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Sample records for albicans regulates hyphal

  1. The Candida albicans-specific gene EED1 encodes a key regulator of hyphal extension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Martin, Ronny

    2011-04-01

    The extension of germ tubes into elongated hyphae by Candida albicans is essential for damage of host cells. The C. albicans-specific gene EED1 plays a crucial role in this extension and maintenance of filamentous growth. eed1Δ cells failed to extend germ tubes into long filaments and switched back to yeast growth after 3 h of incubation during growth on plastic surfaces. Expression of EED1 is regulated by the transcription factor Efg1 and ectopic overexpression of EED1 restored filamentation in efg1Δ. Transcriptional profiling of eed1Δ during infection of oral tissue revealed down-regulation of hyphal associated genes including UME6, encoding another key transcriptional factor. Ectopic overexpression of EED1 or UME6 rescued filamentation and damage potential in eed1Δ. Transcriptional profiling during overexpression of UME6 identified subsets of genes regulated by Eed1 or Ume6. These data suggest that Eed1 and Ume6 act in a pathway regulating maintenance of hyphal growth thereby repressing hyphal-to-yeast transition and permitting dissemination of C. albicans within epithelial tissues.

  2. Cell cycle-independent phospho-regulation of Fkh2 during hyphal growth regulates Candida albicans pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie A Greig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, undergoes morphological and transcriptional adaptation in the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. Although previous gene-knockout studies have identified many factors involved in this transformation, it remains unclear how these factors are regulated to coordinate the switch. Investigating morphogenetic control by post-translational phosphorylation has generated important regulatory insights into this process, especially focusing on coordinated control by the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Here we have identified the Fkh2 transcription factor as a regulatory target of both Cdc28 and the cell wall biosynthesis kinase Cbk1, in a role distinct from its conserved function in cell cycle progression. In stationary phase yeast cells 2D gel electrophoresis shows that there is a diverse pool of Fkh2 phospho-isoforms. For a short window on hyphal induction, far before START in the cell cycle, the phosphorylation profile is transformed before reverting to the yeast profile. This transformation does not occur when stationary phase cells are reinoculated into fresh medium supporting yeast growth. Mass spectrometry and mutational analyses identified residues phosphorylated by Cdc28 and Cbk1. Substitution of these residues with non-phosphorylatable alanine altered the yeast phosphorylation profile and abrogated the characteristic transformation to the hyphal profile. Transcript profiling of the phosphorylation site mutant revealed that the hyphal phosphorylation profile is required for the expression of genes involved in pathogenesis, host interaction and biofilm formation. We confirmed that these changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding defects in pathogenic processes. Furthermore, we identified that Fkh2 interacts with the chromatin modifier Pob3 in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, thereby providing a possible mechanism by which the phosphorylation of Fkh2 regulates its

  3. Cell Cycle-Independent Phospho-Regulation of Fkh2 during Hyphal Growth Regulates Candida albicans Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Greig, Jamie A.; Sudbery, Ian M; Richardson, Jonathan; Naglik, Julian; Wang, Yue; Sudbery, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, undergoes morphological and transcriptional adaptation in the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. Although previous gene-knockout studies have identified many factors involved in this transformation, it remains unclear how these factors are regulated to coordinate the switch. Investigating morphogenetic control by post-translational phosphorylation has generated important regulatory insights into this process, especially focusi...

  4. Cell cycle-independent phospho-regulation of Fkh2 during hyphal growth regulates Candida albicans pathogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Greig, Jamie A.; Sudbery, Ian M; Richardson, Jonathan P; Naglik, Julian R.; Yue Wang; Sudbery, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    The opportunistic human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, undergoes morphological and transcriptional adaptation in the switch from commensalism to pathogenicity. Although previous gene-knockout studies have identified many factors involved in this transformation, it remains unclear how these factors are regulated to coordinate the switch. Investigating morphogenetic control by post-translational phosphorylation has generated important regulatory insights into this process, especially focusi...

  5. Aft2, a novel transcription regulator, is required for iron metabolism, oxidative stress, surface adhesion and hyphal development in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ning; Cheng, Xinxin; Yu, Qilin; Qian, Kefan; Ding, Xiaohui; Liu, Ruming; Zhang, Biao; Xing, Laijun; Li, Mingchun

    2013-01-01

    Morphological transition and iron metabolism are closely relevant to Candida albicans pathogenicity and virulence. In our previous study, we demonstrated that C. albicans Aft2 plays an important role in ferric reductase activity and virulence. Here, we further explored the roles of C. albicans Aft2 in numerous cellular processes. We found that C. albicans Aft2 exhibited an important role in iron metabolism through bi-directional regulation effects on iron-regulon expression. Deletion of AFT2 reduced cellular iron accumulation under iron-deficient conditions. Furthermore, both reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were remarkably increased in the aft2Δ/Δ mutant, which were thought to be responsible for the defective responses to oxidative stress. However, we found that over-expression of C. albicans AFT2 under the regulation of the strong PGK1 promoter could not effectively rescue Saccharomyces cerevisiae aft1Δ mutant defects in some cellular processes, such as cell-wall assembly, ion homeostasis and alkaline resistance, suggesting a possibility that C. albicans Aft2 weakened its functional role of regulating some cellular metabolism during the evolutionary process. Interestingly, deletion of AFT2 in C. albicans increased cell surface hydrophobicity, cell flocculation and the ability of adhesion to polystyrene surfaces. In addition, our results also revealed that C. albicans Aft2 played a dual role in regulating hypha-specific genes under solid and liquid hyphal inducing conditions. Deletion of AFT2 caused an impaired invasive growth in solid medium, but an increased filamentous aggregation and growth in liquid conditions. Moreover, iron deficiency and environmental cues induced nuclear import of Aft2, providing additional evidence for the roles of Aft2 in transcriptional regulation. PMID:23626810

  6. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vylkova, Slavena; Lorenz, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino acids are the primary carbon source generate large quantities of ammonia to raise the extracellular pH and induce the hyphal switch. We show here that C. albicans cells neutralize the macrophage phagosome and that neutral pH is a key inducer of germination in phagocytosed cells by using a mutant lacking STP2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple amino acid permeases, that is completely deficient in alkalinization in vitro. Phagocytosed stp2Δ mutant cells showed significant reduction in hypha formation and escaped from macrophages less readily compared to wild type cells; as a result stp2Δ mutant cells were killed at a higher rate and caused less damage to RAW264.7 macrophages. Stp2p-regulated import leads to alkalinization of the phagosome, since the majority of the wild type cells fail to co-localize with acidophilic dyes, whereas the stp2Δ mutant cells were located in acidic phagosomes. Furthermore, stp2Δ mutant cells were able to form hyphae and escape from neutral phagosomes, indicating that the survival defect in these cells was pH dependent. Finally, these defects are reflected in an attenuation of virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Altogether our results suggest that C. albicans utilizes amino acids to promote neutralization of the phagosomal pH, hyphal morphogenesis, and escape from macrophages. PMID:24626429

  7. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavena Vylkova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino acids are the primary carbon source generate large quantities of ammonia to raise the extracellular pH and induce the hyphal switch. We show here that C. albicans cells neutralize the macrophage phagosome and that neutral pH is a key inducer of germination in phagocytosed cells by using a mutant lacking STP2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple amino acid permeases, that is completely deficient in alkalinization in vitro. Phagocytosed stp2Δ mutant cells showed significant reduction in hypha formation and escaped from macrophages less readily compared to wild type cells; as a result stp2Δ mutant cells were killed at a higher rate and caused less damage to RAW264.7 macrophages. Stp2p-regulated import leads to alkalinization of the phagosome, since the majority of the wild type cells fail to co-localize with acidophilic dyes, whereas the stp2Δ mutant cells were located in acidic phagosomes. Furthermore, stp2Δ mutant cells were able to form hyphae and escape from neutral phagosomes, indicating that the survival defect in these cells was pH dependent. Finally, these defects are reflected in an attenuation of virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Altogether our results suggest that C. albicans utilizes amino acids to promote neutralization of the phagosomal pH, hyphal morphogenesis, and escape from macrophages.

  8. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    OpenAIRE

    Slavena Vylkova; Lorenz, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino...

  9. Gymnemic acids inhibit hyphal growth and virulence in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vediyappan, Govindsamy; Dumontet, Vincent; Pelissier, Franck; d'Enfert, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic and polymorphic fungal pathogen that causes mucosal, disseminated and invasive infections in humans. Transition from the yeast form to the hyphal form is one of the key virulence factors in C. albicans contributing to macrophage evasion, tissue invasion and biofilm formation. Nontoxic small molecules that inhibit C. albicans yeast-to-hypha conversion and hyphal growth could represent a valuable source for understanding pathogenic fungal morphogenesis, identifying drug targets and serving as templates for the development of novel antifungal agents. Here, we have identified the triterpenoid saponin family of gymnemic acids (GAs) as inhibitor of C. albicans morphogenesis. GAs were isolated and purified from Gymnema sylvestre leaves, the Ayurvedic traditional medicinal plant used to treat diabetes. Purified GAs had no effect on the growth and viability of C. albicans yeast cells but inhibited its yeast-to-hypha conversion under several hypha-inducing conditions, including the presence of serum. Moreover, GAs promoted the conversion of C. albicans hyphae into yeast cells under hypha inducing conditions. They also inhibited conidial germination and hyphal growth of Aspergillus sp. Finally, GAs inhibited the formation of invasive hyphae from C. albicans-infected Caenorhabditis elegans worms and rescued them from killing by C. albicans. Hence, GAs could be useful for various antifungal applications due to their traditional use in herbal medicine. PMID:24040201

  10. Expression of UME6, a Key Regulator of Candida albicans Hyphal Development, Enhances Biofilm Formation via Hgc1- and Sun41-Dependent Mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Banerjee, Mohua; Uppuluri, Priya; Zhao, Xiang R.; Carlisle, Patricia L.; Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; Villar, Cristina C.; López-Ribot, José L.; Kadosh, David

    2013-01-01

    Biofilm formation is associated with the ability of Candida albicans, the major human fungal pathogen, to resist antifungal therapies and grow on tissues, catheters, and medical devices. In order to better understand the relationship between C. albicans morphology and biofilm formation, we examined biofilms generated in response to expression of UME6, a key filament-specific transcriptional regulator. As UME6 levels rise, C. albicans cells are known to transition from yeast to hyphae, and we ...

  11. Hyphal development in Candida albicans requires two temporally linked changes in promoter chromatin for initiation and maintenance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is common in development. For Candida albicans, the most common cause of invasive fungal infections in humans, morphological plasticity is its defining feature and is critical for its pathogenesis. Unlike other fungal pathogens that exist primarily in either yeast or hyphal forms, C. albicans is able to switch reversibly between yeast and hyphal growth forms in response to environmental cues. Although many regulators have been found involved in hyphal development, the mechanisms of regulating hyphal development and plasticity of dimorphism remain unclear. Here we show that hyphal development involves two sequential regulations of the promoter chromatin of hypha-specific genes. Initiation requires a rapid but temporary disappearance of the Nrg1 transcriptional repressor of hyphal morphogenesis via activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway. Maintenance requires promoter recruitment of Hda1 histone deacetylase under reduced Tor1 (target of rapamycin signaling. Hda1 deacetylates a subunit of the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase module, leading to eviction of the NuA4 acetyltransferase module and blockage of Nrg1 access to promoters of hypha-specific genes. Promoter recruitment of Hda1 for hyphal maintenance happens only during the period when Nrg1 is gone. The sequential regulation of hyphal development by the activation of the cAMP-PKA pathway and reduced Tor1 signaling provides a molecular mechanism for plasticity of dimorphism and how C. albicans adapts to the varied host environments in pathogenesis. Such temporally linked regulation of promoter chromatin by different signaling pathways provides a unique mechanism for integrating multiple signals during development and cell fate specification.

  12. Roles of Candida albicans Sfl1 in Hyphal Development▿

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yandong; Su, Chang; Mao, Xuming; Cao, Fang; Chen, Jiangye

    2007-01-01

    The ability to switch between different morphological forms is an important feature of Candida albicans and is relevant to its pathogenesis. Many conserved positive and negative transcription factors are involved in morphogenetic regulation of the two dimorphic fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In S. cerevisiae, the transcriptional repressor Sfl1 and the activator Flo8 function antagonistically in invasive and filamentous growth. We have previously reported that Candida alb...

  13. Hyphal formation of Candida albicans is controlled by electron transfer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most Candida albicans cells cultured in RPMI1640 medium at 37 deg. C grow in hyphal form in aerobic conditions, but they grow in yeast form in anaerobic conditions. The hyphal growth of C. albicans was inhibited in glucose-deficient conditions. Malonic acid, an inhibitor of succinate dehydrogenase, enhanced the yeast proliferation of C. albicans, indicating that the hyphal-formation signal was derived from the glycolysis system and the signal was transmitted to the electron transfer system via the citric acid cycle. Thenoyl trifluoro acetone (TTFA), an inhibitor of the signal transmission between complex II and Co Q, significantly inhibited the hyphal growth of C. albicans. Antimycin, KCN, and oligomycin, inhibitors of complex III, IV, and V, respectively, did not inhibit the hyphal growth of C. albicans. The production of mRNAs for the hyphal formation signal was completely inhibited in anaerobic conditions. These results indicate that the electron transfer system functions upstream of the RAS1 signal pathway and activates the expression of the hyphal formation signal. Since the electron transfer system is inactivated in anaerobic conditions, C. albicans grew in yeast form in this condition

  14. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Schlecht; B.M. Peters; B.P. Krom; J.A. Freiberg; G.M. Hänsch; S.G. Filler; M.A. Jabra-Rizk; M.E. Shirtliff

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through

  15. A single nucleotide polymorphism uncovers a novel function for the transcription factor Ace2 during Candida albicans hyphal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana M Calderón-Noreña

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major invasive fungal pathogen in humans. An important virulence factor is its ability to switch between the yeast and hyphal forms, and these filamentous forms are important in tissue penetration and invasion. A common feature for filamentous growth is the ability to inhibit cell separation after cytokinesis, although it is poorly understood how this process is regulated developmentally. In C. albicans, the formation of filaments during hyphal growth requires changes in septin ring dynamics. In this work, we studied the functional relationship between septins and the transcription factor Ace2, which controls the expression of enzymes that catalyze septum degradation. We found that alternative translation initiation produces two Ace2 isoforms. While full-length Ace2, Ace2L, influences septin dynamics in a transcription-independent manner in hyphal cells but not in yeast cells, the use of methionine-55 as the initiation codon gives rise to Ace2S, which functions as the nuclear transcription factor required for the expression of cell separation genes. Genetic evidence indicates that Ace2L influences the incorporation of the Sep7 septin to hyphal septin rings in order to avoid inappropriate activation of cell separation during filamentous growth. Interestingly, a natural single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP present in the C. albicans WO-1 background and other C. albicans commensal and clinical isolates generates a stop codon in the ninth codon of Ace2L that mimics the phenotype of cells lacking Ace2L. Finally, we report that Ace2L and Ace2S interact with the NDR kinase Cbk1 and that impairing activity of this kinase results in a defect in septin dynamics similar to that of hyphal cells lacking Ace2L. Together, our findings identify Ace2L and the NDR kinase Cbk1 as new elements of the signaling system that modify septin ring dynamics in hyphae to allow cell-chain formation, a feature that appears to have evolved in specific C

  16. The AAA ATPase Vps4 Plays Important Roles in Candida albicans Hyphal Formation and is Inhibited by DBeQ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yahui; Li, Wanjie; Chu, Mi; Chen, Hengye; Yu, Haoyuan; Fang, Chaoguang; Sun, Ningze; Wang, Qiming; Luo, Tian; Luo, Kaiju; She, Xueping; Zhang, Mengqian; Yang, Dong

    2016-06-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human pathogen, and its pathogenicity is associated with hyphal formation. Previous studies have shown that at neutral-to-alkaline pH, hyphal growth is dependent on the Rim101 pathway whose activation requires Snf7, a member of the ESCRT system. In this work, we described the purification and characterization of the C. albicans Vps4, an AAA ATPase required for recycling of the ESCRTs. Its role on hyphal growth has been investigated. Our data suggest deletion of Vps4 decreases overall hyphal growth at pH 7 and increases the growth of multiple hyphae induced by serum, which indicates that the ESCRTs may make a Rim101-independent contribution to hyphal growth. Furthermore, DBeQ, an inhibitor of the AAA ATPase p97, was shown to inhibit the ATPase activity of Vps4 with an IC50 of about 11.5 μM. To a less degree, it also inhibits hyphal growth. Our work may provide a new strategy to control C. albicans infection. PMID:26700222

  17. Garcinia xanthochymus Benzophenones Promote Hyphal Apoptosis and Potentiate Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Desmond N; Yang, Lin; Wu, ShiBiao; Kennelly, Edward J; Lipke, Peter N

    2015-10-01

    Xanthochymol and garcinol, isoprenylated benzophenones purified from Garcinia xanthochymus fruits, showed multiple activities against Candida albicans biofilms. Both compounds effectively prevented emergence of fungal germ tubes and were also cytostatic, with MICs of 1 to 3 μM. The compounds therefore inhibited development of hyphae and subsequent biofilm maturation. Xanthochymol treatment of developing and mature biofilms induced cell death. In early biofilm development, killing had the characteristics of apoptosis, including externalization of phosphatidyl serine and DNA fragmentation, as evidenced by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) fluorescence. These activities resulted in failure of biofilm maturation and hyphal death in mature biofilms. In mature biofilms, xanthochymol and garcinol caused the death of biofilm hyphae, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 30 to 50 μM. Additionally, xanthochymol-mediated killing was complementary with fluconazole against mature biofilms, reducing the fluconazole EC50 from >1,024 μg/ml to 13 μg/ml. Therefore, xanthochymol has potential as an adjuvant for antifungal treatments as well as in studies of fungal apoptosis. PMID:26195512

  18. Hyphal growth in Candida albicans requires the phosphorylation of Sec2 by the Cdc28-Ccn1/Hgc1 kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Amy; Lane, Rachel; Beniston, Richard; Chapa-y-Lazo, Bernardo; Smythe, Carl; Sudbery, Peter

    2010-09-01

    Polarized growth is a fundamental property of cell growth and development. It requires the delivery of post-Golgi secretory vesicles to the site of polarized growth. This process is mediated by Rab GTPases activated by their guanine exchange factors (GEFs). The human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans, can grow in a budded yeast form or in a highly polarized hyphal form, and thus provides a model to study this phenomenon. During hyphal, but not yeast growth, secretory vesicles accumulate in an apical body called a Spitzenkörper, which acts to focus delivery of the vesicles to the tip. Post-Golgi transport of secretory vesicles is mediated by the Rab GTPase Sec4, activated by its GEF Sec2. Using a combination of deletion mapping, in vitro mutagenesis, an analogue-sensitive allele of Cdc28 and an in vitro kinase assay, we show that localization of Sec2 to the Spitzenkörper and normal hyphal development requires phosphorylation of Serine 584 by the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdc28. Thus, as well as controlling passage through the cell cycle, Cdc28 has an important function in controlling polarized secretion. PMID:20639857

  19. Candida albicans Hyphal Formation and Virulence Assessed Using a Caenorhabditis elegans Infection Model ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Peleg, Anton Y.; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans colonizes the human gastrointestinal tract and can cause life-threatening systemic infection in susceptible hosts. We study here C. albicans virulence determinants using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans in a pathogenesis system that models candidiasis. The yeast form of C. albicans is ingested into the C. elegans digestive tract. In liquid media, the yeast cells then undergo morphological change to form hyphae, which results in aggressive tissue destruction and death of th...

  20. Garcinia xanthochymus Benzophenones Promote Hyphal Apoptosis and Potentiate Activity of Fluconazole against Candida albicans Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Desmond N.; Yang, Lin; Wu, ShiBiao; Kennelly, Edward J.; Lipke, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Xanthochymol and garcinol, isoprenylated benzophenones purified from Garcinia xanthochymus fruits, showed multiple activities against Candida albicans biofilms. Both compounds effectively prevented emergence of fungal germ tubes and were also cytostatic, with MICs of 1 to 3 μM. The compounds therefore inhibited development of hyphae and subsequent biofilm maturation. Xanthochymol treatment of developing and mature biofilms induced cell death. In early biofilm development, killing had the char...

  1. Post-transcriptional gene regulation in the biology and virulence of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Traven, Ana

    2016-06-01

    In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, remodelling of gene expression drives host adaptation and virulence. Recent studies revealed that in addition to transcription, post-transcriptional mRNA control plays important roles in virulence-related pathways. Hyphal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, stress responses, antifungal drug susceptibility and virulence in animal models require post-transcriptional regulators. This includes RNA binding proteins that control mRNA localization, decay and translation, as well as the cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathway. Comprehensive understanding of how modulation of gene expression networks drives C. albicans virulence will necessitate integration of our knowledge on transcriptional and post-transcriptional mRNA control. PMID:26999710

  2. Candida albicans AGE3, the ortholog of the S. cerevisiae ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1, is required for hyphal growth and drug resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Lettner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyphal growth and multidrug resistance of C. albicans are important features for virulence and antifungal therapy of this pathogenic fungus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show by phenotypic complementation analysis that the C. albicans gene AGE3 is the functional ortholog of the yeast ARF-GAP-encoding gene GCS1. The finding that the gene is required for efficient endocytosis points to an important functional role of Age3p in endosomal compartments. Most C. albicans age3Delta mutant cells which grew as cell clusters under yeast growth conditions showed defects in filamentation under different hyphal growth conditions and were almost completely disabled for invasive filamentous growth. Under hyphal growth conditions only a fraction of age3Delta cells shows a wild-type-like polarization pattern of the actin cytoskeleton and lipid rafts. Moreover, age3Delta cells were highly susceptible to several unrelated toxic compounds including antifungal azole drugs. Irrespective of the AGE3 genotype, C-terminal fusions of GFP to the drug efflux pumps Cdr1p and Mdr1p were predominantly localized in the plasma membrane. Moreover, the plasma membranes of wild-type and age3Delta mutant cells contained similar amounts of Cdr1p, Cdr2p and Mdr1p. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results indicate that the defect in sustaining filament elongation is probably caused by the failure of age3Delta cells to polarize the actin cytoskeleton and possibly of inefficient endocytosis. The high susceptibility of age3Delta cells to azoles is not caused by inefficient transport of efflux pumps to the cell membrane. A possible role of a vacuolar defect of age3Delta cells in drug susceptibility is proposed and discussed. In conclusion, our study shows that the ARF-GAP Age3p is required for hyphal growth which is an important virulence factor of C. albicans and essential for detoxification of azole drugs which are routinely used for antifungal therapy. Thus, it

  3. Roles of Aspergillus nidulans Cdc42/Rho GTPase regulators in hyphal morphogenesis and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Harris, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-related family of GTPases are pivotal regulators of morphogenetic processes in diverse eukaryotic organisms. In the filamentous fungi two related members of this family, Cdc42 and Rac1, perform particularly important roles in the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity. The activity of these GTPases is tightly controlled by two sets of regulators: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Despite the importance of Cdc42 and Rac1 in polarized hyphal growth, the morphogenetic functions of their cognate GEFs and GAPs have not been widely characterized in filamentous fungi outside the Saccharomycotina. Here we present a functional analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans homologs of the yeast GEF Cdc24 and the yeast GAP Rga1. We show that Cdc24 is required for the establishment of hyphal polarity and localizes to hyphal tips. We also show that Rga1 is necessary for the suppression of branching in developing conidiophores. During asexual development Rga1 appears to act primarily via Cdc42 and in doing so serves as a critical determinant of conidiophore architecture. Our results provide new insight into the roles of Cdc42 during development in A nidulans. PMID:26932184

  4. CARD9 Mediates Dectin-2-induced IκBα Kinase Ubiquitination Leading to Activation of NF-κB in Response to Stimulation by the Hyphal Form of Candida albicans*

    OpenAIRE

    Bi, Liangkuan; Gojestani, Sara; Wu, Weihui; Hsu, Yen-Michael S.; Zhu, Jiayuan; Ariizumi, Kiyoshi; Lin, Xin

    2010-01-01

    The scaffold protein CARD9 plays an essential role in anti-fungus immunity and is implicated in mediating Dectin-1/Syk-induced NF-κB activation in response to Candida albicans infection. However, the molecular mechanism by which CARD9 mediates C. albicans-induced NF-κB activation is not fully characterized. Here we demonstrate that CARD9 is involved in mediating NF-κB activation induced by the hyphal form of C. albicans hyphae (Hyphae) but not by its heat-inactivated unicellular form. Our dat...

  5. 电子传递链对白念珠菌菌丝形成的影响%Effect of electron transfer system on the hyphal formation of Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘泽虎; 吕雪莲; 李筱芳; 吕桂霞; 沈永年; 李岷; 刘维达

    2009-01-01

    to assess the viability of Candida albicans. Results The solvents (chloroform and dimethyl sulfoxide) had no significant effect on the growth of and filamentation in Candida albicans. After incubation with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) or benzhydroxamic acid for 24 hours, yeast cells of Candida albicans predominated in the culture. The growth of Candida albicans was significantly inhibited in log phase by the incubation with classic respiratory chain inhibitors such as rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, sodium azide, TTFA and sodium malonate, compared with the controls (all P < 0.01). Benzhydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of alternative oxidative pathway, also significantly inhibited the growth of Candida albicans in log phase (t = 10.92, P < 0.01). After incubation with rotenone, antimycin A, oligomycin, sodium azide, TTFA, sodium malonate, benzhydroxamic acid and disodium gnanylate, the percentage of filamentation in Candida albicans at 12 hours was 87.49 ± 0.52, 48.75 ± 4.44, 50.33 ± 8.50, 99.00 ± 1.00, 1.60 ± 0.53, 94.01 ± 0.99, 0.00 ± 0.00 and 92.33 ± 2.08, respectively, and the growth of Candida albicans at 7 hours was inhibited by (1.34 ± 0.15)%, (70.61 ± 1.02)%, (50.63 ± 5.38)%, (17.80 ± 7.89)%, (45.17 ± 1.27)%, (10.75 ± 3.62)%, (72.46 ± 1.14)% and -(5.96 ± 4.07)%, respectively. Conclusions Hyphal formation of Candida albicans could be suppressed by inhibitors of classic respiratory chain or alternative oxidative pathway, and is mainly regulated by alternative oxidative pathway.

  6. CaSfl1 plays a dual role in transcriptional regulation in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG TingTing; LI Di; LI WanJie; WANG Yue; SANG JianLi

    2008-01-01

    As a newly identified transcription factor in Candida albcians, CaSfl1 has been shown to be involved in cell flocculation and filamentation and in the negative regulation of several genes involved in hyphal growth. In this study, we constructed Casfl1△/△ mutants and confirmed that deletion of this gene in-deed affected cell flocculation and filamentation. In addition, by RT-PCR we found that while Casfl1 repressed the expression of several hypha-specific genes including HWP1, ECE1, ALS1, ALS3, and FL08, it strongly activated the expression of the heat-shock protein genes HSP30 and HSP90 under certain stress conditions. Therefore, we propose that CaSfl1 can act as both positive and negative regulators, thereby playing a dual role in transcriptional controls in Candida albicans.

  7. FvSO regulates vegetative hyphal fusion, asexual growth, fumonisin B1 production, and virulence in Fusarium verticillioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Wenner, Nancy; Kuldau, Gretchen A

    2015-12-01

    Hyphal anastomosis is a hallmark of filamentous fungi and plays vital roles including cellular homoeostasis, interhyphal communication and nutrient translocation. Here we identify a gene, FvSO, in Fusarium verticillioides, a filamentous ascomycete causing maize ear and stalk rot and producing fumonisin mycotoxins. FvSO, like its Neurospora crassa homologue SO, is required for vegetative hyphal fusion. It is also essential for normal vegetative growth, sporulation, and pathogenesis. FvSO encodes a predicted WW domain protein and shares 70 % protein sequence identity with N. crassa SO. FvSO deletion mutants (ΔFvSO) had abnormal distribution of conidia size, and conidia of ΔFvSO germinated much later and slower than wild type. ΔFvSO was deficient in hyphal anastomosis, had slower radial growth and produced less fungal biomass than wild type. ΔFvSO were unable to perform anastomosis, a key feature of filamentous fungi. Interestingly, production of fumonisin B1 by ΔFvSO was significantly reduced compared to wild type. Additionally, ΔFvSO was nonpathogenic to corn ears, stalks and seedlings, likely due to defective growth and development. In conclusion, FvSO is essential for vegetative hyphal fusion and is required for normal vegetative growth and sporulation, normal levels of fumonisin production and pathogenicity in F. verticillioides. The pleiotropic nature of ΔFvSO phenotypes suggests that FvSO is likely involved in certain signalling pathways that regulate multiple cellular functions. PMID:26615739

  8. Ascorbic acid inhibition of Candida albicans Hsp90-mediated morphogenesis occurs via the transcriptional regulator Upc2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hauwenhuyse, Frédérique; Fiori, Alessandro; Van Dijck, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    Morphogenetic transitions of the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans are influenced by temperature changes, with induction of filamentation upon a shift from 30 to 37°C. Hsp90 was identified as a major repressor of an elongated cell morphology at low temperatures, as treatment with specific inhibitors of Hsp90 results in elongated growth forms at 30°C. Elongated growth resulting from a compromised Hsp90 is considered neither hyphal nor pseudohyphal growth. It has been reported that ascorbic acid (vitamin C) interferes with the yeast-to-hypha transition in C. albicans. In the present study, we show that ascorbic acid also antagonizes the morphogenetic change caused by hampered Hsp90 function. Further analysis revealed that Upc2, a transcriptional regulator of genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis, and Erg11, the target of azole antifungals, whose expression is in turn regulated by Upc2, are required for this antagonism. Ergosterol levels correlate with elongated growth and are reduced in cells treated with the Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) and restored by cotreatment with ascorbic acid. In addition, we show that Upc2 appears to be required for ascorbic acid-mediated inhibition of the antifungal activity of fluconazole. These results identify Upc2 as a major regulator of ascorbic acid-induced effects in C. albicans and suggest an association between ergosterol content and elongated growth upon Hsp90 compromise. PMID:25084864

  9. The GRF10 homeobox gene regulates filamentous growth in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anup K; Wangsanut, Tanaporn; Fonzi, William A; Rolfes, Ronda J

    2015-12-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen and can cause life-threatening infections. Filamentous growth is critical in the pathogenicity of C. albicans, as the transition from yeast to hyphal forms is linked to virulence and is also a pivotal process in fungal biofilm development. Homeodomain-containing transcription factors have been linked to developmental processes in fungi and other eukaryotes. We report here on GRF10, a homeobox transcription factor-encoding gene that plays a role in C. albicans filamentation. Deletion of the GRF10 gene, in both C. albicans SN152 and BWP17 strain backgrounds, results in mutants with strongly decreased hyphal growth. The mutants are defective in chlamydospore and biofilm formation, as well as showing dramatically attenuated virulence in a mouse infection model. Expression of the GRF10 gene is highly induced during stationary phase and filamentation. In summary, our study emphasizes a new role for the homeodomain-containing transcription factor in morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans. PMID:26472755

  10. Eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong X.; Douglas, Lois M.; Veselá, Petra; Rachel, Reinhard; Malinsky, Jan; Konopka, James B.

    2016-01-01

    The plasma membrane of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans forms a protective barrier that also mediates many processes needed for virulence, including cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, and nutrient uptake. Because compartmentalization of the plasma membrane is believed to coordinate these diverse activities, we examined plasma membrane microdomains termed eisosomes or membrane compartment of Can1 (MCC), which correspond to ∼200-nm-long furrows in the plasma membrane. A pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant failed to form eisosomes and displayed strong defects in plasma membrane organization and morphogenesis, including extensive cell wall invaginations. Mutation of eisosome proteins Slm2, Pkh2, and Pkh3 did not cause similar cell wall defects, although pkh2∆ cells formed chains of furrows and pkh3∆ cells formed wider furrows, identifying novel roles for the Pkh protein kinases in regulating furrows. In contrast, the sur7∆ mutant formed cell wall invaginations similar to those for the pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutant even though it could form eisosomes and furrows. A PH-domain probe revealed that the regulatory lipid phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate was enriched at sites of cell wall invaginations in both the sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells, indicating that this contributes to the defects. The sur7∆ and pil1∆ lsp1∆ mutants displayed differential susceptibility to various types of stress, indicating that they affect overlapping but distinct functions. In support of this, many mutant phenotypes of the pil1∆ lsp1∆ cells were rescued by overexpressing SUR7. These results demonstrate that C. albicans eisosomes promote the ability of Sur7 to regulate plasma membrane organization. PMID:27009204

  11. Inhibition of Hyphal Growth of Azole-Resistant Strains of Candida albicans by Triazole Antifungal Agents in the Presence of Lactoferrin-Related Compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Abe, Shigeru; Teraguchi, Susumu; Hayasawa, Hirotoshi; YAMAGUCHI, HIDEYO

    1998-01-01

    The effects of bovine lactoferrin (LF) or the LF-derived antimicrobial peptide lactoferricin B (LFcin B) on the growth of Candida albicans hyphae, including those of three azole-resistant strains, were investigated by a crystal violet staining method. The hyphae of two highly azole-resistant strains were more susceptible to inhibition by LF or LFcin B than the azole-susceptible strains tested. One moderately azole-resistant strain was defective in the formation of hyphae and showed a suscepti...

  12. Forward genetics in Candida albicans that reveals the Arp2/3 complex is required for hyphal formation, but not endocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Epp, Elias; Walther, Andrea; Guylaine, Lépine; Leon, Zully; Mullick, Alaka; Raymond, Martine; Wendland, Jürgen; Whiteway, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid fungal pathogen lacking a defined complete sexual cycle, and thus has been refractory to standard forward genetic analysis. Instead, transcription profiling and reverse genetic strategies based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae have typically been used to link genes to functions. To overcome restrictions inherent in such indirect approaches, we have investigated a forward genetic mutagenesis strategy based on the UAU1 technology. We screened 4700 random insertion mutan...

  13. Function and Regulation of Cph2 in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Shelley; Di Lena, Pietro; Tormanen, Kati; Baldi, Pierre; Liu, Haoping

    2015-11-01

    Candida albicans is associated with humans as both a harmless commensal organism and a pathogen. Cph2 is a transcription factor whose DNA binding domain is similar to that of mammalian sterol response element binding proteins (SREBPs). SREBPs are master regulators of cellular cholesterol levels and are highly conserved from fungi to mammals. However, ergosterol biosynthesis is regulated by the zinc finger transcription factor Upc2 in C. albicans and several other yeasts. Cph2 is not necessary for ergosterol biosynthesis but is important for colonization in the murine gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Here we demonstrate that Cph2 is a membrane-associated transcription factor that is processed to release the N-terminal DNA binding domain like SREBPs, but its cleavage is not regulated by cellular levels of ergosterol or oxygen. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) shows that Cph2 binds to the promoters of HMS1 and other components of the regulatory circuit for GI tract colonization. In addition, 50% of Cph2 targets are also bound by Hms1 and other factors of the regulatory circuit. Several common targets function at the head of the glycolysis pathway. Thus, Cph2 is an integral part of the regulatory circuit for GI colonization that regulates glycolytic flux. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) shows a significant overlap in genes differentially regulated by Cph2 and hypoxia, and Cph2 is important for optimal expression of some hypoxia-responsive genes in glycolysis and the citric acid cycle. We suggest that Cph2 and Upc2 regulate hypoxia-responsive expression in different pathways, consistent with a synthetic lethal defect of the cph2 upc2 double mutant in hypoxia. PMID:26342020

  14. Effect of alcohols on filamentation, growth, viability and biofilm development in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Chauhan, Nitin M; Ravikumar B Shinde; Mohan Karuppayil, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this study we report the potential of alcohols as morphogenetic regulators in Candida albicans. All the alcohols tested influenced various modes of growth like planktonic as well as biofilm forms. Viability was affected at high concentrations. Among the alcohols, the response of C. albicans to amyl alcohol (pentanol) was noteworthy. Amyl alcohol at a concentration 0.5% which was not inhibitory to growth and viability specifically inhibited morphogenetic switching from yeast to hyphal forms...

  15. FgFlbD regulates hyphal differentiation required for sexual and asexual reproduction in the ascomycete fungus Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Hokyoung; Kim, Myung-Gu; Chae, Suhn-Kee; Lee, Yin-Won

    2014-11-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a filamentous fungal plant pathogen that infects major cereal crops. The fungus produces both sexual and asexual spores in order to endure unfavorable environmental conditions and increase their numbers and distribution across plants. In a model filamentous fungus, Aspergillus nidulans, early induction of conidiogenesis is orchestrated by the fluffy genes. The objectives of this study were to characterize fluffy gene homologs involved in conidiogenesis and their mechanism of action in F. graminearum. We characterized five fluffy gene homologs in F. graminearum and found that FlbD is the only conserved regulator for conidiogenesis in A. nidulans and F. graminearum. Deletion of fgflbD prevented hyphal differentiation and the formation of perithecia. Successful interspecies complementation using A. nidulans flbD demonstrated that the molecular mechanisms responsible for FlbD functions are conserved in F. graminearum. Moreover, abaA-wetA pathway is positively regulated by FgFlbD during conidiogenesis in F. graminearum. Deleting fgflbD abolished morphological effects of abaA overexpression, which suggests that additional factors for FgFlbD or an AbaA-independent pathway for conidiogenesis are required for F. graminearum conidiation. Importantly, this study led to the construction of a genetic pathway of F. graminearum conidiogenesis and provides new insights into the genetics of conidiogenesis in fungi. PMID:25277408

  16. Phospholipid biosynthesis in Candida albicans: Regulation by the precursors inositol and choline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipid metabolism in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans was examined. The phospholipid biosynthetic pathways of C. albicans were elucidated and were shown to be similar to those of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, marked differences were seen between these two fungi in the regulation of the pathways in response to exogenously provided precursors inositol and choline. In S. cerevisiae, the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine via methylation of phosphatidylethanolamine appears to be regulated in response to inositol and choline; provision of choline alone does not repress the activity of this pathway. The same pathway in C. albicans responds to the exogenous provision of choline. Possible explanations for the observed differences in regulation are discussed

  17. Mannoprotein Adhesin of Candida albicans Germ Tubes

    OpenAIRE

    VARDAR-ÜNLÜ, Gülhan

    1998-01-01

    The production and detection of a mannoprotein adhesin (MPA) of the hyphal-form cells of C. albicans on plastic petri dishes was investigated. Using Concanavalin A-coated latex microspheres, the MPA was detected on the plastic surface on which C. albicans produced germ tubes. The adhesin was extracted using dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. It did not inhibit the adhesion of the yeast-form C. albicans to buccal epithelial cells (BEC). This suggested that the MPA of the hyphal-form ...

  18. Role of the N-acetylglucosamine kinase (Hxk1) in the regulation of white-gray-opaque tristable phenotypic transitions in C. albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chengjun; Guan, Guobo; Du, Han; Tao, Li; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-07-01

    The amino sugar N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is a host-related environmental cue and a potent inducer of morphological transitions in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. It has been well established that GlcNAc promotes white-to-opaque switching and yeast-to-hyphal growth transition primarily through the Ras-cAMP signaling pathway. As a commensal yeast of humans, C. albicans can efficiently use GlcNAc as the carbon source. In this study, we sought to investigate whether the catabolic pathway of GlcNAc is involved in the regulation of white-gray-opaque tristable transitions in C. albicans. Phenotypic switching assays demonstrated that deletion of the GlcNAc kinase gene, HXK1, induced the gray and opaque phenotypes in a SC5314 background strain, which is heterozygous at the mating type locus (a/α) and is unable to switch to the gray or opaque phenotype under standard culture conditions. Cell type-enriched genes were exclusively expressed in the white, gray, and opaque cells of the hxk1/hxk1 mutant. Mating assays demonstrated that, similar to the counterparts of BJ1097 (a natural white-gray-opaque switchable strain), opaque cells of the hxk1/hxk1 mutant (Δ/α) mated more efficiently than white and gray cells. The transcription factors, Wor1 and Efg1, are required for the development of the opaque and white cell types in the hxk1/hxk1 mutant, respectively. However, deletion of the GlcNAc-specific transporter gene (NGT1), GlcNAc-6-phosphate deacetylase gene (DAC1), and glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminase gene (NAG1) in the same background strain had no obvious effect on white-gray-opaque transitions. Our findings suggest that the GlcNAc kinase, Hxk1, may function as a morphological regulator independent on its catabolic role in C. albicans. PMID:27153757

  19. Transcriptional regulation of drug-resistance genes in Candida albicans biofilms in response to antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watamoto, T; Samaranayake, L P; Egusa, H; Yatani, H; Seneviratne, C J

    2011-09-01

    Biofilm formation is a major virulence attribute of Candida albicans and is directly associated with therapeutic failure. One method by which Candida acquires antifungal resistance is the expression of drug-resistance genes. This study aimed to evaluate the transcriptional regulation of several genes associated with antifungal resistance of C. albicans under planktonic, recently adhered and biofilm growth modes and in C. albicans biofilms in response to antifungal agents. Initially, the antifungal susceptibility of C. albicans cultures in different growth modes was evaluated by standard antifungal susceptibility testing. Next, to assess CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, ERG11, FKS1 and PIL1 expression, RNA was harvested from cells in each growth mode, and from biofilms after drug treatment, and subjected to quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR). Biofilm C. albicans was more resistant to antifungals than recently adhered cells and stationary-phase planktonic cultures. Transcriptional expression of CDR1, CDR2, MDR1, ERG11 and FKS1 was lower in recently adhered C. albicans than in the stationary-phase planktonic cultures. In contrast, PIL1 levels were significantly increased in recently adhered and biofilm modes of growth. The expression of MDR1 in biofilms greatly increased on challenge with amphotericin B but not with the other drugs tested (PERG11 was significantly upregulated by ketoconazole (PCandida biofilms, and lay a foundation for future large-scale genome-wide expression analysis. PMID:21474609

  20. Vacuolar trafficking and Candida albicans pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Glen E.

    2011-01-01

    The vacuole is likely to play a variety of roles in supporting host colonization and infection by pathogenic species of fungi. In the human pathogen Candida albicans, the vacuole undergoes dynamic morphological shifts during the production of the tissue invasive hyphal form, and this organelle is required for virulence. Recent efforts in my lab have focused on defining which vacuolar trafficking pathways are required for C. albicans hyphal growth and pathogenesis. Our results indicate that th...

  1. Hyphal structures in Hydnums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas Geesteranus, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    In this paper descriptions are given of the hyphal structure in the hydnaceous genera Climacodon P. Karst., Creolophus P. Karst., Donkia Pilát, Hydnellum P. Karst., Mycoleptodonoides Nikol., Mycorrhaphium Maas G. (which is introduced as a new genus), Phellodon P. Karst., Sarcodon P. Karst., and Stec

  2. Mutual co-regulation between GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase and ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Yadav, Bhawna; Hauhnar, Lalremruata; Jain, Priyanka; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2012-05-01

    A novel co-regulation exists between the first step of GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor biosynthesis and the rate-determining step of ergosterol biosynthesis in Candida albicans. Depleting CaGpi19p, an accessory subunit of the enzyme complex that initiates GPI biosynthesis, down-regulates ERG11, altering ergosterol levels and drug response. This effect is specific to CaGpi19p depletion and is not due to cell wall defects or GPI deficiency. Additionally, down-regulation of ERG11 down-regulates CaGPI19 and GPI biosynthesis. PMID:22390164

  3. Modelling the regulation of thermal adaptation in Candida albicans, a major fungal pathogen of humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle D Leach

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells have evolved mechanisms to sense and adapt to dynamic environmental changes. Adaptation to thermal insults, in particular, is essential for their survival. The major fungal pathogen of humans, Candida albicans, is obligately associated with warm-blooded animals and hence occupies thermally buffered niches. Yet during its evolution in the host it has retained a bona fide heat shock response whilst other stress responses have diverged significantly. Furthermore the heat shock response is essential for the virulence of C. albicans. With a view to understanding the relevance of this response to infection we have explored the dynamic regulation of thermal adaptation using an integrative systems biology approach. Our mathematical model of thermal regulation, which has been validated experimentally in C. albicans, describes the dynamic autoregulation of the heat shock transcription factor Hsf1 and the essential chaperone protein Hsp90. We have used this model to show that the thermal adaptation system displays perfect adaptation, that it retains a transient molecular memory, and that Hsf1 is activated during thermal transitions that mimic fever. In addition to providing explanations for the evolutionary conservation of the heat shock response in this pathogen and the relevant of this response to infection, our model provides a platform for the analysis of thermal adaptation in other eukaryotic cells.

  4. Self-regulation of Candida albicans population size during GI colonization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jane White

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between colonizing commensal microorganisms and their hosts play important roles in health and disease. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a common component of human intestinal flora. To gain insight into C. albicans colonization, genes expressed by fungi grown within a host were studied. The EFH1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor, was highly expressed during growth of C. albicans in the intestinal tract. Counterintuitively, an efh1 null mutant exhibited increased colonization of the murine intestinal tract, a model of commensal colonization, whereas an EFH1 overexpressing strain exhibited reduced colonization of the intestinal tract and of the oral cavity of athymic mice, the latter situation modeling human mucosal candidiasis. When inoculated into the bloodstream of mice, both efh1 null and EFH1 overexpressing strains caused lethal infections. In contrast, other mutants are attenuated in virulence following intravenous inoculation but exhibited normal levels of intestinal colonization. Finally, although expression of several genes is dependent on transcription factor Efg1p during laboratory growth, Efg1p-independent expression of these genes was observed during growth within the murine intestinal tract. These results show that expression of EFH1 regulated the level of colonizing fungi, favoring commensalism as opposed to candidiasis. Also, different genes are required in different host niches and the pathway(s that regulates gene expression during host colonization can differ from well-characterized pathways used during laboratory growth.

  5. Functional importance of the DNA binding activity of Candida albicans Czf1p.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Petrovska

    Full Text Available The human opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans undergoes a reversible morphological transition between the yeast and hyphal states in response to a variety of signals. One such environmental trigger is growth within a semisolid matrix such as agar medium. This growth condition is of interest because it may mimic the growth of C. albicans in contact with host tissue during infection. During growth within a semisolid matrix, hyphal growth is positively regulated by the transcriptional regulator Czf1p and negatively by a second key transcriptional regulator, Efg1p. Genetic studies indicate that Czf1p, a member of the zinc-cluster family of transcriptional regulators, exerts its function by opposing the inhibitory influence of Efg1p on matrix-induced filamentous growth. We examined the importance of the two known activities of Czf1p, DNA-binding and interaction with Efg1p. We found that the two activities were separable by mutation allowing us to demonstrate that the DNA-binding activity of Czf1p was essential for its role as a positive regulator of morphogenesis. Surprisingly, however, interactions with Efg1p appeared to be largely dispensable. Our studies provide the first evidence of a key role for the DNA-binding activity of Czf1p in the morphological yeast-to-hyphal transition triggered by matrix-embedded growth.

  6. Morphogenic regulator EFG1 affects the drug susceptibilities of pathogenic Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Tulika; Hameed, Saif; Manoharlal, Raman; Biswas, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K; Goswami, Shyamal K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-08-01

    This study shows that the morphogenic regulator EFG1 level affects the drug susceptibilities of Candida albicans when grown on solid growth media. The Deltaefg1 mutant showed sensitivity particularly to those drugs that target ergosterol or its metabolism. Efg1p disruption showed a gene-dosage effect on drug susceptibilities and resulted in enhanced susceptibility to drugs in the homozygous mutant as compared with the wild type, heterozygous and revertant strains. The enhanced sensitivity to drugs was independent of the status of ATP-binding cassette and MFS multidrug efflux pumps of C. albicans. The Deltaefg1 mutant displayed increased membrane fluidity that coincided with the downregulation of ERG11 and upregulation of OLE1 and ERG3, leading to enhanced passive diffusion of drugs. Interestingly, Deltaefg1 mutant cells displayed enhanced levels of endogenous ROS levels. Notably, the higher levels of ROS in the Deltaefg1 mutant could be reversed by the addition of antioxidants. However, the restoration of ROS levels did not reverse the drug sensitivities of the Deltaefg1 mutant. Taken together, we, for the first time, establish a new role to EFG1 in affecting the drug susceptibilities of C. albicans cells, independent of ROS and known drug efflux mechanisms. PMID:20491944

  7. Chemical screening identifies filastatin, a small molecule inhibitor of Candida albicans adhesion, morphogenesis, and pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fazly, Ahmed; Jain, Charu; Dehner, Amie C.; Issi, Luca; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Ali, Akbar; Cao, Hong; Fidel, Paul L.; P. Rao, Reeta; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2013-01-01

    Infection by pathogenic fungi, such as Candida albicans, begins with adhesion to host cells or implanted medical devices followed by biofilm formation. By high-throughput phenotypic screening of small molecules, we identified compounds that inhibit adhesion of C. albicans to polystyrene. Our lead candidate compound also inhibits binding of C. albicans to cultured human epithelial cells, the yeast-to-hyphal morphological transition, induction of the hyphal-specific HWP1 promoter, biofilm forma...

  8. Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogens Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Jackson, Andrew P

    2009-12-01

    Candida dubliniensis is the closest known relative of Candida albicans, the most pathogenic yeast species in humans. However, despite both species sharing many phenotypic characteristics, including the ability to form true hyphae, C. dubliniensis is a significantly less virulent and less versatile pathogen. Therefore, to identify C. albicans-specific genes that may be responsible for an increased capacity to cause disease, we have sequenced the C. dubliniensis genome and compared it with the known C. albicans genome sequence. Although the two genome sequences are highly similar and synteny is conserved throughout, 168 species-specific genes are identified, including some encoding known hyphal-specific virulence factors, such as the aspartyl proteinases Sap4 and Sap5 and the proposed invasin Als3. Among the 115 pseudogenes confirmed in C. dubliniensis are orthologs of several filamentous growth regulator (FGR) genes that also have suspected roles in pathogenesis. However, the principal differences in genomic repertoire concern expansion of the TLO gene family of putative transcription factors and the IFA family of putative transmembrane proteins in C. albicans, which represent novel candidate virulence-associated factors. The results suggest that the recent evolutionary histories of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are quite different. While gene families instrumental in pathogenesis have been elaborated in C. albicans, C. dubliniensis has lost genomic capacity and key pathogenic functions. This could explain why C. albicans is a more potent pathogen in humans than C. dubliniensis.

  9. pH Regulates White-Opaque Switching and Sexual Mating in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Cao, Chengjun; Jia, Wei; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-11-01

    As a successful commensal and pathogen of humans, Candida albicans encounters a wide range of environmental conditions. Among them, ambient pH, which changes frequently and affects many biological processes in this species, is an important factor, and the ability to adapt to pH changes is tightly linked with pathogenesis and morphogenesis. In this study, we report that pH has a profound effect on white-opaque switching and sexual mating in C. albicans. Acidic pH promotes white-to-opaque switching under certain culture conditions but represses sexual mating. The Rim101-mediated pH-sensing pathway is involved in the control of pH-regulated white-opaque switching and the mating response. Phr2 and Rim101 could play a major role in acidic pH-induced opaque cell formation. Despite the fact that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway does not play a major role in pH-regulated white-opaque switching and mating, white and opaque cells of the cyr1/cyr1 mutant, which is defective in the production of cAMP, showed distinct growth defects under acidic and alkaline conditions. We further discovered that acidic pH conditions repressed sexual mating due to the failure of activation of the Ste2-mediated α-pheromone response pathway in opaque A: cells. The effects of pH changes on phenotypic switching and sexual mating could involve a balance of host adaptation and sexual reproduction in C. albicans. PMID:26342021

  10. Antifungal effects of undecylenic acid on the biofilm formation of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Dongmei; Zhao, Yaxin; Yan, Hongxia; Fu, Hongjun; Shen, Yongnian; Lu, Guixia; Mei, Huan; Qiu, Ying; Li, Dongmei; Liu, Weida

    2016-05-01

    Undecylenic acid can effectively control skin fungal infection, but the mechanism of its fungal inhibition is unclear. Hyphal growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans) and biofilm formation have been well recognized as important virulence factors for the initiation of skin infection and late development of disseminated infection. In this study, we seek to investigate antifungal mechanisms of undecylenic acid by evaluating the virulence factors of C. albicans during biofilm formation. We found that undecylenic acid inhibits biofilm formation of C. albicans effectively with optimal concentration above 3 mM. In the presence of this compound, the morphological transition from yeast to filamentous phase is abolished ultimately when the concentration of undecylenic acid is above 4 mM. Meanwhile, the cell surface is crumpled, and cells display an atrophic appearance under scanning electron microscopy even with low concentration of drug treatment. On the other hand, the drug treatment decreases the transcriptions of hydrolytic enzymes such as secreted aspartic protease, lipase, and phospholipase. Hyphal formation related genes, like HWP1, are significantly reduced in transcriptional level in drug-treated biofilm condition as well. The down-regulated profile of these genes leads to a poorly organized biofilm in undecylenic acid treated environment. PMID:26902505

  11. Candida albicans OPI1 regulates filamentous growth and virulence in vaginal infections, but not inositol biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying-Lien Chen

    Full Text Available ScOpi1p is a well-characterized transcriptional repressor and master regulator of inositol and phospholipid biosynthetic genes in the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An ortholog has been shown to perform a similar function in the pathogenic fungus Candida glabrata, but with the distinction that CgOpi1p is essential for growth in this organism. However, in the more distantly related yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, the OPI1 homolog was not found to regulate inositol biosynthesis, but alkane oxidation. In Candida albicans, the most common cause of human candidiasis, its Opi1p homolog, CaOpi1p, has been shown to complement a S. cerevisiae opi1∆ mutant for inositol biosynthesis regulation when heterologously expressed, suggesting it might serve a similar role in this pathogen. This was tested in the pathogen directly in this report by disrupting the OPI1 homolog and examining its phenotypes. It was discovered that the OPI1 homolog does not regulate INO1 expression in C. albicans, but it does control SAP2 expression in response to bovine serum albumin containing media. Meanwhile, we found that CaOpi1 represses filamentous growth at lower temperatures (30 °C on agar, but not in liquid media. Although, the mutant does not affect virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection, it does affect virulence in a rat model of vaginitis. This may be because Opi1p regulates expression of the SAP2 protease, which is required for rat vaginal infections.

  12. Hsp90 is involved in apoptosis of Candida albicans by regulating the calcineurin-caspase apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, BaoDi; Wang, Yan; Li, DeDong; Xu, Yi; Liang, RongMei; Zhao, LanXue; Cao, YongBing; Jia, JianHui; Jiang, YuanYing

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of apoptosis in C. albicans that is inducible by environmental stresses such as hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, and amphotericin B. Apoptosis is regulated by the calcineurin-caspase pathway in C. albicans, and calcineurin is under the control of Hsp90 in echinocandin resistance. However, the role of Hsp90 in apoptosis of C. albicans remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Hsp90 in apoptosis of C. albicans by using an Hsp90-compromised strain tetO-HSP90/hsp90 and found that upon apoptotic stimuli, including hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid or amphotericin B treatment, less apoptosis occurred, less ROS was produced, and more cells survived in the Hsp90-compromised strain compared with the Hsp90/Hsp90 wild-type strain. In addition, Hsp90-compromised cells were defective in up-regulating caspase-encoding gene CaMCA1 expression and activating caspase activity upon the apoptotic stimuli. Investigations on the relationship between Hsp90 and calcineurin revealed that activation of calcineurin could up-regulate apoptosis but could not further down-regulate apoptosis in Hsp90-compromised cells, indicating that calcineurin was downstream of Hsp90. Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA) could further decrease the apoptosis in calcineurin-pathway-defect strains, indicating that compromising Hsp90 function had a stronger effect than compromising calcineurin function on apoptosis. Collectively, this study demonstrated that compromised Hsp90 reduced apoptosis in C. albicans, partially through downregulating the calcineurin-caspase pathway. PMID:23028789

  13. Hsp90 is involved in apoptosis of Candida albicans by regulating the calcineurin-caspase apoptotic pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BaoDi Dai

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of apoptosis in C. albicans that is inducible by environmental stresses such as hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, and amphotericin B. Apoptosis is regulated by the calcineurin-caspase pathway in C. albicans, and calcineurin is under the control of Hsp90 in echinocandin resistance. However, the role of Hsp90 in apoptosis of C. albicans remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of Hsp90 in apoptosis of C. albicans by using an Hsp90-compromised strain tetO-HSP90/hsp90 and found that upon apoptotic stimuli, including hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid or amphotericin B treatment, less apoptosis occurred, less ROS was produced, and more cells survived in the Hsp90-compromised strain compared with the Hsp90/Hsp90 wild-type strain. In addition, Hsp90-compromised cells were defective in up-regulating caspase-encoding gene CaMCA1 expression and activating caspase activity upon the apoptotic stimuli. Investigations on the relationship between Hsp90 and calcineurin revealed that activation of calcineurin could up-regulate apoptosis but could not further down-regulate apoptosis in Hsp90-compromised cells, indicating that calcineurin was downstream of Hsp90. Hsp90 inhibitor geldanamycin (GdA could further decrease the apoptosis in calcineurin-pathway-defect strains, indicating that compromising Hsp90 function had a stronger effect than compromising calcineurin function on apoptosis. Collectively, this study demonstrated that compromised Hsp90 reduced apoptosis in C. albicans, partially through downregulating the calcineurin-caspase pathway.

  14. Candida albicans Biofilm-Defective Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Richard, Mathias L.; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Bruno, Vincent M; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2005-01-01

    Biofilm formation plays a key role in the life cycles and subsistence of many microorganisms. For the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, biofilm development is arguably a virulence trait, because medical implants that serve as biofilm substrates are significant risk factors for infection. The development of C. albicans biofilms in vitro proceeds through an early phase, in which yeast cells populate a substrate, an intermediate phase, in which pseudohyphal and hyphal cell types are produc...

  15. Signalling mucin Msb2 Regulates adaptation to thermal stress in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswat, Darpan; Kumar, Rohitashw; Pande, Tanaya; Edgerton, Mira; Cullen, Paul J

    2016-05-01

    Temperature is a potent inducer of fungal dimorphism. Multiple signalling pathways control the response to growth at high temperature, but the sensors that regulate these pathways are poorly defined. We show here that the signalling mucin Msb2 is a global regulator of temperature stress in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Msb2 was required for survival and hyphae formation at 42°C. The cytoplasmic signalling domain of Msb2 regulated temperature-dependent activation of the CEK mitogen activated proteins kinase (MAPK) pathway. The extracellular glycosylated domain of Msb2 (100-900 amino acid residues) had a new and unexpected role in regulating the protein kinase C (PKC) pathway. Msb2 also regulated temperature-dependent induction of genes encoding regulators and targets of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is a protein quality control (QC) pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum that controls protein folding/degradation in response to high temperature and other stresses. The heat shock protein and cell wall component Ssa1 was also required for hyphae formation and survival at 42°C and regulated the CEK and PKC pathways. PMID:26749104

  16. First step of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) biosynthesis cross-talks with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Bhawna; Bhatnagar, Shilpi; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Jain, Priyanka; Pratyusha, Vavilala A; Kumar, Pravin; Komath, Sneha Sudha

    2014-02-01

    Candida albicans is a leading cause of fungal infections worldwide. It has several glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored virulence factors. Inhibiting GPI biosynthesis attenuates its virulence. Building on our previous work, we explore the interaction of GPI biosynthesis in C. albicans with ergosterol biosynthesis and hyphal morphogenesis. This study is also the first report of transcriptional co-regulation existing between two subunits of the multisubunit enzyme complex, GPI-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase (GPI-GnT), involved in the first step of GPI anchor biosynthesis in eukaryotes. Using mutational analysis, we show that the accessory subunits, GPI2 and GPI19, of GPI-GnT exhibit opposite effects on ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling (which determines hyphal morphogenesis). This is because the two subunits negatively regulate one another; GPI19 mutants show up-regulation of GPI2, whereas GPI2 mutants show up-regulation of GPI19. Two different models were examined as follows. First, the two GPI-GnT subunits independently interact with ergosterol biosynthesis and Ras signaling. Second, the two subunits mutually regulate one another and thereby regulate sterol levels and Ras signaling. Analysis of double mutants of these subunits indicates that GPI19 controls ergosterol biosynthesis through ERG11 levels, whereas GPI2 determines the filamentation by cross-talk with Ras1 signaling. Taken together, this suggests that the first step of GPI biosynthesis talks to and regulates two very important pathways in C. albicans. This could have implications for designing new antifungal strategies. PMID:24356967

  17. Self-Regulation of Candida albicans Population Size during GI Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    White, Sarah Jane; Rosenbach, Ari; Lephart, Paul; Nguyen, Diem; Benjamin, Alana; Tzipori, Saul; Whiteway, Malcolm; Mecsas, Joan; Kumamoto, Carol A.

    2007-01-01

    Interactions between colonizing commensal microorganisms and their hosts play important roles in health and disease. The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a common component of human intestinal flora. To gain insight into C. albicans colonization, genes expressed by fungi grown within a host were studied. The EFH1 gene, encoding a putative transcription factor, was highly expressed during growth of C. albicans in the intestinal tract. Counterintuitively, an efh1 null mutant ex...

  18. Candida albicans up-regulates the Fas-L expression in liver Natural Killer and Natural Killer T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, María Sol; Figueredo, Carlos Mauricio; Rodríguez-Galán, María Cecilia; Icely, Paula Alejandra; Cejas, Hugo; Cano, Roxana; Correa, Silvia Graciela; Sotomayor, Claudia Elena

    2015-11-01

    After Candida albicans arrival to the liver, the local production of proinflammatory cytokines and the expanded intrahepatic lymphocytes (IHL) can be either beneficial or detrimental to the host. Herein we explored the balance between protective inflammatory reaction and liver damage, focusing our study on the contribution of TNF-α and Fas-Fas-L pathways in the hepatocellular apoptosis associated to C. albicans infection. A robust tissue reaction and a progressive increase of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were observed in infected animals. Blocking the biological activity of TNF-α did not modify the number of apoptotic cells observed in C. albicans infected animals. Fas-L molecule was up regulated on purified hepatic mononuclear cells and its expression progressed with the infection. In the IHL compartment, the absolute number of Fas-L+ NK and NKT cells increased on days 1 and 3 of the infection. C. albicans was also able to up regulate Fas-L expression in normal liver NK and NKT cells after in vitro contact. The innate receptor TLR2 was involved in this phenomenon. In the interplay between host factors and evasion strategies exploited by pathogens, the mechanism supported here could represent an additional way that allows this fungus to circumvent protective immune responses in the liver. PMID:26101139

  19. Quercetin sensitizes fluconazole-resistant candida albicans to induce apoptotic cell death by modulating quorum sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, B N; Upreti, D K; Singh, B R; Pandey, G; Verma, S; Roy, S; Naqvi, A H; Rawat, A K S

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates group behaviors of Candida albicans such as biofilm, hyphal growth, and virulence factors. The sesquiterpene alcohol farnesol, a QS molecule produced by C. albicans, is known to regulate the expression of virulence weapons of this fungus. Fluconazole (FCZ) is a broad-spectrum antifungal drug that is used for the treatment of C. albicans infections. While FCZ can be cytotoxic at high concentrations, our results show that at much lower concentrations, quercetin (QC), a dietary flavonoid isolated from an edible lichen (Usnea longissima), can be implemented as a sensitizing agent for FCZ-resistant C. albicans NBC099, enhancing the efficacy of FCZ. QC enhanced FCZ-mediated cell killing of NBC099 and also induced cell death. These experiments indicated that the combined application of both drugs was FCZ dose dependent rather than QC dose dependent. In addition, we found that QC strongly suppressed the production of virulence weapons-biofilm formation, hyphal development, phospholipase, proteinase, esterase, and hemolytic activity. Treatment with QC also increased FCZ-mediated cell death in NBC099 biofilms. Interestingly, we also found that QC enhances the anticandidal activity of FCZ by inducing apoptotic cell death. We have also established that this sensitization is reliant on the farnesol response generated by QC. Molecular docking studies also support this conclusion and suggest that QC can form hydrogen bonds with Gln969, Thr1105, Ser1108, Arg1109, Asn1110, and Gly1061 in the ATP binding pocket of adenylate cyclase. Thus, this QS-mediated combined sensitizer (QC)-anticandidal agent (FCZ) strategy may be a novel way to enhance the efficacy of FCZ-based therapy of C. albicans infections. PMID:25645848

  20. Heterogeneous surface distribution of the fibrinogen-binding protein on Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, J P; López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W. L.

    1994-01-01

    As detected by indirect immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, fibrinogen binding was heterogeneously distributed on the surface of Candida albicans. A low level of binding was generally observed homogeneously distributed on some yeast and most hyphal extensions of germ tubes. However, on most hyphal extensions, there were randomly distributed areas of increased expression, as revealed by patches of greater fluorescence intensity.

  1. Non-lytic expulsion/exocytosis of Candida albicans from macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    Bain, Judith M.; Lewis, Leanne E.; Okai, Blessing; Quinn, Janet; Gow, Neil A R; Erwig, Lars-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen and is recognised and phagocytosed by macrophages. Using live-cell imaging, non-lytic expulsion/exocytosis of C. albicans from macrophages is demonstrated for the first time. Following complete expulsion, both the phagocyte and pathogen remain intact and viable. Partial engulfment of hyphal C. albicans without macrophage lysis is also demonstrated. These observations underpin the complexity of interactions between C. albicans and innate immune cells.

  2. Effect of alcohols on filamentation, growth, viability and biofilm development in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin M Chauhan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we report the potential of alcohols as morphogenetic regulators in Candida albicans. All the alcohols tested influenced various modes of growth like planktonic as well as biofilm forms. Viability was affected at high concentrations. Among the alcohols, the response of C. albicans to amyl alcohol (pentanol was noteworthy. Amyl alcohol at a concentration 0.5% which was not inhibitory to growth and viability specifically inhibited morphogenetic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. It also inhibited normal biofilm development favoring yeast dominated biofilms. Based on this study we hypothesize that alcohols produced under anaerobic conditions may not favor biofilm development and support dissemination of yeast cells. Since anaerobic conditions are not found to favor production of quorum sensing molecules like farnesol, the alcohols may play a role in morphogenetic regulation.

  3. The Rbf1, Hfl1 and Dbp4 of Candida albicans regulate common as well as transcription factor-specific mitochondrial and other cell activities

    OpenAIRE

    Khamooshi, Kasra; Sikorski, Patricia; Sun, Nuo; Calderone, Richard; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Background Our interest in Candida albicans mitochondria began with the identification of GOA1. We demonstrated its role in cell energy production, cross-talk among mitochondria and peroxisomes, non-glucose energy metabolism, maintenance of stationary phase growth, and prevention of premature apoptosis. Its absence results in avirulence. However, what regulated transcription of GOA1 was unknown. Results To identify transcriptional regulators (TRs) of GOA1, we screened a C. albicans TF knockou...

  4. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saif Hameed

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR, however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25 and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7 genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron

  5. Calcineurin signaling and membrane lipid homeostasis regulates iron mediated multidrug resistance mechanisms in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Saif; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni; Singh, Ashutosh; Goswami, Shyamal K; Prasad, Rajendra

    2011-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that iron deprivation enhances drug susceptibility of Candida albicans by increasing membrane fluidity which correlated with the lower expression of ERG11 transcript and ergosterol levels. The iron restriction dependent membrane perturbations led to an increase in passive diffusion and drug susceptibility. The mechanisms underlying iron homeostasis and multidrug resistance (MDR), however, are not yet resolved. To evaluate the potential mechanisms, we used whole genome transcriptome and electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) based lipidome analyses of iron deprived Candida cells to examine the new cellular circuitry of the MDR of this pathogen. Our transcriptome data revealed a link between calcineurin signaling and iron homeostasis. Among the several categories of iron deprivation responsive genes, the down regulation of calcineurin signaling genes including HSP90, CMP1 and CRZ1 was noteworthy. Interestingly, iron deprived Candida cells as well as iron acquisition defective mutants phenocopied molecular chaperone HSP90 and calcineurin mutants and thus were sensitive to alkaline pH, salinity and membrane perturbations. In contrast, sensitivity to above stresses did not change in iron deprived DSY2146 strain with a hyperactive allele of calcineurin. Although, iron deprivation phenocopied compromised HSP90 and calcineurin, it was independent of protein kinase C signaling cascade. Notably, the phenotypes associated with iron deprivation in genetically impaired calcineurin and HSP90 could be reversed with iron supplementation. The observed down regulation of ergosterol (ERG1, ERG2, ERG11 and ERG25) and sphingolipid biosynthesis (AUR1 and SCS7) genes followed by lipidome analysis confirmed that iron deprivation not only disrupted ergosterol biosynthesis, but it also affected sphingolipid homeostasis in Candida cells. These lipid compositional changes suggested extensive remodeling of the membranes in iron deprived Candida

  6. Therapeutic potential of thiazolidinedione-8 as an antibiofilm agent against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Feldman

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is known as a commensal microorganism but it is also the most common fungal pathogen in humans, causing both mucosal and systemic infections. Biofilm-associated C. albicans infections present clinically important features due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. Quorum sensing is closely associated with biofilm formation and increasing fungal pathogenicity. We investigated the ability of the novel bacterial quorum sensing quencher thiazolidinedione-8 (S-8 to inhibit the formation of, and eradication of mature C. albicans biofilms. In addition, the capability of S-8 to alter fungal adhesion to mammalian cells was checked. S-8 exhibited specific antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities against C. albicans, at four- to eightfold lower concentrations than the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observed that S-8 dose-dependently reduces C. albicans-GFP binding to RAW macrophages. S-8 at sub-MICs also interfered with fungal morphogenesis by inhibiting the yeast-to-hyphal form transition. In addition, the tested agent strongly affected fungal cell wall characteristics by modulating its hydrophobicity. We evaluated the molecular mode of S-8 antibiofilm and antiadhesion activities using real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of genes associated with biofilm formation, adhesion and filamentation, HWP1, ALS3 and EAP1, respectively, were dose-dependently downregulated by S-8. Transcript levels of UME6, responsible for long-term hyphal maintenance, were also significantly decreased by the tested agent. Both signaling pathways of hyphal formation-cAMP-PKA and MAPK-were interrupted by S-8. Their upstream general regulator RAS1 was markedly suppressed by S-8. In addition, the expression levels of MAPK cascade components CST20, HST7 and CPH1 were downregulated by S-8. Finally, transcriptional repressors of filament formation, TUP1 and NRG1, were dramatically upregulated by our

  7. Cdc28–Cln3 phosphorylation of Sla1 regulates actin patch dynamics in different modes of fungal growth

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Guisheng; Wang, Yan-Ming; Wang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic balance between targeted transport and endocytosis is critical for polarized cell growth. However, how actin-mediated endocytosis is regulated in different growth modes remains unclear. Here we report differential regulation of cortical actin patch dynamics between the yeast and hyphal growth in Candida albicans. The mechanism involves phosphoregulation of the endocytic protein Sla1 by the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) Cdc28–Cln3 and the actin-regulating kinase Prk1. Mutational stud...

  8. Is Candida albicans a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, W.F.; Pieters, R.H.H.; Knippels, L.M.J.; Jansen, M.C.J.F.; Koppelman, S.J.

    2003-01-01

    Coeliac disease is a T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the small intestine that is induced by ingestion of gluten proteins from wheat, barley, or rye. We postulate that Candida albicans is a trigger in the onset of coeliac disease. The virulence factor of C albicans - hyphal wall protein 1 (HWP1

  9. Pleiotropic effects of the vacuolar ABC transporter MLT1 of Candida albicans on cell function and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Kaemmer, Philipp; Förster, Toni M; Singh, Ashutosh; Coste, Alix T; Andes, David R; Hube, Bernhard; Sanglard, Dominique; Chauhan, Neeraj; Kaur, Rupinder; d'Enfert, Christophe; Mondal, Alok Kumar; Prasad, Rajendra

    2016-06-01

    Among the several mechanisms that contribute to MDR (multidrug resistance), the overexpression of drug-efflux pumps belonging to the ABC (ATP-binding cassette) superfamily is the most frequent cause of resistance to antifungal agents. The multidrug transporter proteins Cdr1p and Cdr2p of the ABCG subfamily are major players in the development of MDR in Candida albicans Because several genes coding for ABC proteins exist in the genome of C. albicans, but only Cdr1p and Cdr2p have established roles in MDR, it is implicit that the other members of the ABC family also have alternative physiological roles. The present study focuses on an ABC transporter of C. albicans, Mlt1p, which is localized in the vacuolar membrane and specifically transports PC (phosphatidylcholine) into the vacuolar lumen. Transcriptional profiling of the mlt1∆/∆ mutant revealed a down-regulation of the genes involved in endocytosis, oxidoreductase activity, virulence and hyphal development. High-throughput MS-based lipidome analysis revealed that the Mlt1p levels affect lipid homoeostasis and thus lead to a plethora of physiological perturbations. These include a delay in endocytosis, inefficient sequestering of reactive oxygen species (ROS), defects in hyphal development and attenuated virulence. The present study is an emerging example where new and unconventional roles of an ABC transporter are being identified. PMID:27026051

  10. Fungal morphogenetic pathways are required for the hallmark inflammatory response during Candida albicans vaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brian M; Palmer, Glen E; Nash, Andrea K; Lilly, Elizabeth A; Fidel, Paul L; Noverr, Mairi C

    2014-02-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterized during murine vaginitis. Kinetic analyses of vaginal infection with C. albicans in C57BL/6 mice demonstrated that fungal burdens remained constant throughout the observation period, while polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN), S100A8, and interleukin-1β levels obtained from vaginal lavage fluid increased by day 3 onward. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was also positively correlated with increased effectors of innate immunity. Additionally, immunodepletion of neutrophils in infected mice confirmed a nonprotective role for PMNs during vaginitis. Determination of the importance of fungal morphogenesis during vaginitis was addressed with a two-pronged approach. Intravaginal inoculation of mice with C. albicans strains deleted for key transcriptional regulators (bcr1Δ/Δ, efg1Δ/Δ, cph1Δ/Δ, and efg1Δ/Δ cph1Δ/Δ) controlling the yeast-to-hypha switch revealed a crucial role for morphogenetic signaling through the Efg1 and, to a lesser extent, the Bcr1 pathways in contributing to vaginitis immunopathology. Furthermore, overexpression of transcription factors NRG1 and UME6, to maintain yeast and hyphal morphologies, respectively, confirmed the importance of morphogenesis in generating innate immune responses in vivo. These results highlight the yeast-to-hypha switch and the associated morphogenetic response as important virulence components for the immunopathogenesis of Candida vaginitis, with implications for transition from benign colonization to symptomatic infection. PMID

  11. Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide inhibits Candida albicans hyphae formation and alters gene expression during biofilm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandara, H M H N; K Cheung, B P; Watt, R M; Jin, L J; Samaranayake, L P

    2013-02-01

    Elucidation of bacterial and fungal interactions in multispecies biofilms will have major impacts on understanding the pathophysiology of infections. The objectives of this study were to (i) evaluate the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on Candida albicans hyphal development and transcriptional regulation, (ii) investigate protein expression during biofilm formation, and (iii) propose likely molecular mechanisms for these interactions. The effect of LPS on C. albicans biofilms was assessed by XTT-reduction and growth curve assays, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Changes in candidal hypha-specific genes (HSGs) and transcription factor EFG1 expression were assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, respectively. Proteome changes were examined by mass spectrometry. Both metabolic activities and growth rates of LPS-treated C. albicans biofilms were significantly lower (P yeasts in test biofilms compared with the controls. SEM and CLSM further confirmed these data. Significantly upregulated HSGs (at 48 h) and EFG1 (up to 48 h) were noted in the test biofilms (P < 0.05) but cAMP levels remained unaffected. Proteomic analysis showed suppression of candidal septicolysin-like protein, potential reductase-flavodoxin fragment, serine hydroxymethyltransferase, hypothetical proteins Cao19.10301(ATP7), CaO19.4716(GDH1), CaO19.11135(PGK1), CaO19.9877(HNT1) by P. aeruginosa LPS. Our data imply that bacterial LPS inhibit C. albicans biofilm formation and hyphal development. The P. aeruginosa LPS likely target glycolysis-associated mechanisms during candidal filamentation. PMID:23194472

  12. Correlation between virulence of Candida albicans mutants in mice and Galleria mellonella larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Marc; Thomas, David Y; Whiteway, Malcolm; Kavanagh, Kevin

    2002-10-11

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic human pathogen in which the yeast to hyphal switch may be an important factor in virulence in mammals. This pathogen has recently been shown to also kill insects such as the Greater Wax Moth Galleria mellonella when injected into the haemocoel of the insect larvae. We have investigated the effect of previously characterised C. albicans mutations that influence the yeast to hyphal transition on virulence in G. mellonella larvae. There is a good correlation between the virulence of these mutants in the insect host and the virulence measured through systemic infection of mice. Although the predominant cellular species detected in G. mellonella infections is the yeast form of C. albicans, mutations that influence the hyphal transition also reduce pathogenicity in the insect. The correlation with virulence measured in the mouse infection system suggests that Galleria may provide a convenient and inexpensive model for the in vivo screening of mutants of C. albicans. PMID:12381467

  13. Tetracycline Effects on Candida Albicans Virulence Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Logan McCool; Hanh Mai; Michael Essmann; Bryan Larsen

    2008-01-01

    Object. To determine if tetracycline, previously reported to increase the probability of developing symptomatic vaginal yeast infections, has a direct effect on Candida albicans growth or induction of virulent phenotypes. Method. In vitro, clinical isolates of yeast were cultivated with sublethal concentrations of tetracycline and yeast cell counts, hyphal formation, drug efflux pump activity, biofilm production, and hemolysin production were determined by previously reported methods. Resul...

  14. The Candida albicans Histone Acetyltransferase Hat1 Regulates Stress Resistance and Virulence via Distinct Chromatin Assembly Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tscherner

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Human fungal pathogens like Candida albicans respond to host immune surveillance by rapidly adapting their transcriptional programs. Chromatin assembly factors are involved in the regulation of stress genes by modulating the histone density at these loci. Here, we report a novel role for the chromatin assembly-associated histone acetyltransferase complex NuB4 in regulating oxidative stress resistance, antifungal drug tolerance and virulence in C. albicans. Strikingly, depletion of the NuB4 catalytic subunit, the histone acetyltransferase Hat1, markedly increases resistance to oxidative stress and tolerance to azole antifungals. Hydrogen peroxide resistance in cells lacking Hat1 results from higher induction rates of oxidative stress gene expression, accompanied by reduced histone density as well as subsequent increased RNA polymerase recruitment. Furthermore, hat1Δ/Δ cells, despite showing growth defects in vitro, display reduced susceptibility to reactive oxygen-mediated killing by innate immune cells. Thus, clearance from infected mice is delayed although cells lacking Hat1 are severely compromised in killing the host. Interestingly, increased oxidative stress resistance and azole tolerance are phenocopied by the loss of histone chaperone complexes CAF-1 and HIR, respectively, suggesting a central role for NuB4 in the delivery of histones destined for chromatin assembly via distinct pathways. Remarkably, the oxidative stress phenotype of hat1Δ/Δ cells is a species-specific trait only found in C. albicans and members of the CTG clade. The reduced azole susceptibility appears to be conserved in a wider range of fungi. Thus, our work demonstrates how highly conserved chromatin assembly pathways can acquire new functions in pathogenic fungi during coevolution with the host.

  15. Roles of Zinc-responsive transcription factor Csr1 in filamentous growth of the pathogenic Yeast Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Jeong; Kil, Minkwang; Jung, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Jinmi

    2008-02-01

    In the fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition occurs in response to a broad range of environmental stimuli and is considered to be a major virulence factor. To address whether the zinc homeostasis affects the growth or pathogenicity of C. albicans, we functionally characterized the zinc-finger protein Csr1 during filamentation. The deduced amino acid sequence of Csr1 showed a 49% similarity to the zinc-specific transcription factor, Zap1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sequential disruptions of CSR1 were carried out in diploid C. albicans. The csr1/csr1 mutant strain showed severe growth defects under zinc-limited growth conditions and the filamentation defect under hyphainducing media. The colony morphology and the germ-tube formation were significantly affected by the csr1 mutation. The expression of the hyphae-specific gene HWP1 was also impaired in csr1/csr1 cells. The C. albicans homologs of ZRT1 and ZRT2, which are zinc-transporter genes in S. cerevisiae, were isolated. High-copy number plasmids of these genes suppressed the filamentation defect of the csr1/csr1 mutant strain. We propose that the filamentation phenotype of C. albicans is closely associated with the zinc homeostasis in the cells and that Csr1 plays a critical role in this regulation. PMID:18309267

  16. Nuclear Proteins Associated with Hyphen Growth in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Alsheyab Fawzi

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungus and the most prevalent among human pathogenic yeasts. The Candida spp. are dimorphic fungi with mycelium (M) and budding yeast (B) growth phases. Dimorphism of C. albicans is believed to be a critical component of pathogenesis, to ensure whether the yeast form or the hyphal form is primary responsible for pathogenicity. Growth-form-specific transcripts of C. albicans were characterized using ddRT-PCR to ascertain their fundamental differentiation p...

  17. Cell Wall Polysaccharides of Candida albicans Induce Mast Cell Degranulation in the Gut

    OpenAIRE

    Sakurai, Atsuko; Yamaguchi, Natsu; Sonoyama, Kei

    2012-01-01

    We investigated Candida albicans-induced mast cell degranulation in vitro and in vivo. Cell wall fraction but not culture supernatant and cell membrane fraction prepared from hyphally grown C. albicans induced β-hexosaminidase release in RBL-2H3 cells. Cell wall mannan and soluble β-glucan fractions also induced β-hexosaminidase release. Histological examination of mouse forestomach showed that C. albicans gut colonization induces mast cell degranulation. However, intragastric administration ...

  18. Click beetle luciferases as dual reporters of gene expression in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitan, Mario; Eichhof, Isabel; Lagadec, Quentin; Ernst, Joachim F

    2016-08-01

    Synthetic genes encoding functional luciferases of the click beetle (CB) Pyrophorus plagiophthalamus have been expressed in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Both green- and red-emitting CB luciferases (CaCBGluc and CaCBRluc) were produced with high efficiency in transformants under transcriptional control of the growth-dependent ACT1 promoter, as well as by the HWP1 and UME6 promoters, which are upregulated during hyphal morphogenesis, as well as by the YWP1 and EFG1 promoters, which are downregulated. For all hyphally regulated genes, relative bioluminescence values derived from promoter fusions approximated relative transcript levels of native genes, although downregulation of YWP1 promoter activity required correction for the stability of CB luciferases (approximate half-lives 30 min for CaCBRluc and 80 min for CaCBGluc, as determined by immunoblotting). Importantly, the activity of both luciferases could be separately monitored in a single strain, in intact cells, in lysed cells or in cell extracts using luciferin as single substrate and inhibition of hypha formation by farnesol could be easily detected by the HWP1p-CaCBRluc fusion. The results suggest that CB luciferases are convenient tools to measure gene expression in C. albicans and may facilitate screenings for antifungal compounds. PMID:27339610

  19. Transcript profiling reveals rewiring of iron assimilation gene expression in Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-12-01

    Hyphal growth is repressed in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis by the transcription factor Nrg1. Transcript profiling of a C. dubliniensis NRG1 mutant identified a common group of 28 NRG1-repressed genes in both species, including the hypha-specific genes HWP1, ECE1 and the regulator of cell elongation UME6. Unexpectedly, C. dubliniensis NRG1 was required for wild-type levels of expression of 10 genes required for iron uptake including seven ferric reductases, SIT1, FTR1 and RBT5. However, at alkaline pH and during filamentous growth in 10% serum, most of these genes were highly induced in C. dubliniensis. Conversely, RBT5, PGA10, FRE10 and FRP1 did not exhibit induction during hyphal growth when NRG1 is downregulated, indicating that in C. dubliniensis NRG1 is also required for optimal expression of these genes in alkaline environments. In iron-depleted medium at pH 4.5, reduced growth of the NRG1 mutant relative to wild type was observed; however, growth was restored to wild-type levels or greater at pH 6.5, indicating that alkaline induction of iron assimilation gene expression could rescue this phenotype. These data indicate that transcriptional control of iron assimilation and pseudohypha formation has been separated in C. albicans, perhaps promoting growth in a wider range of niches.

  20. Genomewide location analysis of Candida albicans Upc2p, a regulator of sterol metabolism and azole drug resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Znaidi, Sadri; Weber, Sandra; Al-Abdin, Osman Zin; Bomme, Perrine; Saidane, Saloua; Drouin, Simon; Lemieux, Sébastien; De Deken, Xavier; Robert, François; Raymond, Martine

    2008-05-01

    Upc2p, a transcription factor of the zinc cluster family, is an important regulator of sterol biosynthesis and azole drug resistance in Candida albicans. To better understand Upc2p function in C. albicans, we used genomewide location profiling to identify the transcriptional targets of Upc2p in vivo. A triple hemagglutinin epitope, introduced at the C terminus of Upc2p, conferred a gain-of-function effect on the fusion protein. Location profiling identified 202 bound promoters (P ERG11, ERG2, and others), 18 genes encoding ribosomal subunits (RPS30, RPL32, RPL12, and others), 3 genes encoding drug transporters (CDR1, MDR1, and YOR1), 4 genes encoding transcription factors (INO2, ACE2, SUT1, and UPC2), and 6 genes involved in sulfur amino acid metabolism (MET6, SAM2, SAH1, and others). Bioinformatic analyses suggested that Upc2p binds to the DNA motif 5'-VNCGBDTR that includes the previously characterized Upc2p binding site 5'-TCGTATA. Northern blot analysis showed that increased binding correlates with increased expression for the analyzed Upc2p targets (ERG11, MDR1, CDR1, YOR1, SUT1, SMF12, and CBP1). The analysis of ERG11, MDR1, and CDR1 transcripts in wild-type and upc2Delta/upc2Delta strains grown under Upc2p-activating conditions (lovastatin treatment and hypoxia) showed that Upc2p regulates its targets in a complex manner, acting as an activator or as a repressor depending upon the target and the activating condition. Taken together, our results indicate that Upc2p is a key regulator of ergosterol metabolism. They also suggest that Upc2p may contribute to azole resistance by regulating the expression of drug efflux pump-encoding genes in addition to ergosterol biosynthesis genes. PMID:18390649

  1. Plasma-membrane Cnh1 Na+/H+ antiporter regulates potassium homeostasis in Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kinclová-Zimmermannová, Olga; Sychrová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 153, č. 8 (2007), s. 2603-2612. ISSN 1350-0872 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531; GA AV ČR KJB5011307 Grant ostatní: CANTRAIN(XE) MRTN-CT-2004-512481 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : C. albicans * Cnh1 antiporter * potassium homeostasis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.110, year: 2007

  2. cDNA Array Analysis of the Differential Expression Change in Virulence-related Genes During the Development of Resistance in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng XU; Yuan-Ying JIANG; Yong-Bing CAO; Jun-Dong ZHANG; Ying-Ying CAO; Ping-Hui GAO; De-Jun WANG; Xu-Ping FU; Kang YING; Wan-Sheng CHEN

    2005-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated fungus in immunocompromised patients associated with mucosal and deep-tissue infections. To investigate the correlation between virulence and resistance on a gene expression profile in C. albicans, we examined the changes in virulence-related genes during the development of resistance in C. albicans from bone marrow transplant patients using a constructed cDNA array representing 3096 unigenes. In addition to the genes known to be associated with azole resistance,16 virulence-related genes were identified, whose differential expressions were newly found to be associated with the resistant phenotype. Differential expressions for these genes were confirmed by RT-PCR independently. Furthermore, the up-regulation of EFG1, CPH2, TEC1, CDC24, SAP10, ALS9, SNF1, SPO72 and BDF1, and the down-regulation of RAD32, IPF3636 and UBI4 resulted in stronger virulence and invasiveness in the resistant isolates compared with susceptible ones. These findings provide a link between the expression of virulence genes and development of resistance during C. albicans infection in bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, where C. albicans induces hyphal formation and expression change in multiple virulence factors.

  3. Phenotypic plasticity regulates Candida albicans interactions and virulence in the vertebrate host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily M Mallick

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypic diversity is critical to the lifestyles of many microbial species, enabling rapid responses to changes in environmental conditions. In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, cells exhibit heritable switching between two phenotypic states, white and opaque, which yield differences in mating, filamentous growth, and interactions with immune cells in vitro. Here, we addressed the in vivo properties of the two cell states in a zebrafish model of infection. Multiple attributes were compared including the stability of phenotypic states, filamentation, virulence, dissemination, and phagocytosis by immune cells, and phenotypes equated across three different host temperatures. We show that both white and opaque cells can establish a lethal systemic infection. The relative virulence of the two cell types is temperature dependent; virulence is similar at 25°C, but at higher temperatures (30 and 33°C white cells are significantly more virulent than opaque cells. Despite the difference in virulence, fungal burdens and dissemination are similar between cells in the two states. Additionally, both white and opaque cells exhibit robust filamentation during infection, and mutants unable to filament show decreased virulence, establishing that this program is critical for pathogenesis in both cell states. Interactions between C. albicans cells and immune cells were compared both in vitro and in vivo. Macrophages and neutrophils preferentially phagocytosed white cells over opaque cells in vitro, and neutrophils also showed preferential phagocytosis of white cells in vivo. Together, these studies distinguish the properties of white and opaque cells in a vertebrate host, and establish that the two cell types demonstrate both important similarities and key differences during infection.

  4. Microevolution of Candida albicans in macrophages restores filamentation in a nonfilamentous mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Wartenberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Following antifungal treatment, Candida albicans, and other human pathogenic fungi can undergo microevolution, which leads to the emergence of drug resistance. However, the capacity for microevolutionary adaptation of fungi goes beyond the development of resistance against antifungals. Here we used an experimental microevolution approach to show that one of the central pathogenicity mechanisms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphae transition, can be subject to experimental evolution. The C. albicans cph1Δ/efg1Δ mutant is nonfilamentous, as central signaling pathways linking environmental cues to hyphal formation are disrupted. We subjected this mutant to constant selection pressure in the hostile environment of the macrophage phagosome. In a comparatively short time-frame, the mutant evolved the ability to escape macrophages by filamentation. In addition, the evolved mutant exhibited hyper-virulence in a murine infection model and an altered cell wall composition compared to the cph1Δ/efg1Δ strain. Moreover, the transcriptional regulation of hyphae-associated, and other pathogenicity-related genes became re-responsive to environmental cues in the evolved strain. We went on to identify the causative missense mutation via whole genome- and transcriptome-sequencing: a single nucleotide exchange took place within SSN3 that encodes a component of the Cdk8 module of the Mediator complex, which links transcription factors with the general transcription machinery. This mutation was responsible for the reconnection of the hyphal growth program with environmental signals in the evolved strain and was sufficient to bypass Efg1/Cph1-dependent filamentation. These data demonstrate that even central transcriptional networks can be remodeled very quickly under appropriate selection pressure.

  5. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  6. Morphological and physiological changes induced by contact-dependent interaction between Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Batbileg; Cen, Lujia; Agnello, Melissa; Shi, Wenyuan; He, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum are well-studied oral commensal microbes with pathogenic potential that are involved in various oral polymicrobial infectious diseases. Recently, we demonstrated that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 coaggregates with C. albicans SN152, a process mainly mediated by fusobacterial membrane protein RadD and Candida cell wall protein Flo9. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential biological impact of this inter-kingdom interaction. We found that F. nucleatum ATCC 23726 inhibits growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans SN152 in a contact-dependent manner. Further analysis revealed that the inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis is mediated via RadD and Flo9 protein pair. Using a murine macrophage cell line, we showed that the F. nucleatum-induced inhibition of Candida hyphal morphogenesis promotes C. albicans survival and negatively impacts the macrophage-killing capability of C. albicans. Furthermore, the yeast form of C. albicans repressed F. nucleatum-induced MCP-1 and TNFα production in macrophages. Our study suggests that the interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum leads to a mutual attenuation of virulence, which may function to promote a long-term commensal lifestyle within the oral cavity. This finding has significant implications for our understanding of inter-kingdom interaction and may impact clinical treatment strategies. PMID:27295972

  7. Als1 and Als3 regulate the intracellular uptake of copper ions when Candida albicans biofilms are exposed to metallic copper surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Sha; Chang, Wenqiang; Li, Chen; Lou, Hongxiang

    2016-05-01

    Copper surfaces possess efficient antimicrobial effect. Here, we reported that copper surfaces could inactivate Candida albicans biofilms within 40 min. The intracellular reactive oxygen species in C. albicans biofilms were immediately stimulated during the contact of copper surfaces, which might be an important factor for killing the mature biofilms. Copper release assay demonstrated that the copper ions automatically released from the surface of 1 mm thick copper coupons with over 99.9% purity are not the key determinant for the copper-mediated killing action. The susceptibility test to copper surfaces by using C. albicans mutant strains, which were involved in efflux pumps, adhesins, biofilms formation or osmotic stress response showed that als1/als1 and als3/als3 displayed higher resistance to the copper surface contact than other mutants did. The intracellular concentration of copper ions was lower in als1/als1 and als3/als3 than that in wild-type strain. Transcriptional analysis revealed that the expression of copper transporter-related gene, CRP1, was significantly increased in als1/als1, als3/als3, suggesting a potential role of ALS1 and ALS3 in absorbing ions by regulating the expression of CRP1 This study provides a potential application in treating pathogenic fungi by using copper surfaces and uncovers the roles of ALS1 and ALS3 in absorbing copper ions for C. albicans. PMID:27189057

  8. Treatment with some anti-inflammatory drugs reduces germ tube formation in Candida albicans strains

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Rusu; Manuela Radu-Popescu; Diana Pelinescu; Tatiana Vassu

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic dimorphic fungus that inhabits various host mucosal sites. It can cause both superficial and serious systemic disease. Conversion from the yeast to the hyphal form has been associated with increased virulence and mucosal invasiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium diclofenac and aspirin on germs tube formation of different Candida albicans strains. Prostaglandins may play an important role in fungal colonization. Nonsteroida...

  9. Human submandibular-sublingual saliva promotes adhesion of Candida albicans to polymethylmethacrylate.

    OpenAIRE

    Edgerton, M; Scannapieco, F A; Reddy, M. S.; Levine, M J

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify components of saliva that interact with Candida albicans in solution and that may modulate adhesion to dental acrylic (polymethylmethacrylate [PMMA]) surfaces. Saliva-derived pellicles extracted from C. albicans blastoconidia and hyphal-form cells mixed with fresh human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) contained predominantly high- and low-molecular-weight mucins (MG1 and MG2, respectively). In contrast, few components from fresh human parotid ...

  10. Fungal Morphogenetic Pathways Are Required for the Hallmark Inflammatory Response during Candida albicans Vaginitis

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Brian M.; Palmer, Glen E.; Nash, Andrea K.; Lilly, Elizabeth A.; Fidel, Paul L.; Noverr, Mairi C.

    2014-01-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, caused primarily by Candida albicans, presents significant health issues for women of childbearing age. As a polymorphic fungus, the ability of C. albicans to switch between yeast and hyphal morphologies is considered its central virulence attribute. Armed with new criteria for defining vaginitis immunopathology, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the yeast-to-hypha transition is required for the hallmark inflammatory responses previously characterize...

  11. Mucosal biofilms of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Shantanu; Mitchell, Aaron P.

    2011-01-01

    Biofilms are microbial communities that form on surfaces and are embedded in an extracellular matrix. C. albicans forms pathogenic mucosal biofilms that are evoked by changes in host immunity or mucosal ecology. Mucosal surfaces are inhabited by many microbial species; hence these biofilms are polymicrobial. Several recent studies have applied paradigms of biofilm analysis to study mucosal C. albicans infections. These studies reveal that the Bcr1 transcription factor is a master regulator of...

  12. Prostaglandins from Cytosolic Phospholipase A2α/Cyclooxygenase-1 Pathway and Mitogen-activated Protein Kinases Regulate Gene Expression in Candida albicans-infected Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bogeon; Lee, HeeJung; Jayaraja, Sabarirajan; Suram, Saritha; Murphy, Robert C; Leslie, Christina C

    2016-03-25

    InCandida albicans-infected resident peritoneal macrophages, activation of group IVA cytosolic phospholipase A2(cPLA2α) by calcium- and mitogen-activated protein kinases triggers the rapid production of prostaglandins I2and E2through cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and regulates gene expression by increasing cAMP. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages, expression ofIl10,Nr4a2, andPtgs2was lower, and expression ofTnfα was higher, than in wild type macrophages. Expression was reconstituted with 8-bromo-cAMP, the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP, and agonists for prostaglandin receptors IP, EP2, and EP4 in infected but not uninfected cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. InC. albicans-infected cPLA2α(+/+)macrophages, COX-2 expression was blocked by IP, EP2, and EP4 receptor antagonists, indicating a role for both prostaglandin I2and E2 Activation of ERKs and p38, but not JNKs, byC. albicansacted synergistically with prostaglandins to induce expression ofIl10,Nr4a2, andPtgs2. Tnfα expression required activation of ERKs and p38 but was suppressed by cAMP. Results using cAMP analogues that activate PKA or Epacs suggested that cAMP regulates gene expression through PKA. However, phosphorylation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), the cAMP-regulated transcription factor involved inIl10,Nr4a2,Ptgs2, andTnfα expression, was not mediated by cAMP/PKA because it was similar inC. albicans-infected wild type and cPLA2α(-/-)or COX-1(-/-)macrophages. CREB phosphorylation was blocked by p38 inhibitors and induced by the p38 activator anisomycin but not by the PKA activator 6-benzoyl-cAMP. Therefore, MAPK activation inC. albicans-infected macrophages plays a dual role by promoting the cPLA2α/prostaglandin/cAMP/PKA pathway and CREB phosphorylation that coordinately regulate immediate early gene expression. PMID:26841868

  13. Cloning and sequencing of the Candida albicans homologue of SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, the essential gene encoding GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warit, S; Walmsley, R M; Stateva, L I

    1998-09-01

    Two genomic fragments have been isolated from Candida albicans which strongly hybridize to SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, an essential gene which encodes GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A common 2.5 kb Xbal-Pstl fragment has been identified, which Southern analysis suggests is most likely unique in the C. albicans genome. The fragment contains an ORF, which is 82% identical and 90% homologous to the Srb1p/Psa1p/Vig9p from S. cerevisiae, contains one additional amino acid at position 254 and is able to functionally complement the major phenotypic characteristics of S. cerevisiae srb1 null and conditional mutations. The authors therefore conclude that they have cloned and sequenced from C. albicans the bona fide homologue of SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, named hereafter CaSRB1. Northern analysis data indicate that the gene is expressed in C. albicans under conditions of growth in the yeast and hyphal form and suggest that its expression might be regulated. PMID:9782489

  14. Cigarette Smoke-Exposed Candida albicans Increased Chitin Production and Modulated Human Fibroblast Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humidah Alanazi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P<0.01 sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P<0.01 resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P<0.01 slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers.

  15. Cigarette smoke-exposed Candida albicans increased chitin production and modulated human fibroblast cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Humidah; Semlali, Abdelhabib; Perraud, Laura; Chmielewski, Witold; Zakrzewski, Andrew; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    The predisposition of cigarette smokers for development of respiratory and oral bacterial infections is well documented. Cigarette smoke can also contribute to yeast infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) on C. albicans transition, chitin content, and response to environmental stress and to examine the interaction between CSC-pretreated C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. Following exposure to CSC, C. albicans transition from blastospore to hyphal form increased. CSC-pretreated yeast cells became significantly (P < 0.01) sensitive to oxidation but significantly (P < 0.01) resistant to both osmotic and heat stress. CSC-pretreated C. albicans expressed high levels of chitin, with 2- to 8-fold recorded under hyphal conditions. CSC-pretreated C. albicans adhered better to the gingival fibroblasts, proliferated almost three times more and adapted into hyphae, while the gingival fibroblasts recorded a significantly (P < 0.01) slow growth rate but a significantly higher level of IL-1β when in contact with CSC-pretreated C. albicans. CSC was thus able to modulate both C. albicans transition through the cell wall chitin content and the interaction between C. albicans and normal human gingival fibroblasts. These findings may be relevant to fungal infections in the oral cavity in smokers. PMID:25302312

  16. Cell Wall N-Linked Mannoprotein Biosynthesis Requires Goa1p, a Putative Regulator of Mitochondrial Complex I in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    She, Xiaodong; Calderone, Richard; Kruppa, Michael; Lowman, Douglas; Williams, David; Zhang, Lili; Gao, Ying; Khamooshi, Kasra; Liu, Weida; Li, Dongmei

    2016-01-01

    The Goa1p of Candida albicans regulates mitochondrial Complex I (CI) activities in its role as a putative CI accessory protein. Transcriptional profiling of goa1∆ revealed a down regulation of genes encoding β-oligomannosyl transferases. Herein, we present data on cell wall phenotypes of goa1∆ (strain GOA31). We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM), GPC/MALLS, and NMR to compare GOA31 to a gene-reconstituted strain (GOA32) and parental cells. We note by TEM a reduction in outer wall fi...

  17. Candida albicans Cas5, a Regulator of Cell Wall Integrity, Is Required for Virulence in Murine and Toll Mutant Fly Models

    OpenAIRE

    Chamilos, Georgios; Nobile, Clarissa J.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Lewis, Russell E.; Mitchell, Aaron P.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.

    2009-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen, yet the pathogenesis of C. albicans infection remains incompletely understood. We hypothesized that C. albicans has developed evolutionarily conserved mechanisms to invade disparate hosts and tested whether Toll mutant flies could serve as a model host for high-throughput screening of C. albicans virulence genes. We screened 34 C. albicans mutants defective in putative transcription factor genes (see http://www.tigr.org/tigr-scripts/e...

  18. Stage specific assessment of Candida albicans phagocytosis by macrophages identifies cell wall composition and morphogenesis as key determinants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne E Lewis

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major life-threatening human fungal pathogen. Host defence against systemic Candida infection relies mainly on phagocytosis of fungal cells by cells of the innate immune system. In this study, we have employed video microscopy, coupled with sophisticated image analysis tools, to assess the contribution of distinct C. albicans cell wall components and yeast-hypha morphogenesis to specific stages of phagocytosis by macrophages. We show that macrophage migration towards C. albicans was dependent on the glycosylation status of the fungal cell wall, but not cell viability or morphogenic switching from yeast to hyphal forms. This was not a consequence of differences in maximal macrophage track velocity, but stems from a greater percentage of macrophages pursuing glycosylation deficient C. albicans during the first hour of the phagocytosis assay. The rate of engulfment of C. albicans attached to the macrophage surface was significantly delayed for glycosylation and yeast-locked morphogenetic mutant strains, but enhanced for non-viable cells. Hyphal cells were engulfed at a slower rate than yeast cells, especially those with hyphae in excess of 20 µm, but there was no correlation between hyphal length and the rate of engulfment below this threshold. We show that spatial orientation of the hypha and whether hyphal C. albicans attached to the macrophage via the yeast or hyphal end were also important determinants of the rate of engulfment. Breaking down the overall phagocytic process into its individual components revealed novel insights into what determines the speed and effectiveness of C. albicans phagocytosis by macrophages.

  19. Differential filamentation of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis Is governed by nutrient regulation of UME6 expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Leanne

    2010-09-01

    Candida dubliniensis is closely related to Candida albicans; however, it is responsible for fewer infections in humans and is less virulent in animal models of infection. C. dubliniensis forms fewer hyphae in vivo, and this may contribute to its reduced virulence. In this study we show that, unlike C. albicans, C. dubliniensis fails to form hyphae in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) medium supplemented with 10% (vol\\/vol) fetal calf serum (YPDS medium). However, C. dubliniensis filaments in water plus 10% (vol\\/vol) fetal calf serum (WS), and this filamentation is inhibited by the addition of peptone and glucose. Repression of filamentation in YPDS medium could be partly overcome by preculture in synthetic Lee\\'s medium. Unlike C. albicans, inoculation of C. dubliniensis in YPDS medium did not result in increased UME6 transcription. However, >100-fold induction of UME6 was observed when C. dubliniensis was inoculated in nutrient-poor WS medium. The addition of increasing concentrations of peptone to WS medium had a dose-dependent effect on reducing UME6 expression. Transcript profiling of C. dubliniensis hyphae in WS medium identified a starvation response involving expression of genes in the glyoxylate cycle and fatty acid oxidation. In addition, a core, shared transcriptional response with C. albicans could be identified, including expression of virulence-associated genes including SAP456, SAP7, HWP1, and SOD5. Preculture in nutrient-limiting medium enhanced adherence of C. dubliniensis, epithelial invasion, and survival following coculture with murine macrophages. In conclusion, C. albicans, unlike C. dubliniensis, appears to form hyphae in liquid medium regardless of nutrient availability, which may account for its increased capacity to cause disease in humans.

  20. Physiologic Expression of the Candida albicans Pescadillo Homolog Is Required for Virulence in a Murine Model of Hematogenously Disseminated Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Uppuluri, Priya; Chaturvedi, Ashok K.; Jani, Niketa; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Monteagudo Castro, Carlos; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Köhler, Julia R.; Lopez Ribot, Jose L.

    2012-01-01

    Morphogenetic conversions contribute to the pathogenesis of Candida albicans invasive infections. Many studies to date have convincingly demonstrated a link between filamentation and virulence; however, relatively little is known regarding the role of the filament-to-yeast transition during the pathogenesis of invasive candidiasis. We previously identified the C. albicans pescadillo homolog (PES1) as essential during yeast growth and growth of lateral yeast on hyphae but not during hyphal gro...

  1. Hyphal growth of hypomyces chlorinus tul

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incorporation of the chitin precursor N-acetyl-D-(1,3H) glucosamine by H. chlorinus has been studied by light and electron microscopy autoradiography. Light microscopic autoradiography schowed that the incorporation occurred preferentially at the hyphal apex. Autoradiograms from electron microscopy were quantitatively evaluated to determine the relative radioactivity incorporation between the cell wall and cytoplasm: this showed that (3H) incorporation took place mainly in the plasmalemma-wall complex. However, a small amount of N-acetyl glucosamine can enter into the cytoplasmic space and is then transported by endomembranes (Golgi apparatus-vesicles) to the plasmalemma-cell wall interface before polymerization. (author)

  2. Streptococcus mutans Can Modulate Biofilm Formation and Attenuate the Virulence of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Júnia Oliveira; Rossoni, Rodnei Dennis; Vilela, Simone Furgeri Godinho; de Alvarenga, Janaína Araújo; Velloso, Marisol dos Santos; Prata, Márcia Cristina de Azevedo; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso; Junqueira, Juliana Campos

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans are found together in the oral biofilms on dental surfaces, but little is known about the ecological interactions between these species. Here, we studied the effects of S. mutans UA159 on the growth and pathogencity of C. albicans. Initially, the effects of S. mutans on the biofilm formation and morphogenesis of C. albicans were tested in vitro. Next, we investigate the influence of S. mutans on pathogenicity of C. albicans using in vivo host models, in which the experimental candidiasis was induced in G. mellonella larvae and analyzed by survival curves, C. albicans count in hemolymph, and quantification of hyphae in the host tissues. In all the tests, we evaluated the direct effects of S. mutans cells, as well as the indirect effects of the subproducts secreted by this microorganism using a bacterial culture filtrate. The in vitro analysis showed that S. mutans cells favored biofilm formation by C. albicans. However, a reduction in biofilm viable cells and inhibition of hyphal growth was observed when C. albicans was in contact with the S. mutans culture filtrate. In the in vivo study, injection of S. mutans cells or S. mutans culture filtrate into G. mellonella larvae infected with C. albicans increased the survival of these animals. Furthermore, a reduction in hyphal formation was observed in larval tissues when C. albicans was associated with S. mutans culture filtrate. These findings suggest that S. mutans can secrete subproducts capable to inhibit the biofilm formation, morphogenesis and pathogenicity of C. albicans, attenuating the experimental candidiasis in G. mellonella model. PMID:26934196

  3. Triclosan antagonizes fluconazole activity against Candida albicans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, J

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg\\/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg\\/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes.

  4. Effects of salivary protein flow and indigenous microorganisms on initial colonization of Candida albicans in an in vivo model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaguchi Norihiko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is part of the commensal microbial flora of the oral cavity. When the host immune defenses are impaired or when the normal microbial flora is disturbed, C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the oral mucosa and tongue. Recently, we produced NOD/SCID.e2f1-/- mice that show hyposalivation, decrease of salivary protein flow, lack IgA and IgG in saliva, and have decreased NK cells. Our objective was to characterize C. albicans infection and biofilm formation in mice. Methods NOD/SCID.e2f1-/- mice were used as an animal model for C. albicans infection. C. albicans yeast and hyphal forms solutions were introduced in the oral cavity after disinfection by Chlorhexidine. Results The numbers of C. albicans colonized and decreased in a time-dependent manner in NOD/SCID.e2f1+/+ after inoculation. However, the colonization levels were higher in NOD/SCID.e2f1+/+ than NOD/SCID.e2f1-/- mice. In the mice fed 1% sucrose water before inoculation, C. albicans sample was highly contaminated by indigenous microorganisms in the oral cavity; and was not in the mice fed no sucrose water. The colonization of C. albicans was not influenced by the contamination of indigenous microorganisms. The hyphal form of C. albicans restricted the restoration of indigenous microorganisms. The decreased saliva in NOD/SCID.e2f1-/- did not increase the colonization of C. albicans in comparison to NOD/SCID.e2f1+/+ mice. We suggest that the receptor in saliva to C. albicans may not be sufficiently provided in the oral cavity of NOD/SCID.e2f1-/- mice. Conclusion The saliva protein flow may be very important for C. albicans initial colonization, where the indigenous microorganisms do not affect colonization in the oral cavity.

  5. Comparative transcript profiling of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis identifies SFL2, a C. albicans gene required for virulence in a reconstituted epithelial infection model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Spiering, Martin J

    2010-02-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are closely related species displaying differences in virulence and genome content, therefore providing potential opportunities to identify novel C. albicans virulence genes. C. albicans gene arrays were used for comparative analysis of global gene expression in the two species in reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHE). C. albicans (SC5314) showed upregulation of hypha-specific and virulence genes within 30 min postinoculation, coinciding with rapid induction of filamentation and increased RHE damage. C. dubliniensis (CD36) showed no detectable upregulation of hypha-specific genes, grew as yeast, and caused limited RHE damage. Several genes absent or highly divergent in C. dubliniensis were upregulated in C. albicans. One such gene, SFL2 (orf19.3969), encoding a putative heat shock factor, was deleted in C. albicans. DeltaDeltasfl2 cells failed to filament under a range of hypha-inducing conditions and exhibited greatly reduced RHE damage, reversed by reintroduction of SFL2 into the DeltaDeltasfl2 strain. Moreover, SFL2 overexpression in C. albicans triggered hyphal morphogenesis. Although SFL2 deletion had no apparent effect on host survival in the murine model of systemic infection, DeltaDeltasfl2 strain-infected kidney tissues contained only yeast cells. These results suggest a role for SFL2 in morphogenesis and an indirect role in C. albicans pathogenesis in epithelial tissues.

  6. Genetics of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, S.; Magee, P T

    1990-01-01

    Candida albicans is among the most common fungal pathogens. Infections caused by C. albicans and other Candida species can be life threatening in individuals with impaired immune function. Genetic analysis of C. albicans pathogenesis is complicated by the diploid nature of the species and the absence of a known sexual cycle. Through a combination of parasexual techniques and molecular approaches, an effective genetic system has been developed. The close relationship of C. albicans to the more...

  7. Candida Albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Maria Magdalena Simatupang

    2009-01-01

    義歯性口内炎患者のデンチャープラーク中には、多数の真菌が認められることから、これら真菌が衰症の原因菌の一つとされている。このようなデンチャープラーク中の真菌には、Candida属が高頻度に検出され、中でもCandida albicansの検出率が著しく高いことが知られている。本真菌は、酵母(Y)型並びにフィラメント(F)型の二つの形態をとる二形性真菌であり、種々の因子によりその形態が変化することが、古くから知られている。しかし、その詳細な機構については未だ不明な点が多い。著者は、C.albicansが培地中のビオテン濃度により形態変化を受ける事実に着目し、本菌の二形性と脂質代謝との間に、なんらかの関連性があるのではないかとの作業仮設のもとに、以下の実験を行った。 本研究は、Candida albicans A IFO 1385株を用いて行った。使用培地は、サブローグルコース培地(2% グルコース、1% ペプトン、 0.5% イーストエキス)(medium A)並びにメチオニン含有合成培地(medium B)である。培養温度は、それぞれY型薗並びにF型菌を得るために、25℃...

  8. The adaptive metabolic response involves specific protein glutathionylation during the filamentation process in the pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergondey, R; Garcia, C; Serre, V; Camadro, J M; Auchère, F

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunist pathogen responsible for a large spectrum of infections, from superficial mycosis to the systemic disease candidiasis. Its ability to adopt various morphological forms, such as unicellular yeasts, filamentous pseudohyphae and hyphae, contributes to its ability to survive within the host. It has been suggested that the antioxidant glutathione is involved in the filamentation process. We investigated S-glutathionylation, the reversible binding of glutathione to proteins, and the functional consequences on C. albicans metabolic remodeling during the yeast-to-hyphae transition. Our work provided evidence for the specific glutathionylation of mitochondrial proteins involved in bioenergetics pathways in filamentous forms and a regulation of the main enzyme of the glyoxylate cycle, isocitrate lyase, by glutathionylation. Isocitrate lyase inactivation in the hyphal forms was reversed by glutaredoxin treatment, in agreement with a glutathionylation process, which was confirmed by proteomic data showing the binding of one glutathione molecule to the enzyme (data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003685). We also assessed the effect of alternative carbon sources on glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity. Changes in nutrient availability led to morphological flexibility and were related to perturbations in glutathione levels and isocitrate lyase activity, confirming the key role of the maintenance of intracellular redox status in the adaptive metabolic strategy of the pathogen. PMID:27083931

  9. Plasma membrane organization promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lois M; Konopka, James B

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans is a human fungal pathogen capable of causing lethal systemic infections. The plasma membrane plays key roles in virulence because it not only functions as a protective barrier, it also mediates dynamic functions including secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, invasive hyphal morphogenesis, endocytosis, and nutrient uptake. Consistent with this functional complexity, the plasma membrane is composed of a wide array of lipids and proteins. These components are organized into distinct domains that will be the topic of this review. Some of the plasma membrane domains that will be described are known to act as scaffolds or barriers to diffusion, such as MCC/eisosomes, septins, and sites of contact with the endoplasmic reticulum. Other zones mediate dynamic processes, including secretion, endocytosis, and a special region at hyphal tips that facilitates rapid growth. The highly organized architecture of the plasma membrane facilitates the coordination of diverse functions and promotes the pathogenesis of C. albicans. PMID:26920878

  10. Caveats in the investigation of form-specific molecules of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E; Beatty, W. L.

    1990-01-01

    Numerous reports purporting the existence of form-specific antigens of Candida albicans have been published, but it is generally unclear whether antigenic variability is an acceptable alternative interpretation. In this study, we used indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy to determine the distribution and form specificities of two antigens during yeast and hyphal growth in several defined and complex media. The results confirmed that antigen expression varies with len...

  11. Characterization of antigens specific to the surface of germ tubes of Candida albicans by immunofluorescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Sundstrom, P M; Kenny, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    To characterize germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans, rabbit antiserum prepared to Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes was adsorbed with stationary-phase blastospores. By immunofluorescence and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, this antibody did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. Germ tube-specific antigens appeared 30 min after placing blastospores in appropriate conditions for germ tube formation. Hyphae, formed by allo...

  12. Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis in the gut: Synergy in commensalism?

    OpenAIRE

    Garsin, Danielle A.; Michael C Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Candida albicans and the gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis are both normal residents of the human gut microbiome and cause opportunistic disseminated infections in immunocompromised individuals. Using a nematode infection model, we recently showed that co-infection resulted in less pathology and less mortality than infection with either species alone and this was partly explained by an interkingdom signaling event in which a bacterial-derived product inhibits hyphal mor...

  13. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Armstead Valerie; Parveen Zahida; Logan David A; Lobach Ludmila; Powell Garry; Acheampong Edward; Barodka Viachaslau M; Mukhtar Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Alth...

  14. Inhibition of Candida albicans virulence factors by novel levofloxacin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafreen, Raja Mohamed Beema; Raja Mohamed, Beema Shafreen; Muthamil, Subramanian; Subramanian, Muthamil; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Shunmugiah, Karutha Pandian

    2014-08-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen, responsible for biofilm associated infections in immunocompromised patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antibiofilm properties of novel levofloxacin derivatives on C. albicans biofilms. The levofloxacin derivatives at their Biofilm Inhibitory Concentrations (BIC) were able to inhibit the biofilms of C. albicans, the yeast-to-hyphal transition and were also able to disrupt their mature biofilms. Furthermore, Real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene (ERG11) and the efflux pump-encoding genes (CDR1 and MDR1) was decreased upon treatment with the levofloxacin derivatives. The total ergosterol content quantified using UV spectrophotomer showed decrease in ergosterol in the presence of levofloxacin derivatives. Overall, levofloxacin derivatives (6a, 6c and 7d) are capable of inhibiting C. albicans virulence factors. Therefore, these compounds with potential therapeutic implications can be used as new strategy to treat biofilm-related candidal infections. PMID:24723295

  15. Antimicrobial effects of liquid anesthetic isoflurane on Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstead Valerie

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that can grow in yeast morphology or hyphal form depending on the surrounding environment. This ubiquitous fungus is present in skin and mucus membranes as a potential pathogen that under opportunistic conditions causes a series of systemic and superficial infections known as candidiasis, moniliasis or simply candidiasis. There has been a steady increase in the prevalence of candidiasis that is expressed in more virulent forms of infection. Although candidiasis is commonly manifested as mucocutaneous disease, life-threatening systemic invasion by this fungus can occur in every part of the body. The severity of candidal infections is associated with its morphological shift such that the hyphal morphology of the fungus is most invasive. Of importance, aberrant multiplication of Candida yeast is also associated with the pathogenesis of certain mucosal diseases. In this study, we assessed the anti-candidal activity of the volatile anesthetic isoflurane in liquid form in comparison with the anti-fungal agent amphotericin B in an in vitro culture system. Exposure of C. albicans to isoflurane (0.3% volume/volume and above inhibited multiplication of yeast as well as formation of hyphae. These data suggest development of potential topical application of isoflurane for controlling a series of cutaneous and genital infections associated with this fungus. Elucidiation of the mechanism by which isoflurane effects fungal growth could offer therapeutic potential for certain systemic fungal infections.

  16. Endoftalmite por Candida albicans Candida albicans endophthalmitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro Duraes Serracarbassa; Patrícia Dotto

    2003-01-01

    O autor descreve os aspectos epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e clínicos da endoftalmite endógena por Candida albicans. Apresenta ainda novos métodos diagnósticos e opções terapêuticas utilizadas no tratamento das infecções fúngicas intra-oculares, por meio de revisão bibliográfica.The author describes epidemiological, histopathological and clinical aspects of endogenous Candida albicans endophthalmitis. He also presents new diagnostic methods and therapeutical options to treat intraocular f...

  17. Endoftalmite por Candida albicans Candida albicans endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Duraes Serracarbassa

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available O autor descreve os aspectos epidemiológicos, histopatológicos e clínicos da endoftalmite endógena por Candida albicans. Apresenta ainda novos métodos diagnósticos e opções terapêuticas utilizadas no tratamento das infecções fúngicas intra-oculares, por meio de revisão bibliográfica.The author describes epidemiological, histopathological and clinical aspects of endogenous Candida albicans endophthalmitis. He also presents new diagnostic methods and therapeutical options to treat intraocular fungal infections, based on literature review.

  18. Hyphal tip cytoplasmic organization in four zygomycetous fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Karen E; Roberson, Robert W

    2016-05-01

    We have examined the hyphal tip structure in four zygomycetous fungi: Mortierella verticillata (Mortierellales), Coemansia reversa (Kickxellales), Mucor indicus and Gilbertella persicaria (Mucorales) using both light and transmission electron microscopy. We have used cryofixation and freeze-substitution methods to preserve fungal hyphae for transmission electron microscopy, which yielded improved preservation of ultrastructural details. Our research has confirmed studies that described the accumulation of secretory vesicles as a crescent at the hyphal apex (i.e. the apical vesicle crescent [AVC]) and provided a more detailed understanding of the vesicle populations. In addition, we have been able to observe the behavior of the AVC during hyphal growth in M. indicus and G. persicaria. PMID:26908648

  19. Sunflower seed husk agar: A new medium for the differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Z

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A sunflower ( Helianthus annuus seed husk agar medium has been developed and evaluated for differentiation of Candida dubliniensis from Candida albicans on the basis of colony morphology and chlamydospore production. All C. dubliniensis isolates (n=40 produced rough colonies with hyphal fringes and abundant chlamydospores whereas 101 of 105 (96.2% C. albicans isolates produced smooth colonies with no evidence of chlamydospore production. Since this medium is free from oil droplets, chlamydospores can be examined with greater clarity by Dalmau plate technique. This medium provides a simple and cost-effective tool for the presumptive differentiation of C. dubliniensis from C. albicans and is particularly suited for clinical microbiology laboratories where biochemical or molecular methods for the differentiation of these two species are not available.

  20. Inhibitory effects of several saturated fatty acids and their related fatty alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Kazumi; Takahashi, Miki; Yui, Satoru; Abe, Shigeru

    2015-12-01

    We examined the effect of 5 saturated fatty acids and their related alcohols on the growth of Candida albicans. The inhibitory effects of these compounds against the yeast and hyphal growth forms of C. albicans were examined using the modified NCCLS method and crystal violet staining, respectively. Among these compounds, capric acid inhibited both types of growth at the lowest concentration. The IC(80), i.e., the concentration at which the compounds reduced the growth of C. albicans by 80% in comparison with the growth of control cells, of capric acid for the hyphal growth of this fungus, which is indispensable for its mucosal invasion, was 16.7 μM. These fatty acids, including capric acid, have an unpleasant smell, which may limit their therapeutic use. To test them at reduced concentrations, the combined effect of these fatty acids and oligonol, a depolymerized polyphenol, was evaluated in vitro. These combinations showed potent synergistic inhibition of hyphal growth [fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index = 0.319]. Our results demonstrated that capric acid combined with oligonol could be used as an effective anti-Candida compound. It may be a candidate prophylactic or therapeutic tool against mucosal Candida infection. PMID:26781922

  1. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with 125I, or metabolically with [35S] methionine or [3H] mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen

  2. Co-occurence of filamentation defects and impaired biofilms in Candida albicans protein kinase mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Nina; Morrissey, John Patrick

    2015-12-01

    Pathogenicity of Candida albicans is linked with its developmental stages, notably the capacity switch from yeast-like to hyphal growth, and to form biofilms on surfaces. To better understand the cellular processes involved in C. albicans development, a collection of 63 C. albicans protein kinase mutants was screened for biofilm formation in a microtitre plate assay. Thirty-eight mutants displayed some degree of biofilm impairment, with 20 categorised as poor biofilm formers. All the poor biofilm formers were also defective in the switch from yeast to hyphae, establishing it as a primary defect. Five genes, VPS15, IME2, PKH3, PGA43 and CEX1, encode proteins not previously reported to influence hyphal development or biofilm formation. Network analysis established that individual components of some processes, most interestingly MAP kinase pathways, are not required for biofilm formation, most likely indicating functional redundancy. Mutants were also screened for their response to bacterial supernatants and it was found that Pseudomonas aeruginosa supernatants inhibited biofilm formation in all mutants, regardless of the presence of homoserine lactones (HSLs). In contrast, Candida morphology was only affected by supernatant containing HSLs. This confirms the distinct HSL-dependent inhibition of filamentation and the HSL-independent impairment of biofilm development by P. aeruginosa. PMID:26472756

  3. The role of tip-localized mitochondria in hyphal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levina, Natalia N; Lew, Roger R

    2006-02-01

    Hyphal tip-growing organisms have a high density of tip-localized mitochondria which maintain a membrane potential based on Rhodamine 123 fluorescence, but do not produce ATP based on the absence of significant oxygen consumption. Two possible roles of these mitochondria in tip growth were examined: Calcium sequestration and biogenesis, because tip-high cytoplasmic calcium gradients are a common feature of tip-growing organisms, and the volume expansion as the tip extends would require a continuous supply of additional mitochondria. Co-localization of calcium-sensitive fluorescent dye and mitochondria-specific fluorescent dyes showed that the tip-localized mitochondria do contain calcium, and therefore, may function in calcium clearance from the cytoplasm. Short-term inhibition of DNA synthesis or mitochondrial protein synthesis did not affect either tip growth, or mitochondrial shape or distribution. Therefore, mitochondrial biogenesis may not occur from the tip-localized mitochondria in hyphal organisms. PMID:16455272

  4. Differential Requirement of the Transcription Factor Mcm1 for Activation of the Candida albicans Multidrug Efflux Pump MDR1 by Its Regulators Mrr1 and Cap1▿

    OpenAIRE

    Mogavero, Selene; Tavanti, Arianna; Senesi, Sonia; Rogers, P. David; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Overexpression of the multidrug efflux pump Mdr1 causes increased fluconazole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. The transcription factors Mrr1 and Cap1 mediate MDR1 upregulation in response to inducing stimuli, and gain-of-function mutations in Mrr1 or Cap1, which render the transcription factors hyperactive, result in constitutive MDR1 overexpression. The essential MADS box transcription factor Mcm1 also binds to the MDR1 promoter, but its role in inducible or constitutive...

  5. Hyphal Branching during Arbuscule Development Requires Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhiza11[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jin; Floss, Daniela S.; Levesque-Tremblay, Veronique; Bravo, Armando

    2015-01-01

    During arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, arbuscule development in the root cortical cell and simultaneous deposition of the plant periarbuscular membrane generate the interface for symbiotic nutrient exchange. The transcriptional changes that accompany arbuscule development are extensive and well documented. By contrast, the transcriptional regulators that control these programs are largely unknown. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of an insertion allele of Medicago truncatula Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1 (RAM1), ram1-3, which reveals that RAM1 is not necessary to enable hyphopodium formation or hyphal entry into the root but is essential to support arbuscule branching. In ram1-3, arbuscules consist only of the arbuscule trunk and in some cases, a few initial thick hyphal branches. ram1-3 is also insensitive to phosphate-mediated regulation of the symbiosis. Transcript analysis of ram1-3 and ectopic expression of RAM1 indicate that RAM1 regulates expression of EXO70I and Stunted Arbuscule, two genes whose loss of function impacts arbuscule branching. Furthermore, RAM1 regulates expression of a transcription factor Required for Arbuscule Development (RAD1). RAD1 is also required for arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis, and rad1 mutants show reduced colonization. RAM1 itself is induced in colonized root cortical cells, and expression of RAM1 and RAD1 is modulated by DELLAs. Thus, the data suggest that DELLAs regulate arbuscule development through modulation of RAM1 and RAD1 and that the precise transcriptional control essential to place proteins in the periarbuscular membrane is controlled, at least in part, by RAM1. PMID:26511916

  6. Histatin 5 inhibits adhesion of C. albicans to Reconstructed Human Oral Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Buozi Moffa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As a polymorphic species, C. albicans is capable of switching between yeast and hyphal forms. While the yeast form is most commonly associated with systemic disease, the hyphae are more adept at adhering to and penetrating host tissue and are therefore frequently observed in mucosal fungal infections, most commonly oral candidiasis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of Histatin 5 to protect the Human Oral Epithelium against C. albicans adhesion. Human Oral Epithelial Tissues (HOET were incubated with PBS containing histatin 5 for 2 h, followed by incubation with C. albicans for 1 h at 37 °C, after HOET were washed with PBS, transferred to fresh RPMI and incubated for 16 h at 37°C at 5 % CO2. HOET were then prepared for histopathological analysis using light microscopy. In addition, the TUNEL assay was employed to evaluate the apoptosis of epithelial cells using fluorescent microscopy. HOET pre-incubated with histatin-5 showed a lower rate of C. albicans growth and cell apoptosis when compared to the control groups. The data suggest that the coating with histatin-5 is able to reduce C. albicans colonization on epithelial cell surfaces and also protect the basal cell layers from undergoing apoptosis.

  7. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtliff, Mark E; Krom, Bastiaan P; Meijering, Roelien A M; Peters, Brian M; Zhu, Jingsong; Scheper, Mark A; Harris, Megan L; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2009-06-01

    Farnesol, a precursor in the isoprenoid/sterol pathway, was recently identified as a quorum-sensing molecule produced by the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Farnesol is involved in the inhibition of germination and biofilm formation by C. albicans and can be cytotoxic at certain concentrations. In addition, we have shown that farnesol can trigger apoptosis in mammalian cells via the classical apoptotic pathways. In order to elucidate the mechanism behind farnesol cytotoxicity in C. albicans, the response to farnesol was investigated, using proteomic analysis. Global protein expression profiles demonstrated significant changes in protein expression resulting from farnesol exposure. Among the downregulated proteins were those involved in metabolism, glycolysis, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial electron transport and the respiratory chain, whereas proteins involved in folding, protection against environmental and oxidative stress, actin cytoskeleton reorganization, and apoptosis were upregulated. Cellular changes that accompany apoptosis (regulated cell death) were further analyzed using fluorescent microscopy and gene expression analysis. The results indicated reactive oxygen species accumulation, mitochondrial degradation, and positive terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) in the farnesol-exposed cells concurrent with increased expression of antioxidant-encoding and drug response genes. More importantly, the results demonstrated farnesol-induced upregulation of the caspase gene MCA1 and the intracellular presence of activated caspases. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that farnesol promotes apoptosis in C. albicans through caspase activation, implying an important physiological role for farnesol in the fungal cell life cycle with important implications for adaptation and survival. PMID:19364863

  8. Upc2p-associated differential protein expression in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehamer, Christopher F; Cummings, Edwin D; Hilliard, George M; Morschhäuser, Joachim; David Rogers, Phillip

    2009-10-01

    The gain-of-function mutation G648D in UPC2 causes ERG11 up-regulation and increased fluconazole resistance in Candida albicans. In this study, we performed 2-DE and PMF to identify proteomic alterations in an ERG11-overexpressing fluconazole-resistant C. albicans clinical isolate compared with its fluconazole-susceptible parent strain. We identified 23 differentially expressed proteins, and among them, seven became differentially expressed in a C. albicans wild-type strain after the introduction of a UPC2 allele carrying this mutation. These Upc2p-regulated proteins may contribute to fluconazole resistance in C. albicans. PMID:19750515

  9. Neutrophil-mediated protection of cultured human vascular endothelial cells from damage by growing Candida albicans hyphae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions were studied between human neutrophils and cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells invaded by Candida albicans. In the absence of neutrophils, progressive Candida germination and hyphal growth extensively damaged endothelial cell monolayers over a period of 4 to 6 hours, as determined both by morphological changes and release of 51Cr from radiolabeled endothelial cells. Monolayers were completely destroyed and replaced by hyphae after 18 hours of incubation. In contrast, when added 2 hours after the monolayers had been infected with Candida, neutrophils selectively migrated toward and attached to hyphae at points of hyphal penetration into individual endothelial cells (observed by time-lapse video-microscopy). Attached neutrophils spread over hyphal surfaces both within and beneath the endothelial cells; neutrophil recruitment to initial sites of leukocyte-Candida-endothelial cell interactions continued throughout the first 60 minutes of observation. Neutrophil spreading and stasis were observed only along Candida hyphae and at sites of Candida-endothelial cell interactions. These events resulted in 58.0% killing of Candida at 2 hours and subsequent clearance of Candida from endothelial cell monolayers, as determined by microcolony counts and morphological observation. On introduction of additional neutrophils to yield higher ratios of neutrophils to endothelial cells (10 neutrophils:1 endothelial cell), neutrophil migration toward hyphal elements continued. Despite retraction or displacement of occasional endothelial cells by invading Candida and neutrophils, most endothelial cells remained intact, viable, and motile as verified both by morphological observations and measurement of 51Cr release from radiolabeled monolayers

  10. Assessing the advantage of morphological changes in Candida albicans: a game theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EddaKlipp

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A range of attributes determines the virulence of human pathogens. During interactions with their hosts, pathogenic microbes often undergo transitions between distinct stages, and the ability to switch between these can be directly related to the disease process. Understanding the mechanisms and dynamics of these transitions is a key factor in understanding and combating infectious diseases. The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans exhibits different morphotypes at different stages during the course of infection (candidiasis. For example, hyphae are considered to be the invasive form, which causes tissue damage, while yeast cells are predominant in the commensal stage. Here, we described interactions of C. albicans with its human host in a game theoretic model. In the game, players are fungal cells. Each fungal cell can adopt one of the two strategies: to exist as a yeast or hyphal cell. We characterized the ranges of model parameters in which the coexistence of both yeast and hyphal forms is plausible. Stability analysis of the system showed that, in theory, a reduced ability of the host to specifically recognize yeast and hyphal cells can result in bi-stability of the microbial populations’ profile. Inspired by the model analysis we reasoned that the types of microbial interactions can change during invasive candidiasis. We found that positive cooperation among fungal cells occurs in mild infections and an enhanced tendency to invade the host is associated with negative cooperation. The model can easily be extended to multi-player systems with direct application to identifying individuals that enhance either positive or negative cooperation. Results of the modelling approach have potential application in developing treatment strategies.

  11. Distinct roles of two ceramide synthases, CaLag1p and CaLac1p, in the morphogenesis of Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheon, Seon Ah; Bal, Jyotiranjan; Song, Yunkyoung;

    2012-01-01

    Lag1p and Lac1p catalyse ceramide synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study shows that Lag1 family proteins are generally required for polarized growth in hemiascomycetous yeast. However, in contrast to S. cerevisiae where these proteins are functionally redundant, C. albicans Lag1p (CaLag1......p) and Lac1p (CaLac1p) are functionally distinct. Lack of CaLag1p, but not CaLac1p, caused severe defects in the growth and hyphal morphogenesis of C. albicans. Deletion of CaLAG1 decreased expression of the hypha-specific HWP1 and ECE1 genes. Moreover, overexpression of CaLAG1 induced pseudohyphal....... albicans....

  12. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gruber

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  13. Hyphal growth in Candida albicans requires the phosphorylation of Sec2 by the Cdc28-Ccn1/Hgc1 kinase

    OpenAIRE

    Bishop, Amy; Lane, Rachel; Beniston, Richard; Chapa-y-Lazo, Bernardo; Smythe, Carl; Sudbery, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This study establishes that Sec2, the guanine exchange factor (GEF) of the Rab GTPase Sec4, which has a central function in polarized exocytosis, undergoes CDK-dependent phosphorylation/relocalization in response to hypha-inducing signals.

  14. Skin Immunity to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashem, Sakeen W; Kaplan, Daniel H

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic commensal fungus that colonizes healthy human skin, mucosa, and the reproductive tract. C. albicans is also a predominantly opportunistic fungal pathogen, leading to disease manifestations such as disseminated candidiasis and chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis (CMC). The differing host susceptibilities for the sites of C. albicans infection have revealed tissue compartmentalization with tailoring of immune responses based on the site of infection. Furthermore, extensive studies of host genetics in rare cases of CMC have identified conserved genetic pathways involved in immune recognition and the response to the extracellular pathogen. We focus here on human and mouse skin as a site of C. albicans infection, and we review established and newly discovered insights into the cellular pathways that promote cutaneous antifungal immunity. PMID:27178391

  15. Analysis of single hyphal growth and fragmentation in submerged cultures using a population model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krabben, Preben; Nielsen, Søren; Michelsen, Michael Locht

    1997-01-01

    Descriptions of population dynamics in submerged cultures are important when studying the mechanisms of growth and fragmentation of filamentous microorganisms. Population models are traditionally formulated as population balance equations. Population models of filamentous morphology are difficult...... to solve because of random fragmentation, which introduces an integral term into the population balance equations. Balances for the systemic properties, e.g. concentration of hyphal elements, substrate concentration, average total hyphal length, and average number of growing tips, are set up. Based...... and the Monte Carlo method is shown to be superior with respect to versatility. With measurements of 100 hyphal elements to represent a steady state and using the Monte Carlo method and a statistical test it is shown that one can discriminate between four models of hyphal fragmentation in submerged...

  16. Morphological Characteristics of Hyphal Interaction between Grifola umbellata and its Companion Fungus

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Xiao-Ke; Guo, Shun-xing; Lee, Min-Woong

    2005-01-01

    Morphological characteristics of hyphal interaction between Grifola umbellata (Pers. Ex Fr.) Pilat and its companion fungus which related to sclerotia formation from hyphae were investigated by external observations, light microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). External observations showed that a dense antagonism line was formed by both G. umbellata and companion fungus after their hyphae contacted each other in dual culture. Many hyphal strands emerged on the colony of G. umb...

  17. Treatment with some anti-inflammatory drugs reduces germ tube formation in Candida albicans strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rusu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic dimorphic fungus that inhabits various host mucosal sites. It can cause both superficial and serious systemic disease. Conversion from the yeast to the hyphal form has been associated with increased virulence and mucosal invasiveness. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sodium diclofenac and aspirin on germs tube formation of different Candida albicans strains. Prostaglandins may play an important role in fungal colonization. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are inhibitors of the cyclooxygenase isoenzymes. These drugs specifically block the biosynthesis of mammalian prostaglandins by inhibiting one or both of cyclooxygenase isoenzymes. In tests for germ tube formation sodium diclofenac reduced the filamentation to the 12.5%- 5.1%. In the presence of aspirin the filamentation was reduced up to 85-45% depending on the tested strain. Our results suggest that cyclooxygenase-depending synthesis of fungal prostaglandins is important for morphogenesis and fungal virulence. Inhibitors of cyclooxygenase isoensymes (aspirin and diclofenac are effective in decreasing germ tube formation of Candida albicans.

  18. Oxidative Stress Responses in the Human Fungal Pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra da Silva Dantas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is a major fungal pathogen of humans, causing approximately 400,000 life-threatening systemic infections world-wide each year in severely immunocompromised patients. An important fungicidal mechanism employed by innate immune cells involves the generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, there is much interest in the strategies employed by C. albicans to evade the oxidative killing by macrophages and neutrophils. Our understanding of how C. albicans senses and responds to ROS has significantly increased in recent years. Key findings include the observations that hydrogen peroxide triggers the filamentation of this polymorphic fungus and that a superoxide dismutase enzyme with a novel mode of action is expressed at the cell surface of C. albicans. Furthermore, recent studies have indicated that combinations of the chemical stresses generated by phagocytes can actively prevent C. albicans oxidative stress responses through a mechanism termed the stress pathway interference. In this review, we present an up-date of our current understanding of the role and regulation of oxidative stress responses in this important human fungal pathogen.

  19. Interleukin 17-Mediated Host Defense against Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Sparber

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is part of the normal microbiota in most healthy individuals. However, it can cause opportunistic infections if host defenses are breached, with symptoms ranging from superficial lesions to severe systemic disease. The study of rare congenital defects in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis led to the identification of interleukin-17 (IL-17 as a key factor in host defense against mucosal fungal infection. Experimental infections in mice confirmed the critical role of IL-17 in mucocutaneous immunity against C. albicans. Research on mouse models has also contributed importantly to our current understanding of the regulation of IL-17 production by different cellular sources and its effector functions in distinct tissues. In this review, we highlight recent findings on IL-17-mediated immunity against C. albicans in mouse and man.

  20. Libraries for two-hybrid screening of yeast and hyphal growth forms in Zymoseptoria tritici☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W.; Kilaru, S.; Collins, C.; Courbot, M.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi are constantly emerging resistance to anti-fungal treatments. Therefore, identification of new fungicide targets is important. Good candidates are essential fungal proteins and their regulators. An efficient way to reveal the molecular environment of an essential protein is the search for interacting factors. Here, we establish three yeast two-hybrid libraries, covering yeast and hyphal stages of the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. No detectable genomic DNA was present in any of the 3 libraries. Random amplification revealed that the libraries include cDNA fragments of up to 2000 bp, suggesting that small-to-medium sized proteins are represented therein. Indeed, full-length cDNAs of five proteins were found in all libraries. The full-length cDNA of large chitin synthase gene mcs1 (5742 bp with introns; 5568 bp without introns) could not be amplified, but its 5′ and 3′ regions were represented, suggesting that even larger genes are covered in all libraries. Finally, we tested for the expected interaction of the autophagy proteins ZtAtg4 and ZtAtg8 in Z. tritici, and then used ZtAtg4 to screen one of the two-hybrid libraries. Indeed, we found ZtAtg8 as a positive interaction partner, confirming that interacting proteins can be identified. Thus, these molecular tools promise to be useful in identifying novel fungicide target proteins. PMID:26092795

  1. Libraries for two-hybrid screening of yeast and hyphal growth forms in Zymoseptoria tritici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, W; Kilaru, S; Collins, C; Courbot, M; Steinberg, G

    2015-06-01

    Pathogenic fungi are constantly emerging resistance to anti-fungal treatments. Therefore, identification of new fungicide targets is important. Good candidates are essential fungal proteins and their regulators. An efficient way to reveal the molecular environment of an essential protein is the search for interacting factors. Here, we establish three yeast two-hybrid libraries, covering yeast and hyphal stages of the wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. No detectable genomic DNA was present in any of the 3 libraries. Random amplification revealed that the libraries include cDNA fragments of up to 2000bp, suggesting that small-to-medium sized proteins are represented therein. Indeed, full-length cDNAs of five proteins were found in all libraries. The full-length cDNA of large chitin synthase gene mcs1 (5742bp with introns; 5568bp without introns) could not be amplified, but its 5' and 3' regions were represented, suggesting that even larger genes are covered in all libraries. Finally, we tested for the expected interaction of the autophagy proteins ZtAtg4 and ZtAtg8 in Z. tritici, and then used ZtAtg4 to screen one of the two-hybrid libraries. Indeed, we found ZtAtg8 as a positive interaction partner, confirming that interacting proteins can be identified. Thus, these molecular tools promise to be useful in identifying novel fungicide target proteins. PMID:26092795

  2. Estimation of hyphal tensile strength in production-scale Aspergillus oryzae fungal fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zheng Jian; Shukla, Vivek; Wenger, Kevin; Fordyce, Andrew; Pedersen, Annemarie Gade; Marten, Mark

    2002-03-20

    Fragmentation of filamentous fungal hyphae depends on two phenomena: hydrodynamic stresses, which lead to hyphal breakage, and hyphal tensile strength, which resists breakage. The goal of this study was to use turbulent hydrodynamic theory to develop a correlation that allows experimental data of morphology and hydrodynamics to be used to estimate relative (pseudo) tensile strength (sigma(pseudo)) of filamentous fungi. Fed-batch fermentations were conducted with a recombinant strain of Aspergillus oryzae in 80 m(3) fermentors, and measurements were made of both morphological (equivalent hyphal length, L) and hydrodynamic variables (specific power input, epsilon; kinematic viscosity, v). We found that v increased over 100-fold during these fermentations and, hence, Kolmogorov microscale (lambda) also changed significantly with time. In the impeller discharge zone, where hyphal fragmentation is thought to actually take place, lambda was calculated to be 700-3500 microm, which is large compared to the size of typical fungal hyphae (100-300 microm). This result implies that eddies in the viscous subrange are responsible for fragmentation. Applying turbulent theory for this subrange, it was possible to calculate sigma(pseudo)from morphological and hydrodynamic measurements. Pseudo tensile strength was not constant but increased to a maximum during the first half and then decreased during the second half of each fermentation, presumably due to differences in physiological state. When a literature correlation for hyphal fragmentation rate (k(frag)) was modified by adding a term to account for viscosity and tensile strength, the result was better qualitative agreement with morphological data. Taken together, these results imply hyphal tensile strength can change significantly over the course of large-scale, fed-batch fungal fermentations and that existing fragmentation and morphology models may be improved if they accounted for variations in hyphal tensile strength with

  3. Up-regulation of ERG11 gene among fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans generated in vitro: is there any clinical implication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Mariceli Araujo; Paula, Claudete Rodrigues

    2007-01-01

    A well-characterized matched pair of fluconazole (FLU)-susceptible and FLU-resistant isolates, in addition to a clinical resistant isolate, was analyzed. It was found a differential expression of genes: the resistant strains experimentally induced after fluconazole exposure in vitro were associated mainly with up-regulation of ERG11 gene and a clear trailing growth in broth microdilution tests, whereas the isolate with clinically acquired resistance expressed constitutively high level of CDR gene and fluconazole MIC >64 mg mL(-1) within 24 h of incubation. The phenotype of resistant cells generated in vitro was reversible, implying that an induced transcriptional up-regulation of ERG genes would be one adaptive mechanism allowing the cells to grow in the presence of azole drugs. These drugs could have a potential role in modulating genes whose up-regulation would allow cells to remain in the hosts, providing a source for further development of resistance. PMID:16839736

  4. Intestinal Cell Tight Junctions Limit Invasion of Candida albicans through Active Penetration and Endocytosis in the Early Stages of the Interaction of the Fungus with the Intestinal Barrier.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Goyer

    Full Text Available C. albicans is a commensal yeast of the mucous membranes in healthy humans that can also cause disseminated candidiasis, mainly originating from the digestive tract, in vulnerable patients. It is necessary to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of the interaction of C. albicans with enterocytes to better understand the basis of commensalism and pathogenicity of the yeast and to improve the management of disseminated candidiasis. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of tight junction (TJ formation in parallel with the invasion of C. albicans into the Caco-2 intestinal cell line. Using invasiveness assays on Caco-2 cells displaying pharmacologically altered TJ (i.e. differentiated epithelial cells treated with EGTA or patulin, we were able to demonstrate that TJ protect enterocytes against invasion of C. albicans. Moreover, treatment with a pharmacological inhibitor of endocytosis decreased invasion of the fungus into Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, suggesting that facilitating access of the yeast to the basolateral side of intestinal cells promotes endocytosis of C. albicans in its hyphal form. These data were supported by SEM observations of differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ, which highlighted membrane protrusions engulfing C. albicans hyphae. We furthermore demonstrated that Als3, a hypha-specific C. albicans invasin, facilitates internalization of the fungus by active penetration and induced endocytosis by differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ. However, our observations failed to demonstrate binding of Als3 to E-cadherin as the trigger mechanism of endocytosis of C. albicans into differentiated Caco-2 cells displaying altered TJ.

  5. The Natural Product Citral Can Cause Significant Damage to the Hyphal Cell Walls of Magnaporthe grisea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Yu Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to find a natural alternative to the synthetic fungicides currently used against the devastating rice blast fungus, Magnaporthe grisea, this study explored the antifungal potential of citral and its mechanism of action. It was found that citral not only inhibited hyphal growth of M. grisea, but also caused a series of marked hyphal morphological and structural alterations. Specifically, citral was tested for antifungal activity against M. grisea in vitro and was found to significantly inhibit colony development and mycelial growth with IC50 and IC90 values of 40.71 and 203.75 μg/mL, respectively. Furthermore, citral reduced spore germination and germ tube length in a concentration-dependent manner. Following exposure to citral, the hyphal cell surface became wrinkled with folds and cell breakage that were observed under scanning electron microscopy (SEM. There was damage to hyphal cell walls and membrane structures, loss of villous-like material outside of the cell wall, thinning of the cell wall, and discontinuities formed in the cell membrane following treatment based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM. This increase in chitinase activity both supports the morphological changes seen in the hyphae, and also suggests a mechanism of action. In conclusion, citral has strong antifungal properties, and treatment with this compound is capable of causing significant damage to the hyphal cell walls of M. grisea.

  6. Vegetative Hyphal Fusion and Subsequent Nuclear Behavior in Epichloë Grass Endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Jun-ya; Charlton, Nikki D.; Yi, Mihwa; Young, Carolyn A.; Craven, Kelly D.

    2015-01-01

    Epichloë species (including the former genus Neotyphodium) are fungal symbionts of many agronomically important forage grasses, and provide their grass hosts with protection from a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Epichloë species include many interspecific hybrids with allodiploid-like genomes, which may provide the potential for combined traits or recombination to generate new traits. Though circumstantial evidence suggests that such interspecific hybrids might have arisen from nuclear fusion events following vegetative hyphal fusion between different Epichloë strains, this hypothesis has not been addressed empirically. Here, we investigated vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë species. A majority of Epichloë strains, especially those having a sexual stage, underwent self vegetative hyphal fusion. Vegetative fusion also occurred between two hyphae from different Epichloë strains. Though Epichloë spp. are uninucleate fungi, hyphal fusion resulted in two nuclei stably sharing the same cytoplasm, which might ultimately lead to nuclear fusion. In addition, protoplast fusion experiments gave rise to uninucleate putative hybrids, which apparently had two markers, one from each parent within the same nucleus. These results are consistent with the notion that interspecific hybrids arise from vegetative hyphal fusion. However, we also discuss additional factors, such as post-hybridization selection, that may be important to explain the recognized prevalence of hybrids in Epichloë species. PMID:25837972

  7. Vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloe grass endophytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Ya Shoji

    Full Text Available Epichloë species (including the former genus Neotyphodium are fungal symbionts of many agronomically important forage grasses, and provide their grass hosts with protection from a wide range of biotic and abiotic stresses. Epichloë species include many interspecific hybrids with allodiploid-like genomes, which may provide the potential for combined traits or recombination to generate new traits. Though circumstantial evidence suggests that such interspecific hybrids might have arisen from nuclear fusion events following vegetative hyphal fusion between different Epichloë strains, this hypothesis has not been addressed empirically. Here, we investigated vegetative hyphal fusion and subsequent nuclear behavior in Epichloë species. A majority of Epichloë strains, especially those having a sexual stage, underwent self vegetative hyphal fusion. Vegetative fusion also occurred between two hyphae from different Epichloë strains. Though Epichloë spp. are uninucleate fungi, hyphal fusion resulted in two nuclei stably sharing the same cytoplasm, which might ultimately lead to nuclear fusion. In addition, protoplast fusion experiments gave rise to uninucleate putative hybrids, which apparently had two markers, one from each parent within the same nucleus. These results are consistent with the notion that interspecific hybrids arise from vegetative hyphal fusion. However, we also discuss additional factors, such as post-hybridization selection, that may be important to explain the recognized prevalence of hybrids in Epichloë species.

  8. Candida albicans and Streptococcus salivarius modulate IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha expression and secretion by engineered human oral mucosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostefaoui, Yakout; Bart, Christian; Frenette, Michel; Rouabhia, Mahmoud

    2004-11-01

    We investigated the involvement of oral epithelial cells via two cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and one chemokine (IL-8) in local defences against live yeast (Candida albicans) and bacteria (Streptococcus salivarius) using an engineered human oral mucosa model. We report that the yeast changed from the blastospore to the hyphal form and induced significant tissue disorganization at later contact periods (24 and 48 h) compared to the bacteria. However, this effect did not reduce the viability or total number of epithelial cells. Gene activation analyses revealed that IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha mRNA levels rose in tissues in contact with live C. albicans or S. salivarius. Gene activation was followed by an upregulation of protein secretion. IL-6 levels were higher after contact with C. albicans than with S. salivarius. IL-8 levels after contact with S. salivarius were higher than with C. albicans. Our study suggests that S. salivarius is more efficient at inducing proinflammatory mediator release than C. albicans. These results provide additional evidence for the contribution of oral epithelial cells to the inflammatory response against fungi and bacteria. PMID:15469436

  9. A novel immune evasion strategy of candida albicans: proteolytic cleavage of a salivary antimicrobial peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiller, Timothy F; Hube, Bernhard; Schild, Lydia; Shirtliff, Mark E; Scheper, Mark A; Winkler, Robert; Ton, Amy; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is an opportunistic infection considered to be a harbinger of AIDS. The etiologic agent Candida albicans is a fungal species commonly colonizing human mucosal surfaces. However, under conditions of immune dysfunction, colonizing C. albicans can become an opportunistic pathogen causing superficial or even life-threatening infections. The reasons behind this transition, however, are not clear. In the oral cavity, salivary antimicrobial peptides are considered to be an important part of the host innate defense system in the prevention of microbial colonization. Histatin-5 specifically has exhibited potent activity against C. albicans. Our previous studies have shown histatin-5 levels to be significantly reduced in the saliva of HIV+ individuals, indicating an important role for histatin-5 in keeping C. albicans in its commensal stage. The versatility in the pathogenic potential of C. albicans is the result of its ability to adapt through the regulation of virulence determinants, most notably of which are proteolytic enzymes (Saps), involved in tissue degradation. In this study, we show that C. albicans cells efficiently and rapidly degrade histatin-5, resulting in loss of its anti-candidal potency. In addition, we demonstrate that this cellular activity is due to proteolysis by a member of the secreted aspartic proteases (Sap) family involved in C. albicans pathogenesis. Specifically, the proteolysis was attributed to Sap9, in turn identifying histatin-5 as the first host-specific substrate for that isoenzyme. These findings demonstrate for the first time the ability of a specific C. albicans enzyme to degrade and deactivate a host antimicrobial peptide involved in the protection of the oral mucosa against C. albicans, thereby providing new insights into the factors directing the transition of C. albicans from commensal to pathogen, with important clinical implications for alternative therapy. This report characterizes the first defined

  10. A novel immune evasion strategy of candida albicans: proteolytic cleavage of a salivary antimicrobial peptide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy F Meiller

    Full Text Available Oropharyngeal candidiasis is an opportunistic infection considered to be a harbinger of AIDS. The etiologic agent Candida albicans is a fungal species commonly colonizing human mucosal surfaces. However, under conditions of immune dysfunction, colonizing C. albicans can become an opportunistic pathogen causing superficial or even life-threatening infections. The reasons behind this transition, however, are not clear. In the oral cavity, salivary antimicrobial peptides are considered to be an important part of the host innate defense system in the prevention of microbial colonization. Histatin-5 specifically has exhibited potent activity against C. albicans. Our previous studies have shown histatin-5 levels to be significantly reduced in the saliva of HIV+ individuals, indicating an important role for histatin-5 in keeping C. albicans in its commensal stage. The versatility in the pathogenic potential of C. albicans is the result of its ability to adapt through the regulation of virulence determinants, most notably of which are proteolytic enzymes (Saps, involved in tissue degradation. In this study, we show that C. albicans cells efficiently and rapidly degrade histatin-5, resulting in loss of its anti-candidal potency. In addition, we demonstrate that this cellular activity is due to proteolysis by a member of the secreted aspartic proteases (Sap family involved in C. albicans pathogenesis. Specifically, the proteolysis was attributed to Sap9, in turn identifying histatin-5 as the first host-specific substrate for that isoenzyme. These findings demonstrate for the first time the ability of a specific C. albicans enzyme to degrade and deactivate a host antimicrobial peptide involved in the protection of the oral mucosa against C. albicans, thereby providing new insights into the factors directing the transition of C. albicans from commensal to pathogen, with important clinical implications for alternative therapy. This report characterizes the

  11. The TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) from the Human Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans Can Complement Defects in Human and Yeast TBPs

    OpenAIRE

    Leng, Ping; Carter, Philip E.; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    1998-01-01

    Candida albicans is the major fungal pathogen in humans, yet little is known about transcriptional regulation in this organism. Therefore, we have isolated, characterized, and expressed the C. albicans TATA-binding protein (TBP) gene (TBP1), because this general transcription initiation factor plays a key role in the activation and regulation of eukaryotic promoters. Southern and Northern blot analyses suggest that a single C. albicans TBP1 locus is expressed at similar levels in the yeast an...

  12. Change in hyphal morphology of Aspergillus Oryzae during fed-batch cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack, Martin Brian; Olsson, Lisbeth; Hansen, K;

    2006-01-01

    batch phase from 2.8-2.9 up to 4.0-4.4 mu m. The diameter of the hyphal elements remained constant, around 4 mu m, after the feed was started. However, the diameter of the immediate hyphal tip, where the enzyme secretion is thought to take place, increased dramatically with up to a factor 2.5 during the......Industrial enzymes are often produced by filamentous fungi in fed-batch cultivations. During cultivation, the different morphological forms displayed by the fungi have an impact on the overall production. The morphology of a recombinant lipase producing Aspergillus oryzae strain was investigated...

  13. Identification and characterization of genes required for hyphal morphogenesis in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, S D; Hofmann, A F; Tedford, H W; Lee, M.P.

    1999-01-01

    In the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, germination of an asexual conidiospore results in the formation of a hyphal cell. A key feature of spore germination is the switch from isotropic spore expansion to polarized apical growth. Here, temperature-sensitive mutations are used to characterize the roles of five genes (sepA, hypA, podB-podD) in the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity. Evidence that suggests that the hypA, podB, and sepA genes are required for multiple aspect...

  14. An iron homeostasis regulatory circuit with reciprocal roles in Candida albicans commensalism and pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Changbin; Pande, Kalyan; French, Sarah D.; Tuch, Brian B.; Noble, Suzanne M.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract and bloodstream are highly disparate biological niches that differ in concentrations of nutrients such as iron. However, some commensal-pathogenic microorganisms, such as the yeast Candida albicans, thrive in both environments. We report the evolution of a transcription circuit in C. albicans that controls iron uptake and determines its fitness in both niches. Our analysis of DNA-binding proteins that regulate iron uptake by this organism suggests the evol...

  15. Candida albicans skin abscess Abscesso de pele por Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Francisco Tuon

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Subcutaneous candidal abscess is a very rare infection even in immunocompromised patients. Some cases are reported when breakdown in the skin occurs, as bacterial cellulites or abscess, iatrogenic procedures, trauma and parenteral substance abuse. We describe a case of Candida albicans subcutaneous abscess without fungemia, which can be associated with central venous catheter.Abscesso subcutâneo por Candida é infecção muito rara mesmo em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Alguns casos são relatados quando ocorre dano na pele, como celulite bacteriana ou abscesso, procedimentos iatrogênicos, trauma e abuso de substância parenteral. Relatamos caso de abscesso subcutâneo por Candida albicans sem fungemia, que pode estar associado com cateter venoso central.

  16. Candida albicans skin abscess Abscesso de pele por Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe Francisco Tuon; Antonio Carlos Nicodemo

    2006-01-01

    Subcutaneous candidal abscess is a very rare infection even in immunocompromised patients. Some cases are reported when breakdown in the skin occurs, as bacterial cellulites or abscess, iatrogenic procedures, trauma and parenteral substance abuse. We describe a case of Candida albicans subcutaneous abscess without fungemia, which can be associated with central venous catheter.Abscesso subcutâneo por Candida é infecção muito rara mesmo em pacientes imunocomprometidos. Alguns casos são relatado...

  17. Mitochondrial two-component signaling systems in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavrianos, John; Berkow, Elizabeth L; Desai, Chirayu; Pandey, Alok; Batish, Mona; Rabadi, Marissa J; Barker, Katherine S; Pain, Debkumar; Rogers, P David; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Chauhan, Neeraj

    2013-06-01

    Two-component signal transduction pathways are one of the primary means by which microorganisms respond to environmental signals. These signaling cascades originated in prokaryotes and were inherited by eukaryotes via endosymbiotic lateral gene transfer from ancestral cyanobacteria. We report here that the nuclear genome of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans contains elements of a two-component signaling pathway that seem to be targeted to the mitochondria. The C. albicans two-component response regulator protein Srr1 (stress response regulator 1) contains a mitochondrial targeting sequence at the N terminus, and fluorescence microscopy reveals mitochondrial localization of green fluorescent protein-tagged Srr1. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis indicates that C. albicans Srr1 is more closely related to histidine kinases and response regulators found in marine bacteria than are other two-component proteins present in the fungi. These data suggest conservation of this protein during the evolutionary transition from endosymbiont to a subcellular organelle. We used microarray analysis to determine whether the phenotypes observed with a srr1Δ/Δ mutant could be correlated with gene transcriptional changes. The expression of mitochondrial genes was altered in the srr1Δ/Δ null mutant in comparison to their expression in the wild type. Furthermore, apoptosis increased significantly in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant strain compared to the level of apoptosis in the wild type, suggesting the activation of a mitochondrion-dependent apoptotic cell death pathway in the srr1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, this study shows for the first time that a lower eukaryote like C. albicans possesses a two-component response regulator protein that has survived in mitochondria and regulates a subset of genes whose functions are associated with the oxidative stress response and programmed cell death (apoptosis). PMID:23584995

  18. Influence of Hyphal Inoculum potential on the Competitive Success of Fungi Colonizing Wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zewei; Vail, Andrew; Sadowsky, Michael J; Schilling, Jonathan S

    2015-05-01

    The relative amounts of hyphal inoculum in forest soils may determine the capacity for fungi to compete with and replace early colonizers of wood in ground contact. Our aim in this study was to test the flexibility of priority effects (colonization timing) by varying the timing of inoculum introduction (i.e., precolonization) and amount of inoculum (i.e., inoculum potential). We controlled these variables in soil-block microcosms using fungi with known competitive outcomes in similar conditions, tracking isolate-specific fungal biomass, and residue physiochemistry over time. In the precolonization trial (experiment I), a brown rot fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum was given 1, 3, or 5 weeks to precolonize wood blocks (oak, birch, pine, and spruce) prior the introduction of a white rot fungus, Irpex lacteus, a more aggressive colonizer in this set-up. In the inoculum potential trial (experiment II), the fungi were inoculated simultaneously, but with eightfold higher brown rot inoculum than that of experiment I. As expected, longer precolonization duration increased the chance for the less-competitive brown rot fungus to outcompete its white rot opponent. Higher brown rot fungal inoculum outside of the wood matrix also resulted in competitive success for the brown rot isolate in most cases. These temporal shifts in fungal dominance were detectable in a 'community snapshot' as isolate-specific quantitative PCR, but also as functionally-relevant consequences of wood rot type, including carbohydrate depolymerization and pH. These results from a controlled system reinforce fungal-fungal interaction and suggest that relative inoculum availability beyond the wood matrix (i.e., soils) might regulate the duration of priority effects and shift the functional trajectory of wood decomposition. PMID:25750000

  19. Detection of hyphal fusion in filamentous fungi using differently fluorescence-labeled histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rech, Christine; Engh, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2007-11-01

    Cell fusion occurs regularly during the vegetative and sexual phases of the life cycle in filamentous fungi. Here, we present a simple and efficient method that can detect even rare hyphal fusion events. Using the homothallic ascomycete Sordaria macrospora as an experimental system, we developed a histone-assisted merged fluorescence (HAMF) assay for the investigation of hyphal fusion between vegetative mycelia. For this purpose, two reporter vectors were constructed encoding the histone proteins HH2B or HH2A fused at their C terminus either with the cyan or yellow fluorescent protein, respectively. The chimeric proteins generate fluorescently labeled nuclei and thus enable the distinction between different strains in a mycelial mixture. For example, hyphae with nuclei that show both cyan as well as yellow fluorescence indicate the formation of a heterokaryon as a result of hyphal fusion. To test the applicability of our HAMF assay, we used two S. macrospora developmental mutants that are supposed to have reduced hyphal fusion rates. The simple and efficient HAMF assay described here could detect even rare fusion events and should be applicable to a broad range of diverse fungal species including those lacking male or female reproductive structures or asexual spores. PMID:17929020

  20. Hyphal Growth from Spores of the Mycorrhizal Fungus Glomus Caledonius: Effect of Amino Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hepper, C.M.; Jakobsen, Iver

    1983-01-01

    Hyphal growth from spores of Glomus caledonius (Nicol. and Gerd.) Trappe and Gerdemann was stimulated by cystine, glycine and lysine at optimum concentrations of 4.6, 556 and 825 mg l−1 respectively. When all three amino acids were supplied together in water agar, five times more growth was obtai...

  1. GAp permeases in Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kraidlová, Lucie; Sychrová, Hana; Van Dijck, P.

    Fyziologický ústav AV ČR, v. v. i.. Roč. 57, č. 4 (2008), 79P-79P ISSN 0862-8408. [PhD Student Workshop of Institute of Physiology. 02.06.2008-04.06.2008, Seč] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : cpr1 * Candida albicans * amino-acid uptake * GAP permease Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  2. Milestones in Candida albicans Gene Manipulation

    OpenAIRE

    Samaranayake, Dhanushki P.; Hanes, Steven D.

    2011-01-01

    In the United States, candidemia is one of the most common hospital-acquired infections and is estimated to cause 10,000 deaths per year. The species Candida albicans is responsible for the majority of these cases. As C. albicans is capable of developing resistance against the currently available drugs, understanding the molecular basis of drug resistance, finding new cellular targets, and further understanding the overall mechanism of C. albicans pathogenesis are important goals. To study th...

  3. Serum repressing efflux pump CDR1 in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jen-Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the prevalence of candidemia has increased significantly and drug resistance has also become a pressing problem. Overexpression of CDR1, an efflux pump, has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the drug resistance in Candida albicans. It has been demonstrated that biological fluids such as human serum can have profound effects on antifungal pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to understand the effects of serum in drug susceptibility via monitoring the activity of CDR1 promoter of C. albicans. Results The wild-type C. albicans cells (SC5314 but not the cdr1/cdr1 mutant cells became more susceptible to the antifungal drug when the medium contained serum. To understand the regulation of CDR1 in the presence of serum, we have constructed CDR1 promoter-Renilla luciferase (CDR1p-RLUC reporter to monitor the activity of the CDR1 promoter in C. albicans. As expected, the expression of CDR1p-RLUC was induced by miconazole. Surprisingly, it was repressed by serum. Consistently, the level of CDR1 mRNA was also reduced in the presence of serum but not N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a known inducer for germ tube formation. Conclusion Our finding that the expression of CDR1 is repressed by serum raises the question as to how does CDR1 contribute to the drug resistance in C. albicans causing candidemia. This also suggests that it is important to re-assess the prediction of in vivo therapeutic outcome of candidemia based on the results of standard in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing, conducted in the absence of serum.

  4. Candida albicans actively modulates intracellular membrane trafficking in mouse macrophage phagosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Arenas, Elena; Bleck, Christopher K E; Nombela, César; Gil, Concha; Griffiths, Gareth; Diez-Orejas, Rosalía

    2009-04-01

    The intracellular trafficking/survival strategies of the opportunistic human pathogen Candida albicans are poorly understood. Here we investigated the infection of RAW264.7 macrophages with a virulent wild-type (WT) filamentous C. albicans strain and a hyphal signalling-defective mutant (efg1Delta/cph1Delta). A comparative analysis of the acquisition by phagosomes of actin, and of early/late endocytic organelles markers of the different fungal strains was performed and related to Candida's survival inside macrophages. Our results show that both fungal strains have evolved a similar mechanism to subvert the 'lysosomal' system, as seen by the inhibition of the phagosome fusion with compartments enriched in the lysobisphosphatidic acid and the vATPase, and thereby the acquisition of a low pH from the outset of infection. Besides, the virulent WT strain displayed additional specific survival strategies to prevent its targeting to compartmentsdisplaying late endosomal/lysosomal features, such as induction of active recycling out of phagosomes of the lysosomal membrane protein LAMP-1, the lysosomal protease cathepsin D and preinternalized colloidal gold. Finally, both virulent and efg1Delta/cph1Delta mutant fungal strains actively suppressed the production of macrophage nitric oxide (NO), although their cell wall extracts were potent inducers of NO. PMID:19134116

  5. Differential virulence of Candida albicans and C. dubliniensis: A role for Tor1 kinase?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sullivan, Derek J

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are two very closely related species of pathogenic yeast. C. albicans is the most prevalent species in the human gastrointestinal tract and is responsible for far more opportunistic infections in comparison with C. dubliniensis. This disparity is likely to be due to the reduced ability of C. dubliniensis to undergo the yeast to hypha transition, a change in morphology that plays an important role in C. albicans virulence. We have recently shown that hypha formation by C. dubliniensis is specifically repressed by nutrients at alkaline pH. In this article, we present new data showing that this can be partly reversed by treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the nutrient sensing kinase Tor1 (Target Of Rapamycin). We also provide a speculative model to describe why C. albicans filaments more efficiently in nutrient rich environments, citing recently described data on Mds3, a pH responsive regulator of Tor1 kinase activity.

  6. Candida albicans escapes from mouse neutrophils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Niemiec, Maria J; Röhm, Marc;

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen, is able to grow as budding yeasts or filamentous forms, such as hyphae. The ability to switch morphology has been attributed a crucial role for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. To mimic disseminated candidiasis in humans, the mouse...... is the most widely used model organism. Neutrophils are essential immune cells to prevent opportunistic mycoses. To explore potential differences between the rodent infection model and the human host, we compared the interactions of C. albicans with neutrophil granulocytes from mice and humans. We...... revealed that murine neutrophils exhibited a significantly lower ability to kill C. albicans than their human counterparts. Strikingly, C. albicans yeast cells formed germ tubes upon internalization by murine neutrophils, eventually rupturing the neutrophil membrane and thereby, killing the phagocyte. On...

  7. Genetic organization and mRNA expression of enolase genes of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwait, P; Sundstrom, P

    1995-04-01

    In previous work, we cloned a Candida albicans cDNA for the glycolytic enzyme enolase and found a single, abundant enolase transcript on Northern (RNA) blots and a single protein on immunoblots, using antiserum raised against a recombinant enolase fusion protein. Because C. albicans enolase is abundantly produced during infection and elicits strong host immune responses, the mechanisms regulating enolase production are important for understanding the growth of C. albicans in vivo. To obtain more information on enolase gene expression by C. albicans, we used the enolase cDNA clone to investigate the genetic organization of enolase genes and the steady-state levels of enolase mRNA under several growth conditions. Gene disruption techniques in combination with Southern blot analyses of genomic DNA showed the presence of two enolase gene loci that could be distinguished by the locations of ClaI and Mn/I sites in their 3' flanking regions. Enolase steady-state mRNA levels were greatest during the middle phase of the logarithmic growth curve and were low during stationary phase. Minimal differences in enolase mRNA levels between yeast cells and hyphae were found. Propagation of C. albicans in glucose did not cause increased enolase mRNA levels compared with growth in a nonfermentable carbon source (pyruvate). It was concluded that two gene loci exist for C. albicans enolase and that enolase mRNA is constitutively produced at high levels during active metabolism. PMID:7896700

  8. Transcriptional landscape of trans-kingdom communication between Candida albicans and Streptococcus gordonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, L C; Paszkiewicz, K H; Silverman, R J; Splatt, P R; Shaw, S; Nobbs, A H; Lamont, R J; Jenkinson, H F; Ramsdale, M

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the transcriptional landscape of the pleiomorphic fungus Candida albicans is highly dependent upon growth conditions. Here using a dual RNA-seq approach we identified 299 C. albicans and 72 Streptococcus gordonii genes that were either upregulated or downregulated specifically as a result of co-culturing these human oral cavity microorganisms. Seventy-five C. albicans genes involved in responses to chemical stimuli, regulation, homeostasis, protein modification and cell cycle were significantly (P ≤ 0.05) upregulated, whereas 36 genes mainly involved in transport and translation were downregulated. Upregulation of filamentation-associated TEC1 and FGR42 genes, and of ALS1 adhesin gene, concurred with previous evidence that the C. albicans yeast to hypha transition is promoted by S. gordonii. Increased expression of genes required for arginine biosynthesis in C. albicans was potentially indicative of a novel oxidative stress response. The transcriptional response of S. gordonii to C. albicans was less dramatic, with only eight S. gordonii genes significantly (P ≤ 0.05) upregulated at least two-fold (glpK, rplO, celB, rplN, rplB, rpsE, ciaR and gat). The expression patterns suggest that signals from S. gordonii cause a positive filamentation response in C. albicans, whereas S. gordonii appears to be transcriptionally less influenced by C. albicans. PMID:26042999

  9. Calcineurin Orchestrates Hyphal Growth, Septation, Drug Resistance and Pathogenesis of Aspergillus fumigatus: Where Do We Go from Here?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen R Juvvadi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on fungal pathogens belonging to the ascomycota phylum are critical given the ubiquity and frequency with which these fungi cause infections in humans. Among these species, Aspergillus fumigatus causes invasive aspergillosis, a leading cause of death in immunocompromised patients. Fundamental to A. fumigatus pathogenesis is hyphal growth. However, the precise mechanisms underlying hyphal growth and virulence are poorly understood. Over the past 10 years, our research towards the identification of molecular targets responsible for hyphal growth, drug resistance and virulence led to the elucidation of calcineurin as a key signaling molecule governing these processes. In this review, we summarize our salient findings on the significance of calcineurin for hyphal growth and septation in A. fumigatus and propose future perspectives on exploiting this pathway for designing new fungal-specific therapeutics.

  10. Effects of fluconazole on the secretome, the wall proteome, and wall integrity of the clinical fungus Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorgo, Alice G; Heilmann, Clemens J; Dekker, Henk L; Bekker, Martijn; Brul, Stanley; de Koster, Chris G; de Koning, Leo J; Klis, Frans M

    2011-08-01

    Fluconazole is a commonly used antifungal drug that inhibits Erg11, a protein responsible for 14α-demethylation during ergosterol synthesis. Consequently, ergosterol is depleted from cellular membranes and replaced by toxic 14α-methylated sterols, which causes increased membrane fluidity and drug permeability. Surface-grown and planktonic cultures of Candida albicans responded similarly to fluconazole at 0.5 mg/liter, showing reduced biomass formation, severely reduced ergosterol levels, and almost complete inhibition of hyphal growth. There was no evidence of cell leakage. Mass spectrometric analysis of the secretome showed that its composition was strongly affected and included 17 fluconazole-specific secretory proteins. Relative quantification of (14)N-labeled query walls relative to a reference standard mixture of (15)N-labeled yeast and hyphal walls in combination with immunological analysis revealed considerable fluconazole-induced changes in the wall proteome as well. They were, however, similar for both surface-grown and planktonic cultures. Two major trends emerged: (i) decreased incorporation of hypha-associated wall proteins (Als3, Hwp1, and Plb5), consistent with inhibition of hyphal growth, and (ii) increased incorporation of putative wall repair-related proteins (Crh11, Pga4, Phr1, Phr2, Pir1, and Sap9). As exposure to the wall-perturbing drug Congo red led to a similar response, these observations suggested that fluconazole affects the wall. In keeping with this, the resistance of fluconazole-treated cells to wall-perturbing compounds decreased. We propose that fluconazole affects the integrity of both the cellular membranes and the fungal wall and discuss its potential consequences for antifungal therapy. We also present candidate proteins from the secretome for clinical marker development. PMID:21622905

  11. UvHOG1 is important for hyphal growth and stress responses in the rice false smut fungus Ustilaginoidea virens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dawei; Wang, Yi; Han, Yu; Xu, Jin-Rong; Wang, Chenfang

    2016-01-01

    Rice false smut caused by Ustilaginoidea virens is one of the most important diseases of rice worldwide. Although its genome has been sequenced, to date there is no report on targeted gene deletion in U. virens and no molecular studies on genetic mechanisms regulating the infection processes of this destructive pathogen. In this study, we attempted to generate knockout mutants of the ortholog of yeast HOG1 MAP kinase gene in U. virens. One Uvhog1 deletion mutant was identified after screening over 600 hygromycin-resistant transformants generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation. The Uvhog1 mutant was reduced in growth rate and conidiation but had increased sensitivities to SDS, Congo red, and hyperosmotic stress. Deletion of UvHOG1 resulted in reduced expression of the stress response-related genes UvATF1 and UvSKN7. In the Uvhog1 mutant, NaCl treatment failed to stimulate the accumulation of sorbitol and glycerol. In addition, the Uvhog1 mutant had reduced toxicity on shoot growth in rice seed germination assays. Overall, as the first report of targeted gene deletion mutant in U. virens, our results showed that UvHOG1 likely has conserved roles in regulating stress responses, hyphal growth, and possibly secondary metabolism. PMID:27095476

  12. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  13. Secretion and filamentation are mediated by the Candida albicans t-SNAREs Sso2p and Sec9p

    OpenAIRE

    Bernardo, Stella M.; Rane, Hallie S.; Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    To study the role of late secretion in Candida albicans pathogenesis, we created conditional mutant C. albicans strains in which the t-SNARE-encoding genes SSO2 or SEC9 were placed under the control of a tetracycline-regulated promoter. In repressing conditions, C. albicans tetR-SSO2 and tetR-SEC9 mutant strains were defective in cytokinesis and secretion of aspartyl proteases and lipases. The mutant strains also exhibited a defect in filamentation compared to controls, and thus we followed t...

  14. Bax-induced cell death in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Kris; Eberhardt, Ines; Reekmans, Rieka; Contreras, Roland

    2004-12-01

    Bax is a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family of proteins involved in the regulation of genetically programmed cell death in mammalian cells. It has been shown that heterologous expression of Bax in several yeast species, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Pichia pastoris, also induces cell death. In this study we investigated the effects of Bax expression in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Cell death inducing expression of Bax required a synthetic BAX gene that was codon-optimized for expression in Candida albicans. Expression of this BAX gene resulted in growth inhibition and cell death. By fusing Bax with the yeast enhanced green fluorescent protein of Aequoria victoria, the cell death-inducing effect of Bax was increased due to reduced proteolytic degradation of Bax. Using this fusion protein we showed that, upon expression in C. albicans, Bax co-localizes with the mitochondria. Furthermore, we showed for the first time that expression of Bax in yeast causes the mitochondria, which are normally distributed throughout the cell, to cluster in the perinuclear region. PMID:15565645

  15. A Candida albicans PeptideAtlas

    OpenAIRE

    Vialas, Vital; Sun, Zhi; Loureiro y Penha, Carla Verónica; Carrascal, Montserrat; Abián, Joaquín; Monteoliva, Lucía; Deutsch, Eric W.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Moritz, Robert L.; Gil, Concha

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans public proteomic datasets, though growing steadily in the last few years, still have a very limited presence in online repositories. We report here the creation of a C. albicans PeptideAtlas comprising near 22,000 distinct peptides at a 0.24% False Discovery Rate (FDR) that account for over 2500 canonical proteins at a 1.2% FDR. Based on data from 16 experiments, we attained coverage of 41% of the C. albicans open reading frame sequences (ORFs) in the database used for the se...

  16. Candida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?

    OpenAIRE

    Moran, Gary P; Coleman, David C.; Sullivan, Derek J.

    2011-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisa...

  17. Initiation of phospholipomannan β-1,2 mannosylation involves Bmts with redundant activity, influences its cell wall location and regulates β-glucans homeostasis but is dispensable for Candida albicans systemic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courjol, F; Mille, C; Hall, R A; Masset, A; Aijjou, R; Gow, N A R; Poulain, D; Jouault, T; Fradin, C

    2016-01-01

    Pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi synthesize glycosphingolipids, which have a crucial role in growth and viability. Glycosphingolipids also contribute to fungal-associated pathogenesis. The opportunistic yeast pathogen Candida albicans synthesizes phospholipomannan (PLM), which is a glycosphingolipid of the mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide family. Through its lipid and glycan moieties, PLM contributes to the initial recognition of the yeast, causing immune system disorder and persistent fungal disease through activation of host signaling pathways. The lipid moiety of PLM activates the deregulation signaling pathway involved in yeast phagocytosis whereas its glycan moiety, composed of β-1,2 mannosides (β-Mans), participates to inflammatory processes through a mechanism involving Galectin-3. Biosynthesis of PLM β-Mans involves two β-1,2 mannosyltransferases (Bmts) that initiate (Bmt5) and elongate (Bmt6) the glycan chains. After generation of double bmtsΔ mutants, we show that Bmt5 has redundant activity with Bmt2, which can replace Bmt5 in bmt5Δ mutant. We also report that PLM is located in the inner layer of the yeast cell wall. PLM seems to be not essential for systemic infection of the yeast. However, defect of PLM β-mannosylation increases resistance of C. albicans to inhibitors of β-glucans and chitin synthesis, highlighting a role of PLM in cell wall homeostasis. PMID:26427558

  18. Coaggregation of Candida albicans, Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans is Candida albicans strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzmi, Mohd Hafiz; Dashper, Stuart; Catmull, Deanne; Cirillo, Nicola; Reynolds, Eric C; McCullough, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Microbial interactions are necessarily associated with the development of polymicrobial oral biofilms. The objective of this study was to determine the coaggregation of eight strains of Candida albicans with Actinomyces naeslundii and Streptococcus mutans. In autoaggregation assays, C. albicans strains were grown in RPMI-1640 and artificial saliva medium (ASM) whereas bacteria were grown in heart infusion broth. C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans were suspended to give 10(6), 10(7) and 10(8) cells mL(-1) respectively, in coaggregation buffer followed by a 1 h incubation. The absorbance difference at 620 nm (ΔAbs) between 0 h and 1 h was recorded. To study coaggregation, the same protocol was used, except combinations of microorganisms were incubated together. The mean ΔAbs% of autoaggregation of the majority of RPMI-1640-grown C. albicans was higher than in ASM grown. Coaggregation of C. albicans with A. naeslundii and/or S. mutans was variable among C. albicans strains. Scanning electron microscopy images showed that A. naeslundii and S. mutans coaggregated with C. albicans in dual- and triculture. In conclusion, the coaggregation of C. albicans, A. naeslundii and S. mutans is C. albicans strain dependent. PMID:26054855

  19. Candida albicans heme oxygenase and its product CO contribute to pathogenesis of candidemia and alter systemic chemokine and cytokine expression

    OpenAIRE

    Navarathna, Dhammika H. M. L. P.; Roberts, David D.

    2010-01-01

    Mammalian heme oxygenases play important roles in immune regulation by producing immunosuppressive CO. The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans encodes a heme oxygenase, Hmx1, that is specifically induced by the host protein hemoglobin, suggesting a role in the pathogenesis of disseminated bloodstream infections. We show that exposing mice to therapeutic levels of CO increases C. albicans virulence, whereas a HMX1 null strain has decreased virulence in murine disseminated candidiasis. Levels of ...

  20. CalPFl4030 negatively modulates intracellular ATP levels during the development of azole resistance in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-ming JIA; Ying WANG; Jun-dong ZHANG; Hong-yue TAN; Yuan-yingJIANG; Jun GU

    2011-01-01

    Aim:Widespread and repeated use of azoles, particularly fiuconazole, has led to the rapid development of azole resistance in Candida albicans.We investigated the role of CalPF14030 during the development of azole resistance in C albicans.Methods:The expression of CalPF14030 was measured by quantitative RT-PCR, and CalPF14030 was disrupted by the hisG-URA3-hisG(URA-blaster)method.The sensitivity of C albicans to azoles was examined using a spot assay, and the intracellular ATP concentrations were measured by a luminometer.Results:CalPF14030 expression in C albicans was up-regulated by Ca2+ in a calcineurin-dependent manner, and the protein was overexpressed during the stepwise acquisition of azole resistance.However,disruption or ectopic overexpression of CalPFl4030 did not affect the sensitivity of C albicans to azoles.Finally,we demonstrated that disruption of CalPFll4030 significantly increased intracellular ATP levels.and overexpression significantly decreased intracellular ATP levels jn C albicans.Conclusion:CalPF14030 may negatively modulate intracellular ATP levels during the development of azole resistance in C albicans.

  1. Proinflammatory Chemokines during Candida albicans Keratitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R.

    2009-01-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infect...

  2. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    BEHZADI, Payam; BEHZADI, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution o...

  3. The diploid genome sequence of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ted; Federspiel, Nancy A.; Chibana, Hiroji; Dungan, Jan; Kalman, Sue; Magee, B. B.; Newport, George; Thorstenson, Yvonne R.; Agabian, Nina; Magee, P T; Davis, Ronald W.; Scherer, Stewart

    2004-01-01

    We present the diploid genome sequence of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Because C. albicans has no known haploid or homozygous form, sequencing was performed as a whole-genome shotgun of the heterozygous diploid genome in strain SC5314, a clinical isolate that is the parent of strains widely used for molecular analysis. We developed computational methods to assemble a diploid genome sequence in good agreement with available physical mapping data. We provide a whole-genome description ...

  4. Characterization of Mucosal Candida albicans Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna; Kashleva, Helena; Dwivedi, Prabhat; Diaz, Patricia; Vasilakos, John

    2009-01-01

    C. albicans triggers recurrent infections of the alimentary tract mucosa that result from biofilm growth. Although the ability of C. albicans to form a biofilm on abiotic surfaces has been well documented in recent years, no information exists on biofilms that form directly on mucosal surfaces. The objectives of this study were to characterize the structure and composition of Candida biofilms forming on the oral mucosa. We found that oral Candida biofilms consist of yeast, hyphae, and commens...

  5. Triclosan antagonises fluconazole activity against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L) triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1? and cdr2? strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total m...

  6. Triclosan Antagonizes Fluconazole Activity against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, J.; Pinjon, E.; Oltean, H.N.; White, T. C.; Kelly, S.L.; Martel, C.M.; Sullivan, D. J.; Coleman, D C; MORAN, G.P

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total ...

  7. Hubungan Kadar Glukosa Darah dengan Pertumbuhan Candida Albicans pada Penderita Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hernawati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is comma only hereditary metabolic disorder. The signs were hyperglycemic and glucosuric with or without acute or chronic clinically symptoms. It was cause effectively insulin deficiency. The primary was carbohydrate metabolism disorder which followed lipid and protein metabolism disorders. The increase of boold. Glucose conentration could increase salivary glucose concentration. Glucose was a good media for the growth of microorganism, for example: candida albicans. The most frequently infection on oral mucous diabetes mellitus patients was candidacies. The purpose of the study was to determine the relation of blood glucose concentration and C. albicans growth on oral cavity diabetes mellitus patients. The subject consisted of 8 non regulated diabetes mellitus, 8 regulated diabetes mellitus, and 8 normal patients, respectively. The assessment of blood glucose concentration used Bio-Rad Diastat Halmoglobine A1c method. The growth of C. albicans was determined using swab on oral mucous. The result of swab was into culated on sabaurond agar, than gram stining and glucose test was done. Data was analyzed using spearman test. The result indicated that the growth of C. albicans was eughen on non regulated diabetes mellitus than regulated diabetes mellitus. It's also on regulated diabetes mellitus that normal patient.

  8. Comparison of the MUREX C. albicans, Albicans-Sure, and BactiCard Candida test kits with the germ tube test for presumptive identification of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Crist, A E; Dietz, T J; Kampschroer, K.

    1996-01-01

    The MUREX C. albicans (MC)(Murex Diagnostics), Albicans-Sure (AS) (Clinical Standards Laboratories), and BactiCard Candida (BC) (Remel) test kits were compared with the germ tube (GT) test for the rapid, presumptive identification of Candida albicans. All three test kits detect the enzymes L-proline aminopeptidase and beta-galactosaminidase in yeast cells grown on culture media and are based on the principle that C. albicans produces both enzymes whereas other yeasts produce only one or neith...

  9. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F; Lo, Tricia L; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H; Traven, Ana

    2015-10-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  10. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoti Verma-Gaur

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease.

  11. The Cek1‑mediated MAP kinase pathway regulates exposure of α‑1,2 and β‑1,2‑mannosides in the cell wall of Candida albicans modulating immune recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, E; Correia, I; Salazin, A; Fradin, C; Jouault, T; Poulain, D; Liu, F-T; Pla, J

    2016-07-01

    The Cek1 MAP kinase (MAPK) mediates vegetative growth and cell wall biogenesis in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Alterations in the fungal cell wall caused by a defective Cek1‑mediated signaling pathway leads to increased β‑1,3‑glucan exposure influencing dectin‑1 fungal recognition by immune cells. We show here that cek1 cells also display an increased exposure of α‑1,2 and β‑1,2‑mannosides (α‑M and β‑M), a phenotype shared by strains defective in the activating MAPKK Hst7, suggesting a general defect in cell wall assembly. cek1 cells display walls with loosely bound material as revealed by transmission electron microscopy and are sensitive to tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N‑glycosylation. Transcriptomal analysis of tunicamycin treated cells revealed a differential pattern between cek1 and wild type cells which involved mainly cell wall and stress related genes. Mapping α‑M and β‑M epitopes in the mannoproteins of different cell wall fractions (CWMP) revealed an important shift in the molecular weight of the mannan derived from mutants defective in this MAPK pathway. We have also assessed the role of galectin‑3, a member of a β‑galactoside‑binding protein family shown to bind to and kill C. albicans through β‑M recognition, in the infection caused by cek1 mutants. Increased binding of cek1 to murine macrophages was shown to be partially blocked by lactose. Galectin-3(-/-) mice showed increased resistance to fungal infection, although galectin-3 did not account for the reduced virulence of cek1 mutants in a mouse model of systemic infection. All these data support a role for the Cek1‑mediated pathway in fungal cell wall maintenance, virulence and antifungal discovery. PMID:27191378

  12. Role of fungal dynein in hyphal growth, microtubule organization, spindle pole body motility and nuclear migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S; Turgeon, B G; Yoder, O C; Aist, J R

    1998-06-01

    Cytoplasmic dynein is a microtubule-associated motor protein with several putative subcellular functions. Sequencing of the gene (DHC1) for cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of the filamentous ascomycete, Nectria haematococca, revealed a 4,349-codon open reading frame (interrupted by two introns) with four highly conserved P-loop motifs, typical of cytoplasmic dynein heavy chains. The predicted amino acid sequence is 78.0% identical to the cytoplasmic dynein heavy chain of Neurospora crassa, 70.2% identical to that of Aspergillus nidulans and 24.8% identical to that of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genomic copy of DHC1 in N. haematococca wild-type strain T213 was disrupted by inserting a selectable marker into the central motor domain. Mutants grew at 33% of the wild-type rate, forming dense compact colonies composed of spiral and highly branched hyphae. Major cytological phenotypes included (1) absence of aster-like arrays of cytoplasmic microtubules focused at the spindle pole bodies of post-mitotic and interphase nuclei, (2) limited post-mitotic nuclear migration, (3) lack of spindle pole body motility at interphase, (4) failure of spindle pole bodies to anchor interphase nuclei, (5) nonuniform distribution of interphase nuclei and (6) small or ephemeral Spitzenkörper at the apices of hyphal tip cells. Microtubule distribution in the apical region of tip cells of the mutant was essentially normal. The nonuniform distribution of nuclei in hyphae resulted primarily from a lack of both post-mitotic nuclear migration and anchoring of interphase nuclei by the spindle pole bodies. The results support the hypothesis that DHC1 is required for the motility and functions of spindle pole bodies, normal secretory vesicle transport to the hyphal apex and normal hyphal tip cell morphogenesis. PMID:9580563

  13. Laboratory and field methods for measurement of hyphal uptake of nutrients in soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, P.F.; Jakobsen, I.

    2000-01-01

    to grow through the mesh into the other compartment. Application of tracer isotopes to the soil of this hyphal compartment can be used to measure nutrient uptake by plants via AM fungal hyphae. Use of compartmented systems is discussed with particular reference to phosphorus, which is the mineral...... nutrient transported in the largest quantity by AM fungi. Laboratory and field applications of the compartmentation methodology are presented with emphasis on the functioning of native AM fungal communities. Advantages and limitations of the method are considered and future important research directions...

  14. Insights into the mode of action of anticandidal herbal monoterpenoid geraniol reveal disruption of multiple MDR mechanisms and virulence attributes in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Fatima, Zeeshan; Hameed, Saif

    2016-07-01

    The anticandidal potential of Geraniol (Ger) against Candida albicans has already been established. The present study reveals deeper insights into the mechanisms of action of Ger. We observed that the repertoire of antifungal activity was not only limited to C. albicans and its clinical isolates but also against non-albicans species of Candida. The membrane tampering effect was visualized through transmission electron micrographs, depleted ergosterol levels and altered plasma membrane ATPase activity. Ger also affects cell wall as revealed by spot assays with cell wall-perturbing agents and scanning electron micrographs. Functional calcineurin pathway seems to be indispensable for the antifungal effect of Ger as calcineurin signaling mutant was hypersensitive to Ger while calcineurin overexpressing strain remained resistant. Ger also causes mitochondrial dysfunction, impaired iron homeostasis and genotoxicity. Furthermore, Ger inhibits both virulence attributes of hyphal morphogenesis and biofilm formation. Taken together, our results suggest that Ger is potential antifungal agent that warrants further investigation in clinical applications so that it could be competently employed in therapeutic strategies to treat Candida infections. PMID:26935560

  15. Transcriptional response to fluconazole and amphotericin B in Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nailis, Heleen; Vandenbosch, Davy; Deforce, Dieter; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2010-05-01

    Biofilm formation is often associated with persistent Candida albicans infections. Treatment of these infections is difficult, since sessile C. albicans cells show increased resistance towards antifungal agents. The molecular mechanisms behind biofilm resistance in C. albicans are not yet understood. In the present study, we investigated the transcriptional response in young and mature in vitro-grown biofilms after a short and longer exposure time to high doses of fluconazole or amphotericin B. Treatment of biofilms with high doses of antifungal agents resulted in a drug-specific transcriptional response. Exposure of biofilms to fluconazole induced upregulation of genes encoding enzymes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (ERG1, ERG3, ERG11 and ERG25). Treatment of biofilms with amphotericin B resulted in an overexpression of KRE1 and SKN1, two genes encoding proteins involved in beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis. Our data indicate that sessile C. albicans cells show controlled regulation of gene expression, as they quickly mount a drug-specific transcriptional response in the presence of high doses of antifungal agents. These transcriptional changes suggest upregulation of ergosterol biosynthesis (fluconazole) and upregulation of beta-1,6-glucan biosynthesis (amphotericin B) in sessile C. albicans cells that might contribute to a resistant biofilm phenotype. PMID:20170727

  16. A histone deacetylase adjusts transcription kinetics at coding sequences during Candida albicans morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denes Hnisz

    Full Text Available Despite their classical role as transcriptional repressors, several histone deacetylases, including the baker's yeast Set3/Hos2 complex (Set3C, facilitate gene expression. In the dimorphic human pathogen Candida albicans, the homologue of the Set3C inhibits the yeast-to-filament transition, but the precise molecular details of this function have remained elusive. Here, we use a combination of ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq to show that the Set3C acts as a transcriptional co-factor of metabolic and morphogenesis-related genes in C. albicans. Binding of the Set3C correlates with gene expression during fungal morphogenesis; yet, surprisingly, deletion of SET3 leaves the steady-state expression level of most genes unchanged, both during exponential yeast-phase growth and during the yeast-filament transition. Fine temporal resolution of transcription in cells undergoing this transition revealed that the Set3C modulates transient expression changes of key morphogenesis-related genes. These include a transcription factor cluster comprising of NRG1, EFG1, BRG1, and TEC1, which form a regulatory circuit controlling hyphal differentiation. Set3C appears to restrict the factors by modulating their transcription kinetics, and the hyperfilamentous phenotype of SET3-deficient cells can be reverted by mutating the circuit factors. These results indicate that the chromatin status at coding regions represents a dynamic platform influencing transcription kinetics. Moreover, we suggest that transcription at the coding sequence can be transiently decoupled from potentially conflicting promoter information in dynamic environments.

  17. Hyphal-like extension and pseudohyphal formation in industrial strains of yeasts induced by isoamyl alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceccato-Antonini Sandra Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Yeasts can produce pseudohyphae and hyphal-like extensions under certain growth conditions like isoamyl alcohol (IAA induction, a chief constituent of fusel oil, which is a subproduct from the ethanolic fermentation. The morphology switch from yeast to a filamentous form can be troublesome to the process. In this work it was studied the influence of fusel alcohols, nitrogen sources (ammonium sulphate and leucine and glifosate (a chemical maturator for sugar cane added to a complex medium on some industrial strains of yeasts isolated from the fermentative process. Two industrial strains showed transition to hyphal-like extensions or pseudohyphae (clusters of cells upon addition of IAA from 0.3 to 0.9% /v. The alterations were reversible when the yeasts were reinoculated in YEPD without IAA. Although pseudohyphae are a result of nitrogen-limited medium, we observed them as a result of IAA addition. No influence of the nitrogen source or isopropilic alcohol or glifosate was detected for any strain studied in the concentrations used.

  18. Differential activity of Striga hermonthica seed germination stimulants and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching factors in rice and their contribution to underground communication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Cardoso

    Full Text Available Strigolactones (SLs trigger germination of parasitic plant seeds and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi. There is extensive structural variation in SLs and plants usually produce blends of different SLs. The structural variation among natural SLs has been shown to impact their biological activity as hyphal branching and parasitic plant seed germination stimulants. In this study, rice root exudates were fractioned by HPLC. The resulting fractions were analyzed by MRM-LC-MS to investigate the presence of SLs and tested using bioassays to assess their Striga hermonthica seed germination and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching stimulatory activities. A substantial number of active fractions were revealed often with very different effect on seed germination and hyphal branching. Fractions containing (--orobanchol and ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol contributed little to the induction of S. hermonthica seed germination but strongly stimulated AM fungal hyphal branching. Three SLs in one fraction, putative methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers, had moderate seed germination and hyphal branching inducing activity. Two fractions contained strong germination stimulants but displayed only modest hyphal branching activity. We provide evidence that these stimulants are likely SLs although no SL-representative masses could be detected using MRM-LC-MS. Our results show that seed germination and hyphal branching are induced to very different extents by the various SLs (or other stimulants present in rice root exudates. We propose that the development of rice varieties with different SL composition is a promising strategy to reduce parasitic plant infestation while maintaining symbiosis with AM fungi.

  19. Differential activity of Striga hermonthica seed germination stimulants and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching factors in rice and their contribution to underground communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Catarina; Charnikhova, Tatsiana; Jamil, Muhammad; Delaux, Pierre-Marc; Verstappen, Francel; Amini, Maryam; Lauressergues, Dominique; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien; Bouwmeester, Harro

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) trigger germination of parasitic plant seeds and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. There is extensive structural variation in SLs and plants usually produce blends of different SLs. The structural variation among natural SLs has been shown to impact their biological activity as hyphal branching and parasitic plant seed germination stimulants. In this study, rice root exudates were fractioned by HPLC. The resulting fractions were analyzed by MRM-LC-MS to investigate the presence of SLs and tested using bioassays to assess their Striga hermonthica seed germination and Gigaspora rosea hyphal branching stimulatory activities. A substantial number of active fractions were revealed often with very different effect on seed germination and hyphal branching. Fractions containing (-)-orobanchol and ent-2'-epi-5-deoxystrigol contributed little to the induction of S. hermonthica seed germination but strongly stimulated AM fungal hyphal branching. Three SLs in one fraction, putative methoxy-5-deoxystrigol isomers, had moderate seed germination and hyphal branching inducing activity. Two fractions contained strong germination stimulants but displayed only modest hyphal branching activity. We provide evidence that these stimulants are likely SLs although no SL-representative masses could be detected using MRM-LC-MS. Our results show that seed germination and hyphal branching are induced to very different extents by the various SLs (or other stimulants) present in rice root exudates. We propose that the development of rice varieties with different SL composition is a promising strategy to reduce parasitic plant infestation while maintaining symbiosis with AM fungi. PMID:25126953

  20. Comparison Between Virulence Factors of Candida albicans and Non-Albicans Species of Candida Isolated from Genitourinary Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Udayalaxmi,; Jacob, Shani; D’Souza, Diney

    2014-01-01

    Background: Candida spp. is frequently isolated from cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis and catheter associated UTI. C.albicans is the most frequently isolated species but non-albicans species of candida are gaining clinical significance.

  1. Production of a hemolytic factor by Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Manns, J M; MOSSER, D. M.; Buckley, H R

    1994-01-01

    Candida albicans exhibits hemolytic activity when grown on glucose-enriched blood agar. This activity is present on intact organisms, and it is secreted into the culture medium. Hemoglobin released from lysed erythrocytes can restore the transferrin-inhibited growth of C. albicans. We conclude that C. albicans expresses a hemolytic factor which allows it to acquire iron from host erythrocytes.

  2. Functional diversity of complex I subunits in Candida albicans mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; She, Xiaodong; Calderone, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Our interest in the mitochondria of Candida albicans has progressed to the identification of several proteins that are critical to complex I (CI) activity. We speculated that there should be major functional differences at the protein level between mammalian and fungal mitochondria CI. In our pursuit of this idea, we were helped by published data of CI subunit proteins from a broad diversity of species that included two subunit proteins that are not found in mammals. These subunit proteins have been designated as Nuo1p and Nuo2p (NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductases). Since functional assignments of both C. albicans proteins were unknown, other than having a putative NADH-oxidoreductase activity, we constructed knock-out strains that could be compared to parental cells. The relevance of our research relates to the critical roles of both proteins in cell biology and pathogenesis and their absence in mammals. These features suggest they may be exploited in antifungal drug discovery. Initially, we characterized Goa1p that apparently regulates CI activity but is not a CI subunit protein. We have used the goa1∆ for comparisons to Nuo1p and Nuo2p. We have demonstrated the critical role of these proteins in maintaining CI activities, virulence, and prolonging life span. More recently, transcriptional profiling of the three mutants and an ndh51∆ (protein is a highly conserved CI subunit) has revealed that there are overlapping yet also different functional assignments that suggest subunit specificity. The differences and similarities of each are described below along with our hypotheses to explain these data. Our conclusion and perspective is that the C. albicans CI subunit proteins are highly conserved except for two that define non-mammalian functions. PMID:26373419

  3. Global screening of potential Candida albicans biofilm-related transcription factors via network comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murillo Luis A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans is a commonly encountered fungal pathogen in humans. The formation of biofilm is a major virulence factor in C. albicans pathogenesis and is related to antidrug resistance of this organism. Although many factors affecting biofilm have been analyzed, molecular mechanisms that regulate biofilm formation still await to be elucidated. Results In this study, from the gene regulatory network perspective, we developed an efficient computational framework, which integrates different kinds of data from genome-scale analysis, for global screening of potential transcription factors (TFs controlling C. albicans biofilm formation. S. cerevisiae information and ortholog data were used to infer the possible TF-gene regulatory associations in C. albicans. Based on TF-gene regulatory associations and gene expression profiles, a stochastic dynamic model was employed to reconstruct the gene regulatory networks of C. albicans biofilm and planktonic cells. The two networks were then compared and a score of relevance value (RV was proposed to determine and assign the quantity of correlation of each potential TF with biofilm formation. A total of twenty-three TFs are identified to be related to the biofilm formation; ten of them are previously reported by literature evidences. Conclusions The results indicate that the proposed screening method can successfully identify most known biofilm-related TFs and also identify many others that have not been previously reported. Together, this method can be employed as a pre-experiment screening approach that reveals new target genes for further characterization to understand the regulatory mechanisms in biofilm formation, which can serve as the starting point for therapeutic intervention of C. albicans infections.

  4. Thymol has antifungal activity against Candida albicans during infection and maintains the innate immune response required for function of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Chengjie; Sun, Lingmei; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-08-01

    The Caenorhabditis elegans model can be used to study Candida albicans virulence and host immunity, as well as to identify plant-derived natural products to use against C. albicans. Thymol is a hydrophobic phenol compound from the aromatic plant thyme. In this study, the in vitro data demonstrated concentration-dependent thymol inhibition of both C. albicans growth and biofilm formation during different developmental phases. With the aid of the C. elegans system, we performed in vivo assays, and our results further showed the ability of thymol to increase C. elegans life span during infection, inhibit C. albicans colony formation in the C. elegans intestine, and increase the expression levels of host antimicrobial genes. Moreover, among the genes that encode the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, mutation of the pmk-1 or sek-1 gene decreased the beneficial effects of thymol's antifungal activity against C. albicans and thymol's maintenance of the innate immune response in nematodes. Western blot data showed the level of phosphorylation of pmk-1 was dramatically decreased against C. albicans. In nematodes, treatment with thymol recovered the dysregulation of pmk-1 and sek-1 gene expressions, the phosphorylation level of PMK-1 caused by C. albicans infection. Therefore, thymol may act, at least in part, through the function of the p38 MAPK signaling pathway to protect against C. albicans infection and maintain the host innate immune response to C. albicans. Our results indicate that the p38 MAPK signaling pathway plays a crucial role in regulating the beneficial effects observed after nematodes infected with C. albicans were treated with thymol. PMID:26783030

  5. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Tecoma stans Leaves Inhibits Growth and Promotes ATP Depletion and Lipid Peroxidation in Candida albicans and Candida krusei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriota, Leydianne L. S.; Procópio, Thamara F.; de Souza, Maria F. D.; de Oliveira, Ana Patrícia S.; Carvalho, Lidiane V. N.; Pitta, Maira G. R.; Rego, Moacyr J. B. M.; Paiva, Patrícia M. G.; Pontual, Emmanuel V.; Napoleão, Thiago H.

    2016-01-01

    Tecoma stans (yellow elder) has shown medicinal properties and antimicrobial activity. Previous reports on antifungal activity of T. stans preparations and presence of trypsin inhibitor activity from T. stans leaves stimulated the investigation reported here. In this work, we proceeded to the purification and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor (TesTI), which was investigated for anti-Candida activity. Finally, in order to determine the potential of TesTI as a new natural chemotherapeutic product, its cytotoxicity to human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was evaluated. TesTI was isolated from saline extract by ammonium sulfate fractionation followed by ion exchange and gel filtration chromatographies. Antifungal activity was evaluated by determining the minimal inhibitory (MIC) and fungicide (MFC) concentrations using fungal cultures containing only yeast form or both yeast and hyphal forms. Candida cells treated with TesTI were evaluated for intracellular ATP levels and lipid peroxidation. Cytotoxicity of TesTI to PBMCs was evaluated by MTT assay. TesTI (39.8 kDa, pI 3.41, Ki 43 nM) inhibited similarly the growth of both C. albicans and C. krusei culture types at MIC of 100 μg/mL. The MFCs were 200 μg/mL for C. albicans and C. krusei. Time-response curves revealed that TesTI (at MIC) was more effective at inhibiting the replication of C. albicans cells. At MIC, TesTI promoted reduction of ATP levels and lipid peroxidation in the Candida cells, being not cytotoxic to PBMCs. In conclusion, TesTI is an antifungal agent against C. albicans and C. krusei, without toxicity to human cells. PMID:27199940

  6. Perbedaan Efek Ekstrak Jintan Hitam terhadap Candida albicans Denture Stomatitis dan Candida albicans (ATCC® 10231™)

    OpenAIRE

    Carey, Steffi

    2015-01-01

    Jintan hitam mempunyai efek fungistatis dan fungisidal. Hal ini disebabkan adanya senyawa berupa timokuinon, timol, dan karvakrol. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui berapa konsentrasi Kadar Hambat Minimum (KHM) dan Kadar Bunuh Minimum (KBM) dari ekstrak jintan hitam terhadap Candida albicans denture stomatitis dan Candida albicans (ATCC® 10231™), serta untuk mengetahui apakah terdapat perbedaan efek ekstrak jintan hitam terhadap kedua jenis fungi tersebut. Jenis penelitian eksperiment...

  7. Changes in hyphal morphology due to chitosan treatment in some fungal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enio Nazaré de Oliveira Junior

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this work, changes in the hyphal morphology due to chitosan treatment in some fungal species were studied. Scanning electron microscope (SEM observations revealed that chitosans with molar fraction of acetyl groups (F A 0.16 and 0.18 and degree of polymerization (DP 1,089 and 1,242 had a direct effect on the morphology of the chitosan-treated fungi, reflecting its potential for causing a delay in the growth of Alternaria alternata (500 µg × mL-1, Botrytis cinerea (1,000 µg × mL-1, Penicillium expansum (1,000 µg × mL-1 and Rhizopus stolonifer (500 µg × mL-1. Mycelial aggregation and structural changes such as excessive branching, swelling of the cell wall and hyphae size reduction were observed in the micrographs.

  8. The ABCs of Candida albicans Multidrug Transporter Cdr1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Rajendra; Banerjee, Atanu; Khandelwal, Nitesh Kumar; Dhamgaye, Sanjiveeni

    2015-12-01

    In the light of multidrug resistance (MDR) among pathogenic microbes and cancer cells, membrane transporters have gained profound clinical significance. Chemotherapeutic failure, by far, has been attributed mainly to the robust and diverse array of these proteins, which are omnipresent in every stratum of the living world. Candida albicans, one of the major fungal pathogens affecting immunocompromised patients, also develops MDR during the course of chemotherapy. The pivotal membrane transporters that C. albicans has exploited as one of the strategies to develop MDR belongs to either the ATP binding cassette (ABC) or the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) class of proteins. The ABC transporter Candida drug resistance 1 protein (Cdr1p) is a major player among these transporters that enables the pathogen to outplay the battery of antifungals encountered by it. The promiscuous Cdr1 protein fulfills the quintessential need of a model to study molecular mechanisms of multidrug transporter regulation and structure-function analyses of asymmetric ABC transporters. In this review, we cover the highlights of two decades of research on Cdr1p that has provided a platform to study its structure-function relationships and regulatory circuitry for a better understanding of MDR not only in yeast but also in other organisms. PMID:26407965

  9. Intracellular aspartic protease ACP of Candida albicans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bauerová, Václava; Dolejší, Elena; Hrušková-Heidingsfeldová, Olga; Pichová, Iva

    Patras : University of Patras, 2007. s. 306. [General Meeting of the International Proteolysis Society /5./. 20.10.2007-24.10.2007, Patras] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC531 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Candida albicans * ACP Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  10. Different levels of hyphal self-incompatibility modulate interconnectedness of mycorrhizal networks in three arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi within the Glomeraceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepe, Alessandra; Giovannetti, Manuela; Sbrana, Cristiana

    2016-05-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) live in symbiosis with most plant species and produce underground extraradical hyphal networks functional in the uptake and translocation of mineral nutrients from the soil to host plants. This work investigated whether fungal genotype can affect patterns of interconnections and structural traits of extraradical mycelium (ERM), by comparing three Glomeraceae species growing in symbiosis with five plant hosts. An isolate of Funneliformis coronatus consistently showed low ability to form interconnected ERM and self-incompatibility that represented up to 21 % of hyphal contacts. The frequency of post-fusion self-incompatible interactions, never detected before in AMF extraradical networks, was 8.9 %. In F. coronatus ERM, the percentage of hyphal contacts leading to perfect hyphal fusions was 1.2-7.7, while it ranged from 25.8-48 to 35.6-53.6 in Rhizophagus intraradices and Funneliformis mosseae, respectively. Low interconnectedness of F. coronatus ERM resulted also from a very high number of non-interacting contacts (83.2 %). Such findings show that AMF genotypes in Glomeraceae can differ significantly in anastomosis behaviour and that ERM interconnectedness is modulated by the fungal symbiont, as F. coronatus consistently formed poorly interconnected networks when growing in symbiosis with five different host plants and in the asymbiotic stage. Structural traits, such as extent, density and hyphal self-compatibility/incompatibility, may represent key factors for the differential performance of AMF, by affecting fungal absorbing surface and foraging ability and thus nutrient flow from soil to host roots. PMID:26630971

  11. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both 32P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis

  12. Development of DNA probes for Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, L.L.; Hudson, J.B.

    1988-07-01

    An attempt was made to produce DNA probes that could be used as a rapid and efficient means of detecting candidiasis (invasive Candida infection) in immunocompromised patients. Whole DNA from Candida albicans was digested with restriction endonuclease, and the resulting fragments were randomly cloned into a plasmid vector. Several recombinant plasmids were evaluated for cross-hybridization to various other Candida species, other fungal DNAs, and to nonfungal DNAs. Cross reactions were observed between the probes and different yeasts, but none with unrelated DNAs. Some recombinants were genus-specific, and two of these were applied to the analysis of C. albicans growth curves. It became evident that, although both /sup 32/P- and biotin-labelled probes could be made quite sensitive, a possible limitation in their diagnostic potential was the poor liberation of Candida DNA from cells. Thus, better methods of treatment of clinical specimens will be required before such probes will be useful in routine diagnosis.

  13. Laminin receptors on Candida albicans germ tubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bouchara, J P; Tronchin, G; Annaix, V; Robert, R; Senet, J M

    1990-01-01

    Recent evidence for the role of laminin in cell adhesion and in the pathogenesis of several bacterial infections has led us to investigate the existence of receptors for this extracellular matrix component in Candida albicans. At first, immunofluorescence demonstrated the presence of laminin-binding sites at the surface of germ tubes. Electron microscopy confirmed this result and permitted precise localization of the binding sites on the outermost fibrillar layer of the germ tube cell wall. B...

  14. White-opaque switching in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Lohse, Matthew B.; Johnson, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    The human commensal yeast Candida albicans undergoes an epigenetic switch between two distinct types of cells, referred to as white and opaque. These two cell types differ in many respects, including their cell and colony morphologies, their metabolic states, their mating behaviors, their preferred niches in the host, and their interactions with the host immune system. Each of the two cell types is heritable for many generations and switching between them appears stochastic; however, environm...

  15. Proinflammatory chemokines during Candida albicans keratitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyong; Hua, Xia; Wilhelmus, Kirk R

    2010-03-01

    Chemotactic cytokines mediate the recruitment of leukocytes into infected tissues. This study investigated the profile of chemokines during experimental Candida albicans keratitis and determined the effects of chemokine inhibition on leukocyte infiltration and fungal growth during murine keratomycosis. Scarified corneas of BALB/c mice were topically inoculated with C. albicans and monitored daily over one week for fungal keratitis. After a gene microarray for murine chemokines compared infected corneas to controls, real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunostaining assessed chemokine expression in infected and mock-inoculated corneas. An anti-chemokine antibody was then administered subconjunctivally and evaluated for effects on clinical severity, corneal inflammation, fungal recovery, and cytokine expression. Of 33 chemokine genes examined by microarray, 6 CC chemokines and 6 CXC chemokines were significantly (Pamount of recoverable fungi was not significantly (P=0.4) affected. Anti-CCL3 treatment significantly (P=0.01) reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1beta in infected corneas. These results indicate that chemokines, especially the CC chemokine CCL3, play important roles in the acute inflammatory response to C. albicans corneal infection. PMID:20005222

  16. The role of phenotypic switching in the basic biology and pathogenesis of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Soll, David R.

    2014-01-01

    The ‘‘white-opaque’’ transition in Candida albicans was discovered in 1987. For the next fifteen years, a significant body of knowledge accumulated that included differences between the cell types in gene expression, cellular architecture and virulence in cutaneous and systemic mouse models. However, it was not until 2002 that we began to understand the role of switching in the life history of this pathogen, the role of the mating type locus and the molecular pathways that regulated it. Then ...

  17. Non-albicans Candida Infection: An Emerging Threat

    OpenAIRE

    Deorukhkar, Sachin C.; Santosh Saini; Stephen Mathew

    2014-01-01

    The very nature of infectious diseases has undergone profound changes in the past few decades. Fungi once considered as nonpathogenic or less virulent are now recognized as a primary cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised and severely ill patients. Candida spp. are among the most common fungal pathogens. Candida albicans was the predominant cause of candidiasis. However, a shift toward non-albicans Candida species has been recently observed. These non-albicans Candida species d...

  18. Candida albicans Quorum Sensing Molecules Stimulate Mouse Macrophage Migration

    OpenAIRE

    Hargarten, Jessica C.; Moore, Tyler C.; Petro, Thomas M.; Nickerson, Kenneth W.; Atkin, Audrey L.

    2015-01-01

    The polymorphic commensal fungus Candida albicans causes life-threatening disease via bloodstream and intra-abdominal infections in immunocompromised and transplant patients. Although host immune evasion is a common strategy used by successful human fungal pathogens, C. albicans provokes recognition by host immune cells less capable of destroying it. To accomplish this, C. albicans white cells secrete a low-molecular-weight chemoattractive stimulant(s) of macrophages, a phagocyte that they ar...

  19. Molecular genetic techniques for gene manipulation in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Qiu-Rong; Yan, Lan; Lv, Quan-zhen; Zhou, Mi; Sui, Xue; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-ying

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen in humans due to its high frequency as an opportunistic and pathogenic fungus causing superficial as well as invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. An understanding of gene function in C. albicans is necessary to study the molecular basis of its pathogenesis, virulence and drug resistance. Several manipulation techniques have been used for investigation of gene function in C. albicans, including gene disruption, controlled...

  20. Mucosal damage and neutropenia are required for Candida albicans dissemination

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, A.Y.; Kohler, J.R.; Coggshall, K.T.; Rooijen, van, N.; Pier, G B

    2008-01-01

    Candida albicans fungemia in cancer patients is thought to develop from initial gastrointestinal (GI) colonization with subsequent translocation into the bloodstream after administration of chemotherapy. It is unclear what components of the innate immune system are necessary for preventing C. albicans dissemination from the GI tract, but we have hypothesized that both neutropenia and GI mucosal damage are critical for allowing widespread invasive C. albicans disease. We investigated these par...

  1. Zebrafish as a Model Host for Candida albicans Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Chun-Cheih; Hsu, Po-Chen; Jen, Chung-Feng; Chen, I-Hui; Wang, Chieh-Huei; Chan, Hau-Chien; Tsai, Pei-Wen; Tung, Kai-Che; Wang, Chian-Huei; Lan, Chung-Yu; Chuang, Yung-Jen

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the zebrafish model organism was developed to obtain a minivertebrate host system for a Candida albicans infection study. We demonstrated that C. albicans can colonize and invade zebrafish at multiple anatomical sites and kill the fish in a dose-dependent manner. Inside zebrafish, we monitored the progression of the C. albicans yeast-to-hypha transition by tracking morphogenesis, and we monitored the corresponding gene expression of the pathogen and the early host immune respons...

  2. Candida albicans versus Candida dubliniensis: Why Is C. albicans More Pathogenic?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moran, Gary P

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are highly related pathogenic yeast species. However, C. albicans is far more prevalent in human infection and has been shown to be more pathogenic in a wide range of infection models. Comparison of the genomes of the two species has revealed that they are very similar although there are some significant differences, largely due to the expansion of virulence-related gene families (e.g., ALS and SAP) in C. albicans, and increased levels of pseudogenisation in C. dubliniensis. Comparative global gene expression analyses have also been used to investigate differences in the ability of the two species to tolerate environmental stress and to produce hyphae, two traits that are likely to play a role in the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. Taken together, these data suggest that C. dubliniensis is in the process of undergoing reductive evolution and may have become adapted for growth in a specialized anatomic niche.

  3. Differential Activity of Striga hermonthica Seed Germination Stimulants and Gigaspora rosea Hyphal Branching Factors in Rice and Their Contribution to Underground Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, C.; Charnikhova, T.; M. Jamil; Delaux, P.M.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; M. Amini; Lauressergues, D.; Ruyter-Spira, C. P.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2014-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) trigger germination of parasitic plant seeds and hyphal branching of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. There is extensive structural variation in SLs and plants usually produce blends of different SLs. The structural variation among natural SLs has been shown to impact their biological activity as hyphal branching and parasitic plant seed germination stimulants. In this study, rice root exudates were fractioned by HPLC. The resulting fractions were analyzed by ...

  4. Deletion of a Yci1 Domain Protein of Candida albicans Allows Homothallic Mating in MTL Heterozygous Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuan; Gadoury, Christine; Hirakawa, Matthew P.; Bennett, Richard J.; Harcus, Doreen; Marcil, Anne

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT It has been proposed that the ancestral fungus was mating competent and homothallic. However, many mating-competent fungi were initially classified as asexual because their mating capacity was hidden behind layers of regulation. For efficient in vitro mating, the essentially obligate diploid ascomycete pathogen Candida albicans has to change its mating type locus from heterozygous MTLa/α to homozygous MTLa/a or MTLα/α and then undergo an environmentally controlled epigenetic switch to the mating-competent opaque form. These requirements greatly reduce the potential for C. albicans mating. Deletion of the Yci1 domain gene OFR1 bypasses the need for C. albicans cells to change the mating type locus from heterozygous to homozygous prior to switching to the opaque form and mating and allows homothallic mating of MTL heterozygous strains. This bypass is carbon source dependent and does not occur when cells are grown on glucose. Transcriptional profiling of ofr1 mutant cells shows that in addition to regulating cell type and mating circuitry, Ofr1 is needed for proper regulation of histone and chitin biosynthesis gene expression. It appears that OFR1 is a key regulator in C. albicans and functions in part to maintain the cryptic mating phenotype of the pathogen. PMID:27118591

  5. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca2+–Mg2+ ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca2+ concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of 3H-UdR, 3H-TdR and 3H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca2+–Mg2+ ATPase, cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited 3H-UdR, 3H-TdR and 3H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca2+–Mg2+ ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca2+ concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca2+–Mg2+ ATPase, increasing cytosolic Ca2+ content and damaging the ultrastructure of C. albicans

  6. Baicalin prevents Candida albicans infections via increasing its apoptosis rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shulong; Fu, Yingyuan, E-mail: yingyuanfu@126.com; Wu, Xiuzhen; Zhou, Zhixing; Xu, Jing; Zeng, Xiaoping; Kuang, Nanzhen; Zeng, Yurong

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Baicalin increases the ratio of the G0/G1 stages and C. albicans apoptosis. • Baicalin decreases the proliferation index of C. albicans. • Baicalin inhibits the biosynthesis of DNA, RNA and protein in C. albicans. • Baicalin depresses Succinate Dehydrogenase and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase in C. albicans. • Baicalin increases the endocytic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration in C. albicans. - Abstract: Background: These experiments were employed to explore the mechanisms underlying baicalin action on Candida albicans. Methodology and principal findings: We detected the baicalin inhibition effects on three isotope-labeled precursors of {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C. albicans using the isotope incorporation technology. The activities of Succinate Dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase (CCO) and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration, the cell cycle and apoptosis, as well as the ultrastructure of C.albicans were also tested. We found that baicalin inhibited {sup 3}H-UdR, {sup 3}H-TdR and {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into C.albicans (P < 0.005). The activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase of C.albicans in baicalin groups were lower than those in control group (P < 0.05). Ca{sup 2+} concentrations of C. albicans in baicalin groups were much higher than those in control group (P < 0.05). The ratio of C.albicans at the G0/G1 stage increased in baicalin groups in dose dependent manner (P < 0.01). There were a significant differences in the apoptosis rate of C.albicans between baicalin and control groups (P < 0.01). After 12–48 h incubation with baicalin (1 mg/ml), C. albicans shown to be markedly damaged under transmission electron micrographs. Innovation and significance: Baicalin can increase the apoptosis rate of C. albicans. These effects of Baicalin may involved in its inhibiting the activities of the SDH and Ca{sup 2+}–Mg{sup 2+} ATPase, increasing

  7. Intestinal colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal immunity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Dong Bai; Xian-Hua Liu; Qing-Ying Tong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To observe the relationship between intestinal lumen colonization with Candida albicans and mucosal secretory IgA (sIgA).METHODS: A total of 82 specific-pathogen-free mice were divided randomly into control and colonization groups. After Candida albicans were inoculated into specific-pathogenfree mice, the number of Candida albicans adhering to cecum and mucosal membrane was counted. The lymphocyte proliferation in Peyer's patch and in lamina propria was shown by BrdU incorporation, while mucosal sIgA (surface membrane) isotype switch in Peyer's patch was investigated. IgA plasma cells in lamina propria were observed by immunohistochemical staining. Specific IgA antibodies to Candida albicans were measured with ELISA.RESULTS: From d 3 to d 14 after Candida albicans gavaging to mice, the number of Candida albicans colonizing in lumen and adhering to mucosal membrane was sharply reduced.Candida albicans translocation to mesenteric lymph nodes occurred at early time points following gavage administration and disappeared at later time points. Meanwhile, the content of specific IgA was increased obviously. Proliferation and differentiation of lymphocytes in lamina propria were also increased.CONCLUSION: Lymphocytes in lamina propria play an important role in intestinal mucosal immunity of specificpathogen-free mice when they are first inoculated with Candida albicans. The decreasing number of Candida albicans in intestine is related to the increased level of specific IgA antibodies in the intestinal mucus.

  8. Environmental pH adaption and morphological transitions in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Han; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-05-01

    The human fungal pathogen Candida albicans encounters a wide range of pH stresses during its commensal and pathogenic lifestyles. It has been well studied that environmental pH regulates the yeast-filamentous growth transition in this fungus. White-opaque switching is another type of phenotypic transitions in C. albicans. White and opaque cells are two morphologically and functionally distinct cell types, which differ in many aspects including global gene expression profiles, virulence, mating competency, and susceptibility to antifungals. The switch between white and opaque cell types is heritable and epigenetically regulated. In a recently study, Sun et al. (Eukaryot Cell 14:1127-1134, 2015) reported that pH plays a critical role in the regulation of the white-opaque phenotypic switch and sexual mating in C. albicans via both the conserved Rim101-mediated pH sensing and cAMP signaling pathways. The effect of pH on the two biological processes may represent a balancing act between host environmental adaptation and sexual reproduction in this pathogenic fungus. PMID:26581628

  9. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. ► The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. ► The MBP–Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the “ATP state” of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck–core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  10. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada); Allingham, John S., E-mail: allinghj@queensu.ca [Department of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, Canada K7L 3N6 (Canada)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  11. Neurospora COP9 signalosome integrity plays major roles for hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhipeng Zhou

    Full Text Available The COP9 signalosome (CSN is a highly conserved multifunctional complex that has two major biochemical roles: cleaving NEDD8 from cullin proteins and maintaining the stability of CRL components. We used mutation analysis to confirm that the JAMM domain of the CSN-5 subunit is responsible for NEDD8 cleavage from cullin proteins in Neurospora crassa. Point mutations of key residues in the metal-binding motif (EX(nHXHX(10D of the CSN-5 JAMM domain disrupted CSN deneddylation activity without interfering with assembly of the CSN complex or interactions between CSN and cullin proteins. Surprisingly, CSN-5 with a mutated JAMM domain partially rescued the phenotypic defects observed in a csn-5 mutant. We found that, even without its deneddylation activity, the CSN can partially maintain the stability of the SCF(FWD-1 complex and partially restore the degradation of the circadian clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ in vivo. Furthermore, we showed that CSN containing mutant CSN-5 efficiently prevents degradation of the substrate receptors of CRLs. Finally, we found that deletion of the CAND1 ortholog in N. crassa had little effect on the conidiation circadian rhythm. Our results suggest that CSN integrity plays major roles in hyphal growth, conidial development, and circadian function in N. crassa.

  12. Vesicle trafficking via the Spitzenkörper during hyphal tip growth in Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijksterhuis, Jan; Molenaar, Douwe

    2013-04-01

    Growing hyphae of Rhizoctonia solani were stained with the endocytic marker dye FM4-64 and imaged by confocal microscopy. Staining of the plasma membrane was followed by labeling of organelles in the cytoplasm (after ~1 min) and of the Spitzenkörper (Spk; after ~2 min). Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of the stained Spk demonstrated the vectorial flow of secretory vesicles from the apical cytoplasm to the Spk. This flux was modelled in a two-compartment model. The turnover time of the vesicles of the Spk was estimated to be 1.3-2.5 min. These results are roughly consistent with the expected flux of vesicles through the Spk based on the number of secretory vesicles within the Spk and the number of secretory vesicles that would be necessary to fuse with the apical plasma membrane to maintain hyphal extension rates. These results suggest that membrane retrieval via endocytosis is not as significant as previously suggested. PMID:23334442

  13. Real-time PCR expression profiling of genes encoding potential virulence factors in Candida albicans biofilms: identification of model-dependent and -independent gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Řičicová Markéta

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Candida albicans infections are often associated with biofilm formation. Previous work demonstrated that the expression of HWP1 (hyphal wall protein and of genes belonging to the ALS (agglutinin-like sequence, SAP (secreted aspartyl protease, PLB (phospholipase B and LIP (lipase gene families is associated with biofilm growth on mucosal surfaces. We investigated using real-time PCR whether genes encoding potential virulence factors are also highly expressed in biofilms associated with abiotic surfaces. For this, C. albicans biofilms were grown on silicone in microtiter plates (MTP or in the Centres for Disease Control (CDC reactor, on polyurethane in an in vivo subcutaneous catheter rat (SCR model, and on mucosal surfaces in the reconstituted human epithelium (RHE model. Results HWP1 and genes belonging to the ALS, SAP, PLB and LIP gene families were constitutively expressed in C. albicans biofilms. ALS1-5 were upregulated in all model systems, while ALS9 was mostly downregulated. ALS6 and HWP1 were overexpressed in all models except in the RHE and MTP, respectively. The expression levels of SAP1 were more pronounced in both in vitro models, while those of SAP2, SAP4 and SAP6 were higher in the in vivo model. Furthermore, SAP5 was highly upregulated in the in vivo and RHE models. For SAP9 and SAP10 similar gene expression levels were observed in all model systems. PLB genes were not considerably upregulated in biofilms, while LIP1-3, LIP5-7 and LIP9-10 were highly overexpressed in both in vitro models. Furthermore, an elevated lipase activity was detected in supernatans of biofilms grown in the MTP and RHE model. Conclusions Our findings show that HWP1 and most of the genes belonging to the ALS, SAP and LIP gene families are upregulated in C. albicans biofilms. Comparison of the fold expression between the various model systems revealed similar expression levels for some genes, while for others model-dependent expression

  14. Preparation of Candida albicans Biofilms for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T.; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy is a form of microscopy that allows for imaging of distinct portions of an individual cell. For Candida albicans biofilms, it is often used to visualize the cell walls of fixed samples of yeast and hyphae. This protocol describes how to grow, harvest, and fix Candida albicans biofilms in preparation for Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  15. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Koh, Yoon-Woo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hee-Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jung-Mi [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  16. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  17. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  18. Melittin induces apoptotic features in Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Cana [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong Gun, E-mail: dglee222@knu.ac.kr [School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, College of Natural Sciences, Kyungpook National University, 1370 Sankyuk-dong, Puk-ku, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-26

    Melittin is a well-known antimicrobial peptide with membrane-active mechanisms. In this study, it was found that Melittin exerted its antifungal effect via apoptosis. Candida albicans exposed to Melittin showed the increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, measured by DHR-123 staining. Fluorescence microscopy staining with FITC-annexin V, TUNEL and DAPI further confirmed diagnostic markers of yeast apoptosis including phosphatidylserine externalization, and DNA and nuclear fragmentation. The current study suggests that Melittin possesses an antifungal effect with another mechanism promoting apoptosis.

  19. Sensitization of Candida albicans to terbinafine by berberine and berberrubine

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAM, PIKLING; KOK, STANTON HON LUNG; LEE, KENNETH KA HO; LAM, KIM HUNG; HAU, DESMOND KWOK PO; WONG, WAI YEUNG; BIAN, ZHAOXIANG; GAMBARI, ROBERTO; CHUI, CHUNG HIN

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans (C. albicans) is an opportunistic fungal pathogen, particularly observed in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans accounts for 50–70% of cases of invasive candidiasis in the majority of clinical settings. Terbinafine, an allylamine antifungal drug, has been used to treat fungal infections previously. It has fungistatic activity against C. albicans. Traditional Chinese medicines can be used as complementary medicines to conventional drugs to treat a variety of ailments and diseases. Berberine is a quaternary alkaloid isolated from the traditional Chinese herb, Coptidis Rhizoma, while berberrubine is isolated from the medicinal plant Berberis vulgaris, but is also readily derived from berberine by pyrolysis. The present study demonstrates the possible complementary use of berberine and berberrubine with terbinafine against C. albicans. The experimental findings assume that the potential application of these alkaloids together with reduced dosage of the standard drug would enhance the resulting antifungal potency. PMID:27073630

  20. In vitro antifungal activity of baicalin against Candida albicans biofilms via apoptotic induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, TianMing; Shi, GaoXiang; Shao, Jing; Wu, DaQiang; Yan, YuanYuan; Zhang, MengXiang; Cui, YanYan; Wang, ChangZhong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antifungal activity of baicalin and its potential mechanism of action against Candida albicans biofilms. The standard techniques including microdilution method and checkerboard assay were employed to evaluate the susceptibilities of baicalin alone and in combination with fluconazole against planktonic and biofilm cells of C. albicans. Transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), fluorescent microscope and flow cytometry were used to assess the apoptotic incidences induced by baicalin in biofilm cells. The expressions of four genes (RAS1, CAP1, PDE2 and TPK1) related to Ras-cAMP-PKA pathway were also analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results showed that minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and sessile minimum inhibitory concentration (SMIC50) of baicalin were 500 and 2000 μg/mL with fractional inhibitory concentration indexs (FICIs) ranging from 0.28 to 0.75. A series of events related to apoptosis were observed in baicalin-treated C. albicans biofilms, including extensive chromatin condensation along the nuclear envelope, ROS accumulation, MMP reduction, PS externalization, nuclear fragmentation, chromatin condensation, metacaspase activation and Cyt C release. Additionally, the expressions of RAS1 and TPK1 were up-regulated by 3.2 and 2.9 folds respectively, while those of CAP1 and PDE2 were down-regulated by 3.3 and 6.6 folds respectively after exposure to baicalin in biofilm cells. In conclusion, baicalin can suppress the development of C. albicans biofilms most likely due to inducing cell death via apoptosis. PMID:26169236

  1. MBL-mediated opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by human neutrophils is coupled with intracellular Dectin-1-triggered ROS production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Li

    Full Text Available Mannan-binding lectin (MBL, a lectin homologous to C1q, greatly facilitates C3/C4-mediated opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans (C. albicans by human neutrophils, and has the capacity to bind to CR1 (CD35 expressed on circulating neutrophils. The intracellular pool of neutrophil Dectin-1 plays a critical role in stimulating the reactive oxygen species (ROS generation through recognition of β-1,3-glucan component of phagocytized zymosan or yeasts. However, little is known about whether MBL can mediate the opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by neutrophils independent of complement activation, and whether MBL-mediated opsonophagocytosis influence the intracellular expression of Dectin-1 and ROS production. Here we showed that the inhibited phagocytic efficiency of neutrophils as a result of blockage of Dectin-1 was compensated by exogenous MBL alone in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the expressions of Dectin-1 at mRNA and intracellular protein levels were significantly up-regulated in neutrophils stimulated by MBL-pre-incubated C. albicans, while the expression of surface Dectin-1 remained almost unchanged. Nevertheless, the stimulated ROS production in neutrophils was partly and irreversibly inhibited by blockage of Dectin-1 in the presence of exogenous MBL. Confocal microscopy examination showed that intracellular Dectin-1 was recruited and co-distributed with ROS on the surface of some phagocytized yeasts. The β-1,3-glucanase digestion test further suggested that the specific recognition and binding site of human Dectin-1 is just the β-1,3-glucan moiety on the cell wall of C. albicans. These data demonstrate that MBL has an ability to mediate the opsonophagocytosis of Candida albicans by human neutrophils independent of complement activation, which is coupled with intracellular Dectin-1-triggered ROS production.

  2. In vitro activity of eugenol against Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Miao; Du, Minquan; Fan, Mingwen; Bian, Zhuan

    2007-03-01

    Most manifestations of candidiasis are associated with biofilm formation occurring on the surfaces of host tissues and medical devices. Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated causative pathogen of candidiasis, and the biofilms display significantly increased levels of resistance to the conventional antifungal agents. Eugenol, the major phenolic component of clove essential oil, possesses potent antifungal activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of eugenol on preformed biofilms, adherent cells, subsequent biofilm formation and cell morphogenesis of C. albicans. Eugenol displayed in vitro activity against C. albicans cells within biofilms, when MIC(50) for sessile cells was 500 mg/L. C. albicans adherent cell populations (after 0, 1, 2 and 4 h of adherence) were treated with various concentrations of eugenol (0, 20, 200 and 2,000 mg/L). The extent of subsequent biofilm formation were then assessed with the tetrazolium salt reduction assay. Effect of eugenol on morphogenesis of C. albicans cells was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicated that the effect of eugenol on adherent cells and subsequent biofilm formation was dependent on the initial adherence time and the concentration of this compound, and that eugenol can inhibit filamentous growth of C. albicans cells. In addition, using human erythrocytes, eugenol showed low hemolytic activity. These results indicated that eugenol displayed potent activity against C. albicans biofilms in vitro with low cytotoxicity and therefore has potential therapeutic implication for biofilm-associated candidal infections. PMID:17356790

  3. AI-2 of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Inhibits Candida albicans Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endang W. Bachtiar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, a Gram-negative bacterium, and Candida albicans, a polymorphic fungus, are both commensals of the oral cavity but both are opportunistic pathogens that can cause oral diseases. A. actinomycetemcomitans produces a quorum-sensing molecule called autoinducer-2 (AI-2, synthesized by LuxS, that plays an important role in expression of virulence factors, in intra- but also in interspecies communication. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of AI-2 based signaling in the interactions between C. albicans and A. actinomycetemcomitans. A. actinomycetemcomitans adhered to C. albicans and inhibited biofilm formation by means of a molecule that was secreted during growth. C. albicans biofilm formation increased significantly when co-cultured with A. actinomycetemcomitans luxS, lacking AI-2 production. Addition of wild-type-derived spent medium or synthetic AI-2 to spent medium of the luxS strain, restored inhibition of C. albicans biofilm formation to wild-type levels. Addition of synthetic AI-2 significantly inhibited hypha formation of C. albicans possibly explaining the inhibition of biofilm formation. AI-2 of A. actinomycetemcomitans is synthesized by LuxS, accumulates during growth and inhibits C. albicans hypha- and biofilm formation. Identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between bacteria and fungi may provide important insight into the balance within complex oral microbial communities.

  4. Apotransferrin has a second mechanism for anticandidal activity through binding of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yongmoon

    2014-02-01

    It has been reported that transferrin has antibacterial and antifungal activities via iron chelation in the environment surrounding the microbes. In the present study, we investigated whether the binding of transferrin to Candida albicans mediates growth inhibition. By using cultures that contained iron-free (apo)transferrin glycoprotein either in contact with candidal cells or separated from candidal cells by a dialysis membrane, we distinguished the growth inhibition by transferrin-cell interaction from that of simple iron chelation. Maximal growth inhibition always occurred when the apotransferrin interacted directly with the cells. Additionally, there was partial inhibition even when candidal cells were in contact with iron-saturated transferrin. Binding studies with (59)Fe(3+) radiolabeled-transferrin indicated that the apo-protein can bind to the candidal cell surface. The binding sites were saturable and it was dose dependent. Chemicals (hydrogen peroxide, dithiothreitol, sodium dodecyl sulfate) blocked transferrin binding to C. albicans, and among the three, hydrogen peroxide (HP) was the most effective for the blocking. When HP-treated yeast cells were added to the culture that was pretreated with apotransferrin, candidal cell growth increased by 5-fold as compared to the growth of HP-untreated candidal cells under apotransferrin-regulation (P mechanism of anticandidal activity that is mediated by binding to the surface of C. albicans yeast cells. PMID:24155020

  5. CO(2) acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rebecca A; De Sordi, Luisa; Maccallum, Donna M; Topal, Hüsnü; Eaton, Rebecca; Bloor, James W; Robinson, Gary K; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Wang, Yue; Gow, Neil A R; Steegborn, Clemens; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2010-01-01

    When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO(2) acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO(2)-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p), a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate fungal responses to serum and bacterial peptidoglycan. We further identify Lys 1373 as essential for CO(2)/bicarbonate regulation of Cyr1p. Disruption of the CO(2)/bicarbonate receptor-site interferes selectively with C. albicans filamentation within fungal biomasses. Comparisons between the Drosophila melanogaster infection model and the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, suggest that metabolic CO(2) sensing may be important for initial colonisation and epithelial invasion. Our results reveal the existence of a gaseous Candida signalling pathway and its molecular mechanism and provide insights into an evolutionary conserved CO(2)-signalling system. PMID:21124988

  6. CO(2 acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Hall

    Full Text Available When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO(2 acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO(2-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p, a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate fungal responses to serum and bacterial peptidoglycan. We further identify Lys 1373 as essential for CO(2/bicarbonate regulation of Cyr1p. Disruption of the CO(2/bicarbonate receptor-site interferes selectively with C. albicans filamentation within fungal biomasses. Comparisons between the Drosophila melanogaster infection model and the mouse model of disseminated candidiasis, suggest that metabolic CO(2 sensing may be important for initial colonisation and epithelial invasion. Our results reveal the existence of a gaseous Candida signalling pathway and its molecular mechanism and provide insights into an evolutionary conserved CO(2-signalling system.

  7. The stepwise acquisition of fluconazole resistance mutations causes a gradual loss of fitness in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasse, Christoph; Dunkel, Nico; Schäfer, Tina; Schneider, Sabrina; Dierolf, Franziska; Ohlsen, Knut; Morschhäuser, Joachim

    2012-11-01

    The pathogenic yeast Candida albicans can develop resistance to the widely used antifungal agent fluconazole, which inhibits ergosterol biosynthesis. Resistance is often caused by gain-of-function mutations in the transcription factors Mrr1, Tac1 and Upc2, which result in constitutive overexpression of multidrug efflux pumps and ergosterol biosynthesis genes respectively. It is not known how the permanently changed gene expression program in resistant strains affects their fitness in the absence of drug selection pressure. We have systematically investigated the effects of activating mutations in Mrr1, Tac1 and Upc2, individually and in all possible combinations, on the degree of fluconazole resistance and on the fitness of C. albicans in an isogenic strain background. All combinations of different resistance mechanisms resulted in a stepwise increase in drug resistance, culminating in 500-fold increased fluconazole resistance in strains possessing mutations in the three transcription factors and an additional resistance mutation in the drug target enzyme Erg11. The acquisition of resistance mutations was associated with reduced fitness under non-selective conditions in vitro as well as in vivo during colonization of a mammalian host. Therefore, without compensatory mutations, the inability to appropriately regulate gene expression results in a loss of competitive fitness of drug-resistant C. albicans strains. PMID:22924823

  8. A subset of IL-17+ mesenchymal stem cells possesses anti-Candida albicans effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruili Yang; Yi Liu; Peyman Kelk; Cunye Qu; Kentaro Akiyama; Chider Chen; Ikiru Atsuta

    2013-01-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) comprise a heterogeneous population of postnatal progenitor cells with profound immunomodulatory properties,such as upregulation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and downregulation of Th17 cells.However,it is unknown whether different MSC subpopulations possess the same range of immunomodulatory function.Here,we show that a subset of single colony-derived MSCs producing IL-17 is different from bulk MSC population in that it cannot upregulate Tregs,downregulate Th17 cells,or ameliorate disease phenotypes in a colitis mouse model.Mechanistically,we reveal that IL-17,produced by these MSCs,activates the NFκB pathway to downregulate TGF-β production in MSCs,resulting in abolishment of MSC-based immunomodulation.Furthermore,we show that NFκB is able to directly bind to TGF-β promoter region to regulate TGF-β expression in MSCs.Moreover,these IL-17+ MSCs possess anti-Candida albicans growth effects in vitro and therapeutic effect in C.albicans-infected mice.In summary,this study shows that MSCs contain an IL-17+ subset capable of inhibiting C.albicans growth,but attenuating MSC-based immunosuppression via NFκB-mediated downregulation of TGF-β.

  9. Glucanase Induces Filamentation of the Fungal Pathogen Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, H.; Nobile, CJ; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common human fungal pathogen. Many organisms, including C. albicans, secrete glucanases under different environmental conditions. Here, we report a novel role for beta-1, 3- glucanase in inducing Candida albicans to form filaments at 22°C and enhancing filamentation at 37°C in nutrient-rich medium. Quorum sensing, the efg1-signaling and cek1 MAP kinase pathways are involved in this process. Our data suggest that the natural antifungal agent beta-glucanase may supp...

  10. Probiotic lactobacillus and estrogen effects on vaginal epithelial gene expression responses to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaginal epithelial cells have receptors, signal transduction mechanisms, and cytokine secretion capabilities to recruit host defenses against Candida albicans infections. This research evaluates how probiotic lactobacilli affect the defensive epithelial response. Methods This study used quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay (qRT-PCR, flow cytometry, and a multiplex immunoassay to observe changes in the regulation of gene expression related to cytokine responses in the VK2 (E6/E7 vaginal epithelial cell line treated with 17β-estradiol, exposed to probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1® and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14® and challenged with C. albicans. Data were statistically evaluated by repeated measures analysis of variance and paired t-tests where appropriate. Results C. albicans induced mRNA expression of genes related to inflammatory cytokine responses associated with nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signal transduction pathways. 17β-estradiol suppressed expression of interleukin-1α (IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα mRNA. Probiotic lactobacilli suppressed C. albicans-induced nuclear factor-kappa B inhibitor kinase kinase alpha (Iκκα, Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2, TLR6, IL-8, and TNFα, also suggesting inhibition of NF-κB signaling. The lactobacilli induced expression of IL-1α, and IL-1β mRNA, which was not inhibited by curcumin, suggesting that they induce an alternate inflammatory signal transduction pathway to NF-κB, such as the mitogen activated protein kinase and activator protein-1 (MAPK/AP-1 signal transduction pathway. Curcumin inhibited IL-13 secretion, suggesting that expression of this cytokine is mainly regulated by NF-κB signaling in VK2 cells. Conclusions The results suggest that C. albicans infection induces pro-inflammatory responses in vaginal epithelial cells, and estrogen and lactobacilli suppress

  11. Hyphal N transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus associated with cucumber grown at three nitrogen levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    mg N which were applied gradually to the RC during the experiment. N-15 was supplied to HC(A) 42 d after planting, at 50 mg (NH4+)-N-15-N kg-1 soil. Lateral movement of the applied N-15 towards the roots was minimized by using a nitrification inhibitor and a hyphal buffer compartment. Non...... colonization at all three levels of N supply, but this effect was strongest in plants of low N status. The results indicated that this increase was due partly to the improved inflow of N via the external hyphae. Root colonization by G. intraradices was unaffected by the amount of N supplied to the RC, while...... hyphal length increased in HC(A) compared to HC(B). Although a considerable N-15 content was detected in mycorrhizal roots adjacent to HC(B), only insignificant amounts of N-15 were found in the external hyphae in HC(B). The external hyphae depleted the soil of inorganic N in both HC(A) and HC(B), while...

  12. Hyphal transport by a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus of N applied to the soil as ammonium or nitrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A.; Jakobsen, I.; Jensen, E.S.

    1993-01-01

    Transport of N by hyphae of a vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus was studied under controlled experimental conditions. The N source was applied to the soil as (NH4+)-N-15 or (NH3-)N-15. Cucumis sativus was grown for 25 days, either alone or in symbiosis with Glomus intraradices, in containers...... compartment at 7 and 12 days after labelling, and the concentration of mineral N in the samples was measured from 2 M KCl extracts. Mycorrhizal colonization did not affect plant dry weight. The recovery of N-15 in mycorrhizal plants was 38 or 40%, respectively, when (NH4+)-N-15 or (NO3-)-N-15 was applied. The...... corresponding values for non-mycorrhizal plants were 7 and 16%. The higher N-15 recovery observed in mycorrhizal plants than in non-mycorrhizal plants suggests that hyphal transport of N from the applied N-15 sources towards the host plant had occurred. The concentration of mineral N in the soil of hyphal...

  13. Separate effects of moisture content and water activity on the hyphal extension of Penicillium rubens on porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Segers, Frank J J; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Adan, Olaf C G

    2015-12-01

    To prevent indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of fungi is a key element. Indoor moisture is quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH controls the water activity of the indoor materials that fungi grow on, a well-studied parameter known to limit fungal growth. RH, however, also controls the amount of water present in these materials, the moisture content. The significance of the moisture content of these materials to indoor fungal growth is currently overlooked. In the work reported here, growth experiments with the indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates were performed to test whether the moisture content influences growth on porous materials. Second, we report the development of a video microscopy method that for the first time quantified hyphal growth on a porous material. It is found that a higher moisture content leads to earlier colonization and higher hyphal extension rates. This is a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. The real-time monitoring of colonization of gypsum provides a new view of growth on indoor surfaces. PMID:26248303

  14. An interspecies regulatory network inferred from simultaneous RNA-seq of Candida albicans invading innate immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LanayTierney

    2012-03-01

    comprising Hap3 in C. albicans, and Ptx3 and Mta2 in M. musculus. Remarkably, binding of recombinant Ptx3 to the C. albicans cell wall was found to regulate the expression of fungal Hap3 target genes as predicted by the network inference model. Pre-incubation of C. albicans with recombinant Ptx3 significantly altered the expression of Mta2 target cytokines such as IL-2 and IL-4 in a Hap3-dependent manner, further suggesting a role for Mta2 in host-pathogen interplay as predicted in the network inference model. We propose an integrated model for the functionality of these sub-networks during fungal invasion of immune cells, according to which binding of Ptx3 to the C. albicans cell wall induces remodelling via fungal Hap3 target genes, thereby altering the immune response to the pathogen. We show the applicability of network inference to predict interactions between host-pathogen pairs, demonstrating the usefulness of this systems biology approach to decipher mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis.

  15. COMPARATIVE TRANSCRIPT PROFILING OF Candida albicans AND Candida dubliniensis IDENTIFIES SFL2, A C. albicans GENE REQUIRED FOR VIRULENCE IN A RECONSTITUTED EPITHELIAL INFECTION MODEL

    OpenAIRE

    HIGGINS, JUDY; Sullivan, Derek; Coleman, David; Moran, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are closely related species displaying differences in virulence and genome content, therefore providing potential opportunities to identify novel C. albicans virulence genes. C. albicans gene arrays were used for comparative analysis of global gene expression in the two species in reconstituted human oral epithelium (RHE). C. albicans (SC5314) showed upregulation of hypha-specific and virulence genes within 30 min postinoculation, coinciding with rapi...

  16. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  17. Dental Caries in Rats Associated with Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Klinke, Thomas; Guggenheim, Bernhard; Klimm, Wolfgang; Thurnheer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    In addition to occasional opportunistic colonization of the oral mucosa, Candida albicans is frequently found in carious dentin. The yeast’s potential to induce dental caries as a consequence of its pronounced ability to produce and tolerate acids was investigated. Eighty caries-active Osborne-Mendel rats were raised on an ampicillin-supplemented diet and exposed to C. albicans and/or Streptococcus mutans, except for controls. Throughout the 28-day test period, the animals were offered the mo...

  18. Blood group glycolipids as epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron, B J; Douglas, L J

    1996-01-01

    The role of glycosphingolipids as possible epithelial cell receptors for Candida albicans was examined by investigating the binding of biotinylated yeasts to lipids extracted from human buccal epithelial cells and separated on thin-layer chromatograms. Binding was visualized by the addition of 125I-streptavidin followed by autoradiography. Five C. albicans strains thought from earlier work to have a requirement for fucose-containing receptors all bound to the same three components in the lipi...

  19. Role of extracellular DNA in Candida albicans biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Margarida; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2009-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix in bacterial biofilms. However, in Candida albicans there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (ecDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. The main objective of this work was to examine the effect of Deoxyribonuclease I (DNase) treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm as indicators of the role of ecDNA in biofilm structure and developm...

  20. Biofilm formation among Candida albicans isolated from vagina

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Study was conducted in a rural tertiary care hospital with a purpose to demonstrate the biofilm forming abilities of C. albicans isolated from cases of vulvovaginal candidiasis and asymptomatic carriers.Material and Methods: C. albicans was isolated and identified by standard laboratory techniques. Biofilm formation in vitro was tested using the 96 well microtitre plate method with crystal violet staining.Results: Overall rate of Candida isolation in study subjects was 40%. Candida i...

  1. Expression of surface hydrophobic proteins by Candida albicans in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Glee, P M; Sundstrom, P; Hazen, K C

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans modulates cell surface hydrophobicity during growth and morphogenesis in vitro. To determine if surface hydrophobicity is expressed during pathogenesis, we generated a polyclonal antiserum against yeast hydrophobic proteins. The antiserum was then used for indirect immunofluorescence analysis of tissues from mice colonized and chronically infected with C. albicans. Results demonstrated that yeast hydrophobic proteins are exposed on fungal cells present in host tissues. The po...

  2. Improved assay for surface hydrophobic avidity of Candida albicans cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; LeMelle, W G

    1990-01-01

    A simple method that distinguishes among hydrophobic avidity levels of highly hydrophobic isolates of the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is described. This method involves mixing polystyrene microspheres at different concentrations with a constant concentration of yeast cells and plotting the data in accordance with the Langmuir isotherm equation. A 10-fold difference between the C. albicans isolates with the lowest and highest avidity (KH) values was found. This method may also demonstra...

  3. Candida albicans specializations for iron homeostasis: from commensalism to virulence

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is a fungal commensal-pathogen that persistently associates with its mammalian hosts. Between the commensal and pathogenic lifestyles, this microorganism inhabits host niches that differ markedly in the levels of bioavailable iron. A number of recent studies have exposed C. albicans specializations for acquiring iron from specific host molecules in regions where iron is scarce, while also defending against iron-related toxicity in regions where iron occurs in surfeit. Togethe...

  4. Virulence factors of non-Candida albicans Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Sónia Carina; Negri, M.; Monteiro, D. R.; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário; Azeredo, Joana

    2012-01-01

    Infections caused by Candida species (candidosis) have greatly increased over recent years, mainly due to the escalation of the AIDS epidemic, population ageing, increasing number of immunocompromised patients and the more widespread use of indwelling medical devices. Besides Candida albicans, non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species such as Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis and Candida parapsilosis are now frequently identified as potential human pathogens. Candida species pathogenicit...

  5. Three distinct secreted aspartyl proteinases in Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    White, T C; Miyasaki, S H; Agabian, N

    1993-01-01

    The secreted aspartyl proteinases of Candida albicans (products of the SAP genes) are thought to contribute to virulence through their effects on Candida adherence, invasion, and pathogenicity. From a single strain of C. albicans (WO-1) which expresses a phenotypic switching system, three secreted aspartyl proteinases have been identified as determined by molecular weight and N-terminal sequence. Each of the three identified proteins represents the mature form of one of three distinct protein...

  6. Ser or Leu: structural snapshots of mistranslation in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Sárkány, Zsuzsa; Silva, Alexandra; Pereira, Pedro J.B.; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic opportunistic fungal pathogen normally residing as commensal on mucosal surfaces, skin and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts. However, in immunocompromised patients C. albicans can cause superficial mucosal infections or life-threatening disseminated candidemia. A change in physiological conditions triggers a cascade of molecular events leading to morphogenetic alterations and increased resistance to damage induced by host defenses. The complex biolog...

  7. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is conside...

  8. In vitro Antifungal Activity of Cucumis melo on Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Issa Gholampour-Azizi; Samaneh Rouhi; Fahimeh Yahyayi

    2015-01-01

    Background: With respect to the emergence of susceptibility of some fungi to antifungal agents, making use of medicinal plants is progressing. Objectives: The aim of this study was to verify the anti-fungal characteristics of mature and immature Cucumis melo fruit on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive study, antifungal activity of aqueous, ethnolic and methanolic extracts of C. melo fruits were tested on C. albicans; also results were obtained by disc and well ...

  9. Oxidative stress of photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy inhibits Candida albicans virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Ilka Tiemy; Prates, Renato Araujo; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Simões Ribeiro, Martha

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) is based on the principal that microorganisms will be inactivated using a light source combined to a photosensitizing agent in the presence of oxygen. Oxidative damage of cell components occurs by the action of reactive oxygen species leading to cell death for microbial species. It has been demonstrated that PACT is highly efficient in vitro against a wide range of pathogens, however, there is limited information for its in vivo potential. In addition, it has been demonstrated that sublethal photodynamic inactivation may alter the virulence determinants of microorganisms. In this study, we explored the effect of sublethal photodynamic inactivation to the virulence factors of Candida albicans. Methylene Blue (MB) was used as photosensitizer for sublethal photodynamic challenge on C. albicans associated with a diode laser irradiation (λ=660nm). The parameters of irradiation were selected in causing no reduction of viable cells. The potential effects of PACT on virulence determinants of C. albicans cells were investigated by analysis of germ tube formation and in vivo pathogenicity assays. Systemic infection was induced in mice by the injection of fungal suspension in the lateral caudal vein. C. albicans exposed to sublethal photodynamic inactivation formed significantly less germ tube than untreated cells. In addition, mice infected with C. albicans submitted to sublethal PACT survived for a longer period of time than mice infected with untreated cells. The oxidative damage promoted by sublethal photodynamic inactivation inhibited virulence determinants and reduced in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans.

  10. Cellular responses of Candida albicans to phagocytosis and the extracellular activities of neutrophils are critical to counteract carbohydrate starvation, oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Miramón

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are key players during Candida albicans infection. However, the relative contributions of neutrophil activities to fungal clearance and the relative importance of the fungal responses that counteract these activities remain unclear. We studied the contributions of the intra- and extracellular antifungal activities of human neutrophils using diagnostic Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP-marked C. albicans strains. We found that a carbohydrate starvation response, as indicated by up-regulation of glyoxylate cycle genes, was only induced upon phagocytosis of the fungus. Similarly, the nitrosative stress response was only observed in internalised fungal cells. In contrast, the response to oxidative stress was observed in both phagocytosed and non-phagocytosed fungal cells, indicating that oxidative stress is imposed both intra- and extracellularly. We assessed the contributions of carbohydrate starvation, oxidative and nitrosative stress as antifungal activities by analysing the resistance to neutrophil killing of C. albicans mutants lacking key glyoxylate cycle, oxidative and nitrosative stress genes. We found that the glyoxylate cycle plays a crucial role in fungal resistance against neutrophils. The inability to respond to oxidative stress (in cells lacking superoxide dismutase 5 or glutathione reductase 2 renders C. albicans susceptible to neutrophil killing, due to the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. We also show that neutrophil-derived nitric oxide is crucial for the killing of C. albicans: a yhb1Δ/Δ mutant, unable to detoxify NO•, was more susceptible to neutrophils, and this phenotype was rescued by the nitric oxide scavenger carboxy-PTIO. The stress responses of C. albicans to neutrophils are partially regulated via the stress regulator Hog1 since a hog1Δ/Δ mutant was clearly less resistant to neutrophils and unable to respond properly to neutrophil-derived attack. Our data indicate that an appropriate fungal

  11. Differential effects of antifungal agents on expression of genes related to formation of Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzimoschou, Athanasios; Simitsopoulou, Maria; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Walsh, Thomas J; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse specific molecular mechanisms involved in the intrinsic resistance of C. albicans biofilms to antifungals. We investigated the transcriptional profile of three genes (BGL2, SUN41, ECE1) involved in Candida cell wall formation in response to voriconazole or anidulafungin after the production of intermediate and mature biofilms. C. albicans M61, a well-documented biofilm producer strain, was used for the development of intermediate (12 h and 18 h) and completely mature biofilms (48 h). After exposure of cells from each biofilm growth mode to voriconazole (128 and 512 mg l(-1)) or anidulafungin (0.25 and 1 mg l(-1)) for 12-24 h, total RNA samples extracted from biofilm cells were analysed by RT-PCR. The voriconazole and anidulafungin biofilm MIC was 512 and 0.5 mg l(-1) respectively. Anidulafungin caused significant up-regulation of SUN41 (3.7-9.3-fold) and BGL2 (2.2-2.8 fold) in intermediately mature biofilms; whereas, voriconazole increased gene expression in completely mature biofilms (SUN41 2.3-fold, BGL2 2.1-fold). Gene expression was primarily down-regulated by voriconazole in intermediately, but not completely mature biofilms. Both antifungals caused down-regulation of ECE1 in intermediately mature biofilms. PMID:26593284

  12. Hypoxic Adaptation by Efg1 Regulates Biofilm Formation by Candida albicans▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stichternoth, Catrin; Ernst, Joachim F.

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia is encountered frequently by Candida albicans during systemic infection of the human host. We tested if hypoxia allows biofilm formation by C. albicans, which is a major cause of perseverance and antifungal resistance in C. albicans infections. Using an in vitro biofilm system, we unexpectedly discovered that several positive regulators of biofilm formation during normoxia, including Tec1, Ace2, Czf1, Och1, and Als3, had little or no influence on biofilm development during hypoxia, ir...

  13. Candida albicans infection leads to barrier breakdown and a MAPK/NF-κB mediated stress response in the intestinal epithelial cell line C2BBe1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhringer, Michael; Pohlers, Susann; Schulze, Sylvie; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Piegsa, Judith; Weber, Michael; Martin, Ronny; Hünniger, Kerstin; Linde, Jörg; Guthke, Reinhard; Kurzai, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) form a tight barrier to the gut lumen. Paracellular permeability of the intestinal barrier is regulated by tight junction proteins and can be modulated by microorganisms and other stimuli. The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, a frequent commensal of the human mucosa, has the capacity of traversing this barrier and establishing systemic disease within the host. Infection of polarized C2BBe1 IEC with wild-type C. albicans led to a transient increase of transepithelial electric resistance (TEER) before subsequent barrier disruption, accompanied by a strong decline of junctional protein levels and substantial, but considerably delayed cytotoxicity. Time-resolved microarray-based transcriptome analysis of C. albicans challenged IEC revealed a prominent role of NF-κB and MAPK signalling pathways in the response to infection. Hence, we inferred a gene regulatory network based on differentially expressed NF-κB and MAPK pathway components and their predicted transcriptional targets. The network model predicted activation of GDF15 by NF-κB was experimentally validated. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activation in C. albicans infected C2BBe1 cells led to enhanced cytotoxicity in the epithelial cells. Taken together our study identifies NF-κB activation as an important protective signalling pathway in the response of epithelial cells to C. albicans. PMID:26752615

  14. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. PMID:26152186

  15. Induction of apoptosis in oral epithelial cells by Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar, C Cunha; Chukwuedum Aniemeke, J; Zhao, X-R; Huynh-Ba, G

    2012-12-01

    During infection, interactions between Candida albicans and oral epithelial cells result in oral epithelial cell death. This is clinically manifested by the development of oral mucosal ulcerations generally associated with discomfort. In vitro studies have shown that C. albicans induces early apoptotic alterations in oral epithelial cells; however, these studies have also shown that treatment of infected cells with caspase inhibitors does not prevent their death. The reasons for these contradictory results are unknown and it is still not clear if C. albicans stimulates oral epithelial signaling pathways that promote apoptotic cell death. Activation of specific death pathways in response to microbial organisms plays an essential role in modulating the pathogenesis of a variety of infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to (i) characterize C. albicans-induced apoptotic morphological alterations in oral epithelial cells, and (ii) investigate the activation of apoptotic signaling pathways and expression of apoptotic genes during infection. Candida albicans induced early apoptotic changes in over 50% of oral epithelial cells. However, only 15% of those showed mid-late apoptotic alterations. At the molecular level, C. albicans caused a loss of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and translocation of mitochondrial cytochrome c. Caspase-3/9 activities increased only during the first hours of infection. Moreover, poly[ADP ribose] polymerase 1 was cleaved into apoptotic and necrotic-like fragments. Finally, five anti-apoptotic genes were significantly upregulated and two pro-apoptotic genes were downregulated during infection. Altogether, these findings indicate that epithelial apoptotic pathways are activated in response to C. albicans, but fail to progress and promote apoptotic cell death. PMID:23134609

  16. Daya hambat xylitol dan nistation terhadap pertumbuhan Candida albicans (in vitro (Inhibition effect of xylitol and nistatin combination on Candida albicans growth (in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Kartimah Djajusman

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The growth of Candida albicans can be controlled by using antifungal such as nystatin. These days we found that using antifungal is not enough to control Candida albicans, we also have to control the intake of sugar by using xylitol. Purpose: Purpose of the study was to determine the optimal inhibitory concentration of xylitol-nystatin in the Candida albicans growth. Methods: This was an in-vitro study using an antimicrobial test of serial dilution with xylitol-nystatin and sucrose–nystatin consentration of 1%, 3%, 5%, 7%, 9%, and 10%.Growth inhibition of C. albicans was determined by the inhibition zone of xylitol + nystatin on C. albicans culture media (in vitro Results: The result of study was the inhibitory consentration of xylitol-nystatin to inhibit Candida albicans growth was 3%-10%. Conclusion: The study showed that combination of xylitol and nystation could inhibit the growth of Candida albicans.Latar belakang: Pertumbuhan Candida albicans dapat dikontrol dengan menggunakan antijamur seperti nistatin. Penggunakan antijamur saja tidak cukup untuk mengontrol Candida albicans, namun perlu pula mengontrol asupan gula dengan menggunakan xylitol. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan konsentrasi hambat optimal xylitol-nistatin dalam pertumbuhan Candida albicans. Metode: Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian in vitro menggunakan uji antimikroba pengenceran serial dengan xylitol-nistatin dan nystatin-sukrosa konsentrasi 1%, 3 %, 5 %, 7%, 9%, dan 10%. Daya hambat pertumbuhan C. albicans diukur dari zona hambat xylitol + nistatin pada media kultur C. albicans (in vitro Hasil: Konsentrasi penghambatan xylitol-nistatin untuk menghambat pertumbuhan Candida albicans adalah 3-10%. Simpulan: Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa kombinasi xylitol dan nystation bisa menghambat pertumbuhan Candida albicans.

  17. Candida albicans Quorum Sensing Molecules Stimulate Mouse Macrophage Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargarten, Jessica C; Moore, Tyler C; Petro, Thomas M; Nickerson, Kenneth W; Atkin, Audrey L

    2015-10-01

    The polymorphic commensal fungus Candida albicans causes life-threatening disease via bloodstream and intra-abdominal infections in immunocompromised and transplant patients. Although host immune evasion is a common strategy used by successful human fungal pathogens, C. albicans provokes recognition by host immune cells less capable of destroying it. To accomplish this, C. albicans white cells secrete a low-molecular-weight chemoattractive stimulant(s) of macrophages, a phagocyte that they are able to survive within and eventually escape from. C. albicans opaque cells do not secrete this chemoattractive stimulant(s). We report here a physiological mechanism that contributes to the differences in the interaction of C. albicans white and opaque cells with macrophages. E,E-Farnesol, which is secreted by white cells only, is a potent stimulator of macrophage chemokinesis, whose activity is enhanced by yeast cell wall components and aromatic alcohols. E,E-farnesol results in up to an 8.5-fold increase in macrophage migration in vitro and promotes a 3-fold increase in the peritoneal infiltration of macrophages in vivo. Therefore, modulation of farnesol secretion to stimulate host immune recognition by macrophages may help explain why this commensal is such a successful pathogen. PMID:26195556

  18. Candida albicans commensalism and pathogenicity are intertwined traits directed by a tightly knit transcriptional regulatory circuit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Christian Pérez

    Full Text Available Systemic, life-threatening infections in humans are often caused by bacterial or fungal species that normally inhabit a different locale in our body, particularly mucosal surfaces. A hallmark of these opportunistic pathogens, therefore, is their ability to thrive in disparate niches within the host. In this work, we investigate the transcriptional circuitry and gene repertoire that enable the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans to proliferate in two different niches. By screening a library of transcription regulator deletion strains in mouse models of intestinal colonization and systemic infection, we identified eight transcription regulators that play roles in at least one of these models. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation, we uncovered a network comprising ∼800 target genes and a tightly knit transcriptional regulatory circuit at its core. The network is enriched with genes upregulated in C. albicans cells growing in the host. Our findings indicate that many aspects of commensalism and pathogenicity are intertwined and that the ability of this microorganism to colonize multiple niches relies on a large, integrated circuit.

  19. A core filamentation response network in Candida albicans is restricted to eight genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronny Martin

    Full Text Available Although morphological plasticity is a central virulence trait of Candida albicans, the number of filament-associated genes and the interplay of mechanisms regulating their expression remain unknown. By correlation-based network modeling of the transcriptional response to different defined external stimuli for morphogenesis we identified a set of eight genes with highly correlated expression patterns, forming a core filamentation response. This group of genes included ALS3, ECE1, HGT2, HWP1, IHD1 and RBT1 which are known or supposed to encode for cell- wall associated proteins as well as the Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor encoding gene DCK1 and the unknown function open reading frame orf19.2457. The validity of network modeling was confirmed using a dataset of advanced complexity that describes the transcriptional response of C. albicans during epithelial invasion as well as comparing our results with other previously published transcriptome studies. Although the set of core filamentation response genes was quite small, several transcriptional regulators are involved in the control of their expression, depending on the environmental condition.

  20. Effect of Xylitol on Candida albicans resistance in serum (in vitro study)

    OpenAIRE

    Ria Puspitawati; Theodorus Hedwin Kadrianto; Bachtiar, Boy M.; Lakshmi A. Leepel

    2013-01-01

    Xylitol is reported to inhibit the growth of C. albicans. Objectives: Investigating serum factor role in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans and the effect of 1%, 5%, 10% xylitol on C. albicans resistance in serum in vitro. Methods: Identification of C. albicans (oral swab of candidiasis patient) was conducted using CHROMAgar, confirmed by germ tube test. The cultures were serially diluted, inoculated in Saburoud Dextrose Broth (SDB) contained 0% (control), 1%, 5%, or 10% xylitol, and kept f...

  1. Comparison of the Hydrophobic Properties of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, Kevin C.; Wu, Jean G.; Masuoka, James

    2001-01-01

    Although Candida dubliniensis is a close genetic relative of Candida albicans, it colonizes and infects fewer sites. Nearly all instances of candidiasis caused by C. dubliniensis are restricted to the oral cavity. As cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) influences virulence of C. albicans, CSH properties of C. dubliniensis were investigated and compared to C. albicans. Growth temperature is one factor which affects the CSH status of stationary-phase C. albicans. However, C. dubliniensis, similar...

  2. The role of faecal Candida albicans in the pathogenesis of food-intolerant irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Middleton, S J; Coley, A.; Hunter, J O

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans was sought in stool samples from 38 patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 20 healthy controls. In only three patients with irritable bowel syndrome was C. albicans discovered and these patients had either recently received antibiotics or the stool sample had been delayed more than 24 hours in transit. C. albicans was isolated from none of the control stool samples. We conclude that C. albicans is not involved in the aetiology of the irritable bowel syndrome.

  3. Traversal of Candida albicans across Human Blood-Brain Barrier In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jong, Ambrose Y.; Stins, Monique F.; Huang, Sheng-He; Chen, Steven H. M.; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2001-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic pathogen, which primarily affects neonates and immunocompromised individuals. The pathogen can invade the central nervous system, resulting in meningitis. At present, the pathogenesis of C. albicans meningitis is unclear. We used an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier to investigate the interaction(s) of C. albicans with human brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC). Binding of C. albicans to human BMEC was time and inoculum dependent. Inv...

  4. Candida albicans morphology and dendritic cell subsets determine T helper cell differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Kashem, Sakeen W.; Igyarto, Botond Z.; Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Kumamoto, Yosuke; Mohammed, Javed A.; Jarrett, Elizabeth; Drummond, Rebecca A.; Zurawski, Sandra M.; Zurawski, Gerard; Berman, Judith; Iwasaki, Akiko; Brown, Gordon D.; Kaplan, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus responsible for chronic mucocutaneous and systemic infections. Mucocutaneous immunity to C. albicans requires T helper-17 (Th17) cell differentiation that is thought to depend on recognition of filamentous C. albicans. Systemic immunity is considered T cell independent. Using a murine skin infection model, we compared T helper cell responses to yeast and filamentous C. albicans, We found that only yeast induced Th17 cell responses through a mechanism tha...

  5. Antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine on intratubular Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques Rezende Delgado, Ronan; Helena Gasparoto, Thaís; Renata Sipert, Carla; Ramos Pinheiro, Claudia; Gomes de Moraes, Ivaldo; Brandão Garcia, Roberto; Antônio Hungaro Duarte, Marco; Monteiro Bramante, Clóvis; Aparecido Torres, Sérgio; Pompermaier Garlet, Gustavo; Paula Campanelli, Ana; Bernardineli, Norberti

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine gel for the elimination of intratubular Candida albicans (C. albicans). Human single-rooted teeth contaminated with C. albicans were treated with calcium hydroxide, 2% chlorhexidine gel, calcium hydroxide plus 2% chlorhexidine gel, or saline (0.9% sodium chloride) as a positive control. The samples obtained at depths of 0–100 and 100–200 µm from the root canal system were analyzed for C. albicans load by counting the ...

  6. Prediction of antigenic sites on ALS1 and HWP1 protein sequences in vaginal isolated C. albicans of using bioinformatics analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Pakdel

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The ability to predict antigenic sites on proteins is of major importance for medication. The aim of this study was to predict the antigenic sites on Agglutin in Like Sequence (ALS1 and Hyphal Wall Protein Sequences (HWP1 in Candida albicans isolated of vaginal infections using Physico-Chemical Profiles server. Materials and Methods: 7 isolates were obtained from women with vaginal infection which were collected from various medical centers of Tehran in 2011 and 2012. At the first,DNA was extracted  by Phenol-Chloroform method. Multiplex PCR was performed by using specific primers. In order to do bioinformatic studies, the genes were sequenced and then translated. Antigenic sites of protein sequences were identified by Physico-Chemical Profiles program. Results: The results showed that the presence of two genes als1 and hwp1 in isolates. In ALS1 and HWP1, respectively 2 and 1 antigenic site with the most antigenicity were identified. Conclusions: According to previous studies, Serine and Threonine phosphorylation is an important mechanism in pathogenesis of ALS1 and HWP1 proteins. Results in this study showed that serine and threonine are the most amino acids in the antigenic sites with high antigenicity property.

  7. The expression of genes involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis biofilms exposed to fluconazole.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2009-03-01

    The expression of the ERG1, ERG3, ERG7, ERG9, ERG11 and ERG25 genes in response to incubation with fluconazole and biofilm formation was investigated using reverse-transcription PCR and real-time PCR in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates. The viability of biofilm was measured using an 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Expression of the ERG11 gene was found to be low or moderate and it was regulated by fluconazole addition more so than by biofilm formation. Very low or non-detectable expression of ERG1, ERG7 and ERG25 genes was detected in C. albicans. The expression of the ERG9 increased in the presence of fluconazole in some isolates. Following incubation with fluconazole, formation of biofilm by C. dubliniensis was coupled with up-regulation of the ERG3 and ERG25 genes as have been observed previously in C. albicans. Planktonic cells of both Candida species released from biofilm displayed similar resistance mechanisms to fluconazole like attached cells. The XTT reduction assay and CSLM revealed that although incubation with fluconazole decreased the biofilm thickness, these were still comprised metabolically active cells able to disseminate and produce biofilm. Our data indicate that biofilm represents a highly adapted community reflecting the individuality of clinical isolates.

  8. The expression of genes involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis biofilms exposed to fluconazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borecká-Melkusová, Silvia; Moran, Gary P; Sullivan, Derek J; Kucharíková, Sona; Chorvát, Dusan; Bujdáková, Helena

    2009-03-01

    The expression of the ERG1, ERG3, ERG7, ERG9, ERG11 and ERG25 genes in response to incubation with fluconazole and biofilm formation was investigated using reverse-transcription PCR and real-time PCR in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis clinical isolates. The viability of biofilm was measured using an 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide (XTT) reduction assay and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). Expression of the ERG11 gene was found to be low or moderate and it was regulated by fluconazole addition more so than by biofilm formation. Very low or non-detectable expression of ERG1, ERG7 and ERG25 genes was detected in C. albicans. The expression of the ERG9 increased in the presence of fluconazole in some isolates. Following incubation with fluconazole, formation of biofilm by C. dubliniensis was coupled with up-regulation of the ERG3 and ERG25 genes as have been observed previously in C. albicans. Planktonic cells of both Candida species released from biofilm displayed similar resistance mechanisms to fluconazole like attached cells. The XTT reduction assay and CSLM revealed that although incubation with fluconazole decreased the biofilm thickness, these were still comprised metabolically active cells able to disseminate and produce biofilm. Our data indicate that biofilm represents a highly adapted community reflecting the individuality of clinical isolates. PMID:18627475

  9. Multi-species biofilm of Candida albicans and non-Candida albicans Candida species on acrylic substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apurva K Pathak

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In polymicrobial biofilms bacteria extensively interact with Candida species, but the interaction among the different species of the Candida is yet to be completely evaluated. In the present study, the difference in biofilm formation ability of clinical isolates of four species of Candida in both single-species and multi-species combinations on the surface of dental acrylic resin strips was evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The species of Candida, isolated from multiple species oral candidiasis of the neutropenic patients, were used for the experiment. Organisms were cultured on Sabouraud dextrose broth with 8% glucose (SDB. Biofilm production on the acrylic resins strips was determined by crystal violet assay. Student's t-test and ANOVA were used to compare in vitro biofilm formation for the individual species of Candida and its different multi-species combinations. RESULTS: In the present study, differences between the mean values of the biofilm-forming ability of individual species (C. glabrata>C. krusei>C. tropicalis>C. albicans and in its multi-species' combinations (the highest for C. albicans with C. glabrata and the lowest for all the four species combination were reported. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study showed that biofilm-forming ability was found greater for non-Candida albicans Candida species (NCAC than for C. albicans species with intra-species variation. Presence of C. albicans in multi-species biofilms increased, whereas; C. tropicalis decreased the biofilm production with all other NCAC species.

  10. Oral candidiasis-adhesion of non-albicans Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bokor-Bratić Marija B.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infection caused primarily by Candida albicans. However, in recent years, species of non-albicans Candida have been implicated more frequently in mucosal infection. Candida species usually reside as commensal organisms and are part of normal oral microflora. Determining exactly how transformation from commensal to pathogen takes place and how it can be prevented is continuous challenge for clinical doctors. Candidal adherence to mucosal surfaces is considered as a critical initial step in the pathogenesis of oral candidiasis. Acrylic dentures, acting as reservoirs, play an important role in increasing the risk from Candida colonisation. Thus, this review discusses what is currently known about the adhesion of non-albicans Candida species of oral origin to buccal epithelial cells and denture acrylics.

  11. The interplay between NSAIDs and Candida albicans on the gastrointestinal tract of guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadăş, George C; Taulescu, Marian A; Ciobanu, Lidia; Fiţ, Nicodim I; Flore, Chirilă; Răpuntean, Sorin; Bouari, Cosmina M; Catoi, Cornel

    2013-04-01

    Recent studies suggest that Candida albicans colonization is associated with several gastrointestinal inflammatory disorders and is also responsible for the delay in ulcer healing. No data are reported about the effects of C. albicans on the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)-induced necroinflammatory lesions. On the other hand, beneficial effects of NSAIDs regarding the colonization potential with C. albicans have been reported. Our aim was to investigate whether the association between NSAIDs and C. albicans could potentially induce necroinflammatory lesions in the guinea pigs gastric and enteral mucosa. Three interventional groups of 11 guinea pigs each were investigated after 5 days of receiving indomethacin, C. albicans or the association of both. C. albicans and necroinflammatory lesions were graded based on histological examinations. Statistical analysis used Mann-Whitney nonparametric test. NSAIDs did not significantly decrease C. albicans colonization grades on gastrointestinal mucosa. Administration of indomethacin subsequent to C. albicans determined significantly more severe necroinflammatory lesions compared to group that only received C. albicans. The association of NSAIDs and C. albicans did not cause significantly more severe degenerative or inflammatory lesions compared to the administration of only NSAIDs in this experimental model. Associations between NSAIDs and C. albicans caused significantly more severe necroinflammatory injuries than the lesions produced by C. albicans, without enhancing the mucosal injury or inflammation caused by NSAIDs. PMID:23334509

  12. Purification of actin from Candida albicans and comparison with the Candida 48,000-Mr protein.

    OpenAIRE

    Fiss, E.; Buckley, H R

    1987-01-01

    Actin was purified from Candida albicans cells by affinity chromatography by DNase-Sepharose and was recognized by immunoblotting with monoclonal antibody directed against chick muscle actin. The C. albicans 48-kilodalton protein recognized by sera from patients with invasive candidiasis was shown by DEAE chromatography and immunoblotting not to be identical with the purified C. albicans actin.

  13. In vitro evaluation of antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleem, Dalia; Chen, Emily; Benso, Bruna; Pardi, Vanessa; Murata, Ramiro M

    2016-01-01

    Monolaurin (also known as glycerol monolaurate) is a natural compound found in coconut oil and is known for its protective biological activities as an antimicrobial agent. The nature of oral candidiasis and the increased antifungal resistance demand the search for novel antifungal therapeutic agents. In this study, we examine the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms (strain ATCC:SC5314/MYA2876) in vitro and investigate whether monolaurin can alter gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β. In a co-culture model, oral fibroblast cells were cultured simultaneously with C. albicans for 24 hrs followed by the exposure to treatments of monolaurin (3.9-2,500 µM), positive control fluconazole (32.2 µM), and vehicle control group (1% ethanol), which was a model used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of monolaurin on fibroblasts as well as to analyze morphological characteristics of biofilms through fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the co-culture model was used for RNA extraction of oral fibroblasts to assess gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed the MIC and MFC of monolaurin were in the range 62.5-125 µM and 125-250 µM, respectively. Biofilm antifungal assay showed significant reduction in Log (CFU/ml) of biofilms treated with 1,250 and 2,500 µM of 1-monolaurin when compared to the control groups . There was also a significant down-regulation of IL-1α and IL-1β in the co-culture treated with monolaurin. It can be concluded that monolaurin has a potential antifungal activity against C. albicans and can modulate the pro-inflammatory response of the host. PMID:27366648

  14. In vitro evaluation of antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benso, Bruna; Pardi, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Monolaurin (also known as glycerol monolaurate) is a natural compound found in coconut oil and is known for its protective biological activities as an antimicrobial agent. The nature of oral candidiasis and the increased antifungal resistance demand the search for novel antifungal therapeutic agents. In this study, we examine the antifungal activity of monolaurin against Candida albicans biofilms (strain ATCC:SC5314/MYA2876) in vitro and investigate whether monolaurin can alter gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, IL-1α and IL-1β. In a co-culture model, oral fibroblast cells were cultured simultaneously with C. albicans for 24 hrs followed by the exposure to treatments of monolaurin (3.9–2,500 µM), positive control fluconazole (32.2 µM), and vehicle control group (1% ethanol), which was a model used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of monolaurin on fibroblasts as well as to analyze morphological characteristics of biofilms through fluorescence microscopy. In addition, the co-culture model was used for RNA extraction of oral fibroblasts to assess gene expression of host inflammatory cytokines, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results showed the MIC and MFC of monolaurin were in the range 62.5–125 µM and 125–250 µM, respectively. Biofilm antifungal assay showed significant reduction in Log (CFU/ml) of biofilms treated with 1,250 and 2,500 µM of 1-monolaurin when compared to the control groups . There was also a significant down-regulation of IL-1α and IL-1β in the co-culture treated with monolaurin. It can be concluded that monolaurin has a potential antifungal activity against C. albicans and can modulate the pro-inflammatory response of the host. PMID:27366648

  15. Synergistic Interactions of Eugenol-tosylate and Its Congeners with Fluconazole against Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Aijaz; Wani, Mohmmad Younus; Khan, Amber; Manzoor, Nikhat; Molepo, Julitha

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the antifungal properties of a monoterpene phenol "Eugenol" against different Candida strains and have observed that the addition of methyl group to eugenol drastically increased its antimicrobial potency. Based on the results and the importance of medicinal synthetic chemistry, we synthesized eugenol-tosylate and its congeners (E1-E6) and tested their antifungal activity against different clinical fluconazole (FLC)- susceptible and FLC- resistant C. albicans isolates alone and in combination with FLC by determining fractional inhibitory concentration indices (FICIs) and isobolograms calculated from microdilution assays. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) results confirmed that all the tested C. albicans strains were variably susceptible to the semi-synthetic derivatives E1-E6, with MIC values ranging from 1-62 μg/ml. The test compounds in combination with FLC exhibited either synergy (36%), additive (41%) or indifferent (23%) interactions, however, no antagonistic interactions were observed. The MICs of FLC decreased 2-9 fold when used in combination with the test compounds. Like their precursor eugenol, all the derivatives showed significant impairment of ergosterol biosynthesis in all C. albicans strains coupled with down regulation of the important ergosterol biosynthesis pathway gene-ERG11. The results were further validated by docking studies, which revealed that the inhibitors snugly fitting the active site of the target enzyme, mimicking fluconazole, may well explain their excellent inhibitory activity. Our results suggest that these compounds have a great potential as antifungals, which can be used as chemosensitizing agents with the known antifungal drugs. PMID:26694966

  16. Streptococcus gordonii glucosyltransferase promotes biofilm interactions with Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Ricker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida albicans co-aggregates with Streptococcus gordonii to form biofilms and their interactions in mucosal biofilms may lead to pathogenic synergy. Although the functions of glucosyltransferases (Gtf of Mutans streptococci have been well characterized, the biological roles of these enzymes in commensal oral streptococci, such as S. gordonii, in oral biofilm communities are less clear. Objective: The objective of this work was to explore the role of GtfG, the single Gtf enzyme of S. gordonii, in biofilm interactions with C. albicans. Design: Biofilms were grown under salivary flow in flow cells in vitro, or under static conditions in 96 well plates. A panel of isogenic S. gordonii CH1 gtfG mutants and complemented strains were co-inoculated with C. albicans strain SC5314 to form mixed biofilms. Biofilm accretion and binding interactions between the two organisms were tested. Biofilms were quantified using confocal microscopy or the crystal violet assay. Results: The presence of GtfG enhanced dual biofilm accretion, and sucrose supplementation further augmented dual biofilm formation, pointing to a role of newly synthesized glucans. GtfG also promoted binding to C. albicans preformed biofilms. Soluble α-1,6-glucans played a role in these interactions since: 1 a strain producing only soluble glucans (CH107 formed robust dual biofilms under conditions of salivary flow; and 2 the dual biofilm was susceptible to enzymatic breakdown by dextranase which specifically degrades soluble α-1,6-glucans. Conclusion: Our work identified a novel molecular mechanism for C. albicans and S. gordonii biofilm interactions, mediated by GtfG. This protein promotes early biofilm binding of S. gordonii to C. albicans which leads to increased accretion of streptococcal cells in mixed biofilms. We also showed that soluble glucans, with α-1,6-linkages, promoted inter-generic adhesive interactions.

  17. Coaggregation of Streptococcus sanguis and other streptococci with Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, H F; Lala, H C; Shepherd, M G

    1990-01-01

    Thirteen strains of viridans group streptococci and two strains of other streptococci were tested for coaggregation with Candida albicans. Streptococcus sanguis strains generally exhibited low levels of adherence to 28 degrees C-grown exponential-phase yeast cells, but starvation of yeast cells for glucose at 37 degrees C (or at 28 degrees C) increased their coaggregating activity with these streptococci by at least tenfold. This was a property common to four C. albicans strains tested, two of which were able to form mycelia (6406 and MEN) and two of which were not (MM2002 and CA2). The expression of the coaggregation adhesin during yeast cell starvation was inhibited by addition of trichodermin or amphotericin B. The strains of S. sanguis, Streptococcus gordonii, and Streptococcus oralis tested for coaggregating activity encompassed a diverse range of physiological and morphological types, yet all exhibited saturable coaggregation with starved C. albicans cells. There was no correlation of cell surface hydrophobicity, of either yeast or streptococcal cells, with their abilities to coaggregate. Strains of Streptococcus anginosus also coaggregated with starved yeast cells; Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus pyogenes coaggregated to a lesser degree with C. albicans, and the coaggregation with S. pyogenes was not promoted by yeast cell starvation; Streptococcus mutans and Enterococcus faecalis did not coaggregate with yeast. The coaggregation reactions of S. sanguis and S. gordonii with C. albicans were inhibited by EDTA and by heat or protease treatment of the yeast cells and were not reversible by the addition of lactose or other simple sugars. These observations extend the range of intergeneric coaggregations that are known to occur between oral microbes and suggest that coaggregations of C. albicans with viridans group streptococci may be important for colonization of oral surfaces by the yeast. PMID:2182544

  18. Doxorubicin induces drug efflux pumps in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofla, Grzegorz; Turner, Vincent; Schulz, Bettina; Storch, Ulrike; Froelich, Daniela; Rognon, Bénédicte; Coste, Alix T; Sanglard, Dominique; Ruhnke, Markus

    2011-02-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most important opportunistic fungal pathogens. It can cause serious fungal diseases in immunocompromised patients, including those with cancer. Treatment failures due to the emergence of drug-resistant C. albicans strains have become a serious clinical problem. Resistance incidents were often mediated by fungal efflux pumps which are closely related to the human ABC transporter P-glycoprotein (P-gp). P-gp is often overexpressed in cancer cells and confers resistance to many cytotoxic drugs. We examined whether cytotoxic drugs commonly used for cancer treatment (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) could alter the expression of genes responsible for the development of fluconazole resistance in Candida cells in the way they can influence homologous genes in cancer cell lines. ABC transporters (CDR1 and CDR2) and other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11) were tested by real-time PCR for their expression in C. albicans cells at the mRNA level after induction by antineoplastic drugs. The results were confirmed by a lacZ gene reporter system and verified at the protein level using GFP and immunoblotting. We showed that doxorubicin is a potent inducer of CDR1/CDR2 expression in C. albicans at both the mRNA and protein level and thus causes an increase in fluconazole MIC values. However, cyclophosphamide, which is not a substrate of human P-gp, did not induce ABC transporter expression in C. albicans. Neither doxorubicin nor cyclophosphamide could influence the expression of the other resistance genes (MDR1 and ERG11). The induction of CDR1/CDR2 by doxorubicin in C. albicans and the resulting alteration of antifungal susceptibility might be of clinical relevance for the antifungal treatment of Candida infections occurring after anticancer chemotherapy with doxorubicin. PMID:20818920

  19. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans is mediated by Cdr1-p extrusion and depletion of intracellular glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingsong; Krom, Bastiaan P; Sanglard, Dominique; Intapa, Chaidan; Dawson, Clinton C; Peters, Brian M; Shirtliff, Mark E; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    Farnesol is a key derivative in the sterol biosynthesis pathway in eukaryotic cells previously identified as a quorum sensing molecule in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Recently, we demonstrated that above threshold concentrations, farnesol is capable of triggering apoptosis in C. albicans. However, the exact mechanism of farnesol cytotoxicity is not fully elucidated. Lipophilic compounds such as farnesol are known to conjugate with glutathione, an antioxidant crucial for cellular detoxification against damaging compounds. Glutathione conjugates act as substrates for ATP-dependent ABC transporters and are extruded from the cell. To that end, this current study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that farnesol conjugation with intracellular glutathione coupled with Cdr1p-mediated extrusion of glutathione conjugates, results in total glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and ultimately fungal cell death. The combined findings demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels concomitant with up-regulation of CDR1 and decreased cell viability. However, addition of exogenous reduced glutathione maintained intracellular glutathione levels and enhanced viability. In contrast, farnesol toxicity was decreased in a mutant lacking CDR1, whereas it was increased in a CDR1-overexpressing strain. Further, gene expression studies demonstrated significant up-regulation of the SOD genes, primary enzymes responsible for defense against oxidative stress, with no changes in expression in CDR1. This is the first study describing the involvement of Cdr1p-mediated glutathione efflux as a mechanism preceding the farnesol-induced apoptotic process in C. albicans. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying farnesol-cytotoxicity in C. albicans may lead to the development of this redox-cycling agent as an alternative antifungal agent. PMID:22205973

  20. Farnesol-induced apoptosis in Candida albicans is mediated by Cdr1-p extrusion and depletion of intracellular glutathione.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsong Zhu

    Full Text Available Farnesol is a key derivative in the sterol biosynthesis pathway in eukaryotic cells previously identified as a quorum sensing molecule in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. Recently, we demonstrated that above threshold concentrations, farnesol is capable of triggering apoptosis in C. albicans. However, the exact mechanism of farnesol cytotoxicity is not fully elucidated. Lipophilic compounds such as farnesol are known to conjugate with glutathione, an antioxidant crucial for cellular detoxification against damaging compounds. Glutathione conjugates act as substrates for ATP-dependent ABC transporters and are extruded from the cell. To that end, this current study was undertaken to validate the hypothesis that farnesol conjugation with intracellular glutathione coupled with Cdr1p-mediated extrusion of glutathione conjugates, results in total glutathione depletion, oxidative stress and ultimately fungal cell death. The combined findings demonstrated a significant decrease in intracellular glutathione levels concomitant with up-regulation of CDR1 and decreased cell viability. However, addition of exogenous reduced glutathione maintained intracellular glutathione levels and enhanced viability. In contrast, farnesol toxicity was decreased in a mutant lacking CDR1, whereas it was increased in a CDR1-overexpressing strain. Further, gene expression studies demonstrated significant up-regulation of the SOD genes, primary enzymes responsible for defense against oxidative stress, with no changes in expression in CDR1. This is the first study describing the involvement of Cdr1p-mediated glutathione efflux as a mechanism preceding the farnesol-induced apoptotic process in C. albicans. Understanding of the mechanisms underlying farnesol-cytotoxicity in C. albicans may lead to the development of this redox-cycling agent as an alternative antifungal agent.

  1. The exocyst in Candida albicans polarized secretion and filamentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A; Bernardo, Stella M; Lee, Samuel A

    2016-05-01

    The exocyst is an octameric complex that orchestrates the docking and tethering of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis and is fundamental for key biological processes including growth and establishment of cell polarity. Although components of the exocyst are well conserved among fungi, the specific functions of each component of the exocyst complex unique to Candida albicans biology and pathogenesis are not fully understood. This commentary describes recent findings regarding the role of exocyst subunits Sec6 and Sec15 in C. albicans filamentation and virulence. PMID:26762634

  2. A radiolabel release microassay for phagocytic killing of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chromium-51 release technique for quantifying intracellular killing of radiolabelled Candida albicans particles was exploited in a microassay in which murine and human phagocytes acted as effectors under peculiarly simple conditions. At appropriate effector: target ratios and with a 4 h incubation, up to 50% specific chromium release could be detected in the supernatant with no need for opsonization or lysis of phagocytes. This simple microassay permits easy-to-perform, simultaneous testing of a variety of different phagocytes even if only available in limited amounts, and provides an objective measurement of intracellular killing of Candida albicans. (Auth.)

  3. Modulation of Candida albicans Biofilm by Different Carbon Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, the role of carbon sources (glucose, lactate, sucrose, and arabinose) on Candida albicans biofilm development and virulence factors was studied on polystyrene microtiter plates. Besides this, structural changes in cell wall component β-glucan in presence of different carbon sources have also been highlighted. Biofilm formation was analyzed by XTT (2,3-bis[2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide) reduction assay. Glucose-grown cells exhibited the highest metabolic activity during adhesion among all carbon sources tested (p albicans biofilm development and modulate virulence factors and structural organization of cell wall component β-glucan. PMID:26899861

  4. Histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 is required for Candida albicans pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes da Rosa, Jessica; Boyartchuk, Victor L.; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Kaufman, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen that is the most prevalent cause of hospital-acquired fungal infections. In mammalian hosts, C. albicans is engulfed by phagocytes that attack the pathogen with DNA-damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) by the fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 is important for yeast model organisms to survive DNA damage and maintain genome integrity. To assess the importance of Rtt109 for C. al...

  5. Development of a High-Throughput Candida albicans Biofilm Chip

    OpenAIRE

    Srinivasan, Anand; Uppuluri, Priya; Lopez-Ribot, Jose; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed “nano-biofilms”. The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of bi...

  6. The role of phenotypic switching in the basic biology and pathogenesis of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Soll

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The “white-opaque” transition in Candida albicans was discovered in 1987. For the next fifteen years, a significant body of knowledge accumulated that included differences between the cell types in gene expression, cellular architecture and virulence in cutaneous and systemic mouse models. However, it was not until 2002 that we began to understand the role of switching in the life history of this pathogen, the role of the mating type locus and the molecular pathways that regulated it. Then in 2006, both the master switch locus WORI and the pheromone-induced white cell biofilm were discovered. Since that year, a number of new observations on the regulation and biology of switching have been made that have significantly increased the perceived complexity of this fascinating phenotypic transition.

  7. Daya hambat xylitol dan nistation terhadap pertumbuhan Candida albicans (in vitro) (Inhibition effect of xylitol and nistatin combination on Candida albicans growth (in vitro))

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Kartimah Djajusman; Udijanto Tedjosasongko; Irmawati Irmawati

    2014-01-01

    Background: The growth of Candida albicans can be controlled by using antifungal such as nystatin. These days we found that using antifungal is not enough to control Candida albicans, we also have to control the intake of sugar by using xylitol. Purpose: Purpose of the study was to determine the optimal inhibitory concentration of xylitol-nystatin in the Candida albicans growth. Methods: This was an in-vitro study using an antimicrobial test of serial dilution with xylitol-nystatin and sucros...

  8. Genome-wide expression profiling of the response to terbinafine in Candida albicans using a cDNA microarray analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yue-bin; QIAN Yuan-shu; MA Lian; GU Hong-ni

    2007-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is the most frequently seen opportunistic human fungal pathogen. Terbinafine is an allylamine antifungal agent that has been proven to have high clinical efficacy in the therapy of fungal infections, the mechanism of action of terbinafine involves the specific inhibition of fungal squalene epoxidase, resulting in ergosterol deficiency and accumulation of intracellular squalene. We used cDNA microarray analysis technology to monitor global expression profile changes of Candida albicans genes in response to terbinafine treatment, and we anticipated a panoramic view of the responses of Candida albicans cells to the representatives of allylamine antifungal agents at the molecular level in an effort to identify drug class-specific and mechanism-independent changes in gene expression.Methods Candida albicans strain ATCC 90028 was exposed to either medium alone or terbinafine at a concentration equivalent to the 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs, 4 mg/L) for 90 minutes. RNA was isolated and gene expression profiles were compared to identify the changes in the gene expression profile using a cDNA microarray analysis. Differential expression of 10 select genes detected by cDNA microarray analysis was confirmed by semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results A total of 222 genes were found to be responsive to terbinafine, including 121 up-regulated genes and 101 down-regulated genes. These included genes encoding membrane transport proteins belonging to the members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) or major facilitator superfamily (MFS; CDR1, AGP2, GAP6, PHO84, HOL3, FCY23, VCX1),genes involved in stress response and detoxification (CDR1, AGP2, HOL3), and gene involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway (ERG12). The results of semi-quantitative RT-PCR were consistent with that of the cDNA microarray analysis.Conclusions The up-regulation of the gene encoding the multidrug resistance efflux pump

  9. Establishment and evaluation of invasive Candida albicans infection model in mice%侵袭性白念珠菌小鼠感染模型的建立与评估

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜发娅; 阎澜; 姜远英; 徐贵丽

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish an invasive Candida albicans infection model in mice. Methods The virulence of Candida albicans in vitro was evaluated by means of mycelial growth experiment,while that in vivo was evaluated through the mouse infection model;an aliquot of culture containing Candida albicans with 5 × 105 CFU was injected into each mouse through the tail vein and the survival time of the infected mice was observed. 100% death of the mice within 7 days of infection was used as the successful establishment of the infection model;fluconazole was applied to the infected mice and the effect on the infection of Candida albicans was evaluated as well. Results Candida albicans had the same virulence in vitro and in vivo;strains were well inducted in the 4 hyphal induction media;the survival rate of the infected mice was very low;fluconazole was more effective on Candida albicans sensitive to it than on those resistant to it( P ﹤ 0. 05). Conclusions Invasive Candida albicans infection model in mice is applicable for drug screening of anti-Candida albicans activity in vivo.%目的:建立侵袭性白念珠菌小鼠感染模型。方法体外通过菌丝生长实验评价白念珠菌的毒力大小,通过尾静脉注射白念珠菌菌悬液感染小鼠后,观察小鼠生存时间,评价白念珠菌体内毒力大小;以感染后7 d 内小鼠100%死亡为标准,建立了侵袭性白念珠菌小鼠感染模型,对感染小鼠进行氟康唑治疗效果评价。结果白念珠菌体外毒力与体内毒力一致,4种培养基中菌丝均生长良好的菌株,体内感染小鼠后,小鼠生存率也最低;感染模型中,氟康唑对敏感白念珠菌的治疗效果强于对氟康唑耐药白念珠菌(P ﹤0.05)。结论建立的侵袭性白念珠菌感染模型可用于药物体内抗白念珠菌活性的筛选。

  10. Recent advances in genes involved in secondary metabolite synthesis, hyphal development, energy metabolism and pathogenicity in Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zongyi; Zhu, Wei; Su, Hao; Zhao, Yong; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2014-01-01

    The ascomycete fungus, Fusarium graminearum (teleomorph Gibberella zeae), is the most common causal agent of Fusarium head blight (FHB), a devastating disease for cereal crops worldwide. F. graminearum produces ascospores (sexual spores) and conidia (asexual spores), which can serve as disease inocula of FHB. Meanwhile, Fusarium-infected grains are often contaminated with mycotoxins such as trichothecenes (TRIs), fumonisins, and zearalenones, among which TRIs are related to the pathogenicity of F. graminearum, and these toxins are hazardous to humans and livestock. In recent years, with the complete genome sequencing of F. graminearum, an increasing number of functional genes involved in the production of secondary metabolites, hyphal differentiation, sexual and asexual reproduction, virulence and pathogenicity have been identified from F. graminearum. In this review, the secondary metabolite synthesis, hyphal development and pathogenicity related genes in F. graminearum were thoroughly summarized, and the genes associated with secondary metabolites, sexual reproduction, energy metabolism, and pathogenicity were highlighted. PMID:24389085

  11. Intra-amniotic Candida albicans infection induces mucosal injury and inflammation in the ovine fetal intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikiforou, Maria; Jacobs, Esmee M R; Kemp, Matthew W; Hornef, Mathias W; Payne, Matthew S; Saito, Masatoshi; Newnham, John P; Janssen, Leon E W; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Kramer, Boris W; Wolfs, Tim G A M

    2016-01-01

    Chorioamnionitis is caused by intrauterine infection with microorganisms including Candida albicans (C.albicans). Chorioamnionitis is associated with postnatal intestinal pathologies including necrotizing enterocolitis. The underlying mechanisms by which intra-amniotic C.albicans infection adversely affects the fetal gut remain unknown. Therefore, we assessed whether intra-amniotic C.albicans infection would cause intestinal inflammation and mucosal injury in an ovine model. Additionally, we tested whether treatment with the fungistatic fluconazole ameliorated the adverse intestinal outcome of intra-amniotic C.albicans infection. Pregnant sheep received intra-amniotic injections with 10(7) colony-forming units C.albicans or saline at 3 or 5 days before preterm delivery at 122 days of gestation. Fetuses were given intra-amniotic and intra-peritoneal fluconazole treatments 2 days after intra-amniotic administration of C.albicans. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal colonization and invasive growth within the fetal gut with mucosal injury and intestinal inflammation, characterized by increased CD3(+) lymphocytes, MPO(+) cells and elevated TNF-α and IL-17 mRNA levels. Fluconazole treatment in utero decreased intestinal C.albicans colonization, mucosal injury but failed to attenuate intestinal inflammation. Intra-amniotic C.albicans caused intestinal infection, injury and inflammation. Fluconazole treatment decreased mucosal injury but failed to ameliorate C.albicans-mediated mucosal inflammation emphasizing the need to optimize the applied antifungal therapeutic strategy. PMID:27411776

  12. Diorcinol D Exerts Fungicidal Action against Candida albicans through Cytoplasm Membrane Destruction and ROS Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chang, Wenqiang; Zhang, Ming; Li, Xiaobin; Jiao, Yang; Lou, Hongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans, which is the most common human fungal pathogen, causes high mortality among immunocompromised patients. Antifungal drug resistance becomes a major challenge for the management of Candida infection. Diorcinol D (DD), a diphenyl ether derivative isolated from an endolichenic fungus, exerted fungicidal action against Candida species. In this study, we investigated the possible mechanism of its antifungal activity. The change of membrane dynamics and permeability suggested that the cell membrane was disrupted by the treatment of DD. This was further supported by the evidences of intracellular glycerol accumulation, alteration of cell ultrastructure, and down-regulation of genes involved in cell membrane synthesis. In addition, the treatment of C. albicans with DD resulted in the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which caused the dysfunction of mitochondria. These altogether suggested that DD exerted its antifungal activity through cytoplasmic membrane destruction and ROS accumulation. This finding is helpful to uncover the underlying mechanisms for the diphenyl ether derivatives and provides a potential application in fighting clinical fungal infections. PMID:26047493

  13. Cap1p attenuates the apoptosis of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bao-Di; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Lan-Xue; Li, De-Dong; Li, Ming-Bang; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2013-06-01

    Candida albicans is the most common opportunistic fungal pathogen and its apoptosis is inducible by environmental stress. Based on our previous finding that transcription factor Cap1p was involved in baicalein-induced apoptosis, the present study aimed to further clarify the role of Cap1p in apoptosis by observing the impact of CAP1 deletion on cell fate. It was found that apoptotic stimulation with amphotericin B, acetic acid and hydrogen peroxide increased the number of apoptotic and necrotic cells, caspase activity and the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas it decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential and intracellular ATP level in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. The cell fate was, at least partly, caused by glutathione depletion and attenuation of the expression of the glutathione reductase gene in the cap1Δ/Δ mutant. Collectively, our data suggest that Cap1p participated in the apoptosis of C. albicans by regulating the expression of the glutathione reductase gene and glutathione content. PMID:23517286

  14. DAYA HAMBAT EKSTRAK BUAH MENGKUDU TERHADAP PERTUMBUHAN CANDIDA ALBICANS

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad, Ilyas

    2008-01-01

    Mengkudu mengandung saponin, flavonoid, minyak atsiri dan alkaloid yang dinyatakan sebagai antibakteri dan antijamur. Penelitian ini merupakan Eksperimen Laboratories dengan rancangan Time Series Design menggunakan isolat ???Candida Albicans??? yang telah diremajakan, adapun tempat pelaksanaannya pada Laboratorium Mikrobiologi Fakultas Kedokteran Unhas. Tujuan penelitian ini yaitu untuk mengetahui konsentrasi hambat minimal dan daya hambat sari buah mengkudu berdasakan konsentarsi terhadap...

  15. Candida albicans in oral biofilms could prevent caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, Hubertine Marjoleine; Kos, Kevin; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann; Krom, Bastiaan P

    2016-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is a Gram-positive bacterium involved in development to caries, the most common infectious disease of our time. Streptococcus mutans interacts with other microbes, like the fungus Candida albicans and both are commonly isolated from patients with caries. Since the role of C. albicans in caries remains unknown, our aim was to unravel this using an in vitro dual-species cariogenic oral biofilm model. Biofilms were grown for 24-72 h on glass cover slips or hydroxyapatite (HA) disks to mimic the surface of teeth. Medium pH, lactic acid production capacity and calcium release from HA disks were determined. All 24-h biofilms had external pH values below the critical pH of 5.5 where enamel dissolves. In contrast, 72-h dual-species biofilms had significantly higher pH (above the critical pH) and consequently decreased calcium release compared to single-species S. mutans biofilms. Counter intuitively, lactic acid production and growth of S. mutans were increased in 72-h dual-species biofilms. Candida albicans modulates the pH in dual-species biofilms to values above the critical pH where enamel dissolves. Our results suggest that C. albicans is not by definition a cariogenic microorganism; it could prevent caries by actively increasing pH preventing mineral loss. PMID:27129365

  16. Disruption of Sphingolipid Biosynthesis Blocks Phagocytosis of Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikadu G Tafesse

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of phagocytes to clear pathogens is an essential attribute of the innate immune response. The role of signaling lipid molecules such as phosphoinositides is well established, but the role of membrane sphingolipids in phagocytosis is largely unknown. Using a genetic approach and small molecule inhibitors, we show that phagocytosis of Candida albicans requires an intact sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway. Blockade of serine-palmitoyltransferase (SPT and ceramide synthase-enzymes involved in sphingolipid biosynthesis- by myriocin and fumonisin B1, respectively, impaired phagocytosis by phagocytes. We used CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing to generate Sptlc2-deficient DC2.4 dendritic cells, which lack serine palmitoyl transferase activity. Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells exhibited a stark defect in phagocytosis, were unable to bind fungal particles and failed to form a normal phagocytic cup to engulf C. albicans. Supplementing the growth media with GM1, the major ganglioside present at the cell surface, restored phagocytic activity of Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells. While overall membrane trafficking and endocytic pathways remained functional, Sptlc2-/- DC2.4 cells express reduced levels of the pattern recognition receptors Dectin-1 and TLR2 at the cell surface. Consistent with the in vitro data, compromised sphingolipid biosynthesis in mice sensitizes the animal to C. albicans infection. Sphingolipid biosynthesis is therefore critical for phagocytosis and in vivo clearance of C. albicans.

  17. Resistance of Candida albicans biofilms to antifungal agents in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Hawser, S. P.; Douglas, L J

    1995-01-01

    Biofilms formed by Candida albicans on small discs of catheter material were resistant to the action of five clinically important antifungal agents as determined by [3H]leucine incorporation and tetrazolium reduction assays. Fluconazole showed the greatest activity, and amphotericin B showed the least activity against biofilm cells. These findings were confirmed by scanning electron microscopy of the biofilms.

  18. Allium sativum (garlic) inhibits lipid synthesis by Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Adetumbi, M; Javor, G T; Lau, B H

    1986-01-01

    The effect of aqueous garlic extract on the macromolecular synthesis of Candida albicans was studied. Protein and nucleic acid syntheses were inhibited to the same extent as growth, but lipid synthesis was completely arrested. Blockage of lipid synthesis is likely an important component of the anticandidal activity of garlic.

  19. Synergistic activity of rabbit granulocyte peptides against Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Lehrer, R I; Szklarek, D; Ganz, T; Selsted, M E

    1986-01-01

    Rabbit granulocytes contain six antimicrobial peptides that are structurally homologous to the human neutrophil "defensins." NP-5, a rabbit defensin, lacks significant activity against Candida albicans. Nevertheless, its addition to submicromolar concentrations of rabbit NP-1, NP-2, or NP-3a potentiates their candidacidal effect. Thus, granulocyte defensins can act synergistically against potential pathogens.

  20. Baicalein induces programmed cell death in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Bao-Di; Cao, Ying-Ying; Huang, Shan; Xu, Yong-Gang; Gao, Ping-Hui; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2009-08-01

    Recent evidence has revealed the occurrence of an apoptotic phenotype in Candida albicans that is inducible with environmental stresses such as acetic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and amphotericin B. In the present study, we found that the Chinese herbal medicine Baicalein (BE), which was one of the skullcapflavones, can induce apoptosis in C. albicans. The apoptotic effects of BE were detected by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC and DAPI, and it was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy analysis. After exposure to 4 microg/ml BE for 12 h, about 10% of C. albicans cells were apoptotic. Both the increasing intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and upregulation of some redox-related genes (CAP1, SOD2, TRR1) were observed. Furthermore, we compared the survivals of CAP1 deleted, wild-type, and overexpressed strains and found that Cap1p attenuated BE-initiated cell death, which was coherent with a higher mRNA level of the CAP1 gene. In addition, the mitochondrial membrane potential of C. albicans cells changed significantly ( palbicans cells, and the apoptosis was associated with the breakdown of mitochondrial membrane potential. PMID:19734718

  1. Genetic Relationship between Human and Animal Isolates of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Anke; Krüger, Monika; SCHMID, JAN

    2005-01-01

    Analyzing Candida albicans isolates from different human and animal individuals by Ca3 fingerprinting, we obtained no evidence for host-specific genotypes and for the existence of species-specific lineages, even though a certain degree of separation between human and animal isolates was found. Therefore, animals could potentially serve as reservoirs for human Candida infection.

  2. Reduced virulence of Candida albicans mutants affected in multidrug resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, J. M.; Henry, L K; Jiang, W; Koltin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    Disruption of a multidrug resistance gene (CaMDR1) in Candida albicans resulted in mutant strains that colonized mouse kidneys to very high levels but were markedly reduced in their virulence. No obvious differences in several properties related to colonization and dissemination were noted among MDR+ or mdr- strains. These results suggest that specific fungal efflux pumps play a role in fungal pathogenicity.

  3. Ocorrência de Candida albicans em intestinos de bovinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Foram realizadas a identificação e a sorotipagem de C. albicans isoladas de fezes de bovinos em amamentação natural. Para o isolamento, utilizou-se o meio seletivo e diferencial de Pagano Levin, adicionado de bifenilo na concentração final de 0,1%. De 210 bovinos inicialmente considerados, 70 adultos, 68 bezerros após o desmame e 72 bezerros em fase de amamentação natural, observou-se positividade para C. albicans somente em nove amostras de fezes de bezerros em fase de amamentação (12,5%. A determinação do sorotipo por meio de provas de aglutinação direta em lâmina, com soros monoespecíficos, revelou que a totalidade das amostras isoladas pertencia ao sorotipo A. O bifenilo na concentração de 0,1% mostrou-se inibitório para a maioria dos bolores sem, aparentemente, afetar a viabilidade de C. albicans. O isolamento de C. albicans somente a partir de fezes de bezerros em amamentação, provavelmente, está relacionado à dieta láctea.

  4. Effects of ambroxol on Candida albicans growth and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rene, Hernandez-Delgadillo; José, Martínez-Sanmiguel Juan; Isela, Sánchez-Nájera Rosa; Claudio, Cabral-Romero

    2014-04-01

    Typically, the onset of candidiasis is characterised by the appearance of a biofilm of Candida albicans, which is associated with several diseases including oral candidiasis in young and elderly people. The objective of this work was to investigate the in vitro fungicidal activity as well as the antibiofilm activity of ambroxol (AMB) against C. albicans growth. In the present investigation, the fungicidal activity of AMB was established using the cell viability 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Also the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMB required to inhibit the fungal growth was determined. Simultaneously, the antibiofilm activity of AMB was evaluated using fluorescence microscopy. The study revealed that 2 mg ml(-1) of AMB exhibited higher fungicidal activity than 3.3 mg ml(-1) of terbinafine, one of most common commercial antifungals. A MIC of 1 mg ml(-1) was determined for AMB to interfere with C. albicans growth. Furthermore, AMB was found to be effective in inhibiting the biofilm formation of C. albicans and exerted its fungicidal activity against the fungal cells interspersed in the preformed biofilm. The study suggests a potential role of the mucolytic agent, AMB, as an interesting therapeutic alternative in the treatment of oral candidiasis. PMID:24224742

  5. HIV aspartyl protease inhibitors as promising compounds against Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    André; Luis; Souza; dos; Santos

    2010-01-01

    Cells of Candida albicans(C.albicans) can invade humans and may lead to mucosal and skin infections or to deep-seated my coses of almost all inner organs,especially in immunocompromised patients.In this context,both the host immune status and the ability of C.albicans to modulate the expression of its virulence factors are relevant aspects that drive the candidal susceptibility or resistance;in this last case,culminating in the establishment of successful infection knownas candidiasis.C.albicans possesses a potent arma-mentarium consisting of several virulence moleculesthat help the fungal cells to escape of the host immuneresponses.There is no doubt that the secretion of aspartyl-type proteases,designated as Saps,are one of the major virulence attributes produced by C.albicans cells,since these hydrolytic enzymes participate in a wide range of fungal physiological processes as well as in different facets of the fungal-host interactions.For these reasons,Saps clearly hold promise as new potential drug targets.Corroborating this hypothesis,the introduction of new anti-human immunodeficiency virus drugs of the as party l protease inhibitor-type(HIV PIs) have emerged as new agents for the inhibition of Saps.The introduction of HIV PIs has revolutionized the treatment of HIV disease,reducing opportunistic infections,especially candidiasis.The attenuation of candidal infections in HIV-infected individuals might not solely have resulted from improved immunological status,but also as a result of direct inhibition of C.albicans Saps.In this article,we review updates on the beneficial effects of HIV PIs against the human fungal pathogen C.albicans,focusing on the effects of these compounds on Sap activity,growth behavior,morphological architecture,cellular differentiation,fungal adhesion to animal cells and abiotic materials,modulation of virulence factors,experimental candidiasis infection,and their synergistic actions with classical antifungal agents.

  6. Effect of plagiochin E, an antifungal macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl), on cell wall chitin synthesis in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-zhen WU; Ai-xia CHENG; Ling-mei SUN; Hong-xiang LOU

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of plagiochin E (PLE), an antifungal macrocyclic bis(bibenzyl) isolated from liverwort Marchantia polymorpha L, on cell wall chitin synthesis in Candida albicans. Methods: The effect of PLE on chitin synthesis in Candida albicans was investigated at the cellular and molecular lev-els. First, the ultrastructural changes were observed under transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Second, the effects of PLE on chitin synthetase (Chs) activi-ties in vitro were assayed using 6-O-dansyl-N-acetylglucosamine as a fluorescent substrate, and its effect on chitin synthesis in situ was assayed by spheroplast regeneration. Finally, real-time RT-PCR was performed to assay its effect on the expression of Chs genes (CHS). Results: Observation under TEM showed that the structure of the cell wall in Candida albicans was seriously damaged, which suggested that the antifungal activity of PLE was associated with its effect on the cell wail. Enzymatic assays and spheroplast regeneration showed that PLE inhibited chitin synthesis in vitro and in situ. The results of the PCR showed that PLE significantly downregulated the expression of CHS1, and upregulated the expression of CHS2 and CHS3. Because different Chs is regulated at different stages of transcription and post-translation, the downregulation of CHS1 would decrease the level of Chs 1 and inhibit its activity, and the inhibitory effects of PLE on Chs2 and Chs3 would be at the post-translational level or by the inhibi-tion on the enzyme-active center. Conclusion: These results indicate that the antifungal activity of PLE would be attributed to its inhibitory effect on cell wall chitin synthesis in Candida albicans.

  7. Study of Candida Albicans Vaginitis Model in Kunming Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhuo; KONG Xiaofeng

    2007-01-01

    The model of vaginal candidiasis in Kunming mice was constructed in order to search for the optima construction conditions and provide an economic animal model of Candida albicans (C.albicans) vaginitis. Estrogen benzoate (E2) was given to mice at different concentrations ranging from 0.0 to 0.05 mg/mouse (4 levels) beginning 72 h prior to vaginal inoculation, then mice were inoculated intravaginally with various concentrations of stationary-phase C. albicans blastoconidia (ATCC90028) (5 levels) in 20 μL of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) in each F2 level. General state,scores of genital pathology, the hyphae and vaginal fungal burden (CFU) in vaginal lavage fluid, the hydrops rate of uterus and vaginal tissues for pathological section in mice were observed and obtained at day 2, 4, 7, 14 and 21 after inoculation. The results showed the infection rate in mice was related to the dosage of E2 and concentration of C. albicans blastoconidia. Additionally there was better cross-effect between the two treated factors. The infection rate was about 80% on the day 4,and could reach 100% on the day 7 until the end of experiment after inoculated intravaginally in groups of E2I3, E2 0.025 mg/mouse injected hypodermically and inoculated intravaginally with 5×104 C. albicans blastoconidia, and large amount of hyphae and blastoconidia could be observe in superficial layer tissue and canal of vaginal by PAS. From the results in our experiment it was concluded that E2I3 was the optima construction condition in kunming mice.

  8. A cytoplasmic Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase SOD1 contributes to hyphal growth and virulence of Fusarium graminearum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sheng-Hua; Guo, Yan; Wang, Yan-Zhang; Zhang, Dong; Xu, Ling; Tang, Wei-Hua

    2016-06-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are scavengers of superoxide radicals, one of the main reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. SOD-based ROS scavenging system constitutes the frontline defense against intra- and extracellular ROS, but the roles of SODs in the important cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum are not very clear. There are five SOD genes in F. graminearum genome, encoding cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 and MnSOD3, mitochondrial MnSOD2 and FeSOD4, and extracellular CuSOD5. Previous studies reported that the expression of SOD1 increased during infection of wheat coleoptiles and florets. In this work we showed that the recombinant SOD1 protein had the superoxide dismutase activity in vitro, and that the SOD1-mRFP fusion protein localized in the cytoplasm of F. graminearum. The Δsod1 mutants had slightly reduced hyphal growth and markedly increased sensitivity to the intracellular ROS generator menadione. The conidial germination under extracellular oxidative stress was significantly delayed in the mutants. Wheat floret infection assay showed that the Δsod1 mutants had a reduced pathogenicity. Furthermore, the Δsod1 mutants had a significant reduction in production of deoxynivalenol mycotoxin. Our results indicate that the cytoplasmic Cu-Zn SOD1 affects fungal growth probably depending on detoxification of intracellular superoxide radicals, and that SOD1-mediated deoxynivalenol production contributes to the virulence of F. graminearum in wheat head infection. PMID:27037138

  9. Enhanced hyphal growth of arbuscular mycorrhizae by root exudates derived from high R/FR treated Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Maki; Yamamoto, Naoya; Miyamoto, Taro; Shimomura, Aya; Arima, Susumu; Hirsch, Ann M; Suzuki, Akihiro

    2016-06-01

    Red/Far Red (R/FR) sensing positively influences the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis of both legume and nonlegume plants through jasmonic acid (JA) and strigolactone signaling. We previously reported that root exudates obtained from high R/FR-grown plants contained more strigolactone than low R/FR-grown plants. To determine whether JA and JA derivatives were secreted from roots, we investigated the expression levels of JA-responsive genes in L. japonicus Miyakojima MG20 plants treated with root exudates prepared from either high or low R/FR light-treated plants. The root exudates from high R/FR light-treated plants were found to enhance the expression levels of JA-responsive genes significantly. Moreover, exogenous JA increased AM fungal hyphal elongation as did the root exudates derived from high R/FR-grown L. japonicus plants. We conclude that increased JA accumulation and secretion into root exudates from high R/FR light-grown plants is the best explanation for increased colonization and enhanced mycorrhization under these conditions. PMID:27191935

  10. Sustained Nitric Oxide-Releasing Nanoparticles Induce Cell Death in Candida albicans Yeast and Hyphal Cells, Preventing Biofilm Formation In Vitro and in a Rodent Central Venous Catheter Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohammed S; Lee, Hiu Ham; Sanchez, David A; Friedman, Adam J; Tar, Moses T; Davies, Kelvin P; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Martinez, Luis R

    2016-04-01

    Candida albicansis a leading nosocomial pathogen. Today, candidal biofilms are a significant cause of catheter infections, and such infections are becoming increasingly responsible for the failure of medical-implanted devices.C. albicansforms biofilms in which fungal cells are encased in an autoproduced extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Consequently, the enclosed fungi are protected from antimicrobial agents and host cells, providing a unique niche conducive to robust microbial growth and a harbor for recurring infections. Here we demonstrate that a recently developed platform comprised of nanoparticles that release therapeutic levels of nitric oxide (NO-np) inhibits candidal biofilm formation, destroys the extracellular polysaccharide matrices of mature fungal biofilms, and hinders biofilm development on surface biomaterials such as the lumen of catheters. We found NO-np to decrease both the metabolic activity of biofilms and the cell viability ofC. albicansin vitroandin vivo Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis found NO-np to induce apoptosis in biofilm yeast cellsin vitro Moreover, NO-np behave synergistically when used in combination with established antifungal drug therapies. Here we propose NO-np as a novel treatment modality, especially in combination with standard antifungals, for the prevention and/or remediation of fungal biofilms on central venous catheters and other medical devices. PMID:26810653

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells mediate Aspergillus hyphal extract-induced allergic airway inflammation by inhibition of the Th17 signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, Melissa J; Brooks, Elice M; Bonenfant, Nick R; Sokocevic, Dino; Borg, Zachary D; Goodwin, Meagan; Loi, Roberto; Cruz, Fernanda; Dunaway, Chad W; Steele, Chad; Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Systemic administration of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) suppresses airway inflammation and methacholine-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) in mouse models of T helper cell (Th) type 2-mediated eosinophilic allergic airway inflammation (AAI); however, the efficacy of MSCs in mouse models of severe Th17-mediated neutrophilic AAI has not yet been demonstrated. We assessed MSC effects in a mouse model of mixed Th2/Th17 AAI produced by mucosal exposure to Aspergillus fumigatus hyphal extract (AHE). Following sensitization produced by oropharyngeal AHE administration, systemic (tail vein) administration of syngeneic MSCs on the first day of challenge significantly reduced acute AHR predominantly through reduction of Th17-mediated airway inflammation. In parallel experiments, MSCs also mitigated AHR when administered during recurrent challenge 10 weeks after initial sensitization and challenge through reduction in systemic Th17-mediated inflammation. Investigation into potential mechanistic actions of MSCs in this model demonstrated that although T regulatory cells were increased in all AHE-treated mice, MSC administration did not alter T regulatory cell numbers in either the acute or recurrent model. Differential induction of interleukin-17a secretion was observed in ex vivo restimulation of mediastinal lymph node mixed-cell cytokine analyses. Although the mechanisms by which MSCs act to decrease inflammation and AHR in this model are not yet fully elucidated, decrease in Th17-mediated airway inflammation appears to play a significant role. These results provide a basis for further investigations of MSC administration as a potential therapeutic approach for severe refractory neutrophilic asthma. PMID:24436442

  12. Isolation of Candida albicans and their sensitivity to antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, S S; Liu, C I; Chang, C F; Tsai, Y H

    1982-02-01

    During 1978 and 1979 outbreaks of candidiasis were encountered in about 500,000 broiler chickens on 30 farms, 30,000 guinea fowl on 4 farms, 500 geese on 1 farm, and 10 penguins in a zoo. This represents the first report of avian candidiasis in Taiwan. Diagnoses were based on typical gross and microscopic pathology consistent isolation of Candida albicans from crop and esophageal lesions, virulence of isolates in rabbits, identification of the isolates as C. albicans serotype A by chlamydospore and germ tube formation, fermentation tests, and agglutination by specific antisera, and the lack of any sign of fowl pox or trichomoniasis. The upsurge of candidiasis is attributed to the modernization stressors which interact deleteriously with opportunistic pathogens. In vitro sensitivity testing recorded the following order of effectiveness against 20 isolates: nystatin greater than gentian violet greater than copper sulfate = propionic acid = p-hydroxy benzoic acid greater than calcium propionate = propylene glycol. PMID:7042231

  13. Recurrent Candida albicans Ventriculitis Treated with Intraventricular Liposomal Amphotericin B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demet Toprak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS infection with Candida is rare but significant because of its high morbidity and mortality. When present, it is commonly seen among immunocompromised and hospitalized patients. Herein, we describe a case of a four-year-old boy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL who experienced recurrent Candida albicans meningitis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous liposomal amphotericin B at first attack, but 25 days after discharge he was readmitted to hospital with symptoms of meningitis. Candida albicans was grown in CFS culture again and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed ventriculitis. We administered liposomal amphotericin B both intravenously and intraventricularly and favorable result was achieved without any adverse effects. Intraventricular amphotericin B may be considered for the treatment of recurrent CNS Candida infections in addition to intravenous administration.

  14. Increased Filamentous Growth of Candida albicans in Simulated Microgravity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sara D. Altenburg; Sheila M. Nielsen-Preiss; Linda E. Hyman

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of simulated microgravity (SMG)-induced changes in the pathogenicity of microorganisms is important for success of long-term spaceflight. In a previous study using the high aspect ratio vessel bioreactor, we showed that the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae underwent a significant phenotypic response when grown in modeled microgravity, which was reflected in the analysis of gene expression profiles. In this study, we establish that Candida albicans responds to SMG in a similar fashion, demonstrating that there is a conserved response among yeast to this environmental stress. We also report that the growth of C. albicans in SMG results in a morphogenic switch that is consistent with enhanced pathogenicity. Specifically, we observed an increase in filamentous forms of the organism and accompanying changes in the expression of two genes associated with the yeasthyphal transition. The morphological response may have significant implications for astronauts' safety, as the fungal pathogen may become more virulent during spaceflight.

  15. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H.; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemic C. albicans infection that can be imaged in vivo using confocal microscopy. We observed filamentous growth of the organism in vivo as well as formation of microabscesses. This model system will allow us to gain significant new information about C. albicans pathogenesis through studies of host-C. albicans interactions in the native environment.

  16. Interleukin 17-mediated host defense against candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Sparber, Florian; LeibundGut-Landmann, Salomé

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is part of the normal microbiota in most healthy individuals. However, it can cause opportunistic infections if host defenses are breached, with symptoms ranging from superficial lesions to severe systemic disease. The study of rare congenital defects in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis led to the identification of interleukin-17 (IL-17) as a key factor in host defense against mucosal fungal infection. Experimental infections in mice confirmed the critical role...

  17. Interleukin 17-Mediated Host Defense against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Sparber; Salomé LeibundGut-Landmann

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is part of the normal microbiota in most healthy individuals. However, it can cause opportunistic infections if host defenses are breached, with symptoms ranging from superficial lesions to severe systemic disease. The study of rare congenital defects in patients with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis led to the identification of interleukin-17 (IL-17) as a key factor in host defense against mucosal fungal infection. Experimental infections in mice confirmed the critical role...

  18. ANTAGONISTIC EFFECT OF EDIBLE MUSHROOM EXTRACT ON CANDIDA ALBICANS GROWTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paccola Edneia A. de Souza

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Five species of edible mushrooms, Lentinula edodes, Pleurotus ostreatus, Pholiota nameko, Macrolepiota bonaerensis and Agaricus blazei, were tested for their potential to inhibit the in vitro growth of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. Only L. edodes had a fungistatic effect on this human pathogen. The inhibitory compound was produced intra and extracellularly in submersed L. edodes culture, and was also present in fresh and dehydrated mushroom basidiocarps. The fungistatic compound was heat sensitive and lost activity after 72 hours.

  19. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known,...

  20. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    David W. Williams; Jordan, Rachael P. C.; Wei, Xiao-qing; Alves, Carlos T.; Wise, Matt P; Wilson, Melanie J.; Michael A. O. Lewis

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exis...

  1. Deoxyribonucleic acid-deficient strains of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Olaiya, A F; Steed, J R; Sogin, S J

    1980-01-01

    We analyzed a series of germ tube-negative variants isolated from Candida albicans 3153A for deoxyribonucleic acid content. As analyzed by flow microfluorometry, the deoxyribonucleic acid level in these variant strains was 50% of that of the parental strain and equivalent to that of haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This finding was confirmed by comparison of survival rates when exposed to the mutagens ultraviolet light, ethyl methane sulfonate, and methyl methane sulfonate. The diameter of t...

  2. Interactions of Candida albicans with host epithelial surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Williams

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic, fungal pathogen of humans that frequently causes superficial infections of oral and vaginal mucosal surfaces of debilitated and susceptible individuals. The organism is however, commonly encountered as a commensal in healthy individuals where it is a component of the normal microflora. The key determinant in the type of relationship that Candida has with its host is how it interacts with the epithelial surface it colonises. A delicate balance clearly exists between the potentially damaging effects of Candida virulence factors and the nature of the immune response elicited by the host. Frequently, it is changes in host factors that lead to Candida seemingly changing from a commensal to pathogenic existence. However, given the often reported heterogeneity in morphological and biochemical factors that exist between Candida species and indeed strains of C. albicans, it may also be the fact that colonising strains differ in the way they exploit resources to allow persistence at mucosal surfaces and as a consequence this too may affect the way Candida interacts with epithelial cells. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of some of the possible interactions that may occur between C. albicans and host epithelial surfaces that may in turn dictate whether Candida removal, its commensal persistence or infection follows.

  3. In vivo Models for Candida Albicans Biofilms Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenrui Gu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm is a common mode of fungal growth in clinical infection. In the mode of biofilm, Candida albicans tends to display high resistance to body immunity and antimicrobial agents, which has a significant impact on mortality. Biofilm models are essential tools to better understand the mechanisms of formation and resistance. Compared to in vitro models, in vivo models can better take into account the host immune system and are indispensable for the study of medical device related infection. The aim of this review is to summarize information related to the reported in vivo models of C. albicans biofilms, analyze the operating process and application of them, and compare their advantages and limitations. A literature search was performed from databases in Medline (PubMed, Web of Science, Science Direct, and Google scholar by applying some related search terms. The articles related to agriculture, ecology, and synthetic work and those using languages other than English have been excluded. The bibliographies of papers relating to the review subject were also searched for further relevant references. According to the common sites of C. albicans infection; three kinds of in vivo models are discussed in this review: oral mucosa model, vaginal mucosa model and implanted catheter model. The former two models can demonstrate the structure and composition of biofilms growing on the mucosa, and implanted catheter model represents different kinds of medical devices. To expedite the success of new treatments of infection, further refinement of in vivo models is an urgent need.

  4. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  5. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr 51Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function

  6. A Human-Curated Annotation of the Candida albicans Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent sequencing and assembly of the genome for the fungal pathogen Candida albicans used simple automated procedures for the identification of putative genes. We have reviewed the entire assembly, both by hand and with additional bioinformatic resources, to accurately map and describe 6,354 genes and to identify 246 genes whose original database entries contained sequencing errors (or possibly mutations that affect their reading frame. Comparison with other fungal genomes permitted the identification of numerous fungus-specific genes that might be targeted for antifungal therapy. We also observed that, compared to other fungi, the protein-coding sequences in the C. albicans genome are especially rich in short sequence repeats. Finally, our improved annotation permitted a detailed analysis of several multigene families, and comparative genomic studies showed that C. albicans has a far greater catabolic range, encoding respiratory Complex 1, several novel oxidoreductases and ketone body degrading enzymes, malonyl-CoA and enoyl-CoA carriers, several novel amino acid degrading enzymes, a variety of secreted catabolic lipases and proteases, and numerous transporters to assimilate the resulting nutrients. The results of these efforts will ensure that the Candida research community has uniform and comprehensive genomic information for medical research as well as for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  7. Emergence of non-albicans candida species in neonatal candidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Juyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida species are one of the most common causes of blood stream infections among neonates and account for 9-13% of such infections. Although Candida albicans remains the most common fungal isolate from neonatal candidemia, longitudinal studies have detected a shift towards non-albicans Candida (NAC species. Aim: To examine the prevalence and epidemiology of candidemia among infants admitted to our hospital. Materials and Methods: Blood samples were collected from 548 neonates and only those which yielded pure growth of Candida spp. were included in the study. The isolates were identified as per standard mycological techniques and antifungal susceptibility (AFS was done by disc diffusion method. Results: Of the total 132 neonates included in the study, NAC species were responsible for 80.30% cases with C. parapsilosis (25.0% and C. tropicalis (21.97% as the most predominant species; whereas 19.70% of cases were caused by C. albicans. AFS results revealed that 65.91, 73.49, and 96.21% isolates were sensitive to fluconazole (FLK, itraconazole (ITR, and amphotericin B (AMB, respectively. Conclusion: Candidemia in neonates is an ominous prognostic sign and is an important entity in our hospital. Strict infection control strategies, appropriate preventive and therapeutic measures such as prophylactic antifungal use and a restrictive policy of antibiotic use should be implemented.

  8. The Transcription Factor Mrr1p Controls Expression of the MDR1 Efflux Pump and Mediates Multidrug Resistance in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Joachim Morschhäuser; Katherine S. Barker; Liu, Teresa T.; Julia BlaB-Warmuth; Ramin Homayouni; P David Rogers

    2007-01-01

    Constitutive overexpression of the MDR1 (multidrug resistance) gene, which encodes a multidrug efflux pump of the major facilitator superfamily, is a frequent cause of resistance to fluconazole and other toxic compounds in clinical Candida albicans strains, but the mechanism of MDR1 upregulation has not been resolved. By genome-wide gene expression analysis we have identified a zinc cluster transcription factor, designated as MRR1 (multidrug resistance regulator), that was coordinately upregu...

  9. Activation of Rac1 by the Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor Dck1 Is Required for Invasive Filamentous Growth in the Pathogen Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Hope, Hannah; Bogliolo, Stéphanie; Arkowitz, Robert A; Bassilana, Martine

    2008-01-01

    Rho G proteins and their regulators are critical for cytoskeleton organization and cell morphology in all eukaryotes. In the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans, the Rho G proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 are required for the switch from budding to filamentous growth in response to different stimuli. We show that Dck1, a protein with homology to the Ced-5, Dock180, myoblast city family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors, is necessary for filamentous growth in solid media, similar to Rac1. Our ...

  10. Particular Candida albicans Strains in the Digestive Tract of Dyspeptic Patients, Identified by Multilocus Sequence Typing

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Yan-Bing; Zheng, Jian-Ling; Jin, Bo; Zhuo, De-Xiang; Huang, Zhu-Qing; Qi, He; Zhang, Wei; Duan, Wei; Fu, Ji-Ting; Wang, Chui-Jie; Mao, Ze-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida albicans is a human commensal that is also responsible for chronic gastritis and peptic ulcerous disease. Little is known about the genetic profiles of the C. albicans strains in the digestive tract of dyspeptic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, diversity, and genetic profiles among C. albicans isolates recovered from natural colonization of the digestive tract in the dyspeptic patients. Methods and Findings Oral swab samples (n = 111) and gast...

  11. Control of Candida albicans Metabolism and Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Phenazines

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Diana K.; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Jacobs, Nicholas J.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentra...

  12. Neuroinflammation and structural injury of the fetal ovine brain following intra-amniotic Candida albicans exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Ophelders, Daan R. M. G.; Gussenhoven, Ruth; Lammens, Martin; Küsters, Benno; Kemp, Matthew W.; Newnham, John P; Payne, Matthew S.; Suhas G Kallapur; Jobe, Allan H.; Zimmermann, Luc J.; Boris W Kramer; Tim G A M Wolfs

    2016-01-01

    Background Intra-amniotic Candida albicans (C. Albicans) infection is associated with preterm birth and high morbidity and mortality rates. Survivors are prone to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes. The mechanisms leading to these adverse neonatal brain outcomes remain largely unknown. To better understand the mechanisms underlying C. albicans-induced fetal brain injury, we studied immunological responses and structural changes of the fetal brain in a well-established translational ovine mod...

  13. Anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia (noni) extracts against Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    K Barani; Sunayana Manipal; D Prabu; Adil Ahmed; Preethi Adusumilli; C Jeevika

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia fruit extract on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Juice extract from M. citrifolia fruit was lyophilized and used in anti-fungal testing. Anti-fungal activity of M. citrifolia fruit extract against C. albicans was tested in vitro at various concentrations. The inhibitory effect of M. citrifolia extract on C. albicans was determined by agar culture and applied broth dilution test. Resul...

  14. Sap6, a secreted aspartyl proteinase, participates in maintenance the cell surface integrity of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Buu, Leh-Miauh; Chen, Yee-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Background The polymorphic species Candida albicans is the major cause of candidiasis in humans. The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of C. albicans, encoded by a family of 10 SAP genes, have been investigated as the virulent factors during candidiasis. However, the biological functions of most Sap proteins are still uncertain. In this study, we applied co-culture system of C. albicans and THP-1 human monocytes to explore the pathogenic roles and biological functions of Sap proteinases. R...

  15. Funktionelle Analyse einer Familie von Oligopeptidtransportern des humanpathogenen Hefepilzes Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Reuß, Oliver Rainer

    2006-01-01

    Der Hefepilz Candida albicans ist Teil der natürlichen Mikroflora auf den Schleimhäuten des Verdauungs- und Urogenitaltrakts der meisten gesunden Menschen. Allerdings kann C. albicans vor allem in immunsupprimierten Patienten auch schwerwiegende Infektionen verursachen. Diese reichen von oberflächlichen Mykosen bis hin zu lebensbedrohlichen systemischen Infektionen. C. albicans besitzt eine Reihe von Eigenschaften, die es diesem opportunistisch humanpathogenen Pilz ermöglichen unterschiedlich...

  16. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Seung-Bae Lee

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV) and sweet bee venom (SBV) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC) strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assays were performed by ...

  17. A role for complement receptor-like molecules in iron acquisition by Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen of humans, is dependent upon iron for growth. Consequently, human serum inhibits C. albicans growth due to the presence of high affinity iron-binding proteins that sequester serum iron, making it unavailable for use by the organism. We report that in the inhibitory environment of human serum, the growth of C. albicans can be restored by the addition of exogenous hemoglobin or heme, but not by protoporphyrin IX, the heme precursor that does no...

  18. Hydrophobic interaction in Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis adherence to various denture base resin materials.

    OpenAIRE

    Minagi, S; Miyake, Y; Inagaki, K; Tsuru, H; Suginaka, H

    1985-01-01

    The effects of hydrophobicities of substrate surfaces on microbial adherence were examined by using Candida albicans and Candida tropicalis and 21 denture base resin materials. With increasing surface free energy of resin plates, increasing adherence of C. albicans and decreasing adherence of C. tropicalis were observed. The surface free energy of C. albicans is higher than that of all resin material surfaces, and C. tropicalis has surface free energy lower than that of all materials used. In...

  19. Anti-Candida albicans activity of Pichia anomala as determined by a growth rate reduction assay.

    OpenAIRE

    Sawant, A D; Abdelal, A T; Ahearn, D G

    1988-01-01

    Killer toxin activity of Pichia anomala WC65 appeared fungicidal for P. bimundalis WC38 and fungistatic for Candida albicans RC1. Inhibitory activity against sensitive C. albicans showed a linear relationship between toxin concentrations and the inverse of the reduced growth rates. The plot of toxin concentrations against growth rates was hyperbolic, as is characteristic of saturation kinetics. Sensitivity of C. albicans to the toxin decreased with increased cell age. The measurement of growt...

  20. Proanthocyanidins polymeric tannin from Stryphnodendron adstringens are active against Candida albicans biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz, Raul Leal Faria; Vila, Taissa Vieira Machado; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Rozental, Sonia; Ishida, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Background Biofilm formation is important in Candida albicans pathogenesis and constitutes a mechanism of antifungal resistance. Thus, we evaluated the effect of proanthocyanidins polymer-rich fractions from Stryphnodendron adstringens (fraction F2 and subfraction F2.4) against C. albicans biofilms. Methods Firstly, the antifungal activity of F2 and F2.4 against planktonic cells of Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) was determined using broth microdilution method. Anti-biofilm effect of F2 and F2....

  1. Effect of Xylitol on Candida albicans resistance in serum (in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Puspitawati

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Xylitol is reported to inhibit the growth of C. albicans. Objectives: Investigating serum factor role in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans and the effect of 1%, 5%, 10% xylitol on C. albicans resistance in serum in vitro. Methods: Identification of C. albicans (oral swab of candidiasis patient was conducted using CHROMAgar, confirmed by germ tube test. The cultures were serially diluted, inoculated in Saburoud Dextrose Broth (SDB contained 0% (control, 1%, 5%, or 10% xylitol, and kept for 3 or 7 days. These inoculations were then exposed to either active or inactive serum (Fetal Bovine Serum heated in 65ºC for 30 minutes for 2 hours in 37ºC. The colony forming unit (CFU of C. albicans in Saburoud Dextrose Agar (SDA were counted after 2 days. C. albicans ATCC 10231 strain was used as a comparison. One-way ANOVA with 0.05 was used. Results: After 3 days cultured in media with or without xylitol, the CFU of C. albicans exposed to active serum were significantly lower than those exposed to inactive serum (p=0.032. Although not statistically significant (p=0.689, increased concentration of xylitol lead to increased resistance of C. albicans in active serum. Only 7 day exposure of 10% xylitol resulted in significantly higher growth of C. albicans (p=0.034. No significant difference of C. albicans CFU in active or inactive serum (p=0.404. Conclusion: Serum factor has role in inhibiting C. albicans growth in vitro. Exposure of 1%, 5%, or 10% xylitol for 3 or 7 days has no significant effect on C. albicans resistance in serum.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i2.98

  2. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Verma-Gaur, Jiyoti; Qu, Yue; Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory change...

  3. Dynamic Transcript Profiling of Candida Albicans Infection in Zebrafish: a Pathogen-Host Interaction Study

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yan Yu; Chao, Chun-Cheih; Liu, Fu-Chen; Hsu, Po-Chen; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Peng, Shih-Chi; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Lan, Chung-Yu; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Wong, David Shan Hill

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is responsible for a number of life-threatening infections and causes considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Previous studies of C. albicans pathogenesis have suggested several steps must occur before virulent infection, including early adhesion, invasion, and late tissue damage. However, the mechanism that triggers C. albicans transformation from yeast to hyphae form during infection has yet to be fully elucidated. This study used a systems biolo...

  4. Imaging morphogenesis of Candida albicans during infection in a live animal

    OpenAIRE

    Mitra, Soumya; Dolan, Kristy; Foster, Thomas H.; Wellington, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that requires an intact host immune response to prevent disease. Thus, studying host-pathogen interactions is critical to understanding and preventing this disease. We report a new model infection system in which ongoing C. albicans infections can be imaged at high spatial resolution in the ears of living mice. Intradermal inoculation into mouse ears with a C. albicans strain expressing green fluorescent protein results in systemicC. ...

  5. Sputum Candida albicans presages FEV₁ decline and hospital-treated exacerbations in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H

    2010-11-01

    The role of Candida albicans in the cystic fibrosis (CF) airway is underexplored. Considered a colonizer, few question its pathogenic potential despite high isolation frequencies from sputum culture. We evaluated the frequency and identified the strongest predictors of C albicans colonization in CF. Independent associations of colonization with clinical outcomes were determined, and the longitudinal effects of C albicans acquisition on BMI and FEV₁ were evaluated.

  6. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  7. Human Epithelial Cells Discriminate between Commensal and Pathogenic Interactions with Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Timothy J.; Kullas, Amy L.; Southern, Peter J.; Davis, Dana A.

    2016-01-01

    The commensal fungus, Candida albicans, can cause life-threatening infections in at risk individuals. C. albicans colonizes mucosal surfaces of most people, adhering to and interacting with epithelial cells. At low concentrations, C. albicans is not pathogenic nor does it cause epithelial cell damage in vitro; at high concentrations, C. albicans causes mucosal infections and kills epithelial cells in vitro. Here we show that while there are quantitative dose-dependent differences in exposed epithelial cell populations, these reflect a fundamental qualitative difference in host cell response to C. albicans. Using transcriptional profiling experiments and real time PCR, we found that wild-type C. albicans induce dose-dependent responses from a FaDu epithelial cell line. However, real time PCR and Western blot analysis using a high dose of various C. albicans strains demonstrated that these dose-dependent responses are associated with ability to promote host cell damage. Our studies support the idea that epithelial cells play a key role in the immune system by monitoring the microbial community at mucosal surfaces and initiating defensive responses when this community is dysfunctional. This places epithelial cells at a pivotal position in the interaction with C. albicans as epithelial cells themselves promote C. albicans stimulated damage. PMID:27088599

  8. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Inactivation Inhibits Candida albicans Virulence Factors and Reduces In Vivo Pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Caetano Padial; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Tegos, George P.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios; Hamblin, Michael R.; Ribeiro, Martha Simões

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether Candida albicans exhibits altered pathogenicity characteristics following sublethal antimicrobial photodynamic inactivation (APDI) and if such alterations are maintained in the daughter cells. C. albicans was exposed to sublethal APDI by using methylene blue (MB) as a photosensitizer (0.05 mM) combined with a GaAlAs diode laser (λ 660 nm, 75 mW/cm2, 9 to 27 J/cm2). In vitro, we evaluated APDI effects on C. albicans growth, germ tube formation, sensitivity to oxidative and osmotic stress, cell wall integrity, and fluconazole susceptibility. In vivo, we evaluated C. albicans pathogenicity with a mouse model of systemic infection. Animal survival was evaluated daily. Sublethal MB-mediated APDI reduced the growth rate and the ability of C. albicans to form germ tubes compared to untreated cells (P < 0.05). Survival of mice systemically infected with C. albicans pretreated with APDI was significantly increased compared to mice infected with untreated yeast (P < 0.05). APDI increased C. albicans sensitivity to sodium dodecyl sulfate, caffeine, and hydrogen peroxide. The MIC for fluconazole for C. albicans was also reduced following sublethal MB-mediated APDI. However, none of those pathogenic parameters was altered in daughter cells of C. albicans submitted to APDI. These data suggest that APDI may inhibit virulence factors and reduce in vivo pathogenicity of C. albicans. The absence of alterations in daughter cells indicates that APDI effects are transitory. The MIC reduction for fluconazole following APDI suggests that this antifungal could be combined with APDI to treat C. albicans infections. PMID:23129051

  9. Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans: In vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Zhu, Yingbo; Chen, Jia; Wang, Yucheng; Sherwood, Margaret E; Murray, Clinton K; Vrahas, Mark S; Hooper, David C; Hamblin, Michael R; Dai, Tianhong

    2016-07-01

    Fungal infections are a common cause of morbidity, mortality and cost in critical care populations. The increasing emergence of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the development of new therapeutic approaches for fungal infections. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of an innovative approach, antimicrobial blue light (aBL), for inactivation of Candida albicans in vitro and in infected mouse burns. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to aBL (415 nm) were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocytes. The potential development of aBL resistance by C. albicans was investigated via 10 serial passages of C. albicans on aBL exposure. For the animal study, a mouse model of thermal burn infected with the bioluminescent C. albicans strain was used. aBL was delivered to mouse burns approximately 12 h after fungal inoculation. Bioluminescence imaging was performed to monitor in real time the extent of infection in mice. The results obtained from the studies demonstrated that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to aBL than human keratinocytes. Serial passaging of C. albicans on aBL exposure implied a tendency of reduced aBL susceptibility of C. albicans with increasing numbers of passages; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the post-aBL survival rate of C. albicans between the first and the last passage (P>0.05). A single exposure of 432 J/cm(2) aBL reduced the fungal burden in infected mouse burns by 1.75-log10 (P=0.015). Taken together, our findings suggest aBL is a potential therapeutic for C. albicans infections. PMID:26909654

  10. Live Candida albicans suppresses production of reactive oxygen species in phagocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellington, Melanie; Dolan, Kristy; Krysan, Damian J

    2009-01-01

    Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important aspect of phagocyte-mediated host responses. Since phagocytes play a crucial role in the host response to Candida albicans, we examined the ability of Candida to modulate phagocyte ROS production. ROS production was measured in the murine macrophage cell line J774 and in primary phagocytes using luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence. J774 cells, murine polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), human monocytes, and human PMN treated with live C. albicans produced significantly less ROS than phagocytes treated with heat-killed C. albicans. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS production in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages from C57BL/6 mice, but not from BALB/c mice. Live C. albicans also suppressed ROS in response to external stimuli. C. albicans and Candida glabrata suppressed ROS production by phagocytes, whereas Saccharomyces cerevisiae stimulated ROS production. The cell wall is the initial point of contact between Candida and phagocytes, but isolated cell walls from both heat-killed and live C. albicans stimulated ROS production. Heat-killed C. albicans has increased surface exposure of 1,3-beta-glucan, a cell wall component that can stimulate phagocytes. To determine whether surface 1,3-beta-glucan exposure accounted for the difference in ROS production, live C. albicans cells were treated with a sublethal dose of caspofungin to increase surface 1,3-beta-glucan exposure. Caspofungin-treated C. albicans was fully able to suppress ROS production, indicating that suppression of ROS overrides stimulatory signals from 1,3-beta-glucan. These studies indicate that live C. albicans actively suppresses ROS production in phagocytes in vitro, which may represent an important immune evasion mechanism. PMID:18981256

  11. The Mnn2 mannosyltransferase family modulates mannoprotein fibril length, immune recognition and virulence of Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Hall

    Full Text Available The fungal cell wall is the first point of interaction between an invading fungal pathogen and the host immune system. The outer layer of the cell wall is comprised of GPI anchored proteins, which are post-translationally modified by both N- and O-linked glycans. These glycans are important pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs recognised by the innate immune system. Glycan synthesis is mediated by a series of glycosyl transferases, located in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Mnn2 is responsible for the addition of the initial α1,2-mannose residue onto the α1,6-mannose backbone, forming the N-mannan outer chain branches. In Candida albicans, the MNN2 gene family is comprised of six members (MNN2, MNN21, MNN22, MNN23, MNN24 and MNN26. Using a series of single, double, triple, quintuple and sextuple mutants, we show, for the first time, that addition of α1,2-mannose is required for stabilisation of the α1,6-mannose backbone and hence regulates mannan fibril length. Sequential deletion of members of the MNN2 gene family resulted in the synthesis of lower molecular weight, less complex and more uniform N-glycans, with the sextuple mutant displaying only un-substituted α1,6-mannose. TEM images confirmed that the sextuple mutant was completely devoid of the outer mannan fibril layer, while deletion of two MNN2 orthologues resulted in short mannan fibrils. These changes in cell wall architecture correlated with decreased proinflammatory cytokine induction from monocytes and a decrease in fungal virulence in two animal models. Therefore, α1,2-mannose of N-mannan is important for both immune recognition and virulence of C. albicans.

  12. Molecular mechanisms of action of herbal antifungal alkaloid berberine, in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiveeni Dhamgaye

    Full Text Available Candida albicans causes superficial to systemic infections in immuno-compromised individuals. The concomitant use of fungistatic drugs and the lack of cidal drugs frequently result in strains that could withstand commonly used antifungals, and display multidrug resistance (MDR. In search of novel fungicidals, in this study, we have explored a plant alkaloid berberine (BER for its antifungal potential. For this, we screened an in-house transcription factor (TF mutant library of C. albicans strains towards their susceptibility to BER. Our screen of TF mutant strains identified a heat shock factor (HSF1, which has a central role in thermal adaptation, to be most responsive to BER treatment. Interestingly, HSF1 mutant was not only highly susceptible to BER but also displayed collateral susceptibility towards drugs targeting cell wall (CW and ergosterol biosynthesis. Notably, BER treatment alone could affect the CW integrity as was evident from the growth retardation of MAP kinase and calcineurin pathway null mutant strains and transmission electron microscopy. However, unlike BER, HSF1 effect on CW appeared to be independent of MAP kinase and Calcineurin pathway genes. Additionally, unlike hsf1 null strain, BER treatment of Candida cells resulted in dysfunctional mitochondria, which was evident from its slow growth in non-fermentative carbon source and poor labeling with mitochondrial membrane potential sensitive probe. This phenotype was reinforced with an enhanced ROS levels coinciding with the up-regulated oxidative stress genes in BER-treated cells. Together, our study not only describes the molecular mechanism of BER fungicidal activity but also unravels a new role of evolutionary conserved HSF1, in MDR of Candida.

  13. ERG11 mutations and expression of resistance genes in fluconazole-resistant Candida albicans isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonghao; Sheng, Fang; Zhao, Jie; Chen, Lamei; Li, Chunyang

    2015-11-01

    Azole resistance in the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans poses significant challenges for its antibiotic treatment. The conformational change of the target enzyme 14 alpha-demethylase (Erg11p) due to ERG11 gene mutations is one of the mechanisms resulting in the azole resistance. ERG11 of 23 isolates (8 susceptible and 15 resistant) and 6 standard strains of Candida albicans were amplified and sequenced. Nineteen missense mutations were detected. Two mutations, G487T (A114S) and T916C (Y257H), coexisted exclusively in 14 fluconazole-resistant isolates. To identify the resistance mechanisms in the isolates with G487T and T916C mutations, we compared the expression of 5 resistance-related genes in the 14 azole-resistant isolates with those in the susceptible type strain ATCC 10231, Saccharomyces cerevisiae AD/CDR1 and AD/CDR2. The tested values of mRNA transcription of CDR1 and CDR2 were higher than that of control strain, while the semi-quantified Cdr1p values were not higher in all of the 14 resistant isolates. And the data analyzed with t test suggest that both of the differences are significant (P ERG11, MDR1, and FLU1 varied in these isolates. These data suggested that overexpression of the five genes might not be the reason of resistance in the 14 isolates with G487T and T916C, especially in the 5 isolates (GZ09, GZ15, GZ16, GZ58, and 4263) in which neither translation of Cdr1p/Cdr2p nor transcription of ERG11, MDR1, or FLU1 was detected up-regulated. The results suggest that Erg11p conformational change due to the point mutations is most likely responsible for the azole resistance in these isolates. PMID:26349561

  14. Effect of Xylitol with Various Concentration and Duration on the Growth of Candida albicans (In Vitro study)

    OpenAIRE

    Lakshmi A. Leepel; Shandy Sastra; Ria Puspitawati; Bachtiar, Boy M.

    2012-01-01

    The growth of C. albicans is influenced by glucose intake. Xylitol is commonly used as sugar substitute. Reported effective concentrations of xylitol in reducing C. albicans growth in vitro were varied, 1%, 5%, and 10%. Objectives: Investigate the effect of different concentration and duration of xylitol exposure in inhibiting C. albicans growth in vitro. Method: Identification of C. albicans from oral swab of a male candidiasis patient was conducted using CHROMagar, confirmed by germ tube te...

  15. Candida albicans biofilm development in vitro for photodynamic therapy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a phototherapy based on the use of a photo sensitizer (PS) in the presence of low intensity light with resonant wavelength of absorption of the PS and biological systems that can raise awareness, generating reactive oxygen species. Studies show that PDT has a lethal effect on Candida albicans. The biofilm formed by C. albicans is the cause of infections associated with medical devices such as catheters, with a proven resistance to antifungal agents, and the removal of the catheter colonized almost always is necessary. However, few studies in literature report the behavior and response of biofilm organized by C. albicans against PDT. The aims of this study were to develop a methodology for in vitro biofilm formation of C. albicans, evaluate the sensitivity of the biofilm of C. albicans to antimicrobial photodynamic therapy using PS as the methylene blue (MB) and hypocrellin B: La+3 (HBLa+3) and analyze the biofilm by Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). For biofilm formation, discs were made from elastomeric silicone catheters. The PS were dissolved in solution of PBS, and the MB had two different concentrations tested in the biofilm: 100μM and 1mM; HBLa+3 only one of 10μM. The irradiation of both dyes with the microorganism was done by two different LEDs, one with red emission at λ = 630nm ± 20nm and the other one blue emission at λ = 460nm ± 30nm. We performed a curve of survival fraction versus time of irradiation of each sample with biofilm and suspension of the microorganism in the yeast form to verify the susceptibility of the front PDT. The yeast showed 100% reduction using both PS, but at different times of irradiation (30s to HBLa+3 and 6 min for the MB at 100μM). When the therapy was applied in biofilm, the MB 100μM did not show any significant reduction, while at concentration of 1mM was reduced by 100% after 6 min of irradiation. The HBLa+3 biofilm group showed a lower reduction in the concentration of 10μM in

  16. Host-Imposed Copper Poisoning Impacts Fungal Micronutrient Acquisition during Systemic Candida albicans Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Joanna; Ballou, Elizabeth R.; Childers, Delma S.; MacCallum, Donna M.; Feldmann, Joerg; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    Nutritional immunity is a process whereby an infected host manipulates essential micronutrients to defend against an invading pathogen. We reveal a dynamic aspect of nutritional immunity during infection that involves copper assimilation. Using a combination of laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP MS) and metal mapping, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression profiling from infected tissues, we show that readjustments in hepatic, splenic and renal copper homeostasis accompany disseminated Candida albicans infections in the mouse model. Localized host-imposed copper poisoning manifests itself as a transient increase in copper early in the kidney infection. Changes in renal copper are detected by the fungus, as revealed by gene expression profiling and fungal virulence studies. The fungus responds by differentially regulating the Crp1 copper efflux pump (higher expression during early infection and down-regulation late in infection) and the Ctr1 copper importer (lower expression during early infection, and subsequent up-regulation late in infection) to maintain copper homeostasis during disease progression. Both Crp1 and Ctr1 are required for full fungal virulence. Importantly, copper homeostasis influences other virulence traits—metabolic flexibility and oxidative stress resistance. Our study highlights the importance of copper homeostasis for host defence and fungal virulence during systemic disease. PMID:27362522

  17. Enrichment and Broad Representation of Plant Biomass-Degrading Enzymes in the Specialized Hyphal Swellings of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, the Fungal Symbiont of Leaf-Cutter Ants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aylward, Frank O.; Khadempour, Lily; Tremmel, Daniel; McDonald, Bradon R.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wu, Si; Moore, Ronald J.; Orton, Daniel J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Currie, Cameron R.

    2015-08-28

    Leaf-cutter ants are prolific and conspicuous Neotropical herbivores that derive energy from specialized fungus gardens they cultivate using foliar biomass. The basidiomycetous cultivar of the ants, Leucoagaricus gongylophorus, produces specialized hyphal swellings called gongylidia that serve as the primary food source of ant colonies. Gongylidia also contain lignocellulases that become concentrated in ant digestive tracts and are deposited within fecal droplets onto fresh foliar material as it is foraged by the ants. Although the enzymes concentrated by L. gongylophorus within gongylidia are thought to be critical to the initial degradation of plant biomass, only a few enzymes present in these hyphal swellings have been identified. Here we use proteomic methods to identify proteins present in the gongylidia of three Atta cephalotes colonies. Our results demonstrate that a diverse but consistent set of enzymes is present in gongylidia, including numerous lignocellulases likely involved in the degradation of polysaccharides, plant toxins, and proteins. Overall, gongylidia contained over three-quarters of all lignocellulases identified in the L. gongylophorus genome, demonstrating that the majority of the enzymes produced by this fungus for biomass breakdown are ingested by the ants. We also identify a set of 23 lignocellulases enriched in gongylidia compared to whole fungus garden samples, suggesting that certain enzymes may be particularly important in the initial degradation of foliar material. Our work sheds light on the complex interplay between leaf-cutter ants and their fungal symbiont that allows for the host insects to occupy an herbivorous niche by indirectly deriving energy from plant biomass.

  18. Pengaruh Perendaman Basis Gigitiruan Resin Akrilik Polimerisasi Panas Dalam Ekstrak Kayu Manis Terhadap Jumlah Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Siahaan, Grace Asima

    2015-01-01

    Resin akrilik polimerisasi panas merupakan bahan yang sering digunakan dalam proses pembuatan basis gigitiruan. Bahan ini memilik sifat kemis dan biologis yang berhubungan dengan pembentukan koloni Candida albicans .Terbentuknya koloni Candida albicans pada basis gigitiruan akan mengakibatkan terjadinya denture stomatitis pada pasien pemakai gigitiruan. Oleh karena itu, dokter gigi memiliki tanggung jawab memberikan instruksi kepada pasien agar menjaga kebersihan gigitiruan dan kebersihan ron...

  19. Portal vein thrombosis due to Candida albicans associated with hepatic cirrhosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, G.; Gil Grande, L. A.; Boixeda, B.; Martín-de-Argila, C.; Barcena, R.; Garcia Hoz, F.

    1993-01-01

    A case of portal vein thrombosis due to Candida albicans in a patient with alcoholic hepatic cirrhosis in the absence of hepatocarcinoma is described. Infection is a known cause of portal vein thrombosis but thrombosis by Candida albicans has not to our knowledge been previously reported.

  20. Candida albicans genome sequence: a platform for genomics in the absence of genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Odds, Frank C.; Brown, Alistair JP; Gow, Neil AR

    2004-01-01

    Publication of the complete diploid genome sequence of the yeast Candida albicans will accelerate research into the pathogenesis of Candida infections. Comparative genomic analysis highlights genes that may contribute to C. albicans survival and its fitness as a human commensal and pathogen.

  1. Use of Multiple Restriction Endonucleases for the Enhanced Differentiation of Candida albicans Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple endonuclease restriction enzymes it was possible to distinguish 31 patterns among 33 epidemiologi-cally independent Candida albicans from the oral cavity. This degree of discrimination required the use of three restriction enzymes.Keywords - Candida albicans, RFLP, Electrophoretic patterns, Epidemiology.

  2. Synthesis of Melanin Pigment by Candida albicans In Vitro and during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Morris-Jones, Rachael; Gomez, Beatriz L.; Diez, Soraya; Uran, Martha; Morris-Jones, Stephen D.; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Hamilton, Andrew J.

    2005-01-01

    Melanins are implicated in the pathogenesis of several important human diseases. This study confirmed the presence of melanin particles in Candida albicans in vitro and during infection. Dark particles were isolated from the digestion of C. albicans cultures and from infected tissue, as established by electron microscopy and immunofluorescence techniques.

  3. Aktivierungsmuster humaner neutrophiler Granulozyten nach Kontakt mit den pathogenen Pilzen Candida albicans und Aspergillus fumigatus

    OpenAIRE

    Hornbach, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Humane neutrophile Granulozyten spielen eine wichtige Rolle in der Immunabwehr invasiver Infektionen durch die humanpathogenen Pilze Candida albicans und Aspergillus fumigatus. Das Ziel der hier vorliegenden Arbeit bestand in einer Charakterisierung der Interaktion beider Pilzspezies mit neutrophilen Granulozyten, mit Fokussierung auf die unterschiedlichen Effektormechanismen dieser Zellen. C. albicans exprimiert eine Reihe von Aspartatproteasen, welche mit der Virulenz des Erregers assoziier...

  4. Efek Penambahan Glukosa pada Saburoud Dextrose Broth terhadap Pertumbuhan Candida albicans (Uji In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi A. Leepel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available High carbohydrate intake is one of predisposing factors of oral candidiasis. Objective: Investigating the effect of 1%,5%,10% glucose addition on the growth of C.albicans in vitro. Method: C.albicans sample was taken from oral swab of a male oral candidiasis patient. Identification of C.albicans was conducted using CHROMagar and confirmed by germ tube formation in serum. As a comparison, C.albicans ATCC10231 was used. After 2 days the cultures were serially diluted and inoculated in SDB without glucose, and with 1%,5%,10% addditional glucose, kept for 3 and 7 days in room temperature, then inoculated in SDA. The CFU/ml were counted after 2 days. ANOVA with α0.05 was used. Result: Statisticaly, additional 1% glucose for 3 days lead to significant decreased of growth of both clinical strain and ATCC 10231 C. albicans. However, only additional 5% and 10% glucose in clinical isolate for 7 days increased the growth of C.albicans significantly. Conclusion: The effect of additional glucose on the increased growth of C.albicans in vitro is influenced by the concentration, exposure duration of glucose, and by the strain of C.albicans.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i1.14

  5. Candida albicans septicemia in a premature infant successfully treated with oral fluconazole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodé, S; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Lars; Hjelt, K

    1992-01-01

    A premature male infant, birth-weight 1460 g, was treated successfully for a Candida albicans septicemia with orally administered fluconazole for 20 days. Dosage was 5 mg/kg/day. No side effects were seen. Fluconazole may present a major progress in treatment of invasive C. albicans infections in...

  6. Biochemical characterization of recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zameitat, E.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang;

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent yeast pathogen in humans, and recently it has become increasingly resistant to the current antifungal agents. In this study we investigated C. albicans dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.99.11), which catalyzes the fourth step of de novo pyrimidine ...

  7. Candida albicans biofilm on titanium: effect of peroxidase precoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois1,21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, 2UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: The present study aimed to document Candida albicans biofilm development on titanium and its modulation by a peroxidase-precoated material which can generate antimicrobials, such as hypoiodite or hypothiocyanite, from hydrogen peroxide, iodide, or thiocyanate. For this purpose, titanium (powder or foil was suspended in Sabouraud liquid medium inoculated with C. albicans ATCC10231. After continuous stirring for 2–21 days at room temperature, the supernatant was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm and titanium washed three times in sterile Sabouraud broth. Using the tetrazolium salt MTT-formazan assay, the titanium-adherent fungal biomass was measured as 7.50 ± 0.60 × 106 blastoconidia per gram of titanium powder (n = 30 and 0.50 ± 0.04 × 106 blastoconidia per cm² of titanium foil (n = 12. The presence of yeast on the surface of titanium was confirmed by microscopy both on fresh preparations and after calcofluor white staining. However, in the presence of peroxidase systems (lactoperoxidase with substrates such as hydrogen peroxide donor, iodide, or thiocyanate, Candida growth in both planktonic and attached phases appeared to be inhibited. Moreover, this study demonstrates the possible partition of peroxidase systems between titanium material (peroxidase-precoated and liquid environment (containing peroxidase substrates to limit C. albicans biofilm formation.Keywords: adhesion, material, oral, yeast

  8. Development of a high-throughput Candida albicans biofilm chip.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Srinivasan

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-density microarray platform consisting of nano-biofilms of Candida albicans. A robotic microarrayer was used to print yeast cells of C. albicans encapsulated in a collagen matrix at a volume as low as 50 nL onto surface-modified microscope slides. Upon incubation, the cells grow into fully formed "nano-biofilms". The morphological and architectural complexity of these biofilms were evaluated by scanning electron and confocal scanning laser microscopy. The extent of biofilm formation was determined using a microarray scanner from changes in fluorescence intensities due to FUN 1 metabolic processing. This staining technique was also adapted for antifungal susceptibility testing, which demonstrated that, similar to regular biofilms, cells within the on-chip biofilms displayed elevated levels of resistance against antifungal agents (fluconazole and amphotericin B. Thus, results from structural analyses and antifungal susceptibility testing indicated that despite miniaturization, these biofilms display the typical phenotypic properties associated with the biofilm mode of growth. In its final format, the C. albicans biofilm chip (CaBChip is composed of 768 equivalent and spatially distinct nano-biofilms on a single slide; multiple chips can be printed and processed simultaneously. Compared to current methods for the formation of microbial biofilms, namely the 96-well microtiter plate model, this fungal biofilm chip has advantages in terms of miniaturization and automation, which combine to cut reagent use and analysis time, minimize labor intensive steps, and dramatically reduce assay costs. Such a chip should accelerate the antifungal drug discovery process by enabling rapid, convenient and inexpensive screening of hundreds-to-thousands of compounds simultaneously.

  9. RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA ALBICANS DIRECTLY FROM YEAST POSITIVE BLOOD CULTURE BOTTLES BY FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION USING PNA PROBES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) method using peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes for identification of Candida albicans directly from yeast-positive blood culture bottles is described. The test (C. albicans PNA FISH) is based on a fluorescein-labeled PNA probe targeting C. albicans 26...

  10. Development of a membrane based detection of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Almeida, Catarina Guerreiro Silva de

    2015-01-01

    Tese de mestrado integrado em Engenharia Biomédica e Biofísica , apresentada à Universidade de Lisboa, através da Faculdade de Ciências, 2015 Candida é uma família de fungos, normalmente, presente na flora gastrointestinal, nos orgãos genitais, no sistema respiratório e na pele de pessoas saudáveis e, até determinada quantidade, não trazem nenhum risco. Apenas 17 espécies de Candida podem ser consideradas como patogénicas para o ser humano e, dentro deste grupo, Candida albicans é a esp...

  11. Activation and binding of C3 by Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozel, T R; Brown, R R; Pfrommer, G S

    1987-01-01

    Interaction with components of the complement system is an important aspect of the pathogenesis of infection by Candida albicans. The key role of C3 as an opsonic ligand and as an element in amplification of complement activation led us to examine several factors that influence the activation and binding of C3 cleavage fragments to the yeast. Activation and binding of C3 were determined by use of normal human serum containing 125I-labeled C3. Incubation of yeast-phase cells in 20% serum led t...

  12. Cancer drugs inhibit morphogenesis in the human fungal pathogen, Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhushree M Routh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Candida infections are very common in cancer patients and it is a common practice to prescribe antifungal antibiotics along with anticancer drugs. Yeast to hyphal form switching is considered to be important in invasive candidiasis. Targeting morphogenetic switching may be useful against invasive candidiasis. In this study, we report the antimorphogenetic properties of thirty cancer drugs.

  13. Anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia (noni extracts against Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Barani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-fungal activity of Morinda citrifolia fruit extract on Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Juice extract from M. citrifolia fruit was lyophilized and used in anti-fungal testing. Anti-fungal activity of M. citrifolia fruit extract against C. albicans was tested in vitro at various concentrations. The inhibitory effect of M. citrifolia extract on C. albicans was determined by agar culture and applied broth dilution test. Results: M. citrifolia extract at 1000 μg/ml concentration effectively inhibited the growth of C. albicans (16.6 ± 0.3 compared with the positive control - amphotericin B (20.6 ± 0.6. It was found to be a dose-dependent reaction. Conclusion: M. citrifolia fruit extract had an anti-fungal effect on C. albicans and the inhibitory effect varied with concentration.

  14. Detection of phospholipase activity of Candida albicans and non albicans isolated from women of reproductive age with vulvovaginal candidiasis in rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S R Fule

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC is most common accounting for 17 to 39% of symptomatic women. Both Candida albicans and non albicans Candida species are involved in VVC. Amongst various virulence factors proposed for Candida, extracellular phospholipases is one of the virulence factor implicated in its pathogenicity. With this background the present study was carried out to find the prevalence of different Candida species and to detect phospholipase producing strains isolated from symptomatic women with VVC. Materials and Methods: At least two vaginal swabs from 156 women of reproductive age with abnormal vaginal discharge were collected. Direct microscopy and Gram′s stained smear examined for presence of budding yeast and pseudo mycelia followed by isolation and identification of Candida species. Extracellular phospholipase activity was studied by inoculating all isolates on Sabouraud′s dextrose egg yolk agar (SDA medium. Results: Of the 156 women with curdy white discharge alone or in combination with other signs, 59 (37.82% women showed laboratory evidence of VVC. A total of 31 (52.54% women had curdy white discharge followed by 12 (20.33% with other signs and symptoms. C. albicans (62.59% and non albicans Candida (37.28% in a ratio of 1.68:1 were isolated. Of the 37 strains of C. albians 30 (81.08% showed the enzyme activity. Seventeen (56.66% strains showed higher Pz value of < 0.70 (++++. Conclusion: Although there may be typical clinical presentation of Candidiasis. all the patients did not show laboratory evidence of infection. Pregnancy was found to be major risk factor for development of VVC. C. albicans was prevalent species but non albicans species were also frequently isolated. Extracellular phospholipase activity was seen in C. albicans and not in non albicans Candida isolates.

  15. PENGHAMBATAN CAJUPUTS CANDY TERHADAP VIABILITAS KHAMIR Candida albicans SECARA IN VITRO [Inhibition of Cajuputs Candy Toward the Viability of Candida albicans by using In Vitro Assay

    OpenAIRE

    C. Hanny Wijaya 2); A. Fieki Rachmatillah1); Bachtiar, Boy M.

    2014-01-01

    The utilization of cajuput essential oil as a flavor in candy may produce a physiological active added value. Some compounds of cajuput plant (Melaleuca cajuputi L) have been reported for their anti-microbial activities. Candida albicans is a normal commensal organism in human mouth. However, it may become virulent and responsible for oral diseases known as oral candidiasis. This study aimed to determine the effect of cajuput and peppermint oil in cajuputs candy in inhibiting the C. albicans ...

  16. Analysis of genital Candida albicans infection by rapid microsatellite markers genotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Wei-min; MEI Xing-yu; GAO Fei; HUO Ke-ke; SHEN Liang-liang; QIN Hai-hong; WU Zhou-wei; ZHENG Jie

    2007-01-01

    Background Candida albicans (C. albicans) infection, often occurring in genital candidiasis, has increased dramatically recently. Developing an efficient C. albicans typing method may contribute to understanding its epidemiological characteristics and guiding efficient treatment. We used rapid microsatellite genotyping assay for interstrain differentiation of C. albicans isolates and explored some characteristics of its spread.Methods DNA was extracted from C. albicans isolates from gentalia, recta and mouths of 39 female cases and 27 male cases of genital candidiasis. Three fluorescent primers for the microsatellite markers in conserved genes (CDC3, EF3and HIS3) of C. albicans were used to amplify the isolates DNA by PCR. Fluorescent signals were read with an automatic sequencer and analyzed with GeneScan software.Results Analysis of the three microsatellites markers showed 18 gene allelic associations in genital C. albicans infected patients: 10 allelic associations in female and 11 allelic associations in male, of which 3 allelic associations shared by both genders covered 71% of infections. The most dominant allele association of pathogenic strains for both genders was 116:124, 122:131,160:200 that covered about 50% of infection. Gentalia and recta shared the same strains in 80%of female patients, but in only 3.8% of male patients. There were 2.7% female patients, but no males, with same strain in both gentalia and mouths. Five of seven genital C. albicans infected couples had the same allelic associations of which 4were the dominant pathogenic C. albicans susceptible for both genders.Conclusions The predominant allelic association of the pathogenic strain in genital C. albicans infection is 116:124,122:131, 160:200. Vaginal pathogenic strains are probably maintained from the rectal reservoir. Pathogenic strains of male patients are probably from frequent sexual intercourse. The aggressiveness of some strains varies with gender.

  17. Candida albicans susceptibility to lactoperoxidase-generated hypoiodite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ahariz

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed Ahariz1, Philippe Courtois21Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium; 2Laboratory of Experimental Hormonology, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium and UER de Biologie Médicale, Haute Ecole Francisco Ferrer, Brussels, BelgiumAbstract: In vivo, lactoperoxidase produces hypothiocyanite (OSCN- from thiocyanate (SCN- in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; in vitro, iodide (I- can be oxidized into hypoiodite (OI- by this enzyme. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro the anti-Candida effect of iodide versus thiocyanate used as lactoperoxidase substrate to prevent Candida biofilms development. Candida albicans ATCC 10231 susceptibility upon both peroxidase systems was tested in three different experimental designs: (i in a liquid culture medium, (ii in an interface model between solid culture medium and gel containing the enzymic systems, (iii in a biofilm model onto titanium and acrylic resin. Yeast growth in liquid medium was monitored by turbidimetry at 600 nm. Material-adherent yeast biomass was evaluated by the tetrazolium salt MTT method. The iodide-peroxidase system has been shown to inhibit Candida biofilm formation at lower substrate concentrations (~200 fold less H2O2 donor and for longer incubation periods than the thiocyanate-peroxidase system. In conclusion, efficiency of lactoperoxidase-generated OI- to prevent C. albicans biofilm development allows refining iodine antifungal use in ex vivo conditions.Keywords: denture, iodide, oral, peroxidase, saliva, titanium

  18. Candida albicans menengitis in a newborn with classical galactosemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Altunhan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Classical galactosemia is a rarely seen carbohydrate metabolismdisorder. The frequency of sepsis significantlyincreases in patients with galactosemia. The most commonagent causing sepsis is E. coli. Sepsis due to fungusin patients with galactosemia is rarely reported. Candidais an important cause of sepsis in newborn intensive careunits especially in newborns with underlying risk factorssuch as prematurity and low birth weight. Although themost common etiologic agent of sepsis is E. coli in caseswith galactosemia, it should be kept in mind that candidamay also be causative agent of sepsis and meningitis inthese patients even though there is no underlying risk factor.Also the clinical and laboratory findings of candidiasismay be obscure. For this reason, especially in newborncandida meningitis, the index of suspicion should be kepthigh for early diagnosis and treatment. In such patientscerebrospinal fluid analysis, culture and brain imagingshould be done necessarily, because early diagnosis andtreatment will be life saving. In this article we reported agalactosemia case with the diagnosis of meningitis andCandida albicans grown in his blood culture derived onthe fourth day of admission to clinic.Key words: Candida albicans, galactosemia, meningitis,newborn, sepsis

  19. Scolopendin 2 leads to cellular stress response in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heejeong; Hwang, Jae-Sam; Lee, Dong Gun

    2016-07-01

    Centipedes, a kind of arthropod, have been reported to produce antimicrobial peptides as part of an innate immune response. Scolopendin 2 (AGLQFPVGRIGRLLRK) is a novel antimicrobial peptide derived from the body of the centipede Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans by using RNA sequencing. To investigate the intracellular responses induced by scolopendin 2, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione accumulation and lipid peroxidation were monitored over sublethal and lethal doses. Intracellular ROS and antioxidant molecule levels were elevated and lipids were peroxidized at sublethal concentrations. Moreover, the Ca(2+) released from the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated in the cytosol and mitochondria. These stress responses were considered to be associated with yeast apoptosis. Candida albicans cells exposed to scolopendin 2 were identified using diagnostic markers of apoptotic response. Various responses such as phosphatidylserine externalization, chromatin condensation, and nuclear fragmentation were exhibited. Scolopendin 2 disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential and activated metacaspase, which was mediated by cytochrome c release. In conclusion, treatment of C. albicans with scolopendin 2 induced the apoptotic response at sublethal doses, which in turn led to mitochondrial dysfunction, metacaspase activation, and cell death. The cationic antimicrobial peptide scolopendin 2 from the centipede is a potential antifungal peptide, triggering the apoptotic response. PMID:27207682

  20. Mechanism of iron uptake by the pathogenic yeast, Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C. albicans requires iron for growth and phenotypic development. When deprived of iron, mycelium and bud formation was suppressed. Survival of the organism was also reduced under iron-limiting conditions. The combination of elevated temperature and iron-deprivation further reduced phenotypic development and survival of the yeast. The combination of elevated temperature and iron starvation resulted in a decrease in both the growth rate and siderophore production. However, with time, the cells were able to show partial recovery in the growth rate which occurred concomitantly with an increase in siderophore production. In order for siderophores to be utilized, ferri-siderophore receptors must be produced. The receptor was shown to be located in the plasma membrane of the yeast. Scatchard analysis of the binding of ferri-siderophores to plasma membrane receptors showed an increase in receptor affinity and number of binding sites in iron-starved cells when compared to control cells. Autoradiograms of the 58Fe-siderophore-protein complex following SDS-PAGE separation of candidal proteins revealed the presence of a ferri-siderophore receptor of approximately 10,000 daltons. C. albicans strains which lacked the ability to synthesize phenolate siderophore maintained a phenolate receptor and bound candidal phenolate siderophore better than non-candidal phenolate siderophores

  1. Polyketide glycosides from Bionectria ochroleuca inhibit Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin; You, Jianlan; King, Jarrod B; Cai, Shengxin; Park, Elizabeth; Powell, Douglas R; Cichewicz, Robert H

    2014-10-24

    One of the challenges presented by Candida infections is that many of the isolates encountered in the clinic produce biofilms, which can decrease these pathogens' susceptibilities to standard-of-care antibiotic therapies. Inhibitors of fungal biofilm formation offer a potential solution to counteracting some of the problems associated with Candida infections. A screening campaign utilizing samples from our fungal extract library revealed that a Bionectria ochroleuca isolate cultured on Cheerios breakfast cereal produced metabolites that blocked the in vitro formation of Candida albicans biofilms. A scale-up culture of the fungus was undertaken using mycobags (also known as mushroom bags or spawn bags), which afforded four known [TMC-151s C-F (1-4)] and three new [bionectriols B-D (5-7)] polyketide glycosides. All seven metabolites exhibited potent biofilm inhibition against C. albicans SC5314, as well as exerted synergistic antifungal activities in combination with amphotericin B. In this report, we describe the structure determination of the new metabolites, as well as compare the secondary metabolome profiles of fungi grown in flasks and mycobags. These studies demonstrate that mycobags offer a useful alternative to flask-based cultures for the preparative production of fungal secondary metabolites. PMID:25302529

  2. Heat-shock protein 90 in Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Researches on Candidal heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in recent years are summarized.Candida albicans is a commensal pathogen in human and animals.In immunocompromised individuals it behaves as an opportunist pathogen,giving rise to superficial or systemic infections.Systemic candidosis is a common cause of death among immunocompromised and debilitated patients,in which the mortality is as high as 70%.HSP90 is now recognized as an immunodominant antigen in C.albicans and plays a key role in systemic candidosis as a molecular chaperone.The 47-ku peptide is the breakdown product of HSP90.Patients who has recovered from systemic candidosis produce high titre of antibodies to 47-ku antigen,whereas the fatal cases have little antibody or falling titres.The three commonest epitopes of candidal HSP90 have been mapped,epitopes C,B and H.Epitopes C and H are immunogenic.The antibody probes of both epitopes may be developed into a new serological test agents for systemic candidosis due to rather high specificity and sensitivity.The recent results establish HSP90 as an ATP-dependent chaperone that is involved in the folding of cell regulatory proteins and in the refolding of stress-denatured polypeptides.Some researches on fungal HSP90 and the treatment of patients with candidosis are reviewed as well.

  3. Cell surface changes in the Candida albicans mitochondrial mutant goa1Δ are associated with reduced recognition by innate immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    She, Xiaodong; Zhang, Lulu; Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard; Li, Dongmei

    2013-01-01

    We have previously characterized several fungal-specific proteins from the human pathogen Candida albicans that either encode subunits of mitochondria Complex I (CI) of the electron transport chain (ETC) or regulate CI activity (Goa1p). Herein, the role of energy production and cell wall gene expression is investigated in the mitochondria mutant goa1Δ. We show that down regulation of cell wall-encoding genes in the goa1Δ results in sensitivity to cell wall inhibitors such as congo red and cal...

  4. Analysis of Two Putative Candida albicans Phosphopantothenoylcysteine Decarboxylase / Protein Phosphatase Z Regulatory Subunits Reveals an Unexpected Distribution of Functional Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrényi, Katalin; Molero, Cristina; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Ariño, Joaquin; Dombrádi, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphatase Z (Ppz) is a fungus specific enzyme that regulates cell wall integrity, cation homeostasis and oxidative stress response. Work on Saccharomyces cerevisiae has shown that the enzyme is inhibited by Hal3/Vhs3 moonlighting proteins that together with Cab3 constitute the essential phosphopantothenoylcysteine decarboxylase (PPCDC) enzyme. In Candida albicans CaPpz1 is also involved in the morphological changes and infectiveness of this opportunistic human pathogen. To reveal the CaPpz1 regulatory context we searched the C. albicans database and identified two genes that, based on the structure of their S. cerevisiae counterparts, were termed CaHal3 and CaCab3. By pull down analysis and phosphatase assays we demonstrated that both of the bacterially expressed recombinant proteins were able to bind and inhibit CaPpz1 as well as its C-terminal catalytic domain (CaPpz1-Cter) with comparable efficiency. The binding and inhibition were always more pronounced with CaPpz1-Cter, indicating a protective effect against inhibition by the N-terminal domain in the full length protein. The functions of the C. albicans proteins were tested by their overexpression in S. cerevisiae. Contrary to expectations we found that only CaCab3 and not CaHal3 rescued the phenotypic traits that are related to phosphatase inhibition by ScHal3, such as tolerance to LiCl or hygromycin B, requirement for external K+ concentrations, or growth in a MAP kinase deficient slt2 background. On the other hand, both of the Candida proteins turned out to be essential PPCDC components and behaved as their S. cerevisiae counterparts: expression of CaCab3 and CaHal3 rescued the cab3 and hal3 vhs3 S. cerevisiae mutations, respectively. Thus, both CaHal3 and CaCab3 retained the PPCDC related functions and have the potential for CaPpz1 inhibition in vitro. The fact that only CaCab3 exhibits its phosphatase regulatory potential in vivo suggests that in C. albicans CaCab3, but not CaHal3, acts as a

  5. The effectiveness of Nigella sativa seed extract in inhibiting Candida albicans on heat cured acrylic resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanoem EH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Indonesia has a variety of plants that can be used for medicines. One of the medicinal plants is Nigella sativa. Nigella sativa has been used for medicinal purposes, both as medicinal herb and as medicinal oil. It contains saponin and atsiri oils that have antifungal, antimicrobial and antibacterial effects. Nigella sativa has been suggested as denture cleansers since it can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans (C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin. Purpose: The aim of this research is to know the effectiveness of Nigella sativa seed extract in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin. Methods: Eighteen acrylic samples were divided into three groups. Group I was control group, only contaminated with C. albicans without immersing in any solution. Group II was acrylic sample immersed in sterile aquades for one hour. Group III was acrylic sample immersed in Nigella sativa seed extract for one hour. Results: There were significant differences of C. albicans (p < 0.05 among the three groups. The number of Candida albicans was significantly higher in Group I, while that in group II was lower than that in group I, and that in group III was the lowest. Conclusion: Nigella sativa seed extract was effective in inhibiting the growth of C. albicans on heat cured acrylic resin.Latar belakang: Indonesia memiliki berbagai tanaman yang dapat dipakai sebagai obat, salah satu tanaman tersebut adalah jinten hitam (Nigella sativa. Pada beberapa negara jinten hitam telah digunakan untuk berbagai tujuan, baik sebagai obat herbal maupun sebagai minyak. kandungan jinten hitam adalah saponin dan minyak atsiri yang mempunyai efek anti jamur dan anti mikroba. Jinten hitam disarankan sebagai pilihan pembersih gigi tiruan yang dapat menghambat pertumbuhan Candida albicans (C. albicans pada resin akrilik heat cured. Tujuan: Tujuan penelitian ini adalah mengetahui efektivitas dari ekstrak biji jinten hitam dalam menghambat pertumbuhan

  6. Dynamic monitoring and analysis of the persisters emerging in Candida albicans biofilm%白假丝酵母菌生物膜中滞留菌形成的动态监测及分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董洪楠; 孙静; 张颖; 武侠; 褚昊月; 亓庆国

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究白假丝酵母菌生物膜产生滞留菌的动态特点,为揭示其产生机制及相关途径奠定基础.方法:分别以两相型白假丝酵母菌标准菌液构建体外生物膜模型,CFU计数法统计不同时间段生物膜加药前真菌细胞繁殖数目及加药后滞留菌产生数目,采用SPSS11.5软件包对数据进行统计学分析;结合激光共聚焦显微镜(CLSM),观察生物膜的形态变化.结果:两相型菌液形成的不同时间段生物膜,真菌细胞繁殖数目及滞留菌数目均无显著差异.其中,真菌细胞繁殖数目呈“S”形生长,12h后渐稳定;滞留菌0.5 h即大量产生,2h后数目基本稳定,此时镜下生物膜处于微菌落始形成期.结论:白假丝酵母菌滞留菌的形成与其生物膜形成初期(2h内)附着表面的诱导密切相关,而与生物膜成熟程度及两相型状态无显著关联.%PURPOSE: To investigate the mechanism and approach related to persisters emerging in Candida albicans biofilm by studying its dynamic characteristics. METHODS: The Candida albicans biofilms model in vitro were formed by individual yeast cells and hyphal compartments respectively. The numbers of progenitive fungal cells and persisters at different stages were counted and analyzed with SPSS11.5 software package. The biofilm morphological changes were observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy. RESULTS: Different stages of biofilms which were formed by individual yeast cells and hyphal compartments had no significant difference both on the number of progenitive fungal cells and persisters. The number of progenitive fungal cells showed S-shaped growth curve until 12 hours. The persisters emerged within 0.5 hour and its number reached a steady state after 2 hours while the biofilm was in the period of microcolony formation under microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The persisters emerging in Candida albicans biofilm are closely connected with the attachment to a surface (within 2 hours of the

  7. Sds22 participates in Glc7 mediated Rad53 dephosphorylation in MMS-induced DNA damage in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Guangyin; Wan, Junhua; Mu, Chunhua; Liu, Qizheng; Wang, Yue; Sang, Jianli

    2016-08-01

    The protein kinase Rad53 and its orthologs play a fundamental role in regulating the DNA damage checkpoint in eukaryotes. Rad53 is activated by phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and deactivated by dephosphorylation after the damage is repaired. However, the phosphatases involved in Rad53 deactivation are not entirely understood. In this study, by investigating the consequences of overexpressing SDS22, a gene encoding a regulatory subunit of the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we discovered that Sds22 plays an important role in Rad53 dephosphorylation and thus the deactivation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Sds22 cellular levels increase when cells are exposed to DNA damaging agents and decrease after removing the genotoxins. Depletion of Glc7 has similar phenotypes. We provide evidence that Sds2 acts through inhibitory physical association with Glc7. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms for the control of DNA damage checkpoint. Furthermore, SDS22 overexpression reduces C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection, suggesting potential targets for developing antifungal drugs. PMID:27328280

  8. Antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast:Candida albicans and Rhodotorula sp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Moussa; Djebli Noureddine; Aissat Saad; Meslem Abdelmelek; Benhalima Abdelkader

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the antifungal activity of four honeys of different types from Algeria against pathogenic yeast i.e. Candida albicans (C. albicans) and Rhodotorula sp. Methods:Four Algeria honeys of different botanical origin were analyzed to test antifungal effect against C. albicans, and Rhodotorula sp. Different concentrations (undiluted, 10%, 30%, 50%and 70%w/v) of honey were studied in vitro for their antifugal activity using C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. as fungal strains. Results:The range of the diameter of zone of inhibition of various concentrations of tested honeys was (7-23 mm) for Rhodotorula sp., while C. albicans showed clearly resistance towards all concentrations used. The MICs of tested honey concentrations against C. albicans and Rhodotorula sp. were (70.09-93.48)%and (4.90-99.70)%v/v, respectively. Conclusions:This study demonstrates that, in vitro, these natural products have clearly an antifungal activity against Rhodotorula sp. and C. albicans.

  9. CX3CL1 expression induced by Candida albicans in oral fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kouji; Nishi, Hiromi; Fukui, Akiko; Shigeishi, Hideo; Takechi, Masaaki; Kamata, Nobuyuki

    2010-11-01

    Oral fibroblasts as well as keratinocytes are thought to influence host inflammatory responses against Candida albicans. However, little is known about chemokine expressions in oral fibroblasts against C. albicans infection. We therefore examined whether C. albicans induced several chemokines including fractalkine/CX3CL1 (CX3CL1), a unique chemokine that has properties of both chemoattractants and adhesion molecules, in fibroblasts and keratinocytes. The addition of C. albicans live cells to human immortalized oral keratinocytes (RT7) resulted in increases in the mRNA levels of multiple chemokines, but not of CX3CL1. In contrast, live and heat-killed C. albicans caused an increase in CX3CL1 mRNA and protein expression in human immortalized oral fibroblasts (GT1). CX3CL1 mRNA expression in GT1 cells was also enhanced by stimulation with a nonalbicans species of Candida. Further, the CX3CL1 chemokine domain showed antifungal activity against C. albicans. CX3CL1 secreted by oral fibroblasts appears to play an important role in the oral immune response to C. albicans infection. PMID:20880200

  10. Quantitative and qualitative analyses of the cell death process in Candida albicans treated by antifungal agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Young-Sun; Han, Ihn; Kim, Mi-Hyun; Jung, Min Hyung; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2011-01-01

    The death process of Candida albicans was investigated after treatment with the antifungal agents flucytosine and amphotericin B by assessing morphological and biophysical properties associated with cell death. C. albicans was treated varying time periods (from 6 to 48 hours) and examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM and AFM images clearly showed changes in morphology and biophysical properties. After drug treatment, the membrane of C. albicans was perforated, deformed, and shrunken. Compared to the control, C. albicans treated with flucytosine was softer and initially showed a greater adhesive force. Conversely, C. albicans treated with amphotericin B was harder and had a lower adhesive force. In both cases, the surface roughness increased as the treatment time increased. The relationships between morphological changes and the drugs were observed by AFM clearly; the surface of C. albicans treated with flucytosine underwent membrane collapse, expansion of holes, and shrinkage, while the membranes of cells treated with amphotericin B peeled off. According to these observations, the death process of C. albicans was divided into 4 phases, CDP(0), CDP(1), CDP(2), and CDP(4), which were determined based on morphological changes. Our results could be employed to further investigate the antifungal activity of compounds derived from natural sources. PMID:22174777

  11. Antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine on intratubular Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ronan Jacques Rezende Delgado; Thaís Helena Gasparoto; Carla Renata Sipert; Claudia Ramos Pinheiro; Ivaldo Gomes de Moraes; Roberto Brandāo Garcia; Marco Antonio Hungaro Duarte; Clóvis Monteiro Bramante; Sérgio Aparecido Torres; Gustavo Pompermaier Garlet; Ana Paula Campanelli; Norberti Bernardineli

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of calcium hydroxide and chlorhexidine gel for the elimination of intratubular Candida albicans (C. albicans). Human single-rooted teeth contaminated with C. albicans were treated with calcium hydroxide, 2% chlorhexidine gel, calcium hydroxide plus 2% chlorhexidine gel, or saline (0.9% sodium chloride) as a positive control. The samples obtained at depths of 0-100 and 100-200 μm from the root canal system were analyzed for C. albicans load by counting the number of colony forming units and for the percentage of viable C. albicans using fluorescence microscopy. First, the antimicrobial activity of calcium hydroxide and the 2% chlorhexidine gel was evaluated by counting the number of colony forming units. After 14 days of intracanal medication, there was a significant decrease in the number of C. albicanscolony forming units at a depth of 0-100 lzm with chlorhexidine treatment either with or without calcium hydroxide compared with the calcium hydroxide only treatment. However, there were no differences in the number of colony forming units at the 100-200 μm depth for any of the medications investigated. C. albicans viability was also evaluated by vital staining techniques and fluorescence microscopy analysis. Antifungal activity against C. albicans significantly increased at both depths in the chlorhexidine groups with and without calcium hydroxide compared with the groups treated with calcium hydroxide only. Treatments with only chlorhexidine or chlorhexidine in combination with calcium hydroxide were effective for elimination of C. albicans.

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Alpha-Mangostin on Adhesion of Candida albicans to Denture Acrylic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaomongkolgit, Ruchadaporn; Jamdee, Kusuma

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Candida-associated denture stomatitis is a very common disease affecting denture wearers. It is characterized by the presence of yeast biofilm on the denture, primarily associated with C. albicans. The investigation of agents that can reduce C. albicans adhesion may represent a significant advancement in the prevention and treatment of this disease. This study aims to investigate the effect of alpha-mangostin on the in vitro adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic and germ tube formation by C. albicans and to compare its activity with clotrimazole which is a topical antifungal agent commonly used for the treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Materials and Methodology: Alpha-mangostin was extracted by thin layer chromatography. The effect of alpha-mangostin on adhesion of C. albicans to denture acrylic was determined by using a colorimetric tetrazolium assay and germ tube formation by C. albicans was determined by using the counting chamber. Results: A significant reduction of C. albicans adhesion to denture acrylic was evident after exposure to 2,000 µg/ml of alpha-mangostin for only 15 min. In addition, the 2,000 µg/ml of the alpha-mangostin-treated C. albicans had a reduced ability for germ tube formation. These inhibitory effects of alpha-mangostin were as effective as clotrimazole. Conclusion: Alpha-mangostin has antifungal property against C. albicans by inhibiting the adhesion to denture acrylic and germ tube formation in vitro. These results suggest the potential application of alpha-mangostin as a topical medication or a natural oral hygiene product for treatment of Candida-associated denture stomatitis. PMID:26962371

  13. Candida albicans infection in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čanković Miloš

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacground/Aim. Systemic candidiasis in intensive care units remains an improtant problem due to antifungal resistance. Patients undergoing radiotherapy for head and neck cancer are at increased risk of developing oral candidiasis and they more frequent have prior fungi colonization. Due to identification of specific risk factors predisposing to fungal infection in order to threat such patients the aim of this study was to determine the presence of Candida species in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and compare it to the control subjects (patients with benign oral mucosal lesions. Methods. A total number of 30 consecutive oral cancer examined patients were included in this prospective study (24 men and 6 women with a mean age of 61.47 years, range 41-81 years. The control group consisted of 30 consecutive patients with histologically proven benign oral mucosal lesions (16 men and 14 women with a mean age of 54.53 years, range 16- 83 years. The samples for mycological examination were obtained by using sterile cotton swabs from the cancer lesion surface and in the patients of the control group from the benign mucosal lesion surface. Samples were inoculated in Sabouraud' dextrose agar. For identification purposes, Mackenzie germ tube test was performend on all isolates. Results. The prevalence of Candida was significantly higher in oral cancer patients than in control subjects (χ2 = 5.455, p = 0.020. Candida was found on nine of the 30 cancer surfaces; 5 (16.7% were identified as non-albicans Candida and 4 (13.3% as Candida albicans. In the control group, only Candida albicans was isolated from 2 (6.7% patients. In this study, no statistically significant differences in the presence of Candida species was found with respect to gender, age, smoking, alcohol consumption, wearing of dental protheses and the site of cancer lesion. Conclusion. The increased prevalence of yeasts on the surfaces of oral carcinoma indicates a need for their

  14. Three-dimensional image analysis of plugging at the septal pore by Woronin body during hypotonic shock inducing hyphal tip bursting in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus oryzae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We observed that the filamentous fungus, Aspergillus oryzae, grown on agar media burst out cytoplasmic constituents from the hyphal tip soon after flooding with water. Woronin body is a specialized organelle known to plug the septal pore adjacent to the lysed compartment to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm. A. oryzae Aohex1 gene homologous to Neurospora crassa HEX1 gene encoding a major protein in Woronin body was expressed as a fusion with DsRed2, resulting in visualization of Woronin body. Confocal microscopy and three-dimensional reconstruction of images visualized the septal pore as a dark region surrounded by green fluorescence of EGFP-fused secretory protein, RNase T1, on the septum. Dual fluorescent labeling revealed the plugging of the septal pores adjacent to the lysed apical compartments by Woronin bodies during hypotonic shock. Disruption of Aohex1 gene caused disappearance of Woronin bodies and the defect to prevent extensive loss of cytoplasm during hypotonic shock

  15. Cloning and Sequencing of a Candida albicans Catalase Gene and Effects of Disruption of This Gene†

    OpenAIRE

    Wysong, Deborah R.; Christin, Laurent; Sugar, Alan M.; Robbins, Phillips W.; Diamond, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    Catalase plays a key role as an antioxidant, protecting aerobic organisms from the toxic effects of hydrogen peroxide, and in some cases has been postulated to be a virulence factor. To help elucidate the function of catalase in Candida albicans, a single C. albicans-derived catalase gene, designated CAT1, was isolated and cloned. Degenerate PCR primers based on highly conserved areas of other fungal catalase genes were used to amplify a 411-bp product from genomic DNA of C. albicans ATCC 102...

  16. A 51Chromium release assay for phagocytic killing of Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular killing of Candida albicans was measured by a chromium release technique. Appropriate conditions were equal numbers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) and 51Chromium labelled C. albicans (106/ml), fresh plasma at a final concentration of 2.5%, incubated at 37degC for 60 min. Using normal PMNs, 35-71% of releasable chromium was liberated into the supernatant under these conditions. This assay is easy to perform, requires a small amount of blood and offers an objective measurement of intracellular killing of C. albicans

  17. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls

  18. Melanin Externalization in Candida albicans Depends on Cell Wall Chitin Structures▿

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Claire A; Gómez, Beatriz L.; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.; Mackenzie, Kevin S; Munro, Carol A.; Brown, Alistair J. P.; Gow, Neil A. R.; Kibbler, Christopher C.; Odds, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Candida albicans produces dark-pigmented melanin after 3 to 4 days of incubation in medium containing l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) as a substrate. Expression profiling of C. albicans revealed very few genes significantly up- or downregulated by growth in l-DOPA. We were unable to determine a possible role for melanin in the virulence of C. albicans. However, we showed that melanin was externalized from the fungal cells in the form of electron-dense melanosomes tha...

  19. Influence of Various Ultraviolet Light Intensities on Pathogenic Determinants of Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad K. Abu Sini; Khaled H. Abu-Elteen; Ali Z. Elkarmi; Mawieh A. Hamad; Rula F. Khuzaie

    2007-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment of Candida albicans with different UV light (360 nm) intensities (4, 6 and 10 W m-2) at different time intervals (6, 12, 24 and 48 h) in an attempt to investigate its influence on proteinase and phospholipase activities in correlation with in vitro adherence to Buccal Epithelial Cells (BECs) and lethality to mice were studied. Irradiated C. albicans cells were found to be less virulent than non-irradiated. Exposure of C. albicans to various doses of radiation led to...

  20. Presence of extracellular DNA in the Candida albicans biofilm matrix and its contribution to biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, M.; Uppuluri, Priya; Thomas, Derek P.; Cleary, Ian A.; Henriques, Mariana; Lopez-Ribot, José L.; Oliveira, Rosário

    2009-01-01

    DNA has been described as a structural component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in bacterial biofilms. In Candida albicans, there is a scarce knowledge concerning the contribution of extracellular DNA (eDNA) to biofilm matrix and overall structure. This work examined the presence and quantified the amount of eDNA in C. albicans biofilm ECM and the effect of DNase treatment and the addition of exogenous DNA on C. albicans biofilm development as indicators of a role for eDNA in biofilm devel...

  1. Epithelial discrimination of commensal and pathogenic Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S X; Moyes, D L; Richardson, J P; Blagojevic, M; Naglik, J R

    2016-04-01

    All mucosal surfaces are lined by epithelial cells and are colonised by opportunistic microbes. In health, these opportunistic microbes remain commensal and are tolerated by the immune system. However, when the correct environmental conditions arise, these microbes can become pathogenic and need to be controlled or cleared by the immune system to prevent disease. The mechanisms that enable epithelial cells to initiate the 'danger' signals activated specifically by pathogenic microbes are critical to mucosal defence and homeostasis but are not well understood. Deciphering these mechanisms will provide essential understanding to how mucosal tissues maintain health and activate immunity, as well as how pathogens promote disease. This review focuses on the interaction of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with epithelial cells and the epithelial mechanisms that enable mucosal tissues to discriminate between the commensal and pathogenic state of this medically important fungus. PMID:26843519

  2. Phage displaying epitope of Candida albicans HSP90 and serodiagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琼; 王丽; 卢大宁; 邢沈阳; 尹东; 朱筱娟

    2004-01-01

    @@ Recently, the frequent use of immunosuppressants and chemotherapeutic drugs for cancers has caused an increase in the frequency of life-threatening systemic candidiasis.1 Studies by Matthews et al2 indicated HSP90 fragments are major targets for the immune system in infection due to C. albicans, and anti-epitope LKVIRK of HSP90 antibody is a serological marker for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. Cloning and sequencing HSP90 antigen revealed that the linear epitope LKVIRK, localized near the C-terminus of the 47 kDa protein which circulates in the sera of patients with invasive candidiasis, as a heat-stable breakdown product of large more heat-labile antigen HSP90.2 In this study, epitope LKVIRK was displayed on the surface of phage fd to develop a new serological test for systemic candidiasis.

  3. PENGHAMBATAN CAJUPUTS CANDY TERHADAP VIABILITAS KHAMIR Candida albicans SECARA IN VITRO [Inhibition of Cajuputs Candy Toward the Viability of Candida albicans by using In Vitro Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Hanny Wijaya1*

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of cajuput essential oil as a flavor in candy may produce a physiological active added value. Some compounds of cajuput plant (Melaleuca cajuputi L have been reported for their anti-microbial activities. Candida albicans is a normal commensal organism in human mouth. However, it may become virulent and responsible for oral diseases known as oral candidiasis. This study aimed to determine the effect of cajuput and peppermint oil in cajuputs candy in inhibiting the C. albicans biofilms formation by using in vitro biofilm assay and viability assay. Furthermore, the influence of concentration of cajuput oil on the anti-microbial activities had been analyzed. All the tested concentration of cajuput oil in cajuputs candy was effective to inhibit the viability of C. albicans. The provision of flavor components of cajuput and peppermint oil could produce synergistic effects compared to a single flavor component. The addition of cajuput oil at 0.6% was able to inhibit the viability of C. albicans. The activities of the cajuput oil showed positive correlation to the concentration. The variable of plus and minus 0.1% addition of the cajuput oil concentration, however, produced no significant difference to inhibit the growth of C. albicans in biofilm. Sensory test, hedonic test, was conducted to evaluate the flavor, aroma, and overall attributes, resulting in no significant difference between 0.6 to 0.8% additions of cajuput oil upon the sensory acceptance.

  4. The fungus Candida albicans tolerates ambiguity at multiple codons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Salvador Simões

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycete Candida albicans is a normal resident of the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It occurs in a broad range of body sites and has high capacity to survive and proliferate in adverse environments with drastic changes in oxygen, carbon dioxide, pH, osmolarity, nutrients and temperature. Its biology is unique due to flexible reassignment of the leucine CUG codon to serine and synthesis of statistical proteins. Under standard growth conditions 3% of leucine and 97% of serine are incorporated at CUG sites on a proteome wide scale, but leucine incorporation fluctuates in response to environmental stressors and can be artificially increased up to 98%. In order to determine whether such flexibility also exists at other codons, we have constructed several serine tRNAs that decode various non-cognate codons. Expression of these tRNAs had minor effects on fitness, but growth of the mistranslating strains at different temperatures, in medium with different pH and nutrients composition was often enhanced relatively to the wild type (WT strain, supporting our previous data on adaptive roles of CUG ambiguity in variable growth conditions. Parallel evolution of the recombinant strains (100 generations followed by full genome resequencing identified various strain specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and one SNP in the deneddylase (JAB1 gene in all strains. Since JAB1 is a subunit of the COP9 signalosome complex, which interacts with cullin (Cdc53p to mediate degradation of a variety of cellular proteins, our data suggest that neddylation plays a key role in tolerance and adaptation to codon ambiguity in C. albicans.

  5. Humoral Immunity Links Candida albicans Infection and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradin, Chantal; Salleron, Julia; Damiens, Sébastien; Moragues, Maria Dolores; Souplet, Vianney; Jouault, Thierry; Robert, Raymond; Dubucquoi, Sylvain; Sendid, Boualem; Colombel, Jean Fréderic; Poulain, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective The protein Hwp1, expressed on the pathogenic phase of Candida albicans, presents sequence analogy with the gluten protein gliadin and is also a substrate for transglutaminase. This had led to the suggestion that C. albicans infection (CI) may be a triggering factor for Celiac disease (CeD) onset. We investigated cross-immune reactivity between CeD and CI. Methods Serum IgG levels against recombinant Hwp1 and serological markers of CeD were measured in 87 CeD patients, 41 CI patients, and 98 healthy controls (HC). IgA and IgG were also measured in 20 individuals from each of these groups using microchips sensitized with 38 peptides designed from the N-terminal of Hwp1. Results CI and CeD patients had higher levels of anti-Hwp1 (p=0.0005 and p=0.004) and anti-gliadin (p=0.002 and p=0.0009) antibodies than HC but there was no significant difference between CeD and CI patients. CeD and CI patients had higher levels of anti-transglutaminase IgA than HC (p=0.0001 and p=0.0039). During CI, the increase in anti-Hwp1 paralleled the increase in anti-gliadin antibodies. Microchip analysis showed that CeD patients were more reactive against some Hwp1 peptides than CI patients, and that some deamidated peptides were more reactive than their native analogs. Binding of IgG from CeD patients to Hwp1 peptides was inhibited by γIII gliadin peptides. Conclusions Humoral cross-reactivity between Hwp1 and gliadin was observed during CeD and CI. Increased reactivity to Hwp1 deamidated peptide suggests that transglutaminase is involved in this interplay. These results support the hypothesis that CI may trigger CeD onset in genetically-susceptible individuals. PMID:25793717

  6. Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Enjalbert, Brice

    2009-04-01

    Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.

  7. Effect of Xylitol with Various Concentration and Duration on the Growth of Candida albicans (In Vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmi A. Leepel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The growth of C. albicans is influenced by glucose intake. Xylitol is commonly used as sugar substitute. Reported effective concentrations of xylitol in reducing C. albicans growth in vitro were varied, 1%, 5%, and 10%. Objectives: Investigate the effect of different concentration and duration of xylitol exposure in inhibiting C. albicans growth in vitro. Method: Identification of C. albicans from oral swab of a male candidiasis patient was conducted using CHROMagar, confirmed by germ tube test. C. albicans suspension (108 cells/μl were inoculated in SDB contained 1%, 5%, 10% xylitol, and without xylitol (as control, for 3 and 7 days, then incubated in 37oC on SDA and counted for their CFU after 48 hours. The C. albicans ATCC 10231 strain was used as a comparison. Results: After 3 days, increased concentration of xylitol (1%, 5%, 10% lead to decrease growth of C. albicans, both the ATCC 10231 (125%; 51%; 14% respectively and the clinical isolate (103%; 81%; 42%, p = 0.044. Significant lower growth of C. albicans compared to control were only seen in those exposed to 10% xylitol (p = 0.024. After 7 days, exposure of 1%, 5%, 10% xylitol did not significantly affect the growth of C. albicans (p = 0.396. Conclusion: The growth of C. albicans could be inhibited by 10% xylitol for 3 days.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v16i1.12

  8. DNA content, kinetic complexity, and the ploidy question in Candida albicans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggsby, W.S.; Torres-Bauza, L.J.; Wills, J.W.; Townes, T.M.

    1982-07-01

    Candida albicans is a dimorphic fungus that is pathogenic for humans. No sexual cycle has been reported for this fungus, and earlier reports have differed on whether typical strains of C. albicans are haploid or diploid. Previous estimates of the DNA content of C. albicans varied by one order of magnitude. The authors used three independent methods to measure the kinetic complexity of the single-copy DNA from a typical strain of C. albicans (strain H317) to determine the DNA content per haploid genote; they obtained values of 15 and 20 fg per cell by using S1 nuclease and hydroxyapatite assays, respectively. Optical assays for DNA reassociation kinetics, although not definitive in themselves, yielded values in this range. Chemical measurements of the DNA content of several typical strains, including strain H317, yielded values clustered about a mean of 37 fg per cell. They concluded that these strains are diploid.

  9. Biochemical characterization of recombinant dihydroorotate dehydrogenase from the opportunistic pathogenic yeast Candida albicans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zameitat, E.; Gojkovic, Zoran; Knecht, Wolfgang; Piskur, Jure; Loffler, M.

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent yeast pathogen in humans, and recently it has become increasingly resistant to the current antifungal agents. In this study we investigated C. albicans dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH, EC 1.3.99.11), which catalyzes the fourth step of de novo pyrimidine...... lacks the targeting sequence and the transmembrane domain, were subcloned from C. albicans, recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, purified, and characterized for their kinetics and substrate specificity. An inhibitor screening with 28 selected compounds was performed. Only the dianisidine...... derivative, redoxal, and the biphenyl quinoline-carboxylic acid derivative, brequinar sodium, which are known to be potent inhibitors of mammalian DHODH, markedly reduced C. albicans DHODH activity. This study provides a background for the development of antipyrimidines with high efficacy for decreasing in...

  10. Manipulation of Host Diet To Reduce Gastrointestinal Colonization by the Opportunistic Pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunsalus, Kearney T W; Tornberg-Belanger, Stephanie N; Matthan, Nirupa R; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Kumamoto, Carol A

    2016-01-01

    Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause systemic infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. Infections arise from colonization of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, where C. albicans is part of the normal microflora. Reducing colonization in at-risk patients using antifungal drugs prevents C. albicans-associated mortalities. C. albicans provides a clinically relevant system for studying the relationship between diet and the microbiota as it relates to commensalism and pathogenicity. As a first step toward a dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization, we investigated the impact of dietary lipids on murine colonization by C. albicans. Coconut oil and its constituent fatty acids have antifungal activity in vitro; we hypothesized that dietary coconut oil would reduce GI colonization by C. albicans. Colonization was lower in mice fed a coconut oil-rich diet than in mice fed diets rich in beef tallow or soybean oil. Switching beef tallow-fed mice to a coconut oil diet reduced preexisting colonization. Coconut oil reduced colonization even when the diet also contained beef tallow. Dietary coconut oil also altered the metabolic program of colonizing C. albicans cells. Long-chain fatty acids were less abundant in the cecal contents of coconut oil-fed mice than in the cecal contents of beef tallow-fed mice; the expression of genes involved in fatty acid utilization was lower in C. albicans from coconut oil-fed mice than in C. albicans from beef tallow-fed mice. Extrapolating to humans, these findings suggest that coconut oil could become the first dietary intervention to reduce C. albicans GI colonization. IMPORTANCE Candida albicans, the most common human fungal pathogen, can cause infections with a mortality rate of ~40%. C. albicans is part of the normal gut flora, but when a patient's immune system is compromised, it can leave the gut and cause infections. By reducing the amount of C. albicans in the gut of susceptible

  11. Additive potential of ginger starch on antifungal potency of honey against Candida albicans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Moussa; Djebli Noureddine; Hammoudi SM; Aissat Saad; Akila Bourabeh; Hemida Houari

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the additive action of ginger starch on the antifungal activity of honey against Candida albicans (C. albicans). Methods: C. albicans was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of four varieties of Algerian honey. Lower concentrations of honey than the MIC were incubated with a set of concentrations of starch and then added to media to determine the minimum additive inhibitory concentration (MAIC). Results: The MIC for the four varieties of honey without starch against C. albicans ranged between 38% and 42% (v/v). When starch was incubated with honey and then added to media, a MIC drop was noticed with each variety. MAIC of the four varieties ranged between 32% honey (v/v) with 4% starch and 36% honey (v/v) with 2% starch. Conclusions: The use of ginger starch allows honey benefit and will constitute an alternative way against the resistance to antifungal agents.

  12. Impact of oxidative and osmotic stresses on Candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, Suma C; Padmapriya, Kumar; Pruthi, Parul A; Prasad, R; Pruthi, Vikas

    2016-09-01

    Candida albicans possesses an ability to grow under different host-driven stress conditions by developing robust protective mechanisms. In this investigation the focus was on the impact of osmotic (2M NaCl) and oxidative (5 mM H2O2) stress conditions during C. albicans biofilm formation. Oxidative stress enhanced extracellular DNA secretion into the biofilm matrix, increased the chitin level, and reduced virulence factors, namely phospholipase and proteinase activity, while osmotic stress mainly increased extracellular proteinase and decreased phospholipase activity. Fourier transform infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis of mannan isolated from the C. albicans biofilm cell wall revealed a decrease in mannan content and reduced β-linked mannose moieties under stress conditions. The results demonstrate that C. albicans adapts to oxidative and osmotic stress conditions by inducing biofilm formation with a rich exopolymeric matrix, modulating virulence factors as well as the cell wall composition for its survival in different host niches. PMID:27472386

  13. Control of Candida albicans metabolism and biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa phenazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Diana K; Grahl, Nora; Okegbe, Chinweike; Dietrich, Lars E P; Jacobs, Nicholas J; Hogan, Deborah A

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans has developmental programs that govern transitions between yeast and filamentous morphologies and between unattached and biofilm lifestyles. Here, we report that filamentation, intercellular adherence, and biofilm development were inhibited during interactions between Candida albicans and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through the action of P. aeruginosa-produced phenazines. While phenazines are toxic to C. albicans at millimolar concentrations, we found that lower concentrations of any of three different phenazines (pyocyanin, phenazine methosulfate, and phenazine-1-carboxylate) allowed growth but affected the development of C. albicans wrinkled colony biofilms and inhibited the fungal yeast-to-filament transition. Phenazines impaired C. albicans growth on nonfermentable carbon sources and led to increased production of fermentation products (ethanol, glycerol, and acetate) in glucose-containing medium, leading us to propose that phenazines specifically inhibited respiration. Methylene blue, another inhibitor of respiration, also prevented the formation of structured colony biofilms. The inhibition of filamentation and colony wrinkling was not solely due to lowered extracellular pH induced by fermentation. Compared to smooth, unstructured colonies, wrinkled colony biofilms had higher oxygen concentrations within the colony, and wrinkled regions of these colonies had higher levels of respiration. Together, our data suggest that the structure of the fungal biofilm promotes access to oxygen and enhances respiratory metabolism and that the perturbation of respiration by bacterial molecules such as phenazines or compounds with similar activities disrupts these pathways. These findings may suggest new ways to limit fungal biofilms in the context of disease. IMPORTANCE Many of the infections caused by Candida albicans, a major human opportunistic fungal pathogen, involve both morphological transitions and the formation of surface-associated biofilms. Through the

  14. The Candida Genome Database (CGD), a community resource for Candida albicans gene and protein information

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud, Martha B.; Costanzo, Maria C.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Binkley, Gail; Lane, Christopher; Miyasato, Stuart R.; SHERLOCK, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD) is a new database that contains genomic information about the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. CGD is a public resource for the research community that is interested in the molecular biology of this fungus. CGD curators are in the process of combing the scientific literature to collect all C.albicans gene names and aliases; to assign gene ontology terms that describe the molecular function, biological process, and subcellular localization of ea...

  15. Modulation der Candida albicans Biofilmbildung und Expression von Pathogenitätsfaktoren durch Lactobacillus spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Dreßel, Tilmann

    2014-01-01

    Lactobacillus- Spezies, die zur Gattung der Milchsäurebakterien gehören, haben bereits hemmende Eigenschaften gegen Candida albicans gezeigt. Dieser dimorphe Hefepilz ist einer der bedeutendsten Erreger von Pilzinfektionen beim Menschen und einer der häufigsten Verursacher Katheter- assoziierter Infektionen. Eine bedeutende Rolle bei der Pathogenität von C. albicans spielt die Biofilmbildung, die sowohl die körpereigene Abwehr als auch die antimykotische Therapie einer invasiven Infektion erh...

  16. Prostaglandin E2 from Candida albicans Stimulates the Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Mixed Biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Krause, Jan; Geginat, Gernot; Tammer, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans interact synergistically in dual species biofilms resulting in enhanced mortality in animal models. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the current study was to test possible candidate molecules which might mediate this synergistic interaction in an in vitro model of mixed biofilms, such as farnesol, tyrosol and prostaglandin (PG) E2. In mono-microbial and dual biofilms of C.albicans wild type strains PGE...

  17. Demonstration and solubilization of antigens expressed primarily on the surfaces of Candida albicans germ tubes.

    OpenAIRE

    Smail, E H; J. M. Jones

    1984-01-01

    Antisera against mycelial-phase, but not yeast-phase, Candida albicans absorbed with yeast-phase organisms preferentially stained germ tube segments of several strains of mycelial-phase C. albicans by the indirect fluorescent-antibody staining technique. Germ tube segment antigens were not found in significant amounts on blastospore segments or on yeast-phase organisms. Absorption of the mycelial-phase reference sera with yeast-phase C. stellatoidea, but not with C. tropicalis, C. guillermond...

  18. A virtual infection model quantifies innate effector mechanisms and Candida albicans immune escape in human blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Hünniger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans bloodstream infection is increasingly frequent and can result in disseminated candidiasis associated with high mortality rates. To analyze the innate immune response against C. albicans, fungal cells were added to human whole-blood samples. After inoculation, C. albicans started to filament and predominantly associate with neutrophils, whereas only a minority of fungal cells became attached to monocytes. While many parameters of host-pathogen interaction were accessible to direct experimental quantification in the whole-blood infection assay, others were not. To overcome these limitations, we generated a virtual infection model that allowed detailed and quantitative predictions on the dynamics of host-pathogen interaction. Experimental time-resolved data were simulated using a state-based modeling approach combined with the Monte Carlo method of simulated annealing to obtain quantitative predictions on a priori unknown transition rates and to identify the main axis of antifungal immunity. Results clearly demonstrated a predominant role of neutrophils, mediated by phagocytosis and intracellular killing as well as the release of antifungal effector molecules upon activation, resulting in extracellular fungicidal activity. Both mechanisms together account for almost [Formula: see text] of C. albicans killing, clearly proving that beside being present in larger numbers than other leukocytes, neutrophils functionally dominate the immune response against C. albicans in human blood. A fraction of C. albicans cells escaped phagocytosis and remained extracellular and viable for up to four hours. This immune escape was independent of filamentation and fungal activity and not linked to exhaustion or inactivation of innate immune cells. The occurrence of C. albicans cells being resistant against phagocytosis may account for the high proportion of dissemination in C. albicans bloodstream infection. Taken together, iterative experiment

  19. Antifungal Activity of Lavandula Angustifolia and Quergues Infectoria Extracts in Comparison with Nystatin on Candida Albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Nouri, F; A. Raoofi; S. Dadfar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction & Objective: Nowadays,herbal extracts are used to treat diseases, especially infec-tious ones. Candida albicans is the most common causes of oral opportunistic infections.In this study, antifungal effects of two herbal extracts were evaluated on an oral pathogen i.e. Candida albicans. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive- analytic study, the Department of Prosthodontics, ,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, school of Dentistry the oral samples of 25 patients with dentu...

  20. Silver colloidal nanoparticles : antifungal effect against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Monteiro, D. R.; Gorup, L. F.; Silva, Sónia Carina; Negri, M.; E. R. Camargo; Oliveira, Rosário; Barbosa, D. B.; Henriques, Mariana

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of silver nanoparticles (SN) against Candida albicans and Candida glabrata adhered cells and biofilms. SN (average diameter 5 nm) were synthesized by silver nitrate reduction with sodium citrate and stabilized with ammonia. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) tests were performed for C. albicans (n = 2) and C. glabrata (n = 2) grown in suspension following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute microbroth dilution method. SN were applie...

  1. Shuttle vectors for facile gap repair cloning and integration into a neutral locus in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Gerami-Nejad, Maryam; Zacchi, Lucia F.; McClellan, Mark; Matter, Kathleen; Berman, Judith

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. The current techniques used to construct C. albicans strains require integration of exogenous DNA at ectopic locations, which can exert position effects on gene expression that can confound the interpretation of data from critical experiments such as virulence assays. We have identified a large intergenic region, NEUT5L, which facilitates the integration and expression of ectopic genes. To construct and integrate inserts int...

  2. CO(2) acts as a signalling molecule in populations of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Rebecca A.; De Sordi, Luisa; MacCallum, Donna M.; Topal, Husnu; Eaton, Rebecca; Bloor, James W.; Robinson, Gary K.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Wang, Yue; Gow, Neil A R; Steegborn, Clemens; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A.

    2010-01-01

    When colonising host-niches or non-animated medical devices, individual cells of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans expand into significant biomasses. Here we show that within such biomasses, fungal metabolically generated CO(2) acts as a communication molecule promoting the switch from yeast to filamentous growth essential for C. albicans pathology. We find that CO(2)-mediated intra-colony signalling involves the adenylyl cyclase protein (Cyr1p), a multi-sensor recently found to coordinate...

  3. Formation of Azole-Resistant Candida albicans by Mutation of Sterol 14-Demethylase P450

    OpenAIRE

    Asai, Kentaro; Tsuchimori, Noboru; Okonogi, Kenji; Perfect, John R.; Gotoh, Osamu; Yoshida, Yuzo

    1999-01-01

    The sterol 14-demethylase P450 (CYP51) of a fluconazole-resistant isolate of Candida albicans, DUMC136, showed reduced susceptibility to this azole but with little change in its catalytic activity. Twelve nucleotide substitutions, resulting in four amino acid changes, were identified in the DUMC136 CYP51 gene in comparison with a reported CYP51 sequence from a wild-type, fluconazole-susceptible C. albicans strain. Seven of these substitutions, including all of those causing amino acid changes...

  4. Prothioconazole and Prothioconazole-Desthio Activities against Candida albicans Sterol 14-α-Demethylase

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Josie E.; Warrilow, Andrew G. S.; Cools, Hans J; Fraaije, Bart A.; Lucas, John A.; Rigdova, Katarina; Griffiths, William J.; Kelly, Diane E.; Kelly, Steven L.

    2013-01-01

    Prothioconazole is a new triazolinthione fungicide used in agriculture. We have used Candida albicans CYP51 (CaCYP51) to investigate the in vitro activity of prothioconazole and to consider the use of such compounds in the medical arena. Treatment of C. albicans cells with prothioconazole, prothioconazole-desthio, and voriconazole resulted in CYP51 inhibition, as evidenced by the accumulation of 14α-methylated sterol substrates (lanosterol and eburicol) and the depletion of ergosterol. We the...

  5. Modulation of Post-Antibiotic Bacterial Community Reassembly and Host Response by Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Erb Downward, John R.; Falkowski, Nicole R.; Mason, Katie L.; Ryan Muraglia; Huffnagle, Gary B.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of Candida albicans into cefoperazone-treated mice results in changes in bacterial community reassembly. Our objective was to use high-throughput sequencing to characterize at much greater depth the specific changes in the bacterial microbiome. The colonization of C. albicans significantly altered bacterial community reassembly that was evident at multiple taxonomic levels of resolution. There were marked changes in the levels of Bacteriodetes and Lactobacillaceae. Lachnospir...

  6. Production of anti-Candida antibodies in mice with gut colonization of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Yasuo Ono; Osamu Koshio; Nobuo Suegara; Tatsuo Ikeda; Kayoko Wada; Masayasu Mitsuya; Hiroko Ishibashi; Shigeru Abe; Shigeru Tansho; Hideyo Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Production of antibodies that are specific for allergens is an important pathological process in inflammatory allergic diseases. These contain the antibodies against antigens of Candida albicans, one of the normal microbial flora in an intestinal tract. We studied the effects of the prednisolone administration on the production of anti-Candida antibodies in the gastrointestinally C. albicans-colonized mice. METHODS AND MATERIALS: BALB/c mice, treated with antibacterial antibiotics...

  7. Comparison of dielectric barrier discharge modes fungicidal effect on candida albicans growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filamentary and quasi-homogeneous mode of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) was investigated as a plasma source with fungicidal effect on Candida albicans yeast inoculated on Sabouraud agar wafers. As compared with the filamentary DBD mode, the quasi-homogeneous mode had significantly better results: shorter exposition time needed for inhibiting C. albicans yeast, moreover the quasi-homogeneous mode had gentle influence on the agar surface structure.

  8. Farnesol : beyond morphogenesis control in non-candida albicans candida species

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, M.; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2007-01-01

    During the last decade the incidence of candidiasis increased dramatically. Although Candida albicans remains the most frequent cause of infections, non-Candida albicans candida (NCAC) species are emerging as new pathogens. Candida infections are often associated with biofilms that can develop on natural surfaces and medical devices. In a similar manner to other microorganisms, signalling pathways may control the diversity and distribution of Candida species within biofilms. E,...

  9. Antifungal Effect of Zataria multiflora Essence on Experimentally Contaminated Acryl Resin Plates With Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jafari, Abbas Ali; Falah Tafti, Abbas; Hoseiny, Seyed Mehdi; Kazemi, Abdolhossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence and colonization of Candida species particularly C. albicans on denture surfaces, forms a microbial biofilm, which may result denture stomatitis in complete denture users. Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the antifungal effect Zataria multiflora essence in removing of Candida albicans biofilms on experimentally contaminated resin acryl plates. Materials and Methods: In the present experimental study, 160 resin acrylic plates (10 × 10 × 1 mm) w...

  10. Passage through the mammalian gut triggers a phenotypic switch that promotes Candida albicans commensalism

    OpenAIRE

    Pande, Kalyan; Chen, Changbin; Noble, Suzanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Among ~5,000,000 fungal species, 1 Candida albicans is exceptional in its lifelong association with humans, either within the gastrointestinal microbiome or as an invasive pathogen. 2 Opportunistic infections are generally ascribed to defective host immunity 3 but may require specific microbial programs. Here, we report that exposure of C. albicans to the mammalian gut triggers a developmental switch, driven by the Wor1 transcription factor, to a commensal cell type. Wor1 expression was previ...

  11. Does Candida albicans Als5p Amyloid Play a Role in Commensalism in Caenorhabditis elegans?

    OpenAIRE

    Bois, Michael; Singh, Sean; Samlalsingh, Alyssa; Lipke, Peter N.; Garcia, Melissa C.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans, a dimorphic fungus and an opportunistic pathogen, possesses a myriad of adherence factors, including members of the agglutinin-like sequence (Als) family of mannoproteins. The adhesin Als5p mediates adhesion to many substrates and is upregulated during commensal interactions but is downregulated during active C. albicans infections. An amyloid-forming core sequence at residues 325 to 331 is important for Als5p function, because a single-amino-acid substitution at position 32...

  12. Adherence of Candida albicans germ tubes to plastic: ultrastructural and molecular studies of fibrillar adhesins.

    OpenAIRE

    Tronchin, G; Bouchara, J P; Robert, R; Senet, J M

    1988-01-01

    Germ tubes of Candida albicans produced an additional fibrillar surface layer responsible for enhanced adherence to plastic. The correlation between germination of C. albicans and adherence of germ tubes to a plastic matrix led us to consider the existence of germ tube-specific adhesive components involved in the attachment process. Using concanavalin A-sensitized latex microspheres, we first detected extracellular molecules on the plastic surface after removal of the adherent germ tubes. Ele...

  13. Fungal inhibitory effect of Citrus Limon peel essential oil on Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Hernawan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is an opportunistic infections due to Candida albicans that often found in people with HIV/AIDS. Anti-fungi, polyne and azole, are used in the treatment of oral candidiasis, but often cause persistence and recurrence. Citrus Limon peel contains terpenoids capable of inhibiting the synthesis of ergosterol, a component of the fungal cell wall that helps to maintain cell membrane permeability. Essential oil derived from citrus limon peel, thus, is expected to inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Purpose: This research was aimed to know how essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel can inhibit the growth of Candida albicans. Method: This research was a laboratory experimental research carried out in three phases. First, essential oil was made with cold pressing method, and then the concentration of 100% was diluted to 50%, 12.5%, 6.25%, 3.125%, 1.56% and 0.78%. A test was conducted on the culture of Candida albicans in Sabouraud broth, accompanied by control (+ and (-. Second, the dilution of essential oil was conducted to alter the concentration with inhibitory power, from the strongest one to the weakest one, and then it was tested on the culture of Candida albicans. Third, spreading was carried out from liquid culture to agar media in order to measure the number of colonies. Result: Candida albicans did not grow on media with 100% essential oil treatment, but it grew on media with 50% essential oil treatment. In the second phase, dilution of 100%, 90%, 80%, 70%, 60% and 50% was conducted. The growth of Candida albicans was found on the treatment media of 60% and 50%. On the agar media, the growth occurred in the cultured medium treated with 70%. Conclusion: The minimum inhibitory power of essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel against Candida albicans was in the concentration of 80%. Essential oil derived from citrus Limon peel has antifungal effect and potential as a therapeutic agent for oral candidiasis.

  14. Mechanisms of the antifungal action of marine metagenome-derived peptide, MMGP1, against Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuirulan Pushpanathan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of resistant variants to existing antifungal drugs continues to be the serious problem in Candida albicans-induced fungal pathogenesis, which has a considerable impact on animal and human health. Identification and characterization of newer drugs against C. albicans is, therefore, essential. MMGP1 is a direct cell-penetrating peptide recently identified from marine metagenome, which was found to possess potent antifungal activity against C. albicans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the mechanism of antifungal action of MMGP1 against C. albicans. Agarose gel shift assay found the peptide to be having a remarkable DNA-binding ability. The modification of the absorption spectra and fluorescence quenching of the tryptophyl residue correspond to the stacking between indole ring and nucleotide bases. The formation of peptide-DNA complexes was confirmed by fluorescence quenching of SYTO 9 probe. The interaction of peptide with plasmid DNA afforded protection of DNA from enzymatic degradation by DNase I. In vitro transcription of mouse β-actin gene in the presence of peptide led to a decrease in the level of mRNA synthesis. The C. albicans treated with MMGP1 showed strong inhibition of biosynthetic incorporation of uridine analog 5-ethynyluridine (EU into nascent RNA, suggesting the peptide's role in the inhibition of macromolecular synthesis. Furthermore, the peptide also induces endogenous accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in C. albicans. MMGP1 supplemented with glutathione showed an increased viability of C. albicans cells. The hyper-produced ROS by MMGP1 leads to increased levels of protein carbonyls and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and it also causes dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential and DNA fragmentation in C. albicans cells. CONCLUSION: And Significance: Therefore, the antifungal activity of MMGP1 could be attributed to its binding with DNA, causing

  15. Adherence of Candida albicans to a cell surface polysaccharide receptor on Streptococcus gordonii.

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, A.R.; Gopal, P K; Jenkinson, H F

    1995-01-01

    Candida albicans ATCC 10261 and CA2 bound to cells of the oral bacteria Streptococcus gordonii, Streptococcus oralis, and Streptococcus sanguis when these bacteria were immobilized onto microtiter plate wells, but they did not bind to cells of Streptococcus mutans or Streptococcus salivarius. Cell wall polysaccharide was extracted with alkali from S. gordonii NCTC 7869, the streptococcal species to which C. albicans bound with highest affinity, and was effective in blocking the coaggregation ...

  16. Candida albicans Biofilms Do Not Trigger Reactive Oxygen Species and Evade Neutrophil Killing

    OpenAIRE

    Xie, Zhihong; Thompson, Angela; Sobue, Takanori; Kashleva, Helena; Xu, Hongbin; Vasilakos, John; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils are found within Candida albicans biofilms in vivo and could play a crucial role in clearing the pathogen from biofilms forming on catheters and mucosal surfaces. Our goal was to compare the antimicrobial activity of neutrophils against developing and mature C. albicans biofilms and identify biofilm-specific properties mediating resistance to immune cells. Antibiofilm activity was measured with the 2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxanilide assay and a ...

  17. Killed Candida albicans Yeasts and Hyphae Inhibit Gamma Interferon Release by Murine Natural Killer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Murciano, Celia; Villamón, Eva; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M. Luisa

    2006-01-01

    Killed yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans inhibit gamma interferon secretion by highly purified murine NK cells in response to the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and zymosan. This effect, which is also observed in the presence of NK-activating cytokines (interleukin-2 [IL-2], IL-12, and IL-15), may represent a novel mechanism of immune evasion that contributes to the virulence of C. albicans.

  18. Killed Candida albicans yeasts and hyphae inhibit gamma interferon release by murine natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murciano, Celia; Villamón, Eva; O'Connor, José-Enrique; Gozalbo, Daniel; Gil, M Luisa

    2006-02-01

    Killed yeasts and hyphae of Candida albicans inhibit gamma interferon secretion by highly purified murine NK cells in response to the Toll-like receptor ligands lipopolysaccharide and zymosan. This effect, which is also observed in the presence of NK-activating cytokines (interleukin-2 [IL-2], IL-12, and IL-15), may represent a novel mechanism of immune evasion that contributes to the virulence of C. albicans. PMID:16428793

  19. A Novel Immune Evasion Strategy of Candida albicans: Proteolytic Cleavage of a Salivary Antimicrobial Peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Meiller, Timothy F.; Hube, Bernhard; Schild, Lydia; Shirtliff, Mark E.; Mark A. Scheper; Winkler, Robert; Ton, Amy; Jabra-Rizk, Mary Ann

    2009-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis is an opportunistic infection considered to be a harbinger of AIDS. The etiologic agent Candida albicans is a fungal species commonly colonizing human mucosal surfaces. However, under conditions of immune dysfunction, colonizing C. albicans can become an opportunistic pathogen causing superficial or even life-threatening infections. The reasons behind this transition, however, are not clear. In the oral cavity, salivary antimicrobial peptides are considered to be an ...

  20. Virulence of Candida albicans isolated from HIV infected and non infected individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Wibawa, Tri; Praseno,; Aman, Abu Tholib

    2015-01-01

    Candida sp contributes 33.1 % of fungal infections among HIV patients. Among the species of the genus Candida, Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated from HIV patients. This study aimed to analyze putative virulence factors of C. albicans isolated from oral cavities of HIV infected patients and healthy individuals. Twenty isolates from HIV infected patients and fourteen from healthy individuals were analyzed for phenotypic switching, cell growth rate, hyphae formation, hemolytic act...

  1. The Role of Candida albicans SPT20 in Filamentation, Biofilm Formation and Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Xiaojiang; Fuchs, Beth Burgwyn; Wang, Yan; Chen, Weiping; J. Yuen, Grace; Chen, Rosalyn B.; Jayamani, Elamparithi; Anastassopoulou, Cleo; Pukkila-Worley, Read; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is a ubiquitous fungus, which can cause very serious and sometimes life-threatening infections in susceptible patients. We used Caenorhabditis elegans as a model host to screen a library of C. albicans mutants for decreased virulence and identified SPT20 as important for virulence. The transcription co-activator SPT20 was identified originally as a suppressor of Ty and solo δ insertion mutations, which can cause transcription defects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It is resista...

  2. Antifungal activity, kinetics and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Ru Li; Qing-Shan Shi; Huan-Qin Dai; Qing Liang; Xiao-Bao Xie; Xiao-Mo Huang; Guang-Ze Zhao; Li-Xin Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The antifungal activity, kinetics, and molecular mechanism of action of garlic oil against Candida albicans were investigated in this study using multiple methods. Using the poisoned food technique, we determined that the minimum inhibitory concentration of garlic oil was 0.35 μg/mL. Observation by transmission electron microscopy indicated that garlic oil could penetrate the cellular membrane of C. albicans as well as the membranes of organelles such as the mitochondria, resulting in organel...

  3. Influence of growth conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; Plotkin, B. J.; Klimas, D M

    1986-01-01

    The effect of cultural conditions on cell surface hydrophobicity of Candida albicans and Candida glabrata was tested. C. albicans cells grown at room temperature were more hydrophobic than cells grown at 37 degrees C. No consistent pattern was observed with C. glabrata. Relative hydrophobicity was found to vary with the growth phase and growth medium for both species. The implications for pathogenesis studies are discussed.

  4. A Candida albicans CRISPR system permits genetic engineering of essential genes and gene families

    OpenAIRE

    Vyas, Valmik K.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fink, Gerald R.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a pathogenic yeast that causes mucosal and systematic infections with high mortality. The absence of facile molecular genetics has been a major impediment to analysis of pathogenesis. The lack of meiosis coupled with the absence of plasmids makes genetic engineering cumbersome, especially for essential functions and gene families. We describe a C. albicans CRISPR system that overcomes many of the obstacles to genetic engineering in this organism. The high frequency with wh...

  5. Influence of preformed antibody on the pathogenesis of experimental Candida albicans endocarditis.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheld, W M; Calderone, R A; Brodeur, J P; Sande, M A

    1983-01-01

    The influence of preformed antibody on the induction of experimental Candida albicans endocarditis was investigated by both in vitro and in vivo techniques. Preincubation of C. albicans with immune serum (raised in rabbits by intravenous injection of Formalin-killed yeast cells) decreased adhesion to the constituents of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis, e.g., fibrin plus platelets, in vitro. Two different methods, with radiolabeled or viable yeast cells, were confirmatory and demonstrated...

  6. Comparative genomics of the fungal pathogens Candida dubliniensis and Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Andrew P; Gamble, John A.; Yeomans, Tim; Moran, Gary P.; Saunders, David; Harris, David; Aslett, Martin; Barrell, Jamie F.; Butler, Geraldine; Citiulo, Francesco; Coleman, David C.; de Groot, Piet W. J.; Goodwin, Tim J.; Quail, Michael A.; McQuillan, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is the closest known relative of Candida albicans, the most pathogenic yeast species in humans. However, despite both species sharing many phenotypic characteristics, including the ability to form true hyphae, C. dubliniensis is a significantly less virulent and less versatile pathogen. Therefore, to identify C. albicans-specific genes that may be responsible for an increased capacity to cause disease, we have sequenced the C. dubliniensis genome and compared it with the ...

  7. High Content Phenotypic Screenings to Identify Inhibitors of Candida albicans Biofilm Formation and Filamentation

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Christopher G.; Saville, Stephen P.; Lopez-Ribot, Jose L.

    2014-01-01

    Candida species represent the main cause of opportunistic fungal infections worldwide, and Candida albicans remains the most common etiological agent of candidiasis, now the third to fourth most common nosocomial infection. These infections are typically associated with high morbidity and mortality, mainly due to the limited efficacy of current antifungal drugs. In C. albicans morphogenetic conversions between yeast and filamentous forms and biofilm formation represent two important biologica...

  8. Improved Gene Ontology Annotation for Biofilm Formation, Filamentous Growth, and Phenotypic Switching in Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, Diane O.; Skrzypek, Marek S.; Arnaud, Martha B.; Binkley, Jonathan; Shah, Prachi; Wymore, Farrell; Sherlock, Gavin

    2013-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans is a significant medical threat, especially for immunocompromised patients. Experimental research has focused on specific areas of C. albicans biology, with the goal of understanding the multiple factors that contribute to its pathogenic potential. Some of these factors include cell adhesion, invasive or filamentous growth, and the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The Gene Ontology (GO) (www.geneontology.org) is a standardized vocabulary...

  9. Phenotypic switching in Candida albicans is controlled by a SIR2 gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-Martín, J; Uría, J A; Johnson, A.D.

    1999-01-01

    We report the cloning of a gene from the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans with sequence and functional similarity to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SIR2 gene. Deletion of the gene in C. albicans produces a dramatic phenotype: variant colony morphologies arise at frequencies as high as 1 in 10. The morphologies resemble those described previously as part of a phenotypic switching system proposed to contribute to pathogenesis. Deletion of SIR2 also produces a high frequency of karyotypic ch...

  10. New aniline blue dye medium for rapid identification and isolation of Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldschmidt, M C; Fung, D Y; Grant, R; White, J.; Brown, T

    1991-01-01

    Organic dyes have long been used in diagnostic microbiology to differentiate species by color reactions. We studied the ability of a new noninhibitory medium, YM agar containing 0.01% aniline blue WS dye, Colour Index 42780 (YMAB), to identify Candida albicans among 1,554 yeast specimens obtained from seven clinical laboratories. Appropriate American Type Culture Collection and other characterized strains served as controls. A total of 487 of the clinical strains were identified as C. albican...

  11. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts on Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Sunitha Jagalur Doddanna; Shilpa Patel; Madhusudan Astekar Sundarrao; Ravindra Setru Veerabhadrappa

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Plants as sources of medicinal compounds have continued to play a predominant role in the maintenance of human health since ancient times. Even though several effective antifungal agents are available for oral candida infections, the failure is not uncommon because isolates of Candida albicans may exhibits resistance to the drug during therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of few plant extracts on Candida albicans. An additio...

  12. Th17 cells confer long term adaptive immunity to oral mucosal Candida albicans infections

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Santos, Nydiaris; Huppler, Anna R; Peterson, Alanna C.; Khader, Shabaana A.; McKenna, Kyle C.; Sarah L Gaffen

    2012-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is an opportunistic infection caused by Candida albicans. Despite its prevalence, little is known about C. albicans-specific immunity in the oral mucosa. Vaccines against Candida generate both Th1 and Th17 responses, and considerable evidence implicates IL-17 in immunity to OPC. However, IL-17 is also produced by innate immune cells that are remarkably similar to Th17 cells, expressing the same markers and localizing to similar mucosal sites. To date, the relat...

  13. Ultrastructural and biochemical studies of two dynamically expressed cell surface determinants on Candida albicans.

    OpenAIRE

    Brawner, D L; Cutler, J E

    1986-01-01

    Variability in the expression of two different cell surface carbohydrate determinants was examined with two agglutinating immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (H9 and C6) and immunoelectron microscopy during growth of three strains of Candida albicans. A single strain of Candida parapsilosis did not express either antigen at any time during growth. Antigens were detected on the surface of C. albicans by agglutination tests with either H9 or C6 over a 48-h growth period. The difference in sp...

  14. Antifungal Activity of Bee Venom and Sweet Bee Venom against Clinically Isolated Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Bae Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the antifungal effect of bee venom (BV and sweet bee venom (SBV against Candida albicans (C. albicans clinical isolates. Methods: In this study, BV and SBV were examined for antifungal activities against the Korean Collection for Type Cultures (KCTC strain and 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans. The disk diffusion method was used to measure the antifungal activity and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assays were performed by using a broth microdilution method. Also, a killing curve assay was conducted to investigate the kinetics of the anti- fungal action. Results: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against 10 clinical isolates of C. albicans that were cultured from blood and the vagina by using disk diffusion method. The MIC values obtained for clinical isolates by using the broth microdilution method varied from 62.5 μg/ mL to 125 μg/mL for BV and from 15.63 μg/mL to 62.5 μg/mL for SBV. In the killing-curve assay, SBV behaved as amphotericin B, which was used as positive control, did. The antifungal efficacy of SBV was much higher than that of BV. Conclusion: BV and SBV showed antifungal activity against C. albicans clinical strains that were isolated from blood and the vagina. Especially, SBV might be a candidate for a new antifungal agent against C. albicans clinical isolates.

  15. Global Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Chlamydospore Specific Markers in Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Palige, Katja

    2013-04-15

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are pathogenic fungi that are highly related but differ in virulence and in some phenotypic traits. During in vitro growth on certain nutrient-poor media, C. albicans and C. dubliniensis are the only yeast species which are able to produce chlamydospores, large thick-walled cells of unknown function. Interestingly, only C. dubliniensis forms pseudohyphae with abundant chlamydospores when grown on Staib medium, while C. albicans grows exclusively as a budding yeast. In order to further our understanding of chlamydospore development and assembly, we compared the global transcriptional profile of both species during growth in liquid Staib medium by RNA sequencing. We also included a C. albicans mutant in our study which lacks the morphogenetic transcriptional repressor Nrg1. This strain, which is characterized by its constitutive pseudohyphal growth, specifically produces masses of chlamydospores in Staib medium, similar to C. dubliniensis. This comparative approach identified a set of putatively chlamydospore-related genes. Two of the homologous C. albicans and C. dubliniensis genes (CSP1 and CSP2) which were most strongly upregulated during chlamydospore development were analysed in more detail. By use of the green fluorescent protein as a reporter, the encoded putative cell wall related proteins were found to exclusively localize to C. albicans and C. dubliniensis chlamydospores. Our findings uncover the first chlamydospore specific markers in Candida species and provide novel insights in the complex morphogenetic development of these important fungal pathogens.

  16. Rac1 dynamics in the human opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Vauchelles

    Full Text Available The small Rho G-protein Rac1 is highly conserved from fungi to humans, with approximately 65% overall sequence identity in Candida albicans. As observed with human Rac1, we show that C. albicans Rac1 can accumulate in the nucleus, and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP together with fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP studies indicate that this Rho G-protein undergoes nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. Analyses of different chimeras revealed that nuclear accumulation of C. albicans Rac1 requires the NLS-motifs at its carboxyl-terminus, which are blocked by prenylation of the adjacent cysteine residue. Furthermore, we show that C. albicans Rac1 dynamics, both at the plasma membrane and in the nucleus, are dependent on its activation state and in particular that the inactive form accumulates faster in the nucleus. Heterologous expression of human Rac1 in C. albicans also results in nuclear accumulation, yet accumulation is more rapid than that of C. albicans Rac1. Taken together our results indicate that Rac1 nuclear accumulation is an inherent property of this G-protein and suggest that the requirements for its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling are conserved from fungi to humans.

  17. Person-to-person transfer of Candida albicans in the spacecraft environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, D. L.; Mehta, S. K.; Magee, B. B.; Mishra, S. K.

    1995-01-01

    We assessed the exchange of Candida albicans among crew members during 10 Space Shuttle missions. Throat, nasal, urine and faecal specimens were collected from 61 crew members twice before and once after space flights ranging from 7 to 10 days in duration; crews consisted of groups of five, six or seven men and women. Candida albicans was isolated at least once from 20 of the 61 subjects (33%). Candida strains were identified by restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) after digestion by the endonucleases EcoRI and HinfI; further discrimination was gained by Southern blot hybridization with the C. albicans repeat fragment 27A. Eighteen of the 20 Candida-positive crew members carried different strains of C. albicans in the specimens collected. Possible transfer of C. albicans between members of the same crew was demonstrated only once in the 10 missions studied. We conclude that the transfer of C. albicans among crew members during Space Shuttle flights is less frequent than had been predicted from earlier reports.

  18. Inhibition of Candida albicans biofilm formation and modulation of gene expression by probiotic cells and supernatant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, K M; MacDonald, K W; Chanyi, R M; Cadieux, P A; Burton, J P

    2016-04-01

    Oral candidiasis is a disease caused by opportunistic species of Candida that normally reside on human mucosal surfaces. The transition of Candida from budding yeast to filamentous hyphae allows for covalent attachment to oral epithelial cells, followed by biofilm formation, invasion and tissue damage. In this study, combinations of Lactobacillus plantarum SD5870, Lactobacillus helveticus CBS N116411 and Streptococcus salivarius DSM 14685 were assessed for their ability to inhibit the formation of and disrupt Candida albicans biofilms. Co-incubation with probiotic supernatants under hyphae-inducing conditions reduced C. albicans biofilm formation by >75 % in all treatment groups. Likewise, combinations of live probiotics reduced biofilm formation of C. albicans by >67 %. When live probiotics or their supernatants were overlaid on preformed C. albicans biofilms, biofilm size was reduced by >63 and >65 % respectively. Quantitative real-time PCR results indicated that the combined supernatants of SD5870 and CBS N116411 significantly reduced the expression of several C. albicans genes involved in the yeast-hyphae transition: ALS3 (adhesin/invasin) by 70 % (P biofilm formation) by >99 % (P removing preformed C. albicans biofilms. Our novel results point to the downregulation of several Candida genes critical to the yeast-hyphae transition, biofilm formation, tissue invasion and cellular damage. PMID:26847045

  19. Effect of emodin on Candida albicans growth investigated by microcalorimetry combined with chemometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, W J; Wang, J B; Jin, C; Zhao, Y L; Dai, C M; Xiao, X H; Li, Z L

    2009-07-01

    Using the 3114/3115 thermal activity monitor (TAM) air isothermal microcalorimeter, ampoule mode, the heat output of Candida albicans growth at 37 degrees C was measured, and the effect of emodin on C. albicans growth was evaluated by microcalorimetry coupled with chemometric methods. The similarities between the heat flow power (HFP)-time curves of C. albicans growth affected by different concentrations of emodin were calculated by similarity analysis (SA). In the correspondence analysis (CA) diagram of eight quantitative parameters taken from the HFP-time curves, it could be deduced that emodin had definite dose-effect relationship as the distance between different concentrations of it increased along with the dosage and the effect. From the principal component analysis (PCA) on eight quantitative parameters, the action of emodin on C. albicans growth could be easily evaluated by analyzing the change of values of the main two parameters, growth rate constant k (2) and maximum power output P(2)(m). The coherent results of SA, CA, and PCA showed that emodin at different concentrations had different effects on C. albicans growth metabolism: A low concentration (0-10 microg ml(-1)) poorly inhibited the growth of C. albicans, and a high concentration (15-35 microg ml(-1)) could notably inhibit growth of this fungus. This work provided a useful idea of the combination of microcalorimetry and chemometric analysis for investigating the effect of drug and other compounds on microbes. PMID:19543891

  20. Memory IL-22-producing CD4+ T cells specific for Candida albicans are present in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Binyan; Zhou, Maohua; Li, Li; Zhou, Hui; Zhang, Jianping; Chen, Hui; Wu, Changyou

    2009-06-01

    Co-expression of IL-22 and IL-17 has been identified and demonstrated to be involved in the immunopathogenesis of some autoimmune diseases as well as the defense against pathogenic infections in animal studies. However, the properties of IL-22-producing cells in humans remain largely unclear. In the present study, we showed that IL-22 could be induced from human PBMC following various polyclonal stimulations. The majority of IL-22-producing cells in PBMC were CD4(+) T cells with a memory cell phenotype. In addition, we found that a subset of IL-22(+) T cells produced IL-22 alone, whereas other IL-22(+) T cells co-expressed cytokines typical of Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells. Importantly, stimulation of PBMC from healthy adults with heat-inactivated Candida albicans (C. albicans) yeast or hyphae resulted in IL-22 production by central and effector memory CD4(+) T cells. Moreover, CD4(+)CCR6(+) but not CD4(+)CCR6(-) T cells produced IL-22 when stimulated with either C. albicans or PMA and ionomycin. In addition, PBMC from the individuals infected with C. albicans produced a significantly higher amount of IL-22 compared with healthy controls following stimulation with C. albicans. These data demonstrate that IL-22-producing T cells in humans may play an important role in the defense against fungal infections such as C. albicans. PMID:19449309

  1. Candida albicans chronic colonisation in cystic fibrosis may be associated with inhaled antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noni, Maria; Katelari, Anna; Kaditis, Athanasios; Theochari, Ioanna; Lympari, Ioulia; Alexandrou-Athanassoulis, Helen; Doudounakis, Stavros-Eleftherios; Dimopoulos, George

    2015-07-01

    Candida albicans is increasingly recognised as a coloniser of the respiratory tract in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Yet, the potential role, if any, of the micro-organism in the progress of the disease remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation in patients with CF. A cohort of 121 CF patients born from 1988 to 1996 was, respectively, studied. The medical records of each patient were reviewed from the first time they attended the CF Centre until the occurrence of C. albicans chronic colonisation or their last visit for the year 2010. Chronic colonisation was defined as the presence of C. albicans in more than 50% of cultures in a given year. A number of possible confounders were included in the multivariate logistic regression analysis to identify an independent association between inhaled antibiotics and C. albicans chronic colonisation. Fifty-four (44.6%) of the 121 patients enrolled in the study developed chronic colonisation by the micro-organism. Multivariate logistic regression analysis determined the independent effect of inhaled antibiotic treatment on the odds of chronic colonisation (OR 1.112, 95% CI [1.007-1.229], P = 0.036). Candida albicans chronic colonisation may be associated with the duration of inhaled antibiotic treatment. PMID:26058475

  2. Antimicrobial activity of plant extracts on Candida albicans: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunitha Jagalur Doddanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Plants as sources of medicinal compounds have continued to play a predominant role in the maintenance of human health since ancient times. Even though several effective antifungal agents are available for oral candida infections, the failure is not uncommon because isolates of Candida albicans may exhibits resistance to the drug during therapy. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of few plant extracts on Candida albicans. An additional objective was to identify an alternative, inexpensive, simple, and effective method of preventing and controlling Candida albicans. Materials and Methods: Fine texture powder or paste form of leaves was soaked in sterile distilled water and 100% ethyl alcohol, which were kept in refrigerator at 4°C for 24 h. Then filtrates were prepared and kept in a hot air oven to get a black shining crystal powder/paste form. Stock solutions of plant extracts were inoculated on petri plates containing species of Candida albicans and incubated at 25 ± 2°C for 72 h. Results: Alcoholic curry leaves showed the maximum zone of inhibition on Candida albicans followed by aqueous tea leaves. The other plant extracts like alcoholic onion leaves, alcoholic tea leaves, alcoholic onion bulb, alcoholic aloe vera, and alcoholic mint leaves also inhibited the growth of Candida albicans but lesser extent. Conclusion: The present study renders few medicinal plants as an alternative medicines to the field of dentistry which can be used adjunct to conventional therapy of oral candidasis.

  3. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor RIC8 regulates conidial germination through Gα proteins in Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J Eaton

    Full Text Available Heterotrimeric G protein signaling is essential for normal hyphal growth in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We have previously demonstrated that the non-receptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor RIC8 acts upstream of the Gα proteins GNA-1 and GNA-3 to regulate hyphal extension. Here we demonstrate that regulation of hyphal extension results at least in part, from an important role in control of asexual spore (conidia germination. Loss of GNA-3 leads to a drastic reduction in conidial germination, which is exacerbated in the absence of GNA-1. Mutation of RIC8 leads to a reduction in germination similar to that in the Δgna-1, Δgna-3 double mutant, suggesting that RIC8 regulates conidial germination through both GNA-1 and GNA-3. Support for a more significant role for GNA-3 is indicated by the observation that expression of a GTPase-deficient, constitutively active gna-3 allele in the Δric8 mutant leads to a significant increase in conidial germination. Localization of the three Gα proteins during conidial germination was probed through analysis of cells expressing fluorescently tagged proteins. Functional TagRFP fusions of each of the three Gα subunits were constructed through insertion of TagRFP in a conserved loop region of the Gα subunits. The results demonstrated that GNA-1 localizes to the plasma membrane and vacuoles, and also to septa throughout conidial germination. GNA-2 and GNA-3 localize to both the plasma membrane and vacuoles during early germination, but are then found in intracellular vacuoles later during hyphal outgrowth.

  4. Multilocus Sequence Typing Reveals Intrafamilial Transmission and Microevolutions of Candida albicans Isolates from the Human Digestive Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Bougnoux, M.-E.; Diogo, D.; François, N.; Sendid, B.; Veirmeire, S.; Colombel, J F; BOUCHIER, C; Van Kruiningen, H; d'Enfert, C.; Poulain, D.

    2006-01-01

    Candida albicans is a human commensal that is also responsible for superficial and systemic infections. Little is known about the carriage of C. albicans in the digestive tract and the genome dynamics that occur during commensalisms of this diploid species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, diversity, and genetic relationships among C. albicans isolates recovered during natural colonization of the digestive tract of humans, with emphasis on Crohn's disease patients who pro...

  5. Relationship between Candida albicans producing proteinase (CAPP) and its environmental pH--comparison with a case of trichophyton mentagrophytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, I. J.; Kim, C. W.; Houh, W.; Tsuboi, R; Matsuda, K; Ogawa, H.

    1987-01-01

    Candida albicans produced a karatinolytic proteinase (KPase) or C. albicans producing proteinase (CAPP), a proposed new term for this enzyme, and Trichophyton mentagrophytes also produced KPase when cultivated in liquid medium containing human stratum corneum (HSC) as the nitrogen source, but were unable to do so when cultivated in sabouraud dextrose broth. Purified KPase from the culture supernatants of C. albicans had a molecular weight of 42,000 and an optimum pH at 4.0. The KPase was foun...

  6. Presumptive identification of Candida species other than C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis with the chromogenic medium CHROMagar Candida

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath Lynn L; Floyd Karon L; Beckius Miriam L; Hospenthal Duane R; Murray Clinton K

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background CHROMagar Candida (CaC) is increasingly being reported as a medium used to differentiate Candida albicans from non-albicans Candida (NAC) species. Rapid identification of NAC can assist the clinician in selecting appropriate antifungal therapy. CaC is a differential chromogenic medium designed to identify C. albicans, C. krusei, and C. tropicalis based on colony color and morphology. Some reports have proposed that CaC can also reliably identify C. dubliniensis and C. glab...

  7. Comparison of cell wall proteins in putative Candida albicans & Candida dubliniensis by using modified staining method & SDS-PAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdanparast, Seyed Amir; Nezarati, Seyedeh Shahrzad Mahdavi; Heshmati, Fariba; Hamzehlou, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    Background Candida species are among the most common causes of opportunistic fungal diseases. Among Candida species, Candida albicans is responsible for most infections. Having many strains, C. albicans is very polymorph. C. dubliniensis is very similar to albicans species both morphologically and physiologically. For an infection to occur, cell wall proteins play an important role as they enable yeast to adhere to host cells and begin pathogenesis. Therefore, we decided to extract these prot...

  8. Krüppel-like Factor 4 modulates interleukin-6 release in human dendritic cells after in vitro stimulation with Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czakai, Kristin; Leonhardt, Ines; Dix, Andreas; Bonin, Michael; Linde, Joerg; Einsele, Hermann; Kurzai, Oliver; Loeffler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections are associated with high mortality rates and are mostly caused by the opportunistic fungi Aspergillus fumigatus and Candida albicans. Immune responses against these fungi are still not fully understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) are crucial players in initiating innate and adaptive immune responses against fungal infections. The immunomodulatory effects of fungi were compared to the bacterial stimulus LPS to determine key players in the immune response to fungal infections. A genome wide study of the gene regulation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) confronted with A. fumigatus, C. albicans or LPS was performed and Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) was identified as the only transcription factor that was down-regulated in DCs by both fungi but induced by stimulation with LPS. Downstream analysis demonstrated the influence of KLF4 on the interleukine-6 expression in human DCs. Furthermore, KLF4 regulation was shown to be dependent on pattern recognition receptor ligation. Therefore KLF4 was identified as a controlling element in the IL-6 immune response with a unique expression pattern comparing fungal and LPS stimulation. PMID:27346433

  9. Regulation of filamentation in the human fungal pathogen Candida tropicalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiuyu; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Yue, Huizhen; Liang, Weihong; Cao, Chengjun; Dai, Yu; Huang, Guanghua

    2016-02-01

    The yeast-filament transition is essential for the virulence of a variety of fungi that are pathogenic to humans. N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) is a potent inducer of filamentation in Candida albicans and thermally dimorphic fungi such as Histoplasma capsulatum and Blastomyces dermatitidis. However, GlcNAc suppresses rather than promotes filamentation in Candida tropicalis, a fungal species that is closely related to C. albicans. Despite the intensive study in C. albicans, the regulatory mechanism of filamentation is poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that the cAMP signaling pathway plays a central role in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. By screening an overexpression library of 156 transcription factors, we have identified approximately 40 regulators of filamentous growth. Although most of the regulators (e.g., Tec1, Gat2, Nrg1, Sfl1, Sfl2 and Ash1) demonstrate a conserved role in the regulation of filamentation, similar to their homologues in C. albicans or Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a number of transcription factors (e.g., Wor1, Bcr1, Stp4, Efh1, Csr1 and Zcf17) play a specific role in C. tropicalis. Our findings indicate that multiple interconnected signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of filamentation in C. tropicalis. These mechanisms have conserved and divergent features among different Candida species. PMID:26466925

  10. Prostaglandin E2 from Candida albicans Stimulates the Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Mixed Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jan; Geginat, Gernot; Tammer, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans interact synergistically in dual species biofilms resulting in enhanced mortality in animal models. Methodology/Principal Findings The aim of the current study was to test possible candidate molecules which might mediate this synergistic interaction in an in vitro model of mixed biofilms, such as farnesol, tyrosol and prostaglandin (PG) E2. In mono-microbial and dual biofilms of C.albicans wild type strains PGE2 levels between 25 and 250 pg/mL were measured. Similar concentrations of purified PGE2 significantly enhanced S.aureus biofilm formation in a mode comparable to that observed in dual species biofilms. Supernatants of the null mutant deficient in PGE2 production did not stimulate the proliferation of S.aureus and the addition of the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin blocked the S.aureus biofilm formation in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, S. aureus biofilm formation was boosted by low and inhibited by high farnesol concentrations. Supernatants of the farnesol-deficient C. albicans ATCC10231 strain significantly enhanced the biofilm formation of S. aureus but at a lower level than the farnesol producer SC5314. However, C. albicans ATCC10231 also produced PGE2 but amounts were significantly lower compared to SC5314. Conclusion/Significance In conclision, we identified C. albicans PGE2 as a key molecule stimulating the growth and biofilm formation of S. aureus in dual S. aureus/C. albicans biofilms, although C. albicans derived farnesol, but not tyrosol, may also contribute to this effect but to a lesser extent. PMID:26262843

  11. Antifungal activity of clotrimazole against Candida albicans depends on carbon sources, growth phase and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lydia; Miramón, Pedro; Jablonowski, Nadja; Wisgott, Stephanie; Wilson, Duncan; Brunke, Sascha; Hube, Bernhard

    2015-07-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis, a superficial infection caused predominantly by the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, is frequently treated with clotrimazole. Some drug formulations contain lactate for improved solubility. Lactate may modify C. albicans physiology and drug sensitivity by serving as a carbon source for the fungus and/or affecting local pH. Here, we explored the effects of lactate, in combination with pH changes, on C. albicans proliferation, morphology and clotrimazole sensitivity. Moreover, we determined the influence of growth phase and morphology per se on drug sensitivity. We showed that utilization of lactate as a carbon source did not promote fast fungal proliferation or filamentation. Lactate had no influence on clotrimazole-mediated killing of C. albicans in standard fungal cultivation medium but had an additive effect on the fungicidal clotrimazole action under in vitro vagina-simulative conditions. Moreover, clotrimazole-mediated killing was growth-phase and morphology dependent. Post-exponential cells were resistant to the fungicidal action of clotrimazole, whilst logarithmic cells were sensitive, and hyphae showed the highest susceptibility. Finally, we showed that treatment of pre-formed C. albicans hyphae with sublethal concentrations of clotrimazole induced a reversion to yeast-phase growth. As C. albicans hyphae are considered the pathogenic morphology during mucosal infections, these data suggest that elevated fungicidal activity of clotrimazole against hyphae plus clotrimazole-induced hyphae-to-yeast reversion may help to dampen acute vaginal infections by reducing the relative proportion of hyphae and thus shifting to a non-invasive commensal-like population. In addition, lactate as an ingredient of clotrimazole formulations may potentiate clotrimazole killing of C. albicans in the vaginal microenvironment. PMID:25976001

  12. Capric acid secreted by S. boulardii inhibits C. albicans filamentous growth, adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Murzyn

    Full Text Available Candidiasis are life-threatening systemic fungal diseases, especially of gastro intestinal track, skin and mucous membranes lining various body cavities like the nostrils, the mouth, the lips, the eyelids, the ears or the genital area. Due to increasing resistance of candidiasis to existing drugs, it is very important to look for new strategies helping the treatment of such fungal diseases. One promising strategy is the use of the probiotic microorganisms, which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit. Such a probiotic microorganism is yeast Saccharomyces boulardii, a close relative of baker yeast. Saccharomyces boulardii cells and their extract affect the virulence factors of the important human fungal pathogen C. albicans, its hyphae formation, adhesion and biofilm development. Extract prepared from S. boulardii culture filtrate was fractionated and GC-MS analysis showed that the active fraction contained, apart from 2-phenylethanol, caproic, caprylic and capric acid whose presence was confirmed by ESI-MS analysis. Biological activity was tested on C. albicans using extract and pure identified compounds. Our study demonstrated that this probiotic yeast secretes into the medium active compounds reducing candidal virulence factors. The chief compound inhibiting filamentous C. albicans growth comparably to S. boulardii extract was capric acid, which is thus responsible for inhibition of hyphae formation. It also reduced candidal adhesion and biofilm formation, though three times less than the extract, which thus contains other factors suppressing C. albicans adherence. The expression profile of selected genes associated with C. albicans virulence by real-time PCR showed a reduced expression of HWP1, INO1 and CSH1 genes in C. albicans cells treated with capric acid and S. boulardii extract. Hence capric acid secreted by S. boulardii is responsible for inhibition of C. albicans filamentation and partially also adhesion and

  13. Candida albicans interface infection after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Sedaghat

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical features of interface Candida keratitis after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK, may imitate rejection or crystalline keratopathy. We report here an 18-year-old woman presented with red eye, 4 months after undergoing DALK. Slit lamp examination revealed keratic precipitates (KPs and cojunctival injection. She was prescribed corticosteroid treatment for endothelial rejection by another ophthalmologist because of misdiagnosis, but suffered a recurrence of symptoms after reduction of the corticosteroid treatment. At that time, she was referred to our office. The recurrence persisted despite antibiotic and antifungal therapies. Ten days after treatment with interface irrigation with amphotericin, the infiltration and hypopyon were resolved. Topical steroid was added after 3 months of antifungal monotherapy. Irrigant cultures confirmed the presence of Candida albicans. The corneal graft appeared semi-clear with no signs of infection at 17-month follow-up. We recommend a close follow-up and a timely intervention to prevent the need for more invasive treatment such as penetrating keratoplasty.

  14. UvHOG1 is important for hyphal growth and stress responses in the rice false smut fungus Ustilaginoidea virens

    OpenAIRE

    Dawei Zheng; Yi Wang; Yu Han; Jin-Rong Xu; Chenfang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Rice false smut caused by Ustilaginoidea virens is one of the most important diseases of rice worldwide. Although its genome has been sequenced, to date there is no report on targeted gene deletion in U. virens and no molecular studies on genetic mechanisms regulating the infection processes of this destructive pathogen. In this study, we attempted to generate knockout mutants of the ortholog of yeast HOG1 MAP kinase gene in U. virens. One Uvhog1 deletion mutant was identified after screening...

  15. Binding Force Dynamics of Streptococcus mutans-glucosyltransferase B to Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, G; Marsh, G; Gao, L; Waugh, R; Koo, H

    2015-09-01

    Candida albicans cells are often detected with Streptococcus mutans in plaque biofilms from children affected with early childhood caries. The coadhesion between these 2 organisms appears to be largely mediated by the S. mutans-derived exoenzyme glucosyltransferase B (GtfB); GtfB readily binds to C. albicans cells in an active form, producing glucans locally that provide enhanced binding sites for S. mutans. However, knowledge is limited about the mechanisms by which the bacterial exoenzyme binds to and functions on the fungal surface to promote this unique cross-kingdom interaction. In this study, we use atomic force microscopy to understand the strength and binding dynamics modulating GtfB-C. albicans adhesive interactions in situ. Single-molecule force spectroscopy with GtfB-functionalized atomic force microscopy tips demonstrated that the enzyme binds with remarkable strength to the C. albicans cell surface (~2 nN) and showed a low dissociation rate, suggesting a highly stable bond. Strikingly, the binding strength of GtfB to the C. albicans surface was ~2.5-fold higher and the binding stability, ~20 times higher, as compared with the enzyme adhesion to S. mutans. Furthermore, adhesion force maps showed an intriguing pattern of GtfB binding. GtfB adhered heterogeneously on the surface of C. albicans, showing a higher frequency of adhesion failure but large sections of remarkably strong binding forces, suggesting the presence of GtfB binding domains unevenly distributed on the fungal surface. In contrast, GtfB bound uniformly across the S. mutans cell surface with less adhesion failure and a narrower range of binding forces (vs. the C. albicans surface). The data provide the first insights into the mechanisms underlying the adhesive and mechanical properties governing GtfB interactions with C. albicans. The strong and highly stable GtfB binding to C. albicans could explain, at least in part, why this bacterially derived exoenzyme effectively modulates this

  16. Effect of Low-Level Laser therapy on the fungal proliferation of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vanda S. M.; Araújo, Natália C.; Menezes, Rebeca F. d.; Moreno, Lara M.; Santos-Neto, Alexandrino d. P.; Gerbi, Marleny Elizabeth M.

    2016-03-01

    Candida albicans plays an important role in triggering infections in HIV+ patients. The indiscriminate use of antifungals has led to resistance to Candida albicans, which requires new treatment alternatives for oral candidiasis. Low-level laser therapy promotes a considerable improvement in the healing of wounds and in curing illnesses caused by microorganisms. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser radiation on the cell proliferation of Candida albicans in immunosuppressed patients. Six Candida albicans strains that had been isolated from immunosuppressed patients were divided into a control group and experimental groups, which received eight sessions of laser therapy (InGaAlP, λ685nm, P = 30mW, CW, Φ~6 mm and GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW, CW, Φ~6 mm) using dosimetries of 6J/cm2, 8J/cm2, 10J/cm2 and 12J/cm2 for each wavelength and power. The results were not statistically significant (Kruskal Wallis, p > 0.05), although the proliferation of Candida albicans was lower in some of the experimental groups. The dosimetry of 6J/cm2 (GaAlAs, λ830nm, P = 40mW) provided lower mean scores than the other groups for the growth of Candida. Further studies are required to confirm whetehr laser therapy is a viable option in the treatment of fungal infections.

  17. ERG11 mutations associated with azole resistance in Candida albicans isolates from vulvovaginal candidosis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wang; Li-Hua Huang; Ji-Xue Zhao; Man Wei; Hua Fang; Dan-Yang Wang; Hong-Fa Wang; Ji-Gang Yin; Mei Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the azole susceptibility of Candida albicans (C. albicans) from vulvovaginal candidosis patients and to analyze the relationship between ERG11 gene mutations in these isolates and azole resistance. Methods:Three hundred and two clinical isolates of Candida species were collected. Azole susceptibility was tested in vitro in microdilution studies. The ERG11 genes of 17 isolates of C. albicans (2 susceptibles, 5 dose-dependent resistants and 10 resistants) were amplified and sequenced. Results:Of the 302 isolates collected, 70.2%were C. albicans, of which 8.5%, 3.8%and 4.2%were resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, respectively. In total, 27 missense mutations were detected in ERG11 genes from resistant/susceptible dose-dependent isolates. Among them, Y132H, A114S, and Y257H substitutions were most prevalent and were known to cause fluconazole resistance. G464S and F72S also has been proved to cause fluconazole resistance. Two novel substitutions (T285A, S457P) in hotspot regions were identified. Conclusions:Twenty seven mutations in the ERG11 gene were identified in azole-resistant C. albicans isolates, which indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs and the recurrence of vulvovaginal candidosis. The relationship of two novel substitutions (T285A, S457P) with fluconazole resistance needs to be further verified by site-directed mutagenesis.

  18. ERG11 mutations associated with azole resistance in Candida albicans isolates from vulvovaginal candidosis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin; Wang; Li-Hua; Huang; Ji-Xue; Zhao; Man; Wei; Hua; Fang; Dan-Yang; Wang; Hong-Fa; Wang; Ji-Gang; Yin; Mei; Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the azole susceptibility of Candida albicans(C.albicans)from vulvovaginal candidosis patients and to analyze the relationship between ERG11 gene mutations in these isolates and azole resistance.Methods: Three hundred and two clinical isolates of Candida species were collected.Azole susceptibility was tested in vitro in microdilution studies. The ERG11 genes of 17 isolates of C. albicans(2 susceptibles, 5 dose-dependent resistants and 10 resistants) were amplified and sequenced.Results: Of the 302 isolates collected, 70.2% were C. albicans, of which 8.5%, 3.8% and4.2% were resistant to fluconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole, respectively. In total,27 missense mutations were detected in ERG11 genes from resistant/susceptible dosedependent isolates. Among them, Y132 H, A114 S, and Y257 H substitutions were most prevalent and were known to cause fluconazole resistance. G464 S and F72 S also have been proved to cause fluconazole resistance. Two novel substitutions(T285A, S457P) in hotspot regions were identified.Conclusions: Twenty seven mutations in the ERG11 gene were identified in azoleresistant C. albicans isolates, which indicated a possible relation with the increase in resistance to azole drugs and the recurrence of vulvovaginal candidosis. The relationship of two novel substitutions(T285A, S457P) with fluconazole resistance needs to be further verified by site-directed mutagenesis.

  19. Adherence of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans to different bracket materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivaasan Nambi Rammohan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantify the adherence of Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans on brackets made of stainless steel, plastic, ceramic, titanium, and gold, and to evaluate the various sites of adherence of these microorganisms with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: Brackets made of stainless steel, plastic, ceramic, titanium, and gold were used. The adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans were studied. The brackets were placed in flat-bottomed vials containing basal medium with 20% sucrose added; the flasks were inoculated with each of the microbial suspensions. The samples were incubated at 37°C for 48 h, after which the brackets were removed. The cells adhering to the glass were counted and the brackets were studied with SEM. Results: When evaluated together, the adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans was increased in the ceramic bracket group. When evaluated separately, metallic brackets had increased number of colony-forming units (CFUs of S. mutans and the use of titanium brackets increased the CFUs of C. albicans. SEM demonstrated that the adherence of S. mutans and C. albicans together varied according to the bracket materials, with ceramic having the greatest and stainless steel having the least adherence. Conclusions: Oral hygiene may be of greater concern with esthetic brackets since this study shows that microbial adhesion is greater with these brackets.

  20. Antifungal Activity of Lavandula Angustifolia and Quergues Infectoria Extracts in Comparison with Nystatin on Candida Albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Nouri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Nowadays,herbal extracts are used to treat diseases, especially infec-tious ones. Candida albicans is the most common causes of oral opportunistic infections.In this study, antifungal effects of two herbal extracts were evaluated on an oral pathogen i.e. Candida albicans. Materials & Methods: In this descriptive- analytic study, the Department of Prosthodontics, ,Tehran University of Medical Sciences, school of Dentistry the oral samples of 25 patients with denture stomatitis were collected using sterile swabs. Then the isolated candida albicans and standard candida albicans PTCC 5027 were cultured. The antifungal effect was evaluated with disk plate method. Nystatin and methanol were used as positive and negative control groups, respectively. The power of antifungal activity was evaluated with the inhibition zone diameter of each of the extracts. At the end, the data were analyzed by ANOVA and Fried-man statistical tests. Results: Results showed that extracts of Querques infectoria had great antifungal effects. There was not statistically significant difference between nystatine and Querques infectoria extract (P>0.05 however , Querques infectoria was statistically more effective than lavender extract and nystatin showed the highest antifungal activity (P <0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that plant extracts had positive effects on Candida albicans as compared to nystatin. Thus, we hope to find new herbal medicines and compounds to treat candidiasis in the future. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2016; 23 (2:172-178