri-n-butyltin derivative 10. Upon reacting 10 with hydrogen peroxide and sodium[{sup 125}I]iodide, the radiolabeled [{sup 125}I]9 was obtained in good yield (94% yield, radiochemical purity >95%). In an initial binding study using cortical membrane homogenates of rat brain, ODAM displayed a good binding affinity with a value of K{sub i}=2.8{+-}0.88 nM. Using LLC-PK{sub 1} cells specifically expressing the individual transporter (i.e. dopamine [DAT], norepinephrine [NET], and SERT, respectively), ODAM showed a strong inhibition on SERT (K{sub i}=0.12{+-}0.02 nM). Inhibition constants for the other two transporters were lower (K{sub i}=3.9{+-}0.7 {mu}M and 20.0 {+-} 1.9 nM for DAT and NET, respectively). Initial biodistribution study in rats after an intravenous (IV) injection of [{sup 125}I]ODAM showed a rapid brain uptake and washout (2.03, 1.49, 0.79, 0.27, and 0.07% dose/organ at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, respectively). The hypothalamus region where the serotonin neurons are located exhibited a high specific uptake. Ratios of hypothalamus-cerebellum/cerebellum based on percent dose per gram of these two regions showed values of 0.35, 0.86, 0.86, 0.63, and 0.34 at 2, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min, post-IV injection

  10. Prenatal alcohol exposure results in long-term serotonin neuron deficits in female rats: modulatory role of ovarian steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwowska, Joanna H; Song, Hyun Jung; Bodnar, Tamara; Weinberg, Joanne

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies on male rodents found that prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) decreases the number of serotonin immunoreactive (5-HT-ir) neurons in the brainstem. However, data on the effects of PAE in females are lacking. In light of known sex differences in responsiveness of the 5-HT system and known effects of estrogen (E2 ) and progesterone (P4 ) in the brain, we hypothesized that sex steroids will modulate the adverse effects of PAE on 5-HT neurons in adult females. Adult females from 3 prenatal groups (Prenatal alcohol-exposed [PAE], Pair-fed [PF], and ad libitum-fed Controls [C]) were ovariectomized (OVX), with or without hormone replacement, or underwent Sham OVX. 5-HT-ir cells were examined in key brainstem areas. Our data support the hypothesis that PAE has long-term effects on the 5-HT system of females and that ovarian steroids have a modulatory role in these effects. Intact (Sham OVX) PAE females had marginally lower numbers of 5-HT-ir neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus of the brainstem compared with PF and C females. This marginal difference became significant following removal of hormones by OVX. Replacement with E2 restored the number of 5-HT-ir neurons in PAE females to control levels, while P4 reversed the effects of E2 . Importantly, despite these differential responses of the 5-HT system to ovarian steroids, there were no differences in E2 and P4 levels among prenatal treatment groups. These data demonstrate long-term, adverse effects of PAE on the 5-HT system of females, as well as differential sensitivity of PAE compared with control females to the modulatory effects of ovarian steroids on 5-HT neurons. Our findings have important implications for understanding sex differences in 5-HT dysfunction in depression/anxiety disorders and the higher rates of these mental health problems in individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  11. Alcohol consumption decreases lactate clearance in acutely injured patients☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezman, Zachary D.W.; Comer, Angela C.; Narayan, Mayur; Scalea, Thomas M.; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Smith, Gordon S.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol, a common risk factor for injury, has direct toxic effects on the liver. The use of lactate clearance has been well described as an indicator of the adequacy of resuscitation in injured patients. We investigated whether acutely injured patients with positive blood alcohol content (+BAC) had less lactate clearance than sober patients. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of acutely injured patients treated at an urban Level 1 trauma centre between January 2010 and December 2012. Blood alcohol and venous lactate levels were measured on all patients at the time of arrival. Study subjects were patients transported directly from the scene of injury, who had an elevated lactate concentration on arrival (≥3.0 mmol/L) and at least one subsequent lactate measurement within 24 h after admission. Lactate clearance ([Lactate1 − Lactate2]/Lactate1) was calculated for all patients. Chi-squared tests were used to compare values from sober and intoxicated subjects. Lactate clearance was plotted against alcohol levels and stratified by age and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Results Serial lactate concentration measurements were obtained in 3910 patients; 1674 of them had +BAC. Patients with +BAC were younger (mean age: 36.6 [SD 14.7] vs 41.0 [SD 19.9] years [p = 0.0001]), were more often male (83.4% vs 75.9% [p = 0.0001]), had more minor injuries (ISS 400 (23.5 [SD 6.5]). Lactate clearance decreased with increasing BAC irrespective of age and ISS. Conclusions In a large group of acutely injured patients, a dose-dependent decrease in lactate clearance was seen in those with elevated BAC. This relationship will cause a falsely elevated lactate reading or prolong lactate clearance and should be taken into account when evaluating patients with +BAC. PMID:27025567

  12. Alcohol consumption decreases lactate clearance in acutely injured patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezman, Zachary D W; Comer, Angela C; Narayan, Mayur; Scalea, Thomas M; Hirshon, Jon Mark; Smith, Gordon S

    2016-09-01

    Alcohol, a common risk factor for injury, has direct toxic effects on the liver. The use of lactate clearance has been well described as an indicator of the adequacy of resuscitation in injured patients. We investigated whether acutely injured patients with positive blood alcohol content (+BAC) had less lactate clearance than sober patients. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of acutely injured patients treated at an urban Level 1 trauma centre between January 2010 and December 2012. Blood alcohol and venous lactate levels were measured on all patients at the time of arrival. Study subjects were patients transported directly from the scene of injury, who had an elevated lactate concentration on arrival (≥3.0mmol/L) and at least one subsequent lactate measurement within 24h after admission. Lactate clearance ([Lactate1-Lactate2]/Lactate1) was calculated for all patients. Chi-squared tests were used to compare values from sober and intoxicated subjects. Lactate clearance was plotted against alcohol levels and stratified by age and Injury Severity Score (ISS). Serial lactate concentration measurements were obtained in 3910 patients; 1674 of them had +BAC. Patients with +BAC were younger (mean age: 36.6 [SD 14.7] vs 41.0 [SD 19.9] years [p=0.0001]), were more often male (83.4% vs 75.9% [p=0.0001]), had more minor injuries (ISS400 (23.5 [SD 6.5]). Lactate clearance decreased with increasing BAC irrespective of age and ISS. In a large group of acutely injured patients, a dose-dependent decrease in lactate clearance was seen in those with elevated BAC. This relationship will cause a falsely elevated lactate reading or prolong lactate clearance and should be taken into account when evaluating patients with +BAC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Serotonin-Related Gene Polymorphisms and Asymptomatic Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV-Infected Alcohol Abusers

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    Karina Villalba

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals continue to experience neurocognitive deterioration despite virologically successful treatments. While the cause remains unclear, evidence suggests that HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND may be associated with neurobehavioral dysfunction. Genetic variants have been explored to identify risk markers to determine neuropathogenesis of neurocognitive deterioration. Memory deficits and executive dysfunction are highly prevalent among HIV-infected adults. These conditions can affect their quality of life and HIV risk-taking behaviors. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes may affect the activity of serotonin and increase the risk of HAND. The present study explored the relationship between SLC6A4, TPH2, and GALM genes and neurocognitive impairment in HIV-infected alcohol abusers. A total of 267 individuals were genotyped for polymorphisms in SLC6A4 5-HTTLPR, TPH2 rs4570625, and GALM rs6741892. To assess neurocognitive functions, the Short Category and the Auditory Verbal Learning Tests were used. TPH2 SNP rs4570625 showed a significant association with executive function in African American males (odds ratio 4.8, 95% CI, 1.5–14.8; P=0.005. Similarly, GALM SNP rs6741892 showed an increased risk with African American males (odds ratio 2.4, 95% CI, 1.2–4.9; P=0.02. This study suggests that TPH2 rs4570625 and GALM rs6741892 polymorphisms may be risk factors for HAND.

  14. OPRM1 genotype interacts with serotonin system dysfunction to predict alcohol-heightened aggression in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Carlos A; Lindell, Stephen G; Schwandt, Melanie L; Suomi, Stephen J; Higley, J Dee; Heilig, Markus; Barr, Christina S

    2017-11-01

    Although the notion that alcohol promotes violence is widespread, not all individuals are aggressive while intoxicated. Genetic variation could be a contributing factor to individual differences in alcohol-heightened aggression. The present study examines the effects of OPRM1C77G genotype on responses to threat in rhesus macaques under normal conditions and following alcohol administration. Prior studies have shown that a low CSF level of 5-HIAA is a trait marker for individuals prone to escalated aggression. We wanted to examine whether the predictive value for this marker on aggression was moderated by OPRM1 genotype. Animals were administered alcohol (BAC 100-200 mg%), were provoked by a human intruder, and aggressive responses were recorded. Factor analysis was performed to generate aggressive response factors, which were then used as dependent variables for ANOVA, with OPRM1 genotype and CSF 5-HIAA as independent variables. Factor analysis generated three factors ('Threatening', 'Distance Decreasing' and 'High Intensity'). We found that High Intensity aggression was increased among carriers of the OPRM1 G allele, especially among individuals with low CSF levels of 5-HIAA. Aggression in the non-intoxicated state was predicted by 5-HIAA, but not by genotype. This study demonstrates that OPRM1 genotype predicts alcohol-heightened aggression in rhesus macaques with low CSF levels of 5-HIAA. Because OPRM1 variation predicts similar effects on alcohol response and behavior in humans and macaques, this study could suggest a role for OPRM1 genotype in alcohol-heightened aggression in humans. If so, it may be that compounds that block this receptor could reduce alcohol-associated violence in selected patient populations. © Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  15. Decreased exploratory activity in a mouse model of 15q duplication syndrome; implications for disturbance of serotonin signaling.

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    Kota Tamada

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs have garnered significant attention as an important grouping of developmental brain disorders. Recent genomic studies have revealed that inherited or de novo copy number variations (CNVs are significantly involved in the pathophysiology of ASDs. In a previous report from our laboratory, we generated mice with CNVs as a model of ASDs, with a duplicated mouse chromosome 7C that is orthologous to human chromosome 15q11-13. Behavioral analyses revealed paternally duplicated (patDp/+ mice displayed abnormal behaviors resembling the symptoms of ASDs. In the present study, we extended these findings by performing various behavioral tests with C57BL/6J patDp/+ mice, and comprehensively measuring brain monoamine levels with ex vivo high performance liquid chromatography. Compared with wild-type controls, patDp/+ mice exhibited decreased locomotor and exploratory activities in the open field test, Y-maze test, and fear-conditioning test. Furthermore, their decreased activity levels overcame increased appetite induced by 24 hours of food deprivation in the novelty suppressed feeding test. Serotonin levels in several brain regions of adult patDp/+ mice were lower than those of wild-type control, with no concurrent changes in brain levels of dopamine or norepinephrine. Moreover, analysis of monoamines in postnatal developmental stages demonstrated reduced brain levels of serotonin in young patDp/+ mice. These findings suggest that a disrupted brain serotonergic system, especially during postnatal development, may generate the phenotypes of patDp/+ mice.

  16. Decreased frontal serotonin2A receptor binding in antipsychotic-naive patients with first-episode schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hans; Erritzoe, David; Andersen, Rune

    2010-01-01

    , in vivo studies of serotonin(2A) binding report conflicting results, presumably because sample sizes have been small or because schizophrenic patients who were not antipsychotic-naive were included. Furthermore, the relationships between serotonin(2A) binding, psychopathology, and central neurocognitive......Postmortem investigations and the receptor affinity profile of atypical antipsychotics have implicated the participation of serotonin(2A) receptors in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Most postmortem studies point toward lower cortical serotonin(2A) binding in schizophrenic patients. However...

  17. Milk consumption during adolescence decreases alcohol drinking in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, Jerry P; Criado, Jose R; Walker, Brendan M; Ehlers, Cindy L

    2009-11-01

    Early onset of alcohol consumption increases the risk for the development of dependence. Whether adolescent consumption of other highly palatable solutions may also affect alcohol drinking in adulthood is not known. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of adolescent consumption of four solutions: water, sucrose, sucrose-milk and milk on ethanol drinking in adult rats. Rats had limited access to one of the four solutions from day PND 29 to PND 51 and were subsequently trained to consume ethanol (E) using a sucrose (S) fade-out procedure. Adolescent consumption of sucrose and sucrose-milk solutions increased intake of 2.5% E when it was combined with 10% S but it had no effect on the drinking of 10% E alone. Adolescent consumption of milk and sucrose-milk significantly decreased the intake of 10% E when it was combined with 10% S, and milk significantly reduced 10% E consumption alone and when it was combined with 5% S. Adolescent exposure to the sucrose-milk and sucrose solutions was also found to increase sucrose and sucrose-milk consumption. Our findings suggest adolescent exposure to sucrose increases, whereas, exposure to milk reduces ethanol consumption in adult rats. Our results may provide a new theoretical approach to the early prevention of alcoholism.

  18. Decreased serotonin level during pregnancy alters morphological and functional characteristics of tonic nociceptive system in juvenile offspring of the rat

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    Mikhailenko Victor A

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Serotonin (5-HT contributes to the prenatal development of the central nervous system, acting as a morphogen in the young embryo and later as a neurotransmitter. This biologically active agent influences both morphological and biochemical differentiation of raphe neurons, which give rise to the descending serotonergic paths that regulate the processing of acutely evoked nociceptive inputs. The involvement of 5-HT in the prenatal development of tonic nociceptive system has not been studied. In the present study we evaluated the effects of a single injection (400 mg/kg, 2 ml, i.p. of the 5-HT synthesis inhibitor, para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA, given to pregnant rats during the critical period fetal serotonin development. The functional integrity of the tonic nociceptive response was investigated in 25 day old rats using the classic formalin test. Morphological analysis of brain structures involved in formalin-induced pain and 5-HT levels in the heads of 12-day embryos were also evaluated. Embryonic levels of 5-HT were significantly lowered by the treatment. The juvenile rats from pCPA-treated females showed altered brain morphology and cell differentiation in the developing cortex, hippocampus, raphe nuclei, and substantia nigra. In the formalin test, there were significant decreases in the intensity and duration of the second phase of the formalin-induced response, characterizing persistent, tonic pain. The extent of impairments in the brain structures correlated positively with the level of decrease in the behavioral responses. The data demonstrate the involvement of 5-HT in the prenatal development of the tonic nociceptive system. The decreased tonic component of the behavioral response can be explained by lower activity of the descending excitatory serotonergic system originating in the raphe nuclei, resulting in decreased tonic pain processing organized at the level of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord.

  19. Early life handling decreases serotonin turnover in the nucleus accumbens and affects feeding behavior of adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portella, A K; Silveira, P P; Diehl, L A; Crema, L M; Clemente, Z; Peres, W; Costa, G; Scorza, C; Quillfeldt, J A; Dalmaz, C

    2010-03-01

    In our previous studies, we reported that neonatally handled rats have an increased ingestion of sweet food but are resistant to the damaging effects of a chronic exposure to a highly palatable diet. Accumbal serotonin (5-HT) is important for feeding behavior and plays a role in the vulnerability to diet-induced obesity. Therefore, our hypotheses were (1) 5-HT turnover in the nucleus accumbens is altered in neonatally handled animals and plays a role in their differential feeding behavior and (2) if this is so, a chronic pharmacological treatment affecting 5-HT reuptake (chronic imipramine) would be able to revert the behavioral findings. Litters were divided into nonhandled and handled (10 min/day, Days 1-10 after birth). In Experiment 1, we demonstrated that a decreased 5-HT metabolism in the nucleus accumbens was observed in adult handled animals. In Experiment 2, the two previous groups were subdivided and assigned to receive imipramine diluted in water or water alone. After 30 days of treatment, we evaluated their weight gain and feeding behavior. Handled rats weighed less than nonhandled rats, and all imipramine-treated rats showed a reduction in weight gain after 60 days of treatment. Imipramine reverted the increased sweet food consumption seen in neonatally handled rats. We conclude that serotonin is involved in the altered feeding behavior of neonatally handled rats, and this protocol is an important tool for studying the mechanisms by which early life events have a long-term impact on feeding preferences.

  20. Desipramine enhances the ability of paliperidone to decrease alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, David T; Khokhar, Jibran Y; Gulick, Danielle; Dawson, Ree; Green, Alan I

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol use disorder commonly occurs in patients with schizophrenia and dramatically worsens their course. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine has been associated with reduced drinking in these patients, but its toxicity reduces its use. We have attempted to create a clozapine-like drug by combining agents that capture components of clozapine's pharmacologic action, including its weak dopamine D2 blockade and noradrenergic modulation. The current study assessed whether paliperidone, a dopamine D2 receptor and adrenergic alpha-2 receptor antagonist like clozapine, would attenuate alcohol drinking in the alcohol-preferring P rat and the Syrian golden hamster, and whether desipramine, a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, would potentiate the ability of paliperidone to attenuate alcohol drinking in the P rat and the Syrian golden hamster. Daily subcutaneous injections of paliperidone (5 mg/kg for the rat; 1 mg/kg for the hamster) over 20 days slightly and transiently attenuated initiation of alcohol consumption in both animals. Desipramine (3 mg/kg) or lower doses of paliperidone alone did not affect alcohol drinking. However, the combination of desipramine (3 mg/kg) and paliperidone essentially prevented initiation of alcohol drinking and acquisition of alcohol preference in the P rat (2.5 or 5 mg/kg), and almost as dramatically suppressed chronic alcohol intake and alcohol preference in the hamster (2.5 mg/kg). Taken together, the current data suggest that (1) the desipramine and paliperidone combination attenuates alcohol drinking in a synergistic manner, and (2) desipramine and paliperidone may serve as an effective new treatment for alcohol use disorder in patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Low tryptophan diet decreases brain serotonin and alters response to apomorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahakian, B. J.; Wurtman, R. J.; Barr, J. K.; Millington, W. R.; Chiel, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    The role of the serotoninergic system in the regulation of apomorphine-induced behavior, a behavior primarily controlled by dopaminergic neurotransmission, was investigated in rats fed on a low tryptophan diet since weaning. It was found that reductions in brain seritonin (5-HT) produced by diet result in decreased stereotypy after apomorphine administration. This indicates that although stereotyped behavior is primarily mediated by dopaminergic mechanisms, it can also be modulated by other neurotransmitter including 5-HT. It was also shown that changes in brain seritonin levels can affect psychomotor stimulant-induced hypothermia.

  2. Impulsive alcohol-related risk-behavior and emotional dysregulation among individuals with a serotonin 2B receptor stop codon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkanen, R; Tiihonen, J; Rautiainen, M R; Paunio, T; Bevilacqua, L; Panarsky, R; Goldman, D; Virkkunen, M

    2015-01-01

    A relatively common stop codon (Q20*) was identified in the serotonin 2B receptor gene (HTR2B) in a Finnish founder population in 2010 and it was associated with impulsivity. Here we examine the phenotype of HTR2B Q20* carriers in a setting comprising 14 heterozygous HTR2B Q20* carriers and 156 healthy controls without the HTR2B Q20*. The tridimensional personality questionnaire, Brown–Goodwin lifetime aggression scale, the Michigan alcoholism screening test and lifetime drinking history were used to measure personality traits, impulsive and aggressive behavior, both while sober and under the influence of alcohol, and alcohol consumption. Regression analyses showed that among the HTR2B Q20* carriers, temperamental traits resembled a passive-dependent personality profile, and the presence of the HTR2B Q20* predicted impulsive and aggressive behaviors particularly under the influence of alcohol. Results present examples of how one gene may contribute to personality structure and behaviors in a founder population and how personality may translate into behavior. PMID:26575222

  3. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  4. Decreased noradrenergic and serotonergic reactivity of vas deferens of newborn rats from mothers treated with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine during pregnancy and breast-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Janaina D; Caricati-Neto, Afonso; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Jurkiewicz, Neide H

    2007-11-10

    Female Wistar rats were treated with the serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/i.p/day), during pregnancy and breast-feeding, for the study of the corresponding newborn rats. At the end of the preweaning period, the 30-day old litters had their vas deferens removed for testing peripheral sympathetic reactivity, through the following experiments in vitro: (a) concentration-contraction curves for serotonin and for the adrenergic agonists noradrenaline, phenylephrine, clonidine and dopamine or for the indirect agonist tyramine (b) contractions induced by electric field stimulation, as an indicator of sympathetic neurotransmission (c) release of endogenous noradrenaline, measured by real-time determinations on HPLC (d) Ca(+2) time-contraction curves, to check for changes on Ca(+2) translocation. Our results showed that the affinity (pD(2)) for serotonin was strikingly decreased by about 1.5 log units. The pD(2) for adrenergic agonists was decreased by about 0.5 log units, except for dopamine and clonidine. The maximum effects and intrinsic activity were decreased only for dopamine. On the other hand, the response to Ca(+2) and the release of noradrenaline from nerve terminals were not modified. In additional experiments, the mother's body weights were measured, showing a decrease during gestation and a recovery during lactation while the offspring's weights were lower than controls. It is concluded that, besides the alterations on body weights, changes on noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms were observed and persisted in the newborn, at least one month after parturition.

  5. Storytelling for Empowerment: Decreasing At-Risk Youth's Alcohol and Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Annabelle; Arthur, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Research compared Storytelling for Empowerment Program participants' pre and posttest responses on drug use. High contact participants had the most marked changes with a decrease in their alcohol and marijuana use. All participants in the last year of the program, regardless of contact hours, decreased their alcohol use and increased in their…

  6. Reduced function of the serotonin transporter is associated with decreased expression of BDNF in rodents as well as in humans.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molteni, R.; Cattaneo, A.; Calabrese, F.; Macchi, F.; Olivier, J.D.A.; Racagni, G.; Ellenbroek, A.A.; Gennarelli, M.; Riva, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    In order to identify the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the enhanced susceptibility to depression under serotonin transporter (SERT) dysfunction, we analyzed the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a key player in neuronal plasticity, which is implicated in the

  7. Antagonism of serotonin receptor 1B decreases viability and promotes apoptosis in the COS canine osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, A K; Goodall, C P; Stang, B; Marley, K; Chappell, P E; Bracha, S

    2016-06-01

    Serotonin receptor 1B (5HTR1B) traditionally exhibits anti-proliferative activity in osteoblasts. We examined the expression and function of 5HTR1B in the COS canine osteosarcoma cell line and normal canine osteoblasts. Equal levels of 5HTR1B gene and protein expression were found between normal and malignant osteoblasts. Treatment with serotonin enhanced viability of osteosarcoma cells but not normal osteoblasts. Challenge with the 5HTR1B agonist anpirtoline caused no change in cell viability. Rather incubation with the specific receptor antagonist SB224289 caused reduction in osteoblast viability, with this effect more substantial in osteosarcoma cells. Investigation of this inhibitory activity showed 5HTR1B antagonism induces apoptosis in malignant cells. Evaluation of phosphorylated levels of CREB and ERK, transcriptional regulators associated with serotonin receptor signalling in osteoblasts, revealed aberrant 5HTR1B signalling in COS. Our results confirm the presence of 5HTR1B in a canine osteosarcoma cell line and highlight this receptor as a possible novel therapeutic target. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Central administration of the anorexigenic peptide neuromedin U decreases alcohol intake and attenuates alcohol-induced reward in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallöf, Daniel; Ulenius, Lisa; Egecioglu, Emil; Engel, Jörgen A; Jerlhag, Elisabet

    2017-05-01

    By investigating the neurochemical mechanisms through which alcohol activates the brain reward systems, novel treatment strategies for alcohol use disorder (AUD), a chronic relapsing disease, can be developed. In contrast to the common view of the function of gut-brain peptides, such as neuromedin U (NMU), to regulate food intake and appetite, a novel role in reinforcement mediation has been implied. The anorexigenic effects of NMU are mediated via NMU2 receptors, preferably in the arcuate nucleus and paraventricular nucleus. The expression of NMU2 receptors is also expressed in several reward-related areas in the brain, suggesting a role in reward regulation. The present experiments were therefore set up to investigate the effect of intracerebroventricular administration of NMU on alcohol-mediated behaviors in rodents. We found that central administration of NMU attenuated alcohol-induced locomotor stimulation, accumbal dopamine release and the expression of conditioned place preference in mice. In addition, NMU dose dependently decreased alcohol intake in high, but not in low, alcohol-consuming rats. Central NMU administration did not alter the blood alcohol concentrations nor change the corticosterone levels in rodents. Given that AUD is a major health-care challenge causing an enormous cost to society and novel treatment strategies are warranted, our data suggest that NMU analogues deserve to be evaluated as novel treatment of AUD in humans. © 2016 The Authors Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Decrease in salivary lactoferrin output in chronically intoxicated alcohol-dependent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napoleon Waszkiewicz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available

    Salivary lactoferrin is a glycoprotein involved in the elimination of pathogens and the prevention of massive overgrowth of microorganisms that affect oral and general health. A high concentration of lactoferrin in saliva is often considered to be a marker of damage to the salivary glands, gingivitis, or leakage through inflamed or damaged oral mucosa, infiltrated particularly by neutrophils. We conducted a study to determine the effect of chronic alcohol intoxication on salivary lactoferrin concentration and output. The study included 30 volunteers consisting of ten non-smoking male patients after chronic alcohol intoxication (group A, and 20 control nonsmoking male social drinkers (group C with no history of alcohol abuse. Resting whole saliva was collected 24 to 48 hours after a chronic alcohol intoxication period. Lactoferrin was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. For all participants, the DMFT index (decayed, missing, or filled teeth, gingival index (GI and papilla bleeding index (PBI were assessed. The differences between groups were evaluated using the Mann–Whitney U test. We noticed significantly decreased salivary flow (SF in alcohol dependent patients after chronic alcohol intoxication (A, compared to the control group (C. Although there was no significant difference in salivary lactoferrin concentration between the alcohol dependent group A and the control group C, we found significantly decreased lactoferrin output in group A compared to group C. We found a significant correlation between the amount of daily alcohol use and a decrease in lactoferrin output. There was a significant increase in GI and a tendency of PBI to increase in group A compared to group C. We demonstrated that chronic alcohol intoxication decreases SF and lactoferrin output. The decreased lactoferrin output in persons chronically intoxicated by alcohol may be the result of lactoferrin exhaustion during drinking (due to its alcohol-related lower

  10. Decreased injecting is associated with increased alcohol consumption among injecting drug users in northern Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Vivian F; Minh, Nguyen Le; Frangakis, Constantine; Ha, Tran Viet; Latkin, Carl A; Sripaipan, Teerada; Davis, Wendy; Zelaya, Carla; Ngoc, Nguyen Phuong; Quan, Vu Minh

    2013-07-01

    Reducing injecting frequency may reduce the risk of HIV infection and improve health outcomes among injection drug users (IDUs). However, the reduction of one risk behavior may be associated with an increase in other risk behaviors, including the use of other risk-associated substances. Our objective was to determine if an association exists between a reduction in injecting and level of alcohol use among IDU. We conducted a longitudinal analysis of data collected for a randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of a peer education intervention in reducing HIV risk among IDU and their network members in Thai Nguyen, Vietnam. Our analysis included active male injectors (n = 629) who were study participants and attended both baseline and 3-month visits. Frequency of alcohol consumption was assessed as the number of alcoholic drinks in the past 30 days. Change in risk and outcome behaviors was calculated as the difference in frequencies of behaviors between baseline and 3-month follow-up visits. The outcome of interest was concurrent decreased drug injection and increased alcohol consumption. The mean difference between baseline and 3-month follow-up of alcohol consumption and injection frequency in the past 30 days was 19.03 drinks (93.68 SD) and 20.22 injections (35.66 SD), respectively. Participants who reported reduced injection frequency were almost three times as likely to report increased alcohol consumption (OR 2.8; 95% CI, 2.0, 4.0). The proportion that both decreased injecting and increased alcohol by any amount in the past 30 days was 35.6%. In multivariate analysis higher education was significantly associated with an increase in alcohol and decrease in injecting of any amount. Male IDU may be at risk for increasing alcohol consumption when they reduce injection frequency. Interventions with male IDU that encourage reduction of injection may need to review specific strategies to limit alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  11. Cabergoline decreases alcohol drinking and seeking behaviors via glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicella, Sebastien; Ahmadiantehrani, Somayeh; He, Dao-Yao; Nielsen, Carsten K; Bartlett, Selena E; Janak, Patricia H; Ron, Dorit

    2009-07-15

    Cabergoline is an ergotamine derivative that increases the expression of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in vitro. We recently showed that GDNF in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) reduces the motivation to consume alcohol. We therefore set out to determine whether cabergoline administration decreases alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors via GDNF. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) were used to measure GDNF levels. Western blot analysis was used for phosphorylation experiments. Operant self-administration in rats and a two-bottle choice procedure in mice were used to assess alcohol-drinking behaviors. Instrumental performance tested during extinction was used to measure alcohol-seeking behavior. The [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay was used to assess the expression and function of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R). We found that treatment of the dopaminergic-like cell line SH-SY5Y with cabergoline and systemic administration of cabergoline in rats resulted in an increase in GDNF level and in the activation of the GDNF pathway. Cabergoline treatment decreased alcohol-drinking and -seeking behaviors including relapse, and its action to reduce alcohol consumption was localized to the VTA. Finally, the increase in GDNF expression and the decrease in alcohol consumption by cabergoline were abolished in GDNF heterozygous knockout mice. Together, these findings suggest that cabergoline-mediated upregulation of the GDNF pathway attenuates alcohol-drinking behaviors and relapse. Alcohol abuse and addiction are devastating and costly problems worldwide. This study puts forward the possibility that cabergoline might be an effective treatment for these disorders.

  12. Decreased galanin serum levels are associated with alcohol-craving during withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Annemarie; Muschler, Marc; Frieling, Helge; Lenz, Bernd; Wilhelm, Julia; Gröschl, Michael; Kornhuber, Johannes; Bleich, Stefan; Hillemacher, Thomas

    2011-03-30

    The hypothalamic galanin expression has been associated with increased intake of carbohydrates and fats in preclinical studies. The appetite stimulating effect of galanin is thought to underlie the positive association between alcohol consumption and hypothalamic galanin expression observed in preclinical studies. In this pilot study we investigated alterations in galanin serum levels (33 male patients) in alcohol-dependent patients during alcohol withdrawal (days 1, 7 and 14) in comparison to healthy controls (19 male controls). In order to assess the putative association between appetite regulation, galanin serum levels and alcohol consumption we additionally investigated the serum levels of insulin, glucose and triglycerides. The galanin serum levels on day 1 of alcohol withdrawal were significantly reduced in the alcohol-dependent patients (T=-3.302, p=0.002) and increased significantly from day 1 to day 14 of alcohol withdrawal (F=6.437, p=0.002). We found a significant negative association between the galanin serum levels and alcohol craving measured by the Obsessive Compulsive Drinking Scale (OCDS) (r=-0.449, p=0.009) and the obsessive subscale of the OCDS (r=-0.521, p=0.002) on day 1 of alcohol withdrawal. There was no association between the galanin serum levels and the parameters of energy homeostasis (triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and glucose) investigated. Acute alcohol withdrawal was associated with decreased galanin serum levels in this pilot study. There was no association between the galanin serum levels and the parameters of energy homeostasis. Further research of galanin serum levels in active drinkers will be necessary to clarify the putative association between galanin serum levels, appetite regulation and alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Aggravation of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis by moderate alcohol consumption is associated with decreased SIRT1 activity in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronic alcohol intake decreases adiponectin and sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) expressions, both of which have been implicated in various biological processes including inflammation, apoptosis and metabolism. We have previously shown that moderate consumption of alcohol aggravates liver inflammation and apoptos...

  14. Rikkunshito, a Japanese Kampo Medicine, Ameliorates Decreased Feeding Behavior via Ghrelin and Serotonin 2B Receptor Signaling in a Novelty Stress Murine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chihiro Yamada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of rikkunshito (RKT, a ghrelin signal enhancer, on the decrease in food intake after exposure to novelty stress in mice. RKT administration (500 mg/kg, per os improved the decrease in 6 h cumulative food intake. In control mice, the plasma acylated ghrelin levels significantly increased by 24 h fasting. In contrast, the acylated ghrelin levels did not increase by fasting in mice exposed to the novelty stress. RKT administration to the novelty stress mice showed a significant increase in the acylated ghrelin levels compared with that in the distilled-water-treated control mice. Food intake after administering serotonin 2B (5-HT2B receptor antagonists was evaluated to clarify the role of 5-HT2B receptor activation in the decrease in feeding behavior after novelty stress. SB215505 and SB204741, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists, significantly improved the decrease in food intake after exposure to novelty stress. A component of RKT, isoliquiritigenin, prevented the decrease in 6 h cumulative food intake. Isoliquiritigenin showed 5-HT2B receptor antagonistic activity in vitro. In conclusion, the results suggested that RKT improves the decrease in food intake after novelty stress probably via 5-HT2B receptor antagonism of isoliquiritigenin contained in RKT.

  15. Rikkunshito, a Japanese kampo medicine, ameliorates decreased feeding behavior via ghrelin and serotonin 2B receptor signaling in a novelty stress murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Chihiro; Saegusa, Yayoi; Nakagawa, Koji; Ohnishi, Shunsuke; Muto, Shuichi; Nahata, Miwa; Sadakane, Chiharu; Hattori, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Naoya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effects of rikkunshito (RKT), a ghrelin signal enhancer, on the decrease in food intake after exposure to novelty stress in mice. RKT administration (500 mg/kg, per os) improved the decrease in 6 h cumulative food intake. In control mice, the plasma acylated ghrelin levels significantly increased by 24 h fasting. In contrast, the acylated ghrelin levels did not increase by fasting in mice exposed to the novelty stress. RKT administration to the novelty stress mice showed a significant increase in the acylated ghrelin levels compared with that in the distilled-water-treated control mice. Food intake after administering serotonin 2B (5-HT(2B)) receptor antagonists was evaluated to clarify the role of 5-HT(2B) receptor activation in the decrease in feeding behavior after novelty stress. SB215505 and SB204741, 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonists, significantly improved the decrease in food intake after exposure to novelty stress. A component of RKT, isoliquiritigenin, prevented the decrease in 6 h cumulative food intake. Isoliquiritigenin showed 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonistic activity in vitro. In conclusion, the results suggested that RKT improves the decrease in food intake after novelty stress probably via 5-HT(2B) receptor antagonism of isoliquiritigenin contained in RKT.

  16. Prevention of alcohol-heightened aggression by CRF-R1 antagonists in mice: critical role for DRN-PFC serotonin pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quadros, Isabel M; Hwa, Lara S; Shimamoto, Akiko; Carlson, Julia; DeBold, Joseph F; Miczek, Klaus A

    2014-11-01

    Alcohol can escalate aggressive behavior in a significant subgroup of rodents, humans, and nonhuman primates. The present study investigated whether blockade of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type 1 (CRF-R1) could prevent the emergence of alcohol-heightened aggression in mice. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway from the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) to the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) by CRF-R1 was investigated as a possible target for the prevention of alcohol-heightened aggressive behavior. Male CFW mice that reliably exhibited aggressive behaviors after consuming 1 g/kg of alcohol received systemic or intra-DRN administration of CRF-R1 antagonists, CP-154,526 or MTIP, before a confrontation with a male conspecific. Blockade of DRN CRF-R1 receptors with both antagonists significantly reduced only alcohol-heightened aggression, whereas systemic administration reduced both alcohol-heightened and species-typical aggression. Next, a 5-HT1A agonist, 8-OH-DPAT, was coadministered with CP-154,526 into the DRN to temporarily disrupt 5-HT activity. This manipulation abolished the antiaggressive effects of intra-DRN CP-154,526. In the mPFC, in vivo microdialysis revealed that extracellular 5-HT levels were increased in mice that consumed alcohol and were then injected with CP-154,526, both systemically or intra-DRN. Neither alcohol nor CP-154,526 alone affected 5-HT release in the mPFC. The present results suggest the DRN as a critical site for CRF-R1 to modulate alcohol-heightened aggression via action on the serotonergic DRN-PFC pathway.

  17. Global decrease of serotonin-1A receptor binding after electroconvulsive therapy in major depression measured by PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzenberger, R; Baldinger, P; Hahn, A; Ungersboeck, J; Mitterhauser, M; Winkler, D; Micskei, Z; Stein, P; Karanikas, G; Wadsak, W; Kasper, S; Frey, R

    2013-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is a potent therapy in severe treatment-refractory depression. Although commonly applied in psychiatric clinical routine since decades, the exact neurobiological mechanism regarding its efficacy remains unclear. Results from preclinical and clinical studies emphasize a crucial involvement of the serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT1A) in the mode of action of antidepressant treatment. This includes associations between treatment response and changes in 5-HT1A function and density by antidepressants. Further, alterations of the 5-HT1A receptor are consistently reported in depression. To elucidate the effect of ECT on 5-HT1A receptor binding, 12 subjects with severe treatment-resistant major depression underwent three positron emission tomography (PET) measurements using the highly selective radioligand [carbonyl-11C]WAY100635, twice before (test–retest variability) and once after 10.08±2.35 ECT sessions. Ten patients (∼83%) were responders to ECT. The voxel-wise comparison of the 5-HT1A receptor binding (BPND) before and after ECT revealed a widespread reduction in cortical and subcortical regions (P<0.05 corrected), except for the occipital cortex and the cerebellum. Strongest reductions were found in regions consistently reported to be altered in major depression and involved in emotion regulation, such as the subgenual part of the anterior cingulate cortex (−27.5%), the orbitofrontal cortex (−30.1%), the amygdala (−31.8%), the hippocampus (−30.6%) and the insula (−28.9%). No significant change was found in the raphe nuclei. There was no significant difference in receptor binding in any region comparing the first two PET scans conducted before ECT. This PET study proposes a global involvement of the postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor binding in the effect of ECT. PMID:22751491

  18. Serotonin depletion results in a decrease of the neuronal activation caused by rivastigmine in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Weikop, Pia; Moller, Arne

    2006-01-01

    significantly increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in medial prefrontal cortex and the hippocampus, but not in the septum and dorsal raphe nucleus. 5-HT depletion decreased ACh-induced c-Fos immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus. By contrast, 5-HT depletion had no effect on the ACh-induced activity in the other...

  19. Decreased serum level of NGF in alcohol-dependent patients with declined executive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bae H

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Hwallip Bae,1 Youngsun Ra,1 Changwoo Han,2 Dai-Jin Kim3 1Department of Psychiatry, Myongji Hospital, Goyang, 2Department of Psychiatry, Keyo Hospital, Uiwang, 3Department of Psychiatry, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea Abstract: The role of neurotrophic factors has been highlighted as a cause of decline in the cognitive function of alcohol-dependent patients. It is known that nerve-growth factor (NGF, one of the neurotrophins, is related to the growth and differentiation of nerve cells, as well as to a decline in cognitive function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between decreased NGF levels and cognitive decline in alcohol-dependent patients. The serum concentration of NGF was measured in 38 patients with chronic alcohol dependence, and several neuropsychological tests were also performed for cognitive function assessment. The results indicated a significant correlation between serum NGF level and the trail-making test part B, which evaluates executive function, but did not show a significant correlation with other cognitive function tests. An increased serum level of NGF was associated with a decreased completion time in the trail-making test B, and this finding indicates that a high serum level of NGF is related to greater executive function. This finding may imply a protective role of NGF in preventing neuron damage among patients with alcohol dependence. Larger controlled studies will be necessary in the future to investigate this issue further. Keywords: nerve-growth factor, alcohol dependence, executive function, trail-making test

  20. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazutaka Sawada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus. Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation.

  1. Residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential decreases unsaturated fatty acid level in sake yeast during alcoholic fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen, a key nutrient in alcoholic fermentation, is rapidly depleted during this process. Several pathways of oxygen utilization have been reported in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation, namely synthesis of unsaturated fatty acid, sterols and heme, and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. However, the interaction between these pathways has not been investigated. In this study, we showed that the major proportion of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids in sake fermentation mash is derived from the sake yeast rather than from rice or koji (rice fermented with Aspergillus). Additionally, during alcoholic fermentation, inhibition of the residual mitochondrial activity of sake yeast increases the levels of unsaturated fatty acids of ester-linked lipids. These findings indicate that the residual activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain reduces molecular oxygen levels and decreases the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids, thereby increasing the synthesis of estery flavors by sake yeast. This is the first report of a novel link between residual mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the synthesis of unsaturated fatty acids by the brewery yeast during alcoholic fermentation. PMID:26839744

  2. Aging and depression vulnerability interaction results in decreased serotonin innervation associated with reduced BDNF levels in hippocampus of rats bred for learned helplessness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a strong genetic contribution to the risk for depression. Both reduced hippocampal serotonin neurotransmission and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels have been associated with increased depression vulnerability and are also regulated during aging....... Brains from young (5 months old) and old (13 months old) congenital Learned Helplessness rats (cLH), and congenital Non Learned Helplessness rats (cNLH) were immunohistochemically stained for the serotonin transporter and subsequently stereologically quantified for estimating hippocampal serotonin fiber...... density. Hippocampal BDNF protein levels were measured by ELISA. An exacerbated age-related loss of serotonin fiber density specific for the CA1 area was observed in the cLH animals, whereas reduced hippocampal BDNF levels were seen in young and old cLH when compared with age-matched cNLH controls...

  3. Liraglutide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Which Decreases Hypothalamic 5-HT2A Receptor Expression, Reduces Appetite and Body Weight Independently of Serotonin Synthesis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2018-01-01

    A recent report suggested that brain-derived serotonin (5-HT) is critical for maintaining weight loss induced by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor activation in rats and that 5-HT2A receptors mediate the feeding suppression and weight loss induced by GLP-1 receptor activation. Here, we show that changes in daily food intake and body weight induced by intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, over 4 days did not differ between mice treated with the tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) for 3 days and mice without PCPA treatment. Treatment with PCPA did not affect hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor expression. Despite the anorexic effect of liraglutide disappearing after the first day of treatment, the body weight loss induced by liraglutide persisted for 4 days in mice treated with or without PCPA. Intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide significantly decreased the gene expression of hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptors 1 h after injection. Moreover, the acute anorexic effects of liraglutide were blunted in mice treated with the high-affinity 5-HT2A agonist (4-bromo-3,6-dimethoxybenzocyclobuten-1-yl) methylamine hydrobromide 14 h or 24 h before liraglutide injection. These findings suggest that liraglutide reduces appetite and body weight independently of 5-HT synthesis in mice, whereas GLP-1 receptor activation downregulates the gene expression of hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptors.

  4. Liraglutide, a GLP-1 Receptor Agonist, Which Decreases Hypothalamic 5-HT2A Receptor Expression, Reduces Appetite and Body Weight Independently of Serotonin Synthesis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsunori Nonogaki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A recent report suggested that brain-derived serotonin (5-HT is critical for maintaining weight loss induced by glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 receptor activation in rats and that 5-HT2A receptors mediate the feeding suppression and weight loss induced by GLP-1 receptor activation. Here, we show that changes in daily food intake and body weight induced by intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, over 4 days did not differ between mice treated with the tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph inhibitor p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA for 3 days and mice without PCPA treatment. Treatment with PCPA did not affect hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptor expression. Despite the anorexic effect of liraglutide disappearing after the first day of treatment, the body weight loss induced by liraglutide persisted for 4 days in mice treated with or without PCPA. Intraperitoneal administration of liraglutide significantly decreased the gene expression of hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptors 1 h after injection. Moreover, the acute anorexic effects of liraglutide were blunted in mice treated with the high-affinity 5-HT2A agonist (4-bromo-3,6-dimethoxybenzocyclobuten-1-yl methylamine hydrobromide 14 h or 24 h before liraglutide injection. These findings suggest that liraglutide reduces appetite and body weight independently of 5-HT synthesis in mice, whereas GLP-1 receptor activation downregulates the gene expression of hypothalamic 5-HT2A receptors.

  5. Plaque deposition dependent decrease in 5-HT2A serotonin receptor in AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 amyloid overexpressing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Peter; Ettrup, Anders; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A; El-Sayed, Mona; Elvang, Anders B; Stensbøl, Tine B; Mikkelsen, Jens D; Knudsen, Gitte M; Aznar, Susana

    2010-01-01

    Intrahippocampal injections of aggregated amyloid-beta (Abeta)1-42 in rats result in memory impairment and in reduction of hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor levels. In order to investigate how changes in 5-HT2A levels and functionality relate to the progressive accumulation of Abeta protein, we studied 5-HT2A receptor regulation in double transgenic AbetaPPswe/PS1dE9 mice which display excess production of Abeta and age-dependent increase in amyloid plaques. Three different age-groups, 4-month-old, 8- month-old, and 11-month-old were included in the study. [3H]-MDL100907, [3H]-escitalopram, and [11C]-PIB autoradiography was performed for measuring 5-HT2A receptor, serotonin transporter (SERT), and Abeta plaque levels in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), frontoparietal cortex (FPC), dorsal and ventral hippocampus, and somatosensory cortex. To investigate 5-HT2A receptor functionality, animals were treated with the 5-HT2A receptor agonist DOI and head-twitch response (HTR) subsequently recorded. Expression level of the immediate early gene c-fos was measured by in situ hybridization. We found that the age-related increase in Abeta plaque burden was accompanied by a significant decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding in mPFC in the 11-month-old group. The changes in 5-HT2A receptor binding correlated negatively with [11C]-PIB binding and were not accompanied by decreases in SERT binding. Correspondingly, 11-month-old transgenic mice showed diminished DOI-induced HTR and reduced increase in expression of c-fos mRNA in mPFC and FPC. These observations point towards a direct association between Abeta accumulation and changes in 5-HT2A receptor expression that is independent of upstream changes in the serotonergic system.

  6. The effectiveness of intervention studies to decrease alcohol use in college undergraduate students: an integrative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter Fager, Judith; Mazurek Melnyk, Bernadette

    2004-01-01

    This analysis was performed to critique intervention studies targeted at decreasing alcohol use in college students for the purpose of (1) synthesizing the various types of interventions and outcomes used, (2) evaluating the effectiveness of the interventions, and (3) identifying the strengths and limitations of prior studies to make recommendations for evidence-based clinical practice and future research. An exhaustive literature search was performed for experimental studies conducted in the past 10 years. Analysis using 15 identified studies indicated the following strengths: (1) use of random assignment in many of the studies, (2) use of theoretical frameworks to guide the interventions, (3) replication of previous studies, and (4) inclusion of outcome measures of alcohol use, quantity, and frequency. Limitations included: (1) small convenience samples; (2) use of multiple tools to elicit outcomes, making it difficult to compare results across studies; (3) lack of long-term follow-up to assess sustainability of the interventions; (4) use of only self-report outcome measures, which rely on subject's recall memory; (5) lack of manipulation checks to assure that subjects actually processed the interventions; and (6) a paucity of stress and coping interventions. Extensive research to address the problem of college alcohol use indicates that while education is an integral part of the approach for this problem, it is ineffective when used alone as an intervention strategy. However, some empirical support exists for the use of brief motivational interventions to reduce alcohol use and harm. A personalized approach addressing expectancies and normative use employing a motivational interviewing style may produce desired outcomes. In addition, theory-based manualized approaches using stress and coping intervention strategies need to be developed and tested. In the design of future studies, careful attention also should be given to methodological issues such as sampling

  7. CSF miR-16 is decreased in major depression patients and its neutralization in rats induces depression-like behaviors via a serotonin transmitter system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming-Fen; Dong, Jie-Zheng; Wang, Yu-Wen; He, Jun; Ju, Xuan; Zhang, Long; Zhang, Yong-Hua; Shi, Jian-Fei; Lv, Ya-Ying

    2015-06-01

    Animal and cell line studies demonstrated that miR-16 may be associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) via regulation of the expression of serotonin transporter (SERT) gene. However, human studies about miR-16 of patients with MDD are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible involvement of miR-16 in the mechanism of MDD in humans. Thirty-six drug-free patients with MDD and 30 healthy controls aged between 18 and 45 years old were recruited. 24-item Hamilton depression scale test was performed for each subject. MiR-16 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood, as well as serotonin in CSF were assayed by the qRT-PCR or ELISA method. To confirm the role of CSF miR-16 in MDD, animal study about intracerebroventricular injection of anti-miR-16 was also performed. Depression-like behaviors, CSF miR-16 and serotonin, blood miR-16, and raphe SERT protein of rats were also tested. CSF miR-16 in MDD patients was significantly lower than that in controls. It was negatively correlated with Hamilton scores and positively associated with CSF serotonin. However, blood miR-16 was not significantly different between two groups and it was not statistically correlated with CSF miR-16. In animal study, anti-miR-16-treated rats were evaluated to exhibit depression-like behaviors, extremely lower CSF miR-16, significantly higher CSF serotonin, and obviously higher raphe SERT protein than control rats. We did not detect SERT protein in human brain due to the impossibility of sample collection. Our study suggested that CSF miR-16 participated in the physiopathology of MDD via the modulation of serotonin transmitter system in brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Parental Mediation in the Digital Era: Increasing Children's Critical Thinking May Help Decrease Positive Attitudes toward Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radanielina Hita, Marie Louise; Kareklas, Ioannis; Pinkleton, Bruce

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate in our research that discussion-based parental mediation may successfully decrease the negative effects that youth's engagement with alcohol brands on social media may have on attitudes toward alcohol through its effects on critical thinking. A clear pattern was found with positive mediation leading to unhealthy outcomes and negative mediation predicting healthier behaviors. Youth whose parents critiqued media messages reported more critical thinking skills, which predicted less interaction with alcohol brands on social media and fewer expectancies toward alcohol. On the other hand, youth whose parents endorsed media portrayals of drinking reported fewer critical thinking skills and were thus more likely to interact with alcohol brands on social media. Including a media literacy component in alcohol education that target parental strategies and that are conducive to discussion may lead to beneficial health outcomes in the digital era.

  9. What happened to alcohol consumption and problems in the Nordic countries when alcohol taxes were decreased and borders opened?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Room, Robin; Bloomfield, Kim; Gmel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Aims: The study tests the effects of reductions in alcohol taxation and increases in travellers’ allowances on alcohol consumption and related harm in Denmark, Finland, and southern Sweden. In late 2003 and early 2004, taxes on alcoholic beverages were reduced in Denmark and Finland......, and the abolition of quantitative quotas on alcohol import for personal use from other European Union countries made cheaper alcohol more available in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. Method: Analyses of routine statistical register data and summaries of results from longitudinal and repeated cross......-sectional population surveys and other previous analyses, with northern Sweden as a control site for secular trends. Results: Contrary to expectations, alcohol consumption—as based on register data—increased only in Finland and not in Denmark and southern Sweden, and self-reported survey data did not show an increase...

  10. Testing bidirectional relationships between alcohol use and depressive symptoms: What is the role of the serotonin transporter gene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Roy; van der Zwaluw, Carmen S; Engels, Rutger C

    2018-02-01

    Alcohol abuse often co-exists with a major depressive disorder. In order to understand the development of this comorbidity, it is important to concentrate on the preceding process. It has been suggested that the link between alcohol use and depressive symptoms is a result of an interaction with genetic factors. The aim of this study was to longitudinally examine the effect of the 5-HTTLPR genotype on the association between depressive symptoms and alcohol use in a Dutch community sample. Following a stepwise approach, bivariate correlations, longitudinal regression analyses, and latent growth curve analyses were separately conducted for 316 males and 321 females. A positive correlation between depressive symptoms and alcohol use was shown in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR short allele. In addition, latent growth curve analyses showed a positive association between alcohol use and the intercept of depressive symptoms (but not the slope), but only in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR short allele. These findings show that alcohol use may be positively related, at least cross-sectionally, to depressive symptoms in female carriers of the 5-HTTLPR S allele, and indicate that moderators such as SLC6A4 genotype and sex need to be taken into account when examining associations between depressive symptoms and drinking behavior. In order to gain insight into the longitudinal association between alcohol use and depressive symptoms, studies should concentrate on earlier stages and focus on more fine-grained research designs that allow day-to-day changes in both alcohol use and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serotonin & Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Axholm, Ida; Haxgart, Nina; Ranum, Kasper; Svendsen, Astrid Helmer

    2014-01-01

    350.000.000 people worldwide have a depression and 150.000 Danes are affected every year. Depresion is defined by WHO from it’s syptoms. The diagnose is given from a point system for the patient’s symptoms, for instance HAM-D scale and MADRS scale Serotonin in the brain is synthesized from L-tryptophan in the presynaptic parts of the neuron and is released into the synapse as a transmitter drug. According to the serotonin theory, the concentration of serotonin in the brain is low in depressio...

  12. Higher density of serotonin-1A receptors in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring P rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.T.; Threlkeld, P.G.; Lumeng, L.; Li, Ting-Kai

    1990-01-01

    Saturable [ 3 H]-80HDPAT binding to 5HT-1A receptors in membranes prepared from hippocampus and frontal cerebral cortex of alcohol-preferring (P) rats and of alcohol-nonpreferring (NP) rats has been compared. The B max values or densities of recognition sites for 5HT-1A receptors in both brain areas of the P rats are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats. The corresponding K D values are 38 and 44 percent lower in the P rats than in the NP rats, indicating higher affinities of the recognition sites for the 5HT-1A receptors in hippocampus and cerebral cortex of the P rats. These findings indicate either an enrichment of 5HT-1A receptor density during selective breeding for alcohol preference or an upregulation of 5HT-1A receptors of 5HT found in these brain areas of P rats as compared with the NP rats

  13. Identification of subpopulations of prairie voles differentially susceptible to peer influence to decrease high alcohol intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison M.J. Anacker

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Peer influences are critical in the decrease of alcohol (ethanol abuse and maintenance of abstinence. We previously developed an animal model of inhibitory peer influences on ethanol drinking using prairie voles and here sought to understand whether this influential behavior was due to specific changes in drinking patterns and to variation in a microsatellite sequence in the regulatory region of the vasopressin receptor 1a gene (avpr1a. Adult prairie voles’ drinking patterns were monitored in a lickometer apparatus that recorded each lick a subject exhibited during continuous access to water and 10% ethanol during periods of isolation, pair housing of high and low drinkers, and subsequent isolation. Analysis of fluid consumption confirmed previous results that high drinkers typically decrease ethanol intake when paired with low drinkers, but that a subset of voles do not decrease. Analysis of bout structure revealed differences in the number of ethanol drinking bouts in the subpopulations of high drinkers when paired with low drinkers. Lickometer drinking patterns analyzed by visual and by cross-correlation analyses demonstrated that pair housing did not increase the rate of subjects drinking in bouts occurring at the same time. The length of the avpr1a microsatellite did not predict susceptibility to peer influence or any other drinking behaviors. In summary, subpopulations of high drinkers were identified by fluid intake and number of drinking bouts, which did or did not lower their ethanol intake when paired with a low drinking peer, and these subpopulations should be explored for testing the efficacy of treatments to decrease ethanol use in groups that are likely to be responsive to different types of therapy.

  14. What Gene Mutations Affect Serotonin in Mice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenpenny, Richard C; Commons, Kathryn G

    2017-05-17

    Although serotonin neurotransmission has been implicated in several neurodevelopmental and psychological disorders, the factors that drive dysfunction of the serotonin system are poorly understood. Current research regarding the serotonin system revolves around its dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders, but there is no database collating genetic mutations that result in serotonin abnormalities. To bridge this gap, we developed a list of genes in mice that, when perturbed, result in altered levels of serotonin either in brain or blood. Due to the intrinsic limitations of search, the current list should be considered a preliminary subset of all relevant cases. Nevertheless, it offered an opportunity to gain insight into what types of genes have the potential to impact serotonin by using gene ontology (GO). This analysis found that genes associated with monoamine metabolism were more often associated with increases in brain serotonin than decreases. Speculatively, this could be because several pathways (and therefore many genes) are responsible for the clearance and metabolism of serotonin whereas only one pathway (and therefore fewer genes) is directly involved in the synthesis of serotonin. Another contributor could be cross talk between monoamine systems such as dopamine. In contrast, genes that were associated with decreases in brain serotonin were more likely linked to a developmental process. Sensitivity of serotonin neurons to developmental perturbations could be due to their complicated neuroanatomy or possibly they may be negatively regulated by dysfunction of their innervation targets. Thus, these observations suggest hypotheses regarding the mechanisms underlying the vulnerability of brain serotonin neurotransmission.

  15. Aging and depression vulnerability interaction results in decreased serotonin innervation associated with reduced BDNF levels in hippocampus of rats bred for learned helplessness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aznar, Susana; Klein, Anders B; Santini, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have revealed a strong genetic contribution to the risk for depression. Both reduced hippocampal serotonin neurotransmission and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels have been associated with increased depression vulnerability and are also regulated during aging....... These observations indicate that aging should be taken into account when studying the neurobiological factors behind the vulnerability for depression and that understanding the effect of aging on genetically predisposed individuals may contribute to a better understanding of the pathophysiology behind depression...

  16. Gut peptide GLP-1 and its analogue, Exendin-4, decrease alcohol intake and reward.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita H Shirazi

    Full Text Available Glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1 is a gut- and neuro-peptide with an important role in the regulation of food intake and glucose metabolism. Interestingly, GLP-1 receptors (GLP-1R are expressed in key mesolimbic reward areas (including the ventral tegmental area, VTA, innervated by hindbrain GLP-1 neurons. Recently GLP-1 has emerged as a potential regulator of food reward behavior, an effect driven by the mesolimbic GLP-1Rs. Its role in other reward behaviors remains largely unexplored. Since a considerable overlap has been suggested for circuitry controlling reward behavior derived from food and alcohol we hypothesized that GLP-1 and GLP-1Rs could regulate alcohol intake and alcohol reward. We sought to determine whether GLP-1 or its clinically safe stable analogue, Exendin-4, reduce alcohol intake and reward. To determine the potential role of the endogenous GLP-1 in alcohol intake we evaluated whether GLP-1R antagonist, Exendin 9-39, can increase alcohol intake. Furthermore, we set out to evaluate whether VTA GLP-1R activation is sufficient to reduce alcohol intake. Male Wistar rats injected peripherally with GLP-1 or Exendin-4 reduced their alcohol intake in an intermittent access two bottle free choice drinking model. Importantly, a contribution of endogenously released GLP-1 is highlighted by our observation that blockade of GLP-1 receptors alone resulted in an increased alcohol intake. Furthermore, GLP-1 injection reduced alcohol reward in the alcohol conditioned place preference test in mice. To evaluate the neuroanatomical substrate linking GLP-1 with alcohol intake/reward, we selectively microinjected GLP-1 or Exendin 4 into the VTA. This direct stimulation of the VTA GLP-1 receptors potently reduced alcohol intake. Our findings implicate GLP-1R signaling as a novel modulator of alcohol intake and reward. We show for the first time that VTA GLP-1R stimulation leads to reduced alcohol intake. Considering that GLP-1 analogues are already

  17. Alcohol consumption is associated with decreased risk of rheumatoid arthritis: results from two Scandinavian case-control studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Källberg, H; Jacobsen, Søren; Bengtsson, C

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the association between risk of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and alcohol consumption in combination with smoking and HLA-DRB1 shared epitope (SE). METHODS: Data from two independent case-control studies of RA, the Swedish EIRA (1204 cases and 871 controls) and the Danish...... CACORA (444 cases and 533 controls), were used to estimate ORs of developing RA for different amounts of alcohol consumed. RESULTS: Alcohol consumption was significantly more common in controls (p... alcohol consumers, the quarter with the highest consumption had a decreased risk of RA of the order of 40-50% compared with the half with the lowest consumption (EIRA, OR = 0.5 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.6); CACORA, OR = 0.6 (95% CI 0.4 to 0.9)). For the subset of RA that is seropositive for antibodies...

  18. Efficacy of motivational enhancement therapy to decrease alcohol and illicit-drug use in pregnant substance users reporting baseline alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterman, Robin; Lewis, Daniel; Winhusen, Theresa

    2017-06-01

    Approximately 35% of pregnant substance users in treatment report alcohol abuse, which increases the risk of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) in their offspring. The present study was a preliminary evaluation of the efficacy of motivational enhancement therapy (MET) in decreasing alcohol use in pregnant women attending substance use treatment. Secondary analysis of a trial evaluating the efficacy of MET, relative to treatment as usual (TAU), in improving treatment outcomes in 200 pregnant substance users. The present study included the 41 women (n=27 MET and n=14 TAU) who reported alcohol use in the 28days prior to randomization. Alcohol and illicit-drug use days were assessed with self-report; illicit drug use was assessed with urine drug screens. All measures were obtained weekly for the 4week active study phase and at 1 and 3month follow-ups. Significant treatment-by-time interaction effects were found for illicit-drug use days during the active (X 2 =6.89, df=1, pppsubstance users reporting alcohol use. With 2-5% of US births affected by FASD, future research to replicate these findings seems warranted. ClinicalTrials.gov http://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Identifier: NCT00078143. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Serotonin uptake and serotonin uptake inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, R W; Wong, D T

    1990-01-01

    Serotonin uptake carriers occur on serotonin neurons, on glial cells and on blood platelets. The uptake carrier on serotonin neurons inactivates serotonin that has been released into the synaptic cleft by transporting it back into the nerve terminal. The serotonin uptake carrier is the means by which blood platelets acquire serotonin, since they do not synthesize it. The function of the serotonin uptake carrier on glial cells is poorly understood. Selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake enhance neurotransmission via serotonergic neurons and have been useful pharmacologic tools for studying physiologic roles of serotonin neurons. Some serotonin uptake inhibitors are finding therapeutic uses in mental depression and other psychiatric disorders and in treating obesity and bulimia; other therapeutic applications continue to be evaluated.

  20. Decreased production of higher alcohols by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Chinese rice wine fermentation by deletion of Bat aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cui-Ying; Qi, Ya-Nan; Ma, Hong-Xia; Li, Wei; Dai, Long-Hai; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2015-04-01

    An appropriate level of higher alcohols produced by yeast during the fermentation is one of the most important factors influencing Chinese rice wine quality. In this study, BAT1 and BAT2 single- and double-gene-deletion mutant strains were constructed from an industrial yeast strain RY1 to decrease higher alcohols during Chinese rice wine fermentation. The results showed that the BAT2 single-gene-deletion mutant strain produced best improvement in the production of higher alcohols while remaining showed normal growth and fermentation characteristics. Furthermore, a BAT2 single-gene-deletion diploid engineered strain RY1-Δbat2 was constructed and produced low levels of isobutanol and isoamylol (isoamyl alcohol and active amyl alcohol) in simulated fermentation of Chinese rice wine, 92.40 and 303.31 mg/L, respectively, which were 33.00 and 14.20 % lower than those of the parental strain RY1. The differences in fermentation performance between RY1-Δbat2 and RY1 were minor. Therefore, construction of this yeast strain is important in future development in Chinese wine industry and provides insights on generating yeast strains for other fermented alcoholic beverages.

  1. Expression of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits is decreased in central amygdala of alcoholics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe eJin

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The central nucleus of amygdala (CeA has a role for mediating fear and anxiety responses. It is also involved in emotional imbalance caused by alcohol abuse and dependence and in regulating relapse to alcohol abuse. Growing evidences suggest that excitatory glutamatergic and inhibitory γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic (GABAergic transmissions in the CeA are affected by chronic alcohol exposure. Human post-mortem CeA samples from male alcoholics (n=9 and matched controls (n=9 were assayed for the expression level of ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptors subunit mRNAs using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-qPCR. Our data revealed that out of the 16 ionotropic glutamate receptor subunits, mRNAs encoding two AMPA [2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazol-4-ylpropanoic acid] receptor subunits GluA1 and GluA4; one kainate receptor subunit GluK2; one NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit GluN2D and one delta receptor subunit GluD2 were significantly decreased in the CeA of alcoholics. In contrast, of the 19 GABA-A receptor subunits, only the mRNA encoding the α2 subunit was significantly down-regulated in the CeA of the alcoholics as compared with control subjects. Our findings imply that the down-regulation of specific ionotropic glutamate and GABA-A receptor subunits in the CeA of alcoholics may represent one of the molecular substrates underlying the new balance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in alcohol dependence.

  2. Decreased plasma concentrations of BDNF and IGF-1 in abstinent patients with alcohol use disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria García-Marchena

    Full Text Available The identification of growth factors as potential biomarkers in alcohol addiction may help to understand underlying mechanisms associated with the pathogenesis of alcohol use disorders (AUDs. Previous studies have linked growth factors to neural plasticity in neurocognitive impairment and mental disorders. In order to further clarify the impact of chronic alcohol consumption on circulating growth factors, a cross-sectional study was performed in abstinent AUD patients (alcohol group, N = 91 and healthy control subjects (control group, N = 55 to examine plasma concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 and IGF-1 binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3. The association of these plasma peptides with relevant AUD-related variables and psychiatric comorbidity was explored. The alcohol group was diagnosed with severe AUD and showed an average of 13 years of problematic use and 10 months of abstinence at the moment of participating in the study. Regarding common medical conditions associated with AUD, we observed an elevated incidence of alcohol-induced liver and pancreas diseases (18.7% and psychiatric comorbidity (76.9%. Thus, AUD patients displayed a high prevalence of dual diagnosis (39.3% [mainly depression (19.9%] and comorbid substance use disorders (40.7%. Plasma BDNF and IGF-1 concentrations were significantly lower in the alcohol group than in the control group (p<0.001. Remarkably, there was a negative association between IGF-1 concentrations and age in the control group (r = -0.52, p<0.001 that was not found in the alcohol group. Concerning AUD-related variables, AUD patients with liver and pancreas diseases showed even lower concentrations of BDNF (p<0.05. In contrast, the changes in plasma concentrations of these peptides were not associated with abstinence, problematic use, AUD severity or lifetime psychiatric comorbidity. These results suggest that further research is necessary to elucidate the

  3. Treatment in hospital for alcohol-dependent patients decreases attentional bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flaudias V

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Valentin Flaudias,1,2 Georges Brousse,1,2 Ingrid De Chazeron,1,2 François Planche,2 Julien Brun,2 Pierre-Michel Llorca1,2 1Clermont Université, EA 7280 NPsy-Sydo, Clermont-Ferrand, France; 2Pôle Psychiatrie B, CHU Gabriel-Montpied, Clermont-Ferrand, France Background and objectives: Previous studies in alcohol-dependent patients have shown an attentional bias (AB under related substance cues, which can lead to relapse. This AB can be evaluated by the alcohol Stroop test (AST. The AST is a modified Stroop task in which participants have to name the color of an alcohol-related word or a neutral word. AB is the response-time difference between these two types of words. The goal of the current study was to examine modification of AB during specialized hospitalization for alcohol dependence, with the suppression of a training bias that could be present in within-subject design. Methods: Individuals with alcohol-dependence disorders (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition and admitted for withdrawal in the addiction unit of the University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand (test group, n = 42 and persons with no alcohol or psychiatric disorder (control group, n = 16, recruited among colleagues and friends of the staff, performed the AST. A subgroup of the test group performed the AST in admission (admission group, n = 19, and another subgroup undertook the test immediately before discharge (discharge group, n = 23. Results: Results showed an AB only for patients seen at admission (F[1,55] = 3.283, P = 0.075. Moreover, we observed that the AB in the admission group (mean = 34 ms, standard deviation [SD] = 70.06 was greater than the AB in the control group (mean = 23 ms, SD = 93.42, itself greater than the AB in the discharge group (mean = −12 ms, SD = 93.55 (t[55] = −1.71; P = 0.09. Conclusion: Although the results are preliminary, the present study provides evidence for changes in the AB during alcohol-addiction treatment

  4. Do Alcohol and Marijuana Use Decrease the Probability of Condom Use for College Women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jennifer L.; Fielder, Robyn L.; Carey, Kate B.; Carey, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol and marijuana use are thought to increase sexual risk taking, but event-level studies conflict in their findings and often depend on reports from a limited number of people or on a limited number of sexual events per person. With event-level data from 1856 sexual intercourse events provided by 297 college women (Mage = 18 years; 71% White), we used multilevel modeling to examine associations between alcohol and marijuana use and condom use as well as interactions involving sexual partner type and alcohol-sexual risk expectancies. Controlling for alternative contraception use, partner type, regular levels of substance use, impulsivity and sensation-seeking, and demographics, women were no more or less likely to use condoms during events involving drinking or heavy episodic drinking (HED) than during those without drinking. However, for drinking events, there was a negative association between number of drinks consumed and condom use; additionally, women with stronger alcohol-sexual risk expectancies were marginally less likely to use condoms when drinking. Although there was no main effect of marijuana use on condom use, these data suggest that marijuana use with established romantic partners may increase risk of unprotected sex. Intervention efforts should target expectancies and emphasize the dose-response relationship of drinks to condom use. PMID:24164105

  5. Decreases in adolescent weekly alcohol use in Europe and North America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Looze, Margaretha de; Raaijmakers, Quinten; Bogt, Tom Ter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study examined trends in adolescent weekly alcohol use between 2002 and 2010 in 28 European and North American countries. METHODS: Analyses were based on data from 11-, 13- and 15-year-old adolescents who participated in the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study...... in 2002, 2006 and 2010. RESULTS: Weekly alcohol use declined in 20 of 28 countries and in all geographic regions, from 12.1 to 6.1% in Anglo-Saxon countries, 11.4 to 7.8% in Western Europe, 9.3 to 4.1% in Northern Europe and 16.3 to 9.9% in Southern Europe. Even in Eastern Europe, where a stable trend...... was observed between 2002 and 2006, weekly alcohol use declined between 2006 and 2010 from 12.3 to 10.1%. The decline was evident in all gender and age subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: These consistent trends may be attributable to increased awareness of the harmful effects of alcohol for adolescent development...

  6. Performance measurement: a proposal to increase use of SBIRT and decrease alcohol consumption during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Peggy L

    2014-01-01

    Alcohol consumption during pregnancy has negative implications for maternal and child health. Appropriate early universal Screening, Brief Intervention and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT) for pregnant women is necessary to identify women at risk and reduce the likelihood of continued drinking. Because SBIRT is not consistently used, the development and use of performance measures to assure implementation of SBIRT are key steps towards intervention and reduction of alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Practice guidelines provide ample support for specific instruments designed for SBIRT in prenatal care. An examination of existing performance measures related to alcohol consumption during pregnancy, however, reveals no comprehensive published performance measure designed to quantify the use of SBIRT for alcohol use in prenatal care. Process performance measures were developed that can determine the proportion of pregnant women who are screened during the course of prenatal care and the proportion of women requiring either brief intervention or referral to substance use disorder treatment who received those interventions. The measures require use of screening instruments validated for use with pregnant women. The two proposed measures would represent a significant step in efforts to assure appropriate intervention for women who drink during pregnancy, hold accountable providers who do not employ SBIRT, and provide a basis from which necessary systemic changes might occur. Pregnancy is a time when many women are motivated to stop drinking. That opportunity should be seized, with timely intervention offering assistance for pregnant women who have not stopped drinking of their own accord.

  7. Acceptability of intervention materials to decrease risk for alcohol and medication interactions among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani, Faika; Allen, Hannah; Schoenberg, Nancy; Martin, Catherine; Clayton, Richard

    2018-04-01

    The majority of older adults take prescription or over-the-counter medications and about half consume alcohol regularly. Despite high risk for alcohol medication interactions (AMI), few community-level interventions exist to prevent AMI. The current study assessed the acceptability of educational materials created for use in a brief intervention to prevent AMI among older adults. Older adults from two senior centers reviewed intervention materials (poster, patient and pharmacist brochures, and public service announcement) and participated in a pre and post-test to provide feedback and to assess changes in AMI-related awareness and intentions. Post-test data showed positive feedback and an increase in participant understanding of AMI prevention, with statistically significant changes in perceived importance of messaging surrounding risky alcohol use and potential consequences of AMI. The intervention materials were positively received, and participant feedback indicated that the collective presentation of all the materials was the most preferred tool for educating the community. With positive trends in awareness and knowledge, intervention effectiveness needs to be further evaluated in future large-scale studies. This study provides health education specialists with tools to prevent alcohol and medication interactions among older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ghrelin knockout mice show decreased voluntary alcohol consumption and reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi, Amine; Tolle, Virginie; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Brunel, Luc; Martinez, Jean; Tomasetto, Catherine-Laure; Karam, Sherif M

    2013-05-01

    Recent work suggests that stomach-derived hormone ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonism may reduce motivational aspects of ethanol intake. In the current study we hypothesized that the endogenous GHS-R1A agonist ghrelin modulates alcohol reward mechanisms. For this purpose ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation and voluntary ethanol consumption in a two-bottle choice drinking paradigm were examined under conditions where ghrelin and its receptor were blocked, either using ghrelin knockout (KO) mice or the specific ghrelin receptor (GHS-R1A) antagonist "JMV2959". We showed that ghrelin KO mice displayed lower ethanol-induced CPP than their wild-type (WT) littermates. Consistently, when injected during CPP-acquisition, JMV2959 reduced CPP-expression in C57BL/6 mice. In addition, ethanol-induced locomotor stimulation was lower in ghrelin KO mice. Moreover, GHS-R1A blockade, using JMV2959, reduced alcohol-stimulated locomotion only in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. When alcohol consumption and preference were assessed using the two-bottle choice test, both genetic deletion of ghrelin and pharmacological antagonism of the GHS-R1A (JMV2959) reduced voluntary alcohol consumption and preference. Finally, JMV2959-induced reduction of alcohol intake was only observed in WT but not in ghrelin KO mice. Taken together, these results suggest that ghrelin neurotransmission is necessary for the stimulatory effect of ethanol to occur, whereas lack of ghrelin leads to changes that reduce the voluntary intake as well as conditioned reward by ethanol. Our findings reveal a major, novel role for ghrelin in mediating ethanol behavior, and add to growing evidence that ghrelin is a key mediator of the effects of multiple abused drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Association and interaction analyses of 5-HT3 receptor and serotonin transporter genes with alcohol, cocaine, and nicotine dependence using the SAGE data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiekun; Li, Ming D

    2014-07-01

    Previous studies have implicated genes encoding the 5-HT3AB receptors (HTR3A and HTR3B) and the serotonin transporter (SLC6A4), both independently and interactively, in alcohol (AD), cocaine (CD), and nicotine dependence (ND). However, whether these genetic effects also exist in subjects with comorbidities remains largely unknown. We used 1,136 African-American (AA) and 2,428 European-American (EA) subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) to determine associations between 88 genotyped or imputed variants within HTR3A, HTR3B, and SLC6A4 and three types of addictions, which were measured by DSM-IV diagnoses of AD, CD, and ND and the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND), an independent measure of ND commonly used in tobacco research. Individual SNP-based association analysis revealed a significant association of rs2066713 in SLC6A4 with FTND in AA (β = -1.39; P = 1.6E - 04). Haplotype-based association analysis found one major haplotype formed by SNPs rs3891484 and rs3758987 in HTR3B that was significantly associated with AD in the AA sample, and another major haplotype T-T-G, formed by SNPs rs7118530, rs12221649, and rs2085421 in HTR3A, which showed significant association with FTND in the EA sample. Considering the biologic roles of the three genes and their functional relations, we used the GPU-based Generalized Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (GMDR-GPU) program to test SNP-by-SNP interactions within the three genes and discovered two- to five-variant models that have significant impacts on AD, CD, ND, or FTND. Interestingly, most of the SNPs included in the genetic interaction model(s) for each addictive phenotype are either overlapped or in high linkage disequilibrium for both AA and EA samples, suggesting these detected variants in HTR3A, HTR3B, and SLC6A4 are interactively contributing to etiology of the three addictive phenotypes examined in this study.

  10. Intervening to decrease the probability of alcohol-impaired driving: Impact of novel field sobriety tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ryan C; Robinson, Zechariah; Bazdar, Alexandra; Geller, E Scott

    2016-01-01

    The efficacy of novel field sobriety tests to predict breath alcohol content (BAC) and perceptions of driving risk was evaluated. Participants (N = 210) were passersby at two downtown locations near local bars and one on-campus location near a late-night dining facility between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 2:00 a.m. Participants gave ratings of their perceived risk to drive at their current level of intoxication, then completed three sobriety tests (a hand-pat, tracing test, and Romberg test), and finally provided new ratings of their perceived risk to drive. After completing the final set of questions, participants were administered a Lifeloc FC20 breath alcohol test (±.005 g/dL). Each of the sobriety tests performed better than chance at predicting participant intoxication, but the performance feedback did not enhance awareness of one's risk to drive at a given BAC. Actually, after the sobriety tests, Greek-life females perceived themselves to be less at-risk to drive.

  11. Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese medicine, decreases head-twitch behaviors and serotonin 2A receptors in the prefrontal cortex of isolation-stressed mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Toshiyuki; Mizoguchi, Kazushige; Yamaguchi, Takuji; Nishi, Akinori; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-05-26

    Yokukansan, a traditional Japanese (Kampo) medicine, has recently been used to treat the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), including aggressiveness, excitability, and hallucination. The present study was designed to investigate the mechanisms underlying the ameliorative effects of yokukansan on BPSD using animals exhibiting hallucination-like behaviors. For this purpose, we initially examined whether chronic isolation stress increases the frequency of hallucination in response to a psychedelic drug. Using this animal model, we next examined the effects of yokukansan on drug-induced hallucination-like behaviors. Finally, we examined the density and mRNA levels of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors. Male mice were subjected to isolation stress for six weeks. Yokukansan was incorporated into food pellets, and administered to the mice for six weeks. In some experiments, yokukansan and each of seven constituent herbs were administered orally to the mice for the last two weeks during the six-week period of isolation stress. A 5-HT2A receptor agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI, 2.5mg/kg), was injected into the mice, and head-twitch behaviors were quantified. The binding sites of 5-HT2A receptors on the plasma membrane of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) were assessed by a receptor-binding assay using tritium-labeled ketanserin, and the density and affinity were calculated from a Scatchard plot. The level of mRNAs was measured by PCR analyses. Isolation stress enhanced the frequency of the DOI-induced head-twitch response, and yokukansan treatment by feeding significantly reduced this enhancement. Isolation stress significantly increased the 5-HT2A receptor density in the PFC, and yokukansan treatment by feeding as well as administration significantly down-regulated this increase. Isolation stress and yokukansan did not affect the affinity. Among seven constituent herbs, Bupleurum Root, Uncaria Hook, Japanese Angelica Root, and Glycyrrhiza down

  12. Decreased expression of serotonin in the jejunum and increased numbers of mast cells in the terminal ileum in patients with irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shen-Hao; Dong, Lei; Luo, Jin-Yan; Gong, Jun; Li, Lu; Lu, Xiao-Lan; Han, Shui-Ping

    2007-12-07

    To investigate if there are changes in serotonin (5-HT) levels, enterochromaffin (EC) cells and mast cells in small intestinal mucosa of patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Diarrhea-predominant (IBS-D, n = 20), or constipation-predominant (IBS-C, n = 18) IBS patients and healthy controls (n = 20) underwent colonoscopy and peroral small intestinal endoscopy, and mucosal samples were obtained at the descending part of the duodenum, proximal end of jejunum and terminal ileum. High-performance liquid chromatography-electrochemistry and immunohistochemical methods were used to detect 5-HT content, EC cells and mast cells. (1) There were no differences in the number and distribution of EC cells between IBS patients and the normal group. (2) The mucosal 5-HT contents at the duodenum, jejunum and ileum in IBS-C patients were 182 +/- 90, 122 +/- 54, 61 +/- 35 ng/mg protein, respectively, which were all lower than those in the normal group (256 +/- 84, 188 +/- 91, and 93 +/- 45 ng/mg protein, respectively), with a significant difference at the jejunum (P power field (hpf), respectively, which were significantly more than that in the normal group (29.8 +/- 4.4/hpf) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the numbers of mast cells at the other two parts between IBS patients and the normal group. The numbers of mast cells in IBS-C, IBS-D, and normal groups were all significantly higher at the ileum (38.7 +/- 9.4, 35.8 +/- 5.5, 29.8 +/- 4.4/hpf, respectively) than at the duodenum (19.6 +/- 4.7, 18.5 +/- 6.3, 19.2 +/- 3.3/hpf, respectively, P < 0.001). The changes in the 5-HT signaling pathway at the jejunum of IBS-C patients and the increase in mast cells in patients with IBS at the terminal ileum may offer evidence to explain the pathogenesis of IBS.

  13. Serotonin neurotransmission in anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2012-09-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) show extreme dieting weight loss, hyperactivity, depression/anxiety, self-control, and behavioral impulsivity. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) is involved in almost all the behavioral changes observed in AN patients. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute toward the pathogenesis of AN. It is a frequent disorder among adolescent girls and young women and starts as an attempt to lose weight to look beautiful and attractive. Failure to see the turning point when fasting becomes unreasonable leads to malnutrition and AN. Tryptophan, the precursor of serotonin and an essential amino acid, is only available in the diet. It is therefore likely that excessive diet restriction and malnutrition decrease brain serotonin stores because the precursor is less available to the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT biosynthesis, which normally exists unsaturated with its substrate. Evidence shows that diet restriction-induced exaggerated feedback control over 5-HT synthesis and the smaller availability of tryptophan decreases serotonin neurotransmission at postsynaptic sites, leading to hyperactivity, depression, and behavioral impulsivity. A compensatory upregulation of postsynaptic 5-HT-1A receptors and hypophagic serotonin receptors may be involved in anxiety and suppression of appetite. It is suggested that tryptophan supplementation may improve pharmacotherapy in AN.

  14. Alcohol Consumption in Southern Sweden after Major Decreases in Danish Spirits Taxes and Increases in Swedish Travellers’ Quotas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Nina-Katri J.

    2010-01-01

    Background In 2003, Denmark lowered its tax on spirits, and in 2004, Sweden increased its traveller import quotas. Aim: The aim of the study was to determine whether these two changes increased self-reported alcohol consumption in southern Sweden, which is located near Denmark. Method Data were collected through telephone interviews with the general population between 2003 and 2006. Individuals aged 16–80 years were interviewed. Some lived in southern Sweden, others in the northern region, which was assumed to be unaffected by the policy changes and was thus used as a control site. Analyses were performed for the total population as well as by sex, age, socio-economic group and consumption pattern. Results The expected results were not found: alcohol consumption in southern Sweden had not changed. The few statistically significant changes found in southern Sweden indicated decreases. In the north, however, consumption seemed to have increased. Conclusion In addition to the two policy changes mentioned above, other changes seem to have affected alcohol consumption in Sweden. It is possible, however, that the policy changes have affected population groups not reached by the survey, and thus other types of data need to be analysed before drawing any far-reaching conclusions. PMID:20453510

  15. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... because that's how many accidents occur. What Is Alcoholism? What can be confusing about alcohol is that ... develop a problem with it. Sometimes, that's called alcoholism (say: al-kuh-HOL - ism) or being an ...

  16. Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you are like many Americans, you drink alcohol at least occasionally. For many people, moderate drinking ... risky. Heavy drinking can lead to alcoholism and alcohol abuse, as well as injuries, liver disease, heart ...

  17. Alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Junior, L.

    1988-01-01

    The alcohol production as a secondary energy source, the participation of the alcohol in Brazilian national economic and social aspects are presented. Statistical data of alcohol demand compared with petroleum by-products and electricity are also included. (author)

  18. Decreased serotonin transporters in the hypothalamus and midbrain in patients with multiple systemic atrophy: a study with [{sup 123}I]-FP-CITA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, So Won; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Kim, Jon Min; Eo, Jae Seon; Lee, Won Woo; Kim, Sang Eun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    We investigated quantification of dopaminergic transporter (DAT) and serotonergic transporter (SERT) for differentiating between multiple systemic atrophy (MSA) and idiopathic Parkinsons disease (IPD). Nfluoropropyl- 2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-4-[{sup 123}I]-iodophenylnortropane SPECT ([123I]-FP-CIT SPECT) was performed in 6 patients with MSA, 18 with early IPD, and 6 healthy controls. Standard ROIs (region of interests) of striatal regions to evaluate DAT, and hypothalamus and midbrain for SERT were drawn on standard template images and applied to each image taken 4 hours after radiotracer injection. Striatal V3? for DAT and hypothalamic and midbrain V3? for SERT were calculated using region/reference ration based on the transient equilibrium method. Group differences were tested using ANOVA with the postHoc analysis. DAT in the putamen was significantly decreased in both patients groups with MSA and early IPD, compared with healthy control (p=0.03, p=0.05, respectively). A reduction of DAT in the caudate was significant in MSA patients (p=0.05) and showed a trend in early IPD patient. This implied least involvement of caudate in early IPD. Regarding SERT, MSA patients showed significant reduction of SERT in hypothalamus compared with controls as well as early IPD patients (p=0.05, 0.01, respectively), and also showed a tendency of decrease in SERT of the midbrain (p=0.058 vs, control). In patients with IPD, there was no significant reduction of SERT in the hypothalamus or midbrain when compared with controls. In this study, the decreased SERT in the hypothalamus and midbrain could be demonstrated in MSA patients using [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT. We suggest that the quantification of SERT as well as DAT in [{sup 123}I]-FP-CIT SPECT is helpful to differentiate Parkinsonian disorders.

  19. Role of peripheral serotonin in glucose and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Rose, Michael T; Aso, Hisashi

    2011-06-01

    Two independent serotonin systems exist, one in the brain and the other in the periphery. Serotonin is a well known monoaminergic neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and it is known to regulate feeding behavior, meal size, and body weight. On the other hand, there is much less evidence for the role of serotonin as a gastrointestinal hormone, particularly with respect to its effects on glucose and lipid metabolism. This review summarizes our current understanding of the role of peripheral serotonin on glucose and lipid metabolism and the implications of this for further research. The enterochromaffin cells of the gastrointestinal tract produce peripheral serotonin postprandially. In mice, it induces a decrease in the concentration of circulating lipids as well as hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia through its action on several serotonin receptors. Further, serotonin metabolites act as endogenous agonists for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ and serotonin accelerates adipocyte differentiation via serotonin receptor 2A and 2C. Studies of serotonin are likely to provide new insights into the field of lipid accumulation and metabolism. Recent studies show new physiological functions of peripheral serotonin, linked to glucose and lipid metabolism. Peripheral serotonin may serve as an attractive new therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disorders in the near future.

  20. Serotonin uptake inhibitors: uses in clinical therapy and in laboratory research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, R W

    1995-01-01

    Fluoxetine, zimelidine, sertraline, paroxetine, fluvoxamine, indalpine and citalopram are the selective inhibitors of serotonin uptake that have been most widely studied. Some of these compounds are or have been used clinically in the treatment of mental depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder and bulimia, and therapeutic benefit has been claimed in additional diseases as well. By blocking the membrane uptake carrier which transports serotonin from the extracellular space to inside the serotonin nerve terminals, these compounds increase extracellular concentrations of serotonin and amplify signals sent by serotonin neurons. Because serotonin neurons are widespread in the central nervous system, the functional consequences of blocking serotonin uptake are diverse, but are generally subtle. Animals treated with serotonin uptake inhibitors look normal in gross appearance, but effects such as reduced aggressive behavior, decreased food intake and altered food selection, analgesia, anticonvulsant activity, endocrine changes and neurochemical changes have been demonstrated and characterized. Serotonin uptake inhibitors have helped in revealing some dynamics of serotonin neurons; for example, when uptake is inhibited and extracellular serotonin concentration increases, presynaptic as well as postsynaptic receptors for serotonin are activated to a greater degree. A consequence of increased activation of autoreceptors on serotonin cell bodies and nerve terminals is a reduction in firing of serotonin neurons and a decrease in serotonin synthesis and release. The result is a limit on the degree to which extracellular serotonin and serotonergic neurotransmission are increased.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Arwen B; Kuhn, Cynthia M; Platt, Michael L

    2009-12-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in part due to the lack of a good animal model. We used dietary rapid tryptophan depletion (RTD) to acutely lower brain serotonin in three macaques performing a simple gambling task for fluid rewards. To confirm the efficacy of RTD experiments, we measured total plasma tryptophan using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with electrochemical detection. Reducing brain serotonin synthesis decreased preference for the safe option in a gambling task. Moreover, lowering brain serotonin function significantly decreased the premium required for monkeys to switch their preference to the risky option, suggesting that diminished serotonin signaling enhances the relative subjective value of the risky option. These results implicate serotonin in risk-sensitive decision making and, further, suggest pharmacological therapies for treating pathological risk preferences in disorders such as problem gambling and addiction.

  2. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide. Alcohol abuse is responsible for 4 percent of global deaths and disability, nearly as much as tobacco and five times the burden of illicit drugs (WHO). In developing countries with low mortality, alcohol is the leading risk factor for males, causing 9.8 percent of years lost to death and disability. Alcohol abuse...

  3. Lack of association of the serotonin transporter gene promoter region polymorphism, 5-HTTLPR, including rs25531 with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik; Bagger, Yu; Tanko, Laszlo B

    2009-01-01

    and previous consumption of cigarettes and alcohol were obtained using a questionnaire. Genotypes were classified according to allele size, that is, S and L with 14 and 16 repeat units, respectively, and on a functional basis by amalgamation of the L(G) and S alleles. Data were subjected to regression analyses....... These analyses revealed P values for associations between 5-HTTLPR genotype and alcohol and cigarette consumption in the range from 0.15 to 0.92. On adjustment for age and educational level, significance for the associations of 5-HTTLPR with the smoking and alcohol consumption measures was not reached. We...

  4. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kojori, Eshan Shokri; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-01-01

    During alcohol intoxication the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75g/kg alcohol versus placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video-stimulation (VS) versus when given with no-stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HD) and 23 healthy controls each of whom underwent four PET- 18 FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p=0.04); that alcohol (compared to placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20±13%) than controls (9±11%, p=0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r=0.36, p=0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10±12%) compared to NS in both groups (15±13%, p=0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e. acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in heavy drinkers, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal

  5. Alcohol decreases baseline brain glucose metabolism more in heavy drinkers than controls but has no effect on stimulation-induced metabolic increases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gene-Jack; Shokri Kojori, Ehsan; Fowler, Joanna S; Benveniste, Helene; Tomasi, Dardo

    2015-02-18

    During alcohol intoxication, the human brain increases metabolism of acetate and decreases metabolism of glucose as energy substrate. Here we hypothesized that chronic heavy drinking facilitates this energy substrate shift both for baseline and stimulation conditions. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effects of alcohol intoxication (0.75 g/kg alcohol vs placebo) on brain glucose metabolism during video stimulation (VS) versus when given with no stimulation (NS), in 25 heavy drinkers (HDs) and 23 healthy controls, each of whom underwent four PET-(18)FDG scans. We showed that resting whole-brain glucose metabolism (placebo-NS) was lower in HD than controls (13%, p = 0.04); that alcohol (compared with placebo) decreased metabolism more in HD (20 ± 13%) than controls (9 ± 11%, p = 0.005) and in proportion to daily alcohol consumption (r = 0.36, p = 0.01) but found that alcohol did not reduce the metabolic increases in visual cortex from VS in either group. Instead, VS reduced alcohol-induced decreases in whole-brain glucose metabolism (10 ± 12%) compared with NS in both groups (15 ± 13%, p = 0.04), consistent with stimulation-related glucose metabolism enhancement. These findings corroborate our hypothesis that heavy alcohol consumption facilitates use of alternative energy substrates (i.e., acetate) for resting activity during intoxication, which might persist through early sobriety, but indicate that glucose is still favored as energy substrate during brain stimulation. Our findings are consistent with reduced reliance on glucose as the main energy substrate for resting brain metabolism during intoxication (presumably shifting to acetate or other ketones) and a priming of this shift in HDs, which might make them vulnerable to energy deficits during withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/353248-08$15.00/0.

  6. Alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, H.F.; Tol, A. van

    2005-01-01

    Alcohol consumption affects overall mortality. Light to moderate alcohol consumption reduces the risk of coronary heart disease; epidemiological, physiological and genetic data show a causal relationship. Light to moderate drinking is also associated with a reduced risk of other vascular diseases

  7. Blood levels of melatonin, serotonin, cortisol, and prolactin in relation to the circadian rhythm of platelet serotonin uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modai, I; Malmgren, R; Wetterberg, L; Eneroth, P; Valevski, A; Asberg, M

    1992-08-01

    Blood levels of melatonin, serotonin, cortisol, prolactin, and serotonin uptake by platelets were measured at 08:00, 14:00, 20:00, 02:00, and 08:00 hours in 10 healthy men who ranged in age from 27 to 35 years. The Km values of serotonin active transport by platelets were significantly correlated with melatonin blood levels. There were no other significant correlations. The secretion of steroid hormones and prolactin showed an increase at 02:00 hours; levels of prolactin decreased at 08:00 hours, but steroid levels continued to rise. This finding suggests either a direct effect of melatonin on serotonin active transport or the influence of the suprachiasmatic nucleus on serotonin uptake by platelets. It is also possible that there is a simultaneous decrease in serotonin uptake and decline from peak levels of melatonin due to the rise in steroid secretion.

  8. Zolmitriptan and human aggression: interaction with alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowin, Joshua L; Swann, Alan C; Moeller, F Gerard; Lane, Scott D

    2010-07-01

    The serotonin 1(B/D) (5-HT1(B/D)) receptor has shown potential as a target for decreasing aggression. The 5-HT1(B/D) agonist zolmitriptan's ability to reduce aggressive behavior in humans and its interaction with the well-known aggression-enhancing drug alcohol were examined. Our objective was to investigate zolmitriptan's potential to modify human aggression in a laboratory paradigm across a range of alcohol doses. Alcohol has been consistently associated with aggression and violence, thus we hoped to expand current understanding of alcohol's role in aggressive behavior via manipulation of the serotonin (5-HT) system. Eleven social drinkers, seven male, were recruited to participate in a research study lasting 3-4 weeks. Aggression was measured using the point-subtraction aggression paradigm (PSAP), a laboratory model widely used in human aggression studies. Subjects were administered 5-mg zolmitriptan and placebo capsules along with alcohol doses of 0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 g/kg in a within-subject, counterbalanced dosing design. Data were analyzed as the ratio of aggressive/monetary-earning responses, to account for possible changes in overall motor function due to alcohol. There was a significant alcohol by zolmitriptan interaction on the aggressive/monetary response ratio. Specifically, compared to placebo, zolmitriptan decreased the aggressive/monetary ratio at the 0.4- and 0.8-g/kg alcohol doses. A 5-mg dose of zolmitriptan effectively reduced alcohol-related aggression in an acute dosing protocol, demonstrating an interaction of 5-HT and alcohol in human aggressive behavior.

  9. Fibromyalgia syndrome and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnigenis, M N; Barland, P

    2001-01-01

    Although disturbances in the musculoskeletal system, in the neuroendocrine system and in the central nervous system (CNS) have been implicated in the pathophysiology of fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), the primary mechanisms underlying the etiopathogenesis of FMS remain elusive. It has been postulated that disturbances in serotonin metabolism and transmission, along with disturbances in several other chemical pain mediators, are present in patients with FMS. In this article we review published studies on the pathophysiological role of serotonin in FMS. Although studies that indirectly measured the function of serotonin in the CNS in FMS revealed some abnormalities in the metabolism and transmission of serotonin, the role of serotonin in the pathophysiology of syndrome remains inconclusive and warrants more studies.

  10. Serotonin synthesis, release and reuptake in terminals: a mathematical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best Janet

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that has been linked to a wide variety of behaviors including feeding and body-weight regulation, social hierarchies, aggression and suicidality, obsessive compulsive disorder, alcoholism, anxiety, and affective disorders. Full understanding of serotonergic systems in the central nervous system involves genomics, neurochemistry, electrophysiology, and behavior. Though associations have been found between functions at these different levels, in most cases the causal mechanisms are unknown. The scientific issues are daunting but important for human health because of the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and other pharmacological agents to treat disorders in the serotonergic signaling system. Methods We construct a mathematical model of serotonin synthesis, release, and reuptake in a single serotonergic neuron terminal. The model includes the effects of autoreceptors, the transport of tryptophan into the terminal, and the metabolism of serotonin, as well as the dependence of release on the firing rate. The model is based on real physiology determined experimentally and is compared to experimental data. Results We compare the variations in serotonin and dopamine synthesis due to meals and find that dopamine synthesis is insensitive to the availability of tyrosine but serotonin synthesis is sensitive to the availability of tryptophan. We conduct in silico experiments on the clearance of extracellular serotonin, normally and in the presence of fluoxetine, and compare to experimental data. We study the effects of various polymorphisms in the genes for the serotonin transporter and for tryptophan hydroxylase on synthesis, release, and reuptake. We find that, because of the homeostatic feedback mechanisms of the autoreceptors, the polymorphisms have smaller effects than one expects. We compute the expected steady concentrations of serotonin transporter knockout mice and compare to

  11. Alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Philip J. Cook; Michael J. Moore

    1999-01-01

    Excess drinking is associated with lost productivity, accidents, disability, early death, crime, neglect of family responsibilities, and personality deterioration. These and related concerns have justified special restrictions on alcoholic-beverage commerce and consumption. The nature and extent of government involvement in this arena vary widely over time and place, and are often controversial. Economists have contributed to the evaluation of alcohol policy through empirical work on the effe...

  12. MODULATION OF DEFENSIVE REFLEX CONDITIONING IN SNAILS BY SEROTONIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyatcheslav V Andrianov

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We studied the role of serotonin in the mechanisms of learning in terrestrial snails. To produce a serotonin deficit, the neurotoxic analogues of serotonin, 5,6- or 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6/5,7-DHT were used. Injection of 5,6/5,7-DHT was found to disrupt defensive reflex conditioning. Within two weeks of neurotoxin application, the ability to learn had recovered. Daily injection of serotonin before a training session accelerated defensive reflex conditioning and daily injections of 5-HTP in snails with a deficiency of serotonin induced by 5,7-DHT restored the snail’s ability to learn. We discovered that injections of the neurotoxins 5,6/5,7-DHT as well as serotonin, caused a decrease in the resting and threshold potentials of the premotor interneurons LPa3 and RPa3.

  13. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  14. A cluster randomised trial of a school-based resilience intervention to decrease tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use in secondary school students: study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder Rebecca K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst schools provide a potentially appropriate setting for preventing substance use among young people, systematic review evidence suggests that past interventions in this setting have demonstrated limited effectiveness in preventing tobacco, alcohol and other drug use. Interventions that adopt a mental wellbeing approach to prevent substance use offer considerable promise and resilience theory provides one method to impact on adolescent mental well-being. The aim of the proposed study is to examine the efficacy of a resilience intervention in decreasing the tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use of adolescents. Methods A cluster randomised controlled trial with schools as the unit of randomisation will be undertaken. Thirty two schools in disadvantaged areas will be allocated to either an intervention or a control group. A comprehensive resilience intervention will be implemented, inclusive of explicit program adoption strategies. Baseline surveys will be conducted with students in Grade 7 in both groups and again three years later when the student cohort is in Grade 10. The primary outcome measures will include self-reported tobacco, alcohol, marijuana and other illicit drug use. Comparisons will be made post-test between Grade 10 students in intervention and control schools to determine intervention effectiveness across all measures. Discussion To the authors’ knowledge this is the first randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a comprehensive school-based resilience intervention, inclusive of explicit adoption strategies, in decreasing tobacco, alcohol and illicit drug use of adolescents attending disadvantaged secondary schools. Trial registration ACTRN12611000606987

  15. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinxia Li

    Full Text Available Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  16. Serotonin control of thermotaxis memory behavior in nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinxia; Zhao, Yunli; Huang, Xu; Lin, Xingfeng; Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans.

  17. Serotonin Control of Thermotaxis Memory Behavior in Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuling; Wang, Daoyong; Li, Chaojun; Wang, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is as an ideal model system for the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory. In the present study, we employed C. elegans assay system of thermotaxis memory to investigate the possible role of serotonin neurotransmitter in memory control. Our data showed that both mutations of tph-1, bas-1, and cat-4 genes, required for serotonin synthesis, and mutations of mod-5 gene, encoding a serotonin reuptake transporter, resulted in deficits in thermotaxis memory behavior. Exogenous treatment with serotonin effectively recovered the deficits in thermotaxis memory of tph-1 and bas-1 mutants to the level of wild-type N2. Neuron-specific activity assay of TPH-1 suggests that serotonin might regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior by release from the ADF sensory neurons. Ablation of ADF sensory neurons by expressing a cell-death activator gene egl-1 decreased the thermotaxis memory, whereas activation of ADF neurons by expression of a constitutively active protein kinase C homologue (pkc-1(gf)) increased the thermotaxis memory and rescued the deficits in thermotaxis memory in tph-1 mutants. Moreover, serotonin released from the ADF sensory neurons might act through the G-protein-coupled serotonin receptors of SER-4 and SER-7 to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Genetic analysis implies that serotonin might further target the insulin signaling pathway to regulate the thermotaxis memory behavior. Thus, our results suggest the possible crucial role of serotonin and ADF sensory neurons in thermotaxis memory control in C. elegans. PMID:24223727

  18. An approach for serotonin depletion in pigs: effects on serotonin receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Kornum, Birgitte R; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Depletion of central serotonin (5-HT) levels and dysfunction in serotonergic transmission are implicated in a variety of human CNS disorders. The mechanisms behind these serotonergic deficits have been widely studied using rodent models, but only to a limited extent in larger animal models. The pig...... is increasingly used as an experimental animal model especially in neuroscience research. Here, we present an approach for serotonin depletion in the pig brain. Central serotonin depletion in Danish Landrace pigs was achieved following 4 days treatment with para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA). On day 5, tissue...... average decreases in 5-HT concentrations of 61% ± 14% and 66% ± 16%, respectively, and a substantial loss of 5-HT immunostaining was seen throughout the brain. The serotonin depletion significantly increased 5-HT₄ receptor binding in nucleus accumbens, but did not alter 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  19. An approach for serotonin depletion in pigs: effects on serotonin receptor binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ettrup, Anders; Kornum, Birgitte R; Weikop, Pia

    2011-01-01

    Depletion of central serotonin (5-HT) levels and dysfunction in serotonergic transmission are implicated in a variety of human CNS disorders. The mechanisms behind these serotonergic deficits have been widely studied using rodent models, but only to a limited extent in larger animal models. The pig...... is increasingly used as an experimental animal model especially in neuroscience research. Here, we present an approach for serotonin depletion in the pig brain. Central serotonin depletion in Danish Landrace pigs was achieved following 4 days treatment with para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA). On day 5, tissue...... average decreases in 5-HT concentrations of 61% ± 14% and 66% ± 16%, respectively, and a substantial loss of 5-HT immunostaining was seen throughout the brain. The serotonin depletion significantly increased 5-HT4 receptor binding in nucleus accumbens, but did not alter 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor...

  20. Alcohol Energy Drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Month Home / About Addiction / Alcohol / Alcohol Energy Drinks Alcohol Energy Drinks Read 32794 times font size decrease ... held April 8-11 near the... Read more Alcohol Wine for your health: truth and myth Alcohol ...

  1. Alcohol abuse and related disorders treatment of alcohol dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. P. Sivolap

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol abuse and alcoholism are the leading causes of worse health and increased mortality rates. Excessive alcohol consumption is the third leading cause of the global burden of diseases and a leading factor for lower lifespan and higher mortality. Alcohol abuse decreases working capacity and efficiency and requires the increased cost of the treatment of alcohol-induced disorders, which entails serious economic losses. The unfavorable medical and social consequences of excessive alcohol use determine the importance of effective treatment for alcoholism. The goals of rational pharmacotherapy of alcohol dependence are to enhance GABA neurotransmission, to suppress glutamate neurotransmission, to act on serotonin neurotransmission, to correct water-electrolyte balance, and to compensate for thiamine deficiency. Alcoholism treatment consists of two steps: 1 the prevention and treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and its complications (withdrawal convulsions and delirium alcoholicum; 2 antirecurrent (maintenance therapy. Benzodiazepines are the drugs of choice in alleviating alcohol withdrawal and preventing its convulsive attacks and delirium alcoholicum. Diazepam and chlordiazepoxide are most commonly used for this purpose; the safer drugs oxazepam and lorazepam are given to the elderly and patients with severe liver lesions. Anticonvulsants having normothymic properties, such as carbamazepine, valproic acid, topiramate, and lamotrigine, are a definite alternative to benzodiazepines. The traditional Russian clinical practice (clearance detoxification has not a scientific base or significant impact on alcohol withdrawal-related states in addicts. Relapse prevention and maintenance therapy for alcohol dependence are performed using disulfiram, acamprosate, and naltrexone; since 2013 the European Union member countries have been using, besides these agents, nalmefene that is being registered in Russia. Memantine and a number of other

  2. Alcohol use in adolescents with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conason, Alexis H; Sher, Leo

    2006-01-01

    Eating disorders, in particular bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder are associated with co-morbid alcohol and drug abuse. School-based studies have shown significant associations between bulimic behaviors and various measures of alcohol, cigarette and other drug use and abuse. Amongst bulimic adolescents, substance use is related to an increased likeliness of high risk behaviors such as attempted suicide, stealing and sexual intercourse. In contrast with bulimics and binge eaters, restricting anorexics have low rates of co-morbid substance abuse. It appears that restricting anorexics, binge eaters and bulimics represent distinct subgroups within the eating disordered population and binge eaters and bulimics are more prone to alcohol use. It is possible that individuals with eating disorders turn to alcohol use/abuse as a way of coping with the problems caused by their eating disorder. Researchers have proposed that an addictive personality is an underlying trait, which predisposes individuals to both eating disorders and alcohol abuse. Eating disorders are often conceptualized as an addictive disorder. Opioid antagonists, such as naltrexone, may be useful in treating both eating and alcohol use disorders. There is also evidence that serotonin reuptake inhibitors, which are traditionally used to treat major depression, may be an effective treatment. Cognitive-behavioral therapy has been effective in treating alcohol use and eating disorders individually and may be an effective combined treatment for co-morbid eating disorders and alcohol use. Teaching healthy ways to cope with the stressful situations may also help decrease alcohol use and disordered eating behaviors.

  3. The capsaicin analog nonivamide decreases total energy intake from a standardized breakfast and enhances plasma serotonin levels in moderately overweight men after administered in an oral glucose tolerance test: a randomized, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochkogler, Christina M; Rohm, Barbara; Hojdar, Karin; Pignitter, Marc; Widder, Sabine; Ley, Jakob P; Krammer, Gerhard E; Somoza, Veronika

    2014-06-01

    Since bolus administration of capsaicin has been shown to reduce appetite and ad libitum energy intake, this study elucidated the satiating effect of the less pungent capsaicin analog, nonivamide, on subjective feelings of hunger, ad libitum food intake, and satiating hormones in moderately overweight male subjects. Following a randomized, crossover design, 24 male subjects (BMI 27.5 ± 1.53 kg/m(2) ) received either 75 g glucose in 300 mL water (control treatment, CT) or the same glucose solution supplemented with 0.15 mg nonivamide (nonivamide treatment, NT). Ratings of hunger were assessed before and 2 h after each intervention by means of visual analog scales. Ad libitum energy and macronutrient intakes from a standardized breakfast 2 h postintervention were calculated. Plasma glucose, insulin, peptide YY (3-36), glucagon-like peptide 1, and serotonin were quantified in blood samples drawn before and 15, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min after each intervention. NT reduced subjective feelings of hunger and ad libitum energy and carbohydrate intakes from a standardized breakfast compared to CT. Plasma analysis revealed higher mean plasma glucagon-like peptide 1 and serotonin concentrations after NT versus CT. Addition of 0.15 mg nonivamide to a glucose solution reduced ad libitum energy intake from a standardized breakfast in moderately overweight men. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Mifepristone modulates serotonin transporter function

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chaokun; Shan, Linlin; Li, Xinjuan; Wei, Linyu; Li, Dongliang

    2014-01-01

    Regulating serotonin expression can be used to treat psychotic depression. Mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, is an effective candidate for psychotic depression treatment. However, the underlying mechanism related to serotonin transporter expression is poorly understood. In this study, we cloned the human brain serotonin transporter into Xenopus oocytes, to establish an in vitro expression system. Two-electrode voltage clamp recordings were used to detect serotonin transporte...

  5. Behavioural correlates of alcohol intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, C A; Bremner, K E

    1993-01-01

    Alcohol is used in most cultures despite knowledge of the physical, psychological and social problems associated with its abuse. Behavioural impairment is a function of several factors, including blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and the rate of alcohol metabolism by alcohol dehydrogenase and the microsomal ethanol-oxidizing system. Their availability and activity depend upon alcohol use history, ethnicity, other drug use and gender. Adverse social consequences related to alcohol intoxication include impaired driving, acts of aggression and violence towards self and others, and various types of accidents. About 40% of all fatal traffic accidents in Canada and the US in 1986-1987 were alcohol-related. Similar statistics have been reported in the UK and Europe (e.g. Sweden). The risk of a fatal car accident increases exponentially with a driver's BAC, prompting recommendations to lower the legal BAC limit for driving and piloting aircraft. Risks of falls, drownings, and fires and burns may also be increased by alcohol intoxication. At least 22% of work-related accidents may have involved alcohol use. These data are probably conservative estimates as under-reporting of alcohol use is likely. Alcohol facilitates aggressive behaviours, but it is difficult to separate the pharmacological effect from psychosocial effects or some other common factor (e.g. low CSF levels of the serotonin metabolite 5-H1AA have been reported in alcoholics, suicide attempters, violent offenders). In addition, alcohol interacts with other drugs to increase or decrease their behavioural and therapeutic effects. An acutely high BAC inhibits the metabolism of other CNS depressants (e.g. benzodiazepines), but long-term alcohol use increases the metabolism of most drugs. A potential amethystic agent, to block or reverse alcohol's effects, has been identified in preclinical studies (Ro15-4513, an imidazobenzodiazepine). Some clinical studies indicated that naloxone, lithium, ibuprofen, zimeldine and

  6. Serotonin modulates insect hemocyte phagocytosis via two different serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Huang, Jia; Li, Meng-Qi; Wu, Ya-Su; Xia, Ren-Ying; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2016-03-14

    Serotonin (5-HT) modulates both neural and immune responses in vertebrates, but its role in insect immunity remains uncertain. We report that hemocytes in the caterpillar, Pieris rapae are able to synthesize 5-HT following activation by lipopolysaccharide. The inhibition of a serotonin-generating enzyme with either pharmacological blockade or RNAi knock-down impaired hemocyte phagocytosis. Biochemical and functional experiments showed that naive hemocytes primarily express 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors. The blockade of 5-HT1B significantly reduced phagocytic ability; however, the blockade of 5-HT2B increased hemocyte phagocytosis. The 5-HT1B-null Drosophila melanogaster mutants showed higher mortality than controls when infected with bacteria, due to their decreased phagocytotic ability. Flies expressing 5-HT1B or 5-HT2B RNAi in hemocytes also showed similar sensitivity to infection. Combined, these data demonstrate that 5-HT mediates hemocyte phagocytosis through 5-HT1B and 5-HT2B receptors and serotonergic signaling performs critical modulatory functions in immune systems of animals separated by 500 million years of evolution.

  7. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Matsunaga

    Full Text Available Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others, we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative, as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative. Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking, which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  8. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants’ happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers’ attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels. PMID:28683075

  9. Association between salivary serotonin and the social sharing of happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Masahiro; Ishii, Keiko; Ohtsubo, Yohsuke; Noguchi, Yasuki; Ochi, Misaki; Yamasue, Hidenori

    2017-01-01

    Although human saliva contains the monoamine serotonin, which plays a key role in the modulation of emotional states, the association between salivary serotonin and empathic ability remains unclear. In order to elucidate the associations between salivary serotonin levels, trait empathy, and the sharing effect of emotions (i.e., sharing emotional experiences with others), we performed a vignette-based study. Participants were asked to evaluate their happiness when they experience several hypothetical life events, whereby we manipulated the valence of the imagined event (positive, neutral, or negative), as well as the presence of a friend (absent, positive, or negative). Results indicated that the presence of a happy friend significantly enhanced participants' happiness. Correlation analysis demonstrated that salivary serotonin levels were negatively correlated with happiness when both the self and friend conditions were positive. Correlation analysis also indicated a negative relationship between salivary serotonin levels and trait empathy (particularly in perspective taking), which was measured by the Interpersonal Reactivity Index. Furthermore, an exploratory multiple regression analysis suggested that mothers' attention during childhood predicted salivary serotonin levels. Our findings indicate that empathic abilities and the social sharing of happiness decreases as a function of salivary serotonin levels.

  10. Serotonin and histamine mediate gastroprotective effect of fluoxetine against experimentally-induced ulcers in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Sokar, Samia; Elsayed Elsayad, Mageda; Sabri Ali, Hend

    2016-09-01

    Research in the treatment of gastric ulcer has involved the investigation of new alternatives, such as anti-depressant drugs. The present study was designed to investigate the gastroprotective effects of fluoxetine against indomethacin and alcohol induced gastric ulcers in rats and the potential mechanisms of that effect. Fluoxetine (20 mg/kg) was administered IP for 14 days. For comparative purposes, other rats were treated with ranitidine (30 mg/kg). Thereafter, after 24 h of fasting, INDO (100 mg/kg) or absolute alcohol (5 ml/kg) was administered to all rats (saline was administered to naïve controls) and rats in each group were sacrificed 5 h (for INDO rats) or 1 h (for alcohol rats) later. Macroscopic examination revealed that both fluoxetine and ranitidine decreased ulcer scores in variable ratios, which was supported by microscopic histopathological examination. Biochemical analysis of fluoxetine- or ranitidine-pre-treated host tissues demonstrated reductions in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and myeloperoxidase (MPO) levels and concomitant increases in gastric pH, nitric oxide (NO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) contents. Fluoxetine, more than ranitidine, also resulted in serotonin and histamine levels nearest to control values. Moreover, immuno-histochemical analysis showed that fluoxetine markedly enhanced expression of cyclo-oxygenases COX-1 and COX-2 in both models; in comparison, ranitidine did not affect COX-1 expression in either ulcer model but caused moderate increases in COX-2 expression in INDO-induced hosts and high expression in alcohol-induced hosts. The results here indicated fluoxetine exhibited better gastroprotective effects than ranitidine and this could be due to anti-secretory, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-histaminic effects of the drug, as well as a stabilization of gastric serotonin levels.

  11. Serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors are the same size in membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brann, M.R.

    1985-01-01

    Target size analysis was used to compare the sizes of serotonin-S2 and dopamine-D2 receptors in rat brain membranes. The sizes of these receptors were standardized by comparison with the muscarinic receptor, a receptor of known size. The number of serotonin-S2 receptors labeled with (3H)ketanserin or (3H)spiperone in frontal cortex decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and receptor affinity was not affected. The number of dopamine-D2 receptors labeled with (3H)spiperone in striatum also decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and D2 and S2 receptors were equally sensitive to radiation. In both striatum and frontal cortex, the number of muscarinic receptors labeled with (3H)QNB decreased as an exponential function of radiation dose, and were much less sensitive to radiation than S2 and D2 receptors. These data indicate that in rat brain membranes, S2 and D2 receptors are of similar size, and both molecules are much larger than the muscarinic receptor

  12. Serotonin-induced hypophagia is mediated via α2 and β2 adrenergic receptors in neonatal layer-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendehdel, M; Sardari, F; Hassanpour, S; Rahnema, M; Adeli, A; Ghashghayi, E

    2017-06-01

    1. Serotoninergic and adrenergic systems play crucial roles in feed intake regulation in avians but there is no report on possible interactions among them. So, in this study, 5 experiments were designed to evaluate the interaction of central serotonergic and adrenergic systems on food intake regulation in 3 h food deprived (FD 3 ) neonatal layer-type chickens. 2. In Experiment 1, chickens received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of control solution, serotonin (56.74 nmol), prazosin (α 1 receptor antagonist, 10 nmol) and co-injection of serotonin plus prazosin. In Experiment 2, control solution, serotonin (56.74 nmol), yohimbine (α 2 receptor antagonist, 13 nmol) and co-injection of serotonin plus yohimbine were used. In Experiment 3, the birds received control solution, serotonin (56.74 nmol), metoprolol (β 1 receptor antagonist, 24 nmol) and co-injection of serotonin plus metoprolol. In Experiment 4, injections were control solution, serotonin (56.74 nmol), ICI 118.551 (β 2 receptor antagonist, 5 nmol) and serotonin plus ICI 118.551. In Experiment 5, control solution, serotonin (56.74 nmol), SR59230R (β 3 receptor antagonist, 20 nmol) and co-administration of serotonin and SR59230R were injected. In all experiments the cumulative food intake was measured until 120 min post injection. 3. The results showed that ICV injection of serotonin alone decreased food intake in chickens. A combined injection of serotonin plus ICI 118.551 significantly attenuated serotonin-induced hypophagia. Also, co-administration of serotonin and yohimbine significantly amplified the hypophagic effect of serotonin. However, prazosin, metoprolol and SR59230R had no effect on serotonin-induced hypophagia in chickens. 4. These results suggest that serotonin-induced feeding behaviour is probably mediated via α 2 and β 2 adrenergic receptors in neonatal layer-type chicken.

  13. The Effects of Serotonin in Immune Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Herr, Nadine; Bode, Christoph; Duerschmied, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] plays an important role in many organs as a peripheral hormone. Most of the body’s serotonin is circulating in the bloodstream, transported by blood platelets and is released upon activation. The functions of serotonin are mediated by members of the 7 known mammalian serotonin receptor subtype classes (15 known subtypes), the serotonin transporter (SERT), and by covalent binding of serotonin to different effector proteins. Almost all immune cells express...

  14. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarkasing, J T; Witkamp, R F; Boekschoten, M V; Ter Laak, M C; Heins, M S; van Norren, K

    2016-05-20

    Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections between peripheral inflammation, anorexia and hypothalamic serotonin metabolism and signaling pathways. First, we investigated the response of two hypothalamic neuronal cell lines to TNFα, IL-6 and LPS. Next, we studied transcriptomic changes and serotonergic activity in the hypothalamus of mice after intraperitoneal injection with TNFα, IL-6 or a combination of TNFα and IL-6. In vitro, we showed that hypothalamic neurons responded to inflammatory mediators by releasing cytokines. This inflammatory response was associated with an increased serotonin release. Mice injected with TNFα and IL-6 showed decreased food intake, associated with altered expression of inflammation-related genes in the hypothalamus. In addition, hypothalamic serotonin turnover showed to be elevated in treated mice. Overall, our results underline that peripheral inflammation reaches the hypothalamus where it affects hypothalamic serotoninergic metabolism. These hypothalamic changes in serotonin pathways are associated with decreased food intake, providing evidence for a role of serotonin in inflammation-induced anorexia.

  15. MicroRNA-155 Deficiency Leads to Decreased Atherosclerosis, Increased White Adipose Tissue Obesity, and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A NOVEL MOUSE MODEL OF OBESITY PARADOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtue, Anthony; Johnson, Candice; Lopez-Pastraña, Jahaira; Shao, Ying; Fu, Hangfei; Li, Xinyuan; Li, Ya-Feng; Yin, Ying; Mai, Jietang; Rizzo, Victor; Tordoff, Michael; Bagi, Zsolt; Shan, Huimin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2017-01-27

    Obesity paradox (OP) describes a widely observed clinical finding of improved cardiovascular fitness and survival in some overweight or obese patients. The molecular mechanisms underlying OP remain enigmatic partly due to a lack of animal models mirroring OP in patients. Using apolipoprotein E knock-out (apoE -/- ) mice on a high fat (HF) diet as an atherosclerotic obesity model, we demonstrated 1) microRNA-155 (miRNA-155, miR-155) is significantly up-regulated in the aortas of apoE -/- mice, and miR-155 deficiency in apoE -/- mice inhibits atherosclerosis; 2) apoE -/- /miR-155 -/- (double knock-out (DKO)) mice show HF diet-induced obesity, adipocyte hypertrophy, and present with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; 3) DKO mice demonstrate HF diet-induced elevations of plasma leptin, resistin, fed-state and fasting insulin and increased expression of adipogenic transcription factors but lack glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. Our results are the first to present an OP model using DKO mice with features of decreased atherosclerosis, increased obesity, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Our findings suggest the mechanistic role of reduced miR-155 expression in OP and present a new OP working model based on a single miRNA deficiency in diet-induced obese atherogenic mice. Furthermore, our results serve as a breakthrough in understanding the potential mechanism underlying OP and provide a new biomarker and novel therapeutic target for OP-related metabolic diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of injected leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haleem, Darakhshan J; Haque, Zeba; Inam, Qurrat-ul-Aen; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Muhammad Abdul

    2015-12-01

    Leptin is viewed as an important target for developing novel therapeutics for obesity, depression/anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. The present study therefore concerns behavioral, hormonal and central serotonin modulating effects of systemically injected leptin. Pharmacological doses (100 and 500 μg/kg) of leptin injected systemically decreased 24h cumulative food intake and body weight in freely feeding rats and improved acquisition and retention of memory in Morris water maze test. Potential anxiety reducing, hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of the peptide hormone were determined in a separate experiment. Animals injected with 100 or 500 μg/kg leptin were tested for anxiety in an elevated plus maze test 1h later. A significant increase in the number of entries and time passed in open arm of the elevated plus maze in leptin injected animals suggested pronounced anxiety reducing effect. Moreover, circulating levels of leptin correlated significantly with anxiety reducing effects of the peptide hormone. Serum serotonin increased and ghrelin decreased in leptin injected animals and correlated, positively and negatively respectively, with circulating leptin. Corticosterone increased at low dose and levels were normal at higher dose. Serotonin metabolism in the hypothalamus and hippocampus decreased only at higher dose of leptin. The results support a role of leptin in the treatment of obesity, anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions. It is suggested that hormonal and serotonin modulating effects of leptin can alter treatment efficacy in particularly comorbid conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Alcohol-induced decrease in muscle protein synthesis associated with increased binding of mTOR and raptor: Comparable effects in young and mature rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vary Thomas C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute alcohol (EtOH intoxication decreases muscle protein synthesis via inhibition of mTOR-dependent translation initiation. However, these studies have been performed in relatively young rapidly growing rats in which muscle protein accretion is more sensitive to growth factor and nutrient stimulation. Furthermore, some in vivo-produced effects of EtOH vary in an age-dependent manner. The hypothesis tested in the present study was that young rats will show a more pronounced decrement in muscle protein synthesis than older mature rats in response to acute EtOH intoxication. Methods Male F344 rats were studied at approximately 3 (young or 12 (mature months of age. Young rats were injected intraperitoneally with 75 mmol/kg of EtOH, and mature rats injected with either 75 or 90 mmol/kg EtOH. Time-matched saline-injected control rats were included for both age groups. Gastrocnemius protein synthesis and the activity of the mTOR pathway were assessed 2.5 h after EtOH using [3H]-labeled phenylalanine and the phosphorylation of various protein factors known to regulate peptide-chain initiation. Results Blood alcohol levels (BALs were lower in mature rats compared to young rats after administration of 75 mmol/kg EtOH (154 ± 23 vs 265 ± 24 mg/dL. However, injection of 90 mmol/kg EtOH in mature rats produced BALs comparable to that of young rats (281 ± 33 mg/dL. EtOH decreased muscle protein synthesis similarly in both young and high-dose EtOH-treated mature rats. The EtOH-induced changes in both groups were associated with a concomitant reduction in 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, and redistribution of eIF4E between the active eIF4E·eIF4G and inactive eIF4E·4EBP1 complex. Moreover, EtOH increased the binding of mTOR with raptor in a manner which appeared to be AMPK- and TSC-independent. In contrast, although muscle protein synthesis was unchanged in mature rats given low-dose EtOH, compared to control values, the phosphorylation of rpS6

  18. Microbiota Modulation With Synbiotic Decreases Liver Fibrosis in a High Fat Choline Deficient Diet Mice Model of Non-Alcoholic Steatohepatitis (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez-Pinto, Helena; Borralho, Paula; Machado, Jorge; Lopes, Maria T; Gato, Inês V; Santos, António M; Guerreiro, António S

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbiota may play a role in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Previous studies showed that prebiotics and probiotics might halt the progression of steatohepatitis. To clarify the potential effect of Synbiotic 2000 ® Forte (Synb) in preventing or ameliorating diet induced steatohepatitis, particularly in fibrosis progression and how this intervention correlates with gut microbiota composition and endotoxinemia. Twenty-seven C57BL/6 mice were divided into three groups: chow diet (CD, n = 7); high-fat choline deficient diet (HFCD, n = 10) and HFCD diet supplemented with Synbiotic 2000 ® Forte (four probiotic strains and four prebiotics mixture) (HFCD + Synb, n = 10). At 6 and 18 weeks, blood samples (lipopolysaccharides assay - LPS), cecal feaces (gut microbiota) and liver tissue (histology) were collected for analysis. Both HCFD diet mice developed steatohepatitis with ballooning at 6 and 18 weeks, opposite to CD. Comparison of histological scores in HFCD and HFCD + Synb, at 6 and 18 weeks showed no significant difference regarding steatosis, inflammation, or ballooning. Evaluating fibrosis with Sirius Red, and degree of smooth-muscle cell activation, HFCD mice had significantly more fibrosis; addition of Synb significantly reduced fibrosis at 6 weeks and 18 weeks. Serum endotoxin levels were similarly increased in HFCD and HFCD + Synb at week 6; however at week 18 HFCD + Synb had significantly lower endotoxin levels than HFCD. Gut microbiota of HFCD vs CD, showed no significant differences regarding the phyla Firmicutes and Bacteroidetes , either at 6 or 18 weeks; Proteobacteria increased at 6 week (3.3) and 18 week (7.5), while the addition of Synb resulted in a decrease at week 18 (-3.90). Fusobacteria markedly increase at week 18 (10.0), but less so with the addition of Synb (5.2). Synbiotic 2000 ® Forte is able to modulate the mouse gut microbiota reducing the degree of fibrosis while simultaneously decreasing endotoxemia.

  19. Serotonin syndrome and other serotonergic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ener, Rasih Atilla; Meglathery, Sharon B; Van Decker, William A; Gallagher, Rollin M

    2003-03-01

    Serotonin syndrome is an iatrogenic disorder induced by pharmacologic treatment with serotonergic agents that increases serotonin activity. In addition, there is a wide variety of clinical disorders associated with serotonin excess. The frequent concurrent use of serotonergic and neuroleptic drugs and similarities between serotonin syndrome and neuroleptic malignant syndrome can present the clinician with a diagnostic challenge. In this article, we review the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of serotonin syndrome as well as other serotonergic disorders.

  20. Characterization and regulation of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake and release in rodent spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauderman, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake and release of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin were investigated in rat spinal cord synaptosomes. In the uptake experiments, sodium-dependent and sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation processes were found. Sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation was: linear with sodium concentrations up to 180 mM; decreased by disruption of membrane integrity or ionic gradients; associated with purified synaptosomal fractions; and reduced after description of descending serotonergic neurons in the spinal cord. Of the uptake inhibitors tested, the most potent was fluoxetine (IC/sub 50/ 75 nM), followed by desipramine (IC/sub 50/ 430 nM) and nomifensine (IC/sub 50/ 950 nM). The sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation process was insensitive to most treatments and probably represents nonspecific membrane binding. Thus, only sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake represents the uptake process of serotonergic nerve terminals in rat spinal cord homogenates. In the release experiments, K/sup +/-induced release of previously accumulated (/sup 3/H)-serotonin was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent, and originated from serotonergic synaptosomes. Exogenous serotonin and 5-methyoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine inhibited (/sup 3/H)-serotonin release in a concentration-dependent way. Of the antagonists tested, only methiothepin effectively blocked the effect of serotonin. These data support the existence of presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors on serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat spinal cord that act to inhibit a voltage and Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive process linked to serotonin release. Alteration of spinai cord serotonergic function may therefore be possible by drugs acting on presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors in the spinal cord.

  1. Serotonin modulates immune function in T cells from HIV-seropositive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Afzelius, P; Andresen, L

    1997-01-01

    We have shown earlier increased intracellular levels of cAMP in peripheral lymphocytes from HIV-seropositive subjects and that a chemically induced decrease in this level increases cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. Others have shown that serotonin indirectly decreases intracellular cAMP levels...... enhancing effect on cell proliferation in some HIV-seropositive individuals than in others....... in normal peripheral lymphocytes. In this study, we show that addition of serotonin decreases intracellular levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from HIV-seropositive subjects and significantly increases the proliferative capacity in vitro. However, the effect of serotonin varies with the initial proliferative...

  2. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their drinking causes distress and harm. It includes alcoholism and alcohol abuse. Alcoholism, or alcohol dependence, is a disease that causes ... referrals. NIH: National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

  3. A double-blind, placebo-controlled study of sertraline with naltrexone for alcohol dependence.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Farren, Conor K

    2009-01-01

    Significant preclinical evidence exists for a synergistic interaction between the opioid and the serotonin systems in determining alcohol consumption. Naltrexone, an opiate receptor antagonist, is approved for the treatment of alcohol dependence. This double-blind placebo-controlled study examined whether the efficacy of naltrexone would be augmented by concurrent treatment with sertraline, a selective serotonin receptor uptake inhibitor (SSRI).

  4. Serotonin, serotonergic receptors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and sexual behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, B; van Oorschot, R; Waldinger, M D

    1998-07-01

    The serotonergic system in the brain modulates many types of behavioural and physiological processes. An example of this modulatory function is seen with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) which enhance serotonin transmission and influence mood, anxiety states, aggression, feeding and sexual behaviour. At present, 14 different serotonin receptors have been described and, although the function and localization of many of these receptors is becoming increasingly clear, much remains unknown. The SSRIs are intriguing drugs; by blocking presynaptic and somatodendritic serotonin transporters, they enhance serotonergic neurotransmission and thereby activate serotonin receptors. It is this effect which leads to the characteristic effects of the SSRIs. Theoretically, however, it appears possible that they may have differential effects on the various subpopulations of serotonin receptors. Differences between the SSRIs have recently been reported in males with rapid ejaculation; fluvoxamine, in contrast to other SSRIs, did not affect rapid ejaculation. What difference in the mechanism of action between the SSRIs is responsible for this differential profile? A conditioned taste aversion procedure has been used in mice to investigate the discriminatory stimuli (cues) of fluvoxamine and fluoxetine. It appeared that the discriminatory stimulus of fluvoxamine is primarily mediated via 5-hydroxytryptamine (HT)1A receptors, whilst that of fluoxetine is primarily mediated via 5-HT2C receptors. Both types of receptors have been implicated in depression and it is conceivable that different SSRIs have intrinsic activity at these receptors. Investigations are now ongoing to determine whether this differential mechanism of action also applies to the other SSRIs and whether there are differences between the SSRIs with respect to their effect on sexual behaviour in rodents.

  5. Serotonin, inhibition, and negative mood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Dayan

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Pavlovian predictions of future aversive outcomes lead to behavioral inhibition, suppression, and withdrawal. There is considerable evidence for the involvement of serotonin in both the learning of these predictions and the inhibitory consequences that ensue, although less for a causal relationship between the two. In the context of a highly simplified model of chains of affectively charged thoughts, we interpret the combined effects of serotonin in terms of pruning a tree of possible decisions, (i.e., eliminating those choices that have low or negative expected outcomes. We show how a drop in behavioral inhibition, putatively resulting from an experimentally or psychiatrically influenced drop in serotonin, could result in unexpectedly large negative prediction errors and a significant aversive shift in reinforcement statistics. We suggest an interpretation of this finding that helps dissolve the apparent contradiction between the fact that inhibition of serotonin reuptake is the first-line treatment of depression, although serotonin itself is most strongly linked with aversive rather than appetitive outcomes and predictions.

  6. Multiple receptor subtypes mediate the effects of serotonin on rat subfornical organ neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrogin, K. E.; Johnson, A. K.; Schmid, H. A.

    1998-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) receives significant serotonergic innervation. However, few reports have examined the functional effects of serotonin on SFO neurons. This study characterized the effects of serotonin on spontaneously firing SFO neurons in the rat brain slice. Of 31 neurons tested, 80% responded to serotonin (1-100 microM) with either an increase (n = 15) or decrease (n = 10) in spontaneous activity. Responses to serotonin were dose dependent and persisted after synaptic blockade. Excitatory responses could also be mimicked by the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)2A/2C receptor agonist 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI; 1-10 microM) and could be blocked by the 5-HT2A/2C-receptor antagonist LY-53,857 (10 microM). LY-53,857 unmasked inhibitory responses to serotonin in 56% of serotonin-excited cells tested. Serotonin-inhibited cells were also inhibited by the 5-HT1A-receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT; 1-10 microM; n = 7). The data indicate that SFO neurons are responsive to serotonin via postsynaptic activation of multiple receptor subtypes. The results suggest that excitatory responses to serotonin are mediated by 5-HT2A or 5-HT2C receptors and that inhibitory responses may be mediated by 5-HT1A receptors. In addition, similar percentages of serotonin-excited and -inhibited cells were also sensitive to ANG II. As such the functional relationship between serotonin and ANG II in the SFO remains unclear.

  7. Prevention of chronic alcohol and nicotine-induced azospermia, sterility and decreased libido, by a novel tri-substituted benzoflavone moiety from Passiflora incarnata Linneaus in healthy male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Kamaldeep; Sharma, Anupam

    2002-11-15

    Excessive long term consumption of alcohol and nicotine have serious detrimental effects upon the libido, fertility, and sperm count in male species. The present work describes the beneficial effects of a novel tri-substituted benzoflavone moiety (BZF) isolated from Passiflora incarnata Linneaus, the phyto-chemical isolation, spectroscopic elucidation, and multifarious biological activities of which have recently been reported by the authors. The BZF moiety has been reported to increase libido, sperm count, and sexual fertility in 2 years old male rats at 10 mg/kg, po dose, in the one of our previous studies. Presently, the BZF moiety has been evaluated against chronic ethanol- and nicotine-induced decrease in libido, sexual fertility and mating efficiency in healthy male rats. The male rats were given ethanol (3 g/kg, po) A, nicotine (2 mg/kg, sc) N, alcohol-nicotine combinations (AN) alone, and also with 10 mg/kg po dose of BZF (concurrent administrations). These treatments were given for 30 days. At the end of treatments, it was observed that rat groups A, N, and AN had no libido (evaluated by mounting behaviour), declined sperm count, and consequently no mating efficiency or fertility (upon pairing with pro-estrus female rats). However, the rats which were given 10 mg/kg BZF along-with nicotine (NP group), alcohol (AP group), and alcohol-nicotine combination (ANP) exhibited significant libido-oriented mounting behaviour, increased sperm count (significantly comparable to the control group), and increased fertilization potential. The rats having decreased sperm count, libido and fertilization potential due to chronic administration of alcohol, nicotine and alcohol-nicotine combinations, i.e., rats of A, N, and AN groups were again subdivided and were given 10 mg/kg BZF for 7 days. This treatment confirmed that BZF speeds up the restoration of sexuality in rats upon cessation of the administration of substances like alcohol, nicotine and alcohol

  8. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.J.A.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; Bruin, A. de

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  9. Deletion of the serotonin transporter in rats disturbs serotonin homeostasis without impairing liver regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matondo, R.B.; Punt, C.; Homberg, J.R.; Toussaint, M.J.; Kisjes, R.; Korporaal, S.J.; Akkerman, J.W.; Cuppen, E.; de Bruin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The serotonin transporter is implicated in the uptake of the vasoconstrictor serotonin from the circulation into the platelets, where 95% of all blood serotonin is stored and released in response to vascular injury. In vivo studies indicated that platelet-derived serotonin mediates liver

  10. Peripheral serotonin regulates maternal calcium trafficking in mammary epithelial cells during lactation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena Laporta

    Full Text Available Lactation is characterized by massive transcellular flux of calcium, from the basolateral side of the mammary alveolar epithelium (blood into the ductal lumen (milk. Regulation of calcium transport during lactation is critical for maternal and neonatal health. The monoamine serotonin (5-HT is synthesized by the mammary gland and functions as a homeostatic regulation of lactation. Genetic ablation of tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1, which encodes the rate-limiting enzyme in non-neuronal serotonin synthesis, causes a deficiency in circulating serotonin. As a consequence maternal calcium concentrations decrease, mammary epithelial cell morphology is altered, and cell proliferation is decreased during lactation. Here we demonstrate that serotonin deficiency decreases the expression and disrupts the normal localization of calcium transporters located in the apical (PMCA2 and basolateral (CaSR, ORAI-1 membranes of the lactating mammary gland. In addition, serotonin deficiency decreases the mRNA expression of calcium transporters located in intracellular compartments (SERCA2, SPCA1 and 2. Mammary expression of serotonin receptor isoform 2b and its downstream pathways (PLCβ3, PKC and MAP-ERK1/2 are also decreased by serotonin deficiency, which might explain the numerous phenotypic alterations described above. In most cases, addition of exogenous 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan to the Tph1 deficient mice rescued the phenotype. Our data supports the hypothesis that serotonin is necessary for proper mammary gland structure and function, to regulate blood and mammary epithelial cell transport of calcium during lactation. These findings can be applicable to the treatment of lactation-induced hypocalcemia in dairy cows and can have profound implications in humans, given the wide-spread use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors as antidepressants during pregnancy and lactation.

  11. Reduced serotonin synthesis and regional cerebral blood flow after anxiolytic treatment of social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, Andreas; Åhs, Fredrik; Appel, Lieuwe; Jonasson, My; Wahlstedt, Kurt; Bani, Massimo; Merlo Pich, Emilio; Bettica, Paolo; Långström, Bengt; Lubberink, Mark; Fredrikson, Mats; Furmark, Tomas

    2016-11-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is associated with increased fear-related neural activity in the amygdala and we recently found enhanced serotonin synthesis rate in the same region. Anxiolytic agents like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists reduce amygdala activity and may attenuate serotonin formation according to animal studies. Here, we examined the effects of SSRI pharmacotherapy, NK1R antagonism, and placebo on serotonin synthesis rate in relation to neural activity, measured as regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and symptom improvement in SAD. Eighteen SAD patients were randomized to receive daily double-blind treatment for six weeks either with the SSRI citalopram (n=6; 40mg), the NK1R antagonist GR205171 (n=6; 5mg; 4 weeks following 2 weeks of placebo), or placebo (n=6). Serotonin synthesis rate at rest and rCBF during stressful public speaking were assessed, before and after treatment, using positron emission tomography with the tracers [ 11 C]5-hydroxytryptophan and [ 15 O]water respectively. The Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale (LSAS-SR) indexed symptom severity. All groups exhibited attenuated amygdala serotonin synthesis rate after treatment, which was associated with reduced amygdala rCBF during public speaking and accompanied by symptom improvement. These results are consistent with the notion that serotonin in the amygdala exerts an anxiogenic influence and, conversely, that anxiolysis is achieved through decreased serotonin formation in the amygdala. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Serotonin Drives Predatory Feeding Behavior via Synchronous Feeding Rhythms in the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Misako; Wilecki, Martin; Sommer, Ralf J

    2017-11-06

    Feeding behaviors in a wide range of animals are regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin, although the exact neural circuits and associated mechanism are often unknown. The nematode Pristionchus pacificus can kill other nematodes by opening prey cuticles with movable teeth. Previous studies showed that exogenous serotonin treatment induces a predatory-like tooth movement and slower pharyngeal pumping in the absence of prey; however, physiological functions of serotonin during predation and other behaviors in P. pacificus remained completely unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of serotonin by generating mutations in Ppa-tph-1 and Ppa-bas-1 , two key serotonin biosynthesis enzymes, and by genetic ablation of pharynx-associated serotonergic neurons. Mutations in Ppa-tph-1 reduced the pharyngeal pumping rate during bacterial feeding compared with wild-type. Moreover, the loss of serotonin or a subset of serotonergic neurons decreased the success of predation, but did not abolish the predatory feeding behavior completely. Detailed analysis using a high-speed camera revealed that the elimination of serotonin or the serotonergic neurons disrupted the timing and coordination of predatory tooth movement and pharyngeal pumping. This loss of synchrony significantly reduced the efficiency of successful predation events. These results suggest that serotonin has a conserved role in bacterial feeding and in addition drives the feeding rhythm of predatory behavior in Pristionchus . Copyright © 2017 Okumura et al.

  13. Serotonin Drives Predatory Feeding Behavior via Synchronous Feeding Rhythms in the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misako Okumura

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Feeding behaviors in a wide range of animals are regulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin, although the exact neural circuits and associated mechanism are often unknown. The nematode Pristionchus pacificus can kill other nematodes by opening prey cuticles with movable teeth. Previous studies showed that exogenous serotonin treatment induces a predatory-like tooth movement and slower pharyngeal pumping in the absence of prey; however, physiological functions of serotonin during predation and other behaviors in P. pacificus remained completely unknown. Here, we investigate the roles of serotonin by generating mutations in Ppa-tph-1 and Ppa-bas-1, two key serotonin biosynthesis enzymes, and by genetic ablation of pharynx-associated serotonergic neurons. Mutations in Ppa-tph-1 reduced the pharyngeal pumping rate during bacterial feeding compared with wild-type. Moreover, the loss of serotonin or a subset of serotonergic neurons decreased the success of predation, but did not abolish the predatory feeding behavior completely. Detailed analysis using a high-speed camera revealed that the elimination of serotonin or the serotonergic neurons disrupted the timing and coordination of predatory tooth movement and pharyngeal pumping. This loss of synchrony significantly reduced the efficiency of successful predation events. These results suggest that serotonin has a conserved role in bacterial feeding and in addition drives the feeding rhythm of predatory behavior in Pristionchus.

  14. Serotonin modulates immune function in T cells from HIV-seropositive subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eugen-Olsen, J; Afzelius, P; Andresen, L

    1997-01-01

    We have shown earlier increased intracellular levels of cAMP in peripheral lymphocytes from HIV-seropositive subjects and that a chemically induced decrease in this level increases cell proliferation and cytotoxicity. Others have shown that serotonin indirectly decreases intracellular cAMP levels...... in normal peripheral lymphocytes. In this study, we show that addition of serotonin decreases intracellular levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from HIV-seropositive subjects and significantly increases the proliferative capacity in vitro. However, the effect of serotonin varies with the initial proliferative...... response; e.g., these with the highest initial responses have the highest increases. An increase in IL-2 production may be a part of this mechanism since addition of serotonin to in vitro cultures of PHA-stimulated cells increases the expression of mRNA for IL-2 and IFN-gamma. The effect on lymphocyte...

  15. Electroacupuncture decreases excessive alcohol consumption involving reduction of FosB/ΔFosB levels in reward-related brain regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    Full Text Available New therapies are needed for alcohol abuse, a major public health problem in the U.S. and worldwide. There are only three FDA-approved drugs for treatment of alcohol abuse (naltrexone, acamprosate and disulfuram. On average these drugs yield only moderate success in reducing long-term alcohol consumption. Electroacupuncture has been shown to alleviate various drugs of abuse, including alcohol. Although previous studies have shown that electroacupuncture reduced alcohol consumption, the underlying mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. ΔFosB and FosB are members of the Fos family of transcription factors implicated in neural plasticity in drug addiction; a connection between electroacupuncture's treatment of alcohol abuse and the Fos family has not been established. In this study, we trained rats to drink large quantities of ethanol in a modified intermittent access two-bottle choice drinking procedure. When rats achieved a stable baseline of ethanol consumption, electroacupuncture (100 Hz or 2 Hz, 30 min each day was administered at Zusanli (ST36 for 6 consecutive days. The level of FosB/ΔFosB in reward-related brain regions was assessed by immunohistochemistry. We found that the intake of and preference for ethanol in rats under 100 Hz, but not 2 Hz electroacupuncture regiment were sharply reduced. The reduction was maintained for at least 72 hours after the termination of electroacupuncture treatment. Conversely, 100 Hz electroacupuncture did not alter the intake of and preference for the natural rewarding agent sucrose. Additionally, FosB/ΔFosB levels in the prefrontal cortex, striatal region and the posterior region of ventral tegmental area were increased following excessive ethanol consumption, but were reduced after six-day 100 Hz electroacupuncture. Thus, this study demonstrates that six-day 100 Hz electroacupuncture treatment effectively reduces ethanol consumption and preference in rats that chronically drink excessive amount of

  16. Serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors improve micturition control in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Redaelli

    Full Text Available Poor micturition control may cause profound distress, because proper voiding is mandatory for an active social life. Micturition results from the subtle interplay of central and peripheral components. It involves the coordination of autonomic and neuromuscular activity at the brainstem level, under the executive control of the prefrontal cortex. We tested the hypothesis that administration of molecules acting as reuptake inhibitors of serotonin, noradrenaline or both may exert a strong effect on the control of urine release, in a mouse model of overactive bladder. Mice were injected with cyclophosphamide (40 mg/kg, to increase micturition acts. Mice were then given one of four molecules: the serotonin reuptake inhibitor imipramine, its metabolite desipramine that acts on noradrenaline reuptake, the serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor duloxetine or its active metabolite 4-hydroxy-duloxetine. Cyclophosphamide increased urine release without inducing overt toxicity or inflammation, except for increase in urothelium thickness. All the antidepressants were able to decrease the cyclophosphamide effects, as apparent from longer latency to the first micturition act, decreased number of urine spots and volume of released urine. These results suggest that serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors exert a strong and effective modulatory effect on the control of urine release and prompt to additional studies on their central effects on brain areas involved in the social and behavioral control of micturition.

  17. Serotonin, carbohydrates, and atypical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, S E

    1992-01-01

    At least three categories of atypical depression have been described. The hysteroid dysphoria is characterized by repeated episodes of depressed mood in response to feeling rejected, and a craving for sweets and chocolate. Two other issues are characterized by a cyclical occurrence of changes of mood and appetite, i.e., the late luteal phase dysphoric disorder (DSM-III-R, appendix), or "the premenstrual syndrome" (PMS), and the major depression with seasonal pattern (DSM-III-R), or seasonal affective disorder (SAD). The reactive mood changes are frequently accompanied by features as hypersomnia, lethargy and increased appetite, particularly with a preference for carbohydrates. Central serotonin pathways participate in the regulation of mood and behavioural impulsivity, and modulate eating patterns qualitatively and quantitatively. Depressives with PMS og SAD benefit, in general, from treatments with serotonin potentiating drugs, suggesting that brain serotonin plays a role in the pathophysiology. Ingestion of carbohydrates increases the plasma ratio of tryptophan to other large neutral amino acids in man and animal, and the serotonin synthesis in the rat brain. Based on these findings it has been suggested that the excessive carbohydrate intake by patients with PMS and SAD reflects a self-medication that temporarily relieves the vegetative symptoms via an increased central serotonergic activity.

  18. Serotonin and Blood Pressure Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert Patrick; Barman, Susan M.

    2012-01-01

    5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) was discovered more than 60 years ago as a substance isolated from blood. The neural effects of 5-HT have been well investigated and understood, thanks in part to the pharmacological tools available to dissect the serotonergic system and the development of the frequently prescribed selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors. By contrast, our understanding of the role of 5-HT in the control and modification of blood pressure pales in comparison. Here we focus on the role of 5-HT in systemic blood pressure control. This review provides an in-depth study of the function and pharmacology of 5-HT in those tissues that can modify blood pressure (blood, vasculature, heart, adrenal gland, kidney, brain), with a focus on the autonomic nervous system that includes mechanisms of action and pharmacology of 5-HT within each system. We compare the change in blood pressure produced in different species by short- and long-term administration of 5-HT or selective serotonin receptor agonists. To further our understanding of the mechanisms through which 5-HT modifies blood pressure, we also describe the blood pressure effects of commonly used drugs that modify the actions of 5-HT. The pharmacology and physiological actions of 5-HT in modifying blood pressure are important, given its involvement in circulatory shock, orthostatic hypotension, serotonin syndrome and hypertension. PMID:22407614

  19. Reduction of sitting time has a positive effect on the decrease of insulin resistance in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sabinicz, Anna; Maciejewska, Dominika; Kaczorowska, Ma?gorzata; Ryterska, Karina; Jamio?-Milc, Dominika; Wyszomirska-Raszeja, Joanna; Gutowska, Izabela; Stachowska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects a large part of the human population. One of the major environmental factors associated with the risk of NAFLD is the lack of physical activity. Aim To compare the level of physical activity and the insulin resistance in NAFLD patients. Material and methods Thirty patients with NAFLD underwent a six-month dietary intervention based on the principles of classical dietetics. Data about diet and physical activity was based on 72-hour...

  20. Melatonin and serotonin effects on gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thor, P J; Krolczyk, G; Gil, K; Zurowski, D; Nowak, L

    2007-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract represents the most important extra pineal source of melatonin. Presence of melatonin (M) suggests that this hormone is somehow involved in digestive pathophysiology. Release of GI melatonin from serotonin-rich enterochromaffin EC cells of the GI mucosa suggest close antagonistic relationship with serotonin (S) and seem to be related to periodicity of food intake. Food deprivation resulted in an increase of tissue and plasma concentrations of M. Its also act as an autocrine and paracrine hormone affecting not only epithelium and immune system but also smooth muscle of the digestive tract. Low doses M improve gastrointestinal transit and affect MMC. M reinforce MMCs cyclic pattern but inhibits spiking bowel activity. Pharmacological doses of M delay gastric emptying via mechanisms that involve CCK2 and 5HT3 receptors. M released in response to lipid infusion exerts a modulatory influence that decreases the inhibitory effects of the ileal brake on gastric emptying. On isolated bowel S induces dose dependent increase in tone and reduction in amplitude of contraction which is affected by M. M reduced the tone but not amplitude or frequency of contraction. M is a promising therapeutic agent for IBS with activities independent of its effects on sleep, anxiety or depression. Since of its unique properties M could be considered for prevention or treatment of colorectal cancer, ulcerative colitis, gastric ulcers and irritable bowel syndrome.

  1. ROLE OF SEROTONIN IN FISH REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvathy ePrasad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine mechanism regulates reproduction through the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis which is evolutionarily conserved in vertebrates. The HPG axis is regulated by a variety of internal as well as external factors. Serotonin, a monoamine neurotransmitter, is involved in a wide range of reproductive functions. In mammals, serotonin regulates sexual behaviours, gonadotropin release and gonadotropin-release hormone (GnRH secretion. However, the serotonin system in teleost may play unique role in the control of reproduction as the mechanism of reproductive control in teleosts is not always the same as in the mammalian models. In fish, the serotonin system is also regulated by natural environmental factors as well as chemical substances. In particular, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are commonly detected as pharmaceutical contaminants in the natural environment. Those factors may influence fish reproductive functions via the serotonin system. This review summarizes the functional significance of serotonin in the teleosts reproduction.

  2. Platelet-Derived Serotonin Mediates Liver Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesurtel, Mickael; Graf, Rolf; Aleil, Boris; Walther, Diego J.; Tian, Yinghua; Jochum, Wolfram; Gachet, Christian; Bader, Michael; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2006-04-01

    The liver can regenerate its volume after major tissue loss. In a mouse model of liver regeneration, thrombocytopenia, or impaired platelet activity resulted in the failure to initiate cellular proliferation in the liver. Platelets are major carriers of serotonin in the blood. In thrombocytopenic mice, a serotonin agonist reconstituted liver proliferation. The expression of 5-HT2A and 2B subtype serotonin receptors in the liver increased after hepatectomy. Antagonists of 5-HT2A and 2B receptors inhibited liver regeneration. Liver regeneration was also blunted in mice lacking tryptophan hydroxylase 1, which is the rate-limiting enzyme for the synthesis of peripheral serotonin. This failure of regeneration was rescued by reloading serotonin-free platelets with a serotonin precursor molecule. These results suggest that platelet-derived serotonin is involved in the initiation of liver regeneration.

  3. Optimum ratio of AET, ATP and serotonin applied in combinations determined with a reference to their toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benova, D.K.; P''tev, I.Kh.

    1985-01-01

    In experiments on mice, a study was made of the quantitative dependence of toxicity of AET, ATP and serotonin applied in combinations. The toxicity decreased when ATP was combined with AET and increased when ATP of AET were combined with serotonin. The toxicity of a combination of all three substances was reduced by introducing high doses of ATP

  4. Understanding the Role of Serotonin in Female Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder and Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Harry A

    2017-12-01

    The neurobiology of sexual response is driven in part by dopamine and serotonin-the former modulating excitatory pathways and the latter regulating inhibitory pathways. Neurobiological underpinnings of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) are seemingly related to overactive serotonin activity that results in underactive dopamine activity. As such, pharmacologic agents that decrease serotonin, increase dopamine, or some combination thereof, have therapeutic potential for HSDD. To review the role of serotonin in female sexual function and the effects of pharmacologic interventions that target the serotonin system in the treatment of HSDD. Searches of the Medline database for articles on serotonin and female sexual function. Relevant articles from the peer-reviewed literature were included. Female sexual response is regulated not only by the sex hormones but also by several neurotransmitters. It is postulated that dopamine, norepinephrine, oxytocin, and melanocortins serve as key neuromodulators for the excitatory pathways, whereas serotonin, opioids, and endocannabinoids serve as key neuromodulators for the inhibitory pathways. Serotonin appears to be a key inhibitory modulator of sexual desire, because it decreases the ability of excitatory systems to be activated by sexual cues. Centrally acting drugs that modulate the excitatory and inhibitory pathways involved in sexual desire (eg, bremelanotide, bupropion, buspirone, flibanserin) have been investigated as treatment options for HSDD. However, only flibanserin, a multifunctional serotonin agonist and antagonist (5-hydroxytryptamine [5-HT] 1A receptor agonist and 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist), is currently approved for the treatment of HSDD. The central serotonin system is 1 biochemical target for medications intended to treat HSDD. This narrative review integrates findings from preclinical studies and clinical trials to elucidate neurobiological underpinnings of HSDD but is limited to 1 neurotransmitter system

  5. Over-expression of CD8+ T-cell activation is associated with decreased CD4+ cells in patients seeking treatment of Alcohol Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuluaga, Paola; Sanvisens, Arantza; Martínez-Cáceres, Eva; Teniente, Aina; Tor, Jordi; Muga, Robert

    2017-11-01

    Harmful alcohol consumption may have an impact on the adaptive immune system through an imbalance in T cell subpopulations and changes in cell activation. We aimed to analyze profiles of CD4 and CD8T cell activation in patients with alcohol use disorder (AUD). We used a cross-sectional study with patients seeking treatment of the disorder. Blood samples for immunophenotyping were obtained at admission. Profiles of T cell activation were defined: (I) CD38 + /HLA-DR + , (II) CD38 + /HLA-DR - , (III) CD38 - /HLA-DR + , (IV) CD38 - /HLA-DR - and compared with healthy controls. We calculated a CD8 + T cell activation indicator (AI) that was defined as the quotient of non-activated cells (CD38 - /HLA-DR - ) and activated cells (CD38 + /HLA-DR + ). 60 patients were eligible (83%M); median age was 49 years [IQR: 44-54] and alcohol consumption was 145g/day [IQR: 90-205]. Mean±SD of CD38 + /HLA-DR - was 50.3±50.6 cells/μL in patients and 33.5±24.5 cells/μL in controls (p=0.03), for the CD38 - /HLA-DR + it was 61±62.2 cells/μL in patients and 21.2±17.3 cells/μL in controls (pcells/μL in patients and 10.8±10.3 cells/μL in controls (pcells, and the percentage of CD38 + /HLA-DR + CD8 + T cells (r=0.37, p=0.003; r=0.2, p=0.086, respectively). Patients with AUD have an increased expression of immune activation with respect to healthy individuals. This excess of activated CD8 + T cells correlates with the absolute CD4 + T cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Serotonin in fear conditioning processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Elizabeth P

    2015-01-15

    This review describes the latest developments in our understanding of how the serotonergic system modulates Pavlovian fear conditioning, fear expression and fear extinction. These different phases of classical fear conditioning involve coordinated interactions between the extended amygdala, hippocampus and prefrontal cortices. Here, I first define the different stages of learning involved in cued and context fear conditioning and describe the neural circuits underlying these processes. The serotonergic system can be manipulated by administering serotonin receptor agonists and antagonists, as well as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), and these can have significant effects on emotional learning and memory. Moreover, variations in serotonergic genes can influence fear conditioning and extinction processes, and can underlie differential responses to pharmacological manipulations. This research has considerable translational significance as imbalances in the serotonergic system have been linked to anxiety and depression, while abnormalities in the mechanisms of conditioned fear contribute to anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Serotonin controlling feeding and satiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Jörg-Peter; Fink, Heidrun

    2015-01-15

    Serotonin has been implicated in the control of satiety for almost four decades. Historically, the insight that the appetite suppressant effect of fenfluramine is linked to serotonin has stimulated interest in and research into the role of this neurotransmitter in satiety. Various rodent models, including transgenic models, have been developed to identify the involved 5-HT receptor subtypes. This approach also required the availability of receptor ligands of different selectivity, and behavioural techniques had to be developed simultaneously which allow differentiating between unspecific pharmacological effects of these ligands and 'true' satiation and satiety. Currently, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2C and 5-HT6 receptors have been identified to mediate serotonergic satiety in different ways. The recently approved anti-obesity drug lorcaserin is a 5-HT2C receptor agonist. In brain, both hypothalamic (arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus) and extrahypothalamic sites (parabrachial nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract) have been identified to mediate the serotonergic control of satiety. Serotonin interacts within the hypothalamus with endogenous orexigenic (Neuropeptide Y/Agouti related protein) and anorectic (α-melanocyte stimulating hormone) peptides. In the nucleus of the solitary tract serotonin integrates peripheral satiety signals. Here, the 5-HT3, but possibly also the 5-HT2C receptor play a role. It has been found that 5-HT acts in concert with such peripheral signals as cholecystokinin and leptin. Despite the recent advances of our knowledge, many of the complex interactions between 5-HT and other satiety factors are not fully understood yet. Further progress in research will also advance the development of new serotonergic anti-obesity drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotonin-induced down-regulation of cell surface serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard; Christensen, Peter Møller; Gether, Ulrik

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) terminates serotonergic signaling and enables refilling of synaptic vesicles by mediating reuptake of serotonin (5-HT) released into the synaptic cleft. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT activity and surface expression are not fully understood...

  9. Alcohol Alert

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... 466 KB] No. 81: Exploring Treatment Options for Alcohol Use Disorders [ PDF - 539K] No. 80: Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: ...

  10. Upregulation of the platelet Serotonin2A receptor and low blood serotonin in suicidal psychiatric patients

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, M. L.; Hawellek, B.; Papassotiropoulos, A.; Deister, A.; Frahnert, C.

    1998-01-01

    Suicidality has been found to be associated with low pre- and postsynaptic serotonin functioning. The purpose of this study was to examine whether in acutely suicidal psychiatric inpatients, the blood serotonin concentration was related to the underlying psychiatric disorder and whether it was associated with changes in the affinity (dissociation constant, KD) or in the maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of the platelet serotonin2A receptor. We therefore determined the blood serotonin concentrat...

  11. Long-term consumption of fish oil-enriched diet impairs serotonin hypophagia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Regina L H; Andrade, Iracema S; Telles, Mônica M; Albuquerque, Kelse T; Nascimento, Cláudia M O; Oyama, Lila M; Casarini, Dulce E; Ribeiro, Eliane B

    2010-10-01

    Hypothalamic serotonin inhibits food intake and stimulates energy expenditure. High-fat feeding is obesogenic, but the role of polyunsaturated fats is not well understood. This study examined the influence of different high-PUFA diets on serotonin-induced hypophagia, hypothalamic serotonin turnover, and hypothalamic protein levels of serotonin transporter (ST), and SR-1B and SR-2C receptors. Male Wistar rats received for 9 weeks from weaning a diet high in either soy oil or fish oil or low fat (control diet). Throughout 9 weeks, daily intake of fat diets decreased such that energy intake was similar to that of the control diet. However, the fish group developed heavier retroperitoneal and epididymal fat depots. After 12 h of either 200 or 300 μg intracerebroventricular serotonin, food intake was significantly inhibited in control group (21-25%) and soy group (37-39%) but not in the fish group. Serotonin turnover was significantly lower in the fish group than in both the control group (-13%) and the soy group (-18%). SR-2C levels of fish group were lower than those of control group (50%, P = 0.02) and soy group (37%, P = 0.09). ST levels tended to decrease in the fish group in comparison to the control group (16%, P = 0.339) and the soy group (21%, P = 0.161). Thus, unlike the soy-oil diet, the fish-oil diet decreased hypothalamic serotonin turnover and SR-2C levels and abolished serotonin-induced hypophagia. Fish-diet rats were potentially hypophagic, suggesting that, at least up to this point in its course, the serotonergic impairment was either compensated by other factors or not of a sufficient extent to affect feeding. That fat pad weight increased in the absence of hyperphagia indicates that energy expenditure was affected by the serotonergic hypofunction.

  12. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan on attention and central serotonin neurochemistry in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg-Wolf, Hannah; Fagan, Nicholas A; Anderson, George M; Tringides, Marios; Dal Monte, Olga; Chang, Steve W C

    2018-01-30

    Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are often associated with impaired serotonergic function. However, serotonergic interventions yield inconsistent effects on behavioral impairments. To better understand serotonin's role in these pathologies, we investigated the role of serotonin in a behavior frequently impaired in depression and anxiety, attention. In this study, we used a quantitative, repeated, within-subject, design to test how L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), the immediate serotonin precursor, modulates central serotoninergic function and attention in macaques. We observed that intramuscular 5-HTP administration increased cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-HTP and serotonin. In addition, individuals' baseline looking duration, during saline sessions, predicted the direction and magnitude in which 5-HTP modulated attention. We found that 5-HTP decreased looking duration in animals with high baseline attention, but increased looking duration in low baseline attention animals. Furthermore, individual differences in 5-HTP's effects were also reflected in how engaged individuals were in the task and how they allocated attention to salient facial features-the eyes and mouth-of stimulus animals. However, 5-HTP constricted pupil size in all animals, suggesting that the bi-directional effects of 5-HTP cannot be explained by serotonin-mediated changes in autonomic arousal. Critically, high and low baseline attention animals exhibited different baseline CSF concentrations of 5-HTP and serotonin, an index of extracellular functionally active serotonin. Thus, our results suggest that baseline central serotonergic functioning may underlie and predict variation in serotonin's effects on cognitive operation. Our findings may help inform serotonin's role in psychopathology and help clinicians predict how serotonergic interventions will influence pathologies.

  13. SEROTONIN METABOLISM FOLLOWING PLATINUM-BASED CHEMOTHERAPY COMBINED WITH THE SEROTONIN TYPE-3 ANTAGONIST TROPISETRON

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHRODER, CP; VANDERGRAAF, WTA; KEMA, IP; GROENEWEGEN, A; SLEIJFER, DT; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    The administration of platinum-based chemotherapy induces serotonin release from the enterochromaffin cells, causing nausea and vomiting. This study was conducted to evaluate parameters of serotonin metabolism following platinum-based chemotherapy given in combination with the serotonin type-3

  14. Serotonin, tryptophan metabolism and the brain-gut-microbiome axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mahony, S M; Clarke, G; Borre, Y E; Dinan, T G; Cryan, J F

    2015-01-15

    The brain-gut axis is a bidirectional communication system between the central nervous system and the gastrointestinal tract. Serotonin functions as a key neurotransmitter at both terminals of this network. Accumulating evidence points to a critical role for the gut microbiome in regulating normal functioning of this axis. In particular, it is becoming clear that the microbial influence on tryptophan metabolism and the serotonergic system may be an important node in such regulation. There is also substantial overlap between behaviours influenced by the gut microbiota and those which rely on intact serotonergic neurotransmission. The developing serotonergic system may be vulnerable to differential microbial colonisation patterns prior to the emergence of a stable adult-like gut microbiota. At the other extreme of life, the decreased diversity and stability of the gut microbiota may dictate serotonin-related health problems in the elderly. The mechanisms underpinning this crosstalk require further elaboration but may be related to the ability of the gut microbiota to control host tryptophan metabolism along the kynurenine pathway, thereby simultaneously reducing the fraction available for serotonin synthesis and increasing the production of neuroactive metabolites. The enzymes of this pathway are immune and stress-responsive, both systems which buttress the brain-gut axis. In addition, there are neural processes in the gastrointestinal tract which can be influenced by local alterations in serotonin concentrations with subsequent relay of signals along the scaffolding of the brain-gut axis to influence CNS neurotransmission. Therapeutic targeting of the gut microbiota might be a viable treatment strategy for serotonin-related brain-gut axis disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic Application of Diacylglycerol Oil for Obesity: Serotonin Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Hirowatari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Characteristics for the serum lipid abnormalities in the obesity/metabolic syndrome are elevated fasting, postprandial triglyceride (TG, and decreased high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C. Diacylglycerol (DAG oil ingestion has been reported to ameliorate postprandial hyperlipidemia and prevent obesity by increasing energy expenditure, due to the intestinal physiochemical dynamics that differ from triacylglycerol (TAG. Our study demonstrated that DAG suppresses postprandial increase in TG-rich lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL, and insulin, as compared with TAG in young, healthy individuals. Interestingly, our study also presented that DAG significantly increases plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the intestine, and mediates thermogenesis, proposing a possible mechanism for a postprandial increase in energy expenditure by DAG. Our other study demonstrated that DAG suppresses postprandial increase in TG, VLDL-C, and remnant-like particle-cholesterol, in comparison with TAG in an apolipoprotein C-II deficient subject, suggesting that DAG suppresses postprandial TG-rich lipoprotein independently of lipoprotein lipase. Further, to understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-mediated increase in serotonin and energy expenditure, we studied the effects of 1-monoacylglycerol and 2(1:1-10 2-monoacylglycerol, distinct digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively, on serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells, the human intestinal cell line. We also studied effects of 1- and 2-monoacylglycerol, and serotonin on the expression of mRNA associated with â-oxidation, fatty acids metabolism, and thermogenesis, in the Caco-2 cells. 1-monoacylglycerol significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells, compared with 2-monoacylglycerol by approximately 40%. The expression of mRNA of acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO, fatty acid translocase (FAT, and uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2, was significantly higher in 1-MOG

  16. Automated mass spectrometric analysis of urinary and plasma serotonin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Wilhelmina H. A.; Wilkens, Marianne H. L. I.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Kema, Ido P.

    Serotonin emerges as crucial neurotransmitter and hormone in a growing number of different physiologic processes. Besides extensive serotonin production previously noted in patients with metastatic carcinoid tumors, serotonin now is implicated in liver cell regeneration and bone formation. The aim

  17. The postradiation efficacy of serotonin and its dependence on the stage of embryonal growith of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinova, M.M.; Podmareva, O.N.; Dontsova, G.V.; Turpaev, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    In earlier experiments, the authors discovered that if serotonin was given to the mouse after its exposure to radiation on the 8th or 9th day of pregnancy, i.e., in the period of intensive neurogenesis, during which this particular biogenic amine was accumulated in the neural tube, the radiation damage was lessened and the growth of the fetus was normalized. These findings suggested involvement of exogenous serotonin in the elimination of radiation damage to the central nervous system of the germ. A question rises: Can serotonin lessen radiation damage to the embryo if it is exposed to ionizing radiation at later periods of gestation, during the period when the bones and the muscles are formed? This is the object of the present study. If mice were irradiated on the 11th day of gestation at a dose of 2.63 Gy, the number of female mice with viable fetuses decreased to 76.9% (compared with 100% of intact controls). The number of fetuses per female decreases to 3.2 (vs. 5.14); all developed fetuses had abnormalities, while there were no malformations in the fetuses of the intact (not irradiated) animals. Comparison results, showing the absence of the therapeutic effect of serotonin at the stage of skeleton formation, with results of previous studies, which demonstrated serotonin efficacy at the stage of formation of the central nervous system, suggests that the therapeutic effect of serotonin depends on the stage of embryo growth during which the mother is exposed to radiation

  18. Symptoms of depression and anxiety in anorexia nervosa: links with plasma tryptophan and serotonin metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Claire; Hassler, Christine; Mattar, Lama; Launay, Jean-Marie; Callebert, Jacques; Steiger, Howard; Melchior, Jean-Claude; Falissard, Bruno; Berthoz, Sylvie; Mourier-Soleillant, Virginie; Lang, François; Delorme, Marc; Pommereau, Xavier; Gerardin, Priscille; Bioulac, Stephanie; Bouvard, Manuel; Godart, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms frequently co-occur with anorexia nervosa (AN). The relationship between these clinical manifestations and the biological changes caused by starvation is not well understood. It has been hypothesised that reduced availability of tryptophan (TRP) could reduce serotonin activity and thus trigger these comorbid symptoms. The aim of this study, during re-feeding in individuals with AN, was to analyse covariations across measures of nutritional status, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and peripheral serotonin markers. Depressive and anxiety symptoms, nutritional status and serotonin markers--whole blood serotonin content, plasma TRP and the ratio between TRP and large neutral amino acids--were assessed for 42 AN participants at admission to inpatient treatment and after re-feeding. Biological measures were compared to those obtained in 42 non-eating disordered subjects. For those with AN, psychological, nutritional and biological parameters improved significantly during hospitalisation. Levels of serotonin markers were significantly lower in the AN group compared to the control group, at admission and at discharge. Increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio was correlated with a decrease in depressive symptoms. In addition, there was a positive correlation between serotonin levels and symptoms of both anxiety and depression at discharge. We speculate that enhanced TRP availability during re-feeding, as a result of the increase in the TRP/LNAA ratio, could restore serotonin neurotransmission and lead to a decrease in depressive symptoms. The association between serotonin and anxiety and depressive symptoms would be consistent with numerous observations indicating abnormal functioning of the serotoninergic system in AN. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Vascular tone and reactivity to serotonin in the internal and external carotid vascular beds of the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H; Hong, E

    1976-04-01

    The effects of intra-arterial infusions of serotonin on internal and external carotid blood flow were determined in anesthetized dogs by electromagnetic flow measurements. Serotonin decreased flow in the internal carotid and increased it in the external carotid. Both responses were blocked by the serotonin antagonist methysergide. The alpha adrenergic antagonist zolertine, the ganglionic blocking agent chlorisondamine and the vasodilator diazoxide blocked external carotid dilator responses but did not modify constriction in the internal carotid. Blockade of external carotid responses by the three drugs was also demonstrated in experiments in which this bed was perfused at a constant rate. These results indicate that the internal and external carotid vascular beds of the dog react in opposite ways to serotonin, that both responses are mediated through the same type of serotonin receptors and that the dilator responses of the external carotid are dependent on vascular tone.

  20. Platelet serotonin content and transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient in patients with pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Silvia; Huber, Lars C; Fischler, Manuel; Treder, Ursula; Maggiorini, Marco; Eberli, Franz Robert; Speich, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    The serotonin system has repeatedly been associated with the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). To comparatively analyze plasmatic and intrathrombocytic serotonin levels in arterial and mixed venous blood of patients with PH and unaffected controls to elucidate pulmonary serotonin metabolisms. Catheters were placed in the radial and pulmonary artery in patients with PH (n = 13) for diagnosis and in age-matched controls (n = 6) undergoing percutaneous closure of the patent foramen ovale. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were immediately centrifuged to obtain plasma and platelets and thereafter frozen at -20°C. After careful thawing, plasmatic and platelet serotonin levels were determined by ELISA. PH was classified as arterial in 4 and chronic thromboembolic in 9 patients with a mean pulmonary artery pressure of 37 (interquartile range: 32-43) mm Hg. Platelet serotonin content was significantly lower in the PH patients than in the controls. The mean transpulmonary gradient (arterial-mixed venous) was negative in the PH group and positive in the controls. An inverse correlation was found between the arterial blood platelet serotonin content and pulmonary hemodynamics. Plasmatic serotonin levels did not differ between the PH and control groups. The lower platelet serotonin concentration in PH patients compared with unaffected controls is an unprecedented finding. The negative transpulmonary platelet serotonin gradient and the strong negative correlation of arterial blood platelet serotonin with pulmonary hemodynamics might indicate increased serotonin uptake in the lungs of PH patients. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Serotonin: Modulator of a Drive to Withdraw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tops, Mattie; Russo, Sascha; Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Tucker, Don M.

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin is a fundamental neuromodulator in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems, with a suspected role in many human mental disorders. Yet, because of the complexity of serotonergic function, researchers have been unable to agree on a general theory. One function suggested for serotonin systems is the avoidance of threat. We propose…

  2. The serotonin transporter knockout rat : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, Jocelien; Cools, Alexander; Ellenbroek, Bart A.; Cuppen, E.; Homberg, Judith; Kalueff, Allan V.; LaPorte, Justin L.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter dicusses the most recent data on the serotonin transporter knock-out rat, a unique rat model that has been generated by target-selected N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) driven mutagenesis. The knock-out rat is the result of a premature stopcodon in the serotonin transporter gene, and the

  3. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 90; Issue 1. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR: involvement in smoking behaviour ... The present review examines the role of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT) in smoking behaviour and investigating studies that showed association of 5-HTT gene ...

  4. Serotonin shapes risky decision making in monkeys

    OpenAIRE

    Long, Arwen B.; Kuhn, Cynthia M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2009-01-01

    Some people love taking risks, while others avoid gambles at all costs. The neural mechanisms underlying individual variation in preference for risky or certain outcomes, however, remain poorly understood. Although behavioral pathologies associated with compulsive gambling, addiction and other psychiatric disorders implicate deficient serotonin signaling in pathological decision making, there is little experimental evidence demonstrating a link between serotonin and risky decision making, in ...

  5. Decreased Libido

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes decreased libido? Decreased libido often accompanies other sexual disorders. Although most men with erectile dysfunction do not complain of decreased libido, after time, persistent failure with erections and sexual performance can lead to reduced sex drive in ...

  6. Alcohol and Breastfeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Maija Bruun; Pottegård, Anton; Damkier, Per

    2014-01-01

    While the harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy are well-established, the consequences of alcohol intake during lactation have been far less examined. We reviewed available data on the prevalence of alcohol intake during lactation, the influence of alcohol on breastfeeding......, the pharmacokinetics of alcohol in lactating women and nursing infants and the effects of alcohol intake on nursing infants. A systematic search was performed in PubMed from origin to May 2013, and 41 publications were included in the review. Approximately half of all lactating women in Western countries consume...... alcohol while breastfeeding. Alcohol intake inhibits the milk ejection reflex, causing a temporary decrease in milk yield. The alcohol concentrations in breast milk closely resemble those in maternal blood. The amount of alcohol presented to nursing infants through breast milk is approximately 5...

  7. Does serotonin play a role in entrance into hibernation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canguilhem, B; Miro, J L; Kempf, E; Schmitt, P

    1986-10-01

    To study the role of brain serotonin in entrance into hibernation, intraventricular injections of 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine, electrolytic lesions of small parts of the median raphe nucleus, and chemical lesions of the same nucleus were undertaken on the European hamster in winter. All the lesions led to a variable decrease of serotonin levels in all parts of the brain areas examined. However, hibernation was suppressed only in those animals whose serotonergic neurons were destroyed in a small anterior part of the median raphe nucleus. Electrolytic lesions as well as chemical lesions in the other parts of the median raphe nucleus or the 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine injections into lateral ventricles do not prevent hibernation. These data suggest that in the European hamster only a specific group of serotonergic neurons of the median raphe nucleus are involved in the process of entrance into hibernation.

  8. On the action of radioprotective agents on the endogenous serotonin content and radiosensitivity of isolated Ehrlich ascites tumour and E. coli B. cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharenko, E.N.; Gorskaya, T.G.; Gusareva, Eh.V.; Konstantinova, M.M.; Panyushkina, N.V.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Biologii Razvitiya)

    1976-01-01

    At a higher radioresistance level attained by incubation of isolated Ehrlich ascites tumour and E. coli B. cells with MEA or noradrenaline, the endogenous serotonin content of these cells was found to increase. The extent of radioresistance increase and the serotonin content of the cells were interrelated, i.e. washing the protector off cells decreased both the radioresistance and the content of endogenous serotonin. It is concluded that radioresistance of cells is connected with the content of biologically active substances (serotonin) that possess radioprotective action

  9. The modulation role of serotonin in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas in response to air exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenjing; Liu, Zhaoqun; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Weilin; Song, Xiaorui; Wang, Xiudan; Li, Yiqun; Xin, Lusheng; Wang, Lingling; Song, Linsheng

    2017-03-01

    Serotonin, also known as 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), is a critical neurotransmitter in the neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network and involved in regulation of the stress response in vertebrates and invertebrates. In the present study, serotonin was found to be widely distributed in the tissues of Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas, including haemolymph, gonad, visceral ganglion, mantle, gill, labial palps and hepatopancreas, and its concentration increased significantly in haemolymph and mantle after the oysters were exposed to air for 1 d. The apoptosis rate of haemocytes was significantly declined after the oysters received an injection of extra serotonin, while the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in haemolymph increased significantly. After the stimulation of serotonin during air exposure, the apoptosis rate of oyster haemocytes and the concentration of H 2 O 2 in haemolymph were significantly decreased, while the SOD activity was significantly elevated. Furthermore, the survival rate of oysters from 4 th to 6 th d after injection of serotonin was higher than that of FSSW group and air exposure group. The results clearly indicated that serotonin could modulate apoptotic effect and redox during air exposure to protect oysters from stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacology of serotonin and female sexual behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphouse, Lynda

    2014-06-01

    In this review, first a historical perspective of serotonin's (5-HT) involvement in female sexual behavior is presented. Then an overview of studies implicating 5-HT is presented. The effect of drugs that increase or decrease CNS levels of 5-HT is reviewed. Evidence is presented that drugs which increase 5-HT have negative effects on female sexual behavior while a decrease in 5-HT is associated with facilitation of sexual behavior. Studies with compounds that act on 5-HT₁, 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors are discussed. Most evidence indicates that 5-HT₁A receptor agonists inhibit sexual behavior while 5-HT₂ or 5-HT₃ receptors may exert a positive influence. There is substantial evidence to support a role for 5-HT in the modulation of female consummatory sexual behavior, but studies on the role of 5-HT in other elements of female sexual behavior (e.g. desire, motivation, sexual appetite) are few. Future studies should be directed at determining if these additional components of female sexual behavior are also modulated by 5-HT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Type I Interferon-Mediated Skewing of the Serotonin Synthesis Is Associated with Severe Disease in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lood, Christian; Tydén, Helena; Gullstrand, Birgitta; Klint, Cecilia; Wenglén, Christina; Nielsen, Christoffer T.; Heegaard, Niels H. H.; Jönsen, Andreas; Kahn, Robin; Bengtsson, Anders A.

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin, a highly pro-inflammatory molecule released by activated platelets, is formed by tryptophan. Tryptophan is also needed in the production of kynurenine, a process mediated by the type I interferon (IFN)-regulated rate-limiting enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). The aim of this study was to investigate levels of serotonin in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), association to clinical phenotype and possible involvement of IDO in regulation of serotonin synthesis. Serotonin levels were measured in serum and plasma from patients with SLE (n=148) and healthy volunteers (n=79) by liquid chromatography and ELISA, as well as intracellularly in platelets by flow cytometry. We found that SLE patients had decreased serotonin levels in serum (p=0.01) and platelets (pserotonin (p=0.0008) as well as increased IDO activity (pserotonin levels in platelets and serum (pserotonin levels were associated with severe SLE with presence of anti-dsDNA antibodies and nephritis. In all, reduced serum serotonin levels in SLE patients were related to severe disease phenotype, including nephritis, suggesting involvement of important immunopathological processes. Further, our data suggest that type I IFNs, present in SLE sera, are able to up-regulate IDO expression, which may lead to decreased serum serotonin levels. PMID:25897671

  12. Disruption of Transient Serotonin Accumulation by Non-Serotonin-Producing Neurons Impairs Cortical Map Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms that alter serotonin transporter SERT expression and functionality increase the risks for autism and psychiatric traits. Here, we investigate how SERT controls serotonin signaling in developing CNS in mice. SERT is transiently expressed in specific sets of glutamatergic neurons and uptakes extrasynaptic serotonin during perinatal CNS development. We show that SERT expression in glutamatergic thalamocortical axons (TCAs dictates sensory map architecture. Knockout of SERT in TCAs causes lasting alterations in TCA patterning, spatial organizations of cortical neurons, and dendritic arborization in sensory cortex. Pharmacological reduction of serotonin synthesis during the first postnatal week rescues sensory maps in SERTGluΔ mice. Furthermore, knockdown of SERT expression in serotonin-producing neurons does not impair barrel maps. We propose that spatiotemporal SERT expression in non-serotonin-producing neurons represents a determinant in early life genetic programming of cortical circuits. Perturbing this SERT function could be involved in the origin of sensory and cognitive deficits associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  13. Study of serotonin effect on the yield of some damages in DNA after ultraviolet and x-ray irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, Eh.V.; Frajkin, G.Ya.

    1985-01-01

    Using thin-layer two-dimensional chromatography serotonin effect on the yield of thymine dimers and appearance of n-glycoside strand breaks in DNA (thymine yield) after ultraviolet and X-ray irradiation is studied. It is shown that bound with DNA serotonin decreases formation of induced by ultraviolet thymine dimers but doesn't affect on the quantity of N-glycoside bond breaks in thymidine residues caused by X radiation. The obtained data are discussed in relation to the problem on mechanisms of realization of serotonin protective effect in the processes of yeast Saccharomyces photoprotection from ultraviolet and X-ray irradiation lethal effect

  14. Aluminum-induced testosterone decrease results in physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A significant decrease in both serotonin and dopamine levels was simultaneously obtained with the decrease of testosterone level especially at the high dose of aluminum. In contrast, at the high dose, acetylcholine recorded significantly high value. In conclusion, aluminum-induced testosterone decrease resulted in a ...

  15. Brain Serotonin Transporter Binding In a Minipig Model of Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Sørensen, Jens Christian Hedemann

    Objectives: Some of the debilitating non-motor aspects of Parkinson’s disease (PD) are related to the serotonin system1. To investigate the involvement of the brain serotonergic system in a PD animal model, we measured the in vivo binding of [11C]-DASB to the serotonin transporter (SERT......) as a marker of serotonergic neurons. In this study, we use the in vivo capabilities of PET imaging to study serotonin neurotransmission in a minipig model of PD induced by the intracerebroventricular injection of lactacystin, an inhibitor of the ubiquitin proteasome system. Methods: Five female Göttingen....... Results: Lactacystin administration induced behavioural symptoms including weakness of hindlimbs and decreased motor activity. SERT binding potential was decreased by 35-40% in striatal brain regions and by 20% in thalamic regions compared to the baseline scans. Conclusions: Our imaging data suggests...

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline inhibits voltage ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-04

    701. South Korea. *Corresponding author (Email, parkws@kangwon.ac.kr). We examined the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) sertraline on voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels in freshly isolated ...

  17. Serotonin depresses feeding behaviour in ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falibene, Agustina; Rössler, Wolfgang; Josens, Roxana

    2012-01-01

    Feeding behaviour is a complex functional system that relies on external signals and the physiological state of the animal. This is also the case in ants as they vary their feeding behaviour according to food characteristics, environmental conditions and - as they are social insects - to the colony's requirements. The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) was shown to be involved in the control and modulation of many actions and processes related to feeding in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In this study, we investigated whether 5-HT affects nectar feeding in ants by analysing its effect on the sucking-pump activity. Furthermore, we studied 5-HT association with tissues and neuronal ganglia involved in feeding regulation. Our results show that 5-HT promotes a dose-dependent depression of sucrose feeding in Camponotus mus ants. Orally administered 5-HT diminished the intake rate by mainly decreasing the volume of solution taken per pump contraction, without modifying the sucrose acceptance threshold. Immunohistochemical studies all along the alimentary canal revealed 5-HT-like immunoreactive processes on the foregut (oesophagus, crop and proventriculus), while the midgut and hindgut lacked 5-HT innervation. Although the frontal and suboesophageal ganglia contained 5-HT immunoreactive cell bodies, serotonergic innervation in the sucking-pump muscles was absent. The results are discussed in the frame of a role of 5-HT in feeding control in ants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Affordability of alcohol and alcohol-related mortality in Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razvodovsky, Yury E

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse has numerous adverse health and social consequences. The consumer response to changes in alcohol affordability is an important issue on alcohol policy debates. Studies from many countries have shown an inverse relationship between alcohol prices and alcohol consumption in the population. There are, however, suggestions that increasing the price of alcohol by rising taxes may have limited effect on alcohol-related problems, associated with long-term heavy drinking. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between alcohol affordability and alcohol-related mortality rates in post-Soviet Belarus. For this purpose trends in alcohol-related mortality rates (mortality from liver cirrhosis, pancreatitis, alcoholism and alcohol psychoses) and affordability of vodka between 1990 and 2010 were compared. The time series analysis revealed that 1% increase in vodka affordability is associated with an increase in liver cirrhosis mortality of 0,77%, an increase in pancreatitis mortality of 0.53%, an increase in mortality from alcoholism and alcohol psychoses of 0,70%. The major conclusion emerging from this study is that affordability of alcohol is one of the most important predictor of alcohol-related problems in a population. These findings provide additional evidence that decreasing in affordability of alcohol is an effective strategy for reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol-related harm.

  19. Autoradiographic localization of 3H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin

  20. Do selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors acutely increase frontal cortex levels of serotonin?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyer, Chad E.; Cremers, Thomas I. F. H.

    2008-01-01

    Selective serotonin uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) exert their effects by inhibiting serotonin (5-HT) re-uptake. Although blockade occurs almost immediately, the neurochemical effects on 5-HT, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, have been a matter of considerable debate. In particular, literature

  1. Common selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor side effects in older adults associated with genetic polymorphisms in the serotonin transporter and receptors: data from a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Lauren D; Dixon, David; Nowotny, Petra; Lotrich, Francis E; Pollock, Bruce G; Kristjansson, Sean D; Doré, Peter M; Lenze, Eric J

    2014-10-01

    Antidepressant side effects are a significant public health issue, associated with poor adherence, premature treatment discontinuation, and, rarely, significant harm. Older adults assume the largest and most serious burden of medication side effects. We investigated the association between antidepressant side effects and genetic variation in the serotonin system in anxious, older adults participating in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram. Adults (N = 177) aged ≥ 60 years were randomized to active treatment or placebo for 12 weeks. Side effects were assessed using the Udvalg fur Kliniske Undersøgelser side-effect rating scale. Genetic polymorphisms were putative functional variants in the promoters of the serotonin transporter and 1A and 2A receptors (5-HTTLPR [L/S + rs25531], HTR1A rs6295, HTR2A rs6311, respectively). Four significant drug-placebo side-effect differences were found: increased duration of sleep, dry mouth, diarrhea, and diminished sexual desire. Analyses using putative high- versus low-transcription genotype groupings revealed six pharmacogenetic effects: greater dry mouth and decreased sexual desire for the low- and high-expressing serotonin transporter genotypes, respectively, and greater diarrhea with the 1A receptor low-transcription genotype. Diminished sexual desire was experienced significantly more by high-expressing genotypes in the serotonin transporter, 1A, or 2A receptors. There was not a significant relationship between drug concentration and side effects nor a mean difference in drug concentration between low- and high-expressing genotypes. Genetic variation in the serotonin system may predict who develops common SSRI side effects and why. More work is needed to further characterize this genetic modulation and to translate research findings into strategies useful for more personalized patient care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Serotonin Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Oliveira

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin Syndrome (SS is a potentially fatal iatrogenic condition that occurs as a result of an over-stimulation of the serotonergic receptors. Its typical presentation consists of the triad altered mental status, autonomic hyperactivity and neuromuscular alterations, although the clinical condition is highly variable. Despite being potentially treatable, many cases per year are underdiagnosed, a fact that has been mainly attributed to the lack of knowledge of this condition by the physicians. SS treatment relies on four pillars: removal of the precipitating agent and supportive therapy, antagonism of 5-HT2A receptors, and control of agitation, autonomic instability and hyperthermia. It is expected that its incidence will accompany the growth of the prescription of antidepressants, andincreasing physician’s awareness about its occurrence, could contribute to a timely diagnosis and to the success of the treatment. We present a clinical case of a patient diagnosed with Bipolar Affective Disorder, hospitalized for a depressive episode with a psychotic component, which developed a SS compatible condition. Based on this case report the authors undertake a theoretical review of this condition.

  3. Immunomodulatory Effects Mediated by Serotonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Arreola

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT induces concentration-dependent metabolic effects in diverse cell types, including neurons, entherochromaffin cells, adipocytes, pancreatic beta-cells, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, epithelial cells, and leukocytes. Three classes of genes regulating 5-HT function are constitutively expressed or induced in these cells: (a membrane proteins that regulate the response to 5-HT, such as SERT, 5HTR-GPCR, and the 5HT3-ion channels; (b downstream signaling transduction proteins; and (c enzymes controlling 5-HT metabolism, such as IDO and MAO, which can generate biologically active catabolites, including melatonin, kynurenines, and kynurenamines. This review covers the clinical and experimental mechanisms involved in 5-HT-induced immunomodulation. These mechanisms are cell-specific and depend on the expression of serotonergic components in immune cells. Consequently, 5-HT can modulate several immunological events, such as chemotaxis, leukocyte activation, proliferation, cytokine secretion, anergy, and apoptosis. The effects of 5-HT on immune cells may be relevant in the clinical outcome of pathologies with an inflammatory component. Major depression, fibromyalgia, Alzheimer disease, psoriasis, arthritis, allergies, and asthma are all associated with changes in the serotonergic system associated with leukocytes. Thus, pharmacological regulation of the serotonergic system may modulate immune function and provide therapeutic alternatives for these diseases.

  4. Human motoneurone excitability is depressed by activation of serotonin 1A receptors with buspirone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Amico, Jessica M; Butler, Annie A; Héroux, Martin E

    2017-01-01

    that activation of 5-HT1Areceptors depresses human motoneurone excitability. Such a depression could contribute to decreased motoneurone output during fatiguing exercise if there is high serotonergic drive to the motoneurones. ABSTRACT: Intense serotonergic drive in the turtle spinal cord results in serotonin...... motoneurone output. Such a mechanism could potentially contribute to fatigue with exercise....

  5. Serotonin manipulations and social behavior : Studies in individuals at familial risk for depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogenelst, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Interactions with others affect our mood, and vice versa. Unsurprisingly, people with a mood disorder such as depression often have difficulties in their social relationships. Depression is often thought to be associated with a decreased availability of serotonin, a signaling molecule in the brain

  6. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor-Induced Hyponatremia and the Plastic Surgery Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Steven M; Sinno, Sammy; Cannavo, Dominick; Baker, Daniel C

    2017-06-01

    Cosmetic plastic surgery procedures continue to increase in frequency, and a greater number of them now occur outside of an acute-care hospital setting. In addition, antidepressant use is also rising, with a greater number of patients taking selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors to aid in a variety of mood and anxiety disorders. Americans spend more than $86 billion each year on antidepressants, as 34 million people in the United States are taking at least one of these medications. Many side effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are well known and not clinically relevant to practicing surgeons. Hyponatremia, however, is a well-documented side effect of these medications that has received relatively little attention in the surgical literature. Postoperative hyponatremia results because of a decrease of antidiuretic hormone suppression that occurs with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor administration. Here, the authors first review the literature reporting hyponatremia with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use. The authors then present two cases of severe postoperative hyponatremia after plastic surgery operations. The authors propose that patients using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, especially elderly patients and those undergoing procedures with expected large fluid shifts, should be tested preoperatively and postoperatively for serum sodium levels so that a diagnosis of hyponatremia may be made early and treated before a catastrophic event. Therapeutic, V.

  7. An examination of serotonin and psychological variables in the relationship between exercise and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wipfli, B; Landers, D; Nagoshi, C; Ringenbach, S

    2011-06-01

    Research has revealed that exercise is effective for reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. The mechanisms by which these reductions occur, however, have not been widely studied. To examine several potential theories, a prospective, randomized, 7-week exercise intervention was conducted. Untrained participants were randomly assigned to an aerobic exercise group or to a stretching-control group. Participants completed several questionnaires to assess psychological variables, including measures of depression and anxiety, and blood was drawn at pre- and post-test to measure serum serotonin levels. A mixed-design ANOVA revealed that the exercise group had lower levels of depression than the stretching-control group after the intervention. The exercise group also showed a larger percentage decrease in serotonin than the stretching-control group. This reduction in blood serotonin after exercise is similar to the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Additionally, percent change in serotonin was found to partially mediate the relationship between exercise and depression. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. On the mechanism of the coronary dilator effect of serotonin in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, M A; Vidrio, H

    1976-03-01

    In experiments designed to determine the nature of the coronary dilator effect of serotonin the influence of intracoronary administration of the amine on coronary perfusion pressure, heart rate and ventricular contractile force was assessed in anesthetized open-chest dogs in which the left coronary artery was perfused with blood at a constant rate. Serotonin elicited dose-related decreases in coronary perfusion pressure and increases in contractile force, and lowered heart rate slightly. The dilator response was antagonized by methysergide, slightly potentiated by practolol and unaffected by reserpine. The inotropic effect was partially antagonized by methysergide and completely blocked by practolol and reserpine. It is concluded that serotonin induces coronary dilatation by direct stimulation of specific receptors that this effect is independent of the cardiac stimulation produced by the amine, and the latter response is mediated through beta1-adrenoceptors activated by released norepinephrine.

  9. Induced thermal stress on serotonin levels in the blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanan Rajendiran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The temperature of habitat water has a drastic influence on the behavioral, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of crustaceans. Hyperglycemia is a typical response of many aquatic animals to harmful physical and chemical environmental changes. In crustaceans increased circulating crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH and hyperglycemia are reported to occur following exposure to several environmental stress. The biogenic amine, serotonin has been found to modulate the CHH levels and oxidation of serotonin into its metabolites is catalysed by monoamine oxidase. The blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus is a dominant intertidal species utilized throughout the indo-pacific region and is a particularly important species of Palk bay. It has high nutritional value and delicious taste and hence their requirements of capture and cultivation of this species are constantly increasing. This species experiences varying and increasing temperature levels as it resides in an higher intertidal zone of Thondi coast. The present study examines the effect of thermal stress on the levels of serotonin and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the hemolymph of P. pelagicus and analyzes the effect of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor, pargyline on serotonin and CHH level after thermal stress. The results showed increased levels of glucose, CHH and serotonin on exposure to 26 °C in control animals. Pargyline injected crabs showed highly significant increase in the levels of CHH and serotonin on every 2 °C increase or decrease in temperature. A greater CHH level of 268.86±2.87 fmol/ml and a greater serotonin level of 177.69±10.10 ng/ml was observed at 24 °C. This could be due to the effect of in maintaining the level of serotonin in the hemolymph and preventing its oxidation, which in turn induces hyperglycemia by releasing CHH into hemolymph. Thus, the study demonstrates the effect of thermal stress on the hemolymph metabolites studied and the role of

  10. Induced thermal stress on serotonin levels in the blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendiran, Saravanan; Muhammad Iqbal, Beema Mahin; Vasudevan, Sugumar

    2016-03-01

    The temperature of habitat water has a drastic influence on the behavioral, physiological and biochemical mechanisms of crustaceans. Hyperglycemia is a typical response of many aquatic animals to harmful physical and chemical environmental changes. In crustaceans increased circulating crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH) and hyperglycemia are reported to occur following exposure to several environmental stress. The biogenic amine, serotonin has been found to modulate the CHH levels and oxidation of serotonin into its metabolites is catalysed by monoamine oxidase. The blue swimmer crab, Portunus pelagicus is a dominant intertidal species utilized throughout the indo-pacific region and is a particularly important species of Palk bay. It has high nutritional value and delicious taste and hence their requirements of capture and cultivation of this species are constantly increasing. This species experiences varying and increasing temperature levels as it resides in an higher intertidal zone of Thondi coast. The present study examines the effect of thermal stress on the levels of serotonin and crustacean hyperglycemic hormone in the hemolymph of P. pelagicus and analyzes the effect of the monoamine oxidase inhibitor, pargyline on serotonin and CHH level after thermal stress. The results showed increased levels of glucose, CHH and serotonin on exposure to 26 °C in control animals. Pargyline injected crabs showed highly significant increase in the levels of CHH and serotonin on every 2 °C increase or decrease in temperature. A greater CHH level of 268.86±2.87 fmol/ml and a greater serotonin level of 177.69±10.10 ng/ml was observed at 24 °C. This could be due to the effect of in maintaining the level of serotonin in the hemolymph and preventing its oxidation, which in turn induces hyperglycemia by releasing CHH into hemolymph. Thus, the study demonstrates the effect of thermal stress on the hemolymph metabolites studied and the role of pargyline in elevating the

  11. Role of serotonin in pathogenesis of analgesic induced headache

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikiatkhachorn, A.

    1999-12-16

    Analgesic abuse has recently been recognized as a cause of deterioration in primary headache patients. Although the pathogenesis of this headache transformation is still obscure, and alteration of central pain control system is one possible mechanism. A number of recent studies indicated that simple analgesics exert their effect by modulating the endogenous pain control system rather than the effect at the peripheral tissue, as previously suggested. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine ; 5-HT) has long been known to play a pivotal role in the pain modulatory system in the brainstem. In the present study, we investigated the changes in 5-HT system in platelets and brain tissue. A significant decrease in platelet 5-HT concentration (221.8{+-}30.7, 445.3{+-}37.4 and 467.2{+-}38.5 ng/10{sup 9} platelets, for patients with analgesic-induced headache and migraine patients, respectively, p<0.02) were evident in patients with analgesic induced headache. Chronic paracetamol administration induced a decrease in 5-HT{sub 2} serotonin receptor in cortical and brain stem tissue in experimental animals (B{sub max}=0.93{+-}0.04 and 1.79{+-}0.61 pmol/mg protein for paracetamol treated rat and controls, respectively, p<0.05). Our preliminary results suggested that chronic administration of analgesics interferes with central and peripheral 5-HT system and therefore possibly alters the 5-HT dependent antinociceptive system. (author)

  12. Altered dopamine and serotonin metabolism in motorically asymptomatic R6/2 mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Mochel

    Full Text Available The pattern of cerebral dopamine (DA abnormalities in Huntington disease (HD is complex, as reflected by the variable clinical benefit of both DA antagonists and agonists in treating HD symptoms. In addition, little is known about serotonin metabolism despite the early occurrence of anxiety and depression in HD. Post-mortem enzymatic changes are likely to interfere with the in vivo profile of biogenic amines. Hence, in order to reliably characterize the regional and chronological profile of brain neurotransmitters in a HD mouse model, we used a microwave fixation system that preserves in vivo concentrations of dopaminergic and serotoninergic amines. DA was decreased in the striatum of R6/2 mice at 8 and 12 weeks of age while DA metabolites, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid, were already significantly reduced in 4-week-old motorically asymptomatic R6/2 mice. In the striatum, hippocampus and frontal cortex of 4, 8 and 12-week-old R6/2 mice, serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased in association with a decreased turnover of serotonin. In addition, automated high-resolution behavioural analyses displayed stress-like behaviours such as jumping and grooming and altered spatial learning in R6/2 mice at age 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Therefore, we describe the earliest alterations of DA and serotonin metabolism in a HD murine model. Our findings likely underpin the neuropsychological symptoms at time of disease onset in HD.

  13. Modulatory role of serotonin on feeding behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, Carolina Peixoto; de Freitas, Manuela Figueiroa Lyra; Nogueira, Maria Inês; Campina, Renata Cristinny de Farias; Takase, Luiz Fernando; de Souza, Sandra Lopes; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2010-12-01

    The appearance, the odor, and the flavor of foods, all send messages to the encephalic area of the brain. The hypothalamus, in particular, plays a key role in the mechanisms that control the feeding behavior. These signals modulate the expression and the action of anorexigenic or orexigenic substances that influence feeding behavior. The serotonergic system of neurotransmission consists of neurons that produce and liberate serotonin as well as the serotonin-specific receptor. It has been proven that some serotonergic drugs are effective in modulating the mechanisms of control of feeding behavior. Obesity and its associated illnesses have become significant public health problems. Some drugs that manipulate the serotonergic systems have been demonstrated to be effective interventions in the treatment of obesity. The complex interplay between serotonin and its receptors, and the resultant effects on feeding behavior have become of great interest in the scientific community.

  14. The serotonin transporter in psychiatric disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spies, Marie; Knudsen, Karen Birgitte Moos; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, psychotropics affecting the serotonergic system have been used extensively in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Molecular imaging, in particular PET, has allowed for elucidation of the essential contribution of the serotonin transporter to the pathophysiology...... of various psychiatric disorders and their treatment. We review studies that use PET to measure cerebral serotonin transporter activity in psychiatric disorders, focusing on major depressive disorder and antidepressant treatment. We also discuss opportunities and limitations in the application...... of this neuroimaging method in clinical practice. Although results from individual studies diverge, meta-analysis indicates a trend towards reduced serotonin transporter availability in patients with major depressive disorder. Inconsistencies in results might suggest symptom heterogeneity in major depressive disorder...

  15. Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield Airmen Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-21

    AFRL-SA-WP-SR-2016-0004 Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield Airmen Trainees Sky J. Wolf, Maj, USAF...Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) January 2015 – May 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield...determine whether serotonin levels measured during Battlefield Airmen training were associated with stress resilience . We measured serotonin in blood

  16. Serotonin and psychiatric disorders. A key to new therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costall, B; Naylor, R J

    1992-02-01

    Evidence is reviewed that 5-HT (5-hydroxytryptamine, serotonin) acting through the 5-HT3 receptor subtype can influence behaviour relevant to anxiety, schizophrenia and cognitive disorders, and that 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron (CAS 116002-70-1) can correct behavioural disturbance in the absence of effect on normal behaviour. The 5-HT3 receptor antagonists exert a breadth of action over a wide dose range in rodent and primate models to inhibit aversive behaviour in animal models of anxiety and certain symptoms of withdrawal from drugs of abuse, alcohol, nicotine, diazepam and cocaine, to antagonise increased locomotor activity caused by mesolimbic dopamine excess, and facilitate performance in cognitive tests. The studies reveal an important role for 5-HT3 receptors in the regulation of limbic-cortical functioning, and a critical role for 5-HT3 receptor antagonists to establish the role of 5-HT3 receptors in schizophrenia, anxiety, drug withdrawal phenomena and cognitive disturbance. Preliminary clinical trials indicate a positive effect of ondansetron in anxiety, schizophrenia, alcohol withdrawal and age associated memory impairment.

  17. Serotonin transporter occupancy by escitalopram and citalopram in the non-human primate brain: a [(11)C]MADAM PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnema, Sjoerd J; Halldin, Christer; Bang-Andersen, Benny; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Farde, Lars

    2015-11-01

    A number of serotonin receptor positron emission tomography (PET) radioligands have been shown to be sensitive to changes in extracellular serotonin concentration, in a generalization of the well-known dopamine competition model. High doses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) decrease serotonin receptor availability in monkey brain, consistent with increased serotonin concentrations. However, two recent studies on healthy human subjects, using a single, lower and clinically relevant SSRI dose, showed increased cortical serotonin receptor radioligand binding, suggesting potential decreases in serotonin concentration in projection regions when initiating treatment. The cross-species differential SSRI effect may be partly explained by serotonin transporter (SERT) occupancy in monkey brain being higher than is clinically relevant. We here determine SERT occupancy after single doses of escitalopram or citalopram by conducting PET measurements with [(11)C]MADAM in monkeys. Relationships between dose, plasma concentration and SERT occupancy were estimated by one-site binding analyses. Binding affinity was expressed as dose (ID50) or plasma concentration (K i) where 50 % SERT occupancy was achieved. Estimated ID50 and K i values were 0.020 mg/kg and 9.6 nmol/L for escitalopram and 0.059 mg/kg and 9.7 nmol/L for citalopram, respectively. Obtained K i values are comparable to values reported in humans. Escitalopram or citalopram doses nearly saturated SERT in previous monkey studies which examined serotonin sensitivity of receptor radioligands. PET-measured cross-species differential effects of SSRI on cortical serotonin concentration may thus be related to SSRI dose. Future monkey studies using SSRI doses inducing clinically relevant SERT occupancy may further illuminate the delayed onset of SSRI therapeutic effects.

  18. Serotonin transporter gene promoter polymorphisms modify the association between paroxetine serotonin transporter occupancy and clinical response in major depressive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruhé, Henricus G.; Ooteman, Wendy; Booij, Jan; Michel, Martin C.; Moeton, Martina; Baas, Frank; Schene, Aart H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In major depressive disorder, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors target the serotonin transporter (SERT). Their response rates (30-50%) are modified by SERT promotor polymorphisms (5-HTTLPR). OBJECTIVES: To quantify the relationship between SERT occupancy and response, and whether

  19. The serotonin transporter plays an important role in male sexual behavior: a study in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, J.Y.; Snoeren, E.; Cuppen, E.; Waldinger, M.; Olivier, B.; Oosting, R.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter for sexual behaviors. Heterozygous (+/-) serotonin transporter (SERT) rats and SERT knockout rats (-/-) have serotonergic disturbances with significant elevations of basal extracellular 5-HT levels. AIM: To investigate the putative role

  20. Serotonin: Is it a marker for the diagnosis of hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Impaired metabolic function in liver cirrhosis and slow uptake and storage of serotonin by the platelets is a sequelae of kinetic change of serotonin transport mechanisms or abnormal serotonin release from dense granules of activated platelets is a condition defined as ''platelet exhaustion'', contributes to elevated plasma ...

  1. Serotonin Syndrome after Concomitant Treatment with Linezolid and Citalopram

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, L.; Stern, R.; Lew, D.; Hoffmeyer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Linezolid, a new synthetic antimicrobial, is an important weapon against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Although there are reports of serotonin syndrome developing after concomitant use of linezolid and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor paroxitene, this report concerns a patient receiving citalopram who developed thrombocytopenia, serotonin syndrome, and lactic acidosis and died following long-term linezolid therapy

  2. Alcohol Alert: Genetics of Alcoholism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Reports » Alcohol Alert » Alcohol Alert Number 84 Alcohol Alert Number 84 Print Version The Genetics of ... immune defense system. Genes Encoding Enzymes Involved in Alcohol Breakdown Some of the first genes linked to ...

  3. A Review of Vilazodone, Serotonin, and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thase, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To review the mechanism of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)–mediated serotonergic neurotransmission, focusing on serotonin 1A (5-HT1A) autoreceptors, which are proposed to be involved in delaying therapeutic efficacy. Vilazodone was specifically designed to function both as an SSRI and a partial agonist at 5-HT1A receptors. This combined mechanism is proposed to decrease time to efficacy, minimize sexual side effects, and provide concomitant anxiolytic properties. Data Sources: A PubMed search of all English-language articles from January 1990 to January 2013 was conducted using the search terms depression and 5-HT1A, depression and buspirone, depression and pindolol, and vilazodone. Study Selection: We found 47 articles and abstracts that were selected for inclusion on the basis of information about the pharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors and the clinical data on pindolol, buspirone, and vilazodone in depression. Data Extraction: This review summarizes current literature involving antidepressant activity, the role of 5-HT1A autoreceptors, and clinical trials involving serotonin reuptake inhibition in conjunction with 5-HT1A agonists and partial agonists, with a focus on vilazodone. Results:Vilazodone has demonstrated efficacy in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials in major depressive disorder. Results suggest that vilazodone has a low incidence of sexual side effects and is effective in patients with high levels of anxiety. A pooled analysis shows evidence of significant symptom reduction after only 1 week of therapy. Conclusions: If future studies corroborate the clinical benefits attributed to its mechanism of action, vilazodone may show potential advantages in terms of onset of action, sexual side effects, and anxiolytic activity in patients with major depressive disorder. PMID:24940527

  4. Genetic Polymorphism in the Promoter Region of Serotonin Transporter: Implications for Ethanol Abuse in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Carlos Eduardo Coral; Oda, Julie Massayo Maeda; Ariza, Carolina Batista; Guembarovski, Roberta Losi; Hirata, Bruna Karina Banin; de Almeida, Felipe Campos; André, Nayara Delgado; Fungaro, Maria Helena Pelegrinelli; Watanabe, Maria Angelica Ehara

    2016-01-01

    To provide a review of published literature regarding genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter gene, named as 5-HTTLPR, and its potential role as a susceptibility marker for ethanol abuse in childhood and adolescence. A literature review of several databases was conducted with the following keywords: 5-HTTLPR, children or adolescents or teenagers, susceptibility, alcohol or ethanol, abuse or misuse. Alcohol interacts with serotonergic synaptic transmission in several ways, and the reduced availability of serotonin transporters might foster brain dysfunction, driving to alcohol abuse. The initial use of ethanol in children and adolescents is determined primarily by environmental influences, whereas the establishment of drinking patterns is strongly controlled by genetic factors. Functional polymorphic variants in the promoter region of the 5-HTTLPR gene have age-dependent effects in alcohol abuse. This polymorphism, mapped to the 5' region of the SLC6A4, is a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and involves a direct repeat of 20-23 base pairs GC-rich sequences, comprising a short (S) allele, consisting of 14 repeats, and a long (L) allele, with 16 repeats. Additional variants have been described, although their influences on childhood and adolescence ethanol use are not clear. The influence of the 5-HTTLPR allelic variants in children and adolescent misuse of alcohol might be considered for clinical management, preventing long-term behavior problem. Identifying genetic markers associated to the potential alcohol misuse or abuse could be useful in guiding management and formulating effective coping strategies.

  5. Alcohol and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haastrup, Maija Bruun; Pottegård, Anton; Damkier, Per

    2014-02-01

    While the harmful effects of alcohol during pregnancy are well-established, the consequences of alcohol intake during lactation have been far less examined. We reviewed available data on the prevalence of alcohol intake during lactation, the influence of alcohol on breastfeeding, the pharmacokinetics of alcohol in lactating women and nursing infants and the effects of alcohol intake on nursing infants. A systematic search was performed in PubMed from origin to May 2013, and 41 publications were included in the review. Approximately half of all lactating women in Western countries consume alcohol while breastfeeding. Alcohol intake inhibits the milk ejection reflex, causing a temporary decrease in milk yield. The alcohol concentrations in breast milk closely resemble those in maternal blood. The amount of alcohol presented to nursing infants through breast milk is approximately 5-6% of the weight-adjusted maternal dose, and even in a theoretical case of binge drinking, the children would not be subjected to clinically relevant amounts of alcohol. Newborns metabolize alcohol at approximately half the rate of adults. Minute behavioural changes in infants exposed to alcohol-containing milk have been reported, but the literature is contradictory. Any long-term consequences for the children of alcohol-abusing mothers are yet unknown, but occasional drinking while breastfeeding has not been convincingly shown to adversely affect nursing infants. In conclusion, special recommendations aimed at lactating women are not warranted. Instead, lactating women should simply follow standard recommendations on alcohol consumption. © 2013 Nordic Pharmacological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The influence of superlethal γ-radiation doses on the content and metabolism of serotonin in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silina, A.G.; Sverdlov, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    As early as 60 min after γ-irradiation of Wistar rats with a dose of 150 Gy the content of serotonin and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid decreases in the midbrain, hippocampus, and cerebral hemisphere cortex. The decrease is most pronounced in the midbrain where serotoninergic neurons are located. The changes are accumulated during the first 24 h following irradiation h

  7. Antidepressant effects of insulin in streptozotocin induced diabetic mice: Modulation of brain serotonin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Deepali; Kurhe, Yeshwant; Radhakrishnan, Mahesh

    2014-04-22

    Diabetes is a persistent metabolic disorder, which often leads to depression as a result of the impaired neurotransmitter function. Insulin is believed to have antidepressant effects in depression associated with diabetes; however, the mechanism underlying the postulated effect is poorly understood. In the present study, it is hypothesized that insulin mediates an antidepressant effect in streptozotocin (STZ) induced diabetes in mice through modulation of the serotonin system in the brain. Therefore, the current study investigated the antidepressant effect of insulin in STZ induced diabetes in mice and insulin mediated modulation in the brain serotonin system. In addition, the possible pathways that lead to altered serotonin levels as a result of insulin administration were examined. Experimentally, Swiss albino mice of either sex were rendered diabetic by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of STZ. After one week, diabetic mice received a single dose of either insulin or saline or escitalopram for 14days. Thereafter, behavioral studies were conducted to test the behavioral despair effects using forced swim test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST), followed by biochemical estimations of serotonin concentrations and monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity in the whole brain content. The results demonstrated that, STZ treated diabetic mice exhibited an increased duration of immobility in FST and TST as compared to non-diabetic mice, while insulin treatment significantly reversed the effect. Biochemical assays revealed that administration of insulin attenuated STZ treated diabetes induced neurochemical alterations as indicated by elevated serotonin levels and decreased MAO-A and MAO-B activities in the brain. Collectively, the data indicate that insulin exhibits antidepressant effects in depression associated with STZ induced diabetes in mice through the elevation of the brain serotonin levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Immunodetection of the serotonin transporter protein is a more valid marker for serotonergic fibers than serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten; Brask, Dorthe; Knudsen, Gitte M.

    2006-01-01

    transporter (SERT) protein, on the other hand, is less liable to metabolism and for that reason we hypothetized that SERT immunostaining is a more stable marker of serotonergic fibers. Rats were pretreated with monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor and compared with placebo treated rats. Brains were double...... immunostained for serotonin and SERT protein and colocalization was quantified in several brain areas by confocal microscopy. In comparison with untreated rats, MAO inhibitor treated rats had a significantly higher number (almost 200% increase) of serotonin immunopositive fibers whereas no difference...... was observed in the number of the SERT positive fibers. Colocalization between serotonin and SERT positive fibers was close to 100% in MAO inhibitor treated animals but only 30% in untreated rats. We conclude that the rapid metabolism of serotonin leads to an underestimation of immunodetected serotonergic...

  9. Combined Effect of food deprivation and serotonin injection on plasma prolactin and glucose levels in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girgis, R.B.; Abdel-Fattah, K.I.; Khamis, F.I.; Abu Zaid, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the role of serotonin (5-HT) on the homeostasis of plasma prolactin and glucose in rats induced by gamma irradiation and food deprivation. Animals were divided into seven groups; control, irradiated at a dose level of 6 Gy, injected with 500 mg/kg b.wt. 5-HT intra-peritoneally, injected with 5-HT before irradiation food deprived for 48 hrs then irradiated, food deprived then injected with 5-HT, and food deprived then injected with 5-HT before whole body irradiation. Samples were collected at 1,3, 7 and 14 days post irradiation. The results showed that gamma irradiation firstly elevated prolactin (PRL) levels in plasma (1 and 3 days) then the levels decreased after 7 and 14 days as compared to control values. Rats received serotonin before irradiation exhibited an increased level of PRL after 14 days post irradiation compared to control value, while the level decreased after 1, 3, 7 days post irradiation. Food deprivation for 48 hrs altered the effect of serotonin and /or irradiation on PRL levels in plasma. Rats injected with serotonin showed a decreased level of plasma prolactin in food deprived rats, 3 days post injection. The obtained results showed that serotonin causes variable effects on plasma prolactin compared to control values. Glucose plasma levels were increased in both irradiated and serotonin injected rats before irradiation, and also in serotonin injected rats as compared to control values. Irradiation of rats after 48 hrs food deprivation induced an increase in plasma glucose levels measured throughout the different experimental periods. Injection of serotonin to rats after 48 hrs food deprivation before irradiation increased plasma glucose levels after 1, 3, 7 and 14 days compared to control value. Also, injection of serotonin to 48 hrs food deprived rats increased glucose levels during all examined days of experiment.It could be concluded that serotonin may have a variable mechanism controlling prolactin

  10. Influence of action of coal dust on metabolism of histamine and serotonin in the body (clinical and experimental study)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gridneva, N.V.; Dainega, V.G.; Talakin, Yu.N.

    1982-04-01

    Because of the role assigned to the destruction of the metabolism of biogenic amines in the pathogenesis of pneumoconiosis in miners and lack of information on metabolism of histamine and serotonin in first contact with coal dust, it was considered expedient to study peculiarities of their metabolism in the development of dust-induced lung pathology. A table shows results of a clinical study of the changes in the indicators of histamine and serotonin metabolism in miners with pneumoconiosis, those with a long period of service and a healthy control group. Miners with various forms of pneumoconiosis all show a significant increase in the histamine level of blood which may be related to the development in the presence of dust-induced lung disease of autoimmune processes accompanied by the liberation of free histamine from cells. With the increase in histamine, an increase of serotonin appears in blood of diseased miners. Long exposure to dust inflow activates metabolism of serotonin. In addition to the clinical study of diseased miners, an experimental investigation was made of the content of serotonin and histamine in organs of white rats. Table 2 shows that after introduction of coal dust over 1-4 months, the accumulation of serotonin in lungs, brain, kidneys, liver, and small intestine increased and the accumulation of histamine in liver, kidneys and brain decreased. Inhalation of dust produces a greater change in content of serotonin in organs; the intratracheal introduction of dust changes content of histamine. Results of experiment confirm destruction of metabolism of histamine and serotonin by coal/rock dust which proves need to use antiserotonins to cure lung disease. High content of histamine in blood determines need for use of antihistamine preparations especially in the presence of bronchospasms caused by effect of histamine on smooth muscle of bronchi.

  11. Serum Metabolomics Reveals Serotonin as a Predictor of Severe Dengue in the Early Phase of Dengue Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Cui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective triage of dengue patients early in the disease course for in- or out-patient management would be useful for optimal healthcare resource utilization while minimizing poor clinical outcome due to delayed intervention. Yet, early prognosis of severe dengue is hampered by the heterogeneity in clinical presentation and routine hematological and biochemical measurements in dengue patients that collectively correlates poorly with eventual clinical outcome. Herein, untargeted liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry metabolomics of serum from patients with dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF in the febrile phase (1.5 in the serum, among which are two products of tryptophan metabolism-serotonin and kynurenine. Serotonin, involved in platelet aggregation and activation decreased significantly, whereas kynurenine, an immunomodulator, increased significantly in patients with DHF, consistent with thrombocytopenia and immunopathology in severe dengue. To sensitively and accurately evaluate serotonin levels as prognostic biomarkers, we implemented stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry and used convalescence samples as their own controls. DHF serotonin was significantly 1.98 fold lower in febrile compared to convalescence phase, and significantly 1.76 fold lower compared to DF in the febrile phase of illness. Thus, serotonin alone provided good prognostic utility (Area Under Curve, AUC of serotonin = 0.8. Additionally, immune mediators associated with DHF may further increase the predictive ability than just serotonin alone. Nine cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, G-CSF, MIP-1β, FGF basic, TNFα and RANTES were significantly different between DF and DHF, among which IFN-γ ranked top by multivariate statistics. Combining serotonin and IFN-γ improved the prognosis performance (AUC = 0.92, sensitivity = 77.8%, specificity = 95.8%, suggesting this duplex panel as accurate metrics for the early prognosis of DHF.

  12. Serum Metabolomics Reveals Serotonin as a Predictor of Severe Dengue in the Early Phase of Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thein, Tun Linn; Fang, Jinling; Pang, Junxiong; Ooi, Eng Eong; Leo, Yee Sin; Ong, Choon Nam; Tannenbaum, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Effective triage of dengue patients early in the disease course for in- or out-patient management would be useful for optimal healthcare resource utilization while minimizing poor clinical outcome due to delayed intervention. Yet, early prognosis of severe dengue is hampered by the heterogeneity in clinical presentation and routine hematological and biochemical measurements in dengue patients that collectively correlates poorly with eventual clinical outcome. Herein, untargeted liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry metabolomics of serum from patients with dengue fever (DF) and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) in the febrile phase (1.5) in the serum, among which are two products of tryptophan metabolism–serotonin and kynurenine. Serotonin, involved in platelet aggregation and activation decreased significantly, whereas kynurenine, an immunomodulator, increased significantly in patients with DHF, consistent with thrombocytopenia and immunopathology in severe dengue. To sensitively and accurately evaluate serotonin levels as prognostic biomarkers, we implemented stable-isotope dilution mass spectrometry and used convalescence samples as their own controls. DHF serotonin was significantly 1.98 fold lower in febrile compared to convalescence phase, and significantly 1.76 fold lower compared to DF in the febrile phase of illness. Thus, serotonin alone provided good prognostic utility (Area Under Curve, AUC of serotonin = 0.8). Additionally, immune mediators associated with DHF may further increase the predictive ability than just serotonin alone. Nine cytokines, including IFN-γ, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-8, G-CSF, MIP-1β, FGF basic, TNFα and RANTES were significantly different between DF and DHF, among which IFN-γ ranked top by multivariate statistics. Combining serotonin and IFN-γ improved the prognosis performance (AUC = 0.92, sensitivity = 77.8%, specificity = 95.8%), suggesting this duplex panel as accurate metrics for the early prognosis of DHF. PMID:27055163

  13. Ontogeny of serotonin and serotonin2A receptors in rat auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basura, Gregory J; Abbas, Atheir I; O'Donohue, Heather; Lauder, Jean M; Roth, Bryan L; Walker, Paul D; Manis, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    Maturation of the mammalian cerebral cortex is, in part, dependent upon multiple coordinated afferent neurotransmitter systems and receptor-mediated cellular linkages during early postnatal development. Given that serotonin (5-HT) is one such system, the present study was designed to specifically evaluate 5-HT tissue content as well as 5-HT(2A) receptor protein levels within the developing auditory cortex (AC). Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), 5-HT and the metabolite, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), was measured in isolated AC, which demonstrated a developmental dynamic, reaching young adult levels early during the second week of postnatal development. Radioligand binding of 5-HT(2A) receptors with the 5-HT(2A/2C) receptor agonist, (125)I-DOI ((+/-)-1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-aminopropane HCl; in the presence of SB206553, a selective 5-HT(2C) receptor antagonist, also demonstrated a developmental trend, whereby receptor protein levels reached young adult levels at the end of the first postnatal week (P8), significantly increased at P10 and at P17, and decreased back to levels not significantly different from P8 thereafter. Immunocytochemical labeling of 5-HT(2A) receptors and confocal microscopy revealed that 5-HT(2A) receptors are largely localized on layer II/III pyramidal cell bodies and apical dendrites within AC. When considered together, the results of the present study suggest that 5-HT, likely through 5-HT(2A) receptors, may play an important role in early postnatal AC development.

  14. [Involvement of calmodulin in realization of vasoconstrictive effects of serotonin and norepinephrin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhevnikova, L M; Avdonin, P V

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement ofcalmodulin in adrenergic and serotoninergic regulation of vascular contractility has been studied. Calmodulin inhibitors trifluoperazine and W-13 suppress vasoconstriction of the rat aorta in response to norepinephrine, serotonin, and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptor agonists (8-OH-DPAT and DOI, respectively) and do not affect the vasodilatory effect of 5HT1B-, 5HT2B-, and 5HT4-receptors. The force of aorta contraction in response to 8-OH-DPAT increases after the activation of calcium entry through voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. This effect is not related to non-specific activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors, since it is realized in the presence of prazosin. The inhibitor of calmodulin-dependent myosin light chain kinase KN93 decreases the vasoconstrictive response in response to norepinephrine and serotonin by only 20%. Calmodulin inhibitors slightly decrease aortic constriction in response to endothelin-1, vasopressin, angiotensin II, and KCl. Trifluoperazine does not suppress vasoconstriction induced by the G-protein activator AlF4(-). It is assumed that the target of trifluoperazine and W-13 is calmodulin interacting directly with alpha1-adrenoceptors and serotonin 5HT1A- and 5HT2A-receptors.

  15. Antibiotics-induced depletion of mice microbiota induces changes in host serotonin biosynthesis and intestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xiaolong; Ding, Chao; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Lizhi; Tian, Hongliang; Gong, Jianfeng; Zhu, Minsheng; Li, Jieshou; Li, Ning

    2017-01-13

    The gastrointestinal motility is affected by gut microbiota and the relationship between them has become a hot topic. However, mechanisms of microbiota in regulating motility have not been well defined. We thus investigated the effect of microbiota depletion by antibiotics on gastrointestinal motility, colonic serotonin levels, and bile acids metabolism. After 4 weeks with antibiotics treatments, gastrointestinal and colon transit, defecation frequency, water content, and other fecal parameters were measured and analyzed in both wild-type and antibiotics-treated mice, respectively. Contractility of smooth muscle, serotonin levels, and bile acids levels in wild-type and antibiotics-treated mice were also analyzed. After antibiotics treatment, the richness and diversity of intestinal microbiota decreased significantly, and the fecal of mice had less output (P Antibiotics treatment in mice also resulted in delayed gastrointestinal and colonic motility (P antibiotics-treated mice, serotonin, tryptophan hydroxylase 1, and secondary bile acids levels were decreased. Gut microbiota play an important role in the regulation of intestinal bile acids and serotonin metabolism, which could probably contribute to the association between gut microbiota and gastrointestinal motility as intermediates.

  16. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    -duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  17. Measuring the serotonin uptake site using [3H]paroxetine--a new serotonin uptake inhibitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleiter, C.H.; Nutt, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that may be involved in ethanol preference and dependence. It is possible to label the serotonin uptake site in brain using the tricyclic antidepressant imipramine, but this also binds to other sites. We have used the new high-affinity uptake blocker paroxetine to define binding to this site and report it to have advantages over imipramine as a ligand

  18. Central serotonin metabolism and frequency of depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praag, H.M. van; Haan, S. de

    1979-01-01

    Central serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) metabolism can be disturbed in a subgroup of patients with vital (endogenous, primary) depression. Presumably these disturbances do not result from the depression and have a predisposing rather than a causative relationship to it. This latter statement

  19. Genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter 5-HTTLPR ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insertion/deletion polymorphism in the 5 - flanking promoter region (5-HTTLPR). This gene has received considerable atten- tion in attempts to understand the molecular determinants of smoking. Therefore, in the present study, the relationship between genetic polymorphism of serotonin transporter in smoking behaviour is ...

  20. BLOOD CHEMISTRY AND PLATELET SEROTONIN UPTAKE AS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A cross sectional study was conducted to investigate the blood chemistry and platelet serotonin uptake as alternative method of determining HIV disease stage in HIV/AIDS patients. Whole blood was taken from subjects at the Human Virology of the Nigerian Institute of Medical Research. Subjects were judged suitable for ...

  1. A dualistic conformational response to substrate binding in the human serotonin transporter reveals a high affinity state for serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across...... that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation...

  2. Serotonin Signaling Through the 5-HT1BReceptor and NADPH Oxidase 1 in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Katie Y; Mair, Kirsty M; Harvey, Adam P; Montezano, Augusto C; Touyz, Rhian M; MacLean, Margaret R

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin can induce human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (hPASMC) proliferation through reactive oxygen species (ROS), influencing the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). We hypothesize that in PASMCs, serotonin induces oxidative stress through NADPH-oxidase-derived ROS generation and reduced Nrf-2 (nuclear factor [erythroid-derived 2]-like 2) antioxidant systems, promoting vascular injury. HPASMCs from controls and PAH patients, and PASMCs from Nox1 -/- mice, were stimulated with serotonin in the absence/presence of inhibitors of Src kinase, the 5-HT 1B receptor, and NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1). Markers of fibrosis were also determined. The pathophysiological significance of our findings was examined in vivo in serotonin transporter overexpressing female mice, a model of pulmonary hypertension. We confirmed thatserotonin increased superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production in these cells. For the first time, we show that serotonin increased oxidized protein tyrosine phosphatases and hyperoxidized peroxiredoxin and decreased Nrf-2 and catalase activity in hPASMCs. ROS generation was exaggerated and dependent on cellular Src-related kinase, 5-HT 1B receptor, and the serotonin transporter in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from PAH subjects. Proliferation and extracellular matrix remodeling were exaggerated in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from PAH subjects and dependent on 5-HT 1B receptor signaling and Nox1, confirmed in PASMCs from Nox1 -/- mice. In serotonin transporter overexpressing mice, SB216641, a 5-HT 1B receptor antagonist, prevented development of pulmonary hypertension in a ROS-dependent manner. Serotonin can induce cellular Src-related kinase-regulated Nox1-induced ROS and Nrf-2 dysregulation, contributing to increased post-translational oxidative modification of proteins and activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways in hPASMCs, associated with mitogenic responses. 5-HT 1B receptors contribute to

  3. Serotonin depletion induces pessimistic-like behavior in a cognitive bias paradigm in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stracke, Jenny; Otten, Winfried; Tuchscherer, Armin; Puppe, Birger; Düpjan, Sandra

    2017-05-15

    Cognitive and affective processes are highly interrelated. This has implications for neuropsychiatric disorders such as major depressive disorder in humans but also for the welfare of non-human animals. The brain serotonergic system might play a key role in mediating the relationship between cognitive functions and affective regulation. The aim of our study was to examine the influence of serotonin depletion on the affective state and cognitive processing in pigs, an important farm animal species but also a potential model species for biomedical research in humans. For this purpose, we modified a serotonin depletion model using para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) to decrease serotonin levels in brain areas involved in cognitive and affective processing (part 1). The consequences of serotonin depletion were then measured in two behavioral tests (part 2): the spatial judgement task (SJT), providing information about the effects of the affective state on cognitive processing, and the open field/novel object (OFNO) test, which measures behavioral reactions to novelty that are assumed to reflect affective state. In part 1, 40 pigs were treated with either pCPA or saline for six consecutive days. Serotonin levels were assessed in seven different brain regions 4, 5, 6, 11 and 13days after the first injection. Serotonin was significantly depleted in all analyzed brain regions up to 13days after the first application. In part 2, the pCPA model was applied to 48 animals in behavioral testing. Behavioral tests, the OFNO test and the SJT, were conducted both before and after pCPA/saline injections. While results from the OFNO tests were inconclusive, an effect of treatment as well as an effect of the phase (before and after treatment) was observed in the SJT. Animals treated with pCPA showed more pessimistic-like behavior, suggesting a more negative affective state due to serotonin depletion. Thus, our results confirm that the serotonergic system is a key player in cognitive

  4. Biological Contribution to Social Influences on Alcohol Drinking: Evidence from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey E. Ryabinin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Social factors have a tremendous influence on instances of heavy drinking and in turn impact public health. However, it is extremely difficult to assess whether this influence is only a cultural phenomenon or has biological underpinnings. Research in non-human primates demonstrates that the way individuals are brought up during early development affects their future predisposition for heavy drinking, and research in rats demonstrates that social isolation, crowding or low social ranking can lead to increased alcohol intake, while social defeat can decrease drinking. Neurotransmitter mechanisms contributing to these effects (i.e., serotonin, GABA, dopamine have begun to be elucidated. However, these studies do not exclude the possibility that social effects on drinking occur through generalized stress responses to negative social environments. Alcohol intake can also be elevated in positive social situations, for example, in rats following an interaction with an intoxicated peer. Recent studies have also begun to adapt a new rodent species, the prairie vole, to study the role of social environment in alcohol drinking. Prairie voles demonstrate a high degree of social affiliation between individuals, and many of the neurochemical mechanisms involved in regulation of these social behaviors (for example, dopamine, central vasopressin and the corticotropin releasing factor system are also known to be involved in regulation of alcohol intake. Naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist approved as a pharmacotherapy for alcoholic patients, has recently been shown to decrease both partner preference and alcohol preference in voles. These findings strongly suggest that mechanisms by which social factors influence drinking have biological roots, and can be studied using rapidly developing new animal models.

  5. Alcohol Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Drinking to Excess U.S. National Library of Medicine, Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Last Updated: June 27, 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Family Health, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: alcohol, alcohol abuse, alcohol addiction ...

  6. Serotonin 2a Receptor and serotonin 1a receptor interact within the medial prefrontal cortex during recognition memory in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Facundo Morici

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Episodic memory, can be defined as the memory for unique events. The serotonergic system one of the main neuromodulatory systems in the brain appears to play a role in it. The serotonin 2a receptor (5-HT2aR one of the principal post-synaptic receptors for 5-HT in the brain, is involved in neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders associated with memory deficits. Recognition memory can be defined as the ability to recognize if a particular event or item was previously encountered and is thus considered, under certain conditions, a form of episodic memory. As human data suggest that a constitutively decrease of 5-HT2A signaling might affect episodic memory performance we decided to compare the performance of mice with disrupted 5-HT2aR signaling (htr2a -/- with wild type (htr2a+/+ littermates in different recognition memory and working memory tasks that differed in the level of proactive interference. We found that ablation of 5-HT2aR signaling throughout development produces a deficit in tasks that cannot be solved by single item strategy suggesting that 5-HT2aR signaling is involved in interference resolution. We also found that in the absence of 5-HT2aR signaling serotonin has a deleterious effect on recognition memory retrieval through the activation of 5-HT1aR in the medial prefrontal cortex.

  7. The reciprocal influences of perceived risk for alcoholism and alcohol use over time: evidence for aversive transmission of parental alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Moira M; Chassin, Laurie

    2010-07-01

    This study examined how perceived risk for alcoholism and alcohol use influenced each other over time. We hypothesized an aversive transmission mechanism, by which some children of alcoholics may reduce their drinking because they perceive themselves to be at risk for future alcohol problems because of their parents' alcoholism. Using participants (N = 804, 47% female) from an ongoing longitudinal study of children of alcoholics (e.g., Chassin et al., 1991), we examined the reciprocal prospective relations between perceived risk for alcoholism and drinking across three measurement occasions, and also tested whether perceived risk for alcoholism mediated the effect of perceived parental alcoholism on subsequent drinking. Mediation analyses provided evidence for aversive transmission, in which the effect of perceived parental alcoholism on alcohol use during young adulthood was decreased to the extent that perceived parental alcoholism predicted higher levels of perceived risk for alcoholism during emerging adulthood. Results indicated reciprocal effects between perceived risk for alcoholism and drinking over time, such that higher levels of perceived risk were associated with lower levels of drinking. Results were replicated using both self-report and collateral-report of alcohol use, and using both actual and perceived parental alcoholism. Young adults may avoid drinking when they perceive their parent(s) to be alcoholic, and consequently perceive themselves to be at elevated risk for alcoholism. Given that beliefs about risk for alcoholism are potentially modifiable, increasing self-perceived risk for alcoholism may be one feasible way to reduce the intergenerational transmission of alcohol disorders within families.

  8. Cerebrovascular Alterations in Alcoholic and Non-Alcoholic Psychiatric Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-19

    Introduction For most people who drink, alcohol is a pleasant accompaniment to social activities. Moderate alcohol use - for most adults , two drinks...anxi- ety-2 vs. risk factors (r=0.538, p=0.036). Alcoholic -drug-depression groups: Significant differences were found for age between the drug...Light-to-moderate alcohol consumption seemed to decrease the risk of isehemic stroke by reducing atherothrombotic events, but the underlying mechanism

  9. Serotonin conflict in sleep-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori

    2012-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been suggested to be a risk factor for weight gain and adiposity. Serotonin (5-HT) substantially contributes to the regulation of sleep and feeding behavior. Although 5-HT predominately promotes waking and satiety, the effects of 5-HT depend on 5-HT receptor function. The 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT2C, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors reportedly contribute to sleep-waking regulation, whereas the 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors contribute to the regulation of satiety. The 5-HT1B and 2C receptors may therefore be involved in the regulation of sleep-feeding. In genetic studies, 5-HT1B receptor mutant mice display greater amounts of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) than wild-type mice, while displaying no effects on waking or slow wave sleep (SWS). On the other hand, 5-HT2C receptor mutant mice exhibit increased wakefulness and decreased SWS, without any effect on REMS. Moreover, the 5-HT2C receptor mutants display leptin-independent hyperphagia, leading to a middle-aged onset of obesity, whereas 5-HT1B receptor mutants do not display any effect on food intake. Thus, the genetic deletion of 5-HT2C receptors results in sleep loss-associated hyperphagia, leading to the late onset of obesity. This is a quite different pattern of sleep-feeding behavior than is observed in disturbed leptin signaling, which displays an increase in sleep-associated hyperphagia. In pharmacologic studies, 5-HT1B and 5-HT2C receptors upregulate wakefulness and downregulate SWS, REMS, and food intake. These findings suggest that 5-HT1B/2C receptor stimulation induces sleep loss-associated anorexia. Thus, the central 5-HT regulation of sleep-feeding can be dissociated. Functional hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and orexin activities may contribute to the dissociated 5-HT regulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Serotonergic medications, herbal supplements, and perioperative serotonin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mary E; Naranjo, Julian; Pollard, Emily M; Weingarten, Toby N; Warner, Mark A; Sprung, Juraj

    2017-09-01

    Perioperative use of serotonergic agents increases the risk of serotonin syndrome. We describe the occurrence of serotonin syndrome after fentanyl use in two patients taking multiple serotonergic agents. Two patients who had been taking multiple serotonergic medications or herbal supplements (one patient taking fluoxetine, turmeric supplement, and acyclovir; the other taking fluoxetine and trazodone) developed serotonin syndrome perioperatively when undergoing outpatient procedures. Both experienced acute loss of consciousness and generalized myoclonus after receiving fentanyl. In one patient, the serotonin syndrome promptly resolved after naloxone administration. In the other patient, the onset of serotonin syndrome was delayed and manifested after discharge, most likely attributed to the intraoperative use of midazolam for sedation. Even small doses of fentanyl administered to patients taking multiple serotonergic medications and herbal supplements may trigger serotonin syndrome. Prompt reversal of serotonin toxicity in one patient by naloxone illustrates the likely opioid-mediated pathogenesis of serotonin syndrome in this case. It also highlights that taking serotonergic agents concomitantly can produce the compounding effect that causes serotonin syndrome. The delayed presentation of serotonin syndrome in the patient who received a large dose of midazolam suggests that outpatients taking multiple serotonergic drugs who receive benzodiazepines may require longer postprocedural monitoring.

  11. The Protective Action Encoding of Serotonin Transients in the Human Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Rosalyn J; Kishida, Kenneth T; Lohrenz, Terry; Saez, Ignacio; Laxton, Adrian W; Witcher, Mark R; Tatter, Stephen B; Ellis, Thomas L; Phillips, Paul Em; Dayan, Peter; Montague, P Read

    2018-01-03

    The role of serotonin in human brain function remains elusive due, at least in part, to our inability to measure rapidly the local concentration of this neurotransmitter. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to infer serotonergic signaling from the striatum of 14 brains of human patients with Parkinson's disease. Here we report these novel measurements and show that they correlate with outcomes and decisions in a sequential investment game. We find that serotonergic concentrations transiently increase as a whole following negative reward prediction errors, while reversing when counterfactual losses predominate. This provides initial evidence that the serotonergic system acts as an opponent to dopamine signaling, as anticipated by theoretical models. Serotonin transients on one trial were also associated with actions on the next trial in a manner that correlated with decreased exposure to poor outcomes. Thus, the fluctuations observed for serotonin appear to correlate with the inhibition of over-reactions and promote persistence of ongoing strategies in the face of short-term environmental changes. Together these findings elucidate a role for serotonin in the striatum, suggesting it encodes a protective action strategy that mitigates risk and modulates choice selection particularly following negative environmental events.Neuropsychopharmacology advance online publication, 14 February 2018; doi:10.1038/npp.2017.304.

  12. On the correlation between the radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its derivatives and their ability to modify the local blood flow in animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramov, M.M.; Vasin, M.V.

    1978-01-01

    Radioprotective effectiveness of serotonin and its alkoxy derivatives and their ability to modify a local blood flow in hemopoietic tissues have been comparatively studied in albino mice and rats. The correlation between these two parameters is nonlinear and may be approximated by a hyperbola equation. The correlation coefficient is - 0.88. A high radioprotective effect of serotonin and its derivatives is observed in the case of a three-fold decrease of the blood flow in the spleen

  13. Serotonin syndrome associated with sertraline use: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Werner Griciunas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Case report of serotonin syndrome in patient who initiated the use of sertraline at a dose greater than twice the recommended for the treatment of psychotic depression. The patient presented contracture of the limbs, puzzled look, mutism and blood pressure 230x110 mmHg. The syndrome is increasingly common, although it is not well recognized. Many medications can cause it and this possibility should be considered in patients taking serotonergic drugs presenting autonomic or mental disorders and neurological symptoms. The findings of clonus, oculogyric crisis, hyperreflexia and hypertonicity should lead to the medication review. Treatment focuses on interruption of causative agents, treatment of a possible hyperthermia and use of benzodiazepines to decrease hypertonus and neurological excitability.

  14. Aggression: the testosterone-serotonin link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birger, Moshe; Swartz, Marnina; Cohen, David; Alesh, Ya'akov; Grishpan, Chaim; Kotelr, Moshe

    2003-09-01

    The relevance of central neurotransmission to aggressive and impulsive behavior has become more evident due to extensive research in humans and animals. Among other findings, there are abundant data relating low serotonergic activity--as measured by low cerebrospinal fluid 5-hydroxyindolacetic acid, and a blunted response of prolactin to fenfluramine--to impulsive behavior. Many studies on testosterone activity show a relation between high plasma levels and a tendency towards aggression. It is hypothesized that the interaction between low serotonin and high testosterone levels in the central nervous system has a significant effect on the neural mechanisms involved in the expression of aggressive behavior. It seems that testosterone modulates serotonergic receptor activity in a way that directly affects aggression, fear and anxiety. Our survey reviews the main findings on serotonin, testosterone and the possible interaction between them with regard to these behavioral phenomena.

  15. Serotonin, atherosclerosis, and collateral vessel spasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenberg, N.

    1988-01-01

    Studies on animal models demonstrate that platelet products contribute to vascular spasm in ischemic syndromes and that this is reversible with administration of ketanserin and thromboxane synthesis inhibitors. Laboratory animals (dogs, rabbits, and rats) that had femoral artery ligations exhibited supersensitivity to serotonin within days in their collateral blood vessels. This supersensitivity lasted at least 6 months. The response to serotonin was reversed by ketanserin, but not by 5HT-1 antagonists. Supersensitivity does not extend to norepinephrine, and alpha blockers do not influence the response to serotonin. It appears that platelet activation by endothelial injury contributes to ischemia through blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm. When platelet activation occurs in vivo, blood vessel occlusion and vascular spasm are reversible in part by using ketanserin or agents that block thromboxane synthesis or its action. Combining both classes of agents reverses spasm completely. These findings support existing evidence that platelet products contribute to vascular disease, and provide an approach to improved management with currently available pharmacologic agents.

  16. Peripheral Serotonin: a New Player in Systemic Energy Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Jun; Kim, Hail; Park, Sangkyu

    2015-01-01

    Whole body energy balance is achieved through the coordinated regulation of energy intake and energy expenditure in various tissues including liver, muscle and adipose tissues. A positive energy imbalance by excessive energy intake or insufficient energy expenditure results in obesity and related metabolic diseases. Although there have been many obesity treatment trials aimed at the reduction of energy intake, these strategies have achieved only limited success because of their associated adverse effects. An ancient neurotransmitter, serotonin is among those traditional pharmacological targets for anti-obesity treatment because it exhibits strong anorectic effect in the brain. However, recent studies suggest the new functions of peripheral serotonin in energy homeostasis ranging from the endocrine regulation by gut-derived serotonin to the autocrine/paracrine regulation by adipocyte-derived serotonin. Here, we discuss the role of serotonin in the regulation of energy homeostasis and introduce peripheral serotonin as a possible target for anti-obesity treatment. PMID:26628041

  17. TSPAN5, ERICH3 and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in major depressive disorder: pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, M; Neavin, D; Liu, D; Biernacka, J; Hall-Flavin, D; Bobo, W V; Frye, M A; Skime, M; Jenkins, G D; Batzler, A; Kalari, K; Matson, W; Bhasin, S S; Zhu, H; Mushiroda, T; Nakamura, Y; Kubo, M; Wang, L; Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Weinshilboum, R M

    2016-12-01

    Millions of patients suffer from major depressive disorder (MDD), but many do not respond to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy. We used a pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomics research strategy to identify genes associated with metabolites that were related to SSRI response. Specifically, 306 MDD patients were treated with citalopram or escitalopram and blood was drawn at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks for blood drug levels, genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and metabolomic analyses. SSRI treatment decreased plasma serotonin concentrations (Pserotonin concentration changes were associated with clinical outcomes (Pserotonin concentration changes were used as phenotypes for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). GWAS for baseline plasma serotonin concentrations revealed a genome-wide significant (P=7.84E-09) SNP cluster on chromosome four 5' of TSPAN5 and a cluster across ERICH3 on chromosome one (P=9.28E-08) that were also observed during GWAS for change in serotonin at 4 (P=5.6E-08 and P=7.54E-07, respectively) and 8 weeks (P=1.25E-06 and P=3.99E-07, respectively). The SNPs on chromosome four were expression quantitative trait loci for TSPAN5. Knockdown (KD) and overexpression (OE) of TSPAN5 in a neuroblastoma cell line significantly altered the expression of serotonin pathway genes (TPH1, TPH2, DDC and MAOA). Chromosome one SNPs included two ERICH3 nonsynonymous SNPs that resulted in accelerated proteasome-mediated degradation. In addition, ERICH3 and TSPAN5 KD and OE altered media serotonin concentrations. Application of a pharmacometabolomics-informed pharmacogenomic research strategy, followed by functional validation, indicated that TSPAN5 and ERICH3 are associated with plasma serotonin concentrations and may have a role in SSRI treatment outcomes.

  18. Acute tryptophan depletion in C57BL/6 mice does not induce central serotonin reduction or affective behavioural changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Donkelaar, Eva L; Blokland, Arjan; Lieben, Cindy K J; Kenis, Gunter; Ferrington, Linda; Kelly, Paul A T; Steinbusch, Harry W M; Prickaerts, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Acute tryptophan depletion is extensively used to investigate the implication of serotonin in the onset of depressive disorders. In rats, it lowers peripheral tryptophan and decreases central serotonin concentrations. We aimed to establish the rat model of acute tryptophan depletion in the mouse for potential application as serotonin challenge tool in genetic mouse models of depression. Pharmacokinetic and behavioural effects of a tryptophan-free diet were examined in Swiss and C57BL/6 mice. Peripheral amino acids were measured and central tryptophan and serotonin concentrations were compared with anxiety and depression-like behaviour in the elevated zero-maze, forced swimming test or tail suspension test. While acute tryptophan depletion resulted in a 74% reduction of the plasma ratio tryptophan to the sum of other large neutral amino acids in Swiss mice 1h after administration (2x10 ml/kg, 30 min interval), there was only a 40% reduction in C57BL/6 mice. The latter did not show anxiety in the elevated zero-maze or increased immobility in the forced swimming test or tail suspension test. A higher dose (2x20 ml/kg) with a longer interval (60 min) reduced the ratio with 68% in C57BL/6 mice, lowered hippocampal serotonin turnover and had no functional effect when tested in the elevated zero-maze and forced swimming test. These findings have important implications for the use of acute tryptophan depletion in general and in particular for its application in mice. Although in healthy mice no clear central serotonin or functional effects were observed, further research is indicated using mice with pre-existing serotonin dysfunction, as they might be more vulnerable to acute tryptophan depletion. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Serum Serotonin Levels Among Homosexual and Heterosexual Men

    OpenAIRE

    Santoso, Santoso; Batubara, Lusiana

    2013-01-01

    Background: Variations in sexual preferences and orientations have both proximate and ultimate causes. Serotonin (5-HT) system is a key in the regulation of reward-related behaviors, from eating, drinking to sexual activity. Recent study demonstrated that a serotonin level is involved in sexual preference in rodent as animal models. This study focuses on the profile of serotonin levels from blood among homosexual compared to heterosexual men.Methods: Eight adult (34.5±7.69) homosexual men wer...

  20. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Donovan, Michael H.; Tecott, Laurence H.

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system (CNS) serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mecha...

  1. Black Alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Thomas D.; Wright, Roosevelt

    1988-01-01

    Examines some aspects of the problem of alcoholism among Blacks, asserting that Black alcoholism can best be considered in an ecological, environmental, sociocultural, and public health context. Notes need for further research on alcoholism among Blacks and for action to reduce the problem of Black alcoholism. (NB)

  2. Alcohol withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... so they can monitor you for symptoms of alcohol withdrawal. Prevention Reduce or avoid alcohol. If you have a drinking problem, you should ... team. 02-05-18: Editorial update. Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse Read more ... HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A. ...

  3. Neuroendocrine disruption in the shore crab Carcinus maenas: Effects of serotonin and fluoxetine on chh- and mih-gene expression, glycaemia and ecdysteroid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Alexandrine; Monsinjon, Tiphaine; Delbecque, Jean-Paul; Olivier, Stéphanie; Poret, Agnès; Foll, Frank Le; Durand, Fabrice; Knigge, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Serotonin, a highly conserved neurotransmitter, controls many biological functions in vertebrates, but also in invertebrates. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), such as fluoxetine, are commonly used in human medication to ease depression by affecting serotonin levels. Their residues and metabolites can be detected in the aquatic environment and its biota. They may also alter serotonin levels in aquatic invertebrates, thereby perturbing physiological functions. To investigate whether such perturbations can indeed be expected, shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) were injected either with serotonin, fluoxetine or a combination of both. Dose-dependent effects of fluoxetine ranging from 250 to 750nM were investigated. Gene expression of crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (chh) as well as moult inhibiting hormone (mih) was assessed by RT-qPCR at 2h and 12h after injection. Glucose and ecdysteroid levels in the haemolymph were monitored in regular intervals until 12h. Serotonin led to a rapid increase of chh and mih expression. On the contrary, fluoxetine only affected chh and mih expression after several hours, but kept expression levels significantly elevated. Correspondingly, serotonin rapidly increased glycaemia, which returned to normal or below normal levels after 12h. Fluoxetine, however, resulted in a persistent low-level increase of glycaemia, notably during the period when negative feedback regulation reduced glycaemia in the serotonin treated animals. Ecdysteroid levels were significantly decreased by serotonin and fluoxetine, with the latter showing less pronounced and less rapid, but longer lasting effects. Impacts of fluoxetine on glycaemia and ecdysteroids were mostly observed at higher doses (500 and 750nM) and affected principally the response dynamics, but not the amplitude of glycaemia and ecdysteroid-levels. These results suggest that psychoactive drugs are able to disrupt neuroendocrine control in decapod crustaceans, as they interfere with the

  4. Elevating serotonin pre-partum alters the Holstein dairy cow hepatic adaptation to lactation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Samantha R.; Prichard, Allan S.; Maerz, Noah L.; Prichard, Austin P.; Endres, Elizabeth L.; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E.; Akins, Matthew S.; Bruckmaier, Rupert M.

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin is known to regulate energy and calcium homeostasis in several mammalian species. The objective of this study was to determine if pre-partum infusions of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), the immediate precursor to serotonin synthesis, could modulate energy homeostasis at the level of the hepatocyte in post-partum Holstein and Jersey dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows and twelve multiparous Jersey cows were intravenously infused daily for approximately 7 d pre-partum with either saline or 1 mg/kg bodyweight of 5-HTP. Blood was collected for 14 d post-partum and on d30 post-partum. Liver biopsies were taken on d1 and d7 post-partum. There were no changes in the circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, non-esterified fatty acids, or urea nitrogen in response to treatment, although there were decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations with 5-HTP treatment around d6 to d10 post-partum, particularly in Jersey cows. Cows infused with 5-HTP had increased hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA expression of the serotonin 2B receptor on d1 and d7 post-partum. Minimal changes were seen in the hepatic mRNA expression of various gluconeogenic enzymes. There were no changes in the mRNA expression profile of cell-cycle progression marker cyclin-dependent kinase 4 or apoptotic marker caspase 3, although proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression tended to be increased in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Immunofluorescence assays showed an increased number of CASP3- and Ki67-positive cells in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Given the elevated hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA abundance of 5HTR2B, 5-HTP infusions may be stimulating an autocrine-paracrine adaptation to lactation in the Holstein cow liver. PMID:28922379

  5. Elevating serotonin pre-partum alters the Holstein dairy cow hepatic adaptation to lactation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha R Weaver

    Full Text Available Serotonin is known to regulate energy and calcium homeostasis in several mammalian species. The objective of this study was to determine if pre-partum infusions of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP, the immediate precursor to serotonin synthesis, could modulate energy homeostasis at the level of the hepatocyte in post-partum Holstein and Jersey dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows and twelve multiparous Jersey cows were intravenously infused daily for approximately 7 d pre-partum with either saline or 1 mg/kg bodyweight of 5-HTP. Blood was collected for 14 d post-partum and on d30 post-partum. Liver biopsies were taken on d1 and d7 post-partum. There were no changes in the circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, non-esterified fatty acids, or urea nitrogen in response to treatment, although there were decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations with 5-HTP treatment around d6 to d10 post-partum, particularly in Jersey cows. Cows infused with 5-HTP had increased hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA expression of the serotonin 2B receptor on d1 and d7 post-partum. Minimal changes were seen in the hepatic mRNA expression of various gluconeogenic enzymes. There were no changes in the mRNA expression profile of cell-cycle progression marker cyclin-dependent kinase 4 or apoptotic marker caspase 3, although proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression tended to be increased in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Immunofluorescence assays showed an increased number of CASP3- and Ki67-positive cells in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Given the elevated hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA abundance of 5HTR2B, 5-HTP infusions may be stimulating an autocrine-paracrine adaptation to lactation in the Holstein cow liver.

  6. Elevating serotonin pre-partum alters the Holstein dairy cow hepatic adaptation to lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Samantha R; Prichard, Allan S; Maerz, Noah L; Prichard, Austin P; Endres, Elizabeth L; Hernández-Castellano, Lorenzo E; Akins, Matthew S; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin is known to regulate energy and calcium homeostasis in several mammalian species. The objective of this study was to determine if pre-partum infusions of 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), the immediate precursor to serotonin synthesis, could modulate energy homeostasis at the level of the hepatocyte in post-partum Holstein and Jersey dairy cows. Twelve multiparous Holstein cows and twelve multiparous Jersey cows were intravenously infused daily for approximately 7 d pre-partum with either saline or 1 mg/kg bodyweight of 5-HTP. Blood was collected for 14 d post-partum and on d30 post-partum. Liver biopsies were taken on d1 and d7 post-partum. There were no changes in the circulating concentrations of glucose, insulin, glucagon, non-esterified fatty acids, or urea nitrogen in response to treatment, although there were decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations with 5-HTP treatment around d6 to d10 post-partum, particularly in Jersey cows. Cows infused with 5-HTP had increased hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA expression of the serotonin 2B receptor on d1 and d7 post-partum. Minimal changes were seen in the hepatic mRNA expression of various gluconeogenic enzymes. There were no changes in the mRNA expression profile of cell-cycle progression marker cyclin-dependent kinase 4 or apoptotic marker caspase 3, although proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression tended to be increased in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Immunofluorescence assays showed an increased number of CASP3- and Ki67-positive cells in Holstein cows infused with 5-HTP on d1 post-partum. Given the elevated hepatic serotonin content and increased mRNA abundance of 5HTR2B, 5-HTP infusions may be stimulating an autocrine-paracrine adaptation to lactation in the Holstein cow liver.

  7. Molecular imaging of serotonin degeneration in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gwenn S; Barrett, Frederick S; Joo, Jin Hui; Nassery, Najlla; Savonenko, Alena; Sodums, Devin J; Marano, Christopher M; Munro, Cynthia A; Brandt, Jason; Kraut, Michael A; Zhou, Yun; Wong, Dean F; Workman, Clifford I

    2017-09-01

    Neuropathological and neuroimaging studies have consistently demonstrated degeneration of monoamine systems, especially the serotonin system, in normal aging and Alzheimer's disease. The evidence for degeneration of the serotonin system in mild cognitive impairment is limited. Thus, the goal of the present study was to measure the serotonin transporter in vivo in mild cognitive impairment and healthy controls. The serotonin transporter is a selective marker of serotonin terminals and of the integrity of serotonin projections to cortical, subcortical and limbic regions and is found in high concentrations in the serotonergic cell bodies of origin of these projections (raphe nuclei). Twenty-eight participants with mild cognitive impairment (age 66.6±6.9, 16 males) and 28 healthy, cognitively normal, demographically matched controls (age 66.2±7.1, 15 males) underwent magnetic resonance imaging for measurement of grey matter volumes and high-resolution positron emission tomography with well-established radiotracers for the serotonin transporter and regional cerebral blood flow. Beta-amyloid imaging was performed to evaluate, in combination with the neuropsychological testing, the likelihood of subsequent cognitive decline in the participants with mild cognitive impairment. The following hypotheses were tested: 1) the serotonin transporter would be lower in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic regions, 2) in mild cognitive impairment relative to controls, the serotonin transporter would be lower to a greater extent and observed in a more widespread pattern than lower grey matter volumes or lower regional cerebral blood flow and 3) lower cortical and limbic serotonin transporters would be correlated with greater deficits in auditory-verbal and visual-spatial memory in mild cognitive impairment, not in controls. Reduced serotonin transporter availability was observed in mild cognitive impairment compared to controls in cortical and limbic

  8. Effect of serotonin on small intestinal contractility in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.B.; Arif, F.; Gregersen, H.

    2008-01-01

    The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro-duodeno-jejunal contrac......The physiological significance of serotonin released into the intestinal lumen for the regulation of motility is unknown in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of serotonin infused into the lumen of the gastric antrum, duodenum or the jejunum, on antro......-duodeno-jejunal contractility in healthy human volunteers. Manometric recordings were obtained and the effects of either a standard meal, continuous intravenous infusion of serotonin (20 nmol/kg/min) or intraluminal bolus infusions of graded doses of serotonin (2.5, 25 or 250 nmol) were compared. In addition, platelet......-depleted plasma levels of serotonin, blood pressure, heart rate and electrocardiogram were evaluated. All subjects showed similar results. Intravenous serotonin increased migrating motor complex phase In frequency 3-fold and migrating velocity 2-fold. Intraluminal infusion of serotonin did not change contractile...

  9. Rotavirus and Serotonin Cross-Talk in Diarrhoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Johan; Karlsson, Thommie; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Svensson, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) has been shown to infect and stimulate secretion of serotonin from human enterochromaffin (EC) cells and to infect EC cells in the small intestine of mice. It remains to identify which intracellularly expressed viral protein(s) is responsible for this novel property and to further establish the clinical role of serotonin in RV infection. First, we found that siRNA specifically silencing NSP4 (siRNANSP4) significantly attenuated secretion of serotonin from Rhesus rotavirus (RRV) infected EC tumor cells compared to siRNAVP4, siRNAVP6 and siRNAVP7. Second, intracellular calcium mobilization and diarrhoeal capacity from virulent and avirulent porcine viruses correlated with the capacity to release serotonin from EC tumor cells. Third, following administration of serotonin, all (10/10) infants, but no (0/8) adult mice, responded with diarrhoea. Finally, blocking of serotonin receptors using Ondansetron significantly attenuated murine RV (strain EDIM) diarrhoea in infant mice (2.9 vs 4.5 days). Ondansetron-treated mice (n = 11) had significantly (p serotonin receptor antagonist significantly (p serotonin from human EC tumor cells and that serotonin participates in RV diarrhoea, which can be attenuated by Ondansetron. PMID:27459372

  10. Plasma serotonin in horses undergoing surgery for small intestinal colic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, Sara C.; Maes, An A.; Delesalle, Catherine J.; Pardon, Bart; Croubels, Siska M.; Deprez, Piet

    2015-01-01

    This study compared serotonin concentrations in platelet poor plasma (PPP) from healthy horses and horses with surgical small intestinal (SI) colic, and evaluated their association with postoperative ileus, strangulation and non-survival. Plasma samples (with EDTA) from 33 horses with surgical SI colic were collected at several pre- and post-operative time points. Serotonin concentrations were determined using liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results were compared with those for 24 healthy control animals. The serotonin concentrations in PPP were significantly lower (P serotonin was not a suitable prognostic factor in horses with SI surgical colic. PMID:25694668

  11. Metabolomics Approach Reveals Integrated Metabolic Network Associated with Serotonin Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Rui; Shen, Sensen; Tian, Yonglu; Burton, Casey; Xu, Xinyuan; Liu, Yi; Chang, Cuilan; Bai, Yu; Liu, Huwei

    2015-07-01

    Serotonin is an important neurotransmitter that broadly participates in various biological processes. While serotonin deficiency has been associated with multiple pathological conditions such as depression, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, the serotonin-dependent mechanisms remain poorly understood. This study therefore aimed to identify novel biomarkers and metabolic pathways perturbed by serotonin deficiency using metabolomics approach in order to gain new metabolic insights into the serotonin deficiency-related molecular mechanisms. Serotonin deficiency was achieved through pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) using p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA) or genetic knockout of the neuronal specific Tph2 isoform. This dual approach improved specificity for the serotonin deficiency-associated biomarkers while minimizing nonspecific effects of pCPA treatment or Tph2 knockout (Tph2-/-). Non-targeted metabolic profiling and a targeted pCPA dose-response study identified 21 biomarkers in the pCPA-treated mice while 17 metabolites in the Tph2-/- mice were found to be significantly altered compared with the control mice. These newly identified biomarkers were associated with amino acid, energy, purine, lipid and gut microflora metabolisms. Oxidative stress was also found to be significantly increased in the serotonin deficient mice. These new biomarkers and the overall metabolic pathways may provide new understanding for the serotonin deficiency-associated mechanisms under multiple pathological states.

  12. Infrared Thermography in Serotonin-Induced Itch Model in Rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jasemian, Yousef; Gazerani, Parisa; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    The study validated the application of infrared thermography in a serotonin-induced itch model in rats since the only available method in animal models of itch is the count of scratching bouts. Twenty four adult Sprague-Dawley male rats were used in 3 experiments: 1) local vasomotor response...... with no scratching reflex was investigated. Serotonin elicited significant scratching and lowered the local temperature at the site of injection. A negative dose-temperature relationship of serotonin was found by thermography. Vasoregulation at the site of serotonin injection took place in the absence of scratching...

  13. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  14. Increasing serotonin concentrations alter calcium and energy metabolism in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laporta, Jimena; Moore, Spencer A E; Weaver, Samantha R; Cronick, Callyssa M; Olsen, Megan; Prichard, Austin P; Schnell, Brian P; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    A 4×4 Latin square design in which varied doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg) of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) were intravenously infused into late-lactation, non-pregnant Holstein dairy cows was used to determine the effects of serotonin on calcium and energy metabolism. Infusion periods lasted 4 days, with a 5-day washout between periods. Cows were infused at a constant rate for 1 h each day. Blood was collected pre- and 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-infusion, urine was collected pre- and post-infusion, and milk was collected daily. All of the 5-HTP doses increased systemic serotonin as compared to the 0 mg/kg dose, and the 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg doses increased circulating glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) concentrations. Treatment of cows with either 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg 5-HTP doses decreased urine calcium elimination, and the 1.5 mg/kg dose increased milk calcium concentrations. No differences were detected in the heart rates, respiration rates, or body temperatures of the cows; however, manure scores and defecation frequency were affected. Indeed, cows that received 5-HTP defecated more, and the consistency of their manure was softer. Treatment of late-lactation dairy cows with 5-HTP improved energy metabolism, decreased loss of calcium into urine, and increased calcium secretion into milk. Further research should target the effects of increasing serotonin during the transition period to determine any benefits for post-parturient calcium and glucose metabolism. © 2015 Society for Endocrinology.

  15. Effect of whole body vibration therapy on circulating serotonin levels in an ovariectomized rat model of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiu-Shi; Huang, Li; Chen, Xian-Hong; Wang, Hai-Bin; Sun, Wei-Shan; Huo, Shao-Chuan; Li, Zi-Qi; Deng, Wei-Min

    2014-01-01

    Studies have reported that whole body vibration (WBV) played a vital role in bone remodeling. Circulating serotonin is also involved in negative regulating bone mass in rodents and humans. However, both WBV and inhibition of serotonin biosynthesis may suppress receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclastogenesis in vitro. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of WBV therapy on the levels of serum serotonin in ovariectomized rats. Thirty-six-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats weighing 276.15±37.75 g were ovariectomized to induce osteoporosis, and another ten rats underwent sham operation to establish sham control (SHAM) group. After 3 months, ovariectomized rats were divided into three subgroups and then separately treated with WBV, Alendronate (ALN) and normal saline (OVX), SHAM group was given normal saline. After 6 weeks of treatment, rats were sacrificed. Serum serotonin, RANKL, bone turnover markers, and bone mineral density (BMD), bone strength were evaluated. The serum serotonin level was significantly lower in WBV group than OVX and ALN groups (P<0.05 and P<0.001). RANKL levels significantly decreased in WBV and ALN groups compared to OVX group (P<0.001 for both). BMD and biomechanical parameters of femur significantly increased (P<0.05 for both) and bone turnover levels decreased (P<0.001 for both) in WBV group compared to OVX group. These data indicated that WBV enhanced the bone strength and BMD in ovariectomized rats most likely by reducing the levels of circulating serotonin.

  16. Alcohol consumption for simulated driving performance: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeid Rezaee-Zavareh

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Alcohol consumption may decrease simulated driving performance in alcohol consumed people compared with non-alcohol consumed people via changes in SDSD, LPSD, speed, MLPD, LC and NA. More well-designed randomized controlled clinical trials are recommended.

  17. Kinetics of homocysteine metabolism after moderate alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Sierksma, A.; Schaafsma, G.; Kok, F.J.; Struys, E.A.; Jakobs, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because plasma homocysteine (tHcy) is considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and associated with alcohol consumption, the authors investigated the effect of moderate alcohol

  18. No link of serotonin 2C receptor editing to serotonin transporter genotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lyddon, R.; Cuppen, E.; Haroutunian, V.; Siever, L.J.; Dracheva, S.

    2010-01-01

    RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process, which has the potential to alter the function of encoded proteins. In particular, serotonin 2C receptor (5-HT2cR) mRNA editing can produce 24 protein isoforms of varying functionality. Rodent studies have shown that 5-HT2cR editing is dynamically

  19. Alcohol Calorie Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Calorie Calculator Weekly Total 0 Calories Alcohol Calorie Calculator Find out the number of beer and ... Calories College Alcohol Policies Interactive Body Calculators Alcohol Calorie Calculator Alcohol Cost Calculator Alcohol BAC Calculator Alcohol ...

  20. Cognitive and neurobiological mechanisms of alcohol-related aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinz, Adrienne J; Beck, Anne; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Sterzer, Philipp; Heinz, Andreas

    2011-06-02

    Alcohol-related violence is a serious and common social problem. Moreover, violent behaviour is much more common in alcohol-dependent individuals. Animal experiments and human studies have provided insights into the acute effect of alcohol on aggressive behaviour and into common factors underlying acute and chronic alcohol intake and aggression. These studies have shown that environmental factors, such as early-life stress, interact with genetic variations in serotonin-related genes that affect serotonergic and GABAergic neurotransmission. This leads to increased amygdala activity and impaired prefrontal function that, together, predispose to both increased alcohol intake and impulsive aggression. In addition, acute and chronic alcohol intake can further impair executive control and thereby facilitate aggressive behaviour.

  1. Looking on the bright side of serotonin transporter gene variation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Homberg, J.R.; Lesch, K.P.

    2011-01-01

    Converging evidence indicates an association of the short (s), low-expressing variant of the repeat length polymorphism, serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), in the human serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT, SERT, SLC6A4) with anxiety-related traits and increased risk for

  2. Serotonin synthesis rate and the tryptophan hydroxylase-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furmark, Tomas; Marteinsdottir, Ina; Frick, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    It is disputed whether anxiety disorders, like social anxiety disorder, are characterized by serotonin over- or underactivity. Here, we evaluated whether our recent finding of elevated neural serotonin synthesis rate in patients with social anxiety disorder could be reproduced in a separate cohor...

  3. Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin receptors during brain embryogenesis favours stress resiliency in female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Lavanco

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Manipulations of the serotonin transmission during early development induce long-lasting changes in the serotonergic circuitry throughout the brain. However, little is known on the developmental consequences in the female progeny. Therefore, this study aimed at exploring the behavioural effects of pre- and postnatal stimulation of the serotonergic system by 5-methoxytryptamine in adolescent female rats on behavioural reactivity and anxiety- like phenotype. Our results show that perinatal 5- methoxythyptamine decreased total distance travelled and rearing frequency in the novel enviroment, and increased the preference for the centre of the arena in the open field test. Moreover, perinatal 5-methoxytryptamine increased the percentages of entries and time spent on the open arms of the elevated plus maze, with respect to perinatally vehicle-exposed rats. Thus, perinatal stimulation of serotonin receptors does not impair the functional response to the emotional challenges in female rats, favouring the occurrence of a stress-resilient phenotype.

  4. Serotonin, ATRX, and DAXX Expression in Pituitary Adenomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Casar-Borota, Olivera; Botling, Johan; Granberg, Dan

    2017-01-01

    Differential diagnosis based on morphology and immunohistochemistry between a clinically nonfunctioning pituitary neuroendocrine tumor (NET)/pituitary adenoma and a primary or secondary NET of nonpituitary origin in the sellar region may be difficult. Serotonin, a frequently expressed marker...... case of an invasive serotonin and adrenocorticotroph hormone immunoreactive NET in the sellar region, we explored the immunohistochemical expression of serotonin, ATRX, and DAXX in a large series of pituitary endocrine tumors of different types from 246 patients and in 2 corticotroph carcinomas. None...... of the pituitary tumors expressed serotonin, suggesting that serotonin immunoreactive sellar tumors represent primary or secondary NETs of nonpituitary origin. Normal expression of ATRX and DAXX in pituitary tumors suggests that ATRX and DAXX do not play a role in the pathogenesis of pituitary endocrine tumors...

  5. Alcoholic Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... avoid all alcohol. Protect yourself from hepatitis C. Hepatitis C is an infectious liver disease caused by a virus. Untreated, it can lead to cirrhosis. If you have hepatitis C and drink alcohol, you're far more likely ...

  6. Serotonin transporter genotype linked to adolescent substance use treatment outcome through externalizing behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy eChung

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Meta-analyses suggest that the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR short (S allele, relative to the long (L allele, is associated with risk for alcohol dependence, particularly among individuals with early onset antisocial alcoholism. Youth in substance use treatment tend to show antisocial or externalizing behaviors, such as conduct problems, which predict worse treatment outcome. This study examined a pathway in which 5-HTTLPR genotype is associated with externalizing behavior, and the intermediate phenotype of externalizing behavior serves as a link between 5-HTTLPR genotype and substance use treatment outcome in youth. Adolescents (n=142 who were recruited from addictions treatment were genotyped for 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms (S and LG carriers vs. LALA, assessed for externalizing and internalizing behaviors shortly after starting treatment, and followed over 6-months. 5-HTTLPR genotype was not associated with internalizing behaviors, and was not directly associated with 6-month substance use outcomes. However, 5-HTTLPR genotype was associated with externalizing behaviors (S and LG > LALA, and externalizing behaviors predicted alcohol and marijuana problem severity at 6-month follow-up. Results indicated an indirect (p<.05 and non-specific (i.e., both alcohol and marijuana severity effect of 5-HTTLPR genotype on youth substance use treatment outcomes, with externalizing behaviors as an important linking factor. Adolescents in substance use treatment with low expressing (S and LG 5-HTTLPR alleles and externalizing behavior might benefit from intervention that addresses serotonergic functioning, externalizing behaviors, and substance use to improve outcomes.

  7. The Cognitive and Behavioural Impact of Alcohol Promoting and Alcohol Warning Advertisements: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyle G.; Stautz, Kaidy; Hollands, Gareth J.; Winpenny, Eleanor M.; Marteau, Theresa M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To assess the immediate effect of alcohol promoting and alcohol warning advertisements on implicit and explicit attitudes towards alcohol and on alcohol seeking behaviour. Methods We conducted a between-participants online experiment in which participants were randomly assigned to view one of three sets of advertisements: (a) alcohol promoting, (b) alcohol warning, or (c) unrelated to alcohol. A total of 373 participants (59.5% female) aged 18–40 (M = 28.03) living in the UK were recruited online through a research agency. Positive and negative implicit attitudes and explicit attitudes towards alcohol were assessed before and after advertisements were viewed. Alcohol seeking behaviour was measured by participants' choice of either an alcohol-related or non-alcohol-related voucher offered ostensibly as a reward for participation. Self-reported past week alcohol consumption was also recorded. Results There were no main effects on any of the outcome measures. In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol promoting advertisements increased positive implicit attitudes (standardized beta = 0.15, P = 0.04) and decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = −0.17, P = 0.02). In heavier drinkers, viewing alcohol warning advertisements decreased negative implicit attitudes (standardized beta = −0.19, P = 0.01). Conclusions Viewing alcohol promoting advertisements has a cognitive impact on heavier drinkers, increasing positive and reducing negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol. Viewing alcohol warning advertisements reduces negative implicit attitudes towards alcohol in heavier drinkers, suggestive of a reactance effect. PMID:26391367

  8. A Dualistic Conformational Response to Substrate Binding in the Human Serotonin Transporter Reveals a High Affinity State for Serotonin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerregaard, Henriette; Severinsen, Kasper; Said, Saida; Wiborg, Ove; Sinning, Steffen

    2015-01-01

    Serotonergic neurotransmission is modulated by the membrane-embedded serotonin transporter (SERT). SERT mediates the reuptake of serotonin into the presynaptic neurons. Conformational changes in SERT occur upon binding of ions and substrate and are crucial for translocation of serotonin across the membrane. Our understanding of these conformational changes is mainly based on crystal structures of a bacterial homolog in various conformations, derived homology models of eukaryotic neurotransmitter transporters, and substituted cysteine accessibility method of SERT. However, the dynamic changes that occur in the human SERT upon binding of ions, the translocation of substrate, and the role of cholesterol in this interplay are not fully elucidated. Here we show that serotonin induces a dualistic conformational response in SERT. We exploited the substituted cysteine scanning method under conditions that were sensitized to detect a more outward-facing conformation of SERT. We found a novel high affinity outward-facing conformational state of the human SERT induced by serotonin. The ionic requirements for this new conformational response to serotonin mirror the ionic requirements for translocation. Furthermore, we found that membrane cholesterol plays a role in the dualistic conformational response in SERT induced by serotonin. Our results indicate the existence of a subpopulation of SERT responding differently to serotonin binding than hitherto believed and that membrane cholesterol plays a role in this subpopulation of SERT. PMID:25614630

  9. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, M.M.M.; Karel, P.; Cools, A.R.; Homberg, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of

  10. Acupuncture causes serotonin release by mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Nikolay; Atanasova, Dimitrinka; Tomov, Nikola; Sivrev, Dimitar; Lazarov, Nikolai

    2017-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) are important object in experimental acupuncture due to their putative involvement in local reactions to needling. In the rat, they are shown to contain in their granules, among other tissue mediators, serotonin, also called 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). The aim of this study is to examine the normal distribution of 5-HT-containing MCs in soft tissues of Zusanli (ST36) acupuncture point (acupoint) and their morphological changes caused by experimental acupuncture. We observed 5-HT-immunopositive MCs in the tissues and in the vicinity of the needle tract formed after acupuncture. As a result of acupuncture needling, the tissue integrity is disrupted and certain folds are formed in the direction of the needle tract. Connective tissue in the vicinity of the needle tract gets compressed and displaced, together with the 5-HT-immunoreactive MCs seen there. Some of those 5-HT-immunopositive MCs showed signs of degranulation with numerous discharged granules, some of them found at a considerable distance form the cell. Furthermore, 5-HT-immunopositive MCs are unevenly distributed in soft tissues of ST36 acupoint. Larger numbers of 5-HT-containing MCs were visualized in subcutis and dermis, compared to the observed in striated muscles. Placing the acupuncture needle into the rat skin caused a formation of an apparent needle tract, tissue displacement and degranulation of 5-HT-immunopositive MCs. The demonstrated serotonin release by means of MC degranulation might be involved in the local tissue response to acupuncture.

  11. Serotonin: a never-ending story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivier, Berend

    2015-04-15

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is an evolutionary ancient molecule that has remarkable modulatory effects in almost all central nervous system integrative functions, such as mood, anxiety, stress, aggression, feeding, cognition and sexual behavior. After giving a short outline of the serotonergic system (anatomy, receptors, transporter) the author's contributions over the last 40 years in the role of serotonin in depression, aggression, anxiety, stress and sexual behavior is outlined. Each area delineates the work performed on animal model development, drug discovery and development. Most of the research work described has started from an industrial perspective, aimed at developing animals models for psychiatric diseases and leading to putative new innovative psychotropic drugs, like in the cases of the SSRI fluvoxamine, the serenic eltoprazine and the anxiolytic flesinoxan. Later this research work mainly focused on developing translational animal models for psychiatric diseases and implicating them in the search for mechanisms involved in normal and diseased brains and finding new concepts for appropriate drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Alcohol Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an alcoholic beverage — such as chemicals, grains or preservatives. Combining alcohol with certain medications also can cause reactions. In rare instances, an unpleasant reaction to alcohol can be a sign of a serious underlying health problem that requires diagnosis and treatment. Symptoms Signs ...

  13. Alcohol misuse

    OpenAIRE

    Coulton, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Alcohol use is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity internationally, and is ranked by the WHO as one of the top 5 risk factors for disease burden. Without treatment, approximately 16% of hazardous or harmful alcohol users will progress to more dependent patterns of alcohol consumption.

  14. Tryptophan Hydroxylase 2 Gene and Alcohol Use among College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacek, Paul; Conner, Tamlin S.; Tennen, Howard; Kranzler, Henry R.; Covault, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    Objective Genes that regulate serotonin activity are regarded as promising predictors of heavy alcohol use. Tryptophan Hydroxylase (TPH2) plays an important role in serotonergic neurotransmission by serving as the rate-limiting enzyme for serotonin biosynthesis in the midbrain and serotonergic neurons. Despite the link between TPH2 and serotonergic function, TPH2’s role in the pathogenesis of alcohol use disorders remains unclear. The goal of this study was to examine whether variation in the TPH2 gene is associated with risky alcohol consumption. Specifically, this study examined whether the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism predicted alcohol consumption among college students. Methods In two successive years, 351 undergraduates were asked to record their alcohol use each day for 30 days using an internet-based electronic diary. Participants’ DNA was collected and polymerase chain reaction genotyping was performed. Results Alcohol consumption was not associated with the TPH2 G-703T polymorphism alone, or the interaction of TPH2 with two other candidate polymorphisms (TPH1 C218A, and the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR) or negative life events. Conclusions This study supports recent null findings relating TPH2 to drinking outcomes. It also extends these findings by showing null interactions with the TPH1 C218A polymorphism, the SLC6A4 tri-allelic 5-HTTLPR polymorphism, and environmental stressors in predicting sub-clinical alcohol use among Caucasian American young adults. PMID:18782386

  15. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  16. Responses of Withdrawal Interneurons to Serotonin Applications in Naïve and Learned Snails Are Different

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana K. Bogodvid

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term changes in membrane potential after associative training were described previously in identified premotor interneurons for withdrawal of the terrestrial snail Helix. Serotonin was shown to be a major transmitter involved in triggering the long-term changes in mollusks. In the present study we compared the changes in electrophysiological characteristics of identifiable premotor interneurons for withdrawal in response to bath applications of serotonin (5-HT or serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP in preparations from naïve, neurotoxin-injected or associatively trained snails. It was found that 5-HT or 5-HTP applications caused a significant decrease of membrane potential in premotor interneurons of naïve snails, associatively trained snails and snails with impaired serotonergic system by injection of a selective neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT 1 week before the experiments. Applications of 5-HT or 5-HTP did not cause significant changes in the action potential (AP threshold potential of these neurons in naïve snails. Conversely, applications of 5-HT or 5-HTP to the premotor interneurons of previously trained or 5,7-DHT-injected snails caused a significant increase in the firing threshold potential in spite of a depolarizing shift of the resting membrane potential. Results demonstrate that responsiveness of premotor interneurons to extracellularly applied 5-HT or 5-HTP changes for days after the associative training or serotonin depletion. Similarity of the effects in trained and 5,7-DHT-injected animals may be due to massive release of serotonin elicited by 5,7-DHT injection. Our results suggest that serotonin release due to aversive conditionining or elicited by the neurotoxin administration triggers similar changes in resting membrane potential and AP threshold in response to bath applications of 5-HT or its precursor 5-HTP.

  17. Peripheral injected cholecystokinin-8S modulates the concentration of serotonin in nerve fibers of the rat brainstem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engster, Kim-Marie; Frommelt, Lisa; Hofmann, Tobias; Nolte, Sandra; Fischer, Felix; Rose, Matthias; Stengel, Andreas; Kobelt, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Serotonin and cholecystokinin (CCK) play a role in the short-term inhibition of food intake. It is known that peripheral injection of CCK increases c-Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR) in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) in rats, and injection of the serotonin antagonist ondansetron decreases the number of c-Fos-IR cells in the NTS. This supports the idea of serotonin contributing to the effects of CCK. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether peripherally injected CCK-8S modulates the concentration of serotonin in brain feeding-regulatory nuclei. Ad libitum fed male Sprague-Dawley rats received 5.2 and 8.7 nmol/kg CCK-8S (n=3/group) or 0.15M NaCl (n=3-5/group) injected intraperitoneally (ip). The number of c-Fos-IR neurons, and the fluorescence intensity of serotonin in nerve fibers were assessed in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), arcuate nucleus (ARC), NTS and dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). CCK-8S increased the number of c-Fos-ir neurons in the NTS (mean±SEM: 72±4, and 112±5 neurons/section, respectively) compared to vehicle-treated rats (7±2 neurons/section, Pserotonin-immunoreactivity 90 min after injection of CCK-8S (46±2 and 49±8 pixel/section, respectively) compared to vehicle (81±8 pixel/section, Pserotonin-immunoreactivity were observed in the PVN and ARC. Our results suggest that serotonin is involved in the mediation of CCK-8's effects in the brainstem. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changes in EEG indices and serotonin concentrations in depression and anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Kichuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electroencephalogram (EEG is an important tool to study brain function. EEG can evaluate the current functional state of the brain with high temporal resolution and identify metabolic and ion disorders that cannot be detected by magnetic resonance imaging.Objective: to analyze the relationship between some neurophysiological and biochemical parameters with a Neuro-KM hardware-software complex for the topographic mapping of brain electrical activity.Patients and methods. 75 patients with depression, 101 with anxiety disorders (AD, and 86 control individuals were examined. EEG spectrum and coherence changes were estimated in the depression and AD groups versus the control group. Correlation analysis of EEG indices and blood serotonin concentrations was carried out.Results and discussion. The patients with depression and those with AD as compared to the controls were observed to have similar EEG spectral changes in the beta band. Coherence analysis in the beta-band showed that both disease groups versus the control group had oppositely directed changes: a reduction in intra- and interhemispheric coherence for depression and its increase for AD (p < 0.001. That in the theta and alpha bands revealed that both disease groups had unidirectional interhemispheric coherence changes: a decrease in integration in the alpha band and its increase in the theta and delta bands in the depression and AD groups (p < 0.05 and multidirectional changes in intrahemispheric coherence: its reduction in the depression group and an increase in the AD group (p < 0.05. Correlation analysis of EEG parameters and platelet serotonin concentrations showed opposite correlations of serotonin concentrations and EEG percentage power in the theta and beta bands. When there were higher serotonin concentrations in the patients with depression, EEG demonstrated a preponderance of a synchronization pattern; when these were in the patients with AD, there was a predominance

  19. Alcohols toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wimer, W.W.; Russell, J.A.; Kaplan, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive reference volume which summarizes literature reports of the known consequences of human and animal contact with alcohols and alcohol-derived substances is presented. Following a discussion of alcohol nomenclature and a brief history of alcohols, the authors have provided detailed chapters on the toxicology of methanol, ethanol, normal and isopropanol, and the butanols. Properties of these alcohols are compared; industrial hygiene and exposure limits are discussed. Additional sections are included covering processing and production technology and exhaust emissions studies. Of particular interest are the section containing abstracts and synopses of principal works and the extensive bibliography of studies dating from the 1800s. 331 references, 26 figures, 56 tables

  20. Serotonin 2c receptors in pro-opiomelanocortin neurons regulate energy and glucose homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy and glucose homeostasis are regulated by central serotonin 2C receptors. These receptors are attractive pharmacological targets for the treatment of obesity; however, the identity of the serotonin 2C receptor-expressing neurons that mediate the effects of serotonin and serotonin 2C receptor a...

  1. Serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration during cardiothoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Christina J; Wang, Dorothy; Sgambelluri, Anna; Kramer, Robert S; Gagnon, David J

    2015-04-01

    Despite its favorable safety profile, there have been reports of methylene blue-induced encephalopathy and serotonin syndrome in patients undergoing parathyroidectomy. We report a case of serotonin syndrome following methylene blue administration in a cardiothoracic surgery patient. A 59-year-old woman taking preoperative venlafaxine and trazodone was given a single dose of 2 mg/kg methylene blue (167 mg) during a planned coronary artery bypass and mitral valve repair. Postoperatively, she was febrile to 38.7°C and developed full-body tremors, rhythmic twitching of the perioral muscles, slow conjugate roving eye movements, and spontaneous movements of the upper extremities. Electroencephalography revealed generalized diffuse slowing consistent with toxic encephalopathy, and a computed tomography scan showed no acute process. The patient's symptoms were most consistent with a methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome. Her motor symptoms resolved within 48 hours and she was eventually discharged home. Only 2 cases of methylene blue-induced serotonin syndrome during cardiothoracic surgery have been described in the literature, with this report representing the third case. Methylene blue and its metabolite, azure B, are potent, reversible inhibitors of monoamine oxidase A which is responsible for serotonin metabolism. Concomitant administration of methylene blue with serotonin-modulating agents may precipitate serotonin syndrome. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Serotonin and the regulation of mammalian energy balance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H Donovan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of energy balance requires regulation of the amount and timing of food intake. Decades of experiments utilizing pharmacological and later genetic manipulations have demonstrated the importance of serotonin signaling in this regulation. Much progress has been made in recent years in understanding how central nervous system serotonin systems acting through a diverse array of serotonin receptors impact feeding behavior and metabolism. Particular attention has been paid to mechanisms through which serotonin impacts energy balance pathways within the hypothalamus. How upstream factors relevant to energy balance regulate the release of hypothalamic serotonin is less clear, but work addressing this issue is underway. Generally, investigation into the central serotonergic regulation of energy balance has had a predominantly hypothalamocentric focus, yet nonhypothalamic structures that have been implicated in energy balance regulation also receive serotonergic innervation and express multiple subtypes of serotonin receptors. Moreover, there is a growing appreciation of the diverse mechanisms through which peripheral serotonin impacts energy balance regulation. Clearly, the serotonergic regulation of energy balance is a field characterized by both rapid advances and by an extensive and diverse set of central and peripheral mechanisms yet to be delineated.

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batić-Mujanović Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of the known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, beneficial or harmful, are associated with the inhibitory action of the serotonin reuptake transporter. This mechanism is present not only in neurons, but also in other cells such as platelets. Serotoninergic mechanism seems to have an important role in hemostasis, which has long been underestimated. Abnormal activation may lead to a prothrombotic state in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. On one hand there may be an increased risk of bleeding, and on the other hand reduction in thrombotic risk may be possible. Serotonin is critical to maintain a platelet haemostatic function, such as platelet aggregation. Evidences from the studies support the hypothesis that antidepressants with a relevant blockade of action of serotonin reuptake mechanism may increase the risk of bleeding, which can occur anywhere in the body. Epidemiological evidences are, however, the most robust for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is estimated that this bleeding can occur in 1 in 100 to 1 in 1.000 patient-years of exposure to the high-affinity selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, with very old patients at the highest risk. The increased risk may be of particular relevance when selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are taken simultaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low dose of aspirin or warfarin.

  4. Serotonin Mechanisms in Heart Valve Disease I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Bo; Xu, Jie; Connolly, Jeanne; Savani, Rashmin C.; Narula, Navneet; Liang, Bruce; Levy, Robert J.

    2002-01-01

    Clinical disorders associated with increased serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] levels, such as carcinoid syndrome, and the use of serotonin agonists, such as fenfluoramine have been associated with a valvulopathy characterized by hyperplastic valvular and endocardial lesions with increased extracellular matrix. Furthermore, 5-HT has been demonstrated to up-regulate transforming growth factor (TGF)-β in mesangial cells via G-protein signal transduction. We investigated the hypothesis that increased exposure of heart valve interstitial cells to 5-HT may result in increased TGF-β1 expression and activity because of serotonin receptor-mediated signal transduction with activation of Gαq, and subsequently up-regulation of phospholipase C. Thus, in the present study we performed a clinical-pathological investigation of retrieved carcinoid and normal valve cusps using immunohistochemical techniques to detect the presence of TGF-β1 and other proteins associated with TGF-β expression, including TGF-β receptors I and II, latent TGF-β-associated peptide (LAP), and α-smooth muscle actin. Carcinoid valve cusps demonstrated the unusual finding of widespread smooth muscle actin involving the interstitial cells in the periphery of carcinoid nodules; these same cells were also positive for LAP. Normal valve cusps were only focally positive for smooth muscle actin and LAP. In sheep aortic valve interstitial cell cultures 5-HT induced TGF-β1 mRNA production and increased TGF-β1 activity. 5-HT also increased collagen biosynthesis at the dosages studied. Furthermore, TGF-β1 added to SAVIC cultures increased the production of sulfated glycan and hyaluronic acid. In addition, overexpression of Gαq using an adenoviral expression vector for a constitutively active Gαq mutant (Q209L-Gαq) resulted in increased phospholipase C activity as well as up-regulation of TGF-β expression and activity. These results strongly support the view that G-protein-related signal

  5. Low levels of serum serotonin and amino acids identified in migraine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Caixia; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Juntuo; Liang, Hui; Wang, Yayun; Sun, Yinping; Ma, Bin; Yin, Yuxin

    2018-02-05

    Migraine is a highly disabling primary headache associated with a high socioeconomic burden and a generally high prevalence. The clinical management of migraine remains a challenge. This study was undertaken to identify potential serum biomarkers of migraine. Using Liquid Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS), the metabolomic profile of migraine was compared with healthy individuals. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (orthoPLS-DA) showed the metabolomic profile of migraine is distinguishable from controls. Volcano plot analysis identified 10 serum metabolites significantly decreased during migraine. One of these was serotonin, and the other 9 were amino acids. Pathway analysis and enrichment analysis showed tryptophan metabolism (serotonin metabolism), arginine and proline metabolism, and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis are the three most prominently altered pathways in migraine. ROC curve analysis indicated Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine are potential sensitive and specific biomarkers for migraine. Our results show Glycyl-l-proline, N-Methyl-dl-Alanine and l-Methionine may be as specific or more specific for migraine than serotonin which is the traditional biomarker of migraine. We propose that therapeutic manipulation of these metabolites or metabolic pathways may be helpful in the prevention and treatment of migraine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Platelet serotonin transporter function and heart rate variability in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eun-Ho; Lee, In-Soo; Park, Joo-Eon; Kim, Kyung-Jeong; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2010-04-01

    Many studies showed abnormal serotonin transporter (5-HTT) function and heart rate variability (HRV) in panic disorder patients. The present study investigated the relationship between HRV power spectral analysis findings and platelet serotonin uptake in panic disorder patients. Short-term HRV over 5 min and platelet serotonin transporter uptake parameters (V(max) and K(m)) were measured both in 45 patients with panic disorder and in 30 age-matched normal healthy control subjects. Low frequency power (LF) normalized unit (nu) and LF/high frequency power (HF) were significantly higher, whereas HF and HF nu were lower in the patient group than in the control group. V(max) and K(m) were all significantly lower (i.e., reflects decreased 5-HTT function) in patients with panic disorder than in normal controls. In the patient group, K(m) was negatively correlated with LF/HF and LF nu whereas no such correlations between them were found in the control group. By multivariate analysis based on multiple hierarchical linear regression, a low K(m) independently predicted an increased LF nu even after controlling for age, sex, and body mass index in the patient group. These results suggest that impaired 5-HTT function is closely related to dysregulation of autonomic nervous system in panic disorder.

  7. TrpC5 Mediates Acute Leptin and Serotonin Effects via Pomc Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying acute leptin and serotonin 2C receptor-induced hypophagia remain unclear. Here, we show that neuronal and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc-specific loss of transient receptor potential cation 5 (TrpC5 subunits is sufficient to decrease energy expenditure and increase food intake resulting in elevated body weight. Deficiency of Trpc5 subunits in Pomc neurons is also sufficient to block the anorexigenic effects of leptin and serotonin 2C receptor (Ht2Cr agonists. The loss of acute anorexigenic effects of these receptors is concomitant with a blunted electrophysiological response to both leptin and Ht2Cr agonists in arcuate Pomc neurons. We also demonstrate that the Ht2Cr agonist lorcaserin-induced improvements in glucose and insulin tolerance are blocked by TrpC5 deficiency in Pomc neurons. Together, our results link TrpC5 subunits in the brain with leptin- and serotonin 2C receptor-dependent changes in neuronal activity, as well as energy balance, feeding behavior, and glucose metabolism.

  8. Alcohol and pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinking alcohol during pregnancy; Fetal alcohol syndrome - pregnancy; FAS - fetal alcohol syndrome ... When a pregnant woman drinks alcohol, the alcohol travels through her blood and into the baby's blood, tissues, and organs. Alcohol breaks down much more slowly in ...

  9. Older Adults and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol ...

  10. Serotonin and dopamine as neurotransmitters in mytilus: block of serotonin receptors by an organic mercurial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twarog, B M; Muneoka, Y; Ledgere, M

    1977-05-01

    The effects of mersalyl, bromo-LSD (BOL) and methysergide (UML) on the relaxation of catch by certain indole and catechol derivatives were studied in the anterior byssus retractor muscle of Mytilus. Mersalyl antagonized relaxation in response to serotonin whereas BOL and UML were less effective. Two other indole derivatives, ergotamine and gramine, were also blocked by mersalyl; BOL and UML antagonized relaxation in response to dopamine more effectively than did mersalyl. Two other catechols, epinephrine and norepinephrine, were also blocked more effectively by BOL and UML than by mersaly. Relaxation in response to neural stimulation was blocked more effectively by mersalyl than by BOL. The blocking action of mersalyl on neural relaxation reversed very poorly after washing the drug, but complete reversal was induced by brief exposure to dithiothreitol. It is concluded that the evidence supports an hypothesis that the transmitter released by relaxing nerves is serotonin. It is suggested that mersalyl blocks serotonin by combining with a sulfhydryl group at or near the site on the receptor to which the indole nitrogen attaches.

  11. Ca++ dependent bistability induced by serotonin in spinal motoneurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J.; Kiehn, O.

    1985-01-01

    The plateau potential, responsible for the bistable state of spinal motoneurons, recently described in the decerebrate cat, was suggested to depend on serotonin (Hounsgaard et al. 1984). In an in vitro preparation of the spinal cord of the turtle we now show that serotonin, applied directly...... to the bath, transforms the intrinsic response properties of motoneurons, uncovering a plateau potential and voltage sensitive bistability. The changes induced by serotonin were blocked by Mn++, while the plateau potential and the bistability remained after application of tetrodotoxin. We conclude...

  12. Serotonin syndrome:case report and current concepts.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fennell, J

    2005-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI\\'s) are increasingly being used as the first line therapeutic agent for the depression. It is therefore not unusual to see a case of overdose with these agents. More commonly an adverse drug reaction may be seen among the older patients who are particularly vulnerable to the serotonin syndrome due to multiple co-morbidity and polypharmacy. The clinical picture of serotonin syndrome (SS) is non-specific and there is no confirmatory test. SS may go unrecognized because it is often mistaken for a viral illness, anxiety, neurological disorder or worsening psychiatric condition.

  13. Possible role of serotonin in regulating lipid peroxidation and electrolytes in argon laser irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, M.F.; Abu-Zied, N.M.; Ibrahem, N.K.

    2007-01-01

    Different properties of low-level argon laser irradiation have been investigated. One of these is its effect on blood. In the present study, effects of low-power laser irradiation on lipid peroxidation and electrolytes were investigated. Forty-eight male albino Wister rats were divided into four groups as follows: control group (Gi), exposed to 0.515 J cm -2 abdominal argon laser irradiation (G2), intraperitoneally serotonin injection with 300 μg/ kg body mass (G3) and intraperitoneally injection with serotonin 300 μg/kg body mass and 0.515 J cm 2 abdominally exposure (G4). Data revealed an increase in TEARS of serum and liver due to laser irradiation, while irradiation induced significant decreases in Ca ++ , Na + , K + , and Na + / K + ratio in serum, Serotonin administration before irradiation attenuated the laser harmful effects. Conclusion: It is suggested that serotonin might be used to increase resistance of blood and liver to laser irradiation. Free radicals play an important role in the biological processes, some of which are necessary for life, such as the intracellular killing of bacteria by granulocytes neutrophil. Free radicals have also been implicated in certain cell signaling processes. The two most important oxygen-centered free radicals are superoxide and hydroxyl radical. They are derived from molecular oxygen under reducing conditions (Raha et al, 2000). However, because of their reactivity, these free radicals can participate in unwanted side reactions resulting in cell damage. Many forms of cancer are thought to be the result of reactions between free radicals and DNA, resulting in mutations that can adversely affect the cell cycle and potentially lead to malignancy (Halliwell et al, 1986). Some of the symptoms of aging such as atherosclerosis are also attributed to free-radical induced oxidation of many of the biochemical making up the body (Penta et al., 2001)

  14. Association between serotonin transporter genotype and extraversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Farah, Martha J; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Breland, Jessica; Brodkin, Edward S

    2007-12-01

    Despite the long-standing recognition that extraversion is partially heritable, few specific genes have been found to be associated significantly with this personality trait. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between a functional genetic polymorphism of the serotonin transporter promoter region (5-HTTLPR) and extraversion. Caucasian participants (N=183) were genotyped for the 5-HTTLPR; extraversion scores for participants homozygous for the short allele (s/s) were compared with those participants carrying at least one long allele (s/l and l/l). An s/s genotype at 5-HTTLPR was significantly associated with self ratings of reduced extraversion (P=0.012); presence versus absence of the long allele explained 3.4% of the variance in extraversion. These findings provide support for the effect of the 5-HTTLPR, and for the serotonergic system more broadly, on behaviors related to extraversion.

  15. Deciding to quit drinking alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcoholism. Alcohol and health. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health . Accessed March 18, 2016. National Institute on Alcohol ... Alcoholism. Alcohol use disorder. www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/overview-alcohol-consumption/alcohol-use-disorders . Accessed March ...

  16. The serotonin transporter: Examination of the changes in transporter affinity induced by ligand binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humphreys, C.J.

    1989-01-01

    The plasmalemmal serotonin transporter uses transmembrane gradients of Na + , Cl - and K + to accumulate serotonin within blood platelets. Transport is competitively inhibited by the antidepressant imipramine. Like serotonin transport, imipramine binding requires Na + . Unlike serotonin, however, imipramine does not appear to be transported. To gain insight into the mechanism of serotonin transport the author have analyzed the influences of Na + and Cl - , the two ions cotransported with serotonin, on both serotonin transport and the interaction of imipramine and other antidepressant drugs with the plasmalemmal serotonin transporter of human platelets. Additionally, the author have synthesized, purified and characterized the binding of 2-iodoimipramine to the serotonin transporter. Finally, the author have conducted a preliminary study of the inhibition of serotonin transport and imipramine binding produced by dicyclohexylcarbodiimide. My results reveal many instances of positive heterotropic cooperativity in ligand binding to the serotonin transporter. Na + binding enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine and several other antidepressant drugs, and also increases the affinity for Cl - . Cl - enhances the transporters affinity for imipramine, as well as for Na + . At concentrations in the range of its K M for transport serotonin is a competitive inhibitor of imipramine binding. At much higher concentrations, however, serotonin also inhibits imipramines dissociation rate constant. This latter effect which is Na + -independent and species specific, is apparently produced by serotonin binding at a second, low affinity site on, or near, the transporter complex. Iodoimipramine competitively inhibit both [ 3 H]imipramine binding and [ 3 H]serotonin transport

  17. Agonist-directed signaling of serotonin 5-HT2C receptors: differences between serotonin and lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backstrom, J R; Chang, M S; Chu, H; Niswender, C M; Sanders-Bush, E

    1999-08-01

    For more than 40 years the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) has been known to modify serotonin neurotransmission. With the advent of molecular and cellular techniques, we are beginning to understand the complexity of LSD's actions at the serotonin 5-HT2 family of receptors. Here, we discuss evidence that signaling of LSD at 5-HT2C receptors differs from the endogenous agonist serotonin. In addition, RNA editing of the 5-HT2C receptor dramatically alters the ability of LSD to stimulate phosphatidylinositol signaling. These findings provide a unique opportunity to understand the mechanism(s) of partial agonism.

  18. Modulation of Tryptophan and Serotonin Metabolism as a Biochemical Basis of the Behavioral Effects of Use and Withdrawal of Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids and Other Image- and Performance-Enhancing Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Abdulla A-B

    2018-01-01

    Modulation of tryptophan (Trp) metabolism may underpin the behavioral effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) and associated image and performance enhancers. Euphoria, arousal, and decreased anxiety observed with moderate use and exercise may involve enhanced cerebral serotonin synthesis and function by increased release of albumin-bound Trp and estrogen-mediated liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) inhibition and enhancement of serotonin function. Aggression, anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and psychosis, observed on withdrawal of AAS or with use of large doses, can be caused by decreased serotonin synthesis due to TDO induction on withdrawal, excess Trp inhibiting the 2 enzymes of serotonin synthesis, and increased cerebral levels of neuroactive kynurenines. Exercise and excessive protein and branched-chain amino acid intakes may aggravate the effects of large AAS dosage. The hypothesis is testable in humans and experimental animals by measuring parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related metabolic processes. PMID:29487480

  19. Modulation of Tryptophan and Serotonin Metabolism as a Biochemical Basis of the Behavioral Effects of Use and Withdrawal of Androgenic-Anabolic Steroids and Other Image- and Performance-Enhancing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla A-B Badawy

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modulation of tryptophan (Trp metabolism may underpin the behavioral effects of androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS and associated image and performance enhancers. Euphoria, arousal, and decreased anxiety observed with moderate use and exercise may involve enhanced cerebral serotonin synthesis and function by increased release of albumin-bound Trp and estrogen-mediated liver Trp 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO inhibition and enhancement of serotonin function. Aggression, anxiety, depression, personality disorders, and psychosis, observed on withdrawal of AAS or with use of large doses, can be caused by decreased serotonin synthesis due to TDO induction on withdrawal, excess Trp inhibiting the 2 enzymes of serotonin synthesis, and increased cerebral levels of neuroactive kynurenines. Exercise and excessive protein and branched-chain amino acid intakes may aggravate the effects of large AAS dosage. The hypothesis is testable in humans and experimental animals by measuring parameters of Trp metabolism and disposition and related metabolic processes.

  20. Serotonin-Sensitive Adenylate Cyclase in Neural Tissue and Its Similarity to the Serotonin Receptor: A Possible Site of Action of Lysergic Acid Diethylamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathanson, James A.; Greengard, Paul

    1974-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) that is activated specifically by low concentrations of serotonin has been identified in homogenates of the thoracic ganglia of an insect nervous system. The activation of this enzyme by serotonin was selectively inhibited by extremely low concentrations of D-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), 2-bromo-LSD, and cyproheptadine, agents which are known to block certain serotonin receptors in vivo. The inhibition was competitive with respect to serotonin, and the calculated inhibitory constant of LSD for this serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase was 5 nM. The data are consistent with a model in which the serotonin receptor of neural tissue is intimately associated with a serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase which mediates serotonergic neurotransmission. The results are also compatible with the possibility that some of the physiological effects of LSD may be mediated through interaction with serotonin-sensitive adenylate cyclase. PMID:4595572

  1. Neonatal serotonin reuptake inhibition reduces hypercaloric diet effects on fat mass and hypothalamic gene expression in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Lígia Cristina Monteiro; Barros, Manuella da Luz Duarte; Pinheiro, Isabeli Lins; Santana, Ricardo Vinicius de Carvalho; de Matos, Rhowena Jane Barbosa; Leandro, Carol Góis; de Souza, Sandra Lopes; de Castro, Raul Manhães

    2015-11-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is involved in nervous system ontogenesis, and is important for neurotransmission and behavior modulation after the developmental stage. Alterations in 5-HT levels during the early period of life may signal to feeding behavior and hypothalamic genic expression changes in adulthood. Investigate the effects of hypercaloric diet in adult rats submitted to neonatal serotonin reuptake inhibition on food intake, fat pad mass, plasmatic triglycerides/cholesterol and gene expression of hypothalamic peptides (POMC, NPY) and serotonin receptors (5-HT1B, 5-HT2C). In each litter, 8 pups were divided into two groups: control (C) and fluoxetine (F). From the 1(st) to the 21(st) postnatal day, C pups received sterile saline while F pups received fluoxetine (10mg/kg). From 180 to 215 days, a group of rats from C and F groups were fed hypercaloric diet (CH and FH, 421.4Kcal/100 g) while the rest of animals from C and F groups fed chow diet (CC and FC). The use of hypercaloric diet was associated with lower accumulation of white adipose tissue in adult rats subjected to neonatal serotonin reuptake inhibition. Adult rats of group FC showed decreased 5-HT2C and neuropeptide Y mRNA expression compared with control chow diet group (CC). After chronic use of a hypercaloric diet, the expression of 5-HT2C was higher in the FH group than the FC group and neuropeptide Y expression decreased in FH related to FC. These findings suggest that neonatal serotonin reuptake inhibition is associated with better adaptation to hypercaloric diet in adult rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Craving Alcohol.

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2014-01-01

    Individuals involved in the treatment of alcoholism for decades have argued that men and women crave alcohol essentially because they enjoy the effect it offers. This effect is so mysterious that, while adults will confess that these cravings are potential dangerous to their health and well being, during consumption their reasoning and belief of these facts will alternate between the true and the false. In essence these individuals alcohol cravings life actually seems to them the only normal ...

  3. The Serotonin Transporter Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Ischemic Stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Janne Kærgård; Kraglund, Kristian Lundsgaard; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2018-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Serotonin is known as a neurotransmitter; however, it also plays an important role in platelet aggregation as it is released upon platelet activation. The serotonin transporter (SERT) is responsible for the uptake of serotonin into platelets. Functional polymorphisms in the SERT gene...... may influence platelet activity, as they result in different levels of transporters and thereby different levels of serotonin in platelets. SERT gene polymorphisms have thus been associated with the risk of myocardial infarction. A similar association may exist between SERT gene polymorphisms...... and stroke. However, to our knowledge, this potential association has not previously been studied. We therefore aimed to investigate the association between polymorphisms in the SERT gene and the risk of ischemic stroke/transitory ischemic attack (TIA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a case...

  4. The serotonin transporter and early life stress : Translational perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houwing, Danielle J; Buwalda, Bauke; Zee, van der Eddy; de Boer, Sietse F; Olivier, Jocelien D A

    2017-01-01

    The interaction between the serotonin transporter (SERT) linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and adverse early life stressing (ELS) events is associated with enhanced stress susceptibility and risk to develop mental disorders like major depression, anxiety, and aggressiveness. In particular, human

  5. [Serotonin syndrome and pain medication : What is relevant for practice?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, M; Wirz, S

    2015-04-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a dangerous and rare complication of a pharmacotherapy and can lead to death. Caused by unwanted interactions of serotonergic drugs, it is characterised by a neuroexcitatory triad of mental changes, neuromuscular hyperactivity and autonomic instability. Opioids with serotonergic effects include the phenylpiperidine series opioids fentanyl, methadone, meperidine and tramadol and the morphine analogues oxycodone and codeine. In combination with certain serotonergic drugs, e.g. antidepressants, they can provoke serotonin syndrome. In patients with such combinations, special attention should be paid to clinical signs of serotonergic hyperactivity. Higher risk combinations (e.g. monoamine oxidase inhibitors with tramadol) must be avoided. Treatment with serotonergic agents must be stopped in moderate or severe serotonin syndrome. Patients with a severe serotonin syndrome require symptomatic intensive care and specifically a pharmacological antagonism with cyproheptadine or chlorpromazine.

  6. Serotonin blockade delays learning performance in a cooperative fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta C; Paula, José R; Bshary, Redouan

    2016-09-01

    Animals use learning and memorizing to gather information that will help them to make ecologically relevant decisions. Neuro-modulatory adjustments enable them to make associations between stimuli and appropriate behavior. A key candidate for the modulation of cooperative behavior is serotonin. Previous research has shown that modulation of the serotonergic system spontaneously affects the behavior of the cleaner wrasse Labroides dimidiatus during interactions with so-called 'client' reef fish. Here, we asked whether shifts in serotonin function affect the cleaners' associative learning abilities when faced with the task to distinguish two artificial clients that differ in their value as a food source. We found that the administration of serotonin 1A receptor antagonist significantly slowed learning speed in comparison with saline treated fish. As reduced serotonergic signaling typically enhances fear, we discuss the possibility that serotonin may affect how cleaners appraise, acquire information and respond to client-derived stimuli via manipulation of the perception of danger.

  7. Moderation of antidepressant response by the serotonin transporter gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uher, Rudolf; Smith, Rebecca

    2009-01-01

    Background: There have been conflicting reports on whether the length polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) moderates the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). We hypothesised that the pharmacogenetic effect of 5-HTTLPR...... is modulated by gender, age and other variants in the serotonin transporter gene. Aims: To test the hypothesis that the 5-HTTLPR differently influences response to escitalopram (an SSRI) compared with nortriptyline (a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor). Method: The 5-HTTLPR and 13 additional markers across...... the serotonin transporter gene were genotyped in 795 adults with moderate-to-severe depression treated with escitalopram or nortriptyline in the Genome Based Therapeutic Drugs for Depression (GENDEP) project. Results: The 5-HTTLPR moderated the response to escitalopram, with long-allele carriers improving more...

  8. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitorprescribing before, during and after pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Charlton, Ra; Jordan, S; Pierini, A

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the prescribing patterns of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) before, during and after pregnancy in six European population-based databases. DESIGN: Descriptive drug utilisation study. SETTING: Six electronic healthcare databases in Denmark, the Netherlands...

  9. Cholinesterase catalyzed hydrolysis of O-acyl derivatives of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makhaeva, G.F.; Suvorov, N.N.; Ginodman, L.N.; Antonov, V.K.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Bioorganicheskoj Khimii)

    1977-01-01

    Hydrolysis of O acyl serotonin derivatives containing the residues of monocarbon dicarbon and amino acids under the effect of horse serum butyryl cholinesterase and bull erythrocytic acetylcholinesterase has been studied. It has been established, that acetylcholinesterase hydrolizes O acetylserotonin only; butyrylcholinesterase hydrolizes all the compounds investigated, except for 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine. The kinetic parameters of hydrolysis were determined. O acyl serotonin derivatives turned out good substrates of butylrylcholinesterase; serotonin and 5.5'-terephtaloildioxytriptamine are effective competitine inhibitors of the enzyme. Estimating of resistance of O acyl serotonin derivatines to blood cholinesterase effect under physiological conditions shows that the compounds investigated with the exception of 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine must be quickly hydrolyzed under butyrylcholinesterase action. 5,5'-terephthaloildioxytriptamine is suggested as a radioprotective preparation with the prolonged effect, which agrees with the biological test results

  10. Protracted effects of chronic stress on serotonin-dependent thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole A; Yamamoto, Bryan K

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to affect serotonin (5HT) neurotransmission in the brain and to alter body temperature. The body temperature is controlled in part, by the medial preoptic area (mPOA) of the hypothalamus. To investigate the effect of chronic stress on 5HT and how it affects body temperature regulation, we examined whether exposure to a chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) paradigm produces long-term alterations in thermoregulatory function of the mPOA through decreased 5HT neurotransmission. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 21 d of CUS. Four days after the last stress exposure, basal body temperature in the home cage and body temperature in a cold room maintained at 10 °C were recorded. The CUS rats had significantly higher subcutaneous basal body temperature at 13:00 h compared to unstressed (NoStress) rats. Whereas the NoStress rats were able to significantly elevate body temperature from basal levels at 30 and 60 min of exposure to the cold room, the CUS rats showed a hypothermic response to the cold. Treatment during CUS with metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, blocked stress-induced decrease in body temperature in response to the cold challenge. CUS also decreased 5HT transporter protein immunoreactivity in the mPOA and 5HT2A/C agonist injection into the mPOA after CUS exposure caused stressed rats to exhibit a sensitized hyperthermic response to cold. These results indicate that the CUS induced changes to the 5HTergic system alter mPOA function in thermoregulation. These findings help us to explain the mechanisms underlying chronic stress-induced disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome wherein long lasting thermoregulatory deficits are observed.

  11. Protracted effects of chronic stress on serotonin dependent thermoregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Reka; Northrop, Nicole A.; Yamamoto, Bryan K.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress is known to affect serotonin (5HT) neurotransmission in the brain and to alter body temperature. Body temperature is controlled in part, by the medial preoptic area of the hypothalamus (mPOA). To investigate the effect of chronic stress on 5HT and how it affects body temperature regulation, we examined whether exposure to a chronic unpredictable stress paradigm (CUS) produces long-term alterations in thermoregulatory function of the mPOA through decreased 5HT neurotransmission. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 21 days of CUS. Four days after last stress exposure, basal body temperature in the home cage and body temperature in a cold room maintained at 10°C were recorded. CUS rats had significantly higher subcutaneous basal body temperature at 13:00 h compared to unstressed (NoStress) rats. Whereas the NoStress rats were able to significantly elevate body temperature from basal levels at 30 and 60 min of exposure to the cold room, the CUS rats showed a hypothermic response to the cold. Treatment during CUS with metyrapone, a corticosterone synthesis inhibitor, blocked stress-induced decrease in body temperature in response to the cold challenge. CUS also decreased 5HT transporter protein immunoreactivity in the mPOA and 5HT2A/C agonist injection into the mPOA after CUS exposure caused stressed rats to exhibit a sensitized hyperthermic response to cold. These results indicate that CUS induced changes to the 5HTergic system alters mPOA function in thermoregulation. These findings help explain mechanisms underlying chronic stress induced disorders such as chronic fatigue syndrome wherein long lasting thermoregulatory deficits are observed. PMID:26414686

  12. In vivo imaging of cerebral serotonin transporter and serotonin(2A) receptor binding in 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") and hallucinogen users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Frøkjær, Vibe; Holst, Klaus K

    2011-01-01

    Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin.......Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin....

  13. Marcadores genéticos dopaminérgicos, serotoninérgicos y de la monoamino-oxidasa (MAO) relacionados con la adicción a los opiáceos, a la cocaína y al alcohol

    OpenAIRE

    Mateu Hernández, César Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: la genética está experimentando un avance espectacular y se postula como una herramienta importante para aportar nuevos descubrimientos en trastornos complejos como son las adicciones. En el presente trabajo se ha realizado un estudio de asociación genética de polimorfismos VNTR, un estudio familiar y un estudio mixto de asociación genético-familiar en una muestra de policonsumidores con adicción al alcohol, la cocaína y los opiáceos. Material y métodos: en una muestra de 302 po...

  14. Formalin pain increases the concentration of serotonin and its 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid metabolite in the CA1 region of hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Soleimannejad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the purpose of the study: The hippocampal formation is involved in nociception. Prenatal serotonin depletion results in a significant decrease in the concentration of nociceptive sensitivity during the second phase of behavioral response in the formalin test.  "nMethods: A microdialysis probe was inserted via a guide cannula into the right CA1 region of the hippocampus. Extracellular serotonin (5HT and its 5- hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5HIAA metabolite overflow were collected every 10 min during the formalin test and measured by HPLC with electrochemichal detector. "n "nResults: Compared to the sham group, formalin injection in the hind paw of the rat significantly increased 5HT after 10, 30, 40, and 50 min and increased 5HIAA after 10, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min collection time periods in hippocampal dialysate. (n=6 for each group at each sampling time. In the formalin treated rats serotonin and 5HIAA concentrations increased in the biphasic pattern in concert with the first and second phases of formalin pain. "nConclusion: The hippocampal formation might be involved in the processing of nociceptive information and serotonin-related mechanisms in the hippocampus may play a role in the biphasic behavioral responses to formalin noxious stimulation. "n   

  15. [Effect and Path Analysis of Laughter Therapy on Serotonin, Depression and Quality of Life in Middle-aged Women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Mi Youn; Hong, Hae Sook

    2015-04-01

    This study was done to examine how laughter therapy impacts serotonin levels, QOL and depression in middle-aged women and to perform a path analysis for verification of the effects. A quasi-experimental study employing a nonequivalent control group and pre-post design was conducted. Participants were 64 middle-aged women (control=14 and experimental=50 in 3 groups according to level of depression). The intervention was conducted five times a week for a period of 2 weeks and the data analysis was conducted using repeated measures ANOVA, ANCOVA and LISREL. Results showed that pre serotonin and QOL in women with severe depression were the lowest. Serotonin in the experimental groups increased after the 10th intervention (p=.006) and the rise was the highest in the group with severe depression (p=.001). Depression in all groups decreased after the 5th intervention (p=.022) and the biggest decline was observed in group with severe depression (p=.007). QOL of the moderate and severe groups increased after the 10th intervention (p=.049), and the increase rate was highest in group with severe depression (pPath analysis revealed that laughter therapy did not directly affect depression, but its effect was indirectly meditated through serotonin variation (pmiddle-aged women by lessening depression and providing important grounds for depression control.

  16. Tryptophan availability modulates serotonin release from rat hypothalamic slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaechter, Judith D.; Wurtman, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between the tryptophan availability and serononin release from rat hypothalamus was investigated using a new in vitro technique for estimating rates at which endogenous serotonin is released spontaneously or upon electrical depolarization from hypothalamic slices superfused with a solution containing various amounts of tryptophan. It was found that the spontaneous, as well as electrically induced, release of serotonin from the brain slices exhibited a dose-dependent relationship with the tryptophan concentration of the superfusion medium.

  17. SEP-225289 serotonin and dopamine transporter occupancy: a PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLorenzo, Christine; Lichenstein, Sarah; Schaefer, Karen; Dunn, Judith; Marshall, Randall; Organisak, Lisa; Kharidia, Jahnavi; Robertson, Brigitte; Mann, J John; Parsey, Ramin V

    2011-07-01

    SEP-225289 is a novel compound that, based on in vitro potencies for transporter function, potentially inhibits reuptake at dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters. An open-label PET study was conducted during the development of SEP-225289 to investigate its dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancy. Different single doses of SEP-225289 were administered to healthy volunteers in 3 cohorts: 8 mg (n = 7), 12 mg (n = 5), and 16 mg (n = 7). PET was performed before and approximately 24 h after oral administration of SEP-225289, to assess occupancy at trough levels. Dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were estimated from PET using (11)C-N-(3-iodoprop-2E-enyl)-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-methylphenyl)nortropane ((11)C-PE2I) and (11)C-N,N-dimethyl-2-(2-amino-4-cyanophenylthio)benzylamine ((11)C-DASB), respectively. Plasma concentration of SEP-225289 was assessed before ligand injection, and subjects were monitored for adverse events. Average dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies increased with increasing doses of SEP-225289. Mean dopamine and serotonin transporter occupancies were 33% ± 11% and 2% ± 13%, respectively, for 8 mg; 44% ± 4% and 9% ± 10%, respectively, for 12 mg; and 49% ± 7% and 14% ± 15%, respectively, for 16 mg. On the basis of the relationship between occupancy and plasma concentration, dopamine transporter IC(50) (the plasma concentration of drug at 50% occupancy) was determined (4.5 ng/mL) and maximum dopamine transporter occupancy was extrapolated (85%); however, low serotonin transporter occupancy prevented similar serotonin transporter calculations. No serious adverse events were reported. At the doses evaluated, occupancy of the dopamine transporter was significantly higher than that of the serotonin transporter, despite similar in vitro potencies, confirming that, in addition to in vitro assays, PET occupancy studies can be instrumental to the drug development process by informing early decisions about

  18. INFLUENCE OF A SEROTONIN-RICH AND DOPAMINE-RICH DIET ON PLATELET SEROTONIN CONTENT AND URINARY-EXCRETION OF BIOGENIC-AMINES AND THEIR METABOLITES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KEMA, IP; SCHELLINGS, AMJ; MEIBORG, G; HOPPENBROUWERS, CJM; MUSKIET, FAJ

    Using high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography, we reevaluated the 24-h influence of a serotonin- and dopamine-rich diet on platelet serotonin and serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), and major catecholamine metabolites in the urine of 15 healthy adults. Although

  19. Multiple cellular responses to serotonin contribute to epithelial homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav P Pai

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Epithelial homeostasis incorporates the paradoxical concept of internal change (epithelial turnover enabling the maintenance of anatomical status quo. Epithelial cell differentiation and cell loss (cell shedding and apoptosis form important components of epithelial turnover. Although the mechanisms of cell loss are being uncovered the crucial triggers that modulate epithelial turnover through regulation of cell loss remain undetermined. Serotonin is emerging as a common autocrine-paracine regulator in epithelia of multiple organs, including the breast. Here we address whether serotonin affects epithelial turnover. Specifically, serotonin's roles in regulating cell shedding, apoptosis and barrier function of the epithelium. Using in vivo studies in mouse and a robust model of differentiated human mammary duct epithelium (MCF10A, we show that serotonin induces mammary epithelial cell shedding and disrupts tight junctions in a reversible manner. However, upon sustained exposure, serotonin induces apoptosis in the replenishing cell population, causing irreversible changes to the epithelial membrane. The staggered nature of these events induced by serotonin slowly shifts the balance in the epithelium from reversible to irreversible. These finding have very important implications towards our ability to control epithelial regeneration and thus address pathologies of aberrant epithelial turnover, which range from degenerative disorders (e.g.; pancreatitis and thyrioditis to proliferative disorders (e.g.; mastitis, ductal ectasia, cholangiopathies and epithelial cancers.

  20. Serotonin receptors in depression: from A to B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M.; Hen, René

    2017-01-01

    The role of serotonin in major depressive disorder (MDD) is the focus of accumulating clinical and preclinical research. The results of these studies reflect the complexity of serotonin signaling through many receptors, in a large number of brain regions, and throughout the lifespan. The role of the serotonin transporter in MDD has been highlighted in gene by environment association studies as well as its role as a critical player in the mechanism of the most effective antidepressant treatments – selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. While the majority of the 15 known receptors for serotonin have been implicated in depression or depressive-like behavior, the serotonin 1A (5-HT 1A) and 1B (5-HT 1B) receptors are among the most studied. Human brain imaging and genetic studies point to the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors in MDD and the response to antidepressant treatment. In rodents, the availability of tissue-specific and inducible knockout mouse lines has made possible the identification of the involvement of 5-HT 1A and 5-HT 1B receptors throughout development and in a cell-type specific manner. This, and other preclinical pharmacology work, shows that autoreceptor and heteroreceptor populations of these receptors have divergent roles in modulating depression-related behavior as well as responses to antidepressants and also have different functions during early postnatal development compared to during adulthood. PMID:28232871

  1. Serotonin Regulates the Feeding and Reproductive Behaviors of Pratylenchus penetrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ziduan; Boas, Stephanie; Schroeder, Nathan E

    2017-07-01

    The success of all plant-parasitic nematodes is dependent on the completion of several complex behaviors. The lesion nematode Pratylenchus penetrans is an economically important parasite of a diverse range of plant hosts. Unlike the cyst and root-knot nematodes, P. penetrans moves both within and outside of the host roots and can feed from both locations. Adult females of P. penetrans require insemination by actively moving males for reproduction and can lay eggs both within and outside of the host roots. We do not have a complete understanding of the molecular basis for these behaviors. One candidate modulator of these behaviors is the neurotransmitter serotonin. Previous research demonstrated an effect of exogenously applied serotonin on the feeding and male mating behaviors of cyst and root-knot nematodes. However, there are no data on the role of exogenous serotonin on lesion nematodes. Similarly, there are no data on the presence and function of endogenous serotonin in any plant-parasitic nematode. Here, we establish that exogenous serotonin applied to P. penetrans regulates both feeding and sex-specific behaviors. Furthermore, using immunohistochemistry and pharmacological assays, our data suggest that P. penetrans utilizes endogenous serotonin to regulate both feeding and sex-specific behaviors.

  2. Age at onset of first depressive episode as a predictor for escitalopram treatment of major depression comorbid with alcohol dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhonen, Leea H; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Lahti, Jari; Alho, Hannu

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine predictors of the response to escitalopram, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor antidepressant and memantine, a non-competitive glutamate NMDA receptor blocker, for the treatment of major depression comorbid with alcohol dependence. Eighty alcohol dependent treatment-seeking adult patients with comorbid major depressive disorder were randomized to receive either memantine 20 mg or escitalopram 20 mg for 26 weeks. In both treatment groups, depression was reduced significantly. Comparisons were made between patients in remission (final Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)decrease<50%). The age at onset of the first major depressive episode significantly correlated with the treatment response in the escitalopram group; the mean age at onset of depression among patients on the non-responders group was 13.7+/-4.0 years and 31.9+/-11.9 years in remission. These results are significantly different from those with memantine. Our study provides evidence that the onset of the first major depressive episode might be a clinically relevant predictor of a response to escitalopram treatment in patients with major depression and comorbid alcohol dependence.

  3. Reduced cocaine-induced serotonin, but not dopamine and noradrenaline, release in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheij, Michel M M; Karel, Peter; Cools, Alexander R; Homberg, Judith R

    2014-11-01

    It has recently been proposed that the increased reinforcing properties of cocaine and ecstasy observed in rats with a genetic deletion of serotonin transporters are the result of a reduction in the psychostimulant-induced release of serotonin. Here we provide the neurochemical evidence in favor of this hypothesis and show that changes in synaptic levels of dopamine or noradrenaline are not very likely to play an important role in the previously reported enhanced psychostimulant intake of these serotonin transporter knockout rats. The results may very well explain why human subjects displaying a reduced expression of serotonin transporters have an increased risk to develop addiction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. Duration and distribution of experimental muscular hyperalgesia in humans following combined infusions of serotonin and bradykinin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babenko, Victor; Svensson, Peter; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    -infusions interval of 3 min. Infusions of isotonic saline (NaCl, 0.9%) were given as control. Pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analogue scale (VAS), and subjects drew the distribution of the pain areas on an anatomical map. Pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were assessed with an electronic algometer...... min after infusions. The VAS-peak after BKN was significantly higher (Ppain area after infusion of BKN....... In addition, PPTs were significantly decreased (Ppain and muscle hyperalgesia to mechanical stimuli. The combination of serotonin and bradykinin can produce muscle...

  5. The effect of radioactive iodine on brain acetylcholine and serotonin in normal and stress subjected rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassan, S.S.; Mazumdar, S.; Prasad, G.C.; Udupa, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The study was designed to throw light on the responses of brain acetylcholine and serotonin in the presence of 131 I in the brain in normal and stress subjected rats. 131 I irradiation in a mild dose increases the 5-hydroxytryptamine and acetylcholine content while shock stress reduces the acetylcholine content but increases the 5-hydroxytryptamine concentration in the brain. The 131 I treatment of shocked rats causes a decrease in 5-hydroxytryptamine and an increase in the acetylcholine content in the brain and it proves to be more effective when radioactive iodine is administered after inhibition of the thyroid activity by Lugol's iodine. (author)

  6. Alcoholism & depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mellisa

    2012-10-01

    One out of 2 Americans report drinking on a routine basis, making the excessive consumption of alcohol the third leading cause of preventable death in America (). Alcoholism and depression are common comorbidities that home healthcare professionals frequently encounter. To achieve the best patient outcomes, alcoholism should be addressed initially. Although all age groups are at risk, alcoholism and depression occur in more than 8 percent of older adults. Prevention through identifying alcohol use early in adolescence is vital to reduce the likelihood of alcohol dependence. This article provides an overview of the long-term effects of alcohol abuse, including alcoholic cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy. The diagnostic criteria for substance dependence and ideas for nonthreatening screening questions to use with patients who are adolescent or older are discussed. While providing patient care, home healthcare nurses share the patient's intimate home environment. This environment is perceived as a safe haven by the patient and home care nurses can take advantage of counseling and treatment opportunities in this nonthreatening environment.

  7. Effects of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks versus consuming alcohol only on overall alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Lydia; de Haan, Hein A; van der Palen, Job; Olivier, Berend; Verster, Joris C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine differences in alcohol consumption and its consequences when consumed alone and when mixed with energy drinks. A survey was conducted among Dutch students at Utrecht University and the College of Utrecht. We collected data on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related consequences of alcohol consumed alone and/or alcohol mixed with energy drinks (AMED). The data were analyzed using a retrospective within-subject design, comparing occasions when subjects consumed AMED with those when they consumed alcohol only in the past 30 days. A representative sample of 6002 students completed the survey, including 1239 who consumed AMED. Compared with consuming alcohol only, when consuming AMED, students consumed significantly fewer alcoholic drinks on an average drinking day (6.0 versus 5.4, respectively), and reported significantly fewer drinking days in the previous month (9.2 versus 1.4), significantly fewer days being drunk (1.9 versus 0.5), and significantly fewer occasions of consuming more than four (female)/five (male) alcoholic drinks (4.7 versus 0.9). The maximum number of mixed alcoholic drinks (4.5) in the previous month was significantly lower when compared with occasions when they consumed alcohol only (10.7). Accordingly, the mean duration of a drinking session was significantly shorter when mixing alcoholic drinks (4.0 versus 6.0 hours). Finally, when consuming AMED, significantly fewer alcohol-related consequences were reported (2.6) for the previous year, including driving a car while intoxicated, taking foolish risks, or being injured or hurt, as compared with alcohol-related consequences when consuming alcohol only (4.9). Mixing alcohol with energy drinks decreases overall alcohol consumption, and decreases the likelihood of experiencing negative alcohol-related consequences.

  8. Serotonin precursor (5-hydroxytryptophan) causes substantial changes in the fighting behavior of male crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyakonova, V E; Krushinsky, A L

    2013-07-01

    This study demonstrates that injection of the serotonin precursor 5-HTP causes substantial changes in the behavioral state, fighting behavior and ability to establish winner-loser relationships in male crickets (Gryllus bimaculatus). The characteristic features of 5-HTP-treated crickets include an elevated posture, enhanced general activity, longer duration of fighting, enhanced rival singing and a decreased ability to produce a clear fight loser. In addition, 5-HTP-treated males showed a slightly delayed latency to spread their mandibles, a decreased number of attacks and an equal potential to win in comparison to controls (physiological solution-treated males). The obtained results imply a significant role for serotonin in the regulation of social status-related behaviors in G. bimaculatus. Specifically, these data indicate that a decrease in serotonergic activity may be functionally important for the control of loser behavior and that some behavioral features of dominant male crickets are likely to be connected with the activation of the serotonergic system.

  9. Serotonin: imaging findings in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailer, Ursula F; Kaye, Walter H

    2011-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) are disorders characterized by aberrant patterns of feeding behavior, weight regulation, and disturbances in attitudes and perceptions toward body weight and shape. Several lines of evidence nominate disturbances of serotonin (5-HT) pathways as playing a role in the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of AN and BN. For example, 5-HT pathways are known to contribute to the modulation of a range of behaviors commonly seen in individuals with AN and BN. New technology using brain imaging with radioligands offers the potential for understanding previously inaccessible brain 5-HT neurotransmitter function and its dynamic relationship with human behaviors. Recent studies using positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography with 5-HT-specific radioligands have consistently shown 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(2A) receptor and 5-HT transporter alterations in AN and BN in cortical and limbic structures, which may be related to anxiety, behavioral inhibition, and body image distortions. These disturbances are present when subjects are ill and persist after recovery, suggesting that these may be traits that are independent of the state of the illness. Effective treatments for AN and BN have been elusive. A better understanding of neurobiology is likely to be important for developing specific and more powerful therapies for these often chronic and deadly disorders.

  10. NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What to Know About Alcohol Treatment What Is Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD)? What Types of Alcohol Treatment Are Available? ... What to Know About Alcohol Treatment What is alcohol use disorder (AUD)? A health condition that can improve with ...

  11. Alcohol and Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... code here Enter ZIP code here Daily Living: Alcohol for Veterans and the Public Alcohol and the Liver: Entire Lesson Overview Alcohol is ... provider or contact a Substance Use Disorder program Alcohol Drinking Diary and Change Plan Alcohol Drinking Diary ...

  12. Isopropanol alcohol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbing alcohol poisoning; Isopropyl alcohol poisoning ... Isopropyl alcohol can be harmful if it is swallowed or gets in the eyes. ... These products contain isopropanol: Alcohol swabs Cleaning supplies ... Rubbing alcohol Other products may also contain isopropanol.

  13. Serotonin-1A receptor imaging in recurrent depression: replication and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drevets, Wayne C. [Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program, MINH Molecular Imaging Branch, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States)], E-mail: drevetsw@mail.nih.gov; Thase, Michael E. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine and Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Moses-Kolko, Eydie L. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Price, Julie [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J. [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Mathis, Chester [Department of Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 19213 (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Introduction: Serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT{sub 1A}R) function appears to be decreased in major depressive disorder (MDD) based on physiological responses to 5-HT{sub 1A}R agonists in vivo and to 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding in brain tissues postmortem or antemortem. We have previously assessed 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding potential (BP) in depression using positron emission tomography (PET) and [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635, and we have demonstrated reduced 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP in the mesiotemporal cortex (MTC) and raphe in depressives with primary recurrent familial mood disorders (n=12) versus controls (n=8) [Drevets WC, Frank E, Price JC, Kupfer DJ, Holt D, Greer PJ, Huang Y, Gautier C, Mathis C. PET imaging of serotonin 1A receptor binding in depression. Biol Psychiatry 1999;46(10):1375-87]. These findings were replicated by some, but not other, studies performed in depressed samples that were more generally selected using criteria for MDD. In the current study, we attempted to replicate our previous findings in an independent sample of subjects selected according to the criteria for primary recurrent depression applied in our prior study. Methods: Using PET and [carbonyl-{sup 11}C]WAY-100635, 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP was assessed in 16 depressed subjects and 8 healthy controls. Results: Mean 5-HT{sub 1A}R BP was reduced by 26% in the MTC (P < .005) and by 43% in the raphe (P < .001) in depressives versus controls. Conclusions: These data replicate our original findings, which showed that BP was reduced by 27% in the MTC (P < .025) and by 42% in the raphe (P < .02) in depression. The magnitudes of these reductions in 5-HT{sub 1A}R binding were similar to those found postmortem in 5-HT{sub 1A}R mRNA concentrations in the hippocampus in MDD [Lopez JF, Chalmers DT, Little KY, Watson SJ. Regulation of serotonin 1A, glucocorticoid, and mineralocorticoid receptor in rat and human hippocampus: implications for neurobiology of depression. Biol Psychiatry 1998;43:547-73] and in 5-HT{sub 1A

  14. Serotonin-1A receptor imaging in recurrent depression: replication and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevets, Wayne C.; Thase, Michael E.; Moses-Kolko, Eydie L.; Price, Julie; Frank, Ellen; Kupfer, David J.; Mathis, Chester

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Serotonin-1A receptor (5-HT 1A R) function appears to be decreased in major depressive disorder (MDD) based on physiological responses to 5-HT 1A R agonists in vivo and to 5-HT 1A R binding in brain tissues postmortem or antemortem. We have previously assessed 5-HT 1A R binding potential (BP) in depression using positron emission tomography (PET) and [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635, and we have demonstrated reduced 5-HT 1A R BP in the mesiotemporal cortex (MTC) and raphe in depressives with primary recurrent familial mood disorders (n=12) versus controls (n=8) [Drevets WC, Frank E, Price JC, Kupfer DJ, Holt D, Greer PJ, Huang Y, Gautier C, Mathis C. PET imaging of serotonin 1A receptor binding in depression. Biol Psychiatry 1999;46(10):1375-87]. These findings were replicated by some, but not other, studies performed in depressed samples that were more generally selected using criteria for MDD. In the current study, we attempted to replicate our previous findings in an independent sample of subjects selected according to the criteria for primary recurrent depression applied in our prior study. Methods: Using PET and [carbonyl- 11 C]WAY-100635, 5-HT 1A R BP was assessed in 16 depressed subjects and 8 healthy controls. Results: Mean 5-HT 1A R BP was reduced by 26% in the MTC (P 1A R binding were similar to those found postmortem in 5-HT 1A R mRNA concentrations in the hippocampus in MDD [Lopez JF, Chalmers DT, Little KY, Watson SJ. Regulation of serotonin 1A, glucocorticoid, and mineralocorticoid receptor in rat and human hippocampus: implications for neurobiology of depression. Biol Psychiatry 1998;43:547-73] and in 5-HT 1A R-binding capacity in the raphe in depressed suicide victims [Arango V, Underwood MD, Boldrini M, Tamir H, Kassir SA, Hsiung S, Chen JJ, Mann JJ. Serotonin 1A receptors, serotonin transporter binding and serotonin transporter mRNA expression in the brainstem of depressed suicide victims. Neuropsychopharmacology 2001;25(6):892-903]. There

  15. Myocardial serotonin exchange: negligible uptake by capillary endothelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffett, T.C.; Chan, I.S.; Bassingthwaighte, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    The extraction of serotonin from the blood during transorgan passage through the heart was studied using Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts. Outflow dilution curves of 131 I- or 125 I-labeled albumin, [ 14 C]sucrose, and [3H]serotonin injected simultaneously into the inflow were fitted with an axially distributed blood-tissue exchange model to examine the extraction process. The model fits of the albumin and sucrose outflow dilution curves were used to define flow heterogeneity, intravascular dispersion, capillary permeability, and the volume of the interstitial space, which reduced the degrees of freedom in fitting the model to the serotonin curves. Serotonin extractions, measured against albumin, during single transcapillary passage, ranged from 24 to 64%. The ratio of the capillary permeability-surface area products for serotonin and sucrose, based on the maximum instantaneous extraction, was 1.37 +/- 0.2 (n = 18), very close to the predicted value of 1.39, the ratio of free diffusion coefficients calculated from the molecular weights. This result shows that the observed uptake of serotonin can be accounted for solely on the basis of diffusion between endothelial cells into the interstitial space. Thus it appears that the permeability of the luminal surface of the endothelial cell is negligible in comparison to diffusion through the clefts between endothelial cells. In 18 sets of dilution curves, with and without receptor and transport blockers or competitors (ketanserin, desipramine, imipramine, serotonin), the extractions and estimates of the capillary permeability-surface area product were not reduced, nor were the volumes of distribution. The apparent absence of transporters and receptors in rabbit myocardial capillary endothelium contrasts with their known abundance in the pulmonary vasculature

  16. Explaining Counterfeit Alcohol Purchases in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotelnikova, Zoya

    2017-04-01

    Alcohol is a common target of counterfeiting in Russia. Counterfeit alcohol is defined here as the manufacture, distribution, unauthorized placement (forgery) of protected commodity trademarks, and infringement of the exclusive rights of the registered trademark holders of alcoholic beverages. It is often argued that the expansion of the counterfeit product market is due to the steady demand of economically disadvantaged people for low-priced goods. The situation becomes more complicated once deceptive and nondeceptive forms of counterfeiting are taken into account. This study aimed to identify markers of risky behavior associated with the purchase of counterfeit alcohol in Russia. The analysis relied on consumer self-reports of alcohol use and purchase collected nationwide by the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS-HSE) in 2012 to 2014. I used a generalized linear mixed-model logistic regression to identify predictors of risky behavior by consumers who purchased counterfeit alcohol, either knowingly or unknowingly, during the 30 days preceding the survey. Purchases of counterfeit alcohol declined slightly from 2012 to 2014, mainly due to a decrease in consumers mistakenly purchasing counterfeit products. Predictors of counterfeit alcohol purchases differed between consumers who knowingly and unknowingly purchased counterfeit products. Nondeceptive purchase of counterfeit alcohol was related primarily to an indifference to alcohol brands. Consumers with social networks that include drinkers of nonbeverage alcohol and producers of homemade alcohol were highly likely to consume counterfeit alcohol deliberately. Problem drinking was significantly associated with a higher risk of both deceptive and nondeceptive purchases of counterfeit alcohol. Poverty largely contributed to nondeceptive counterfeiting. The literature has overestimated the impact of low prices on counterfeit alcohol consumption. Problem drinking and membership in social networks of consumers

  17. The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, does not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic POMC and CART activities in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonogaki, Katsunori; Kaji, Takao

    2016-10-01

    The acute anorexic effect of liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, did not require functional leptin receptor, serotonin, and hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and cocaine amphetamine regulated transcript activities in mice, although decrease in functional hypothalamic orexin activity might be involved in the acute anorexic effect of liraglutide. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Serotonin 2A receptor, serotonin transporter and dopamine transporter alterations in dogs with compulsive behaviour as a promising model for human obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeire, Simon; Audenaert, Kurt; De Meester, Rudy; Vandermeulen, Eva; Waelbers, Tim; De Spiegeleer, Bart; Eersels, Jos; Dobbeleir, André; Peremans, Kathelijne

    2012-01-30

    Neuro-imaging studies have shown altered, yet often inconsistent, serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We investigated both serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission in 9 drug-naïve dogs with compulsive behaviour, as a potential model for human OCD. Single photon emission computed tomography was used with (123)I-R91150 and (123)I-FP-CIT, in combination with (99m)Tc-ECD brain perfusion co-registration, to measure the serotonin (5-HT) 2A receptor, dopamine transporter (DAT) and serotonin transporter (SERT) availability. Fifteen normally behaving dogs were used as reference group. Significantly lower 5-HT2A receptor radioligand availability in frontal and temporal cortices (bilateral) was observed. Further, in 78% of the compulsive dogs abnormal DAT ratios in left and right striatum were demonstrated. Interestingly, both increased and decreased DAT ratios were observed. Finally, significantly lower subcortical perfusion and (hypo)thalamic SERT availability were observed in the compulsive dogs. This study provides evidence for imbalanced serotonergic and dopaminergic pathways in the pathophysiology of compulsions in dogs. The similarities with the altered neurotransmission in human OCD provide construct validity for this non-induced, natural canine model, suggesting its usefulness for future investigations of the pathophysiology of human OCD as well as the effectiveness of psychopharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies of slow responses to serotonin and dopamine of snail identified neurons. Mediating role of the cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterre, Philippe

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the electrophysiological study of slow incoming currents induced in some identified neurons of the Helix aspersa snail by serotonin and dopamine shows that they are associated with a decrease of a potassium conductance involved in the modulation of the action potential duration. By means of enzymatic tests performed on a single cell, and of electrophysiological experiments, the author shows that the cyclic AMP is an intracellular mediator involved in the genesis of these slow responses. Moreover, the obtained results show that serotonin and dopamine act by binding to specific receptors, and that these receptors activate the adenylate-cyclase through a GTP binding protein [fr

  20. Regulating the balance between the kynurenine and serotonin pathways of tryptophan metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Hu, Nan; Yang, Dan; Oxenkrug, Gregory; Yang, Qing

    2017-03-01

    Tryptophan is metabolized along the kynurenine and serotonin pathways, resulting in formation of kynurenine metabolites, neuroactive serotonin and melatonin. Each pathway is critical for maintaining healthy homeostasis. However, the two pathways are extremely unequal in their ability to degrade tryptophan, and little is known about the mechanisms maintaining the balance between them. Here, we demonstrated that in PC12 cells, a change of expression of key genes of one pathway resulted in a change of expression of key genes of the other. Melatonin, the end product of the serotonin pathway, played an important role in tryptophan metabolism by affecting both key enzymes of the two pathways. Melatonin treatment induced the expression of indole-2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1) and enhanced the activity of the IDO1 promoter while decreasing the expression of arylalkylamine N-acetyl transferase. Melatonin treatment up-regulated the expression of forkhead box protein O1 (FoxO1) and enhanced the binding of FoxO1 to the IDO1 promoter. FoxO1 was shown to be a new regulator for IDO1 expression. Melatonin treatment decreased the phosphorylation of FoxO1 by extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and protein kinase B (Akt) and increased the phosphorylation of binding protein 14-3-3 by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and thus the complex of FoxO1-14-3-3 in the cytoplasm was disassembled and FoxO1 was relocated to the nucleus to induce IDO1 expression. The JNK signaling pathway played an important role in melatonin-induced IDO1 up-regulation. In conclusion, this study suggests a link between melatonin, JNK, FoxO1 and IDO1 that acts as a potential balance regulator of tryptophan metabolism, and offers a new approach to treat diseases related to dysregulation of tryptophan metabolism. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. Neural and psychological characteristics of college students with alcoholic parents differ depending on current alcohol use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Rice, Kathleen A; Scholl, Jamie L; Fercho, Kelene A; Pearson, Kami; Kallsen, Noah A; Davies, Gareth E; Ehli, Erik A; Olson, Seth; Schweinle, Amy; Baugh, Lee A; Forster, Gina L

    2018-02-02

    A significant proportion of college students are adult children of an alcoholic parent (ACoA), which can confer greater risk of depression, poor self-esteem, alcohol and drug problems, and greater levels of college attrition. However, some ACoA are resilient to these negative outcomes. The goal of this study was to better understand the psychobiological factors that distinguish resilient and vulnerable college-aged ACoAs. To do so, scholastic performance and psychological health were measured in ACoA college students not engaged in hazardous alcohol use (resilient) and those currently engaged in hazardous alcohol use (vulnerable). Neural activity (as measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging) in response to performing working memory and emotion-based tasks were assessed. Furthermore, the frequency of polymorphisms in candidate genes associated with substance use, risk taking and stress reactivity were compared between the two ACoA groups. College ACoAs currently engaged in hazardous alcohol use reported more anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress symptoms, and increased risky nicotine and marijuana use as compared to ACoAs resistant to problem alcohol use. ACoA college students with current problem alcohol showed greater activity of the middle frontal gyrus and reduced activation of the posterior cingulate in response to visual working memory and emotional processing tasks, which may relate to increased anxiety and problem alcohol and drug behaviors. Furthermore, polymorphisms of cholinergic receptor and the serotonin transporter genes also appear to contribute a role in problem alcohol use in ACoAs. Overall, findings point to several important psychobiological variables that distinguish ACoAs based on their current alcohol use that may be used in the future for early intervention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  3. The relationships between the impact of alcoholic beverage control policies, selected contextual determinants, and alcohol drinking in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, Silvia; Casajuana, Cristina; Allamani, Allaman; Baccini, Michela; Pepe, Pasquale; Massini, Giulia; Gual, Antoni

    2014-10-01

    Alcohol prevention policies alone neither cause nor explain changes in alcohol consumption, nor in related harm. Alcohol consumption in Spain throughout the period 1962-2008 was analyzed considering selected contextual factors and alcohol policies. Increased urbanization was found to be associated with higher consumption, especially of beer. Restrictive policies regulating purchase age, advertising, and licensing premises to sell alcohol were associated with decreased alcohol consumption, while lower blood alcohol concentration limits were followed by an increase. Study limitations are noted. Changes in the evolution of socioeconomic, sociodemographic, and cultural factors should be carefully analyzed to inform alcohol policy planning and evaluation.

  4. Serotonin enhances the impact of health information on food choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaev, Ivo; Crockett, Molly J; Clark, Luke; Müller, Ulrich; Robbins, Trevor W

    2017-06-01

    Serotonin has been implicated in promoting self-control, regulation of hunger and physiological homeostasis, and regulation of caloric intake. However, it remains unclear whether the effects of serotonin on caloric intake reflect purely homeostatic mechanisms, or whether serotonin also modulates cognitive processes involved in dietary decision making. We investigated the effects of an acute dose of the serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram on choices between food items that differed along taste and health attributes, compared with placebo and the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. Twenty-seven participants attended three sessions and received single doses of atomoxetine, citalopram, and placebo in a double-blind randomised cross-over design. Relative to placebo, citalopram increased choices of more healthy foods over less healthy foods. Citalopram also increased the emphasis on health considerations in decisions. Atomoxetine did not affect decision making relative to placebo. The results support the hypothesis that serotonin may influence food choice by enhancing a focus on long-term goals. The findings are relevant for understanding decisions about food consumption and also for treating health conditions such as eating disorders and obesity.

  5. Major depressive disorder and diabetes: does serotonin bridge the gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Long, Nicole E; Stepita, Rebecca A; Taylor, Valerie H; Holloway, Alison C

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric illnesses worldwide, with reported prevalence rates ranging between 10% and 19%. Pharmacotherapy is a first-line option for the management of MDD and, as a result, the use of antidepressants has increased 4 fold in the last 20 years. Serotonin is the most commonly dysregulated neurotransmitter in the etiology of MDD and this system is the primary focus of most medications used in the treatment of illness. Although antidepressant use in adults increases the risk of developing new onset type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms underlying this association are poorly defined. This review will focus on 1) the evidence from human and animal studies suggesting a link between the use of antidepressants that target serotonin signaling (i.e., SSRIs, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), serotonin antagonist and reuptake inhibitors (SARIs), and noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (NaSSAs)) and increased risk of diabetes, and 2) the mechanisms by which alterations in serotonin signalling by antidepressants can affect glucose homeostasis.

  6. Updates on the biology of serotonin and tryptophan hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Tara; Weber, H Christian

    2018-02-01

    To summarize the most recent findings relevant to the biology of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) and the enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) in human gastrointestinal disease. Serotonin is synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS) and the gastrointestinal tract where it is secreted from enteroendocrine cells. Its biosynthesis is regulated by two isoforms of the enzyme TPH of which TPH1 is localized predominantly in gastrointestinal enteroendocrine cells. Serotonin activates the peristaltic reflexes, regulates gastrointestinal motility, and has a role in intestinal inflammation. Inhibition of TPH with novel molecules represents a new pharmacological tool in the successful management of carcinoid syndrome in patients with gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors (GI-NETs). Certain 5-HT receptor subtype agonists and antagonists are useful in the treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest storage organ for serotonin where its biosynthesis is regulated by TPH1. It has several important functions in gastrointestinal motility, secretion, and inflammation. Furthermore, TPH represents a target for inhibitory pharmacological therapy of serotonin access states such as the carcinoid syndrome.

  7. Serotonin and melatonin secretion in postmenopausal women with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacki, Cezary; Walecka-Kapica, Ewa; Błońska, Aleksandra; Winczyk, Katarzyna; Stępień, Agnieszka; Chojnacki, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Postmenopausal women manifest emotional disorders associated with an increase in appetite. The aim of the study was to assess the serotonin and melatonin secretion and metabolism in postmenopausal women in relation to eating disorders. Sixty postmenopausal women and 30 women without hormonal disturbances were enrolled into the study and divided into three groups: group I (control) - women without menstrual disorders, group II - postmenopausal women without appetite disorders and change in body weight, and group III - postmenopausal women with increased appetite and weight gain. Serum melatonin, serotonin, urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) excretion were measured. Serum serotonin and melatonin levels in groups II and III were lower compared to group I. Urinary 5-HIAA and aMT6s excretion was lower in overweight women. In group III the correlation between the serum level of serotonin, melatonin, and BMI was negative; a high statistical significance was found between BMI and urinary aMT6s excretion. Melatonin supplementation and use of drugs modulating the serotonin homeostasis together with female hormones have a beneficial effect in complex treatment of disorders of eating in postmenopausal women. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (3): 299-304).

  8. Serotonin inhibits low-threshold spike interneurons in the striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cains, Sarah; Blomeley, Craig P; Bracci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Low-threshold spike interneurons (LTSIs) are important elements of the striatal architecture and the only known source of nitric oxide in this nucleus, but their rarity has so far prevented systematic studies. Here, we used transgenic mice in which green fluorescent protein is expressed under control of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) promoter and striatal NPY-expressing LTSIs can be easily identified, to investigate the effects of serotonin on these neurons. In sharp contrast with its excitatory action on other striatal interneurons, serotonin (30 μm) strongly inhibited LTSIs, reducing or abolishing their spontaneous firing activity and causing membrane hyperpolarisations. These hyperpolarisations persisted in the presence of tetrodotoxin, were mimicked by 5-HT2C receptor agonists and reversed by 5-HT2C antagonists. Voltage-clamp slow-ramp experiments showed that serotonin caused a strong increase in an outward current activated by depolarisations that was blocked by the specific M current blocker XE 991. In current-clamp experiments, XE 991 per se caused membrane depolarisations in LTSIs and subsequent application of serotonin (in the presence of XE 991) failed to affect these neurons. We concluded that serotonin strongly inhibits striatal LTSIs acting through postsynaptic 5-HT2C receptors and increasing an M type current. PMID:22495583

  9. Lrp5 and bone formation : A serotonin-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay K; Ducy, Patricia

    2010-03-01

    Lrp5, the mutated gene in osteoporosis pseudoglioma (OPPG) and the high bone-mass syndrome (HBM), regulates bone formation, while beta-catenin, the molecular node of Wnt signaling, regulates bone resorption, suggesting that Lrp5 could act in a Wnt-independent manner. Using microarray and conditional gene deletion in mice, we showed that Lrp5 actually enhances bone formation by inhibiting the expression, in duodenum, of tryptophan hydroxylase 1, the rate-limiting enzyme in the serotonin biosynthetic pathway. Accordingly, serotonin circulating levels are high in Lrp5(-/-) mice and OPPG patients but low in HBM patients, and normalizing serum serotonin levels rescues the bone phenotype of the Lrp5(-/-) mice. We also showed that serotonin acts on osteoblasts through the Htr1b receptor and the transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding to inhibit their proliferation. This study shows that Lrp5 acts in gut cells, not in osteoblasts, to control bone formation via a Wnt-independent pathway and identifies a new hormone, serotonin, and a novel endocrine axis regulating bone mass. These findings may have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of low bone-mass disorders.

  10. Alcohol consumption and burden of disease in the Americas in 2012: implications for alcohol policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shield, Kevin D; Monteiro, Maristela; Roerecke, Michael; Smith, Blake; Rehm, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    To describe the volume and patterns of alcohol consumption up to and including 2012, and to estimate the burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption as measured in deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) lost in the Americas in 2012. Measures of alcohol consumption were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Information System on Alcohol and Health (GISAH). The burden of alcohol consumption was estimated in both deaths and DALYs lost based on mortality data obtained from WHO, using alcohol-attributable fractions. Regional groupings for the Americas were based on the WHO classifications for 2004 (according to child and adult mortality). Regional variations were observed in the overall volume of alcohol consumed, the proportion of the alcohol market attributable to unrecorded alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, prevalence of drinking, and prevalence of heavy episodic drinking, with inhabitants of the Americas consuming more alcohol (8.4 L of pure alcohol per adult in 2012) compared to the world average. The Americas also experienced a high burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption (4.7% of all deaths and 6.7% of all DALYs lost), especially in terms of injuries attributable to alcohol consumption. Alcohol is consumed in a harmful manner in the Americas, leading to a high burden of disease, especially in terms of injuries. New cost-effective alcohol policies, such as increasing alcohol taxation, increasing the minimum legal age to purchase alcohol, and decreasing the maximum legal blood alcohol content while driving, should be implemented to decrease the harmful consumption of alcohol and the resulting burden of disease.

  11. Alcohol consumption and burden of disease in the Americas in 2012: implications for alcohol policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Shield

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE:To describe the volume and patterns of alcohol consumption up to and including 2012, and to estimate the burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption as measured in deaths and disability-adjusted life years (DALYs lost in the Americas in 2012. METHODS: Measures of alcohol consumption were obtained from the World Health Organization (WHO Global Information System on Alcohol and Health (GISAH. The burden of alcohol consumption was estimated in both deaths and DALYs lost based on mortality data obtained from WHO, using alcohol-attributable fractions. Regional groupings for the Americas were based on the WHO classifications for 2004 (according to child and adult mortality. RESULTS: Regional variations were observed in the overall volume of alcohol consumed, the proportion of the alcohol market attributable to unrecorded alcohol consumption, drinking patterns, prevalence of drinking, and prevalence of heavy episodic drinking, with inhabitants of the Americas consuming more alcohol (8.4 L of pure alcohol per adult in 2012 compared to the world average. The Americas also experienced a high burden of disease attributable to alcohol consumption (4.7% of all deaths and 6.7% of all DALYs lost, especially in terms of injuries attributable to alcohol consumption. CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol is consumed in a harmful manner in the Americas, leading to a high burden of disease, especially in terms of injuries. New cost-effective alcohol policies, such as increasing alcohol taxation, increasing the minimum legal age to purchase alcohol, and decreasing the maximum legal blood alcohol content while driving, should be implemented to decrease the harmful consumption of alcohol and the resulting burden of disease.

  12. Alcohol Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peter is recovering from an alcohol addiction. The addiction grew slowly over many years. Read Peter's story Treatment & Recovery Information Treatment and Recovery Does Drug Treatment Work? Treatment and Rehab Resources About the National Institute ...

  13. Alcohol and Apoptosis: Friends or Foes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Ana; Chawla, Karan; Umoh, Nsini A; Cousins, Valerie M; Ketegou, Assama; Reddy, Madhumati G; AlRubaiee, Mustafa; Haddad, Georges E; Burke, Mark W

    2015-11-19

    Alcohol abuse causes 79,000 deaths stemming from severe organ damage in the United States every year. Clinical manifestations of long-term alcohol abuse on the cardiac muscle include defective contractility with the development of dilated cardiomyopathy and low-output heart failure; which has poor prognosis with less than 25% survival for more than three years. In contrast, low alcohol consumption has been associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, however the mechanism of this phenomenon remains elusive. The aim of this study was to determine the significance of apoptosis as a mediating factor in cardiac function following chronic high alcohol versus low alcohol exposure. Adult rats were provided 5 mM (low alcohol), 100 mM (high alcohol) or pair-fed non-alcohol controls for 4-5 months. The hearts were dissected, sectioned and stained with cresyl violet or immunohistochemically for caspase-3, a putative marker for apoptosis. Cardiomyocytes were isolated to determine the effects of alcohol exposure on cell contraction and relaxation. High alcohol animals displayed a marked thinning of the left ventricular wall combined with elevated caspase-3 activity and decreased contractility. In contrast, low alcohol was associated with increased contractility and decreased apoptosis suggesting an overall protective mechanism induced by low levels of alcohol exposure.

  14. Acute tryptophan depletion dose dependently impairs object memory in serotonin transporter knockout rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, J D A; Jans, L A W; Korte-Bouws, G A H; Korte, S M; Deen, P M T; Cools, A R; Ellenbroek, B A; Blokland, A

    2008-01-01

    RATIONALE: Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) transiently lowers central serotonin levels and can induce depressive mood states and cognitive defects. Previous studies have shown that ATD impairs object recognition in rats. OBJECTIVES: As individual differences exist in central serotonin

  15. Organization of Monosynaptic Inputs to the Serotonin and Dopamine Neuromodulatory Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachie K. Ogawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin and dopamine are major neuromodulators. Here, we used a modified rabies virus to identify monosynaptic inputs to serotonin neurons in the dorsal and median raphe (DR and MR. We found that inputs to DR and MR serotonin neurons are spatially shifted in the forebrain, and MR serotonin neurons receive inputs from more medial structures. Then, we compared these data with inputs to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc. We found that DR serotonin neurons receive inputs from a remarkably similar set of areas as VTA dopamine neurons apart from the striatum, which preferentially targets dopamine neurons. Our results suggest three major input streams: a medial stream regulates MR serotonin neurons, an intermediate stream regulates DR serotonin and VTA dopamine neurons, and a lateral stream regulates SNc dopamine neurons. These results provide fundamental organizational principles of afferent control for serotonin and dopamine.

  16. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Klysner

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.

  17. Temperature-sensitive high affinity [3H]serotonin binding: characterization and effects of antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmeste, D.M.; Tang, S.W.

    1984-01-01

    Characterization of temperature-sensitive [ 3 H]serotonin (5-HT) binding sites (1 and 4 nM Kd sites) revealed complex inhibition by neuroleptics and serotonin antagonists. There was no simple correlation with affinities for S 1 and S 2 receptors. In vivo pretreatment (48 h before) with mianserin did not alter B/sub max/ or Kd for the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site, although [ 3 H]ketanserin (S 2 ) densities were decreased by 50%. This suggested that possible S 2 components of [ 3 H]5-HT binding must be negligible, even though ketanserin competed with high affinity (IC 50 = 3 nM) for a portion of the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site. Low concentrations of mianserin inhibited the 1 nM Kd [ 3 H]5-HT site in a non-competitive manner, as shown by a decrease in B/sub max/ with no change in Kd after in vitro incubation. The complex inhibition data may therefore represent indirect interactions through another site

  18. Chronic aluminum intoxication in rat induced both serotonin changes in the dorsal raphe nucleus and alteration of glycoprotein secretion in the subcommissural organ: Immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laabbar, Wafaa; Elgot, Abdeljalil; Kissani, Najib; Gamrani, Halima

    2014-08-08

    Aluminum (Al) causes multiple impairments in several body systems including the central nervous system. In fact, Al exposure has been mostly associated with neurological dysfunctions that occur in some brain diseases. The effect of Al neurotoxicity on the dopaminergic system is well documented, but this effect on the serotoninergic system is poorly studied. The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of chronic Al intoxication (0.3% of aluminum chloride exposure from the intra-uterine age until 4 months of adult age) on dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) which is the main source of serotonin, and also on the glycoprotein secretion of subcomissural organ (SCO), receiving important serotoninergic innervation. This will be executed using immunohistochemistry procedure, with both the anti serotonin and the anti Reissner's fiber antibodies in the rat. Our results showed a significant increase of serotonin immunoreactivity in the DRN, accompanied by a noticeable decrease of RF immunoreactivity in the SCO ependymocytes. This study provides further evidence confirming the toxic effect of Al exposure on serotonin neurotransmission in the brain likely through increased synthesis or decreased release. Al exposure was also shown to decrease RF glycoprotein which is involved in the detoxification of cerebrospinal fluid. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protonated serotonin: Geometry, electronic structures and photophysical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidyan, Reza; Amanollahi, Zohreh; Azimi, Gholamhassan

    2017-07-01

    The geometry and electronic structures of protonated serotonin have been investigated by the aim of MP2 and CC2 methods. The relative stabilities, transition energies and geometry of sixteen different protonated isomers of serotonin have been presented. It has been predicted that protonation does not exhibit essential alteration on the S1 ← S0 electronic transition energy of serotonin. Instead, more complicated photophysical nature in respect to its neutral analogue is suggested for protonated system owing to radiative and non-radiative deactivation pathways. In addition to hydrogen detachment (HD), hydrogen/proton transfer (H/PT) processes from ammonium to indole ring along the NH+⋯ π hydrogen bond have been predicted as the most important photophysical consequences of SERH+ at S1 excited state. The PT processes is suggested to be responsible for fluorescence of SERH+ while the HD driving coordinate is proposed for elucidation of its nonradiative deactivation mechanism.

  20. Effects of ageing on serotonin transporters in healthy females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuikka, J.T.; Tammela, L.; Karhunen, L.; Uusitupa, M.; Bergstroem, K.A.; Tiihonen, J.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of ageing on brain serotonin transporters was evaluated in 19 healthy female volunteers (age range 22-74 years) using single-photon emission tomography and [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The study subjects were scanned 0.3, 3, 6 and 23 h after injection of 185 MBq of [ 123 I] nor-β-CIT. The ratio of the distribution volume for tracer in the midbrain to that in the cerebellum minus 1 was used as an index for serotonin transporter binding. An age-related decline of 2% per decade (r=-0.47; P 123 I] nor-β-CIT binding in the serotonin transporter-rich area is much less than that in dopamine transporters in the striatum (6% per decade). (orig.)

  1. Transient Serotonin Toxicity Evoked by Combination of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Fluoxetine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klysner, René; Bjerg Bendsen, Birgitte; Hansen, Maja Soon

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine.......The serotonin syndrome has been described only in rare instances for electroconvulsive therapy combined with an antidepressant medication. We describe a case of serotonin toxicity induced by electroconvulsive therapy in combination with fluoxetine....

  2. D-fenfluramine-induced prolactin responses in postwithdrawal alcoholics and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farren, C K; Ziedonis, D; Clare, A W; Hammeedi, F A; Dinan, T G

    1995-12-01

    Serum prolactin response to the serotonin agonist D-fenfluramine were measured in 19 DSM-111-R male alcoholics, 2.5 or more weeks postalcohol withdrawal. Prolactin responses were compared with nine healthy nonalcoholic male controls. After an overnight fast, each subject received 30 mg of D-fenfluramine orally, and serial samples of serum prolactin were taken over a 4-hr period. D-fenfluramine caused a significantly attenuated peak delta-prolactin response in the alcoholics relative to the controls (p = 0.05). A repeated-measures ANOVA of delta-prolactin yielded a significant within-subjects effect of time (p subjects effect of group that reached significance (p = 0.05), and a nonsignificant group by time interaction. The delta-prolactin value at time points 60 and 240 min postadministration of the probe was significantly attenuated in the alcoholic group, with p alcoholics with a negative family history. The delta-prolactin response did not correlate with subjects' age, duration of alcohol use, duration of abstinence from alcohol, severity of alcohol dependence, or age of onset. Results imply a relative subsensitivity of the serotonin system in postwithdrawal alcoholics, and this may be primarily of the 5-HT2 receptor.

  3. Application of histamine or serotonin to the hypoglossal nucleus increases genioglossus muscle activity across the wake-sleep cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Sakai, Kazuya; Gormand, Frédéric; Petitjean, Thierry; Buda, Colette; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Parrot, Sandrine; Guidon, Gérard; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2009-03-01

    The decrease in genioglossus (GG) muscle activity during sleep, especially rapid eye movement (REM) or paradoxical sleep, can lead to airway occlusion and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). The hypoglossal nucleus innervating the GG muscle is under the control of serotonergic, noradrenergic and histaminergic neurons that cease firing during paradoxical sleep. The objectives of this study were to determine the effect on GG muscle activity during different wake-sleep states of the microdialysis application of serotonin, histamine (HA) or noradrenaline (NE) to the hypoglossal nucleus in freely moving cats. Six adult cats were implanted with electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram and neck electromyogram electrodes to record wake-sleep states and with GG muscle and diaphragm electrodes to record respiratory muscle activity. Microdialysis probes were inserted into the hypoglossal nucleus for monoamine application. Changes in GG muscle activity were assessed by power spectrum analysis. In the baseline conditions, tonic GG muscle activity decreased progressively and significantly from wakefulness to slow-wave sleep and even further during slow-wave sleep with ponto-geniculo-occipital waves and paradoxical sleep. Application of serotonin or HA significantly increased GG muscle activity during the wake-sleep states when compared with controls. By contrast, NE had no excitatory effect. Our results indicate that both serotonin and HA have a potent excitatory action on GG muscle activity, suggesting multiple aminergic control of upper airway muscle activity during the wake-sleep cycle. These data might help in the development of pharmacological approaches for the treatment of OSA.

  4. Coaction of Stress and Serotonin Transporter Genotype in Predicting Aggression at the Transition to Adulthood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Christopher C.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Hammen, Constance; Lind, Penelope A.; Najman, Jake M.; Brennan, Patricia A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that serotonin functioning affects stress reactivity and vulnerability to aggression, research on serotonin gene-stress interactions (G x E) in the development of aggression remains limited. The present study investigated variation in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) as a moderator of the…

  5. Effect of serotonin on the yield of UV-induced thymine dimers in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frajkin, G.Ya.; Strakhovskaya, M.G.; Ivanova, Eh.V.

    1985-01-01

    Using fluorescence method serotonin interaction with DNA is studied and bond constant Ksub(c)=4.2x10 4 M -1 is defined. It is shown that bound serotonin reduces yield of UV-induced thymine dimers. Value of efficient distance of protective serotonin effect constituting part of DNA chain of 4 base pairs, is determined

  6. 21 CFR 862.1390 - 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system... Test Systems § 862.1390 5-Hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system. (a) Identification. A 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid/serotonin test system is a device intended to measure 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid...

  7. The fatty acid amide hydrolase inhibitor URB597 modulates serotonin-dependent emotional behaviour, and serotonin1A and serotonin2A/C activity in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bambico, Francis R; Duranti, Andrea; Nobrega, José N; Gobbi, Gabriella

    2016-03-01

    The fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) inhibitor URB597 increases anandamide, resulting in antidepressant/anxiolytic-like activity, likely via CB1 receptor-mediated modulation of serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine (NE) neurotransmission. However, the relative importance of the 5-HT and NE systems in these effects and on effects of URB597 on postsynaptic 5-HT receptors remain to be determined. Using behavioural and electrophysiological approaches, we assessed the effects of acute-single and repeated URB597 treatment on responses predicting antidepressant/anxiolytic activity, and on hippocampal 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/C receptor sensitivity. Acute-single or serial URB597 treatment, compared to vehicle, reduced immobility in the forced swim test (FST), increased open arm visits in the elevated plus maze and shortened feeding latency in the novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT). Repeated URB597 treatment yielded more profound behavioural effects, which were associated with an increase in hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). The 5-HT synthesis inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA), but not the NE neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP4) prevented URB597-mediated antidepressant/anxiolytic-like response in the FST and NSFT, while DSP4 did not further affect URB597-mediated increase in raphe 5-HT neuron firing. Repeated URB597 administration decreased hippocampal pyramidal firing in response to 5-HT2A/C and 5-HT1A stimulation with 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) and 8-hydroxy-2-dipropylaminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT), respectively, suggesting plastic adaptation of these receptors. The effects of acute-single and repeated URB597 administration on hippocampal cell firing in response to DOI or 8-OH-DPAT were similar in magnitude and intensity to the positive control citalopram. These data indicate that URB597 acts, either directly or indirectly, on the 5-HT system, increases hippocampal BDNF expression, and modifies 5-HT1A

  8. One more beer? Serving alcohol to pseudo-intoxicated guests in bars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosselt, Jordi Franciscus; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; Goverde, Martine M.; de Jong, Menno D.T.

    2013-01-01

    Background Consuming large quantities of alcohol might result in negative consequences for both individual drinkers (alcohol dependency and addiction) and society (violence, traffic crashes). In order to decrease the prevalence of alcohol abuse, many countries have adopted regulations prohibiting

  9. Isoflurane depresses the response of inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons to serotonin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, Ivo F; Zuperku, Edward J; Stucke, Astrid G; Hopp, Francis A; Jakovcevic, Danica; Stuth, Eckehard A E

    2007-04-01

    Endogenous serotonin (5-HT) provides important excitatory drive to inspiratory hypoglossal motoneurons (IHMNs). In vitro studies show that activation of postsynaptic 5-HT receptors decreases a leak K+ channel conductance and depolarizes hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs). In contrast, volatile anesthetics increase this leak K+ channel conductance, which causes neuronal membrane hyperpolarization and depresses HMN excitability. Clinical studies show upper airway obstruction, indicating HMN depression, even at subanesthetic concentrations. The authors hypothesized that if anesthetic activation of leak K+ channels caused neuronal depression in vivo, this effect could be antagonized with serotonin. In this case, the neuronal response to picoejected serotonin would be greater during isoflurane than with no isoflurane. Studies were performed in decerebrate, vagotomized, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated dogs during hypercapnic hyperoxia. The authors studied the effect of approximately 0.3 minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) isoflurane on the spontaneous discharge frequency patterns of single IHMNs and on the neuronal response to picoejection of 5-HT. Normalized data (mean +/- SD, n = 19) confirmed that 0.3 +/- 0.1 MAC isoflurane markedly reduced the spontaneous peak discharge frequency by 48 +/- 19% (P < 0.001) and depressed the slope of the spontaneous discharge patterns. The increase in neuronal frequency in response to 5-HT was reduced by 34 +/- 22% by isoflurane (P < 0.001). Subanesthetic concentrations of isoflurane strongly depressed canine IHMNs in vivo. The neuronal response to 5-HT was also depressed by isoflurane, suggesting that anesthetic activation of leak K+ channels, which is expected to result in a larger 5-HT response, was not a dominant mechanism in this depression.

  10. In Vivo Investigation of Escitalopram’s Allosteric Site on the Serotonin Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Karen E.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Owens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Escitalopram is a commonly prescribed antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor class. Clinical evidence and mapping of the serotonin transporter (SERT) identified that escitalopram, in addition to its binding to a primary uptake-blocking site, is capable of binding to the SERT via an allosteric site that is hypothesized to alter escitalopram’s kinetics at the SERT. The studies reported here examined the in vivo role of the SERT allosteric site in escitalopram action. A knockin mouse model that possesses an allosteric-null SERT was developed. Autoradiographic studies indicated that the knockin protein was expressed at a lower density than endogenous mouse SERT (approximately 10–30% of endogenous mouse SERT), but the knockin mice are a viable tool to study the allosteric site. Microdialysis studies in the ventral hippocampus found no measurable decrease in extracellular serotonin response after local escitalopram challenge in mice without the allosteric site compared to mice with the site (p = 0.297). In marble burying assays there was a modest effect of the absence of the allosteric site, with a larger systemic dose of escitalopram (10-fold) necessary for the same effect as in mice with intact SERT (p = 0.023). However, there was no effect of the allosteric site in the tail suspension test. Together these data suggest that there may be a regional specificity in the role of the allosteric site. The lack of a robust effect overall suggests that the role of the allosteric site for escitalopram on the SERT may not produce meaningful in vivo effects. PMID:26621784

  11. Impaired chemosensitivity of mouse dorsal raphe serotonergic neurons overexpressing serotonin 1A (Htr1a) receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, Gilda; Mlinar, Boris; Audero, Enrica; Gross, Cornelius Thilo; Corradetti, Renato

    2012-01-01

    Serotonergic system participates in a wide range of physiological processes and behaviors, but its role is generally considered as modulatory and noncrucial, especially concerning life-sustaining functions. We recently created a transgenic mouse line in which a functional deficit in serotonin homeostasis due to excessive serotonin autoinhibition was produced by inducing serotonin 1A receptor (Htr1a) overexpression selectively in serotonergic neurons (Htr1a raphe-overexpressing or Htr1a(RO) mice). Htr1a(RO) mice exhibit episodes of autonomic dysregulation, cardiovascular crises and death, resembling those of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and revealing a life-supporting role of serotonergic system in autonomic control. Since midbrain serotonergic neurons are chemosensitive and are implicated in arousal we hypothesized that their chemosensitivity might be impaired in Htr1a(RO) mice. Loose-seal cell-attached recordings in brainstem slices revealed that serotonergic neurons in dorsal raphe nucleus of Htr1a(RO) mice have dramatically reduced responses to hypercapnic challenge as compared with control littermates. In control mice, application of 9% CO(2) produced an increase in firing rate of serotonergic neurons (0.260 ± 0.041 Hz, n=20, p=0.0001) and application of 3% CO(2) decreased their firing rate (-0.142 ± 0.025 Hz, n=17, p=0.0008). In contrast, in Htr1a(RO) mice, firing rate of serotonergic neurons was not significantly changed by 9% CO(2) (0.021 ± 0.034 Hz, n=16, p=0.49) and by 3% CO(2) (0.012 ± 0.046 Hz, n=12, p=0.97). Our findings support the hypothesis that chemosensitivity of midbrain serotonergic neurons provides a physiological mechanism for arousal responses to life-threatening episodes of hypercapnia and that functional impairment, such as excessive autoinhibition, of midbrain serotonergic neuron responses to hypercapnia may contribute to sudden death.

  12. Compressed multiwall carbon nanotube composite electrodes provide enhanced electroanalytical performance for determination of serotonin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fagan-Murphy, Aidan; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2014-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is an important neurochemical that is present in high concentrations within the intestinal tract. Carbon fibre and boron-doped diamond based electrodes have been widely used to date for monitoring 5-HT, however these electrodes are prone to fouling and are difficult to fabricate in certain sizes and geometries. Carbon nanotubes have shown potential as a suitable material for electroanalytical monitoring of 5-HT but can be difficult to manipulate into a suitable form. The fabrication of composite electrodes is an approach that can shape conductive materials into practical electrode geometries suitable for biological environments. This work investigated how compression of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) epoxy composite electrodes can influence their electroanalytical performance. Highly compressed composite electrodes displayed significant improvements in their electrochemical properties along with decreased internal and charge transfer resistance, reproducible behaviour and improved batch to batch variability when compared to non-compressed composite electrodes. Compression of MWCNT epoxy composite electrodes resulted in an increased current response for potassium ferricyanide, ruthenium hexaammine and dopamine, by preferentially removing the epoxy during compression and increasing the electrochemical active surface of the final electrode. For the detection of serotonin, compressed electrodes have a lower limit of detection and improved sensitivity compared to non-compressed electrodes. Fouling studies were carried out in 10 μM serotonin where the MWCNT compressed electrodes were shown to be less prone to fouling than non-compressed electrodes. This work indicates that the compression of MWCNT carbon-epoxy can result in a highly conductive material that can be moulded to various geometries, thus providing scope for electroanalytical measurements and the production of a wide range of analytical devices for a variety of systems

  13. Temperament, character and serotonin activity in the human brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuominen, L; Salo, J; Hirvonen, J

    2013-01-01

    The psychobiological model of personality by Cloninger and colleagues originally hypothesized that interindividual variability in the temperament dimension 'harm avoidance' (HA) is explained by differences in the activity of the brain serotonin system. We assessed brain serotonin transporter (5-HTT......-existing Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) scores. A total of 22 subjects free of psychiatric and somatic disorders were included in the matched high- and low-HA groups. The main outcome measure was regional 5-HTT binding potential (BPND) in high- and low-HA groups estimated with PET and [11C]N,N-dimethyl-2...

  14. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression....

  15. Functional characterization of serotonin receptor subtypes in human duodenal secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelmann, Bodil Elisabeth; Bindslev, Niels; Poulsen, Steen Seier

    2006-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) stimulates ion secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and the sensitivity for 5-HT might be altered in dyspeptic patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the 5-HT-induced electrogenic ion transport in the duodenum of dyspep......Serotonin (5-HT) stimulates ion secretion in the gastrointestinal tract and the sensitivity for 5-HT might be altered in dyspeptic patients infected with Helicobacter pylori. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the 5-HT-induced electrogenic ion transport in the duodenum...

  16. Modulation of the intrinsic properties of motoneurons by serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the main transmitters in the nervous system. Serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei in the brainstem innervate most parts of the central nervous system including motoneurons in the spinal cord and brainstem. This review will focus on the modulatory role that 5-HT exerts...... a sustained depolarization and an amplification of synaptic inputs. Under pathological conditions, such as after a spinal cord injury, the promotion of persistent inward currents by serotonin and/or the overexpression of autoactive serotonergic receptors may contribute to motoneuronal excitability, muscle...

  17. Serotonin/dopamine interactions in a hyperactive mouse: reduced serotonin receptor 1B activity reverses effects of dopamine transporter knockout.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Scott Hall

    Full Text Available Knockout (KO mice that lack the dopamine transporter (SL6A3; DAT display increased locomotion that can be attenuated, under some circumstances, by administration of drugs that normally produce psychostimulant-like effects, such as amphetamine and methylphenidate. These results have led to suggestions that DAT KO mice may model features of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and that these drugs may act upon serotonin (5-HT systems to produce these unusual locomotor decreasing effects. Evidence from patterns of brain expression and initial pharmacologic studies led us to use genetic and pharmacologic approaches to examine the influence of altered 5-HT1B receptor activity on hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Heterozygous 5-HT1B KO and pharmacologic 5-HT1B antagonism both attenuated locomotor hyperactivity in DAT KO mice. Furthermore, DAT KO mice with reduced, but not eliminated, 5-HT1B receptor expression regained cocaine-stimulated locomotion, which was absent in DAT KO mice with normal levels of 5-HT1B receptor expression. Further experiments demonstrated that the degree of habituation to the testing apparatus determined whether cocaine had no effect on locomotion in DAT KO or reduced locomotion, helping to resolve differences among prior reports. These findings of complementation of the locomotor effects of DAT KO by reducing 5-HT1B receptor activity underscore roles for interactions between specific 5-HT receptors and dopamine (DA systems in basal and cocaine-stimulated locomotion and support evaluation of 5-HT1B antagonists as potential, non-stimulant ADHD therapeutics.

  18. The effects of an anabolic androgenic steroid and low serotonin on social and non-social behaviors in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala, Kenneth H; McGinnis, Marilyn Y; Anderson, George M; Lumia, Augustus R

    2008-09-26

    The behavioral and neurochemical impact of low serotonin (5-HT) was examined in gonadally intact male rats exposed to an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) during puberty. Low 5-HT was induced beginning on postnatal day 26 using parachlorophylalanine (PCPA). Injections of the AAS, testosterone (TP), began on day 40. The rats were tested in both non-social (locomotor activity and nose poke for food) and social (low-threat and high-threat) contexts. PCPA and TP+PCPA significantly decreased locomotor activity. PCPA alone significantly increased nose poke latency compared to controls. Freezing in the PCPA group was significantly elevated compared to TP and TP+PCPA groups, but not compared to controls. AAS did not affect non-social behaviors. Thus, low serotonin may increase freezing in a non-social context. Following provocation, PCPA and TP+PCPA significantly increased aggression toward smaller non-threatening opponents, suggesting that males with low 5-HT are more aggressive in a low-threat context when provoked. In the resident-pair intruder test, TP significantly increased aggression whereas PCPA did not, suggesting that in a high-threat context, aggression is primarily mediated by AAS. TP+PCPA males were also significantly more aggressive in the high-threat context suggesting that exposure to AAS may override freezing behavior induced by low serotonin. Both PCPA and TP+PCPA significantly and substantially depleted 5-HT and 5-HIAA in all brain regions examined. AAS significantly decreased 5-HIAA levels in the hypothalamus and increased 5-HT levels in the frontal cortex. Following withdrawal from TP+PCPA, most behavioral and neurochemical measures returned to control levels. These data suggest that low serotonin may be a contributing factor in the increased aggression displayed by adolescents who abuse AAS.

  19. Serotonin, Amygdala and Fear: Assembling the Puzzle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchio, Marco; McHugh, Stephen B; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2016-01-01

    The fear circuitry orchestrates defense mechanisms in response to environmental threats. This circuitry is evolutionarily crucial for survival, but its dysregulation is thought to play a major role in the pathophysiology of psychiatric conditions in humans. The amygdala is a key player in the processing of fear. This brain area is prominently modulated by the neurotransmitter serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT). The 5-HT input to the amygdala has drawn particular interest because genetic and pharmacological alterations of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) affect amygdala activation in response to emotional stimuli. Nonetheless, the impact of 5-HT on fear processing remains poorly understood.The aim of this review is to elucidate the physiological role of 5-HT in fear learning via its action on the neuronal circuits of the amygdala. Since 5-HT release increases in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) during both fear memory acquisition and expression, we examine whether and how 5-HT neurons encode aversive stimuli and aversive cues. Next, we describe pharmacological and genetic alterations of 5-HT neurotransmission that, in both rodents and humans, lead to altered fear learning. To explore the mechanisms through which 5-HT could modulate conditioned fear, we focus on the rodent BLA. We propose that a circuit-based approach taking into account the localization of specific 5-HT receptors on neurochemically-defined neurons in the BLA may be essential to decipher the role of 5-HT in emotional behavior. In keeping with a 5-HT control of fear learning, we review electrophysiological data suggesting that 5-HT regulates synaptic plasticity, spike synchrony and theta oscillations in the BLA via actions on different subcellular compartments of principal neurons and distinct GABAergic interneuron populations. Finally, we discuss how recently developed optogenetic tools combined with electrophysiological recordings and behavior could progress the knowledge of the mechanisms underlying 5

  20. Serotonin hypothesis and pulmonary artery hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Kloza

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tętnicze nadciśnienie płucne jest postępującą chorobą, prowadzącą do niewydolności prawej komory serca i przedwczesnej śmierci. Charakteryzuje się podwyższonym ciśnieniem w tętnicy płucnej, zwiększeniem oporu naczyniowego, przebudową naczyń płucnych oraz dysfunkcją śródbłonka. Patomechanizm tej choroby jest wciąż nieznany. Sugeruje się, że dysfunkcja śródbłonka zaburza równowagę między czynnikami wazodylatacyjnymi a wazokonstrykcyjnymi, w tym np. serotoniną (5-HT. Pierwotnie teorię serotoninową tętniczego nadciśnienia płucnego powiązano z przyjmowaniem leków anoreksygennych, pochodnych fenfluraminy, hamujących wychwyt zwrotny 5-HT. Obecnie potwierdzono zaangażowanie wszystkich składowych układu serotoninergicznego w krążeniu płucnym w tym patomechanizm. W komórkach śródbłonka tętnicy płucnej, hydroksylaza tryptofanu 1 katalizuje reakcję syntezy serotoniny z tryptofanu. 5-HT kurczy naczynia płucne przez pobudzenie receptorów serotoninowych, głównie 5-HT1B i 5-HT2A, a także jest transportowana przez transporter serotoniny (SERT do wnętrza komórki mięśni gładkich tętnicy płucnej, a następnie działając przez kinazę Rho (ROCK lub reaktywne formy tlenu powoduje skurcz naczyń i/lub wzrost aktywacji czynników transkrypcyjnych i proliferację. Potwierdzono interakcję między receptorem 5-HT1B i SERT w modulowaniu skurczu naczyń płucnych i ich proliferacji. W pracy omówiono dowody wpływu 5-HT na rozwój tętniczego nadciśnienia płucnego i możliwe cele terapeutyczne w obrębie układu serotoninergicznego.

  1. Serotonin modulation of cortical neurons and networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celada, Pau; Puig, M. Victoria; Artigas, Francesc

    2013-01-01

    The serotonergic pathways originating in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei (DR and MnR, respectively) are critically involved in cortical function. Serotonin (5-HT), acting on postsynaptic and presynaptic receptors, is involved in cognition, mood, impulse control and motor functions by (1) modulating the activity of different neuronal types, and (2) varying the release of other neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, acetylcholine and dopamine. Also, 5-HT seems to play an important role in cortical development. Of all cortical regions, the frontal lobe is the area most enriched in serotonergic axons and 5-HT receptors. 5-HT and selective receptor agonists modulate the excitability of cortical neurons and their discharge rate through the activation of several receptor subtypes, of which the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, and 5-HT3 subtypes play a major role. Little is known, however, on the role of other excitatory receptors moderately expressed in cortical areas, such as 5-HT2C, 5-HT4, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors are key players and exert opposite effects on the activity of pyramidal neurons in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). The activation of 5-HT1A receptors in mPFC hyperpolarizes pyramidal neurons whereas that of 5-HT2A receptors results in neuronal depolarization, reduction of the afterhyperpolarization and increase of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and of discharge rate. 5-HT can also stimulate excitatory (5-HT2A and 5-HT3) and inhibitory (5-HT1A) receptors in GABA interneurons to modulate synaptic GABA inputs onto pyramidal neurons. Likewise, the pharmacological manipulation of various 5-HT receptors alters oscillatory activity in PFC, suggesting that 5-HT is also involved in the control of cortical network activity. A better understanding of the actions of 5-HT in PFC may help to develop treatments for mood and cognitive disorders associated with an abnormal function of the frontal lobe

  2. Alcoholism and alcohol drinking habits predicted from alcohol dehydrogenase genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup, J.S.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Rasmussen, S.

    2008-01-01

    /1 genotype. Results for ADH1B and ADH1C genotypes among men and women were similar. Finally, because slow ADH1B alcohol degradation is found in more than 90% of the white population compared to less than 10% of East Asians, the population attributable risk of heavy drinking and alcoholism by ADH1B.1......Alcohol is degraded primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) wherein genetic variation that affects the rate of alcohol degradation is found in ADH1B and ADH1C. It is biologically plausible that these variations may be associated with alcohol drinking habits and alcoholism. By genotyping 9080 white...... men and women from the general population, we found that men and women with ADH1B slow vs fast alcohol degradation drank more alcohol and had a higher risk of everyday drinking, heavy drinking, excessive drinking and of alcoholism. For example, the weekly alcohol intake was 9.8 drinks (95% confidence...

  3. Age, sex, and reproductive hormone effects on brain serotonin-1A and serotonin-2A receptor binding in a healthy population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses-Kolko, Eydie L; Price, Julie C; Shah, Nilesh; Berga, Sarah; Sereika, Susan M; Fisher, Patrick M; Coleman, Rhaven; Becker, Carl; Mason, N Scott; Loucks, Tammy; Meltzer, Carolyn C

    2011-12-01

    There is a need for rigorous positron emission tomography (PET) and endocrine methods to address inconsistencies in the literature regarding age, sex, and reproductive hormone effects on central serotonin (5HT) 1A and 2A receptor binding potential (BP). Healthy subjects (n=71), aged 20-80 years, underwent 5HT1A and 2A receptor imaging using consecutive 90-min PET acquisitions with [(11)C]WAY100635 and [(18)F]altanserin. Logan graphical analysis was used to derive BP using atrophy-corrected distribution volume (V(T)) in prefrontal, mesiotemporal, occipital cortices, and raphe nucleus (5HT1A only). We used multivariate linear regression modeling to examine BP relationships with age, age(2), sex, and hormone concentrations, with post hoc regional significance set at pmen (p=0.05-0.06). Raphe 5HT1A receptor BP decreased 4.5% per decade of age (p=0.05), primarily in men. There was a trend for 15% receptor reductions in prefrontal cortical regions in women relative to men (post hoc p=0.03-0.10). The significant decline in 5HT2A receptor BP relative to age (8% per decade; pmen, but increased 5HT1A receptor BP with aging in women, may partially explain the increased susceptibility to affective disorders in women during their reproductive years that is mitigated in later life. 5HT1A receptor decreases with age in men might contribute to the known increased risk for suicide in men over age 75 years. Low hormone concentrations in adults <50 years of age may be associated with more extreme 5HT1A receptor BP values, but remains to be studied further. The 5HT2A receptor declines with age were not related to sex or hormone concentrations in this sample. Additional study in clinical populations is needed to further examine the affective role of sex-hormone-serotonin receptor relationships.

  4. Kinetics of homocysteine metabolism after moderate alcohol consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beulens, J.W.J.; Sierksma, A.; Schaafsma, G.; Kok, F.J.; Struys, E.A.; Jakobs, C.; Hendriks, H.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because plasma homocysteine (tHcy) is considered an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and associated with alcohol consumption, the authors investigated the effect of moderate

  5. A Multidimensional Model of Mothers’ Perceptions of Parent Alcohol Socialization and Adolescent Alcohol Misuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennett, Susan T.; Jackson, Christine; Cole, Veronica T.; Haws, Susan; Foshee, Vangie A.; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Burns, Alison Reimuller; Cox, Melissa J.; Cai, Li

    2015-01-01

    We assessed a multidimensional model of parent alcohol socialization in which key socialization factors were considered simultaneously to identify combinations of factors that increase or decrease risk for development of adolescent alcohol misuse. Of interest was the interplay between putative risk and protective factors, such as whether the typically detrimental effects on youth drinking of parenting practices tolerant of some adolescent alcohol use are mitigated by an effective overall approach to parenting and parental modeling of modest alcohol use. The sample included 1,530 adolescents and their mothers; adolescents’ mean age was 13.0 (SD = .99) at the initial assessment. Latent profile analysis was conducted of mothers’ reports of their attitude toward teen drinking, alcohol-specific parenting practices, parental alcohol use and problem use, and overall approach to parenting. The profiles were used to predict trajectories of adolescent alcohol misuse from early to middle adolescence. Four profiles were identified: two profiles reflected conservative alcohol-specific parenting practices and two reflected alcohol-tolerant practices, all in the context of other attributes. Alcohol misuse accelerated more rapidly from grade 6 through 10 in the two alcohol-tolerant compared with conservative profiles. Results suggest that maternal tolerance of some youth alcohol use, even in the presence of dimensions of an effective parenting style and low parental alcohol use and problem use, is not an effective strategy for reducing risky adolescent alcohol use. PMID:26415053

  6. A multidimensional model of mothers' perceptions of parent alcohol socialization and adolescent alcohol misuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennett, Susan T; Jackson, Christine; Cole, Veronica T; Haws, Susan; Foshee, Vangie A; Reyes, Heathe Luz McNaughton; Burns, Alison Reimuller; Cox, Melissa J; Cai, Li

    2016-02-01

    We assessed a multidimensional model of parent alcohol socialization in which key socialization factors were considered simultaneously to identify combinations of factors that increase or decrease risk for development of adolescent alcohol misuse. Of interest was the interplay between putative risk and protective factors, such as whether the typically detrimental effects on youth drinking of parenting practices tolerant of some adolescent alcohol use are mitigated by an effective overall approach to parenting and parental modeling of modest alcohol use. The sample included 1,530 adolescents and their mothers; adolescents' mean age was 13.0 (SD = .99) at the initial assessment. Latent profile analysis was conducted of mothers' reports of their attitude toward teen drinking, alcohol-specific parenting practices, parental alcohol use and problem use, and overall approach to parenting. The profiles were used to predict trajectories of adolescent alcohol misuse from early to middle adolescence. Four profiles were identified: 2 profiles reflected conservative alcohol-specific parenting practices and 2 reflected alcohol-tolerant practices, all in the context of other attributes. Alcohol misuse accelerated more rapidly from Grade 6 through 10 in the 2 alcohol-tolerant compared with conservative profiles. Results suggest that maternal tolerance of some youth alcohol use, even in the presence of dimensions of an effective parenting style and low parental alcohol use and problem use, is not an effective strategy for reducing risky adolescent alcohol use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Involvement of leptin in hypophagia induced by the serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Jun; Sugimoto, Yumi; Ujikawa, Masanori

    2006-03-01

    We previously demonstrated that a serotonin (5-HT) precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) increases serum leptin levels in mice. It was reported that administration of 5-HTP elicits hypophagia in rodents and humans. In the present study, we examined involvement of leptin in 5-HTP-elicited decreases in the milk intake of fasted mice. Serum leptin levels increased with increases in milk intake in mice, while 5-HTP strongly decreased milk intake in fasted mice compared to that in the control group. Serum leptin levels in fasted mice treated with 5-HTP were similar to those control mice after milk intake. As leptin is a powerful anorectic signal, 5-HTP-induced anorexia may be mediated by facilitation of leptin secretion.

  8. Parkinson's disease: decreased density of 3H-imipramine and 3H-paroxetine binding sites in putamen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raisman, R.; Cash, R.; Agid, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The density of high-affinity 3 H-imipramine and 3 H-paroxetine binding sites (two serotonin-uptake blockers) was decreased in the putamen of parkinsonian patients. The correlation between serotonin levels and the number of 3 H-imipramine and 3 H-paroxetine binding sites suggests that they are located on serotoninergic nerve terminals and could be used to study serotoninergic innervation in the human brain. Since imipramine and paroxetine are powerful antidepressants, these results furthermore suggest that decreased serotoninergic transmission may be implicated in the pathophysiology of depression in Parkinson's disease

  9. What We Fund - Alcohol

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    NCDP

    national and international by ... Marketing restrictions, such as. Reducing availability of retailed alcohol. Bans on alcohol advertizing, ... relationships between alcohol consumption and household poverty (e.g. the opportunity costs of alcohol).

  10. Expression of serotonin, chromogranin-A, serotonin receptor-2B, tryptophan hydroxylase-1, and serotonin reuptake transporter in the intestine of dogs with chronic enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Candice; Ruaux, Craig; Stang, Bernadette V; Valentine, Beth A

    2016-05-01

    Serotonin regulates many intestinal motor and sensory functions. Altered serotonergic metabolism has been described in human gastrointestinal diseases. The objective of our study was to compare expression of several components of the serotonergic system [serotonin (5-HT), serotonin reuptake transporter protein (SERT), tryptophan hydroxylase-1 (TPH-1), 5-HT receptor2B (5-HT2B)] and the enterochromaffin cell marker chromogranin-A (CgA) in the intestinal mucosa between dogs with chronic enteropathy and healthy controls. Serotonin and CgA expression were determined by immunohistochemistry using banked and prospectively obtained, paraffin-embedded canine gastrointestinal biopsies (n = 11), and compared to a control group of canine small intestinal sections (n = 10). Expression of SERT, TPH-1, and 5-HT2B were determined via real-time reverse transcription (qRT)-PCR using prospectively collected endoscopic duodenal biopsies (n = 10) and compared to an additional control group of control duodenal biopsies (n = 8, control group 2) showing no evidence of intestinal inflammation. Dogs with chronic enteropathies showed strong staining for both 5-HT and CgA. Mean positive cells per high power field (HPF) were significantly increased for both compounds in dogs with chronic enteropathies (p < 0.001 for 5-HT; p < 0.05 for CgA). The number of 5-HT-positive and CgA-positive cells/HPF showed significant correlation in the entire group of dogs, including both diseased and healthy individuals (Pearson r(2) = 0.2433, p = 0.016). No significant differences were observed for SERT, TPH-1, or 5-HT2B expression; however, dogs with chronic enteropathy showed greater variability in expression of TPH-1 and 5-HT2B We conclude that components of the neuroendocrine system show altered expression in the intestinal mucosa of dogs with chronic enteropathy. These changes may contribute to nociception and clinical signs in these patients. © 2016 The Author(s).

  11. Corticosteroid modulation and testosterone changes during alcohol intoxication affects voluntary alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, C J P; Etelälahti, T J; Apter, S J

    2017-06-01

    A number of studies have shown that stress and an activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are associated with increased voluntary alcohol drinking. Recently, associations have been found between activated HPA and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes in alcohol-preferring AA and non-preferring ANA, F2 (crossbred second generation from original AA and ANA), and Wistar rats. The aim of the present study has been to determine the role of corticosterone and alcohol-related testosterone-effects in subsequent alcohol drinking in AA, ANA, F2 and Wistar rats. The present study comprises of four substudies presenting new analyses of existing data, by which correlations between basal corticosterone levels, changes in testosterone levels during alcohol intoxications and subsequent voluntary alcohol consumption are investigated. The results displayed positive correlations between basal corticosterone levels and subsequent alcohol-mediated testosterone elevations, which was positively associated with voluntary alcohol consumption. The results also showed a negative correlation between basal corticosterone levels and alcohol-mediated testosterone decreases, which was negatively associated with alcohol consumption. In conclusion, the present study displays novel results, according to which the HPA axis, one hand, relates to testosterone elevation (potentially causing and/or strengthening reinforcement) during alcohol intoxication, which in turn may relate to higher voluntary alcohol consumption (AA rats). Vice versa, the HPA axis may also relate to alcohol-mediated testosterone decrease (causing testosterone reduction and disinforcement) and low-alcohol drinking (ANA, F2 and Wistar rats). In addition, the present results showed that alcohol-mediated testosterone changes may also, independently of the HPA axis, correlate with voluntary alcohol drinking, which indicate the impact of genetic factors. Thus, the role of the HPA-axis may be more related to situational

  12. Linezolid and Rasagiline – A culprit for serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisham, Mohamed; Sivakumar, Mundalipalayam N.; Nandakumar, V.; Lakshmikanthcharan, S.

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital for cellulitis. She had a history of diabetes mellitus and parkinsonism on levodopa/carbidopa, rasagiline, ropinirole, trihexyphenidyl, amantadine, metformin, and glipizide. We present here a case of rare incidence of serotonin syndrome associated with linezolid and rasagiline. PMID:26997732

  13. Linezolid and Rasagiline - A culprit for serotonin syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Hisham; Mundalipalayam N Sivakumar; V Nandakumar; S Lakshmikanthcharan

    2016-01-01

    A 65-year-old female patient was admitted to the hospital for cellulitis. She had a history of diabetes mellitus and parkinsonism on levodopa/carbidopa, rasagiline, ropinirole, trihexyphenidyl, amantadine, metformin, and glipizide. We present here a case of rare incidence of serotonin syndrome associated with linezolid and rasagiline.

  14. Serotonin Transporter Gene, Depressive Symptoms, and Interleukin-6

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Shaoyong; Zhao, Jinying; Bremner, J. Douglas; Miller, Andrew H.; Tang, Weining; Bouzyk, Mark; Snieder, Harold; Novik, Olga; Afzal, Nadeem; Goldberg, Jack; Vaccarino, Viola

    2009-01-01

    Background-We explored the relationship of genetic variants of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4, a key regulator of the serotonergic neurotransmission, with both depressive symptoms and plasma interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Methods and Results-We genotyped 20 polymorphisms in 360 male twins (mean

  15. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for depression in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Leah C; Sansone, Stephanie A; Hermann, Alison D

    2016-12-01

    Perinatal depression is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality and may have long-term consequences on child development. The US Preventive Services Task Force has recently recognized the importance of identifying and treating women with depression in the perinatal period. However, screening and accessing appropriate treatment come with logistical challenges. In many areas, there may not be sufficient access to psychiatric care, and, until these resources develop, the burden may inadvertently fall on obstetricians. As a result, understanding the risks of perinatal depression in comparison with the risks of treatment is important. Many studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in pregnancy fail to control for underlying depressive illness, which can lead to misinterpretation of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor risk by clinicians. This review discusses the risks and benefits of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment in pregnancy within the context of perinatal depression. Whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be associated with certain risks, the absolute risks are low and may be outweighed by the risks of untreated depression for many women and their offspring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors reduces fertility in men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørr, L; Bennedsen, B; Fedder, J

    2016-01-01

    Clinical review of the present data on the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on male fertility was the objective of the study. PubMed and Scopus were searched for publications in English or Danish and reviewed. Human trials, animal studies and in vitro studies were included...

  17. Pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic aspects of serotonin and serotonergic drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Blauw, G. J.; van Brummelen, P.

    1990-01-01

    A survey shall be given on the physiological, pathophysiological and pharmacotherapeutic backgrounds of the biogenic amine 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin; 5HT), to be preceded by a few historical remarks. 5HT is biosynthesized from L-tryptophan via hydroxylation and subsequent decarboxylation. 5HT

  18. Serotonin Syndrome in Tapentadol Literature: Systematic Review of Original Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressler, Laura E; Hammond, Drayton A; Painter, Jacob T

    The potential association between serotonin syndrome and tapentadol is not well described in the literature. This study aimed to review the literature and identify methodological issues that could lead to inaccurately reported rates of serotonin syndrome associated with tapentadol use. A systematic review of English articles using MEDLINE, Cochrane Controlled Trials Register, and Scopus was performed. Additional studies were identified by cross-referencing article bibliographies. Original research that examined the safety of tapentadol in patients with nonconfounding indications were examined. In total, 22 studies met inclusion criteria. There were 13 randomized clinical trials, 7 open-label trials, and 2 observational studies. All studies either did not mention whether serotonergic medication use was prohibited or disallowed use. Frequently reported adverse events were nausea, diarrhea, constipation, fatigue, vomiting, and somnolence. No studies reported serotonin syndrome development. No included trials differentiated between the development of adverse events in patients taking serotonergic drugs and those who were not. This differentiation is necessary to evaluate the increased risk of adverse events in patients prescribed tapentadol concomitantly with other serotonergic medications. Therefore, the current tapentadol literature has important limitations that prevent the adequate characterization of the potential association between tapentadol and serotonin syndrome.

  19. Nutraceutical up-regulation of serotonin paradoxically induces compulsive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    The role of diet in either the etiology or treatment of complex mental disorder is highly controversial in psychiatry. However, physiological mechanisms by which diet can influence brain chemistry – particularly that of serotonin – are well established. Here we show that dietary up-regulation of br...

  20. How the cerebral serotonin homeostasis predicts environmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalbitzer, Jan; Kalbitzer, Urs; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2013-01-01

    Molecular imaging studies with positron emission tomography have revealed that the availability of serotonin transporter (5-HTT) in the human brain fluctuates over the course of the year. This effect is most pronounced in carriers of the short allele of the 5-HTT promoter region (5-HTTLPR), which...

  1. Alterations to embryonic serotonin change aggression and fearfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenatal environment, including maternal hormones, affects the development of the serotonin (5-HT) system, with long-lasting effects on mood and behavioral exhibition in children and adults. The chicken provides a unique animal model to study the effects of embryonic development on childhood and ado...

  2. Brief Report: Platelet-Poor Plasma Serotonin in Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, George M.; Hertzig, Margaret E.; McBride, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    Possible explanations for the well-replicated platelet hyperserotonemia of autism include an alteration in the platelet's handling of serotonin (5-hydroxyserotonin, 5-HT) or an increased exposure of the platelet to 5-HT. Measurement of platelet-poor plasma (PPP) levels of 5-HT appears to provide the best available index of in vivo exposure of the…

  3. Effects of Postnatal Serotonin Agonism on Fear Response and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    The neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) also acts as a neurogenic compound in the developing brain. Early administration of a 5-HT agonist could alter the development of the serotonergic circuitry, altering behaviors mediated by 5-HT signaling, such as memory, fear and aggression. White leghorn chicks...

  4. A role for serotonin in piglet preweaning mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improving piglet survivability rate is of high priority for swine production as well as for piglet well-being. Dysfunction in the serotonin system has been associated with growth deficiencies, infant mortality or failure to thrive (FTT) in human infants. The aim of this study was to examine the role...

  5. A new Drosophila octopamine receptor responds to serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yi-Xiang; Xu, Gang; Gu, Gui-Xiang; Mao, Fen; Ye, Gong-Yin; Liu, Weiwei; Huang, Jia

    2017-11-01

    As the counterparts of the vertebrate adrenergic transmitters, octopamine and tyramine are important physiological regulators in invertebrates. They control and modulate many physiological and behavioral functions in insects. In this study, we reported the pharmacological properties of a new α2-adrenergic-like octopamine receptor (CG18208) from Drosophila melanogaster, named DmOctα2R. This new receptor gene encodes two transcripts by alternative splicing. The long isoform DmOctα2R-L differs from the short isoform DmOctα2R-S by the presence of an additional 29 amino acids within the third intracellular loop. When heterologously expressed in mammalian cell lines, both receptors were activated by octopamine, tyramine, epinephrine and norepinephrine, resulting in the inhibition of cAMP production in a dose-dependent manner. The long form is more sensitive to the above ligands than the short form. The adrenergic agonists naphazoline, tolazoline and clonidine can stimulate DmOctα2R as full agonists. Surprisingly, serotonin and serotoninergic agonists can also activate DmOctα2R. Several tested adrenergic antagonists and serotonin antagonists blocked the action of octopamine or serotonin on DmOctα2R. The data presented here reported an adrenergic-like G protein-coupled receptor activated by serotonin, suggesting that the neurotransmission and neuromodulation in the nervous system could be more complex than previously thought. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Buspirone is an effective augmenting agent of serotonin selective re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Buspirone has previously been reported to be effective in the augmentation of the antidepressant effect of serotonin selective re-uptake inhibitors (SSRls) in depressed outpatients. We report on buspirone augmentation of SSRls in severe treatment-refractory depression in inpatients. Methods. A retrospective ...

  7. Serotonin 2A Receptors, Citalopram and Tryptophan-Depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Macoveanu, Julian; Hornboll, Bettina; Elliott, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    in serotonergic regulation of response inhibition. In 24 healthy adults, we used (18)F-altanserin positron emission tomography to assess cerebral 5-HT(2A) receptors, which have been related to impulsivity. We then investigated the impact of two acute manipulations of brain serotonin levels on behavioral...

  8. High brain serotonin levels in migraine between attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D; Hougaard, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Migraine has been hypothesized to be a syndrome of chronic low serotonin (5-HT) levels, but investigations of brain 5-HT levels have given equivocal results. Here, we used positron emission tomography (PET) imaging of the 5-HT4receptor as a proxy for brain 5-HT levels. Given that the 5-HT4receptor...

  9. High brain serotonin levels in migraine between attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deen, Marie; Hansen, Hanne D.; Hougaard, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate brain 5-HT4-receptor binding with positron emission tomography (PET) as a proxy of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels in migraine patients between attacks. Methods Brain 5-HT4-receptor binding, assessed with PET imaging of the specific 5-HT4-receptor radioligand...

  10. Serotonin synthesis studied with positron emission tomography, (PET)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig; Lundquist, Pinelopi

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to study the biosynthesis and release of serotonin (5HT) at brain serotonergic neurons. PET requires probe compounds with specific attributes to enable imaging and quantification of biological processes. This section focuses on probes to measure...

  11. Serotonin 2A receptor antagonists for treatment of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ebdrup, Bjørn Hylsebeck; Rasmussen, Hans; Arnt, Jørn

    2011-01-01

    : Preclinical, clinical and post-mortem studies of the serotonin 5-HT2A system in schizophrenia are reviewed. The implications of a combined D2 and 5-HT2A receptor blockade, which is obtained by several current antipsychotic drugs, are discussed, and the rationale for the development of more selective 5-HT2A...

  12. Binding-Induced Fluorescence of Serotonin Transporter Ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, James; Ladefoged, Lucy Kate; Babinchak, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The binding-induced fluorescence of 4-(4-(dimethylamino)-phenyl)-1-methylpyridinium (APP(+)) and two new serotonin transporter (SERT)-binding fluorescent analogues, 1-butyl-4-[4-(1-dimethylamino)phenyl]-pyridinium bromide (BPP(+)) and 1-methyl-4-[4-(1-piperidinyl)phenyl]-pyridinium (PPP(+)), has...

  13. Kynurenine and serotonin pathways: A review | Adegbusi | Bayero ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper seeks to elucidate the two-key pathways involving tryptophan matabolism, namely, kynurenine and serotonin pathways. In the kynurenine pathway (KP), the discussion considers the steps of the oxidative degradation of tryptophan to yield nicotinate mononucleotide, a precursors for the biosynthesis of nicotinate ...

  14. Serotonin: is it a marker for the diagnosis of hepatocellular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hoda Aly Abd El Moety

    2013-04-19

    Apr 19, 2013 ... tron granules.68. Lesurtel et al.69 identified platelets as the major source of serotonin that drives liver regeneration in partial hepatectomy of (PHx) mice. They found that liver regeneration in thrombo- cytopenic mice following PHx was restored by supplementing the mice with platelet-rich plasma containing ...

  15. Tall Fescue Alkaloids Bind Serotonin Receptors in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    The serotonin (5HT) receptor 5HT2A is involved in the tall fescue alkaloid-induced vascular contraction in the bovine periphery. This was determined by evaluating the contractile responses of lateral saphenous veins biopsied from cattle grazing different tall fescue/endophyte combinations. The contr...

  16. Increased hypothalamic serotonin turnover in inflammation-induced anorexia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dwarkasing, J.T.; Witkamp, R.F.; Boekschoten, M.V.; Laak, ter M.C.; Heins, M.S.; Norren, van K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anorexia can occur as a serious complication of disease. Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation plays a major role, along with a hypothalamic dysregulation characterized by locally elevated serotonin levels. The present study was undertaken to further explore the connections

  17. Increased serum serotonin improves parturient calcium homeostasis in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez Castellano, Lorenzo E; Hernandez, Laura L. Hernandez; Weaver, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    Hypocalcemia in dairy cows is caused by the sudden increase in calcium demand by the mammary gland for milk production at the onset of lactation. Serotonin (5-HT) is a key factor for calcium homeostasis, modulating calcium concentration in blood. Therefore, it is hypothesized that administration...

  18. Purification and fluorescent labeling of the human serotonin transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren G F; Gether, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    To establish a purification procedure for the human serotonin transporter (hSERT) we expressed in Sf9 insect cells an epitope-tagged version of the transporter containing a FLAG epitope at the N-terminus and a polyhistidine tail at the C-terminus (FLAG-hSERT-12H). For purification, the transporter...

  19. Serotonin syndrome and rhabdomyolysis in venlafaxine poisoning : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanekamp, BB; Zijlstra, JG; Tulleken, JE; Ligtenberg, JJM; van der Werf, TS; Hofstra, LS

    Newer, more selective, antidepressant agents are increasingly being used as first-line treatment. However, clinical experience in patients after a deliberate overdose is limited. We present a case of venlafaxine intoxication complicated by a late rise in creatine kinase, seizures and serotonin

  20. Alcohol response and consumption in adolescent rhesus macaques: life history and genetic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Melanie L; Lindell, Stephen G; Chen, Scott; Higley, J Dee; Suomi, Stephen J; Heilig, Markus; Barr, Christina S

    2010-02-01

    The use of alcohol by adolescents is a growing problem and has become an important research topic in the etiology of the alcohol use disorders. A key component of this research has been the development of animal models of adolescent alcohol consumption and alcohol response. Because of their extended period of adolescence, rhesus macaques are especially well suited for modeling alcohol-related phenotypes that contribute to the adolescent propensity for alcohol consumption. In this review, we discuss studies from our laboratory that have investigated both the initial response to acute alcohol administration and the consumption of alcohol in voluntary self-administration paradigms in adolescent rhesus macaques. These studies confirm that adolescence is a time of dynamic change both behaviorally and physiologically, and that alcohol response and alcohol consumption are influenced by life history variables, such as age, sex, and adverse early experience in the form of peer-rearing. Furthermore, genetic variants that alter functioning of the serotonin, endogenous opioid, and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems are shown to influence both physiological and behavioral outcomes, in some cases interacting with early experience to indicate gene by environment interactions. These findings highlight several of the pathways involved in alcohol response and consumption, namely reward, behavioral dyscontrol, and vulnerability to stress, and demonstrate a role for these pathways during the early stages of alcohol exposure in adolescence. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Cerebral Serotonin Transporter and Serotonin(2A) Receptor Binding in 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or "Ecstasy") and Hallucinogen Users

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erritzoe, David; Frokjaer, Vibe G.; Holst, Klaus K.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine( MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin.Objective: ......Context: Both hallucinogens and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine( MDMA or "ecstasy") have direct agonistic effects on postsynaptic serotonin(2A) receptors, the key site for hallucinogenic actions. In addition, MDMA is a potent releaser and reuptake inhibitor of presynaptic serotonin...

  2. Decreasing prevalence of social drinkers in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callinan, Sarah; Pennay, Amy; Livingston, Michael

    2017-04-01

    There has been a recent decrease in population level alcohol consumption in Australia, particularly in young people. Whether this is due to increasing abstinence or a shift in the way people think about alcohol is not known. The aim of this study is to investigate trends in self-identification of drinker types in Australia from 2001 to 2013 in light of shifting patterns of alcohol consumption in Australia. Five waves of the National Drug Strategy Household Survey from 2001 to 2013 (N=118,416) were used to assess trends in self-identification as a drinker type (non-, ex-, occasional, light, social, heavy and binge drinker). Consumption patterns and demographics of the self-identified groups were also examined. The pattern of self-identification has mostly remained steady over time. The two exceptions to this are a decrease in identification as a social drinker (28% to 22%) and a corresponding increase in identification as a non-drinker (from 19% to 27%). There are few changes over time in the demographic make-up of, or consumption patterns in, the social drinker category with the exception of those over 50, who continue to identify as social drinkers at the same rate. The recent increase in abstinence in Australia seems to be matched by a corresponding decrease in self-identified social drinkers, particularly among those under 50. This indicates that the decrease in consumption is not occurring in those most likely to experience harms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI antidepressants, prolactin and breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet eAshbury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are a widely prescribed class of anti-depressants. Laboratory and epidemiologic evidence suggests that a prolactin-mediated mechanism secondary to increased serotonin levels at neuronal synapses could lead to a potentially carcinogenic effect of SSRIs. In this population-based case-control study, we evaluated the association between SSRI use and breast cancer risk as a function of their relative degree of inhibition of serotonin reuptake as a proxy for their impact on prolactin levels. Cases were 2,129 women with primary invasive breast cancer diagnosed from 2003-2007, and controls were 21,297 women randomly selected from the population registry. Detailed information for each SSRI prescription dispensed was compiled using the Saskatchewan prescription database. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the impact of use of high and lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake and duration of use, as well as to assess the effect of individual high inhibitors on the risk of breast cancer. Exclusive users of high or lower inhibitors of serotonin reuptake were not at increased risk for breast cancer compared with nonusers of SSRIs (OR = 1.01, CI = 0.88-1.17 and OR = 0.91, CI = 0.67-1.25 respectively, regardless of their duration of use or menopausal status. While we cannot rule out the possibility of a clinically important risk increase (OR = 1.83, CI = 0.99-3.40 for long-term users of sertraline (≥24 prescriptions, given the small number of exposed cases (n=12, the borderline statistical significance and the wide confidence interval, these results need to be interpreted cautiously. In this large population-based case-control study, we found no conclusive evidence of breast cancer risk associated with the use of SSRIs even after assessing the degree of serotonin reuptake inhibition and duration of use. Our results do not support the serotonin-mediated pathway for the prolactin-breast cancer hypothesis.

  4. Oxytocin and Serotonin Brain Mechanisms in the Nonhuman Primate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Arthur; Richard, Nathalie; Jazayeri, Mina; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurélien; Fieux, Sylvain; Zimmer, Luc; Duhamel, Jean-René; Sirigu, Angela

    2017-07-12

    Oxytocin (OT) is increasingly studied for its therapeutic potential in psychiatric disorders, which are associated with the deregulation of several neurotransmission systems. Studies in rodents demonstrated that the interaction between OT and serotonin (5-HT) is critical for several aspects of social behavior. Using PET scan in humans, we have recently found that 5-HT 1A receptor (5-HT 1A R) function is modified after intranasal oxytocin intake. However, the underlying mechanism between OT and 5-HT remains unclear. To understand this interaction, we tested 3 male macaque monkeys using both [ 11 C]DASB and [ 18 F]MPPF, two PET radiotracers, marking the serotonin transporter and the 5-HT 1A R, respectively. Oxytocin (1 IU in 20 μl of ACSF) or placebo was injected into the brain lateral ventricle 45 min before scans. Additionally, we performed postmortem autoradiography. Compared with placebo, OT significantly reduced [ 11 C]DASB binding potential in right amygdala, insula, and hippocampus, whereas [ 18 F]MPPF binding potential increased in right amygdala and insula. Autoradiography revealed that [ 11 C]DASB was sensitive to physiological levels of 5-HT modification, and that OT does not act directly on the 5-HT 1A R. Our results show that oxytocin administration in nonhuman primates influences serotoninergic neurotransmission via at least two ways: (1) by provoking a release of serotonin in key limbic regions; and (2) by increasing the availability of 5-HT 1A R receptors in the same limbic areas. Because these two molecules are important for social behavior, our study sheds light on the specific nature of their interaction, therefore helping to develop new mechanisms-based therapies for psychiatric disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Social behavior is largely controlled by brain neuromodulators, such as oxytocin and serotonin. While these are currently targeted in the context of psychiatric disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, a new promising pharmaceutical

  5. Serotonin and calcium homeostasis during the transition period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, S R; Laporta, J; Moore, S A E; Hernandez, L L

    2016-07-01

    The transition from pregnancy to lactation puts significant, sudden demands on maternal energy and calcium reserves. Although most mammals are able to effectively manage these metabolic adaptations, the lactating dairy cow is acutely susceptible to transition-related disorders because of the high amounts of milk being produced. Hypocalcemia is a common metabolic disorder that occurs at the onset of lactation. Hypocalcemia is also known to result in poor animal welfare conditions. In addition, cows that develop hypocalcemia are more susceptible to a host of other negative health outcomes. Different feeding tactics, including manipulating the dietary cation-anion difference and administering low-calcium diets, are commonly used preventative strategies. Despite these interventions, the incidence of hypocalcemia in the subclinical form is still as high as 25% to 30% in the United States dairy cow population, with a 5% to 10% incidence of clinical hypocalcemia. In addition, although there are various effective treatments in place, they are administered only after the cow has become noticeably ill, at which point there is already significant metabolic damage. This emphasizes the need for developing alternative prevention strategies, with the monoamine serotonin implicated as a potential therapeutic target. Our research in rodents has shown that serotonin is critical for the induction of mammary parathyroid hormone-related protein, which is necessary for the mobilization of bone tissue and subsequent restoration of maternal calcium stores during lactation. We have shown that circulating serotonin concentrations are positively correlated with serum total calcium on the first day of lactation in dairy cattle. Administration of serotonin's immediate precursor through feeding, injection, or infusion to various mammalian species has been shown to increase circulating serotonin concentrations, with positive effects on other components of maternal metabolism. Most recently

  6. Serotonin versus catecholamine deficiency: behavioral and neural effects of experimental depletion in remitted depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, P; Neumeister, A; Nugent, A C; Charney, D S; Drevets, W C; Hasler, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite immense efforts into development of new antidepressant drugs, the increases of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic neurotransmission have remained the two major pharmacodynamic principles of current drug treatments for depression. Consequently, psychopathological or biological markers that predict response to drugs that selectively increase serotonin and/or catecholamine neurotransmission hold the potential to optimize the prescriber's selection among currently available treatment options. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential symptomatology and neurophysiology in response to reductions in serotonergic versus catecholaminergic neurotransmission in subjects at high risk of depression recurrence. Using identical neuroimaging procedures with [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography after tryptophan depletion (TD) and catecholamine depletion (CD), subjects with remitted depression were compared with healthy controls in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Although TD induced significantly more depressed mood, sadness and hopelessness than CD, CD induced more inactivity, concentration difficulties, lassitude and somatic anxiety than TD. CD specifically increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral ventral striatum and decreased glucose metabolism in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, whereas TD specifically increased metabolism in the right prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Although we found direct associations between changes in brain metabolism and induced depressive symptoms following CD, the relationship between neural activity and symptoms was less clear after TD. In conclusion, this study showed that serotonin and catecholamines have common and differential roles in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25781231

  7. Microautoradiography of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in mice treated with fluoxetine and serotonin reuptake inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.-X.; Chen, J.-C.; Liu, R.-S.; Wey, S.-P.; Lee, J.-S.; Chen, C.-C.; Fu, Y.-K.; Ting, Gann; Hwang, J.-J. E-mail: jjhwang@ym.edu.tw

    2004-07-01

    A radiopharmaceutical, {sup 123}I-labeled 2-((2-((dimethylamino)methyl)phenyl)thio)-5-iodophenylamine ([{sup 123}I]ADAM), has been developed recently for evaluation of how serotonin transporters (SERT) function in the brain. However, the detailed biodistribution and specific binding in certain brain areas are not well investigated. In this study, both phosphor plate imaging and microautoradiography were applied to explore the binding characteristics of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in SERT neurons. The effect of two psychotropics and one narcotic on the binding of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT was also studied. Fluoxetine and desipramine, both are psychotropics and specific SERT ligands and decreased the affinity of [{sup 123}I]ADAM, while p-chloroamphetamine (PCA), a narcotic, destroyed most of serotonergic neurons, as well as reducing the concentration of serotonin and the number of SERT in the brain as shown by the biodistribution of [{sup 123}I]ADAM. Significant and selective accumulation of [{sup 123}I]ADAM in the areas from midbrain to brain stem in normal mice with maximum target-to-background ratio was found at 90 minutes postinjection. A rapid clearance of [{sup 131}I]ADAM at 120 minutes postinjection was found in the CA1, CA3 and ThN brain areas. In addition, the inhibition effect on binding ability of [{sup 123}I]ADAM to SERT by the psychotropics and the narcotic was found to have the order of: PCA > fluoxetine > desipramine.

  8. Brain imaging of serotonin 4 receptors in humans with [11C]SB207145-PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marner, Lisbeth; Gillings, Nic; Madsen, Karine

    2010-01-01

    Pharmacological stimulation of the serotonin 4 (5-HT(4)) receptor has shown promise for treatment of Alzheimer's disease and major depression. A new selective radioligand, [(11)C]SB207145, for positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify brain 5-HT(4) receptors in sixteen healthy...... is expected to increase competition from endogenous serotonin. Given radiotracer administration at a range of specific activities, we were able to use the individual BP(ND) measurements for population-based estimation of the saturation binding parameters; B(max) ranged from 0.3 to 1.6 nM. B......(max) was in accordance with post-mortem brain studies (Spearman's r=0.83, p=0.04), and the regional binding potentials, BP(ND), were on average 2.6 in striatum, 0.42 in prefrontal cortex, and 0.91 in hippocampus. We found no effect of sex but a decreased binding with age (p=0.046). A power analysis showed that, given...

  9. Serotonin reuptake inhibitors in auditory processing disorders in elderly patients: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Oswaldo Laércio M; Kasse, Cristiane A; Sanchez, Maura; Barbosa, Flavio; Barros, Flavia A

    2004-09-01

    One mechanism associated with degeneration in the elderly is the decrease of neurotransmitters. In the central auditory pathway serotonin, can be found from cochlear nucleus to the auditory cortex, and it constitutes one of the most important neuromodulatory circuits in hearing processing. The present study analyzed the action of citalopram, a selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake, in aged patients with normal to moderate sensorineural hearing loss (HL) and low performance on auditory processing. Prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study. Thirty-eight selected patients were randomly divided into two groups. Nineteen patients made up group A and received placebo for 60 days. Nineteen patients of Group B received 20 mg per day of citalopram for 60 days. Hearing evaluation was performed initially and after 60 days and included pure-tone audiometry, speech discrimination test (SDT), emittanciometry (acoustic impedance audiometry), identification of synthetic sentences with an ipsilateral competitive message (SSI/ICM), tests of pitch-pattern sequences (PPS), and the staggered spondaic words test (SSW). Comparisons of tests of auditory processing pre- and posttreatment in each group showed a statistical improvement in performance on all tests in group B after 2 months of therapy. Comparisons pre- and posttreatment between groups showed that patients who received citalopram presented statistically significantly better results in the SSI/ICM test (P auditory processes in elderly patients with low performance in auditory process.

  10. Serotonin Transporter Gene Associations with Psychopathic Traits in Youth Vary as a Function of Socioeconomic Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeh, Naomi; Javdani, Shabnam; Jackson, Joshua J.; Reynolds, Elizabeth K.; Potenza, Marc N.; Gelernter, Joel; Lejuez, C. W.; Verona, Edelyn

    2010-01-01

    Although prior research has examined the genetic correlates of antisocial behavior, molecular genetics influences on psychopathic traits remain largely unknown. Consequently, we investigated the influence of polymorphic variation at the serotonin transporter protein gene (SLC6A4) and socioeconomic resources (SES) on psychopathic traits in youth across two distinct samples in two separate studies. In Study 1, a main effect of serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) genotype was associated with the impulsivity dimension of psychopathy. That is, individuals homozygous for the short allele evidenced more impulsivity than those homozygous for the long allele. In contrast, a gene-environment interaction was associated with the callous-unemotional and narcissistic features of psychopathy. Callous-unemotional and narcissistic traits increased as SES decreased only among youths with the homozygous-long (l/l) genotype, a novel finding replicated and extended in Study 2. These studies provide preliminary results that the l/l genotype confers risk for the emotional deficits and predatory interpersonal traits associated with psychopathy among youths raised in disadvantaged environments. PMID:20677849

  11. Action potential-independent and pharmacologically unique vesicular serotonin release from dendrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Commons, Kathryn G.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin released within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) induces feedback inhibition of serotonin neuron activity and consequently regulates mood-controlling serotonin release throughout the forebrain. Serotonin packaged in vesicles is released in response to action potentials by the serotonin neuron soma and terminals, but the potential for release by dendrites is unknown. Here three-photon (3P) microscopy imaging of endogenous serotonin in living rat brain slice, immunofluorescence and immuno-gold electron microscopy detection of VMAT2 (vesicular monoamine transporter 2) establish the presence of vesicular serotonin within DR dendrites. Furthermore, activation of glutamate receptors is shown to induce vesicular serotonin release from dendrites. However, unlike release from the soma and terminals, dendritic serotonin release is independent of action potentials, relies on L-type Ca2+ channels, is induced preferentially by NMDA, and displays distinct sensitivity to the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant fluoxetine. The unique control of dendritic serotonin release has important implications for DR physiology and the antidepressant action of SSRIs, dihydropyridines and NMDA receptor antagonists. PMID:23136413

  12. Non-conventional features of peripheral serotonin signalling - the gut and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Stephanie N; Mawe, Gary M

    2017-07-01

    Serotonin was first discovered in the gut, and its conventional actions as an intercellular signalling molecule in the intrinsic and extrinsic enteric reflexes are well recognized, as are a number of serotonin signalling pharmacotherapeutic targets for treatment of nausea, diarrhoea or constipation. The latest discoveries have greatly broadened our understanding of non-conventional actions of peripheral serotonin within the gastrointestinal tract and in a number of other tissues. For example, it is now clear that bacteria within the lumen of the bowel influence serotonin synthesis and release by enterochromaffin cells. Also, serotonin can act both as a pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory signalling molecule in the intestinal mucosa via activation of serotonin receptors (5-HT 7 or 5-HT 4 receptors, respectively). For decades, serotonin receptors have been known to exist in a variety of tissues other than the gut, but studies have now provided strong evidence for physiological roles of serotonin in several important processes, including haematopoiesis, metabolic homeostasis and bone metabolism. Furthermore, evidence for serotonin synthesis in peripheral tissues outside of the gut is emerging. In this Review, we expand the discussion beyond gastrointestinal functions to highlight the roles of peripheral serotonin in colitis, haematopoiesis, energy and bone metabolism, and how serotonin is influenced by the gut microbiota.

  13. Alcohol Misuse Among Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Julie McCulloh; Nemeth, Lynne S; Williams, Pamela Holtzclaw; Newman, Susan D; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2015-01-01

    The self-reported prevalence of alcohol use among U.S. college students decreased from 90.5% in 1980 to 79.2% in 2012. National efforts exist to reduce alcohol misuse among college students in the United States, yet little research addresses substance abuse among nursing students and even less addresses alcohol misuse. Alcohol misuse in nursing students may result in patient harm. This scoping study describes the state of the science of alcohol misuse among nursing students, guided by the research question: "What is the current state of alcohol misuse among U.S. nursing students?" Evidence was drawn from several scholarly sources. Articles were included if they addressed U.S. nursing students; alcohol misuse; substance abuse or chemical impairment; prevalence rates; and/or characteristics including nursing student behaviors, attitudes, and beliefs. Using thematic analysis, common themes were extracted, followed by hand coding those themes and using NVivo qualitative software. Six studies met inclusion criteria. Three themes, eight subthemes, and several gaps in knowledge were identified. The themes include "high prevalence exists," "necessity of supportive environments," and "hopelessness without policies." Subthemes include "root cause," "vulnerable population," "scholarship and substance use," "education," "identification of risk factors," "prevention and deterrents," "safety," "ethical and legal issues," and "consequences." On the basis of this analysis, several research questions were developed to explore alcohol misuse in this population. Alcohol was the most often used substance. Nursing students were unaware of a safe level of consumption and the potential negative health-related and professional effects associated with alcohol misuse.

  14. Overview of Alcohol Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol Use Disorder Fetal Alcohol Exposure Support & Treatment Alcohol Policy Special ... experience alcohol’s longer-term effects, which can include: Alcohol use disorder Health problems Increased risk for certain cancers In ...

  15. -Structure of the respiratory system of the Ulodera Hynobius neblosus tokyoensis Tago, with special reference to the distribution of serotonin-immunoreactive cells in its respiratory tract epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Y

    1995-12-01

    developed capillary networks that were assumed to be involved in gas exchange. The lumen of the laryngotrachea and the pulmonary airway portion contained pseudostratified cilio-mucous epithelium. In the caudaldorsal region of the laryngotrachea adjacent to the lungs, the non-ciliated respiratory epithelium was seen lining the capillaries. In cilio-mucous epithelium of the laryngotrachea, all serotonin-immunoreactive cells were solitary. They apposed to be columnar, cuboidal, triangular, oval, and flask- or spindle-shaped. Solitary serotonin-immunoreactive cells were classified "open type cell" with appical process reaching to the luminal surface and "closed type cell" insulated from the lumen by an epithelial lining. In the pulmonary airway portion, serotonin-immunoreactive cells were solitary cells and in clusters. Serotonin-immunoreactive cells were widely distributed throughout the respiratory tract, but they tended to be found mainly in the cranial portion. The density was highest in the area with the laryngeal sphincter, and decreased caudally in the laryngotrachea and lung. No serotonin-immunoreactive cells were found in the respiratory portion of the dorsal-caudal area of the laryngotrachea or in the part of the lung with non-ciliated cells. So the structure and distribution of serotonin-immunoreactive cells in the respiratory tract of the Tokyo salamander are similar to those of NEE cells and NEBs in mammalian respiratory systems. The density of serotonin-immunoreactive cells appears to be related to the distribution of smooth muscles in the fibromuscular layer and airway portion. The cells may be involved in regulation of the respiratory system. Serotonin is released in response to stimulation, which could result in constriction of the fibromuscular layer and shrinkage of the laryngotracheal cavity, and may regulate pulmonary volume by constricting smooth muscles

  16. Alcohol Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Get follow-up care. If you or your teen has been treated for alcohol poisoning, be sure to ask about follow-up care. Meeting with a health professional, particularly an experienced chemical dependency professional, can help you prevent future binge drinking. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo Clinic ...

  17. ALCOHOL I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    although sales promotions affected stu- dents from Australia and Germany, Welsh students were more likely to purchase alcohol during promotions, because of their intention to take advantage of price discounts. In the Philippines, Swahn et al. (2013) revealed that promotional ac- tivities offering free drinks to students.

  18. Developmental exposure to fluoxetine modulates the serotonin system in hypothalamus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Berg

    Full Text Available The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI fluoxetine (FLU, Prozac® is commonly prescribed for depression in pregnant women. This results in SSRI exposure of the developing fetus. However, there are knowledge gaps regarding the impact of SSRI exposure during development. Given the role of serotonin in brain development and its cross-talk with sex hormone function, we investigated effects of developmental exposure to pharmacologically relevant concentrations of FLU (3 and 30 nM (measured on brain neurotransmitter levels, gonadal differentiation, aromatase activity in brain and gonads, and the thyroid system, using the Xenopus tropicalis model. Tadpoles were chronically exposed (8 weeks until metamorphosis. At metamorphosis brains were cryosectioned and levels of serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine, and their metabolites 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid were measured in discrete regions (telencephalon, hypothalamus and the reticular formation of the cryosections using high-performance liquid chromatography. Exposure to 30 nM FLU increased the concentration of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in hypothalamus compared with controls. FLU exposure did not affect survival, time to metamorphosis, thyroid histology, gonadal sex differentiation, or aromatase activity implying that the effect on the serotonergic neurotransmitter system in the hypothalamus region was specific. The FLU concentration that impacted the serotonin system is lower than the concentration measured in umbilical cord serum, suggesting that the serotonin system of the developing brain is highly sensitive to in utero exposure to FLU. To our knowledge this is the first study showing effects of developmental FLU exposure on brain neurochemistry. Given that SSRIs are present in the aquatic environment the current results warrant further investigation into the neurobehavioral effects of SSRIs in aquatic wildlife.

  19. Controlled Attenuation Parameter And Alcoholic Hepatic Steatosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiele, Maja; Rausch, Vanessa; Fluhr, Gabriele

    2018-01-01

    and patients with a CAP value above 290 dB/m were highly likely to have more than 5% fat in their livers, determined by liver biopsy. CAP was also better than regular ultrasound to determine the severity of alcoholic fatty liver disease. Finally, we show that three in four (non-obese) patients rapidly decrease......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) is a novel non-invasive measure of hepatic steatosis, but has not been evaluated in alcoholic liver disease. We therefore aimed to validate CAP for assessment of biopsy-verified alcoholic steatosis and to study the effect of alcohol...... a significantly higher CAP, which did not decrease significantly during detoxification. CONCLUSIONS: CAP has a good diagnostic accuracy for diagnosing severe alcoholic liver steatosis and can be used to rule in any steatosis. In non-obese but not in obese patients, CAP rapidly declines after alcohol withdrawal...

  20. Exercise and sleep in aging: emphasis on serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancon, M O; Lorrain, D; Dionne, I J

    2014-10-01

    Reductions in central serotonin activity with aging might be involved in sleep-related disorders in later life. Although the beneficial effects of aerobic exercise on sleep are not new, sleep represents a complex recurring state of unconsciousness involving many lines of transmitters which remains only partly clear despite intense ongoing research. It is known that serotonin released into diencephalon and cerebrum might play a key inhibitory role to help promote sleep, likely through an active inhibition of supraspinal neural networks. Several lines of evidence support the stimulatory effects of exercise on higher serotonergic pathways. Hence, exercise has proved to elicit acute elevations in forebrain serotonin concentrations, an effect that waned upon cessation of exercise. While adequate exercise training might lead to adaptations in higher serotonergic networks (desensitization of forebrain receptors), excessive training has been linked to serious brain serotonergic maladaptations accompanied by insomnia. Dietary supplementation of tryptophan (the only serotonin precursor) is known to stimulate serotonergic activity and promote sleep, whereas acute tryptophan depletion causes deleterious effects on sleep. Regarding sleep-wake regulation, exercise has proved to accelerate resynchronization of the biological clock to new light-dark cycles following imposition of phase shifts in laboratory animals. Noteworthy, the effect of increased serotonergic transmission on wake state appears to be biphasic, i.e. promote wake and thereafter drowsiness. Therefore, it might be possible that acute aerobic exercise would act on sleep by increasing activity of ascending brain serotonergic projections, though additional work is warranted to better understand the implication of serotonin in the exercise-sleep axis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Biodistribution and dosimetry of {sup 123}I-mZIENT: a novel ligand for imaging serotonin transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicol, Alice [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Krishnadas, Rajeev [University of Glasgow, Sackler Institute of Psychobiological Research, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Champion, Sue [University of Glasgow, Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Tamagnan, Gilles [Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders, New Haven, CT (United States); Stehouwer, Jeffrey S.; Goodman, Mark M. [Emory University, Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hadley, Donald M. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Department of Neuro-Radiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Pimlott, Sally L. [NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, West of Scotland Radionuclide Dispensary, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled mZIENT (2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(3'-((Z)-2-iodoethenyl)phenyl)nortropane) has been developed as a radioligand for the serotonin transporter. The aim of this preliminary study was to assess its whole-body biodistribution in humans and estimate dosimetry. Three healthy controls and three patients receiving selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) therapy for depression were included (two men, four women, age range 41-56 years). Whole-body imaging, brain SPECT imaging and blood and urine sampling were performed. Whole-body images were analysed using regions of interest (ROIs), time-activity curves were derived using compartmental analysis and dosimetry estimated using OLINDA software. Brain ROI analysis was performed to obtain specific-to-nonspecific binding ratios in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum. Initial high uptake in the lungs decreased in later images. Lower uptake was seen in the brain, liver and intestines. Excretion was primarily through the urinary system. The effective dose was estimated to be of the order of 0.03 mSv/MBq. The organ receiving the highest absorbed dose was the lower large intestine wall. Uptake in the brain was consistent with the known SERT distribution with higher specific-to-nonspecific binding in the midbrain, thalamus and striatum in healthy controls compared with patients receiving SSRI therapy. {sup 123}I-mZIENT may be a promising radioligand for imaging the serotonin transporters in humans with acceptable dosimetry. (orig.)

  2. Serotonin transporter density in binge eating disorder and pathological gambling: A PET study with [11C]MADAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majuri, Joonas; Joutsa, Juho; Johansson, Jarkko; Voon, Valerie; Parkkola, Riitta; Alho, Hannu; Arponen, Eveliina; Kaasinen, Valtteri

    2017-12-01

    Behavioral addictions, such as pathological gambling (PG) and binge eating disorder (BED), appear to be associated with specific changes in brain dopamine and opioid function, but the role of other neurotransmitter systems is less clear. Given the crucial role of serotonin in a number of psychiatric disorders, we aimed to compare brain serotonergic function among individuals with BED, PG and healthy controls. Seven BED patients, 13 PG patients and 16 healthy controls were scanned with high-resolution positron emission tomography (PET) using the serotonin transporter (SERT) tracer [ 11 C]MADAM. Both region-of-interest and voxel-wise whole brain analyses were performed. Patients with BED showed increased SERT binding in the parieto-occipital cortical regions compared to both PG and healthy controls, with parallel decreases in binding in the nucleus accumbens, inferior temporal gyrus and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. No differences between PG patients and controls were observed. None of the subjects were on SSRI medications at the time of imaging, and there were no differences in the level of depression between PG and BED patients. The results highlight differences in brain SERT binding between individuals with BED and PG and provide further evidence of different neurobiological underpinnings in behavioral addictions that are unrelated to the co-existing mood disorder. The results aid in the conceptualization of behavioral addictions by characterizing the underlying serotonin changes and provide a framework for additional studies to examine syndrome-specific pharmaceutical treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  3. Sarpogrelate hydrochloride, a serotonin 5HT2A receptor antagonist, ameliorates the development of chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Erquan; Maruyama, Junko; Yokochi, Ayumu; Mitani, Yoshihide; Sawada, Hirofumi; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Ma, Ning; Maruyama, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine if sarpogrelate hydrochloride (SPG), a serotonin 5HT2A receptor antagonist, prevented the development of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) and hypertensive pulmonary vascular remodeling. Forty-one male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to hypobaric hypoxia (380 mmHg, 10 % oxygen) or room air and administered 50 mg/kg SPG or vehicle by gavage once daily from day -2 to day 14. The mean pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) were measured. Hypertensive pulmonary vascular remodelings were assessed morphometrically by light microscopy. Serotonin-induced contraction was determined in isolated pulmonary artery rings from 24 rats. In another set of rats, Western blotting, real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunofluorescent staining (n = 9) for lung tissue were performed. Chronic hypoxia induced a rise in mean PAP and RVH, increased the percentage of muscularized arteries in peripheral pulmonary arteries and medial wall thickness in small muscular arteries, and potentiated serotonin-induced contraction, each of which was significantly (p pulmonary arteries from chronic hypoxic rats and decreased the MMP-13 mRNA in lung tissue in chronic hypoxic rats. The administration of SPG ameliorated the development of chronic hypoxic PH and hypertensive pulmonary vascular changes.

  4. Effects of Junk Foods on Brain Neurotransmitters (Dopamine and Serotonin) and some Biochemical Parameters in Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Elmonem, H.A.; Ali, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutritional Habits have changed significantly and junk foods have become widely popular, in recent years. The present study aimed to shed the light on the effect of potato chips and / or ketchup consumption on some biochemical parameters. Sixty four male and female albino rats were used in the study. Animals were maintained on 0.25 g potato chips/ rat and / or 0.125 g ketchup / rat, 5 days a week for 4 weeks. Potato chips showed the lowest body wt gain in the male rats after 4 weeks but, ketchup modulated this negative effect of the potato chips in the group of male animals fed on potato chips plus ketchup. Potato chips significantly decreased brain serotonin, liver glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) in both sexes; brain dopamine, serum total proteins, albumin, total globulins, α 2 - and β 1 -globulins in the females and serum thyroxine (T 4 ) in the male rats. Ketchup apparently affected serum T 4 and A / G ratio in both sexes, brain dopamine and liver GSH in the males in addition to brain serotonin, serum total globulins and ?1-globulin in the female rats. Potato chips plus ketchup significantly changed T 4 , dopamine, GSH, CAT, α 1 and α 2 -globulins in both sexes; serotonin and β 1 -globulin in the male rats, total proteins and albumin in the females. It could be concluded that potato chips consumption might induce numerous adverse effects in various body organs

  5. Effects of general and alcohol-specific media literacy training on children's decision making about alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, E W; Johnson, K K

    1997-01-01

    This article examines the immediate and delayed effects of media literacy training on third-grade children's perceptions of alcohol advertising, alcohol norms, expectancies for drinking, and behaviors toward alcohol. A Solomon four-group style experiment (N = 225) with two levels of the treatment factor assessed the effectiveness of in-school media literacy training for alcohol. The experiment compared a treatment that included the viewing of a videotape about television advertising along with the viewing of video clips of alcohol ads and discussion pertaining to alcohol advertising specifically versus one that included the viewing of the same general purpose media literacy videotape along with video clips of non-alcohol advertising and then discussion of advertising in general. The treatment had both immediate and delayed effects. Immediate effects included the children's increased understanding of persuasive intent, viewing of characters as less similar to people they knew in real life and less desirable, decreased desire to be like the characters, decreased expectation of positive consequences from drinking alcohol, and decreased likelihood to choose an alcohol-related product. Indirect effects also were found on their perceptions of television's realism and their views of social norms related to alcohol. Delayed effects were examined and confirmed on expectancies and behavior. The treatment was more effective when alcohol-specific, and it also was more effective among girls than boys.

  6. Interaction of Human Enterochromaffin Cells with Human Enteric Adenovirus 41 Leads to Serotonin Release and Subsequent Activation of Enteric Glia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerberg, Sonja; Hagbom, Marie; Rajan, Anandi; Loitto, Vesa; Persson, B David; Allard, Annika; Nordgren, Johan; Sharma, Sumit; Magnusson, Karl-Eric; Arnberg, Niklas; Svensson, Lennart

    2018-04-01

    Human adenovirus 41 (HAdV-41) causes acute gastroenteritis in young children. The main characteristics of HAdV-41 infection are diarrhea and vomiting. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism of HAdV-41-induced diarrhea is unknown, as a suitable small-animal model has not been described. In this study, we used the human midgut carcinoid cell line GOT1 to investigate the effect of HAdV-41 infection and the individual HAdV-41 capsid proteins on serotonin release by enterochromaffin cells and on enteric glia cell (EGC) activation. We first determined that HAdV-41 could infect the enterochromaffin cells. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the cells expressed HAdV-41-specific coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR); flow cytometry analysis supported these findings. HAdV-41 infection of the enterochromaffin cells induced serotonin secretion dose dependently. In contrast, control infection with HAdV-5 did not induce serotonin secretion in the cells. Confocal microscopy studies of enterochromaffin cells infected with HAdV-41 revealed decreased serotonin immunofluorescence compared to that in uninfected cells. Incubation of the enterochromaffin cells with purified HAdV-41 short fiber knob and hexon proteins increased the serotonin levels in the harvested cell supernatant significantly. HAdV-41 infection could also activate EGCs, as shown in the significantly altered expression of glia fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in EGCs incubated with HAdV-41. The EGCs were also activated by serotonin alone, as shown in the significantly increased GFAP staining intensity. Likewise, EGCs were activated by the cell supernatant of HAdV-41-infected enterochromaffin cells. IMPORTANCE The nonenveloped human adenovirus 41 causes diarrhea, vomiting, dehydration, and low-grade fever mainly in children under 2 years of age. Even though acute gastroenteritis is well described, how human adenovirus 41 causes diarrhea is unknown. In our study, we analyzed the effect of human adenovirus 41

  7. The study of genetic polymorphisms related to serotonin in Alzheimer's disease: a new perspective in a heterogenic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira J.R.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic and environmental factors have been implicated in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common form of dementia in the elderly. Mutations in 3 genes mapped on chromosomes 21, 14 and 1 are related to the rare early onset forms of AD while the e4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (APOE gene (on chromosome 19 is the major susceptibility locus for the most common late onset AD (LOAD. Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine or 5-HT is a key neurotransmitter implicated in the control of mood, sleep, appetite and a variety of traits and behaviors. Recently, a polymorphism in the transcriptional control region upstream of the 5-HT transporter (5-HTT gene has been studied in several psychiatric diseases and personality traits. It has been demonstrated that the short variant(s of this 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR is associated with a different transcriptional efficiency of the 5-HTT gene promoter resulting in decreased 5-HTT expression and 5-HT uptake in lymphocytes. An increased frequency of this 5-HTTLPR short variant polymorphism in LOAD was recently reported. In addition, another common polymorphic variation in the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2C serotonin receptor genes previously analyzed in schizophrenic patients was associated with auditory and visual hallucinations in AD. These observations suggest that the involvement of the serotonin pathway might provide an explanation for some aspects of the affective symptoms commonly observed in AD patients. In summary, research on genetic polymorphisms related to AD and involved in receptors, transporter proteins and the enzymatic machinery of serotonin might enhance our understanding of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  8. Effects of consuming alcohol mixed with energy drinks versus consuming alcohol only on overall alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Haan L

    2012-11-01

    reported (2.6 for the previous year, including driving a car while intoxicated, taking foolish risks, or being injured or hurt, as compared with alcohol-related consequences when consuming alcohol only (4.9.Conclusion: Mixing alcohol with energy drinks decreases overall alcohol consumption, and decreases the likelihood of experiencing negative alcohol-related consequences.Keywords: alcohol, energy drinks, AMED, alcohol consumption, consequences

  9. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Violent Crime: A Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmina Molero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs are widely prescribed, associations with violence are uncertain.From Swedish national registers we extracted information on 856,493 individuals who were prescribed SSRIs, and subsequent violent crimes during 2006 through 2009. We used stratified Cox regression analyses to compare the rate of violent crime while individuals were prescribed these medications with the rate in the same individuals while not receiving medication. Adjustments were made for other psychotropic medications. Information on all medications was extracted from the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register, with complete national data on all dispensed medications. Information on violent crime convictions was extracted from the Swedish national crime register. Using within-individual models, there was an overall association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.19, 95% CI 1.08-1.32, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 1.0%. With age stratification, there was a significant association between SSRIs and violent crime convictions for individuals aged 15 to 24 y (HR = 1.43, 95% CI 1.19-1.73, p < 0.001, absolute risk = 3.0%. However, there were no significant associations in those aged 25-34 y (HR = 1.20, 95% CI 0.95-1.52, p = 0.125, absolute risk = 1.6%, in those aged 35-44 y (HR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.83-1.35, p = 0.666, absolute risk = 1.2%, or in those aged 45 y or older (HR = 1.07, 95% CI 0.84-1.35, p = 0.594, absolute risk = 0.3%. Associations in those aged 15 to 24 y were also found for violent crime arrests with preliminary investigations (HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.16-1.41, p < 0.001, non-violent crime convictions (HR = 1.22, 95% CI 1.10-1.34, p < 0.001, non-violent crime arrests (HR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.07-1.20, p < 0.001, non-fatal injuries from accidents (HR = 1.29, 95% CI 1.22-1.36, p < 0.001, and emergency inpatient or outpatient treatment for alcohol intoxication or misuse (HR = 1.98, 95% CI 1.76-2.21, p < 0.001. With

  10. Chronic alcoholism: insights from neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, S; Petit, G; Maurage, P; Kornreich, C; Verbanck, P; Noël, X

    2009-01-01

    Increasing knowledge of the anatomical structures and cellular processes underlying psychiatric disorders may help bridge the gap between clinical signs and basic physiological processes. Accordingly, considerable insight has been gained in recent years into a common psychiatric condition, i.e., chronic alcoholism. We reviewed various physiological parameters that are altered in chronic alcoholic patients compared to healthy individuals--continuous electroencephalogram, oculomotor measures, cognitive event-related potentials and event-related oscillations--to identify links between these physiological parameters, altered cognitive processes and specific clinical symptoms. Alcoholic patients display: (1) high beta and theta power in the resting electroencephalogram, suggesting hyperarousal of their central nervous system; (2) abnormalities in smooth pursuit eye movements, in saccadic inhibition during antisaccade tasks, and in prepulse inhibition, suggesting disturbed attention modulation and abnormal patterns of prefrontal activation that may stem from the same prefrontal "inhibitory" cortical dysfunction; (3) decreased amplitude for cognitive event-related potentials situated along the continuum of information-processing, suggesting that alcoholism is associated with neurophysiological deficits at the level of the sensory cortex and not only disturbances involving associative cortices and limbic structures; and (4) decreased theta, gamma and delta oscillations, suggesting cognitive disinhibition at a functional level. The heterogeneity of alcoholic disorders in terms of symptomatology, course and outcome is the result of various pathophysiological processes that physiological parameters may help to define. These alterations may be related to precise cognitive processes that could be easily monitored neurophysiologically in order to create more homogeneous subgroups of alcoholic individuals.

  11. Impact of a new alcohol policy on homemade alcohol consumption and sales in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radaev, Vadim

    2015-05-01

    To describe the effects of Russian policy since 2006 affecting price and availability on the consumption of recorded and unrecorded alcohol, with specific reference to homemade alcohol, and to investigate other factors affecting homemade alcohol consumption and purchasing. Consumption and preferred beverage data were collected from RLMS-HSE nationwide panel surveys from 1994 to 2013, with a detailed analysis of 2012 data (18,221 respondents aged 16+ years). Official statistics on manufactured alcohol sales, regional price increase and real disposable income were used. Homemade distilled spirits (samogon) consumption decreased together with that of recorded and unrecorded manufactured spirits since 2000. The consumption of spirits was partially replaced by the consumption of beer and wine. These trends in alcohol consumption were interrupted in 2008-2013. The interruption was more likely affected by the economic crisis and recession than by the new alcohol policy. Social networks and availability of unrecorded alcohol were more important predictors of homemade alcohol consumption and purchasing than was a recorded alcohol price increase. Homemade alcohol consumption does not replace the declining market for recorded spirits in Russia. The effects of economic and social factors on homemade alcohol consumption are greater than are the short-term effects of the new alcohol policy. The very recent (2015) reduction of the minimum unit price of vodka may be premature. © The Author 2015. Medical Council on Alcohol and Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  12. Decreasing relative risk premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    such that the corresponding relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine the set of associated utility functions. We find a new characterization of risk vulnerability and determine a large set of utility functions, closed under summation and composition, which are both risk vulnerable...... and have decreasing relative risk premium. We finally introduce the notion of partial risk neutral preferences on binary lotteries and show that partial risk neutrality is equivalent to preferences with decreasing relative risk premium...

  13. A trophic role for serotonin in the development of a simple feeding circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neckameyer, Wendi S

    2010-08-01

    Correct differentiation and positioning of individual synapses during development is fundamental to the normal function of neuronal circuits. While classical transmitters such as serotonin (5-HT) play a critical trophic role in neurogenesis in addition to their functions as transmitters in the mature nervous system, this process is not well understood. We used a simple model to assess both development and function of a specific behavioral circuit in the larval stage of the fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster). We show that, as in all other species examined, the neurotransmitter actions of 5-HT depress feeding, and decreased neuronal 5-HT levels increase appetite. However, using transgenic tools, we show that constitutive knockdown of neuronal 5-HT synthesis to reduce 5-HT levels during central nervous system (CNS) development results in increased branching of the serotonergic fibers projecting to the gut, as well as increased size and number of varicosities along the neurite length. As larvae, these animals display decreased feeding rates relative to controls, and, when given exogenous 5-hydroxytryptophan, feeding is significantly enhanced. Late-stage wild-type embryos exposed to 5-HT to augment 5-HT levels during CNS development display, as mature larvae, a significant decrease in gut fiber branching and total varicosity number, as well as increased feeding and a hyposensitivity to the effects of 5-HT. Exposure of embryos unable to synthesize neuronal serotonin to 5-HT during late embryogenesis results in rescue of the feeding behavior and abnormalities in the 5-HT gut fiber architecture. These results demonstrate an inverse relationship between developmental 5-HT levels and complexity of the fiber architecture projecting to gut tissue, which results in a perturbed feeding pattern. We conclude that 5-HT is tightly regulated during CNS development to direct the normal architecture and mature function of this neural circuit. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. The role of serotonin, vasopressin, and serotonin/vasopressin interactions in aggressive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Thomas R; Melloni, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Aggression control has been investigated across species and is centrally mediated within various brain regions by several neural systems that interact at different levels. The debate over the degree to which any one system or region affects aggressive responding, or any behavior for that matter, in some senses is arbitrary considering the plastic and adaptive properties of the central nervous system. Nevertheless, from the reductionist point of view, the compartmentalization of evolutionarily maladaptive behaviors to specific regions and systems of the brain is necessary for the advancement of clinical treatments (e.g., pharmaceutical) and novel therapeutic methods (e.g., deep brain stimulation). The general purpose of this chapter is to examine the confluence of two such systems, and how their functional interaction affects aggressive behavior. Specifically, the influence of the serotonin (5HT) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) neural systems on the control of aggressive behavior will be examined individually and together to provide a context by which the understanding of aggression modulation can be expanded from seemingly parallel neuromodulatory mechanisms, to a single and highly interactive system of aggression control.

  15. HIV/AIDS and Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Main Menu Search Search form Search Alcohol & Your Health Overview of Alcohol Consumption Alcohol's Effects on the Body Alcohol ...

  16. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Walitt

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. OBJECTIVES: To assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs in the treatment of fibromyalgia. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5, MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014, EMBASE (1946 to June 2014, and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria: We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis: Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. MAIN RESULTS: The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10% difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6% and placebo (39/171 (22.8% risk difference (RD 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an

  17. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors for fibromyalgia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walitt, Brian; Urrútia, Gerard; Nishishinya, María Betina; Cantrell, Sarah E; Häuser, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia is a clinically well-defined chronic condition with a biopsychosocial aetiology. Fibromyalgia is characterized by chronic widespread musculoskeletal pain, sleep problems, cognitive dysfunction, and fatigue. Patients often report high disability levels and poor quality of life. Since there is no specific treatment that alters the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia, drug therapy focuses on pain reduction and improvement of other aversive symptoms. Objectives The objective was to assess the benefits and harms of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in the treatment of fibromyalgia. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2014, Issue 5), MEDLINE (1966 to June 2014), EMBASE (1946 to June 2014), and the reference lists of reviewed articles. Selection criteria We selected all randomized, double-blind trials of SSRIs used for the treatment of fibromyalgia symptoms in adult participants. We considered the following SSRIs in this review: citalopram, fluoxetine, escitalopram, fluvoxamine, paroxetine, and sertraline. Data collection and analysis Three authors extracted the data of all included studies and assessed the risks of bias of the studies. We resolved discrepancies by discussion. Main results The quality of evidence was very low for each outcome. We downgraded the quality of evidence to very low due to concerns about risk of bias and studies with few participants. We included seven placebo-controlled studies, two with citalopram, three with fluoxetine and two with paroxetine, with a median study duration of eight weeks (4 to 16 weeks) and 383 participants, who were pooled together. All studies had one or more sources of potential major bias. There was a small (10%) difference in patients who reported a 30% pain reduction between SSRIs (56/172 (32.6%)) and placebo (39/171 (22.8%)) risk difference (RD) 0.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01 to 0.20; number needed to treat for an additional

  18. Effect of dissolved oxygen in alcoholic beverages and drinking water on alcohol elimination in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Su-jin; Chae, Jung-woo; Song, Byung-jeong; Lee, Eun-sil; Kwon, Kwang-il

    2013-02-01

    Oxygen plays an important role in the metabolism of alcohol. An increased dissolved oxygen level in alcoholic beverages reportedly accelerates the elimination of alcohol. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of dissolved oxygen in alcohol and the supportive effect of oxygenated water on alcohol pharmacokinetics after the excessive consumption of alcohol, i.e., 540 ml of 19.5% alcohol (v/v). Fifteen healthy males were included in this randomized, 3 × 3 crossover study. Three combinations were tested: X, normal alcoholic beverage and normal water; Y, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and normal water; Z, oxygenated alcoholic beverage and oxygenated water. Blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) were determined by conversion of breath alcohol concentrations. Four pharmacokinetic parameters (C(max), T(max), K(el), and AUCall) were obtained using non-compartmental analysis and the times to reach 0.05% and 0.03% BAC (T(0.05%) and T(0.03%)) were compared using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Duncan's post hoc test. With combination Z, the BAC decreased to 0.05% significantly faster (p alcohol. However, the oxygen dissolved in the alcoholic beverage alone did not have a sufficient effect in this case. We postulate that highly oxygenated water augments the effect of oxygen in the alcoholic beverage in alcohol elimination. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the supportive effect of ingesting additional oxygenated water after heavy drinking of normal alcoholic beverages. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils to sites of acute inflammation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suidan, Georgette L.; Demers, Melanie; Herr, Nadine; Carbo, Carla; Brill, Alexander; Cifuni, Stephen M.; Mauler, Maximilian; Cicko, Sanja; Bader, Michael; Idzko, Marco; Bode, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    The majority of peripheral serotonin is stored in platelets, which secrete it on activation. Serotonin releases Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs) and we asked whether absence of platelet serotonin affects neutrophil recruitment in inflammatory responses. Tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph)1–deficient mice, lacking non-neuronal serotonin, showed mild leukocytosis compared with wild-type (WT), primarily driven by an elevated neutrophil count. Despite this, 50% fewer leukocytes rolled on unstimulated mesenteric venous endothelium of Tph1−/− mice. The velocity of rolling leukocytes was higher in Tph1−/− mice, indicating fewer selectin-mediated interactions with endothelium. Stimulation of endothelium with histamine, a secretagogue of WPBs, or injection of serotonin normalized the rolling in Tph1−/− mice. Diminished rolling in Tph1−/− mice resulted in reduced firm adhesion of leukocytes after lipopolysaccharide treatment. Blocking platelet serotonin uptake with fluoxetine in WT mice reduced serum serotonin by > 80% and similarly reduced leukocyte rolling and adhesion. Four hours after inflammatory stimulation, neutrophil extravasation into lung, peritoneum, and skin wounds was reduced in Tph1−/− mice, whereas in vitro neutrophil chemotaxis was independent of serotonin. Survival of lipopolysaccharide-induced endotoxic shock was improved in Tph1−/− mice. In conclusion, platelet serotonin promotes the recruitment of neutrophils in acute inflammation, supporting an important role for platelet serotonin in innate immunity. PMID:23243271

  20. The serotonin system in autism spectrum disorder: from biomarker to animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Christopher L.; Anacker, Allison M.J.; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Elevated whole blood serotonin, or hyperserotonemia, was the first biomarker identified in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and is present in more than 25% of affected children. The serotonin system is a logical candidate for involvement in ASD due to its pleiotropic role across multiple brain systems both dynamically and across development. Tantalizing clues connect this peripheral biomarker with changes in brain and behavior in ASD, but the contribution of the serotonin system to ASD pathophysiology remains incompletely understood. Studies of whole blood serotonin levels in ASD and in a large founder population indicate greater heritability than for the disorder itself and suggest an association with recurrence risk. Emerging data from both neuroimaging and postmortem samples also indicate changes in the brain serotonin system in ASD. Genetic linkage and association studies of both whole blood serotonin levels and of ASD risk point to the chromosomal region containing the serotonin transporter (SERT) gene in males but not in females. In ASD families with evidence of linkage to this region, multiple rare SERT amino acid variants lead to a convergent increase in serotonin uptake in cell models. A knock-in mouse model of one of these variants, SERT Gly56Ala, recapitulates the hyperserotonemia biomarker and shows increased brain serotonin clearance, increased serotonin receptor sensitivity, and altered social, communication, and repetitive behaviors. Data from other rodent models also suggest an important role for the serotonin system in social behavior, in cognitive flexibility, and in sensory development. Recent work indicates that reciprocal interactions between serotonin and other systems, such as oxytocin, may be particularly important for social behavior. Collectively, these data point to the serotonin system as a prime candidate for treatment development in a subgroup of children defined by a robust, heritable biomarker. PMID:26577932

  1. Acute and delayed effect of (-) deprenyl and (-) 1-phenyl-2-propylaminopentane (PPAP) on the serotonin content of peritoneal cells (white blood cells and mast cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, G; Kovács, P; Pállinger, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Acute and delayed (hormonal imprinting) effect of (-) deprenyl and its derivative without MAO-B inhibitory activity (-) PPAP, were studied on cells of the peritoneal fluid (lymphocytes, monocytes, granulocytes and mast cells) by flow cytometric and confocal microscopic analysis. Thirty minutes after treatment of 6-week-old female animals, deprenyl was ineffective while PPAP significantly increased the serotonin level of these cells. Three weeks after treatment at weaning, deprenyl drastically decreased the serotonin level of each cell type, while PPAP moderately but significantly increased the serotonin level of monocytes, granulocytes and mast cells. This means that the two related molecules have different effects on the immune cells, which seem to be independent of MAO-B inhibition. The experiments emphasize the necessity of studying the prolonged effects of biologically active molecules, even if they are without acute effects. As serotonin is a modulator of the immune system, the influence on immune cells of the molecules studied can contribute to their enhancing effect. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Assessment of the Potential Role of Tryptophan as the Precursor of Serotonin and Melatonin for the Aged Sleep-wake Cycle and Immune Function: as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio D. Paredes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present review we summarize the relationship between the amino acid, tryptophan, the neurotransmitter, serotonin, and the indole, melatonin, with the rhythms of sleep/wake and the immune response along with the possible connections between the alterations in these rhythms due to aging and the so-called “serotonin and melatonin deficiency state.” The decrease associated with aging of the brain and circulating levels of serotonin and melatonin seemingly contributes to the alterations of both the sleep/wake cycle and the immune response that typically accompany old age. The supplemental administration of tryptophan, e.g. the inclusion of tryptophan-enriched food in the diet, might help to remediate these age-related alterations due to its capacity of raise the serotonin and melatonin levels in the brain and blood. Herein, we also summarize a set of studies related to the potential role that tryptophan, and its derived product melatonin, may play in the restoration of the aged circadian rhythms of sleep/wake and immune response, taking the ringdove ( Streptopelia risoria as a suitable model.

  3. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and /sup 3/H-mazindol binding in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED/sub 50/ values of anorectic action and the ED/sub 50/ values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced (/sup 3/H)-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for (/sup 3/H)-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with (/sup 3/H)-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake.

  4. Anorectic activities of serotonin uptake inhibitors: correlation with their potencies at inhibiting serotonin uptake in vivo and 3H-mazindol binding in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, I.; Taranger, M.A.; Claustre, Y.; Scatton, B.; Langer, S.Z.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanism of anorectic action of several serotonin uptake inhibitors was investigated by comparing their anorectic potencies with several biochemical and pharmacological properties and in reference to the novel compound SL 81.0385. The anorectic effect of the potent serotonin uptake inhibitor SL 81.0385 was potentiated by pretreatment with 5-hydroxytryptophan and blocked by the serotonin receptor antagonist metergoline. A good correlation was obtained between the ED 50 values of anorectic action and the ED 50 values of serotonin uptake inhibition in vivo (but not in vitro) for several specific serotonin uptake inhibitors. Most of the drugs tested displaced [ 3 H]-mazindol from its binding to the anorectic recognition site in the hypothalamus, except the pro-drug zimelidine which was inactive. Excluding zimelidine, a good correlation was obtained between the affinities of these drugs for [ 3 H]-mazindol binding and their anorectic action indicating that their anorectic activity may be associated with an effect mediated through this site. Taken together these results suggest that the anorectic action of serotonin uptake inhibitors is directly associated to their ability to inhibit serotonin uptake and thus increasing the synaptic levels of serotonin. The interactions of these drugs with the anorectic recognition site labelled with [ 3 H]-mazindol is discussed in connection with the serotonergic regulation of carbohydrate intake

  5. A chiral synthesis of dapoxetine hydrochloride, a serotonin re-uptake inhibitor, and its 14C isotopomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, W.J.; O'Bannon, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    The 14 C-isotopmer of dapoxetine-[ 14 C] HCl (S (+) -N,N-dimethyl-α[2-(1-naphthalenyloxy)ethyl-2- 14 C]benzenemeth a-n amine hydrochloride, 1a), a potent serotonin re-uptake inhibitor has been prepared by a chiral synthesis, starting with tert. -butyloxyphenylglycine (3). Borane reduction, followed by activation of the resulting alcohol 4 as its mesylate 5b, provided the chiral starting material. The radiolabel was introduced by reaction of 5b with sodium cyanide-[ 14 C]. The desired product (1) was then elaborated from nitrile 6a,b via a five step synthesis in an overall 19.5% radiochemical yield. (Author)

  6. Consequences of serotonin transporter genotype and early adversity on behavioral profile - pathology or adaptation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca S Heiming

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on how behavioral profile is shaped by early adversity in individuals with varying serotonin-transporter (5-HTT genotype. In a recent study on 5-HTT knockout mice Heiming et al. (2009 simulated a ‘dangerous environment’ by confronting pregnant and lactating females with odor cues of unfamiliar males, indicating the risk of infant killing. Growing up in a dangerous environment induced increased anxiety-related behavior and decreased exploratory locomotion in the offspring, the effects being most pronounced in mice lacking 5-HTT expression. We argue that these alterations in behavioral profile represent adaptive maternal effects that help the individuals to cope with adversity. In principle, such effects of adversity on behavioral profile should not automatically be regarded as pathological. Rather and in accordance with modern evolutionary theory they may represent adaptations, although individuals with 5-HTT genotype induced susceptibility to adversity may be at risk of developing pathologies.

  7. Possible role of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline on oxidative stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battal, D; Yalin, S; Eker, E D; Aktas, A; Sahin, N O; Cebo, M; Berköz, M

    2014-01-01

    The naphthylamine derivative sertraline is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin reuptake into presynaptic terminals and the most widely used that has been shown to have both antidepressant and antianxiety effects. In the present study the possible role of sertraline (acute and chronically doses) was evaluated on lipid peroxidation levels and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma and brain tissues of (10, 40, 80 mg/kg) sertraline treated Wistar albino rats (n=48). Lipid peroxidation levels (MDA) of plasma and brain tissue increased in all acute and chronic sertraline treated rats (p Catalase (CAT) levels of plasma and brain tissue and paraoxonase (PON) levels of plasma decreased (p < 0.05) as compared with vehicle group. Based on the data, it can be concluded that high dose sertraline administration enhances oxidative stress. Therefore, dose adjustment in depression patients seems significant as it may help prevention of further prognosis of the diseases.

  8. Expression of serotonin receptors in the colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Qiu, Juanjuan; Wan, Jiajia; Wang, Fengyun; Tang, Xudong; Guo, Huishu

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the difference among the expression of serotonin receptors (5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors) in colonic tissue of chronic diarrhea rats. A rat model of chronic diarrhea was established by lactose diet. The expression of 5-HT3, 5-HT4, and 5-HT7receptors in the colonic tissue was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time PCR and Western blotting techniques. There is no significant difference on the protein expression of 5-HT3receptor between the normal group and the chronic diarrhea model group. The mRNA expression of 5-HT3receptor in the chronic diarrhea model group was significantly lower than that in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly higher than those in the normal group (n = 10; Pchronic diarrhea model group were significantly decreased compared with the normal group (n = 10; Pdiarrhea by lactose diet.

  9. Serotonin and MSH secretion: effect of parachlorophenylalanine on the pituitary cytology of the eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivereau, M

    1978-07-13

    Parachlorophenylalanine (pCPA), an inhibitor of tryptophan hydroxylase which depletes brain serotonin in higher vertebrates, was injected into freshwater eels. After 4 or 6 injections (200 mg/kg/day) or 10 injections (100 and 140 mg/kg/day), the animals are paler, with a low melanophore index. In the pituitary gland, granules tend to accumulate in the basal part of the MSH cells and in the perinuclear area. Cells appear smaller with a decreased nuclear area (P less than 0.001). In the neurohypophysis, the amount of neurosecretory material is often reduced. Conversely, injections of 5-hydroxytryptophan induce a strong darkening, a result similar to that previously reported in some amphibian species and in one lacertilian species. These data substantiate the hypothesis of a stimulatory influence of 5-hydroxytryptamine on MSH release and possibly its synthesis in the eel and other lower vertebrates.

  10. Experimental Disc Herniation in the Rat Causes Downregulation of Serotonin Receptor 2c in a TNF-dependent Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Daniel; Finskas, Oscar; Fujioka, Yuki; Ståhlberg, Anders; Olmarker, Kjell

    2015-06-01

    During recent decades, the knowledge of the pathophysiology of disc herniation and sciatica has drastically improved. What previously was considered a strict biomechanical process is now considered a more complex interaction between leaked nucleus pulposus and the tissue in the spinal canal. An inflammatory reaction, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) playing an essential role, has been demonstrated. However, the exact mechanisms of the pathophysiology of disc herniation remain unknown. In this study we use an animal model to investigate (1) if and/or how experimental disc herniation affects gene expression in the early phase (24 hours postsurgery) in the dorsal root ganglion; and (2) if TNF inhibition can reduce any observed changes. A rat model of disc herniation was used. Twenty rats were evenly divided into four groups: naïve, sham, disc herniation, and disc herniation with TNF inhibition. The dorsal root ganglion of the affected nerve root was harvested 24 hours after surgery and analyzed with a TaqMan Low Density Array(®) quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay. Gene expression levels in sham were compared with disc herniation to assess question 1 and disc herniation to disc herniation with TNF inhibition to assess question 2. Experimental disc herniation caused a decrease in the expression of the serotonin receptor 2c gene (p = 0.022). TNF inhibition was found to reduce the observed decrease in expression of serotonin receptor 2c (p = 0.037). Our results suggest that a decrease in the expression of the serotonin receptor 2c gene may contribute to the pathophysiology of disc herniation. Further research on its involvement is warranted. This pilot study gives a brief insight into cellular changes that may contribute to the pathophysiology of disc herniation. This knowledge may contribute to the development of more and better treatment options for patients with disc herniation and sciatica.

  11. Timing of caloric intake during weight loss differentially affects striatal dopamine transporter and thalamic serotonin transporter binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, Ruth I; Schrantee, Anouk; Adriaanse, Sofie M; Unmehopa, Unga A; Booij, Jan; Reneman, Liesbeth; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Serlie, Mireille J

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that meal timing throughout the day contributes to maintaining or regaining weight after hypocaloric diets. Although brain serotonin and dopamine are well known to be involved in regulating feeding, it is unknown whether meal timing during energy restriction affects these neurotransmitter systems. We studied the effect of a 4 wk hypocaloric diet with either 50% of daily calories consumed at breakfast (BF group) or at dinner (D group) on hypothalamic and thalamic serotonin transporter (SERT) binding and on striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding. The BF and D groups lost a similar amount of weight. Striatal DAT and thalamic SERT binding increased in the BF group, while decreasing in the D group after the diet (ΔDAT 0.37 ± 0.63 vs. -0.53 ± 0.77, respectively; P = 0.005; ΔSERT 0.12 ± 0.25 vs. -0.13 ± 0.26 respectively, P = 0.032). Additional voxel-based analysis showed an increase in DAT binding in the ventral striatum in the BF group and a decrease in the dorsal striatum in the D group. During weight loss, striatal DAT and thalamic SERT binding increased weight independently when 50% of daily calories were consumed at breakfast, whereas it decreased when caloric intake was highest at dinner. These findings may contribute to the earlier reported favorable effect of meal timing on weight maintenance after hypocaloric diets.-Versteeg, R. I., Schrantee, A., Adriaanse, S. M., Unmehopa, U. A., Booij, J., Reneman, L., Fliers, E., la Fleur, S. E., Serlie, M. J. Timing of caloric intake during weight loss differentially affects striatal dopamine transporter and thalamic serotonin transporter binding. © FASEB.

  12. Serotonin transporter evolution and impact of polymorphic transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søeby, Karen; Larsen, Svend Ask; Olsen, Line

    2005-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) is the primary drug target in the current antidepressant therapy. A functional polymorphism in the 2nd intron of the 5HTT gene encoding the SERT has been identified and associated with susceptibility to affective disorders and treatment response to antidepressants...... in the VNTRs of all mammalian SERT genes. The number of these putative binding sites varies proportionally to the length of the VNTR. We propose that the intronic VNTR have been selectively targeted through mammalian evolution to finetune transcriptional regulation of the serotonin expression........ This study addresses the possible impact of the variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) to behavior and disease by examining the evolutionary origin and mechanisms of differential transcriptional regulation of SERT. We trace the evolutionary origin of the VNTR and show that it is present and varies...

  13. Divergent Roles of Central Serotonin in Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning-Ning Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The central serotonin (5-HT system is the main target of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, the first-line antidepressants widely used in current general practice. One of the prominent features of chronic SSRI treatment in rodents is the enhanced adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus, which has been proposed to contribute to antidepressant effects. Therefore, tremendous effort has been made to decipher how central 5-HT regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis. In this paper, we review how changes in the central serotonergic system alter adult hippocampal neurogenesis. We focus on data obtained from three categories of genetically engineered mouse models: (1 mice with altered central 5-HT levels from embryonic stages, (2 mice with deletion of 5-HT receptors from embryonic stages, and (3 mice with altered central 5-HT system exclusively in adulthood. These recent findings provide unique insights to interpret the multifaceted roles of central 5-HT on adult hippocampal neurogenesis and its associated effects on depression.

  14. Serotonin syndrome in a breast-fed neonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Rachel; Matthes, Jean

    2015-05-06

    A late preterm presented with tachypnoea, jitteriness, irritability and low grade fever. Blood gas showed a compensated metabolic acidosis. His mother was taking the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine, 60 mg/day, and he was exclusively breast-fed. The baby's serum level of fluoxetine on day 8 was within the adult therapeutic range and his symptoms were ascribed to fluoxetine toxicity. On changing to formula feeds, his symptoms resolved. SSRIs are commonly administered during pregnancy, but SSRI toxicity in infants is rarely reported. It is possible that this condition is under diagnosed or, alternatively, misdiagnosed as SSRI withdrawal in breast fed infants whose mothers are on SSRIs. There is limited research looking at serotonin excess in neonates, making case reports such as this important in our learning. Increased awareness may prompt more frequent measurements of blood levels in breast-fed infants whose mothers are on SSRIs. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Modulation of the intrinsic properties of motoneurons by serotonin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-François; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Christensen, Rasmus Kordt

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is one of the main transmitters in the nervous system. Serotonergic neurons in the raphe nuclei in the brainstem innervate most parts of the central nervous system including motoneurons in the spinal cord and brainstem. This review will focus on the modulatory role that 5-HT exerts...... a sustained depolarization and an amplification of synaptic inputs. Under pathological conditions, such as after a spinal cord injury, the promotion of persistent inward currents by serotonin and/or the overexpression of autoactive serotonergic receptors may contribute to motoneuronal excitability, muscle....... At the same time, 5-HT increases the firing frequency by inhibiting the small Ca2+ activated K+ conductance (SK) responsible for the medium afterhyperpolarization (AHP) following action potentials. 5-HT also promotes persistent inward currents mediated by voltage sensitive Ca2+ and Na+ conductances, producing...

  16. Decreasing Relative Risk Premium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Frank

    We consider the risk premium demanded by a decision maker with wealth x in order to be indifferent between obtaining a new level of wealth y1 with certainty, or to participate in a lottery which either results in unchanged present wealth or a level of wealth y2 > y1. We define the relative risk...... premium as the quotient between the risk premium and the increase in wealth y1–x which the decision maker puts on the line by choosing the lottery in place of receiving y1 with certainty. We study preferences such that the relative risk premium is a decreasing function of present wealth, and we determine...... relative risk premium in the small implies decreasing relative risk premium in the large, and decreasing relative risk premium everywhere implies risk aversion. We finally show that preferences with decreasing relative risk premium may be equivalently expressed in terms of certain preferences on risky...

  17. Decreasing serial cost sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2009-01-01

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker (Econometrica 60:1009-1037, 1992) and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos (J Econ Theory 79:245-275, 1998) are known by their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization of the increasing serial...... rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker (J Econ Theory 64:178-201, 1994). This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule....

  18. Decreasing Serial Cost Sharing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    The increasing serial cost sharing rule of Moulin and Shenker [Econometrica 60 (1992) 1009] and the decreasing serial rule of de Frutos [Journal of Economic Theory 79 (1998) 245] have attracted attention due to their intuitive appeal and striking incentive properties. An axiomatic characterization...... of the increasing serial rule was provided by Moulin and Shenker [Journal of Economic Theory 64 (1994) 178]. This paper gives an axiomatic characterization of the decreasing serial rule...

  19. Serotonin Influences Locomotion in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    OpenAIRE

    LEWIS, STEFANIE L.; LYONS, DEBORAH E.; MEEKINS, TIFFANIE L.; NEWCOMB, JAMES M.

    2011-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) influences locomotion in many animals, from flatworms to mammals. This study examined the effects of 5-HT on locomotion in the nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina (Gould, 1852). M. leonina exhibits two modes of locomotion, crawling and swimming. Animals were bath-immersed in a range of concentrations of 5-HT or injected with various 5-HT solutions into the hemolymph and then monitored for locomotor activity. In contrast to other gastropods studied, M. leonina showed no signific...

  20. Revisiting the Serotonin Hypothesis: Implications for Major Depressive Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhoury, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a heritable neuropsychiatric disease associated with severe changes at cellular and molecular levels. Its diagnosis mainly relies on the characterization of a wide range of symptoms including changes in mood and behavior. Despite the availability of antidepressant drugs, 10 to 30 % of patients fail to respond after a single or multiple treatments, and the recurrence of depression among responsive patients is very high. Evidence from the past decades suggests that the brain neurotransmitter serotonin (5-HT) is incriminated in MDD, and that a dysfunction of 5-HT receptors may play a role in the genesis of this disease. The 5-HT membrane transporter protein (SERT), which helps regulate the serotonergic transmission, is also implicated in MDD and is one of the main targets of antidepressant therapy. Although a number of behavioral tests and animal models have been developed to study depression, little is known about the neurobiological bases of MDD. Understanding the role of the serotonergic pathway will significantly help improve our knowledge of the pathophysiology of depression and may open up avenues for the development of new antidepressant drugs. The overarching goal of this review is to present recent findings from studies examining the serotonergic pathway in MDD, with a focus on SERT and the serotonin 1A (5-HT1A), serotonin 1B (5-HT1B), and serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors. This paper also describes some of the main molecules involved in the internalization of 5-HT receptors and illustrates the changes in 5-HT neurotransmission in knockout mice and animal model of depression.