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Sample records for albicans genetic variants

  1. Genetics of Candida albicans, a diploid human fungal pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Suzanne M; Johnson, Alexander D

    2007-01-01

    Candida albicans is a species of fungus that typically resides in the gastrointestinal tracts of humans and other warm-blooded animals. It is also the most common human fungal pathogen, causing a variety of skin and soft tissue infections in healthy people and more virulent invasive and disseminated diseases in patients with compromised immune systems. How this microorganism manages to persist in healthy hosts but also to cause a spectrum of disease states in the immunocompromised host are questions of significant biological interest as well as major clinical and economic importance. In this review, we describe recent developments in population genetics, the mating process, and gene disruption technology that are providing much needed experimental insights into the biology of C. albicans.

  2. Molecular genetic techniques for gene manipulation in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiu-Rong; Yan, Lan; Lv, Quan-Zhen; Zhou, Mi; Sui, Xue; Cao, Yong-Bing; Jiang, Yuan-Ying

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is one of the most common fungal pathogen in humans due to its high frequency as an opportunistic and pathogenic fungus causing superficial as well as invasive infections in immunocompromised patients. An understanding of gene function in C. albicans is necessary to study the molecular basis of its pathogenesis, virulence and drug resistance. Several manipulation techniques have been used for investigation of gene function in C. albicans, including gene disruption, controlled gene expression, protein tagging, gene reintegration, and overexpression. In this review, the main cassettes containing selectable markers used for gene manipulation in C. albicans are summarized; the advantages and limitations of these cassettes are discussed concerning the influences on the target gene expression and the virulence of the mutant strains. PMID:24759671

  3. Visualizing the geography of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Joseph H; Novembre, John

    2017-02-15

    One of the key characteristics of any genetic variant is its geographic distribution. The geographic distribution can shed light on where an allele first arose, what populations it has spread to, and in turn on how migration, genetic drift, and natural selection have acted. The geographic distribution of a genetic variant can also be of great utility for medical/clinical geneticists and collectively many genetic variants can reveal population structure. Here we develop an interactive visualization tool for rapidly displaying the geographic distribution of genetic variants. Through a REST API and dynamic front-end, the Geography of Genetic Variants (GGV) browser ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/ ) provides maps of allele frequencies in populations distributed across the globe. GGV is implemented as a website ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/ggv/ ) which employs an API to access frequency data ( http://popgen.uchicago.edu/freq_api/ ). Python and javascript source code for the website and the API are available at: http://github.com/NovembreLab/ggv/ and http://github.com/NovembreLab/ggv-api/ . jnovembre@uchicago.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  4. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility.

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    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk.To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas.We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity.We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles.Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population.

  5. New genetic variants associated with prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants -- one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs -- that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNP

  6. Genetic variants influencing phenotypic variance heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ek, Weronica E; Rask-Andersen, Mathias; Karlsson, Torgny; Enroth, Stefan; Gyllensten, Ulf; Johansson, Åsa

    2018-03-01

    Most genetic studies identify genetic variants associated with disease risk or with the mean value of a quantitative trait. More rarely, genetic variants associated with variance heterogeneity are considered. In this study, we have identified such variance single-nucleotide polymorphisms (vSNPs) and examined if these represent biological gene × gene or gene × environment interactions or statistical artifacts caused by multiple linked genetic variants influencing the same phenotype. We have performed a genome-wide study, to identify vSNPs associated with variance heterogeneity in DNA methylation levels. Genotype data from over 10 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and DNA methylation levels at over 430 000 CpG sites, were analyzed in 729 individuals. We identified vSNPs for 7195 CpG sites (P mean DNA methylation levels. We further showed that variance heterogeneity between genotypes mainly represents additional, often rare, SNPs in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the respective vSNP and for some vSNPs, multiple low frequency variants co-segregating with one of the vSNP alleles. Therefore, our results suggest that variance heterogeneity of DNA methylation mainly represents phenotypic effects by multiple SNPs, rather than biological interactions. Such effects may also be important for interpreting variance heterogeneity of more complex clinical phenotypes.

  7. Genetic variants in periodontal health and disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandrina L. [Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Dentistry; Kobayashi, Junya [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Genome Repair Dynamics

    2010-07-01

    Periodontitis is a complex, multifactorial disease and its susceptibility is genetically determined. The present book systematically reviews the evidence of the association between the genetic variants and periodontitis progression and/or treatment outcomes. Genetic syndromes known to be associated with periodontal disease, the candidate gene polymorphisms investigated in relation to periodontitis, the heritability of chronic and aggressive periodontitis, as well as common guidelines for association studies are described. This growing understanding of the role of genetic variation in inflammation and periodontal chronic disease presents opportunities to identify healthy persons who are at increased risk of disease and to potentially modify the trajectory of disease to prolong healthy aging. The book represents a new concept in periodontology with its pronounced focus on understanding through knowledge rather than presenting the presently valid answers. Connections between genetics and periodontology are systematically reviewed and covered in detail. (orig.)

  8. Genetics in psychiatry: common variant association studies

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    Buxbaum Joseph D

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many psychiatric conditions and traits are associated with significant heritability. Genetic risk for psychiatric conditions encompass rare variants, identified due to major effect, as well as common variants, the latter analyzed by association analyses. We review guidelines for common variant association analyses, undertaking after assessing evidence of heritability. We highlight the importance of: suitably large sample sizes; an experimental design that controls for ancestry; careful data cleaning; correction for multiple testing; small P values for positive findings; assessment of effect size for positive findings; and, inclusion of an independent replication sample. We also note the importance of a critical discussion of any prior findings, biological follow-up where possible, and a means of accessing the raw data.

  9. Genetic variability of Candida albicans in HIV/AIDS patient with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS

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    Retno Puji Rahayu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral candidiasis is the mostly found oral manifestation in HIV/AIDS infected patient caused by immunocompromised especially immunodeficiency. Clinical symptoms is severe pain in oral cavity and dry mouth because of xerostomia which cause the loss of appetite. Candida albicans (C. albicans is normal flora in oral cavity which plays as opportunistic pathogen and also the cause of oral candidiasis. Almost 90% of HIV–infected patient have oral candidiasis. This condition is clinical problem which has not been well-managed yet. C. albicans colonized oral mucous cavity has different genetic variability for each strain. Phenotype of C. albicans has been determined by genetic factor and environtment. This condition stimulate differences of genotype among various strain of C. albicans in the world. Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyze the genetic variability of C.albicans which colonized in the mucous oral cavity of HIV/AIDS patient in Surabaya in the treatment with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS. Methods: This research has been identify and characterize the prevalent strain of C. albicans isolat in Surabaya (East Java in HIV/AIDS infected patient with oral candidiasis by method of Iatron candidal check. The highlight of this research including cytology examination by Papanicoloau staining, C. albicans culture, spheroplast making, DNA isolation and genetic variability checking by randomly amplyfied polymorphism DNA (RAPD. Results: C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of non-HIV patients had a predisposition of farther genetic relationship (genetic distance of 0.452 with C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of HIV ARV and HIV non-ARV patients. The genetic distance was ranging between 0 and 1, where 9 was long genetic distance and 1 was short genetic distance. In contrast, C. albicans colonizing oral mucosa of HIV ARV have predisposition of closer genetic relationship (genetic distance of 0.762 with C. albicans colonizing

  10. Genetics Home Reference: GM2-gangliosidosis, AB variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be inherited? More about Inheriting Genetic Conditions Diagnosis & Management Resources Genetic Testing (1 link) Genetic Testing Registry: Tay-Sachs disease, variant AB General Information from MedlinePlus (5 ...

  11. Unexpectedly high genetic diversity and divergence among populations of the apomictic Neotropical tree Miconia albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, A C C; Serra, A C; Sampaio, D S; Borba, E L; Bonetti, A M; Oliveira, P E

    2018-03-01

    Since tropical trees often have long generation times and relatively small reproductive populations, breeding systems and genetic variation are important for population viability and have consequences for conservation. Miconia albicans is an obligate, diplosporous, apomictic species widespread in the Brazilian Cerrado, the savanna areas in central Brazil and elsewhere in the Neotropics. The genetic variability would be, theoretically, low within these male-sterile and possibly clonal populations, although some variation would be expected due to recombination during restitutional meiosis. We used ISSR markers to assess genetic diversity of M. albicans and to compare with other tropical trees, including invasive species of Melastomataceae. A total of 120 individuals from six populations were analysed using ten ISSR primers, which produced 153 fully reproducible fragments. The populations of M. albicans presented mean Shannon's information index (I) of 0.244 and expected heterozygosity (H e ) of 0.168. Only two pairs of apparently clonal trees were identified, and genetic diversity was relatively high. A hierarchical amova for all ISSR datasets showed that 74% of the variance was found among populations, while only 26% of the variance was found within populations of this species. Multivariate and Bayesian analyses indicated marked separation between the studied populations. The genetic diversity generated by restitutional meiosis, polyploidy and possibly other genome changes may explain the morpho-physiological plasticity and the ability of these plants to differentiate and occupy such a wide territory and different environmental conditions. Producing enormous amounts of bird-dispersed fruits, M. albicans possess weedy potential that may rival other Melastomataceae alien invaders. © 2017 German Society for Plant Sciences and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  12. Genetic variants associated with lung function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wojczynski, Mary; Minster, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    ) associated with FEV1/FVC, none of which were replicated in the CHARGE/SpiroMeta consortia. Using linkage analysis, we identified a novel linkage peak in chromosome 2 at 219 cM for FEV1/FVC (LOD: 3.29) and confirmed a previously reported linkage peak in chromosome 6 at 28 cM (LOD: 3.33) for FEV1. CONCLUSION......: Future studies need to identify the rare genetic variants underlying the linkage peak in chromosome 6 for FEV1....

  13. Molecular typing and genetic relatedness of 72 clinical Candida albicans isolates from poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianchai; Liu, Huanzhang; Yan, Jinkun; Liu, Na; Zhang, Heping; Zhao, Chengrui; Liu, Yanwei

    2018-02-01

    Candida albicans is the most prevalent opportunistic fungus of humans and animals. While most studies focus on human isolates, they rarely focus on poultry isolates. In this study, C. albicans strains were recovered from poultry in the southern Hebei Province (China) and identified. Molecular typing and analyses were performed to understand the molecular epidemiology and genetic relatedness of the strains. The fungi were isolated from live birds with presumed candidiasis or their corpses. The isolates were identified based on morphology, differential medium culture, and rDNA internal transcribed spacer sequencing. The identified C. albicans strains were analyzed by ABC genotyping and multilocus sequence typing. Clonal groups were identified using the eBURST (version 3.0) software, and an UPGMA phylogenetic tree was constructed using the MEGA (version 6.06) software. Overall, 72 isolates were divided into three genotypes (A, B, and C), 48 novel sequence types (STs), five groups with 10 singletons, and four clades. Results indicated that candidiasis is common in poultry in the southern Hebei Province, and that the genetic composition of the C. albicans poultry population from the area is relatively complicated. Based on the eBURST analysis for the STs in this study and others, we suggest that C. albicans poultry isolates were relatively independent but not completely separated from human isolates. The strains with the same or closely related genotypes but recovered from both birds and humans could have transferred and evolved between the two types of host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic Variants Associated with Circulating Parathyroid Hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne; Lutsey, Pamela L; Kleber, Marcus E; Nielson, Carrie M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Bis, Joshua C; Eny, Karen M; Portas, Laura; Eriksson, Joel; Lorentzon, Mattias; Koller, Daniel L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Teumer, Alexander; Pilz, Stefan; Nethander, Maria; Selvin, Elizabeth; Tang, Weihong; Weng, Lu-Chen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Lai, Dongbing; Peacock, Munro; Hannemann, Anke; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg; Nauk, Matthias; Murgia, Federico; Pattee, Jack W; Orwoll, Eric; Zmuda, Joseph M; Riancho, Jose Antonio; Wolf, Myles; Williams, Frances; Penninx, Brenda; Econs, Michael J; Ryan, Kathleen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Paterson, Andrew D; Psaty, Bruce M; Siscovick, David S; Rotter, Jerome I; Pirastu, Mario; Streeten, Elizabeth; März, Winfried; Fox, Caroline; Coresh, Josef; Wallaschofski, Henri; Pankow, James S; de Boer, Ian H; Kestenbaum, Bryan

    2017-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) is a primary calcium regulatory hormone. Elevated serum PTH concentrations in primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism have been associated with bone disease, hypertension, and in some studies, cardiovascular mortality. Genetic causes of variation in circulating PTH concentrations are incompletely understood. We performed a genome-wide association study of serum PTH concentrations among 29,155 participants of European ancestry from 13 cohort studies ( n =22,653 and n =6502 in discovery and replication analyses, respectively). We evaluated the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with natural log-transformed PTH concentration adjusted for age, sex, season, study site, and principal components of ancestry. We discovered associations of SNPs from five independent regions with serum PTH concentration, including the strongest association with rs6127099 upstream of CYP24A1 ( P =4.2 × 10 -53 ), a gene that encodes the primary catabolic enzyme for 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D and 25-dihydroxyvitamin D. Each additional copy of the minor allele at this SNP associated with 7% higher serum PTH concentration. The other SNPs associated with serum PTH concentration included rs4074995 within RGS14 ( P =6.6 × 10 -17 ), rs219779 adjacent to CLDN14 ( P =3.5 × 10 -16 ), rs4443100 near RTDR1 ( P =8.7 × 10 -9 ), and rs73186030 near CASR ( P =4.8 × 10 -8 ). Of these five SNPs, rs6127099, rs4074995, and rs219779 replicated. Thus, common genetic variants located near genes involved in vitamin D metabolism and calcium and renal phosphate transport associated with differences in circulating PTH concentrations. Future studies could identify the causal variants at these loci, and the clinical and functional relevance of these variants should be pursued. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  15. Association of Genetic Variants of Milk Proteins with Milk Production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    Aschaffenburg & Drewry,. 1955; 1957) researchers have become interested in the genetic polymorphism of milk proteins. It is known today that there are at least 39 genetic variants of six milk protein fractions (Eigel et al., 1984; Bouniol et al.,.

  16. CRY2 genetic variants associate with dysthymia.

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    Leena Kovanen

    Full Text Available People with mood disorders often have disruptions in their circadian rhythms. Recent molecular genetics has linked circadian clock genes to mood disorders. Our objective was to study two core circadian clock genes, CRY1 and CRY2 as well as TTC1 that interacts with CRY2, in relation to depressive and anxiety disorders. Of these three genes, 48 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs whose selection was based on the linkage disequilibrium and potential functionality were genotyped in 5910 individuals from a nationwide population-based sample. The diagnoses of major depressive disorder, dysthymia and anxiety disorders were assessed with a structured interview (M-CIDI. In addition, the participants filled in self-report questionnaires on depressive and anxiety symptoms. Logistic and linear regression models were used to analyze the associations of the SNPs with the phenotypes. Four CRY2 genetic variants (rs10838524, rs7121611, rs7945565, rs1401419 associated significantly with dysthymia (false discovery rate q<0.05. This finding together with earlier CRY2 associations with winter depression and with bipolar type 1 disorder supports the view that CRY2 gene has a role in mood disorders.

  17. UV-induced mitotic co-segregation of genetic markers in Candida albicans: Evidence for linkage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crandall, M.

    1983-01-01

    Parasexual genetic studies of the medically important yeast Candida albicans were performed using the method of UV-induced mitotic segregation. UV-irradiation of the Hoffmann-La Roche type culture of C. albicans yielded a limited spectrum of mutants at a relatively high fequency. This observation suggested natural heterozygosity. Canavanine-sensitive (CanS) segregants were induced at a frequency of 7.6 . 10 -3 . Double mutants that were both CanS and methionine (Met - ) auxotrophs were induced at a frequency of 7.4 . 10 -3 . The single Met - segregant class was missing indicating linkage. UV-induced CanS or Met - CanS segregants occurred occasionally in twin-sectored colonies. Analyses of the sectors as well as the observed and missing classes of segregants indicated that genes met and can are linked in the cis configuration. The proposed gene order is: centromere - met - can. Thus, it is concluded that the Hoffmann-La Roche strain of C. albicans is naturally heterozygous at two linked loci. These findings are consistent with diploidy. (orig.)

  18. Genetic Variability of Candida albicans Sap8 Propeptide in Isolates from Different Types of Infection

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    Joana Carvalho-Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The secreted aspartic proteases (Saps are among the most studied virulence determinants in Candida albicans. These proteins are translated as pre-pro-enzymes consisting of a signal sequence followed by a propeptide and the mature enzyme. The propeptides of secreted proteinases are important for the correct processing, folding/secretion of the mature enzyme. In this study, the DNA sequences of C. albicans Saps were screened and a microsatellite was identified in SAP8 propeptide region. The genetic variability of the repetitive region of Sap8 propeptide was determined in 108 C. albicans independent strains isolated from different types of infection: oral infection (OI, oral commensal (OC, vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC, and bloodstream infections (BSI. Nine different propeptides for Sap8 processing were identified whose frequencies varied with the type of infection. OC strains presented the highest gene diversity while OI isolated the lowest. The contribution of the Saps to mucosal and systemic infections has been demonstrated and recently Sap8 has been implicated in the cleavage of a signalling glycoprotein that leads to Cek1-MAPK pathway activation. This work is the first to identify a variable microsatellite in the propeptide of a secreted aspartic protease and brings new insights into the variability of Sap8.

  19. Genetic interactions among homologous recombination mutants in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellido, Alberto; Andaluz, Encarnación; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Larriba, Germán

    2015-01-01

    rad52-ΔΔ and, to a lesser extent, rad51-ΔΔ deletants of Candidaalbicans displayed slow growth and aberrant filamentous morphology whereas rad59-ΔΔ mutants, both by growth rate and morphology resembled wild type. In this study, we have constructed pair-wise double deletants to analyze genetic interactions among these homologous recombination (HR) proteins that affect growth and morphology traits. When grown in liquid YPD medium, double mutant rad51-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ exhibited growth rates, cell and colony morphologies, and plating efficiencies that were not significantly different from those observed for rad51-ΔΔ. The same was true for rad52-ΔΔ rad59-ΔΔ compared to rad52-ΔΔ. Slow growth and decreased plating efficiency were caused, at least in part, by a decreased viability, as deduced from FUN1 staining. Flow cytometry and microscopic studies of filamentous mutant populations revealed major changes in cell ploidy, size and morphology, whereas DAPI staining identified complex nuclear rearrangements in yeast and filamentous cells. These phenotypes were not observed in the rad59-ΔΔ mutant populations. Our results show that abolishing Rad51 functions induces the appearance of a subpopulation of aberrant yeast and filamentous forms with increased cell size and ploidy. The size of this complex subpopulation was exacerbated in rad52-ΔΔ mutants. The combination of filamentous cell morphology and viability phenotypes was reflected on the colony morphology of the respective mutants. We conclude that the rad52 mutation is epistatic to rad51 for all the morphological traits analyzed. We discuss these results in the light of the several functions of these recombination genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic risk variants for social anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Murray B; Chen, Chia-Yen; Jain, Sonia; Jensen, Kevin P; He, Feng; Heeringa, Steven G; Kessler, Ronald C; Maihofer, Adam; Nock, Matthew K; Ripke, Stephan; Sun, Xiaoying; Thomas, Michael L; Ursano, Robert J; Smoller, Jordan W; Gelernter, Joel

    2017-03-01

    Social anxiety is a neurobehavioral trait characterized by fear and reticence in social situations. Twin studies have shown that social anxiety has a heritable basis, shared with neuroticism and extraversion, but genetic studies have yet to demonstrate robust risk variants. We conducted genomewide association analysis (GWAS) of subjects within the Army Study To Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) to (i) determine SNP-based heritability of social anxiety; (ii) discern genetic risk loci for social anxiety; and (iii) determine shared genetic risk with neuroticism and extraversion. GWAS were conducted within ancestral groups (EUR, AFR, LAT) using linear regression models for each of the three component studies in Army STARRS, and then meta-analyzed across studies. SNP-based heritability for social anxiety was significant (h 2 g  = 0.12, P = 2.17 × 10 -4 in EUR). One meta-analytically genomewide significant locus was seen in each of EUR (rs708012, Chr 6: BP 36965970, P = 1.55 × 10 -8 ; beta = 0.073) and AFR (rs78924501, Chr 1: BP 88406905, P = 3.58 × 10 -8 ; beta = 0.265) samples. Social anxiety in Army STARRS was significantly genetically correlated (negatively) with extraversion (r g  = -0.52, se = 0.22, P = 0.02) but not with neuroticism (r g  = 0.05, se = 0.22, P = 0.81) or with an anxiety disorder factor score (r g  = 0.02, se = 0.32, P = 0.94) from external GWAS meta-analyses. This first GWAS of social anxiety confirms a genetic basis for social anxiety, shared with extraversion but possibly less so with neuroticism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Myostatin: genetic variants, therapy and gene doping

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    André Katayama Yamada

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery, myostatin (MSTN has been at the forefront of muscle therapy research because intrinsic mutations or inhibition of this protein, by either pharmacological or genetic means, result in muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. In addition to muscle growth, MSTN inhibition potentially disturbs connective tissue, leads to strength modulation, facilitates myoblast transplantation, promotes tissue regeneration, induces adipose tissue thermogenesis and increases muscle oxidative phenotype. It is also known that current advances in gene therapy have an impact on sports because of the illicit use of such methods. However, the adverse effects of these methods, their impact on athletic performance in humans and the means of detecting gene doping are as yet unknown. The aim of the present review is to discuss biosynthesis, genetic variants, pharmacological/genetic manipulation, doping and athletic performance in relation to the MSTN pathway. As will be concluded from the manuscript, MSTN emerges as a promising molecule for combating muscle wasting diseases and for triggering wide-ranging discussion in view of its possible use in gene doping.Desde sua descoberta, a miostatina (MSTN entrou na linha de frente em pesquisas relacionadas às terapias musculares porque mutações intrínsecas ou inibição desta proteína tanto por abordagens farmacológicas como genéticas resultam em hipertrofia muscular e hiperplasia. Além do aumento da massa muscular, a inibição de MSTN potencialmente prejudica o tecido conectivo, modula a força muscular, facilita o transplante de mioblastos, promove regeneração tecidual, induz termogênese no tecido adiposo e aumenta a oxidação na musculatura esquelética. É também sabido que os atuais avanços em terapia gênica têm uma relação com o esporte devido ao uso ilícito de tal método. Os efeitos adversos de tal abordagem, seus efeitos no desempenho de atletas e métodos para detectar doping genético s

  2. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  3. Schizophrenia genetic variants are not associated with intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Scheltinga, A. F. Terwisscha; Bakker, S. C.; van Haren, N. E. M.; Derks, E. M.; Buizer-Voskamp, J. E.; Cahn, W.; Ripke, S.; Ophoff, R. A.; Kahn, R. S.; Sanders, A. R.; Kendler, K. S.; Levinson, D. F.; Sklar, P.; Holmans, P. A.; Lin, D. -Y.; Duan, J.; Andreassen, O. A.; Scolnick, E.; Cichon, S.; St Clair, D.; Corvin, A.; Gurling, H.; Werge, T.; Rujescu, D.; Blackwood, D. H. R.; Pato, C. N.; Malhotra, A. K.; Purcell, S.; Dudbridge, F.; Neale, B. M.; Rossin, L.; Visscher, P. M.; Posthuma, D.; Ruderfer, D. M.; Fanous, A.; Stefansson, H.; Steinberg, S.; Mowry, B. J.; Golimbet, V.; de Hert, M.; Jonsson, E. G.; Bitter, I.; Pietilainen, O. P. H.; Collier, D. A.; Tosato, S.; Agartz, I.; Albus, M.; Alexander, M.; Amdur, R. L.; Amin, F.; Bass, N.; Bergen, S. E.; Black, D. W.; Børglum, A. D.; Brown, M. A.; Bruggeman, R.; Buccola, N. G.; Byerley, W. F.; Cantor, R. M.; Carr, V. J.; Catts, S. V.; Choudhury, K.; Cloninger, C. R.; Cormican, P.; Craddock, N.; Danoy, P. A.; Datta, S.; de Haan, L.; Demontis, D.; Dikeos, D.; Djurovic, S.; Donnelly, P.; Donohoe, G.; Duong, L.; Dwyer, S.; Fink-Jensen, A.; Freedman, R.; Freimer, N. B.; Friedl, M.; Georgieva, L.; Giegling, I.; Gill, M.; Glenthøj, B.; Godard, S.; Hamshere, M.; Hansen, M.; Hansen, T.; Hartmann, A. M.; Henskens, F. A.; Hougaard, D. M.; Hultman, C. M.; Ingason, A.; Jablensky, A. V.; Jakobsen, K. D.; Jay, M.; Jurgens, G.; Keller, M. C.; Kenis, G.; Kenny, E.; Kim, Y.; Kirov, G. K.; Konnerth, H.; Konte, B.; Krabbendam, L.; Krasucki, R.; Lasseter, V. K.; Laurent, C.; Lawrence, J.; Lencz, T.; Lerer, F. B.; Liang, K. -Y.; Lichtenstein, P.; Lieberman, J. A.; Linszen, D. H.; Lonnqvist, J.; Loughland, C. M.; Maclean, A. W.; Maher, B. S.; Maier, W.; Mallet, J.; Malloy, P.; Mattheisen, M.; Mattingsdal, M.; McGhee, K. A.; McGrath, J. J.; McIntosh, A.; McLean, D. E.; McQuillin, A.; Melle, I.; Michie, P. T.; Milanova, V.; Morris, D. W.; Mors, O.; Mortensen, P. B.; Moskvina, V.; Muglia, P.; Myin-Germeys, I.; Nertney, D. A.; Nestadt, G.; Nielsen, J.; Nikolov, I.; Nordentoft, M.; Norton, N.; Nothen, M. M.; O'Dushlaine, C. T.; Olincy, A.; Olsen, L.; O'Neill, F. A.; Ørntoft, T. F.; Owen, M. J.; Pantelis, C.; Papadimitriou, G.; Pato, M. T.; Peltonen, L.; Petursson, H.; Pickard, B.; Pimm, J.; Pulver, A. E.; Puri, V.; Quested, D.; Quinn, E. M.; Rasmussen, H. B.; Rethelyi, J. M.; Ribble, R.; Rietschel, M.; Riley, B. P.; Ruggeri, M.; Schall, U.; Schulze, T. G.; Schwab, S. G.; Scott, R. J.; Shi, J.; Sigurdsson, E.; Silverman, J. M.; Spencer, C. C. A.; Stefansson, K.; Strange, A.; Strengman, E.; Stroup, T. S.; Suvisaari, J.; Terenius, L.; Thirumalai, S.; Thygesen, J. H.; Timm, S.; Toncheva, D.; van den Oord, E.; van Os, J.; van Winkel, R.; Veldink, J.; Walsh, D.; Wang, A. G.; Wiersma, D.; Wildenauer, D. B.; Williams, H. J.; Williams, N. M.; Wormley, B.; Zammit, S.; Sullivan, P. F.; O'Donovan, M. C.; Daly, M. J.; Gejman, P. V.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with lower pre-morbid intelligence (IQ) in addition to (pre-morbid) cognitive decline. Both schizophrenia and IQ are highly heritable traits. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic variants associated with schizophrenia, including copy number variants (CNVs) and a

  4. Common Gene Variants Account for Most Genetic Risk for Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene variants account for most genetic risk for autism Roles of heritability, mutations, environment estimated – NIH-funded study. The bulk of risk, or liability, for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) was traced to inherited variations ...

  5. Genetic variant as a marker for bladder cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patients who have inherited a specific common genetic variant develop bladder cancer tumors that strongly express a protein known as prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA), which is also expressed in many pancreatic and prostate tumors, according to research a

  6. Determining the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-22

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine.

  7. Association between smoking behaviour and genetic variants of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 4. Association between smoking behaviour and genetic variants of glial cell line-derived ... 1051 Budapest, Hungary; Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Izabella u. 46, H-1064 Budapest, Hungary; Institute of Medical Chemistry, Molecular Biology and ...

  8. Genetically complex epilepsies, copy number variants and syndrome constellations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mefford, Heather C; Mulley, John C

    2010-10-05

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders, with a prevalence of 1% and lifetime incidence of 3%. There are numerous epilepsy syndromes, most of which are considered to be genetic epilepsies. Despite the discovery of more than 20 genes for epilepsy to date, much of the genetic contribution to epilepsy is not yet known. Copy number variants have been established as an important source of mutation in other complex brain disorders, including intellectual disability, autism and schizophrenia. Recent advances in technology now facilitate genome-wide searches for copy number variants and are beginning to be applied to epilepsy. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the contribution of copy number variants to epilepsy, and how that knowledge is redefining classification of clinical and genetic syndromes.

  9. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  10. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  11. Genetic variants and multiple myeloma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martino, Alessandro; Campa, Daniele; Jurczyszyn, Artur

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genetic background plays a role in multiple myeloma susceptibility. Several single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) associated with genetic susceptibility to multiple myeloma were identified in the last years, but only a few of them were validated in independent studies. METHODS...... with multiple myeloma risk (P value range, 0.055-0.981), possibly with the exception of the SNP rs2227667 (SERPINE1) in women. CONCLUSIONS: We can exclude that the selected polymorphisms are major multiple myeloma risk factors. IMPACT: Independent validation studies are crucial to identify true genetic risk...

  12. Rare genetic variants: making the connection with breast cancer susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tú Nguyen-Dumont

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The practice of clinical genetics in the context of breast cancer predisposition has reached another critical point in its evolution. For the past two decades, genetic testing offered to women attending clinics has been limited to BRCA1 and BRCA2 unless other syndromic indicators have been evident (e.g. PTEN and TP53 for Cowden and Li-Fraumeni syndrome, respectively. Women (and their families who are concerned about their personal and/or family history of breast and ovarian cancer have enthusiastically engaged with clinical genetics services, anticipating a genetic cause for their cancer predisposition will be identified and to receive clinical guidance for their risk management and treatment options. Genetic testing laboratories have demonstrated similar enthusiasm for transitioning from single gene to gene panel testing that now provide opportunities for the large number of women found not to carry mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, enabling them to undergo additional genetic testing. However, these panel tests have limited clinical utility until more is understood about the cancer risks (if any associated with the genetic variation observed in the genes included on these panels. New data is urgently needed to improve the interpretation of the genetic variation data that is already reported from these panels and to inform the selection of genes included in gene panel tests in the future. To address this issue, large internationally coordinated research studies are required to provide the evidence-base from which clinical genetics for breast cancer susceptibility can be practiced in the era of gene panel testing and oncogenetic practice.Two significant steps associated with this process include i validating the genes on these panels (and those likely to be added in the future as bona fide breast cancer predisposition genes and ii interpreting the variation, on a variant-by-variant basis in terms of their likely “pathogenicity” ― a process

  13. The role of common genetic variants in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paludan-Muller, Christian; Svendsen, Jesper H.; Olesen, Morten S.

    2016-01-01

    . The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for AF are still far from completely understood, and it is assumed that this arrhythmia represents a complex interplay of genetic predispositions, arrhythmogenic contributors such as electrolytes and inflammatory stimuli as well as contributions from concomitant cardiac......This review focuses on the genetic basis of atrial fibrillation (AF) and the role of variants in the susceptibility of developing the disease. AF is the most common cardiac arrhythmia affecting 1-2% of the general population. Studies in the last decade have demonstrated that AF, and in particular...... lone AF, has a substantial genetic component. A number of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have indicated that common genetic variants, more precisely the so called single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with AF. Presently more than 10 genomic regions have been identified using...

  14. Genetic-relatedness of peri-implants and buccal Candida albicans isolates determined by RAPD-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertone, Adriana M; Rosa, Alcira C; Nastri, Natalia; Santillán, Hector D; Ariza, Yamila; Iovannitti, Cristina A; Jewtuchowicz, Virginia M

    2016-12-01

    Molecular techniques have been used in recent studies to identify a wide range of potential bacterial pathogens in periimplant pockets of the oral cavity. However, the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of yeasts and species distribution related to periimplantitis are as yet unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of yeasts in periimplant biofilm and to study genetic relatedness of Candida albicans. Yeasts recovered from periimplant biofilm samples (n=89) and buccal samples (n=120) were studied in 40 immunocompetent nonsmoking patients who visited the dental clinic of the Asociación Implantodontológica Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina, and had received oral rehabilitation with implants for more than five years. Yeasts recovered from samples were studied by typing assays using RAPDPCR. The prevalence of yeasts in the periimplant sulcus was 73% (n=29). C. albicans was the most prevalent species identified in this study population. The RAPD analysis showed identical genotypes in most C. albicans spp. from the two different sampling sites: buccal and periimplant. These findings suggest that periimplant biofilm is an ecological niche that favors the growth of yeast species. Most C. albicans found in periimplant biofilm originate from the endogenous infection caused by commensal strains. Sociedad Argentina de Investigación Odontológica.

  15. Butyrylcholinesterase Genetic Variants: Association with Cocaine Dependence and Related Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Negr?o, Andr? Brooking; Pereira, Alexandre Costa; Guindalini, Camila; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Messas, Guilherme Peres; Laranjeira, Ronaldo; Vallada, Homero

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The search for genetic vulnerability factors in cocaine dependence has focused on the role that neuroplasticity plays in addiction. However, like many other drugs, the ability of an individual to metabolize cocaine can also influence susceptibility to dependence. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) metabolizes cocaine, and genetic variants of the BChE gene (BCHE) alter its catalytic activity. Therefore, we hypothesize that cocaine users with polymorphisms in BCHE can show diverse addictiv...

  16. Gain-of-function HCN2 variants in genetic epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Melody; Maljevic, Snezana; Phillips, A Marie; Petrovski, Slave; Hildebrand, Michael S; Burgess, Rosemary; Mount, Therese; Zara, Federico; Striano, Pasquale; Schubert, Julian; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Wong, Michael; Weisenberg, Judith L; Thio, Liu Lin; Lerche, Holger; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Petrou, Steven; Reid, Christopher A

    2018-02-01

    Genetic generalized epilepsy (GGE) is a common epilepsy syndrome that encompasses seizure disorders characterized by spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). Pacemaker hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (HCN) are considered integral to SWD genesis, making them an ideal gene candidate for GGE. We identified HCN2 missense variants from a large cohort of 585 GGE patients, recruited by the Epilepsy Phenome-Genome Project (EPGP), and performed functional analysis using two-electrode voltage clamp recordings from Xenopus oocytes. The p.S632W variant was identified in a patient with idiopathic photosensitive occipital epilepsy and segregated in the family. This variant was also independently identified in an unrelated patient with childhood absence seizures from a European cohort of 238 familial GGE cases. The p.V246M variant was identified in a patient with photo-sensitive GGE and his father diagnosed with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Functional studies revealed that both p.S632W and p.V246M had an identical functional impact including a depolarizing shift in the voltage dependence of activation that is consistent with a gain-of-function. In contrast, no biophysical changes resulted from the introduction of common population variants, p.E280K and p.A705T, and the p.R756C variant from EPGP that did not segregate with disease. Our data suggest that HCN2 variants can confer susceptibility to GGE via a gain-of-function mechanism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Combinations of Genetic Variants Occurring Exclusively in Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erling Mellerup

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In studies of polygenic disorders, scanning the genetic variants can be used to identify variant combinations. Combinations that are exclusively found in patients can be separated from those combinations occurring in control persons. Statistical analyses can be performed to determine whether the combinations that occur exclusively among patients are significantly associated with the investigated disorder. This research strategy has been applied in materials from various polygenic disorders, identifying clusters of patient-specific genetic variant combinations that are significant associated with the investigated disorders. Combinations from these clusters are found in the genomes of up to 55% of investigated patients, and are not present in the genomes of any control persons.

  18. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Amand F; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    diabetes, which in no way offsets their substantial benefits. We sought to investigate the associations of LDL cholesterol-lowering PCSK9 variants with type 2 diabetes and related biomarkers to gauge the likely effects of PCSK9 inhibitors on diabetes risk. METHODS: In this mendelian randomisation study, we...... used data from cohort studies, randomised controlled trials, case control studies, and genetic consortia to estimate associations of PCSK9 genetic variants with LDL cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, fasting insulin, bodyweight, waist-to-hip ratio, BMI, and risk of type 2 diabetes, using...... a standardised analysis plan, meta-analyses, and weighted gene-centric scores. FINDINGS: Data were available for more than 550 000 individuals and 51 623 cases of type 2 diabetes. Combined analyses of four independent PCSK9 variants (rs11583680, rs11591147, rs2479409, and rs11206510) scaled to 1 mmol/L lower LDL...

  19. Genetic variants, seasonal abundance and man-biting rate of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The abundance of Anopheles gambiae s.l and presence of the molecular species and hybrid in the study-area is of epidemiological importance since the genetic variants are found to differ in ecological preference and susceptibility to pyrethroids. Keywords: Anopheles gambiae s.l.; molecular forms; sibling species; vector ...

  20. Novel Genetic Variants for Cartilage Thickness and Hip Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castaño-Betancourt, Martha C.; Evans, Dan S.; Ramos, Yolande F M; Boer, Cindy G.; Metrustry, Sarah; Liu, Youfang; den Hollander, Wouter; van Rooij, Jeroen; Kraus, Virginia B.; Yau, Michelle S.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Muir, Kenneth; Hofman, Albert; Doherty, Michael; Doherty, Sally; Zhang, Weiya; Kraaij, Robert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Maciewicz, Rose A.; Arden, Nigel; Nelissen, Rob G H H; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Jordan, Joanne M.; Nevitt, Michael C.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Hart, Deborah J.; Lafeber, Floris; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Evangelou, Evangelos; Spector, Tim D.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Lane, Nancy E.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Valdes, Ana M.; van Meurs, Joyce B J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent and disabling diseases of the elderly. Only few genetic variants have been identified for osteoarthritis, which is partly due to large phenotype heterogeneity. To reduce heterogeneity, we here examined cartilage thickness, one of the structural components

  1. Novel Genetic Variants for Cartilage Thickness and Hip Osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Castaño Betancourt (Martha); D.S. Evans (Daniel); Y.F.M. Ramos (Yolande); Boer, C.G. (Cindy G.); S. Metrustry (Sarah); Liu, Y. (Youfang); W. den Hollander (Wouter); J. Van Rooij (Jeroen); Kraus, V.B. (Virginia B.); Yau, M.S. (Michelle S.); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); Muir, K. (Kenneth); A. Hofman (Albert); M. Doherty (Michael); S. Doherty (Sally); W. Zhang (Weiya); R. Kraaij (Robert); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Barrett-Connor, E. (Elizabeth); R.A. MacIewicz (Rose); N.K. Arden (Nigel); R.G.H.H. Nelissen (Rob); M. Kloppenburg (Margreet); Jordan, J.M. (Joanne M.); M.C. Nevitt (Michael); E. Slagboom (Eline); D. Hart (Deborah); F.P.J.G. Lafeber (Floris); U. Styrkarsdottir (Unnur); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); E. Evangelou (Evangelos); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); N.E. Lane; I. Meulenbelt (Ingrid); A.M. Valdes (Ana Maria); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractOsteoarthritis is one of the most frequent and disabling diseases of the elderly. Only few genetic variants have been identified for osteoarthritis, which is partly due to large phenotype heterogeneity. To reduce heterogeneity, we here examined cartilage thickness, one of the structural

  2. Comparing genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparing genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project with SNPs determined by the International HapMap Consortium ... for Toxicological Research, US Food and Drug Administration, 3900 NCTR Road, Jefferson, AR 72079, USA; Thomson Reuters, IP and Science, 22 Thomson Place, Boston, MA 02210, USA ...

  3. Late onset Pompe disease- new genetic variant: Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The patient was not given enzyme replacement therapy due to cost but received high protein therapy and Oxygen supplementation using Oxygen extractor machine. She is worsening due to respiratory failure. Conclusion: This is a new genetic variant isolated of late-onset Pompe disease which presents with almost pure ...

  4. Host Genetic Variants in the Pathogenesis of Hepatitis C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Rau

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct-acting antiviral drugs (DAAs are currently replacing antiviral therapy for Hepatitis C infection. Treatment related side effects are even worse and the emergence of resistant viruses must be avoided because of the direct-antiviral action. Altogether it remains a challenge to take treatment decisions in a clinical setting with cost restrictions. Genetic host factors are hereby essential to implement an individualized treatment concept. In recent years results on different genetic variants have been published with a strong association with therapy response, fibrosis and treatment-related side effects. Polymorphisms of the IL28B gene were identified as accurate predictors for therapy response and spontaneous clearance of HCV infection and are already used for diagnostic decisions. For RBV-induced side effects, such as hemolytic anemia, associations to genetic variants of inosine triphosphatase (ITPA were described and different SLC28 transporters for RBV-uptake have been successfully analyzed. Fibrosis progression has been associated with variants of Vitamin D receptor (VDR and ABCB11 (bile salt export pump. Cirrhotic patients especially have a high treatment risk and low therapy response, so that personalized antiviral treatment is mandatory. This review focuses on different host genetic variants in the pathogenesis of Hepatitis C at the beginning of a new area of treatment.

  5. Comparing genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) determined based on SNP arrays from the international HapMap consortium (HapMap) and the genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project (1KGP) can serve as two references for genomewide association studies (GWAS). We conducted comparative analyses to provide ...

  6. Association between smoking behaviour and genetic variants of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 95; Issue 4. Association ... glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor; GDNF gene; rs3096140, smoking behaviour; nicotine addiction. ... Since the role of dopamine system in smoking iswell established, we hypothesized that GDNF gene variants may affect smoking behaviour.

  7. Identifying genetic variants that affect viability in large cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakhamanesh Mostafavi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available A number of open questions in human evolutionary genetics would become tractable if we were able to directly measure evolutionary fitness. As a step towards this goal, we developed a method to examine whether individual genetic variants, or sets of genetic variants, currently influence viability. The approach consists in testing whether the frequency of an allele varies across ages, accounting for variation in ancestry. We applied it to the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA cohort and to the parents of participants in the UK Biobank. Across the genome, we found only a few common variants with large effects on age-specific mortality: tagging the APOE ε4 allele and near CHRNA3. These results suggest that when large, even late-onset effects are kept at low frequency by purifying selection. Testing viability effects of sets of genetic variants that jointly influence 1 of 42 traits, we detected a number of strong signals. In participants of the UK Biobank of British ancestry, we found that variants that delay puberty timing are associated with a longer parental life span (P~6.2 × 10-6 for fathers and P~2.0 × 10-3 for mothers, consistent with epidemiological studies. Similarly, variants associated with later age at first birth are associated with a longer maternal life span (P~1.4 × 10-3. Signals are also observed for variants influencing cholesterol levels, risk of coronary artery disease (CAD, body mass index, as well as risk of asthma. These signals exhibit consistent effects in the GERA cohort and among participants of the UK Biobank of non-British ancestry. We also found marked differences between males and females, most notably at the CHRNA3 locus, and variants associated with risk of CAD and cholesterol levels. Beyond our findings, the analysis serves as a proof of principle for how upcoming biomedical data sets can be used to learn about selection effects in contemporary humans.

  8. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  9. Challenges of Identifying Clinically Actionable Genetic Variants for Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia C. Carter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in genomic medicine have the potential to change the way we treat human disease, but translating these advances into reality for improving healthcare outcomes depends essentially on our ability to discover disease- and/or drug-associated clinically actionable genetic mutations. Integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a big data infrastructure can provide an efficient and effective way to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for personalized treatments and reduce healthcare costs. We review bioinformatics processing of next-generation sequencing (NGS data, bioinformatics infrastructures for implementing precision medicine, and bioinformatics approaches for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  10. Mendelian randomization analysis with multiple genetic variants using summarized data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam; Thompson, Simon G

    2013-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies, which typically report regression coefficients summarizing the associations of many genetic variants with various traits, are potentially a powerful source of data for Mendelian randomization investigations. We demonstrate how such coefficients from multiple variants can be combined in a Mendelian randomization analysis to estimate the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome. The bias and efficiency of estimates based on summarized data are compared to those based on individual-level data in simulation studies. We investigate the impact of gene-gene interactions, linkage disequilibrium, and 'weak instruments' on these estimates. Both an inverse-variance weighted average of variant-specific associations and a likelihood-based approach for summarized data give similar estimates and precision to the two-stage least squares method for individual-level data, even when there are gene-gene interactions. However, these summarized data methods overstate precision when variants are in linkage disequilibrium. If the P-value in a linear regression of the risk factor for each variant is less than 1×10⁻⁵, then weak instrument bias will be small. We use these methods to estimate the causal association of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) on coronary artery disease using published data on five genetic variants. A 30% reduction in LDL-C is estimated to reduce coronary artery disease risk by 67% (95% CI: 54% to 76%). We conclude that Mendelian randomization investigations using summarized data from uncorrelated variants are similarly efficient to those using individual-level data, although the necessary assumptions cannot be so fully assessed. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  11. THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS OF GENETIC RISK VARIANTS FOR CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv Kumar Srivastava

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND This review covers therapeutic implication of genetic risk variant responsible for coronary artery disease by utilising the highdensity single-nucleotide microarrays to screen the entire human genome. The sequence of the human genome provides the blueprint for life. Approximately, 99.5% of the human genome Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA sequence is identical among humans with 0.5% of the genome sequence (15 million bps accounting for all individual differences. MATERIALS AND METHODS The new technology of the computerised chip array of millions of Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs as Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA markers makes it possible to study and detect genetic predisposition to common polygenic disorders such as Coronary Artery Disease (CAD. The sample sizes required for these studies are massive and large; worldwide consortiums such as Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-Analysis (CARDIoGRAM study have been formed to accommodate this requirement. After the identification of 9p21 progress to detect genetic predisposition has been remarkable. RESULTS There are currently a total of 50 genetic risk variants predisposing to CAD of genome-wide significance with confirmation in independent populations. Rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency, MAF <5% will require direct sequencing to detect genetic predisposition. CONCLUSION We can develop new biomarkers for detecting early CAD as well as unique targets for novel therapy. The challenge for the future will be to identify the molecular mechanisms mediating the risk of those genetic risk variants that act through nonconventional risk factors. The ultimate objective for the future is the sequencing and functional analysis of the causative polymorphisms for its therapeutic implications.

  12. Cerivastatin, Genetic Variants, and the Risk of Rhabdomyolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciante, Kristin D.; Durda, Jon P.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Lumley, Thomas; Rice, Ken; McKnight, Barbara; Totah, Rheem A.; Tamraz, Bani; Kroetz, Deanna L.; Fukushima, Hisayo; Kaspera, Rüdiger; Bis, Joshua C.; Glazer, Nicole L.; Li, Guo; Austin, Thomas R.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Jaquish, Cashell E.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Tracy, Russell P.; Psaty, Bruce M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective The withdrawal of cerivastatin involved an uncommon but serious adverse reaction, rhabdomyolysis. The bimodal response--rhabdomyolysis in a small proportion of users-- points to genetic factors as a potential cause. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate genetic markers for cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis. Methods The study had two components: a candidate gene study to evaluate variants in CYP2C8, UGT1A1, UGT1A3, and SLCO1B1; and a genome-wide association (GWA) study to identify risk factors in other regions of the genome. 185 rhabdomyolysis cases were frequency matched to statin-using controls from the Cardiovascular Health Study (n=374) and the Heart and Vascular Health Study (n=358). Validation relied on functional studies. Results Permutation test results suggested an association between cerivastatin-associated rhabdomyolysis and variants in SLCO1B1 (p = 0.002), but not variants in CYP2C8 (p = 0.073) or the UGTs (p = 0.523). An additional copy of the minor allele of SLCO1B1 rs4149056 (p.Val174Ala) was associated with the risk of rhabdomyolysis (OR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.40 to 2.56). In transfected cells, this variant reduced cerivastatin transport by 40% compared with the reference transporter (p rhabdomyolysis (OR: 0.48; 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.63). Conclusion We identified modest genetic risk factors for an extreme response to cerivastatin. Disabling genetic variants in the candidate genes were not responsible for the bimodal response to cerivastatin. PMID:21386754

  13. Estimating the contribution of genetic variants to difference in incidence of disease between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Ioannidis, John P A; Flanders, W Dana; Yang, Quanhe; Truman, Benedict I; Khoury, Muin J

    2012-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic susceptibility variants to several complex human diseases. However, risk-genotype frequency at loci showing robust associations might differ substantially among different populations. In this paper, we present methods to assess the contribution of genetic variants to the difference in the incidence of disease between different population groups for different scenarios. We derive expressions for the contribution of a single genetic variant, multiple genetic variants, and the contribution of the joint effect of a genetic variant and an environmental factor to the difference in the incidence of disease. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence increases with increasing difference in risk-genotype frequency, but declines with increasing difference in incidence between the two populations. The contribution of genetic variants also increases with increasing relative risk and the contribution of joint effect of genetic and environmental factors increases with increasing relative risk of the gene-environmental interaction. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence between two populations can be expressed as a function of the population attributable risks of the genetic variants in the two populations. The contribution of a group of genetic variants to the disparity in incidence of disease could change considerably by adding one more genetic variant to the group. Any estimate of genetic contribution to the disparity in incidence of disease between two populations at this stage seems to be an elusive goal.

  14. Unclassified sequence variants (UVS and genetic predisposition to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves-Jean Bignon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are mainly attributable to predisposition genes whose germinal mutations are responsible for the disease. The most common genes associated with breast/ovarian cancer are BRCA1 and BRCA2 but at least 20 other genes of medium of high penetrance have been associated with these types of cancer. Lifetime risk of breast cancer for BRCA mutations carriers approaches 90%. Appropriate medical follow-up is therefore essential for women carrying mutations in these genes. BRCA mutational spectrum has not been entirely characterized but not all sequence variants are pathogenic. These are classified as benign polymorphisms or unclassified variants (UV with unknown pathological potential. To date, 43,5% of over 3500 genetic variants BRCA1 and BRCA2 are reported as having uncertain clinical significance. Whether one sequence variant has or not a pathogenicity implication is often a hard decision to take, involving important consequences for diagnosis and medical follow-up. Here we present several cases of unclassified sequence variants detection and interpretation by in-silico analysis.

  15. Search for Genetic Variants Underlying Musical Aptitude and Related Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Ukkola-Vuoti, Liisa

    2013-01-01

    Music perception and practice represents complex cognitive functions of the brain. There is an abundance of data about the neurophysiological effects of music on the human brain, but heritability and especially molecular studies have been lacking. The development of genome technologies and bioinformatics has enabled the identification of genetic variants underlying complex human traits. These methods can be applied to normal human traits like music perception and performance. Prior to th...

  16. Analysis of Plasminogen Genetic Variants in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovnick, A. Dessa; Traboulsee, Anthony L.; Bernales, Cecily Q.; Ross, Jay P.; Forwell, Amanda L.; Yee, Irene M.; Guillot-Noel, Lena; Fontaine, Bertrand; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Hilven, Kelly; Dubois, Bénédicte; Goris, An; Astobiza, Ianire; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Akkad, Denis A.; Aktas, Orhan; Blaschke, Paul; Buttmann, Mathias; Chan, Andrew; Epplen, Joerg T.; Gerdes, Lisa-Ann; Kroner, Antje; Kubisch, Christian; Kümpfel, Tania; Lohse, Peter; Rieckmann, Peter; Zettl, Uwe K.; Zipp, Frauke; Bertram, Lars; Lill, Christina M; Fernandez, Oscar; Urbaneja, Patricia; Leyva, Laura; Alvarez-Cermeño, Jose Carlos; Arroyo, Rafael; Garagorri, Aroa M.; García-Martínez, Angel; Villar, Luisa M.; Urcelay, Elena; Malhotra, Sunny; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel; Berger, Thomas; Fazekas, Franz; Reindl, Markus; Schmied, Mascha C.; Zimprich, Alexander; Vilariño-Güell, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a prevalent neurological disease of complex etiology. Here, we describe the characterization of a multi-incident MS family that nominated a rare missense variant (p.G420D) in plasminogen (PLG) as a putative genetic risk factor for MS. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D (rs139071351) in 2160 MS patients, and 886 controls from Canada, identified 10 additional probands, two sporadic patients and one control with the variant. Segregation in families harboring the rs139071351 variant, identified p.G420D in 26 out of 30 family members diagnosed with MS, 14 unaffected parents, and 12 out of 30 family members not diagnosed with disease. Despite considerably reduced penetrance, linkage analysis supports cosegregation of PLG p.G420D and disease. Genotyping of PLG p.G420D in 14446 patients, and 8797 controls from Canada, France, Spain, Germany, Belgium, and Austria failed to identify significant association with disease (P = 0.117), despite an overall higher prevalence in patients (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 0.93–1.87). To assess whether additional rare variants have an effect on MS risk, we sequenced PLG in 293 probands, and genotyped all rare variants in cases and controls. This analysis identified nine rare missense variants, and although three of them were exclusively observed in MS patients, segregation does not support pathogenicity. PLG is a plausible biological candidate for MS owing to its involvement in immune system response, blood-brain barrier permeability, and myelin degradation. Moreover, components of its activation cascade have been shown to present increased activity or expression in MS patients compared to controls; further studies are needed to clarify whether PLG is involved in MS susceptibility. PMID:27194806

  17. Systematic Complex Haploinsufficiency-Based Genetic Analysis of Candida albicans Transcription Factors: Tools and Applications to Virulence-Associated Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Virginia E; Murante, Thomas; Koselny, Kristy; Murante, Daniel; Esqueda, Marisol; Wall, Gina A; Wellington, Melanie; Hung, Chiung-Yu; Kumar, Anuj; Krysan, Damian J

    2018-03-28

    Genetic interaction analysis is a powerful approach to the study of complex biological processes that are dependent on multiple genes. Because of the largely diploid nature of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans , genetic interaction analysis has been limited to a small number of large-scale screens and a handful for gene-by-gene studies. Complex haploinsufficiency, which occurs when a strain containing two heterozygous mutations at distinct loci shows a phenotype that is distinct from either of the corresponding single heterozygous mutants, is an expedient approach to genetic interactions analysis in diploid organisms. Here, we describe the construction of a barcoded-library of 133 heterozygous TF deletion mutants and deletion cassettes for designed to facilitate complex haploinsufficiency-based genetic interaction studies of the TF networks in C. albicans We have characterized the phenotypes of these heterozygous mutants under a broad range of in vitro conditions using both agar-plate and pooled signature tag-based assays. Consistent with previous studies, haploinsufficiency is relative uncommon. In contrast, a set of 12 TFs enriched in mutants with a role in adhesion were found to have altered competitive fitness at early time points in a murine model of disseminated candidiasis. Finally, we characterized the genetic interactions of a set of biofilm related TFs in the first two steps of biofilm formation, adherence and filamentation of adherent cells. The genetic interaction networks at each stage of biofilm formation are significantly different indicating that the network is not static but dynamic. Copyright © 2018 Glazier et al.

  18. Combinations of genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling; Andreassen, Ole A.; Bennike, Bente

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to find genetic variants that in combination are significantly associated with bipolar disorder. In previous studies of bipolar disorder, combinations of three and four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotypes taken from 803 SNPs were analyzed, and five...... clusters of combinations were found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. In the present study, combinations of ten SNP genotypes taken from the same 803 SNPs were analyzed, and one cluster of combinations was found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. Combinations from......, heterozygote or variant homozygote. In the combinations containing 10 SNP genotypes almost all the genotypes were the normal homozygote. Such a finding may indicate that accumulation in the genome of combinations containing few SNP genotypes may be a risk factor for bipolar disorder when those combinations...

  19. Genetic mechanisms and age-related macular degeneration: common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, and mitochondrial genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Melissa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a complex and multifaceted disease involving contributions from both genetic and environmental influences. Previous work exploring the genetic contributions of AMD has implicated numerous genomic regions and a variety of candidate genes as modulators of AMD susceptibility. Nevertheless, much of this work has revolved around single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and it is apparent that a significant portion of the heritability of AMD cannot be explained through these mechanisms. In this review, we consider the role of common variants, rare variants, copy number variations, epigenetics, microRNAs, and mitochondrial genetics in AMD. Copy number variations in regulators of complement activation genes (CFHR1 and CFHR3 and glutathione S transferase genes (GSTM1 and GSTT1 have been associated with AMD, and several additional loci have been identified as regions of potential interest but require further evaluation. MicroRNA dysregulation has been linked to the retinal pigment epithelium degeneration in geographic atrophy, ocular neovascularization, and oxidative stress, all of which are hallmarks in the pathogenesis of AMD. Certain mitochondrial DNA haplogroups and SNPs in mitochondrially encoded NADH dehydrogenase genes have also been associated with AMD. The role of these additional mechanisms remains only partly understood, but the importance of their further investigation is clear to elucidate more completely the genetic basis of AMD.

  20. Butyrylcholinesterase genetic variants: association with cocaine dependence and related phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Brooking Negrão

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The search for genetic vulnerability factors in cocaine dependence has focused on the role that neuroplasticity plays in addiction. However, like many other drugs, the ability of an individual to metabolize cocaine can also influence susceptibility to dependence. Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE metabolizes cocaine, and genetic variants of the BChE gene (BCHE alter its catalytic activity. Therefore, we hypothesize that cocaine users with polymorphisms in BCHE can show diverse addictive behaviors due to differences in effective plasma concentrations of cocaine. Those polymorphisms might also influence users to prefer one of the two main preparations (crack or powder cocaine, despite having equal access to both. The present work investigates polymorphisms in BCHE and if those genetic variants constitute risk factors for cocaine dependence and for crack cocaine use. METHODS: A total of 1,436 individuals (698 cocaine-dependent patients and 738 controls were genotyped for three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in BCHE: rs1803274, rs4263329, and rs4680662. RESULTS: For rs4263329, a nominal difference was found between cases and controls. For rs1803274 (the functional SNP, a statistically significant difference was found between patients who used crack cocaine exclusively and those who used only powder cocaine (P = 0.027; OR = 4.36; 95% CI = 1.18-16.04. Allele frequencies and genotypes related to other markers did not differ between cases and controls or between the two cocaine subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that the AA genotype of rs1803274 is a risk factor for crack cocaine use, which is more addictive than powder cocaine use. Further studies are needed in order to confirm this preliminary result and clarify the role of BCHE and its variants in cocaine dependence.

  1. Genetic Variants Contribute to Gene Expression Variability in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulse, Amanda M.; Cai, James J.

    2013-01-01

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have established convincing relationships between genetic variants and gene expression. Most of these studies focused on the mean of gene expression level, but not the variance of gene expression level (i.e., gene expression variability). In the present study, we systematically explore genome-wide association between genetic variants and gene expression variability in humans. We adapt the double generalized linear model (dglm) to simultaneously fit the means and the variances of gene expression among the three possible genotypes of a biallelic SNP. The genomic loci showing significant association between the variances of gene expression and the genotypes are termed expression variability QTL (evQTL). Using a data set of gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 210 HapMap individuals, we identify cis-acting evQTL involving 218 distinct genes, among which 8 genes, ADCY1, CTNNA2, DAAM2, FERMT2, IL6, PLOD2, SNX7, and TNFRSF11B, are cross-validated using an extra expression data set of the same LCLs. We also identify ∼300 trans-acting evQTL between >13,000 common SNPs and 500 randomly selected representative genes. We employ two distinct scenarios, emphasizing single-SNP and multiple-SNP effects on expression variability, to explain the formation of evQTL. We argue that detecting evQTL may represent a novel method for effectively screening for genetic interactions, especially when the multiple-SNP influence on expression variability is implied. The implication of our results for revealing genetic mechanisms of gene expression variability is discussed. PMID:23150607

  2. Blood type, ABO genetic variants, and ovarian cancer survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzi, Gabriella D.; Levinson, Rebecca T.; Toole, Hilary; Snyder, Malcolm-Robert; Deng, Angie; Crispens, Marta A.; Khabele, Dineo; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia

    2017-01-01

    Objective Blood type A and the A1 allele have been associated with increased ovarian cancer risk. With only two small studies published to date, evidence for an association between ABO blood type and ovarian cancer survival is limited. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of Tumor Registry confirmed ovarian cancer cases from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center with blood type from linked laboratory reports and ABO variants from linked Illumina Exome BeadChip data. Associations with overall survival (OS) were quantified by hazard ratios (HR) and confidence intervals (CI) from proportional hazards regression models; covariates included age, race, stage, grade, histologic subtype, and year of diagnosis. Results ABO phenotype (N = 694) and/or genotype (N = 154) data were available for 713 predominantly Caucasian (89.3%) cases. In multivariable models, blood type A had significantly better OS compared to either O (HR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.60–0.93) or all non-A (HR: 0.77, 95% CI: 0.63–0.94) cases. Similarly, missense rs1053878 minor allele carriers (A2) had better OS (HR: 0.50, 95% CI: 0.25–0.99). Among Caucasians, this phenotype association was strengthened, but the genotype association was attenuated; instead, four variants sharing moderate linkage disequilibrium with the O variant were associated with better OS (HR: 0.62, 95% CI: 0.39–0.99) in unadjusted models. Conclusions Blood type A was significantly associated with longer ovarian cancer survival in the largest such study to date. This finding was supported by genetic analysis, which implicated the A2 allele, although O related variants also had suggestive associations. Further research on ABO and ovarian cancer survival is warranted. PMID:28448592

  3. Novel Genetic Variants for Cartilage Thickness and Hip Osteoarthritis.

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    Martha C Castaño-Betancourt

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent and disabling diseases of the elderly. Only few genetic variants have been identified for osteoarthritis, which is partly due to large phenotype heterogeneity. To reduce heterogeneity, we here examined cartilage thickness, one of the structural components of joint health. We conducted a genome-wide association study of minimal joint space width (mJSW, a proxy for cartilage thickness, in a discovery set of 13,013 participants from five different cohorts and replication in 8,227 individuals from seven independent cohorts. We identified five genome-wide significant (GWS, P≤5·0×10-8 SNPs annotated to four distinct loci. In addition, we found two additional loci that were significantly replicated, but results of combined meta-analysis fell just below the genome wide significance threshold. The four novel associated genetic loci were located in/near TGFA (rs2862851, PIK3R1 (rs10471753, SLBP/FGFR3 (rs2236995, and TREH/DDX6 (rs496547, while the other two (DOT1L and SUPT3H/RUNX2 were previously identified. A systematic prioritization for underlying causal genes was performed using diverse lines of evidence. Exome sequencing data (n = 2,050 individuals indicated that there were no rare exonic variants that could explain the identified associations. In addition, TGFA, FGFR3 and PIK3R1 were differentially expressed in OA cartilage lesions versus non-lesioned cartilage in the same individuals. In conclusion, we identified four novel loci (TGFA, PIK3R1, FGFR3 and TREH and confirmed two loci known to be associated with cartilage thickness.The identified associations were not caused by rare exonic variants. This is the first report linking TGFA to human OA, which may serve as a new target for future therapies.

  4. Genetic variants and cognitive aging: destiny or a nudge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Naftali; Lustig, Cindy

    2014-06-01

    One would be hard-pressed to find a human trait that is not heritable at least to some extent, and genetics have played an important role in behavioral science for more than half a century. With the advent of high-throughput molecular methods and the increasing availability of genomic analyses, genetics have acquired a firm foothold in public discourse. However, although the proliferation of genetic association studies and ever-expanding library of single-nucleotide polymorphisms have generated some fascinating results, they have thus far fallen short of delivering the anticipated dramatic breakthroughs. In this collection of eight articles, we present a spectrum of efforts aimed at finding more nuanced and meaningful ways of integrating genomic findings into the study of cognitive aging. The articles present examples of Mendelian randomization in the service of investigating difficult-to-manipulate biochemical properties of human participants. Furthermore, in an important step forward, they acknowledge the interactive effects of genes and physiological risk factors on age-related difference and change in cognitive performance, as well as the possibility of modifying the negative effect of genetic variants by lifestyle changes. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors, somatic mutations and candidate genetic risk variants.

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    Katie M O'Brien

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs are rare but treatable soft tissue sarcomas. Nearly all GISTs have somatic mutations in either the KIT or PDGFRA gene, but there are no known inherited genetic risk factors. We assessed the relationship between KIT/PDGFRA mutations and select deletions or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 279 participants from a clinical trial of adjuvant imatinib mesylate. Given previous evidence that certain susceptibility loci and carcinogens are associated with characteristic mutations, or "signatures" in other cancers, we hypothesized that the characteristic somatic mutations in the KIT and PDGFRA genes in GIST tumors may similarly be mutational signatures that are causally linked to specific mutagens or susceptibility loci. As previous epidemiologic studies suggest environmental risk factors such as dioxin and radiation exposure may be linked to sarcomas, we chose 208 variants in 39 candidate genes related to DNA repair and dioxin metabolism or response. We calculated adjusted odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between each variant and 7 categories of tumor mutation using logistic regression. We also evaluated gene-level effects using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT. Although none of the association p-values were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons, SNPs in CYP1B1 were strongly associated with KIT exon 11 codon 557-8 deletions (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 for rs2855658 and OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.2-2.7 for rs1056836 and wild type GISTs (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.5-4.8 for rs1800440 and OR = 0.5, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9 for rs1056836. CYP1B1 was also associated with these mutations categories in the SKAT analysis (p = 0.002 and p = 0.003, respectively. Other potential risk variants included GSTM1, RAD23B and ERCC2. This preliminary analysis of inherited genetic risk factors for GIST offers some clues about the disease's genetic

  6. Functional relevance for associations between osteoporosis and genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kun; Tan, Li-Jun; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhu, Li-Hua; Zeng, Qin; Hu, Yuan; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by increased bone loss and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, which will lead to reduced bone strength and increased risk of fragility fractures. Previous studies have identified many genetic loci associated with osteoporosis, but functional mechanisms underlying the associations have rarely been explored. In order to explore the potential molecular functional mechanisms underlying the associations for osteoporosis, we performed integrative analyses by using the publically available datasets and resources. We searched 128 identified osteoporosis associated SNPs (PLRP5 rs3736228) were confirmed to impact the expression of 3 genes (RPL31, CPT1A and MTL5) that were differentially expressed between human subjects of high BMD group and low BMD group. All of the functional evidence suggested the important functional mechanisms underlying the associations of the 2 SNPs (rs2278729 and rs3736228) and 3 genes (RPL31, CPT1A and MTL5) with osteoporosis. This study may provide novel insights into the functional mechanisms underlying the osteoporosis associated genetic variants, which will help us to comprehend the potential mechanisms underlying the genetic association for osteoporosis.

  7. Functional relevance for associations between osteoporosis and genetic variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis is characterized by increased bone loss and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, which will lead to reduced bone strength and increased risk of fragility fractures. Previous studies have identified many genetic loci associated with osteoporosis, but functional mechanisms underlying the associations have rarely been explored. In order to explore the potential molecular functional mechanisms underlying the associations for osteoporosis, we performed integrative analyses by using the publically available datasets and resources. We searched 128 identified osteoporosis associated SNPs (P<10-6, and 8 SNPs exert cis-regulation effects on 11 eQTL target genes. Among the 8 SNPs, 2 SNPs (RPL31 rs2278729 and LRP5 rs3736228 were confirmed to impact the expression of 3 genes (RPL31, CPT1A and MTL5 that were differentially expressed between human subjects of high BMD group and low BMD group. All of the functional evidence suggested the important functional mechanisms underlying the associations of the 2 SNPs (rs2278729 and rs3736228 and 3 genes (RPL31, CPT1A and MTL5 with osteoporosis. This study may provide novel insights into the functional mechanisms underlying the osteoporosis associated genetic variants, which will help us to comprehend the potential mechanisms underlying the genetic association for osteoporosis.

  8. Targeted genetic screen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis reveals novel genetic variants with synergistic effect on clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Robins, Henry; Niedermoser, Isabell; Wyles, Matthew; Heath, Paul R.; Higginbottom, Adrian; Walsh, Theresa; Kazoka, Mbombe; Al Kheifat, Ahmad; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Basak, Nazli; Blair, Ian; Dekker, Annelot; Hardiman, Orla; Hide, Winston; Iacoangeli, Alfredo; Kenna, Kevin; Landers, John; McLaughlin, Russel; Mill, Jonathan; Middelkoop, Bas; Moisse, Mattieu; Pardina, Jesus Mora; Morrison, Karen; Newhouse, Stephen; Pulit, Sara; Shatunov, Aleksey; Shaw, Chris; Sproviero, William; Tazelaar, Gijs; van Damme, Philip; van den Berg, Leonard; van der Spek, Rick; Eijk, Kristelvan; van Es, Michael; van Rheenen, Wouter; van Vugt, Joke; Veldink, Jan; Kooyman, Maarten; Glass, Jonathan; Robberecht, Wim; Gotkine, Marc; Drory, Vivian; Kiernan, Matthew; Neto, Miguel Mitne; Ztaz, Mayana; Couratier, Philippe; Corcia, Philippe; Silani, Vincenzo; Chio, Adriano; de Carvalho, Mamede; Pinto, Susana; Redondo, Alberto Garcia; Andersen, Peter; Weber, Markus; Ticozzi, Nicola; Ince, Paul G.; Hautbergue, Guillaume M.; McDermott, Christopher J.; Kirby, Janine; Shaw, Pamela J.

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is underpinned by an oligogenic rare variant architecture. Identified genetic variants of ALS include RNA-binding proteins containing prion-like domains (PrLDs). We hypothesized that screening genes encoding additional similar proteins will yield novel genetic

  9. Combinations of Genetic Variants Occurring Exclusively in Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mellerup, Erling Thyge; Møller, Gert Lykke

    2017-01-01

    The main objective of the study was to find genetic variants that in combination are significantly associated with bipolar disorder. In previous studies of bipolar disorder, combinations of three and four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) genotypes taken from 803 SNPs were analyzed, and five...... clusters of combinations were found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. In the present study, combinations of ten SNP genotypes taken from the same 803 SNPs were analyzed, and one cluster of combinations was found to be significantly associated with bipolar disorder. Combinations from...... the new cluster and from the five previous clusters were identified in the genomes of 266 or 44% of the 607 patients in the study whereas none of the 1355 control participants had any of these combinations in their genome.The SNP genotypes in the smaller combinations were the normal homozygote...

  10. Linking genetic variants of the mineralocorticoid receptor and negative memory bias: Interaction with prior life adversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S.; Gerritsen, L.; Oostrom, I.I.H. van; Arias Vasquez, A.; Rijpkema, M.J.P.; Joels, M.; Franke, B.; Tendolkar, I.; Fernandez, G.S.E.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial research has been conducted investigating the association between life adversity and genetic vulnerability for depression, but clear mechanistic links are rarely identified and investigation often focused on single genetic variants. Complex phenotypes like depression, however, are likely

  11. Genetic Variants Associated with Gestational Hypertriglyceridemia and Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sai-Li; Chen, Tan-Zhou; Huang, Xie-Lin; Chen, Chao; Jin, Rong; Huang, Zhi-Ming; Zhou, Meng-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a well-known cause of pancreatitis. Usually, there is a moderate increase in plasma triglyceride level during pregnancy. Additionally, certain pre-existing genetic traits may render a pregnant woman susceptible to development of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis, especially in the third trimester. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of gestational hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis, we undertook DNA mutation analysis of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL), apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2), apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5), lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1), and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1) genes in five unrelated pregnant Chinese women with severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. DNA sequencing showed that three out of five patients had the same homozygous variation, p.G185C, in APOA5 gene. One patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T and p.L279V, in LPL gene. Another patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T & p.C14F in LPL and GPIHBP1 gene, respectively. No mutations were seen in APOC2 or LMF1 genes. All patients were diagnosed with partial LPL deficiency in non-pregnant state. As revealed in our study, genetic variants appear to play an important role in the development of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia, and, p.G185C mutation in APOA5 gene appears to be the most common variant implicated in the Chinese population. Antenatal screening for mutations in susceptible women, combined with subsequent interventions may be invaluable in the prevention of potentially life threatening gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis.

  12. Genetic Variants Associated with Gestational Hypertriglyceridemia and Pancreatitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai-Li Xie

    Full Text Available Severe hypertriglyceridemia is a well-known cause of pancreatitis. Usually, there is a moderate increase in plasma triglyceride level during pregnancy. Additionally, certain pre-existing genetic traits may render a pregnant woman susceptible to development of severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis, especially in the third trimester. To elucidate the underlying mechanism of gestational hypertriglyceridemic pancreatitis, we undertook DNA mutation analysis of the lipoprotein lipase (LPL, apolipoprotein C2 (APOC2, apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5, lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1 genes in five unrelated pregnant Chinese women with severe hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis. DNA sequencing showed that three out of five patients had the same homozygous variation, p.G185C, in APOA5 gene. One patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T and p.L279V, in LPL gene. Another patient had a compound heterozygous mutation, p.A98T & p.C14F in LPL and GPIHBP1 gene, respectively. No mutations were seen in APOC2 or LMF1 genes. All patients were diagnosed with partial LPL deficiency in non-pregnant state. As revealed in our study, genetic variants appear to play an important role in the development of severe gestational hypertriglyceridemia, and, p.G185C mutation in APOA5 gene appears to be the most common variant implicated in the Chinese population. Antenatal screening for mutations in susceptible women, combined with subsequent interventions may be invaluable in the prevention of potentially life threatening gestational hypertriglyceridemia-induced pancreatitis.

  13. Lack of Association of CD55 Receptor Genetic Variants and Severe Malaria in Ghanaian Children

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    Kathrin Schuldt

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In a recent report, the cellular receptor CD55 was identified as a molecule essential for the invasion of human erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum, the causal agent of the most severe form of malaria. As this invasion process represents a critical step during infection with the parasite, it was hypothesized that genetic variants in the gene could affect severe malaria (SM susceptibility. We performed high-resolution variant discovery of rare and common genetic variants in the human CD55 gene. Association testing of these variants in over 1700 SM cases and unaffected control individuals from the malaria-endemic Ashanti Region in Ghana, West Africa, were performed on the basis of single variants, combined rare variant analyses, and reconstructed haplotypes. A total of 26 genetic variants were detected in coding and regulatory regions of CD55. Five variants were previously unknown. None of the single variants, rare variants, or haplotypes showed evidence for association with SM or P. falciparum density. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of variation in the CD55 gene in the context of SM and show that genetic variants present in a Ghanaian study group appear not to influence susceptibility to the disease.

  14. Novel genetic variants in the TPO gene cause congenital hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao-Gang; Qiu, Ya-Li; Zhu, Hong; Liu, Hong; Li, Qing; Ji, Chun-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the dual oxidase maturation factor 2 (DUOXA2) and thyroid peroxidase (TPO) genes have been reported to cause goitrous congenital hypothyroidism (GCH). The aim of this study was to determine the genetic basis of GCH in affected children. Thirty children with GCH were enrolled for molecular analysis of the DUOXA2 and TPO genes. All subjects underwent clinical examination and laboratory testing. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes, and Sanger sequencing was used to screen for DUOXA2 and TPO gene mutations in the exon fragments amplified from the extracted DNA. Family members of those patients with mutations were also enrolled and evaluated. Analysis of the TPO gene revealed six genetic variants, including two novel heterozygous mutations, c.1970T> C (p.I657T) and c.2665G> T (p.G889X), and four mutations that have been reported previously (c.670_672del, c.2268dup, c.2266T> C and c.2647C> T). Three patients harbored the same mutation c.2268dup. The germline mutations from four unrelated families were consistent with an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern. Conversely, no mutations in the DUOXA2 gene were detected. Two novel inactivating mutations (c.1970T> C and c.2665G> T) in the TPO gene were identified. The c.2268dup mutation occurred frequently. No mutations in the DUOXA2 gene were detected in this study.

  15. m6ASNP: a tool for annotating genetic variants by m6A function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shuai; Xie, Yubin; He, Zhihao; Zhang, Ya; Zhao, Yuli; Chen, Li; Zheng, Yueyuan; Miao, Yanyan; Zuo, Zhixiang; Ren, Jian

    2018-04-02

    Large-scale genome sequencing projects have identified many genetic variants for diverse diseases. A major goal of these projects is to characterize these genetic variants to provide insight into their function and roles in diseases. N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is one of the most abundant RNA modifications in eukaryotes. Recent studies have revealed that aberrant m6A modifications are involved in many diseases. In this study, we present a user-friendly web server called "m6ASNP" that is dedicated to the identification of genetic variants targeting m6A modification sites. A random forest model was implemented in m6ASNP to predict whether the methylation status of a m6A site is altered by the variants surrounding the site. In m6ASNP, genetic variants in a standard VCF format are accepted as the input data, and the output includes an interactive table containing the genetic variants annotated by m6A function. In addition, statistical diagrams and a genome browser are provided to visualize the characteristics and annotate the genetic variants. We believe that m6ASNP is a highly convenient tool that can be used to boost further functional studies investigating genetic variants. The web server "m6ASNP" is implemented in JAVA and PHP and is freely available at http://m6asnp.renlab.org.

  16. Production and characterization of genetically modified human IL-11 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Emiko; Takei, Toshiaki; Ueda, Takuya; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2017-02-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) has been expected as a drug on severe thrombocytopenia caused by myelo-suppressive chemotherapy. Whereas, development of IL-11 inhibitor is also expected for a treatment against IL-11 related cancer progression. Here, we will demonstrate the creation of various kinds of genetically modified hIL-11s. Modified vectors were constructed by introducing N- or O-glycosylation site on the region of hIL-11 that does not belong to the core α-helical motif based on the predicted secondary structure. N-terminal (N: between 22 to 23 aa), the first loop (M1:70 to 71 aa), the second loop (M2:114-115 aa), the third loop (M3:160-161 aa) and C-terminal (C: 200- aa) were selected for modification. A large scale production system was established and the characteristics of modified hIL-11s were evaluated. The structure was analyzed by amino acid sequence and composition analysis and CD-spectra. Glycan was assessed by monosaccharide composition analysis. Growth promoting activity and biological stability were analyzed by proliferation of T1165 cells. N-terminal modified proteins were well glycosylated and produced. Growth activity of 3NN with NASNASNAS sequence on N-terminal was about tenfold higher than wild type (WT). Structural and biological stabilities of 3NN were also better than WT and residence time in mouse blood was longer than WT. M1 variants lacked growth activity though they are well glycosylated and secondary structure is very stable. Both of 3NN and OM1 with AAATPAPG on M1 associated with hIL-11R strongly. These results indicate N-terminal and M1 variants will be expected for practical use as potent agonists or antagonists of hIL-11. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Accessibility and contribution to glucan masking of natural and genetically tagged versions of yeast wall protein 1 of Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Yeast wall protein 1 (Ywp1) is an abundant glycoprotein of the cell wall of the yeast form of Candida albicans, the most prevalent fungal pathogen of humans. Antibodies that bind to the polypeptide backbone of isolated Ywp1 show little binding to intact yeast cells, presumably because the Ywp1 epitopes are masked by the polysaccharides of the mannoproteins that form the outer layer of the cell wall. Rare cells do exhibit much greater anti-Ywp1 binding, however, and one of these was isolated and characterized. No differences were seen in its Ywp1, but it exhibited greater adhesiveness, sensitivity to wall perturbing agents, and exposure of its underlying β-1,3-glucan layer to external antibodies. The molecular basis for this greater epitope accessibility has not been determined, but has facilitated exploration of how these properties change as a function of cell growth and morphology. In addition, previously engineered strains with reduced quantities of Ywp1 in their cell walls were also found to have greater β-1,3-glucan exposure, indicating that Ywp1 itself contributes to the masking of wall epitopes, which may be important for understanding the anti-adhesive effect of Ywp1. Ectopic production of Ywp1 by hyphae, which reduces the adhesivity of these filamentous forms of C. albicans, was similarly found to reduce exposure of the β-1,3-glucan in their walls. To monitor Ywp1 in the cell wall irrespective of its accessibility, green fluorescent protein (Gfp) was genetically inserted into wall-anchored Ywp1 using a bifunctional cassette that also allowed production from a single transfection of a soluble, anchor-free version. The wall-anchored Ywp1-Gfp-Ywp1 accumulated in the wall of the yeast forms but not hyphae, and appeared to have properties similar to native Ywp1, including its adhesion-inhibiting effect. Some pseudohyphal walls also detectably accumulated this probe. Strains of C. albicans with tandem hemagglutinin (HA) epitopes inserted into wall

  18. Virulence factors and genetic variability of vaginal Candida albicans isolates from HIV-infected women in the post-highly active antiretroviral era

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    Pâmela Cristina Mastellaro Delvas Zanni

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC in HIV-infected (HIV+ women is a serious public health problem. However, little is known about the virulence mechanisms of vaginal Candida albicans from HIV+ women in the post-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART era. Here, we report a comparative analysis of the expression of key virulence factors and genetic variability of 26 vaginal C. albicans strains isolated from HIV+ women undergoing HAART and 18 from HIV-uninfected (HIV- women. In general, we observed that C. albicans from HIV+ women receiving HAART showed lower expression of virulence factors compared with C. albicans from HIV- women, except for the proteinase activity which is highly expressed. The results in HIV-women further suggest that virulence factors appear to be expressed in response to the yeast stress, in the presence of an adequate immune response. Furthermore, the RAPD results showed a high heterogeneity among isolates from both groups of women. These findings in HIV+ women using HAART will help to improve the monitoring of vaginal yeast infections and the quality of life of patients.

  19. Genetic Phagocyte NADPH Oxidase Deficiency Enhances Nonviable Candida albicans-Induced Inflammation in Mouse Lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Daiki; Fujimoto, Kenta; Hirose, Rika; Yamanaka, Hiroko; Homme, Mizuki; Ishibashi, Ken-Ichi; Miura, Noriko; Ohno, Naohito; Aratani, Yasuaki

    2017-02-01

    Patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have mutated phagocyte NADPH oxidase, resulting in reduced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the mechanism underlying hyperinfection in CGD is well understood, the basis for inflammatory disorders that arise in the absence of evident infection has not been fully explained. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of phagocyte NADPH oxidase deficiency on lung inflammation induced by nonviable Candida albicans (nCA). Mice deficient in this enzyme (CGD mice) showed more severe neutrophilic pneumonia than nCA-treated wild-type mice, which exhibited significantly higher lung concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC). Neutralization of these proinflammatory mediators significantly reduced neutrophil infiltration. In vitro, production of IL-1β and TNF-α from neutrophils and that of KC from macrophages was enhanced in nCA-stimulated neutrophils from CGD mice. Expression of IL-1β mRNA was higher in the stimulated CGD neutrophils than in the stimulated wild-type cells, concomitant with upregulation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB and its upstream regulator extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2. Pretreatment with an NADPH oxidase inhibitor significantly enhanced IL-1β production in the wild-type neutrophils stimulated with nCA. These results suggest that lack of ROS production because of NADPH oxidase deficiency results in the production of higher levels of proinflammatory mediators from neutrophils and macrophages, which may at least partly contribute to the exacerbation of nCA-induced lung inflammation in CGD mice.

  20. High-throughput, image-based screening of pooled genetic-variant libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuel, George; Moffitt, Jeffrey R; Zhuang, Xiaowei

    2017-12-01

    We report a high-throughput screening method that allows diverse genotypes and corresponding phenotypes to be imaged in individual cells. We achieve genotyping by introducing barcoded genetic variants into cells as pooled libraries and reading the barcodes out using massively multiplexed fluorescence in situ hybridization. To demonstrate the power of image-based pooled screening, we identified brighter and more photostable variants of the fluorescent protein YFAST among 60,000 variants.

  1. Assessment of Functional Effects of Unclassified Genetic Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Hofstra, Robert; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; de Wind, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Inherited predisposition to disease is often linked to reduced activity of a disease associated gene product. Thus, quantitation of the influence of inherited variants on gene function can potentially be used to predict the disease relevance of these variants. While many disease genes have been

  2. Human thromboxane A2 receptor genetic variants: in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gleim

    Full Text Available Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity or promote (hyperactivity vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C(68S, V(80E, E(94V, A(160T, V(176E, and V(217I for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C(68S to normal (V(217I, with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V(80E, E(94V, A(160T, and V(176E. In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants.

  3. Genetic predisposition to ischaemic stroke byRAGEandHMGB1gene variants in Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Zhu, Jing; Chen, Linfa; Hu, Weidong; Wang, Mengxu; Li, Shengnan; Gu, Xuefeng; Tao, Hua; Zhao, Bin; Ma, Guoda; Li, Keshen

    2017-11-21

    Emerging evidence suggests that the multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) and its ligand high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) contribute to the pathophysiology of ischaemic stroke (IS). The present study aimed to investigate the association of RAGE and HMGB1 variants with the risk of IS. A total of 1,034 patients and 1,015 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were genotyped to detect five genetic variants of the RAGE gene and four genetic variants of the HMGB1 gene using the Multiplex SNaPshot assay. We found that the rs2070600 variant of RAGE was associated with an increased risk of IS (OR = 1.19, 95% CI: 1.02-1.38, P = 0.043), whereas the rs2249825 variant of HMGB1 was associated with a decreased risk of IS (OR = 0.83, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98, P = 0.041). Further stratification by IS subtypes revealed that the presence of the TT genotype of the RAGE rs2070600 variant confers a higher risk of the large artery atherosclerosis subtype of IS (P = 0.036). Moreover, patients with the variant T allele of the RAGE rs2070600 variant presented with reduced serum soluble RAGE production. Patients carrying the variant G allele of the HMGB1 rs2249825 variant exhibited significantly lower infarct volumes than those with the major CC genotype. These clues may help in the development of optimal personalized therapeutic approaches for IS patients.

  4. The association of XRCC3 Thr241Met genetic variant with risk of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    complementing group 3 gene (XRCC3) Thr241Met genetic variant could be potentially associated with the risk of prostate cancer. However, results from these published studies were conflicting rather than conclusive. Objectives:This meta-analysis ...

  5. Genetic variants in hormone-related genes and risk of breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tess Clendenen

    Full Text Available Sex hormones play a key role in the development of breast cancer. Certain polymorphic variants (SNPs and repeat polymorphisms in hormone-related genes are associated with sex hormone levels. However, the relationship observed between these genetic variants and breast cancer risk has been inconsistent. We conducted a case-control study nested within two prospective cohorts to assess the relationship between specific genetic variants in hormone-related genes and breast cancer risk. In total, 1164 cases and 2111 individually-matched controls were included in the study. We did not observe an association between potential functional genetic polymorphisms in the estrogen pathway, SHBG rs6259, ESR1 rs2234693, CYP19 rs10046 and rs4775936, and UGT1A1 rs8175347, or the progesterone pathway, PGR rs1042838, with the risk of breast cancer. Our results suggest that these genetic variants do not have a strong effect on breast cancer risk.

  6. Whole-genome sequencing and genetic variant analysis of a Quarter Horse mare.

    KAUST Repository

    Doan, Ryan

    2012-02-17

    BACKGROUND: The catalog of genetic variants in the horse genome originates from a few select animals, the majority originating from the Thoroughbred mare used for the equine genome sequencing project. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants, including single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertion/deletion polymorphisms (INDELs), and copy number variants (CNVs) in the genome of an individual Quarter Horse mare sequenced by next-generation sequencing. RESULTS: Using massively parallel paired-end sequencing, we generated 59.6 Gb of DNA sequence from a Quarter Horse mare resulting in an average of 24.7X sequence coverage. Reads were mapped to approximately 97% of the reference Thoroughbred genome. Unmapped reads were de novo assembled resulting in 19.1 Mb of new genomic sequence in the horse. Using a stringent filtering method, we identified 3.1 million SNPs, 193 thousand INDELs, and 282 CNVs. Genetic variants were annotated to determine their impact on gene structure and function. Additionally, we genotyped this Quarter Horse for mutations of known diseases and for variants associated with particular traits. Functional clustering analysis of genetic variants revealed that most of the genetic variation in the horse\\'s genome was enriched in sensory perception, signal transduction, and immunity and defense pathways. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first sequencing of a horse genome by next-generation sequencing and the first genomic sequence of an individual Quarter Horse mare. We have increased the catalog of genetic variants for use in equine genomics by the addition of novel SNPs, INDELs, and CNVs. The genetic variants described here will be a useful resource for future studies of genetic variation regulating performance traits and diseases in equids.

  7. Targeted Genetic Screen in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Reveals Novel Genetic Variants with Synergistic Effect on Clinical Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnathan Cooper-Knock

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is underpinned by an oligogenic rare variant architecture. Identified genetic variants of ALS include RNA-binding proteins containing prion-like domains (PrLDs. We hypothesized that screening genes encoding additional similar proteins will yield novel genetic causes of ALS. The most common genetic variant of ALS patients is a G4C2-repeat expansion within C9ORF72. We have shown that G4C2-repeat RNA sequesters RNA-binding proteins. A logical consequence of this is that loss-of-function mutations in G4C2-binding partners might contribute to ALS pathogenesis independently of and/or synergistically with C9ORF72 expansions. Targeted sequencing of genomic DNA encoding either RNA-binding proteins or known ALS genes (n = 274 genes was performed in ALS patients to identify rare deleterious genetic variants and explore genotype-phenotype relationships. Genomic DNA was extracted from 103 ALS patients including 42 familial ALS patients and 61 young-onset (average age of onset 41 years sporadic ALS patients; patients were chosen to maximize the probability of identifying genetic causes of ALS. Thirteen patients carried a G4C2-repeat expansion of C9ORF72. We identified 42 patients with rare deleterious variants; 6 patients carried more than one variant. Twelve mutations were discovered in known ALS genes which served as a validation of our strategy. Rare deleterious variants in RNA-binding proteins were significantly enriched in ALS patients compared to control frequencies (p = 5.31E-18. Nineteen patients featured at least one variant in a RNA-binding protein containing a PrLD. The number of variants per patient correlated with rate of disease progression (t-test, p = 0.033. We identified eighteen patients with a single variant in a G4C2-repeat binding protein. Patients with a G4C2-binding protein variant in combination with a C9ORF72 expansion had a significantly faster disease course (t-test, p = 0.025. Our data are

  8. Genetic variants in CHI3L1 influencing YKL-40 levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Alisa D; Johansen, Julia S; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2013-01-01

    Despite its important role in many serious diseases, the genetic background for plasma YKL-40 has still not been systematically catalogued. Therefore, we aimed at identifying genetic variants in CHI3L1 influencing plasma YKL-40 levels in the general population.......Despite its important role in many serious diseases, the genetic background for plasma YKL-40 has still not been systematically catalogued. Therefore, we aimed at identifying genetic variants in CHI3L1 influencing plasma YKL-40 levels in the general population....

  9. Genetic variability of Candida albicans in HIV/AIDS patient with and without ARV therapy and non HIV/AIDS

    OpenAIRE

    Rahayu, Retno Puji; P, Widiyanti; M, Arfijanto

    2012-01-01

    Background: Oral candidiasis is the mostly found oral manifestation in HIV/AIDS infected patient caused by immunocompromised especially immunodeficiency. Clinical symptoms is severe pain in oral cavity and dry mouth because of xerostomia which cause the loss of appetite. Candida albicans (C. albicans) is normal flora in oral cavity which plays as opportunistic pathogen and also the cause of oral candidiasis. Almost 90% of HIV–infected patient have oral candidiasis. This condition is clinical ...

  10. Novel variants in Nordic patients referred for genetic testing of telomere-related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Anna; Rosén, Anna; Raaschou-Jensen, Klas

    2018-01-01

    referred for genetic testing due to suspected telomere-related disorder. We performed Sanger sequencing of the genes TERT, TERC, DKC1, and TINF2 on 135 unrelated index patients and measured telomere length by qPCR on DNA from peripheral blood leukocytes. We identified pathogenic or likely pathogenic...... variants identified in our study highlights the need for solid interpretation of new variants that may be detected. Measurement of telomere length is a useful approach for evaluating pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with telomere-related disorders....

  11. A Functional Assay for Sick Sinus Syndrome Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchau J. Jou

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Congenital Sick Sinus Syndrome (SSS is a disorder associated with sudden cardiac death due to severe bradycardia and prolonged pauses. Mutations in HCN4, the gene encoding inward Na+/K+ current (If, have been described as a cause of congenital SSS. The objective of this study is to develop an SSS model in embryonic zebrafish, and use zebrafish as a moderate-throughput assay to functionally characterize HCN4 variants. Methods: To determine the function of hcn4 in zebrafish, embryos were either bathed in the If -specific blocker (ZD-7288, or endogenous hcn4 expression was knocked down using splice-blocking morpholinos. To assess whether the zebrafish model discriminates benign from pathogenic variants, we tested four HCN4 mutations known to cause human SSS and four variants of unknown significance (VUS. Results: Pharmacological blockade and knockdown of hcn4 in zebrafish phenocopied human SSS, displaying bradycardia and cardiac pauses in intact embryos and explanted hearts. The zebrafish assay correctly identified all disease-causing variants. Of the VUS, the assay predicted 2 as benign and 2 as hypomorphic variants. Conclusions: We conclude that our embryonic zebrafish assay is a novel and effective tool to functionally characterize human HCN4 variants, which can be translated into important clinical prognostic information.

  12. Germline genetic variants with implications for disease risk and therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Amy L; Ward, Kristen M; Luzum, Jasmine A; Ellingrod, Vicki L; Hertz, Daniel L

    2017-10-01

    Genetic testing has multiple clinical applications including disease risk assessment, diagnosis, and pharmacogenomics. Pharmacogenomics can be utilized to predict whether a pharmacologic therapy will be effective or to identify patients at risk for treatment-related toxicity. Although genetic tests are typically ordered for a distinct clinical purpose, the genetic variants that are found may have additional implications for either disease or pharmacology. This review will address multiple examples of germline genetic variants that are informative for both disease and pharmacogenomics. The discussed relationships are diverse. Some of the agents are targeted for the disease-causing genetic variant, while others, although not targeted therapies, have implications for the disease they are used to treat. It is also possible that the disease implications of a genetic variant are unrelated to the pharmacogenomic implications. Some of these examples are considered clinically actionable pharmacogenes, with evidence-based, pharmacologic treatment recommendations, while others are still investigative as areas for additional research. It is important that clinicians are aware of both the disease and pharmacogenomic associations of these germline genetic variants to ensure patients are receiving comprehensive personalized care. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Power and instrument strength requirements for Mendelian randomization studies using multiple genetic variants

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Brandon L; Ahsan, Habibul; VanderWeele, Tyler J

    2010-01-01

    Background Mendelian Randomization (MR) studies assess the causality of an exposure–disease association using genetic determinants [i.e. instrumental variables (IVs)] of the exposure. Power and IV strength requirements for MR studies using multiple genetic variants have not been explored.

  14. Genetic variants influencing lipid levels and risk of dyslipidemia in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. dyslipidemia; lipid levels; single-nucleotide polymorphisms; cardiovascular disease; genetics. Abstract. Recently, several human genetic and genomewide association studies (GWAS) have discovered many genetic loci that are associated with the concentration of the blood lipids. To confirm the reported loci in ...

  15. Genetic variants of the human dipeptide transporter PEPT1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderle, Pascale; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Pinsonneault, Julia

    2006-01-01

    single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 21 occurred in intronic and non-coding regions and 17 in exonic coding region, of which nine were nonsynonymous. Eight nonsynonymous variants were cloned into expression vectors and functionally characterized after transient transfection into Cos7 and Chinese...

  16. Discriminatory power of common genetic variants in personalized breast cancer diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yirong; Abbey, Craig K.; Liu, Jie; Ong, Irene; Peissig, Peggy; Onitilo, Adedayo A.; Fan, Jun; Yuan, Ming; Burnside, Elizabeth S.

    2016-03-01

    Technology advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has engendered optimism that we have entered a new age of precision medicine, in which the risk of breast cancer can be predicted on the basis of a person's genetic variants. The goal of this study is to evaluate the discriminatory power of common genetic variants in breast cancer risk estimation. We conducted a retrospective case-control study drawing from an existing personalized medicine data repository. We collected variables that predict breast cancer risk: 153 high-frequency/low-penetrance genetic variants, reflecting the state-of-the-art GWAS on breast cancer, mammography descriptors and BI-RADS assessment categories in the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) lexicon. We trained and tested naïve Bayes models by using these predictive variables. We generated ROC curves and used the area under the ROC curve (AUC) to quantify predictive performance. We found that genetic variants achieved comparable predictive performance to BI-RADS assessment categories in terms of AUC (0.650 vs. 0.659, p-value = 0.742), but significantly lower predictive performance than the combination of BI-RADS assessment categories and mammography descriptors (0.650 vs. 0.751, p-value < 0.001). A better understanding of relative predictive capability of genetic variants and mammography data may benefit clinicians and patients to make appropriate decisions about breast cancer screening, prevention, and treatment in the era of precision medicine.

  17. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Anthony R; Sweeten, Thayne L; Johnson, Randall C; Odell, Dennis; Westover, Jonna B; Bray-Ward, Patricia; Ward, David C; Davies, Christopher J; Thomas, Aaron J; Croen, Lisa A; Benson, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The "common variant-common disease" hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased vs. matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the "common variant-common disease" hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics. Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14 bp-indel) frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations ( Table 2 ). The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations ( Table 2 ). Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1, and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15, 22, and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR genes in autism

  18. Celiac disease : moving from genetic associations to causal variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrdlickova, B.; Westra, H-J; Franke, L.; Wijmenga, C.

    Genome-wide association studies are providing insight into the genetic basis of common complex diseases: more than 1150 genetic loci [2165 unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)] have recently been associated to 159 complex diseases. The hunt for genes contributing to immune-related diseases

  19. Comparing genetic variants detected in the 1000 genomes project ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-12-11

    Dec 11, 2015 ... research field in human genetics and personalized medicine. Based on the hypothesis of 'common disease – common. Keywords. heterozygous rate; minor allele frequency; transition; transversion; genotype discordance; genomewide association studies. Journal of Genetics, Vol. 94, No. 4, December 2015.

  20. Pleiotropy of genetic variants on obesity and smoking phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Tao; Moon, Jee-Young; Wu, Yiqun

    2017-01-01

    Obesity and cigarette smoking are correlated through complex relationships. Common genetic causes may contribute to these correlations. In this study, we selected 241 loci potentially associated with body mass index (BMI) based on the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT) consort......Obesity and cigarette smoking are correlated through complex relationships. Common genetic causes may contribute to these correlations. In this study, we selected 241 loci potentially associated with body mass index (BMI) based on the Genetic Investigation of ANthropometric Traits (GIANT......, respectively). The BMI-GRS was also positively correlated with pack-years of smoking (psmoking status and BMI/pack-years, respectively. Among them, three and four SNPs...... associated with smoking status and pack-years (psmoking data of the Tobacco, Alcohol and Genetics (TAG) consortium. Among these seven candidate SNPs, one SNP (rs11030104, BDNF) achieved statistical significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple...

  1. Genetic Load of Loss-of-Function Polymorphic Variants in Great Apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Valles-Ibáñez, Guillem; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Prado-Martinez, Javier; Luisi, Pierre; Marquès-Bonet, Tomàs; Casals, Ferran

    2016-03-26

    Loss of function (LoF) genetic variants are predicted to disrupt gene function, and are therefore expected to substantially reduce individual's viability. Knowing the genetic burden of LoF variants in endangered species is of interest for a better understanding of the effects of declining population sizes on species viability. In this study, we have estimated the number of LoF polymorphic variants in six great ape populations, based on whole-genome sequencing data in 79 individuals. Our results show that although the number of functional variants per individual is conditioned by the effective population size, the number of variants with a drastic phenotypic effect is very similar across species. We hypothesize that for those variants with high selection coefficients, differences in effective population size are not important enough to affect the efficiency of natural selection to remove them. We also describe that mostly CpG LoF mutations are shared across species, and an accumulation of LoF variants at olfactory receptor genes in agreement with its pseudogenization in humans and other primate species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. wANNOVAR: annotating genetic variants for personal genomes via the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao; Wang, Kai

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing platforms have become widely available. As a result, personal genomes are increasingly being sequenced in research and clinical settings. However, the resulting massive amounts of variants data pose significant challenges to the average biologists and clinicians without bioinformatics skills. We developed a web server called wANNOVAR to address the critical needs for functional annotation of genetic variants from personal genomes. The server provides simple and intuitive interface to help users determine the functional significance of variants. These include annotating single nucleotide variants and insertions/deletions for their effects on genes, reporting their conservation levels (such as PhyloP and GERP++ scores), calculating their predicted functional importance scores (such as SIFT and PolyPhen scores), retrieving allele frequencies in public databases (such as the 1000 Genomes Project and NHLBI-ESP 5400 exomes), and implementing a 'variants reduction' protocol to identify a subset of potentially deleterious variants/genes. We illustrated how wANNOVAR can help draw biological insights from sequencing data, by analysing genetic variants generated on two Mendelian diseases. We conclude that wANNOVAR will help biologists and clinicians take advantage of the personal genome information to expedite scientific discoveries. The wANNOVAR server is available at http://wannovar.usc.edu, and will be continuously updated to reflect the latest annotation information.

  3. [Genetic variants in miRNAs and its association with breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Gómez, Susana; Ruiz Esparza-Garrido, Ruth; Velázquez-Flores, Miguel; Dolores-Vergara, Maria; Salamanca-Gómez, Fabio; Arenas-Aranda, Diego Julio

    2014-01-01

    In Mexico, breast cancer represents the first cause of cancer death in females. At the molecular level, non-coding RNAs and especially microRNAs have played an important role in the origin and development of this neoplasm In the Anglo-Saxon population, diverse genetic variants in microRNA genes and in their targets are associated with the development of this disease. In the Mexican population it is not known if these or other variants exist. Identification of these or new variants in our population is fundamental in order to have a better understanding of cancer development and to help establish a better diagnostic strategy. DNA was isolated from mammary tumors, adjacent tissue and peripheral blood of Mexican females with or without cancer. From DNA, five microRNA genes and three of their targets were amplified and sequenced. Genetic variants associated with breast cancer in an Anglo- Saxon population have been previously identified in these sequences. In the samples studied we identified seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Two had not been previously described and were identified only in women with cancer. The new variants may be genetic predisposition factors for the development of breast cancer in our population. Further experiments are needed to determine the involvement of these variants in the development, establishment and progression of breast cancer.

  4. Association of Arrhythmia-Related Genetic Variants With Phenotypes Documented in Electronic Medical Records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L; Wells, Quinn S; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A; Kim, Jerry H; Crosslin, David R; Jarvik, Gail P; Carrell, David S; Ralston, James D; Larson, Eric B; Bielinski, Suzette J; Olson, Janet E; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Abul-Husn, Noura S; Scott, Stuart A; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L; Kitchner, Terrie E; He, Max M; Brilliant, Murray H; Wallace, John R; Doheny, Kimberly F; Shoemaker, M Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A; Callis, Thomas E; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D; Ackerman, Michael J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Joshua C; Roden, Dan M

    2016-01-05

    %; P = .35). In the 1270 (63%) with ECGs, corrected QT intervals were not different in variant carriers vs those without (median, 429 vs 439 milliseconds; difference, -10 milliseconds; 95% CI, -16 to +3 milliseconds; P = .17). After manual review, 22 of 63 participants (35%) with designated variants had any ECG or arrhythmia phenotype, and only 2 had corrected QT interval longer than 500 milliseconds. Among laboratories experienced in genetic testing for cardiac arrhythmia disorders, there was low concordance in designating SCN5A and KCNH2 variants as pathogenic. In an unselected population, the putatively pathogenic genetic variants were not associated with an abnormal phenotype. These findings raise questions about the implications of notifying patients of incidental genetic findings.

  5. Association of arrhythmia-related genetic variants with phenotypes documented in electronic medical records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Driest, Sara L.; Wells, Quinn S.; Stallings, Sarah; Bush, William S.; Gordon, Adam; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Kim, Jerry H.; Crosslin, David R.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carrell, David S.; Ralston, James; Larson, Eric B.; Bielinski, Suzette J.; Olson, Janet E.; Ye, Zi; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Abul-Husn, Noura S.; Scott, Stuart A.; Bottinger, Erwin; Almoguera, Berta; Connolly, John; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Hakonarson, Hakon; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Pan, Vivian; Persell, Stephen D.; Smith, Maureen; Chisholm, Rex L.; Kitchner, Terrie E.; He, Max M.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Wallace, John R.; Doheny, Kimberly F.; Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Li, Rongling; Manolio, Teri A.; Callis, Thomas E.; Macaya, Daniela; Williams, Marc S.; Carey, David; Kapplinger, Jamie D.; Ackerman, Michael J.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Denny, Joshua C.; Roden, Dan M.

    2016-01-01

    , −5% to +13%; P = .35). In the 1270 (63%) with ECGs, corrected QT intervals were not different in variant carriers vs those without (median, 429 vs 439 milliseconds; difference, −10 milliseconds; 95% CI, −16 to +3 milliseconds; P = .17). After manual review, 22 of 63 participants (35%) with designated variants had any ECG or arrhythmia phenotype, and only 2 had corrected QT interval longer than 500 milliseconds. Conclusions and Relevance Among laboratories experienced in genetic testing for cardiac arrhythmia disorders, there was low concordance in designating SCN5A and KCNH2 variants as pathogenic. In an unselected population, the putatively pathogenic genetic variants were not associated with an abnormal phenotype. These findings raise questions about the implications of notifying patients of incidental genetic findings. PMID:26746457

  6. Common Genetic Variants Found in HLA and KIR Immune Genes in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R Torres

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The common variant - common disease hypothesis was proposed to explain diseases with strong inheritance. This model suggests that a genetic disease is the result of the combination of several common genetic variants. Common genetic variants are described as a 5% frequency differential between diseased versus matched control populations. This theory was recently supported by an epidemiology paper stating that about 50% of genetic risk for autism resides in common variants. However, rare variants, rather than common variants, have been found in numerous genome wide genetic studies and many have concluded that the common variant—common disease hypothesis is incorrect. One interpretation is that rare variants are major contributors to genetic diseases and autism involves the interaction of many rare variants, especially in the brain. It is obvious there is much yet to be learned about autism genetics.Evidence has been mounting over the years indicating immune involvement in autism, particularly the HLA genes on chromosome 6 and KIR genes on chromosome 19. These two large multigene complexes have important immune functions and have been shown to interact to eliminate unwanted virally infected and malignant cells. HLA proteins have important functions in antigen presentation in adaptive immunity and specific epitopes on HLA class I proteins act as cognate ligands for KIR receptors in innate immunity. Data suggests that HLA alleles and KIR activating genes/haplotypes are common variants in different autism populations. For example, class I allele (HLA-A2 and HLA-G 14bp-indel frequencies are significantly increased by more than 5% over control populations (Table2. The HLA-DR4 Class II and shared epitope frequencies are significantly above the control populations (Table 2. Three activating KIR genes: 3DS1, 2DS1 and 2DS2 have increased frequencies of 15%, 22% and 14% in autism populations, respectively. There is a 6% increase in total activating KIR

  7. Annotating DNA variants is the next major goal for human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, Garry R

    2014-01-02

    Clinical genetic testing has undergone a dramatic transformation in the past two decades. Diagnostic laboratories that previously tested for well-established disease-causing DNA variants in a handful of genes have evolved into sequencing factories identifying thousands of variants of known and unknown medical consequence. Sorting out what does and does not cause disease in our genomes is the next great challenge in making genetics a central feature of healthcare. I propose that closing the gap in our ability to interpret variation responsible for Mendelian disorders provides a grand and unprecedented opportunity for geneticists. Human geneticists are well placed to coordinate a systematic evaluation of variants in collaboration with basic scientists and clinicians. Sharing of knowledge, data, methods, and tools will aid both researchers and healthcare workers in achieving their common goal of defining the pathogenic potential of variants. Generation of variant annotations will inform genetic testing and will deepen our understanding of gene and protein function, thereby aiding the search for molecular targeted therapies. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic association of marbling score with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of the bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J; Lee, C

    2016-04-01

    Selection signals of Korean cattle might be attributed largely to artificial selection for meat quality. Rapidly increased intragenic markers of newly annotated genes in the bovine genome would help overcome limited findings of genetic markers associated with meat quality at the selection signals in a previous study. The present study examined genetic associations of marbling score (MS) with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of Korean cattle. A total of 39 092 nucleotide variants of 407 Korean cattle were utilized in the association analysis. A total of 129 variants were selected within newly annotated genes in the bovine genome. Their genetic associations were analyzed using the mixed model with random polygenic effects based on identical-by-state genetic relationships among animals in order to control for spurious associations produced by population structure. Genetic associations of MS were found (P<3.88×10-4) with six intragenic nucleotide variants on bovine autosomes 3 (cache domain containing 1, CACHD1), 5 (like-glycosyltransferase, LARGE), 16 (cell division cycle 42 binding protein kinase alpha, CDC42BPA) and 21 (snurportin 1, SNUPN; protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 9, PTPN9; chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan 4, CSPG4). In particular, the genetic associations with CDC42BPA and LARGE were confirmed using an independent data set of Korean cattle. The results implied that allele frequencies of functional variants and their proximity variants have been augmented by directional selection for greater MS and remain selection signals in the bovine genome. Further studies of fine mapping would be useful to incorporate favorable alleles in marker-assisted selection for MS of Korean cattle.

  9. Coffee, Genetic Variants, and Parkinson's Disease: Gene–Environment Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada-Fowler, Naomi; Söderkvist, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Studies of gene–environment interactions may help us to understand the disease mechanisms of common and complex diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Sporadic PD, the common form of PD, is thought to be a multifactorial disorder caused by combinations of multiple genetic factors and environmental or life-style exposures. Since one of the most extensively studied life-style factors in PD is coffee/caffeine intake, here, the studies of genetic polymorphisms with life-style interactions of ...

  10. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu...... of discussions within the ICGC on how to address the challenge of identifying mutations that contribute to oncogenesis, tumor maintenance or response to therapy, and recommend computational techniques to annotate somatic variants and predict their impact on cancer phenotype....

  11. Gender-Specific Associations between CHGB Genetic Variants and Schizophrenia in a Korean Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Joong Gon; Kim, Jeong Hyun; Park, Chul Soo; Kim, Bong Jo; Kim, Jae Won; Choi, Ihn Geun; Hwang, Jaeuk; Shin, Hyoung Doo; Woo, Sung Il

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating mental disorder and is known to be affected by genetic factors. The chromogranin B (CHGB), a member of the chromogranin gene family, has been proposed as a candidate gene associated with the risk of schizophrenia. The secretory pathway for peptide hormones and neuropeptides in the brain is regulated by chromogranin proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential associations between genetic variants of CHGB and schizophrenia susceptibility. In the current study, 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms of CHGB were genotyped in 310 schizophrenia patients and 604 healthy controls. Statistical analysis revealed that two genetic variants (non-synonymous rs910122; rs2821 in 3'-untranslated region) were associated with schizophrenia [minimum p=0.002; odds ratio (OR)=0.72], even after correction for multiple testing (p(corr)=0.02). Since schizophrenia is known to be differentially expressed between sexes, additional analysis for sex was performed. As a result, these two genetic variants (rs910122 and rs2821) and a haplotype (ht3) showed significant associations with schizophrenia in male subjects (p(corr)=0.02; OR=0.64), whereas the significance disappeared in female subjects (p>0.05). Although this study has limitations including a small number of samples and lack of functional study, our results suggest that genetic variants of CHGB may have sex-specific effects on the risk of schizophrenia and provide useful preliminary information for further study. © Copyright: Yonsei University College of Medicine 2017

  12. Sensitivity Analyses for Robust Causal Inference from Mendelian Randomization Analyses with Multiple Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Bowden, Jack; Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik; Thompson, Simon G

    2017-01-01

    Mendelian randomization investigations are becoming more powerful and simpler to perform, due to the increasing size and coverage of genome-wide association studies and the increasing availability of summarized data on genetic associations with risk factors and disease outcomes. However, when using multiple genetic variants from different gene regions in a Mendelian randomization analysis, it is highly implausible that all the genetic variants satisfy the instrumental variable assumptions. This means that a simple instrumental variable analysis alone should not be relied on to give a causal conclusion. In this article, we discuss a range of sensitivity analyses that will either support or question the validity of causal inference from a Mendelian randomization analysis with multiple genetic variants. We focus on sensitivity analyses of greatest practical relevance for ensuring robust causal inferences, and those that can be undertaken using summarized data. Aside from cases in which the justification of the instrumental variable assumptions is supported by strong biological understanding, a Mendelian randomization analysis in which no assessment of the robustness of the findings to violations of the instrumental variable assumptions has been made should be viewed as speculative and incomplete. In particular, Mendelian randomization investigations with large numbers of genetic variants without such sensitivity analyses should be treated with skepticism.

  13. Identification of Inherited Retinal Disease-Associated Genetic Variants in 11 Candidate Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astuti, Galuh D N; van den Born, L Ingeborgh; Khan, M Imran; Hamel, Christian P; Bocquet, Béatrice; Manes, Gaël; Quinodoz, Mathieu; Ali, Manir; Toomes, Carmel; McKibbin, Martin; El-Asrag, Mohammed E; Haer-Wigman, Lonneke; Inglehearn, Chris F; Black, Graeme C M; Hoyng, Carel B; Cremers, Frans P M; Roosing, Susanne

    2018-01-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs) display an enormous genetic heterogeneity. Whole exome sequencing (WES) recently identified genes that were mutated in a small proportion of IRD cases. Consequently, finding a second case or family carrying pathogenic variants in the same candidate gene often is challenging. In this study, we searched for novel candidate IRD gene-associated variants in isolated IRD families, assessed their causality, and searched for novel genotype-phenotype correlations. Whole exome sequencing was performed in 11 probands affected with IRDs. Homozygosity mapping data was available for five cases. Variants with minor allele frequencies ≤ 0.5% in public databases were selected as candidate disease-causing variants. These variants were ranked based on their: (a) presence in a gene that was previously implicated in IRD; (b) minor allele frequency in the Exome Aggregation Consortium database (ExAC); (c) in silico pathogenicity assessment using the combined annotation dependent depletion (CADD) score; and (d) interaction of the corresponding protein with known IRD-associated proteins. Twelve unique variants were found in 11 different genes in 11 IRD probands. Novel autosomal recessive and dominant inheritance patterns were found for variants in Small Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein U5 Subunit 200 ( SNRNP200 ) and Zinc Finger Protein 513 ( ZNF513 ), respectively. Using our pathogenicity assessment, a variant in DEAH-Box Helicase 32 ( DHX32 ) was the top ranked novel candidate gene to be associated with IRDs, followed by eight medium and lower ranked candidate genes. The identification of candidate disease-associated sequence variants in 11 single families underscores the notion that the previously identified IRD-associated genes collectively carry > 90% of the defects implicated in IRDs. To identify multiple patients or families with variants in the same gene and thereby provide extra proof for pathogenicity, worldwide data sharing is needed.

  14. Genetic variant of canine distemper virus from clinical cases in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen of worldwide distribution that can cause lethal disease in domestic dogs and other members of the family Canidae. Genetic diversity is found among reference strains and isolates of CDV, mainly in the haemagglutinin (H) protein, and this may be ...

  15. Assessment of genetic diversity among wheat somaclonal variants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-10-26

    Oct 26, 2011 ... yield potential, wide adaptation, and durable resistance to important diseases such as the rusts. ... diversity levels among adapted, wheat germplasm can provide predictive estimates of genetic ..... diversity among Tibetan wheat, common wheat and European spelt wheat revealed by RAPD markers, ...

  16. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.P. Hibar (Derrek); J.L. Stein; M.E. Rentería (Miguel); A. Arias-Vásquez (Alejandro); S. Desrivières (Sylvane); N. Jahanshad (Neda); R. Toro (Roberto); K. Wittfeld (Katharina); L. Abramovic (Lucija); M. Andersson (Micael); B. Aribisala (Benjamin); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); M. Bernard (Manon); M.M. Bohlken (Marc M.); M.P.M. Boks (Marco); L.B.C. Bralten (Linda); A.A. Brown (Andrew); M.M. Chakravarty (M. Mallar); Q. Chen (Qiang); C.R.K. Ching (Christopher); G. Cuellar-Partida (Gabriel); A. den Braber (Anouk); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); A.L. Goldman (Aaron L.); O. Grimm (Oliver); T. Guadalupe (Tulio); J. Hass (Johanna); G. Woldehawariat (Girma); A.J. Holmes (Avram); M. Hoogman (Martine); D. Janowitz (Deborah); T. Jia (Tianye); S. Kim (Shinseog); M. Klein (Marieke); B. Kraemer (Bernd); P.H. Lee (Phil H.); L.M. Olde Loohuis (Loes M.); M. Luciano (Michelle); C. MacAre (Christine); R. Mather; M. Mattheisen (Manuel); Y. Milaneschi (Yuri); K. Nho (Kwangsik); M. Papmeyer (Martina); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); S.L. Risacher (Shannon); R. Roiz-Santiañez (Roberto); E.J. Rose (Emma); A. Salami (Alireza); P.G. Sämann (Philipp); L. Schmaal (Lianne); N.J. Schork (Nicholas); J. Shin (Jean); V.M. Strike (Vanessa); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.M.J. Van Donkelaar (Marjolein M. J.); K.R. van Eijk (Kristel); R.K. Walters (Raymond); L.T. Westlye (Lars); C.D. Whelan (Christopher); A.M. Winkler (Anderson); M.P. Zwiers (Marcel); S. Alhusaini (Saud); L. Athanasiu (Lavinia); S.M. Ehrlich (Stefan); M. Hakobjan (Marina); C.B. Hartberg (Cecilie B.); U.K. Haukvik (Unn); A.J.G.A.M. Heister (Angelien J. G. A. M.); D. Hoehn (David); D. Kasperaviciute (Dalia); D.C. Liewald (David C.); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); R.R.R. Makkinje (Remco R. R.); M. Matarin (Mar); M.A.M. Naber (Marlies A. M.); D. Reese McKay; M. Needham (Margaret); A.C. Nugent (Allison); B. Pütz (Benno); N.A. Royle (Natalie); L. Shen (Li); R. Sprooten (Roy); D. Trabzuni (Danyah); S.S.L. Van Der Marel (Saskia S. L.); K.J.E. Van Hulzen (Kimm J. E.); E. Walton (Esther); A. Björnsson (Asgeir); L. Almasy (Laura); D.J. Ames (David); S. Arepalli (Sampath); A.A. Assareh; M.E. Bastin (Mark); H. Brodaty (Henry); K. Bulayeva (Kazima); M.A. Carless (Melanie); S. Cichon (Sven); A. Corvin (Aiden); J.E. Curran (Joanne); M. Czisch (Michael); G.I. de Zubicaray (Greig); A. Dillman (Allissa); A. Duggirala (Aparna); M.D. Dyer (Matthew); S. Erk; I. Fedko (Iryna); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); T. Foroud (Tatiana); P.T. Fox (Peter); M. Fukunaga (Masaki); J. Raphael Gibbs; H.H.H. Göring (Harald H.); R.C. Green (Robert C.); S. Guelfi (Sebastian); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C.A. Hartman (Catharina); K. Hegenscheid (Katrin); J. Heinz (Judith); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); D.J. Heslenfeld (Dirk); P.J. Hoekstra (Pieter); F. Holsboer; G. Homuth (Georg); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); M. Ikeda (Masashi); C.R. Jack Jr. (Clifford); S. Jenkinson (Sarah); R. Johnson (Robert); R. Kanai (Ryota); M. Keil (Maria); J.W. Kent (Jack W.); P. Kochunov (Peter); J.B. Kwok (John B.); S. Lawrie (Stephen); X. Liu (Xinmin); D.L. Longo (Dan L.); K.L. Mcmahon (Katie); E. Meisenzahl (Eva); I. Melle (Ingrid); S. Mohnke (Sebastian); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.C. Mostert (Jeanette C.); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); M.A. Nalls (Michael); T.E. Nichols (Thomas); L.G. Nilsson; M.M. Nöthen (Markus); K. Ohi (Kazutaka); R.L. Olvera (Rene); R. Perez-Iglesias (Rocio); G. Bruce Pike; S.G. Potkin (Steven); I. Reinvang (Ivar); S. Reppermund; M. Rietschel (Marcella); N. Seiferth (Nina); G.D. Rosen (Glenn D.); D. Rujescu (Dan); K. Schnell (Kerry); C.J. Schofield (Christopher); C. Smith (Colin); V.M. Steen (Vidar); J. Sussmann (Jessika); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); A.W. Toga (Arthur W.); B. Traynor (Bryan); J.C. Troncoso (Juan); J. Turner (Jessica); M.C. Valdés Hernández (Maria); D. van 't Ent (Dennis); M.P. van der Brug (Marcel); N.J. van der Wee (Nic); M.J.D. van Tol (Marie-José); D.J. Veltman (Dick); A.M.J. Wassink (Annemarie); E. Westman (Eric); R.H. Zielke (Ronald H.); A.B. Zonderman (Alan B.); D.G. Ashbrook (David G.); R. Hager (Reinmar); L. Lu (Lu); F.J. Mcmahon (Francis J); D.W. Morris (Derek W); R.W. Williams (Robert W.); H.G. Brunner; M. Buckner; J.K. Buitelaar (Jan K.); W. Cahn (Wiepke); V.D. Calhoun Vince D. (V.); G. Cavalleri (Gianpiero); B. Crespo-Facorro (Benedicto); A.M. Dale (Anders); G.E. Davies (Gareth); N. Delanty; C. Depondt (Chantal); S. Djurovic (Srdjan); D.A. Drevets (Douglas); T. Espeseth (Thomas); R.L. Gollub (Randy); B.C. Ho (Beng ); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); N. Hosten (Norbert); R. Kahn (René); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); A. Meyer-Lindenberg; B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); M. Nauck (Matthias); L. Nyberg (Lars); M. Pandolfo (Massimo); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); J.L. Roffman (Joshua); S.M. Sisodiya (Sanjay); J.W. Smoller; H. van Bokhoven (Hans); N.E.M. van Haren (Neeltje E.); H. Völzke (Henry); H.J. Walter (Henrik); M.W. Weiner (Michael); W. Wen (Wei); T.J.H. White (Tonya); I. Agartz (Ingrid); O.A. Andreassen (Ole); J. Blangero (John); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); R.M. Brouwer (Rachel); D.M. Cannon (Dara); M.R. Cookson (Mark); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); D.J. Donohoe (Dennis); G. Fernandez (Guillén); S.E. Fisher (Simon); C. Francks (Clyde); D.C. Glahn (David); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); O. Gruber (Oliver); J. Hardy (John); R. Hashimoto (Ryota); H.E. Hulshoff Pol (Hilleke); E.G. Jönsson (Erik); I. Kloszewska (Iwona); S. Lovestone (Simon); V.S. Mattay (Venkata S.); P. Mecocci (Patrizia); C. McDonald (Colm); A.M. McIntosh (Andrew); R.A. Ophoff (Roel); T. Paus (Tomas); Z. Pausova (Zdenka); M. Ryten (Mina); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); A.J. Saykin (Andrew); A. Simmons (Andrew); A. Singleton (Andrew); H. Soininen (H.); J.M. Wardlaw (J.); M.E. Weale (Michael); D.R. Weinberger (Daniel); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); L.J. Launer (Lenore); S. Seiler (Stephan); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); G. Chauhan (Ganesh); C.L. Satizabal (Claudia L.); J.T. Becker (James); L.R. Yanek (Lisa); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); M. Ebling (Maritza); B. Fischl (Bruce); W.T. Longstreth Jr; D. Greve (Douglas); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); P. Nyquist (Paul); L.N. Vinke (Louis N.); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); L. Xue (Luting); B. Mazoyer (Bernard); J.C. Bis (Joshua); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); S. Seshadri (Sudha); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G. Schumann (Gunter); B. Franke (Barbara); P.M. Thompson (Paul); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractThe highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate

  17. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, D.P.; Stein, J.L.; Renteria, M.E.; Arias-Vasquez, A.; Desrivières, S.; Jahanshad, N.; Toro, R.; Wittfeld, K.; Abramovic, L.; Andersson, M.; Aribisala, B.S.; Armstrong, N.J.; Bernard, M.; Bohlken, M.M.; Biks, M.P.; Bralten, J.; Brown, A.A.; Chakravarty, M.M.; Chen, Q.; Ching, C.R.K.; Cuellar-Partida, G.; den Braber, A.; Giddaluru, S.; Goldman, A.L.; Grimm, O.; Guadalupe, T.; Hass, J.; Woldehawariat, G.; Holmes, A.J.; Hoogman, M.; Janowitz, D.; Jia, T.; Kim, S.; Klein, M.; Kraemer, B.; Lee, P.H.; Olde Loohuis, L.M.; Luciano, M.; Macare, C.; Mather, K.A.; Mattheisen, M.; Milaneschi, Y.; Nho, K.; Papmeyer, M.; Ramasamy, A.; Risacher, S.L.; Roiz-Santiañez, R.; Rose, E.J.; Salami, A.; Sämann, P.G.; Schmaal, L.; Schork, A.J.; Shin, J.; Strike, L.T.; Teumer, A.; Donkelaar, M.M.J.; van Eijk, K.R.; Walters, R.K.; Westlye, L.T.; Welan, C.D.; Winkler, A.M.; Zwiers, M.P.; Alhusaini, S.; Athanasiu, L.; Ehrlich, S.; Hakobjan, M.M.H.; Hartberg, C.B.; Haukvik, U.K.; Heister, A.J.G.A.M.; Hoehn, D.; Kasperaviciute, D.; Liewald, D.C.M.; Lopez, L.M.; Makkinje, R.R.; Matarin, M.; Naber, M.A.M.; Reese McKay, D.; Needham, M.; Nugent, A.C.; Pütz, B.; Royle, N.A.; Shen, L.; Sprooten, E.; Trabzuni, D.; van der Marel, S.S.L.; van Hulzen, K.J.E.; Walton, E.; Wolf, C.; Almasy, L.; Ames, D.; Arepalli, S.; Assareh, A.A.; Bastin, M.E.; Brodaty, H.; Bulayeva, K.B.; Carless, M.A.; Cichon, S.; Corvin, A.; Curran, J.E.; Czisch, M.; de Zubicaray, G.I.; Dillman, A.; Duggirala, R.; Dyer, T.D.; Erk, S.; Fedko, I.O.; Ferrucci, L.; Foroud, T.M.; Fox, P.T.; Fukunaga, M.; Gibbs, J.R.; Göring, H.H.H.; Green, R.C.; Guelfi, S.; Hansell, N.K.; Hartman, C.A.; Hegenscheid, K.; Heinz, A.; Hernandez, D.G.; Heslenfeld, D.J.; Hoekstra, P.J.; Holsboer, F.; Homuth, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Ikeda, M.; Jack, C.R., Jr.; Jenkinson, M.; Johnson, R.; Kanai, R.; Keil, M.; Kent, J.W. Jr.; Kochunov, P.; Kwok, J.B.; Lawrie, S.M.; Liu, X.; Longo, D.L.; McMahon, K.L.; Meisenzahl, E.; Melle, I.; Mohnke, S.; Montgomery, G.W.; Mostert, J.C.; Mühleisen, T.W.; Nalls, M.A.; Nichols, T.E.; Nilsson, L.G.; Nöthen, M.M.; Ohi, K.; Olvera, R.L.; Perez-Iglesias, R.; Pike, G.B.; Potkin, S.G.; Reinvang, I.; Reppermund, S.; Rietschel, M.; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N.; Rosen, G.D.; Rujescu, D.; Schnell, K.; Schofield, P.R.; Smith, C.; Steen, V.M.; Sussmann, J.E.; Thalamuthu, A.; Toga, A.W.; Traynor, B.J.; Troncoso, J.; Turner, J.A.; Valdés Hernández, M.C.; van t Ent, D.; van der Brug, M.; van der Wee, N.J.A.; van Tol, M.J.; Veltman, D.J.; Wassink, T.H.; Westmann, E.; Zielke, R.H.; Zonderman, A.B.; Ashbrook, D.G.; Hager, R.; Lu, L.; McMahon, F.J.; Morris, D.W.; Williams, R.W.; Brunner, H.G.; Buckner, R.L.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Cahn, W.; Calhoun, V.D.; Cavalleri, G.L.; Crespo-Facorro, B.; Dale, A.M.; Davies, G.E.; Delanty, N.; Depondt, C.; Djurovic, S.; Drevets, W.C.; Espeseth, T.; Gollub, R.L.; Ho, B.C.; Hoffmann, W.; Hosten, N.; Kahn, R.S.; Le Hellard, S.; Meyer-Lindenberg, A.; Müller-Myhsok, B.; Nauck, M.; Nyberg, L.; Pandolfo, M.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Roffman, J.L.; Sisodiya, SM; Smoller, J.W.; van Bokhoven, H.; van Haren, N.E.M.; Völzke, H.; Walter, H.; Weiner, M.W.; Wen, W.; White, T.; Agartz, I.; Andreassen, O.A.; Blangero, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Brouwer, R.M.; Cannon, D.M.; Cookson, M.R.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Deary, I.J.; Donohoe, G.; Fernandez, G.; Fisher, S.E.; Francks, C.; Glahn, D.C.; Grabe, H.J.; Gruber, O.; Hardy, J.; Hashimoto, R.; Hulshoff Pol, H.E.; Jönsson, E.G.; Kloszewska, I.; Lovestone, S.; Mattay, V.S.; Mecocci, P.; McDonald, C.; McIntosh, A.M.; Ophoff, R.A.; Paus, T.; Pausova, Z.; Ryten, M.; Sachdev, P.S.; Saykin, A.J.; Simmons, A.; Singleton, A.; Soininen, H.; Wardlaw, J.M.; Weale, M.E.; Weinberger, D.R.; Adams, H.H.H.; Launer, L.J.; Seiler, S.; Schmidt, R.; Chauhan, G.; Satizabal, C.L.; Becker, J.T.; Yanek, L.; van der Lee, S.J.; Ebling, M.; Fischl, B.; Longstreth, Jr. W.T.; Greve, D.; Schmidt, H.; Nyquist, P.; Vinke, L.N.; van Duijn, C.M.; Xue, L.; Mazoyer, B.; Bis, J.C.; Gudnason, V.; Seshadri, S.; Arfan Ikram, M.; Martin, N.G.; Wright, M.J.; Schumann, G.; Franke, B.; Thompson, P.M.; Medland, S.E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common

  18. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Loohuis, Loes M. Olde; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santianez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Saemann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Puetz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goering, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzah, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mahnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Noethen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdes Hernandez, Maria C.; van't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, Rene S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Voelzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernandez, Guillen; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Pol, Hilleke E. Hulshoff; Joensson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences(1). Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement(2), learning, memory(3) and motivation(4), and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease(5). To

  19. Genetic Variants Influencing Lipid Levels and Risk of Dyslipidemia ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Provincial People's Hospital,32 The First Ring Road West ,Chengdu, Sichuan. 610072,china;;Email:liny042000@aliyun.com. All other author' contacted ..... identified loci that influence lipid concentrations and risk of coronary artery disease. Nat. Genet. 40,161-169. Yan T. T., Yin R. X., Li Q., Huang P., Zeng ...

  20. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  1. Rapid screening for targeted genetic variants via high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambliss, Allison B; Resnick, Molly; Petrides, Athena K; Clarke, William A; Marzinke, Mark A

    2017-03-01

    Current methods for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with aberrant drug-metabolizing enzyme function are hindered by long turnaround times and specialized techniques and instrumentation. In this study, we describe the development and validation of a high-resolution melting (HRM) curve assay for the rapid screening of variant genotypes for targeted genetic polymorphisms in the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP2C9, CYP2C19, and CYP3A5. Sequence-specific primers were custom-designed to flank nine SNPs within the genetic regions of aforementioned drug metabolizing enzymes. PCR amplification was performed followed by amplicon denaturation by precise temperature ramping in order to distinguish genotypes by melting temperature (Tm). A standardized software algorithm was used to assign amplicons as 'reference' or 'variant' as compared to duplicate reference sequence DNA controls for each SNP. Intra-assay (n=5) precision of Tms for all SNPs was ≤0.19%, while inter-assay (n=20) precision ranged from 0.04% to 0.21%. When compared to a reference method of Sanger sequencing, the HRM assay produced no false negative results, and overcall frequency ranged from 0% to 26%, depending on the SNP. Furthermore, HRM genotyping displayed accuracy over input DNA concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 ng/μL. The presented assay provides a rapid method for the screening for genetic variants in targeted CYP450 regions with a result of 'reference' or 'variant' available within 2 h from receipt of extracted DNA. The method can serve as a screening approach to rapidly identify individuals with variant sequences who should be further investigated by reflexed confirmatory testing for aberrant cytochrome P450 enzymatic activity. Rapid knowledge of variant status may aid in the avoidance of adverse clinical events by allowing for dosing of normal metabolizer patients immediately while identifying the need to wait for confirmatory testing in those patients who are

  2. Signatures of natural selection on genetic variants affecting complex human traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ge; Muglia, Louis J; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Akey, Joshua M; Williams, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been hypothesized that polygenic adaptation, resulting in modest allele frequency changes at many loci, could be a major mechanism behind the adaptation of complex phenotypes in human populations. Here we leverage the large number of variants that have been identified through genome-wide association (GWA) studies to comprehensively study signatures of natural selection on genetic variants associated with complex traits. Using population differentiation based methods, such as F ST and phylogenetic branch length analyses, we systematically examined nearly 1300 SNPs associated with 38 complex phenotypes. Instead of detecting selection signatures at individual variants, we aimed to identify combined evidence of natural selection by aggregating signals across many trait associated SNPs. Our results have revealed some general features of polygenic selection on complex traits associated variants. First, natural selection acting on standing variants associated with complex traits is a common phenomenon. Second, characteristics of selection for different polygenic traits vary both temporarily and geographically. Third, some studied traits (e.g. height and urate level) could have been the primary targets of selection, as indicated by the significant correlation between the effect sizes and the estimated strength of selection in the trait associated variants; however, for most traits, the allele frequency changes in trait associated variants might have been driven by the selection on other correlated phenotypes. Fourth, the changes in allele frequencies as a result of selection can be highly stochastic, such that, polygenic adaptation may accelerate differentiation in allele frequencies among populations, but generally does not produce predictable directional changes. Fifth, multiple mechanisms (pleiotropy, hitchhiking, etc) may act together to govern the changes in allele frequencies of genetic variants associated with complex traits.

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis of observational studies shows common genetic variants associated with macronutrient intake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J.S. Ngwa; F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis); D.K. Houston (Denise); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Luan; V. Mikkilä (Vera); F. Renström (Frida); E. Sonestedt (Emily); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); L. Qi (Lu); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); M.C. De Oliveira Otto (Marcia); E.J. Dhurandhar (Emily); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); I. Johansson (Ingegerd); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); K. Lohman (Kurt); A. Manichaikul (Ani); N.M. McKeown (Nicola ); D. Mozaffarian (Dariush); A.B. Singleton (Andrew); K. Stirrups (Kathy); J. Viikari (Jorma); Z. Ye (Zheng); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I.E. Barroso (Inês); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); A. Hofman (Albert); Y. Liu (YongMei); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); K.E. North (Kari); M. Dimitriou (Maria); G. Hallmans (Göran); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Langenberg (Claudia); J.M. Ordovas (Jose); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.B. Hu (Frank); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); O. Raitakari (Olli); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Johnson (Anthony); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.A. Schrack (Jennifer); R.D. Semba; D.S. Siscovick (David); D.K. Arnett (Donna); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P.W. Franks (Paul); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); M. Orho-Melander (Marju); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G.V. Dedoussis (George); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); J.A. Nettleton (Jennifer )

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Macronutrient intake varies substantially between individuals, and there is evidence that this variation is partly accounted for by genetic variants. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with macronutrient intake.

  4. Combined analysis of six lipoprotein lipase genetic variants on triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein, and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wittrup, Hans H; Andersen, Rolf V; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD).......Genetic variants in lipoprotein lipase may affect triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD)....

  5. Genetic variants of retinol-binding protein 4 in adolescents are ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic variants of retinol-binding protein 4 in adolescents are associated with liver function and inflammatory markers but not with obesity and insulin resistance. Chin-Jung Lin Nain-Feng Chu Yi-Jen Hung Dee Pei Chien-Hsing Lee Fone-Ching Hsiao Chieh-Hua Lu Chang-Hsun Hsieh. Research Note Volume 94 Issue 3 ...

  6. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Gaudet (Mia); T. Kircchoff (Tomas); T. Green (Todd); J. Vijai (Joseph); J.M. Korn (Joshua); C. Guiducci (Candace); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); K. McGee (Kate); L. McGuffog (Lesley); C. Kartsonaki (Christiana); J. Morrison (Jonathan); S. Healey (Sue); O. Sinilnikova (Olga); D. Stoppa-Lyonnet (Dominique); S. Mazoyer (Sylvie); M. Gauthier-Villars (Marion); H. Sobol (Hagay); M. Longy (Michel); M. Frenay (Marc); F.B.L. Hogervorst (Frans); M.A. Rookus (Matti); J.M. Collée (Margriet); N. Hoogerbrugge (Nicoline); K.E. van Roozendaal (Kees); M. Piedemonte (Marion); W.S. Rubinstein (Wendy); S. Nerenstone (Stacy); L. van Le (Linda); S.V. Blank (Stephanie); T. Caldes (Trinidad); M. de La Hoya (Miguel); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Lazaro (Conxi); I. Blanco (Ignacio); A. Arason (Adalgeir); O.T. Johannson (Oskar); R.B. Barkardottir (Rosa); P. Devilee (Peter); O.I. Olopade (Olofunmilayo); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); X. Wang (Xianshu); Z. Fredericksen (Zachary); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); M. Barile (Monica); A. Viel (Alessandra); P. Radice (Paolo); C. Phelan (Catherine); S. Narod (Steven); G. Rennert (Gad); F. Lejbkowicz (Flavio); A. Flugelman (Anath); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); G. Glendon (Gord); H. Ozcelik (Hilmi); A.E. Toland (Amanda); M. Montagna (Marco); E. D'Andrea (Emma); E. Friedman (Eitan); Y. Laitman (Yael); Å. Borg (Åke); M.S. Beattie (Mary); S.J. Ramus (Susan); S.M. Domchek (Susan); K.L. Nathanson (Katherine); R. Rebbeck (Timothy); A.B. Spurdle (Amanda); X. Chen (Xiaoqing); H. Holland (Helene); E.M. John (Esther); J. Hopper (John); S.S. Buys (Saundra); M.B. Daly (Mary); M.C. Southey (Melissa); M-B. Terry (Mary-beth); N. Tung (Nadine); T.V.O. Hansen (Thomas); F.C. Nielsen (Finn); M.H. Greene (Mark); P.L. Mai (Phuong); A. Osorio (Ana); M. Duran; R. Andres (Raquel); J. Benítez (Javier); J.N. Weitzel (Jeffrey); J. Garber (Judy); U. Hamann (Ute); S. Peock (Susan); M. Cook (Margaret); C.T. Oliver (Clare); D. Frost (Debra); R. Platte (Radka); D.G. Evans (Gareth); F. Lalloo (Fiona); R. Eeles (Rosalind); L. Izatt (Louise); L.J. Walker (Lisa); J. Eason (Jacqueline); J. Barwell (Julian); A.K. Godwin (Andrew); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); B. Wapenschmidt (Barbara); S. Engert (Stefanie); N. Arnold (Norbert); D. Gadzicki (Dorothea); M. Dean (Michael Emmans); B. Gold (Bert); R.J. Klein (Robert); F.J. Couch (Fergus); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.J. Daly (Mark); A.C. Antoniou (Antonis); D. Altshuler (David); K. Offit (Kenneth)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThe considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2

  7. The association of XRCC3 Thr241Met genetic variant with risk of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Previous studies suggest that the X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 gene (XRCC3) Thr241Met genetic variant could be potentially associated with the risk of prostate cancer. However, results from these published studies were conflicting rather than conclusive. Objectives:This meta-analysis aimed to ...

  8. Open-array analysis of genetic variants in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hanaa R.M. Attia

    beta cell function (HOMA-B). Also logistic regression analysis demonstrated that obesity is the most significant factor affecting. T2D. These findings suggested that management of BMI could sig- nificantly improve beta cell function and reduce the risk of T2D. Of all tested genetic risk variants seven SNPs showed significant.

  9. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carri...

  10. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaudet, Mia M; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Green, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation...

  11. Identifying genetic variants for heart rate variability in the acetylcholine pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz Venegas, Loretto; Hartman, Catharina A; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; van Roon, Arie M; van der Most, Peter J; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ronald; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Nolte, Ilja M; de Geus, Eco J C; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-causemortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3,

  12. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Rietveld (Niels); T. Esko (Tõnu); G. Davies (Gail); T.H. Pers (Tune); P. Turley (Patrick); B. Benyamin (Beben); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); V. Emilsson (Valur); A.D. Johnson (Andrew); J.J. Lee (James J.); C. de Leeuw (Christiaan); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M. Miller (Mike); O. Rostapshova (Olga); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); N. Amin (Najaf); D. Conley (Dalton); J. Derringer; C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); L. Franke (Lude); E.L. Glaeser (Edward L.); N.K. Hansell (Narelle); C. Hayward (Caroline); W.G. Iacono (William); C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); J. Karjalainen (Juha); D. Laibson (David); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); D.C. Liewald (David C.); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); G. Mcmahon (George); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); S. Pinker (Steven); D.J. Porteous (David J.); D. Posthuma (Danielle); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); B.H. Smithk (Blair H.); J.M. Starr (John); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); N.J. Timpsonm (Nicholas J.); M. Trzaskowskin (Maciej); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.C. Verhulst (Frank); M.E. Ward (Mary); M.J. Wright (Margaret); G.D. Smith; I.J. Deary (Ian J.); M. Johannesson (Magnus); R. Plomin (Robert); P.M. Visscher (Peter); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); D. Cesarini (David); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractWe identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxyphenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69

  13. Cross-Ethnic meta-Analysis of genetic variants for polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.V. Louwers (Yvonne); L. Stolk (Lisette); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.S.E. Laven (Joop)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractContext: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed new susceptibility loci for Chinese patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Because ethnic background adds to phenotypic diversities in PCOS, it seems plausible that genetic variants associated with PCOS act

  14. Multiple genetic variants along candidate pathways influence plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Y.; Dollé, M.E.T.; Imholz, S.; Slot, van 't R.; Verschuren, W.M.M.; Wijmenga, C.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Boer, J.M.A.

    2008-01-01

    The known genetic variants determining plasma HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) levels explain only part of its variation. Three hundred eighty-four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across 251 genes based on pathways potentially relevant to HDL-C metabolism were selected and genotyped in 3,575 subjects

  15. A genetic variant in COL11A1 is functionally associated with lumbar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This study aimed to explore whether the genetic variant of COL11A1 is functionally associated with the development of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in Chinese population. SNP rs1676486 of COL11A1 was genotyped in 647 patients and 532 healthy controls. The differences of genotype and allele distributions between ...

  16. Genetic variants of FOXP1 and FOXF1 are associated with the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    peter

    , including male ... identification of genetic variants associated with EA could be used to predict the risk of EA in an early stage and ... value of threshold cycle (Ct) scores was calculated for the determination of relative expression levels of ...

  17. Psoriasis Patients Are Enriched for Genetic Variants That Protect against HIV-1 Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haoyan; Hayashi, Genki; Lai, Olivia Y.; Dilthey, Alexander; Kuebler, Peter J.; Wong, Tami V.; Martin, Maureen P.; Fernandez Vina, Marcelo A.; McVean, Gil; Wabl, Matthias; Leslie, Kieron S.; Maurer, Toby; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Carrington, Mary; Bowcock, Anne M.; Nixon, Douglas F.; Liao, Wilson

    2012-01-01

    An important paradigm in evolutionary genetics is that of a delicate balance between genetic variants that favorably boost host control of infection but which may unfavorably increase susceptibility to autoimmune disease. Here, we investigated whether patients with psoriasis, a common immune-mediated disease of the skin, are enriched for genetic variants that limit the ability of HIV-1 virus to replicate after infection. We analyzed the HLA class I and class II alleles of 1,727 Caucasian psoriasis cases and 3,581 controls and found that psoriasis patients are significantly more likely than controls to have gene variants that are protective against HIV-1 disease. This includes several HLA class I alleles associated with HIV-1 control; amino acid residues at HLA-B positions 67, 70, and 97 that mediate HIV-1 peptide binding; and the deletion polymorphism rs67384697 associated with high surface expression of HLA-C. We also found that the compound genotype KIR3DS1 plus HLA-B Bw4-80I, which respectively encode a natural killer cell activating receptor and its putative ligand, significantly increased psoriasis susceptibility. This compound genotype has also been associated with delay of progression to AIDS. Together, our results suggest that genetic variants that contribute to anti-viral immunity may predispose to the development of psoriasis. PMID:22577363

  18. A genetic variant in COL11A1 is functionally associated with lumbar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WENJUN LIU

    2017-12-14

    Dec 14, 2017 ... Abstract. This study aimed to explore whether the genetic variant of COL11A1 is functionally associated with the development of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in Chinese population. SNP rs1676486 of COL11A1 was genotyped in 647 patients and 532 healthy controls. The differences of genotype and ...

  19. A genetic electrophoretic variant of high-sulfur hair proteins for forensic hair comparisons. I. Characterization of variant high-sulfur proteins of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, B

    1989-02-01

    In a survey of the proteins from human hair, a genetic electrophoretic variant has been observed in the high-sulfur protein region. S-carboxymethylated proteins were examined by 15% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 8.9. Out of 150 unrelated samples of Japanese head hairs analyzed, 107 showed 6 major high-sulfur protein bands (normal) and the remaining 43 samples showed an additional high-sulfur protein band (variant). Of 21 Caucasian samples analyzed only one variant sample was found. Characterization of the proteins by two-dimensional electrophoresis evidenced a variant protein spot which showed an apparent molecular weight of 30 k Da. Isoelectric points of the high-sulfur proteins ranged from 3.25-3.55 and that of variant protein band from 3.3-3.4. Family studies of 21 matings resulting in 49 children indicated that this variant was inherited in an autosomal fashion.

  20. Effects of growth temperature and caffeine on genetic responses of Candida albicans to ethyl methanesulfonate, nitrous acid and ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarachek, A.; Bish, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is more effective than either ethyl methanesulfonate or nitrous acid in inducing reverse mutation from auxotrophy to prototrophy in C. albicans. The killing effect of each of the mutagens is greater for cells grown at 37 C than at 25 C after treatment; mutation frequencies are unaffected by post-treatment growth temperatures. Though caffeine depresses survival of mutagen treated cells at both 25 C or 37 C, its effect is more pronounced at 37 C. Caffeine has no effect on mutagenesis by nitrous acid or ethyl methanesulfonate; it depresses UV mutagenesis, but only at 37 C and at high UV dosages. These findings indicate that UV mutagenesis in C. albicans is mediated by a caffeine-sensitive, recombinational system for DNA repair analogous to those known to occur in other species of yeast. The repair of C. albicans is unique in being susceptible to caffeine only at high temperature and when the number of DNA lesions to be repaired is large. The caffeine sensitive steps in repair critical to UV mutagenesis are not involved in fixing mutations induced by the chemical mutagens tested

  1. The genetic basis of severe combined immunodeficiency and its variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasher, Diana; Dalal, Ilan

    2012-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are characterized by a block in T lymphocyte differentiation that is variably associated with abnormal development of other lymphocyte lineages (B and/or natural killer [NK] cells), leading to death early in life unless treated urgently by hematopoietic stem cell transplant. SCID comprises genotypically and phenotypically heterogeneous conditions, of which the genetic basis for approximately 85% of the underlying immunologic defects have been recently elucidated. A major obstacle in deciphering the pathogenesis of SCID syndromes is that different mutations in a single gene may give rise to distinct clinical conditions and that a similar clinical phenotype can result from mutations in different genes. Mutation analysis is now an important component of the complete evaluation of a patient with SCID since it has a dramatic impact on many aspects of this potentially life-threatening disease such as genetic counseling, prenatal diagnosis, modalities of treatment, and, eventually, prognosis. Dr Robert Good, one of the founders of modern immunology, described the SCID syndrome as “experiments of nature.” By understanding the cellular and genetic basis of these immunodeficiency diseases and, eventually, normal immunity, we optimize the “bedside to research laboratory and back again” approach to medicine. PMID:23776382

  2. Interaction between 5 genetic variants and allergy in glioma risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoemaker, Minouk J; Robertson, Lindsay; Wigertz, Annette

    2010-01-01

    .047), and between "any allergy" and rs6010620 (greater protective effect; interaction OR = 0.70, P = 0.017). Case-only analyses provided further support for atopy interactions for rs4977756 and rs498872. This study provides evidence for possible gene-environment interactions in glioma development......., CDKN2A-CDKN2B), 11q23.3 (rs498872, PHLDB1), and 20q13.33 (rs6010620, RTEL1) as determinants of glioma risk. The authors investigated whether there is interaction between the effects of allergy and these 5 variants on glioma risk. Data from 5 case-control studies carried out in Denmark, Finland, Sweden......, and the United Kingdom (2000-2004) were used, totaling 1,029 cases and 1,668 controls. Risk was inversely associated with asthma, hay fever, eczema, and "any allergy," significantly for each factor except asthma, and was significantly positively associated with number of risk alleles for each of the 5 single...

  3. 'Progress' renders detrimental an ancient mitochondrial DNA genetic variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheu-Grau, David; Gómez-Durán, Aurora; López-Gallardo, Ester; Pinós, Tomàs; Andreu, Antoni L; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    A human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transition, m.1555A>G, in the 12S rRNA gene causes non-syndromic hearing loss. However, this pathological mutation is the wild-type allele in orangutan mtDNA. Here we rule out different genetic factors as the reason for its fixation in orangutans and show that aminoglycosides negatively affect the oxidative phosphorylation function by decreasing the synthesis of mtDNA-encoded proteins and the amount and activity of respiratory complex IV. These drugs also diminish the growth rate of orangutan cells. The m.1555G nucleotide is also the wild-type allele in other mammal species and they might be at risk of suffering a mitochondrial disorder if treated with aminoglycosides. Therefore, pharmacogenomic approaches should be used to confirm this possibility. These observations are important for human health. Due to the fact that old age and high frequency are criteria widely used in mitochondrial medicine to rule out a genetic change as being a pathological mutation, our results prevent against simplistic genetic approaches that do not consider the potential effect of environmental conditions. Hence, these results suggest that some ancient and highly frequent human population polymorphisms, such as those defining mtDNA haplogroups, in mitochondrial rRNA genes can be deleterious in association with new environmental conditions. Therefore, as the discovery of ribosomal antibiotics has allowed to fight infectious diseases and this breakthrough can be considered an important scientific advance or 'progress', our results suggest that 'progress' can also have a negative counterpart and render detrimental many of these mtDNA genotypes.

  4. Computer-aided identification of polymorphism sets diagnostic for groups of bacterial and viral genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huygens Flavia

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and genes that exhibit presence/absence variation have provided informative marker sets for bacterial and viral genotyping. Identification of marker sets optimised for these purposes has been based on maximal generalized discriminatory power as measured by Simpson's Index of Diversity, or on the ability to identify specific variants. Here we describe the Not-N algorithm, which is designed to identify small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for user-specified subsets of known genetic variants. The algorithm does not treat the user-specified subset and the remaining genetic variants equally. Rather Not-N analysis is designed to underpin assays that provide 0% false negatives, which is very important for e.g. diagnostic procedures for clinically significant subgroups within microbial species. Results The Not-N algorithm has been incorporated into the "Minimum SNPs" computer program and used to derive genetic markers diagnostic for multilocus sequence typing-defined clonal complexes, hepatitis C virus (HCV subtypes, and phylogenetic clades defined by comparative genome hybridization (CGH data for Campylobacter jejuni, Yersinia enterocolitica and Clostridium difficile. Conclusion Not-N analysis is effective for identifying small sets of genetic markers diagnostic for microbial sub-groups. The best results to date have been obtained with CGH data from several bacterial species, and HCV sequence data.

  5. Genetic Variants Associated with Hyperandrogenemia in PCOS Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Dadachanji

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome is a multifactorial endocrine disorder whose pathophysiology baffles many researchers till today. This syndrome is typically characterized by anovulatory cycles and infertility, altered gonadotropin levels, obesity, and bulky multifollicular ovaries on ultrasound. Hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance are hallmark features of its complex pathophysiology. Hyperandrogenemia is a salient feature of PCOS and a major contributor to cosmetic anomalies including hirsutism, acne, and male pattern alopecia in affected women. Increased androgen levels may be intrinsic or aggravated by preexisting insulin resistance in women with PCOS. Studies have reported augmented ovarian steroidogenesis patterns attributed mainly to theca cell hypertrophy and altered expression of key enzymes in the steroidogenic pathway. Candidate gene studies have been performed in order to delineate the association of polymorphisms in genes, which encode enzymes in the intricate cascade of steroidogenesis or modulate the levels and action of circulating androgens, with risk of PCOS development and its related traits. However, inconsistent findings have impacted the emergence of a unanimously accepted genetic marker for PCOS susceptibility. In the current review, we have summarized the influence of polymorphisms in important androgen related genes in governing genetic predisposition to PCOS and its related metabolic and reproductive traits.

  6. Family-based studies to identify genetic variants that cause congenital heart defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Cammon B; Bleyl, Steven B; Brunelli, Luca; Bowles, Neil E

    2013-07-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common congenital abnormalities. Analysis of large multigenerational families has led to the identification of a number of genes for CHDs. However, identifiable variations in these genes are the cause of a small proportion of cases of CHDs, suggesting significant genetic heterogeneity. In addition, large families with CHDs are rare, making the identification of additional genes difficult. Next-generation sequencing technologies will provide an opportunity to identify more genes in the future. However, the significant genetic variation between individuals will present a challenge to distinguish between 'pathogenic' and 'benign' variants. We have demonstrated that the analysis of multiple individuals in small families using combinations of algorithms can reduce the number of candidate variants to a small, manageable number. Thus, the analysis of small nuclear families or even distantly related 'sporadic' cases may begin to uncover the 'dark matter' of CHD genetics.

  7. The effects of common genetic variants in oncogenes on ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, L.; Gayther, S.A.; Ramus, S.J.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: The 5-year survival rate for invasive epithelial ovarian cancer is genetic variation may influence survival after cancer diagnoses, which might enable the prediction of response to treatment and survival in the clinical setting. The aim...... of this study was to evaluate associations between common germline genetic variants in the oncogenes BRAF, ERBB2, KRAS, NMI, and PIK3CA, and survival after a diagnosis of epithelial ovarian cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We evaluated the association between 34 tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms and survival...... subtype, the rare allele rs10842513 in KRAS, was associated with poor survival (HR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.10-1.78; P = 0.007). CONCLUSION: Common genetic variants in the BRAF and KRAS oncogenes may be important in the prediction of survival in patients with invasive epithelial ovarian cancer Udgivelsesdato...

  8. Coronary artery disease-associated genetic variants and biomarkers of inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Morten Krogh; Larsen, Sanne Bøjet; Nyegaard, Mette

    2017-01-01

    score was calculated to assess the combined risk associated with all the genetic variants. A multiple linear regression model was used to assess associations between the genetic risk score, single SNPs, and the five inflammatory biomarkers. RESULTS:The minor allele (G) (CAD risk allele) of rs2075650......INTRODUCTION:Genetic constitution and inflammation both contribute to development of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several CAD-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have recently been identified, but their functions are largely unknown. We investigated the associations between CAD...

  9. Looking for new antifungal drugs from flavonoids: impact of the genetic diversity of Candida albicans on the in-vitro response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Maria Rosa; Giuffre, Letterio; El Aamri, Lamya; Hafidi, Majida; Criseo, Giuseppe; Romeo, Orazio; Scordino, Fabio

    2017-12-25

    In an era in which antimicrobial resistance is increasing at an alarming pace, it's very important to find new antimicrobial agents effective against pathogenic microrganisms resistant to traditional treatments. Among the notable breakthroughs in the past years of research in natural-drug discovery there is the identification and testing of flavonoids, a group of plant-derived substances capable of promoting many beneficial effects on humans. These compounds show different biological activities such as inhibition of neuroinflammation and tumor growth as well as antidepressant, antiarthritic, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antidiabetic, antiulcer and antiasthmatic activities. However, one of the most important effects of these phytochemicals is, undoubtedly, their antimicrobial activity against many microbial pathogens. In recent years, hundreds of scientific papers reported the inhibitory effects of flavonoids against pathogenic fungi but none of these has ever considered the inexorable genetic changes occurring within the populations of these microrganisms. Today, we have enough information to estimate genetic diversity within microbial species and recent data revealed that most of fungal pathogens shows a complex population structure in which no a single isolate can be designate as representative of the entire taxon. This is especially true for the highly divergent fungal pathogen Candida albicans, in which the assumption that one or few "standard strains" can represent the whole species is overly unrealistic and should be laid to rest. The goal of this article is to shed light on the extent of genetic variation in C. albicans and how this phenomenon can largely influence the activity of flavonoids against this species. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Genetic variants and risk of asthma in an American Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Lyle G; Azure, Crystal; Segarra, Alexandre; Enright, Kendra J; Hamley, Shawn; Jerome, Dara; O'Leary, Marcia A; O'Leary, Rae A; Parisien, Ashley; Trottier, Kayana; Yracheta, Joseph M; Torgerson, Dara G

    2017-07-01

    Asthma is recognized as a complex, multifactorial disease with a genetic component that is well recognized. Certain genetic variants are associated with asthma in a number of populations. To determine whether the same variants increase the risk of asthma among American Indian children. The electronic medical records of an Indian Health Service facility identified all children between 6 and 17 years of age with case-defining criteria for asthma (n = 108). Control children (n = 216), matched for age, were also identified. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to genotype 10 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 6 genetic loci. Genotypic distributions among cases and controls were evaluated by χ 2 and logistic regression methods. A variant at 5q22.1 revealed a statistically significant imbalance in the distribution of genotypes between case-control pairs (rs10056340, P < .001). In logistic regression analyses, the same variant at 5q22.1 and a variant at 17q21 were associated with asthma at P < .05 (rs10056340 and rs9303277). Inclusions of age, body mass index, and atopy in multivariate models revealed significant associations between rs10056340 (odds ratio, 2.020; 95% confidence interval, 1.283-3.180; P = .002) and all 5 17q21 SNPs and asthma in this population. In analyses restricted to atopic individuals, the association of rs10056340 was essentially unchanged, whereas among nonatopic individuals the trend was in the same direction but nonsignificant. The reverse was true for the 17q21 SNPs. These findings demonstrate that many variants commonly associated with asthma in other populations also accompany this condition among American Indian children. American Indian children also appear to have an increased risk of asthma associated with obesity. Copyright © 2017 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Multivariable Mendelian randomization: the use of pleiotropic genetic variants to estimate causal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Thompson, Simon G

    2015-02-15

    A conventional Mendelian randomization analysis assesses the causal effect of a risk factor on an outcome by using genetic variants that are solely associated with the risk factor of interest as instrumental variables. However, in some cases, such as the case of triglyceride level as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, it may be difficult to find a relevant genetic variant that is not also associated with related risk factors, such as other lipid fractions. Such a variant is known as pleiotropic. In this paper, we propose an extension of Mendelian randomization that uses multiple genetic variants associated with several measured risk factors to simultaneously estimate the causal effect of each of the risk factors on the outcome. This "multivariable Mendelian randomization" approach is similar to the simultaneous assessment of several treatments in a factorial randomized trial. In this paper, methods for estimating the causal effects are presented and compared using real and simulated data, and the assumptions necessary for a valid multivariable Mendelian randomization analysis are discussed. Subject to these assumptions, we demonstrate that triglyceride-related pathways have a causal effect on the risk of coronary heart disease independent of the effects of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

  12. A Comparison of Genetic Programming Variants for Hyper-Heuristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Sean [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Modern society is faced with ever more complex problems, many of which can be formulated as generate-and-test optimization problems. General-purpose optimization algorithms are not well suited for real-world scenarios where many instances of the same problem class need to be repeatedly and efficiently solved, such as routing vehicles over highways with constantly changing traffic flows, because they are not targeted to a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics automate the design of algorithms to create a custom algorithm for a particular scenario. Hyper-heuristics typically employ Genetic Programming (GP) and this project has investigated the relationship between the choice of GP and performance in Hyper-heuristics. Results are presented demonstrating the existence of problems for which there is a statistically significant performance differential between the use of different types of GP.

  13. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iksoo Huh

    Full Text Available Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively.

  14. Penetrance of NOD2/CARD15 genetic variants in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In case-control studies of Europeans, heterozygosity for Arg702Trp(rs2066844), Gly908Arg(rs2066845) and Leu1007fsinsC(rs5743293) on the NOD2/CARD15 gene is associated with a 2-fold greater risk of Crohn disease, whereas homozygosity or compound heterozygosity is associated with a 17-fold greater ...... risk. However, the importance of these genetic variants if identified in particular individuals within the general population is unknown. We undertook this study to estimate the penetrance of these variants in the general population....

  15. Penetrance of NOD2/CARD15 genetic variants in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Kamstrup, Pia R; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    In case-control studies of Europeans, heterozygosity for Arg702Trp(rs2066844), Gly908Arg(rs2066845) and Leu1007fsinsC(rs5743293) on the NOD2/CARD15 gene is associated with a 2-fold greater risk of Crohn disease, whereas homozygosity or compound heterozygosity is associated with a 17-fold greater...... risk. However, the importance of these genetic variants if identified in particular individuals within the general population is unknown. We undertook this study to estimate the penetrance of these variants in the general population....

  16. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Ying-Hsien; Chien, Shu-Chen; Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2014-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209) in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls) were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804) were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL) and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240) and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61) and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52) had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  17. Genetic variants of CD209 associated with Kawasaki disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Chang Kuo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Kawasaki disease (KD is a systemic vasculitis with unknown etiology mainly affecting children in Asian countries. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, CD209 in humans was showed to trigger an anti-inflammatory cascade and associated with KD susceptibility. This study was conducted to investigate the association between genetic polymorphisms of CD209 and the risk KD. METHODS: A total of 948 subjects (381 KD and 567 controls were recruited. Nine tagging SNPs (rs8112310, rs4804800, rs11465421, rs1544766, rs4804801, rs2287886, rs735239, rs735240, rs4804804 were selected for TaqMan allelic discrimination assay. Clinical phenotypes, coronary artery lesions (CAL and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG treatment outcomes were collected for analysis. RESULTS: Significant associations were found between CD209 polymorphisms (rs4804800, rs2287886, rs735240 and the risk of KD. Haplotype analysis for CD209 polymorphisms showed that A/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0002, OR = 1.61 and G/A/G haplotype (P = 0.0365, OR = 1.52 had higher risk of KD as compared with G/G/A haplotype in rs2287886/rs735239/rs735240 pairwise allele analysis. There were no significant association in KD with regards to CAL formation and IVIG treatment responses. CONCLUSION: CD209 polymorphisms were responsible for the susceptibility of KD, but not CAL formation and IVIG treatment responsiveness.

  18. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted...... genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated...

  19. Estimating Marginal Healthcare Costs Using Genetic Variants as Instrumental Variables: Mendelian Randomization in Economic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Padraig; Davey Smith, George; von Hinke, Stephanie; Davies, Neil M; Hollingworth, William

    2016-11-01

    Accurate measurement of the marginal healthcare costs associated with different diseases and health conditions is important, especially for increasingly prevalent conditions such as obesity. However, existing observational study designs cannot identify the causal impact of disease on healthcare costs. This paper explores the possibilities for causal inference offered by Mendelian randomization, a form of instrumental variable analysis that uses genetic variation as a proxy for modifiable risk exposures, to estimate the effect of health conditions on cost. Well-conducted genome-wide association studies provide robust evidence of the associations of genetic variants with health conditions or disease risk factors. The subsequent causal effects of these health conditions on cost can be estimated using genetic variants as instruments for the health conditions. This is because the approximately random allocation of genotypes at conception means that many genetic variants are orthogonal to observable and unobservable confounders. Datasets with linked genotypic and resource use information obtained from electronic medical records or from routinely collected administrative data are now becoming available and will facilitate this form of analysis. We describe some of the methodological issues that arise in this type of analysis, which we illustrate by considering how Mendelian randomization could be used to estimate the causal impact of obesity, a complex trait, on healthcare costs. We describe some of the data sources that could be used for this type of analysis. We conclude by considering the challenges and opportunities offered by Mendelian randomization for economic evaluation.

  20. Current situation, genetic relationship and control measures of infectious bronchitis virus variants circulating in African regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadija Khataby

    2016-08-01

    Three S1 gene hypervariable regions were studied and compared to the reference genotypes/serotypes that found emerging in African regions. This comparison was based on phylogenetic trees, nucleotide and amino-acid sequence analysis. It clearly appears that IBV variants reported in Africa, display a low genetic relationship between them and with the majority of the reference strains emerging in neighboring countries, except the case of variants from Libya and Egypt that show a high relatedness. Also the Massachusetts serotypes were the most prevalent co-circulating with both serotypes, Italy02 type in Morocco and Qx-like genotype in South part of the African continent. In order to control the IBV variants in African regions, an efficient vaccination strategy program should be implemented.

  1. Imaging-Genetics in Dyslexia: Connecting risk genetic variants to brain neuroimaging and ultimately to reading impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicher, John D.; Gruen, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Dyslexia is a common pediatric disorder that affects 5-17% of schoolchildren in the United States. It is marked by unexpected difficulties in fluent reading despite adequate intelligence, opportunity, and instruction. Classically, neuropsychologists have studied dyslexia using a variety of neurocognitive batteries to gain insight into the specific deficits and impairments in affected children. Since dyslexia is a complex genetic trait with high heritability, analyses conditioned on performance on these neurocognitive batteries have been used to try to identify associated genes. This has led to some successes in identifying contributing genes, although much of the heritability remains unexplained. Additionally, the lack of relevant human brain tissue for analysis and the challenges of modeling a uniquely human trait in animals are barriers to advancing our knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology. In vivo imaging technologies, however, present new opportunities to examine dyslexia and reading skills in a clearly relevant context in human subjects. Recent investigations have started to integrate these imaging data with genetic data in attempts to gain a more complete and complex understanding of reading processes. In addition to bridging the gap from genetic risk variant to a discernible neuroimaging phenotype and ultimately to the clinical impairments in reading performance, the use of neuroimaging phenotypes will reveal novel risk genes and variants. In this article, we briefly discuss the genetic and imaging investigations and take an in-depth look at the recent imaging-genetics investigations of dyslexia. PMID:23916419

  2. Invited commentary: genetic variants and individual- and societal-level risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Steven S

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, leading epidemiologists have noted the importance of social factors in studying and understanding the distribution and determinants of disease in human populations; but to what extent are epidemiologic studies integrating genetic information and other biologic variables with information about individual-level risk factors and group-level or societal factors related to the broader residential, behavioral, or cultural context? There remains a need to consider ways to integrate genetic information with social and contextual information in epidemiologic studies, partly to combat the overemphasis on the importance of genetic factors as determinants of disease in human populations. Even in genome-wide association studies of coronary heart disease and other common complex diseases, only a small proportion of heritability is explained by the genetic variants identified to date. It is possible that familial clustering due to genetic factors has been overestimated and that important environmental or social influences (acting alone or in combination with genetic variants) have been overlooked. The accompanying article by Bressler et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2010;171(1):14-23) highlights some of these important issues.

  3. A general framework for estimating the relative pathogenicity of human genetic variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Martin; Witten, Daniela M.; Jain, Preti; O’Roak, Brian J.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Shendure, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to sequence human genomes has exceeded our ability to interpret genetic variation. Current genomic annotations tend to exploit a single information type (e.g. conservation) and/or are restricted in scope (e.g. to missense changes). Here, we describe Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD), a framework that objectively integrates many diverse annotations into a single, quantitative score. We implement CADD as a support vector machine trained to differentiate 14.7 million high-frequency human derived alleles from 14.7 million simulated variants. We pre-compute “C-scores” for all 8.6 billion possible human single nucleotide variants and enable scoring of short insertions/deletions. C-scores correlate with allelic diversity, annotations of functionality, pathogenicity, disease severity, experimentally measured regulatory effects, and complex trait associations, and highly rank known pathogenic variants within individual genomes. The ability of CADD to prioritize functional, deleterious, and pathogenic variants across many functional categories, effect sizes and genetic architectures is unmatched by any current annotation. PMID:24487276

  4. Joint effects of genetic variants and residential proximity to pesticide applications on hypospadias risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Suzan L; Yang, Wei; Ma, Chen; Roberts, Eric; Kegley, Susan; English, Paul; Lammer, Edward J; Witte, John S; Shaw, Gary M

    2016-08-01

    We examined risks associated with joint exposure of gene variants and pesticides. Analyses included 189 cases and 390 male controls born from 1991 to 2003 in California's San Joaquin Valley. We used logistic regression to examine risks associated with joint exposures of gene variants and pesticides that our previous work identified as associated with hypospadias. Genetic variables were based on variants in DGKK, genes involved in sex steroid synthesis/metabolism, and genes involved in genital tubercle development. Pesticide exposure was based on residential proximity to commercial agricultural pesticide applications. Odds ratios (ORs) were highest among babies with joint exposures, who had two- to fourfold increased risks; for example, the OR was 3.7 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8-16.5) among subjects with the risk-associated DGKK haplotype and pesticide exposure; OR, 1.5 (95% CI, 0.7-3.1) among subjects with the haplotype and no pesticide exposure; and OR, 0.9 (95% CI, 0.5-1.6) among subjects without the haplotype but with pesticide exposure, relative to subjects with neither. However, results did not provide statistical evidence that these risks were significantly greater than expected on an additive scale, relative to risks associated with one exposure at a time. We observed elevated risks associated with joint exposures to selected pesticides and genetic variants but no statistical evidence for interaction. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:653-658, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. VaRank: a simple and powerful tool for ranking genetic variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Geoffroy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Most genetic disorders are caused by single nucleotide variations (SNVs or small insertion/deletions (indels. High throughput sequencing has broadened the catalogue of human variation, including common polymorphisms, rare variations or disease causing mutations. However, identifying one variation among hundreds or thousands of others is still a complex task for biologists, geneticists and clinicians.Results. We have developed VaRank, a command-line tool for the ranking of genetic variants detected by high-throughput sequencing. VaRank scores and prioritizes variants annotated either by Alamut Batch or SnpEff. A barcode allows users to quickly view the presence/absence of variants (with homozygote/heterozygote status in analyzed samples. VaRank supports the commonly used VCF input format for variants analysis thus allowing it to be easily integrated into NGS bioinformatics analysis pipelines. VaRank has been successfully applied to disease-gene identification as well as to molecular diagnostics setup for several hundred patients.Conclusions. VaRank is implemented in Tcl/Tk, a scripting language which is platform-independent but has been tested only on Unix environment. The source code is available under the GNU GPL, and together with sample data and detailed documentation can be downloaded from http://www.lbgi.fr/VaRank/.

  6. Association between genetic variants of the clock gene and obesity and sleep duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Macarena; Obregón, Ana María; Chaput, Jean-Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors related to lifestyle aspects. It has been shown that reduced sleep is associated with increased body mass index (BMI). Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) gene variants have also been associated with obesity. The objective of this mini-review was to discuss the available literature related to CLOCK gene variants associated with adiposity and sleep duration in humans. In total, 16 articles complied with the terms of the search that reported CLOCK variants associated with sleep duration, energy intake, and BMI. Overall, six CLOCK single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been associated with sleep duration, and three variants have been associated with energy intake variables. Overall, the most studied area has been the association of CLOCK gene with obesity; close to eight common variants have been associated with obesity. The most studied CLOCK SNP in different populations is rs1801260, and most of these populations correspond to European populations. Collectively, identifying at risk CLOCK genotypes is a new area of research that may help identify individuals who are more susceptible to overeating and gaining weight when exposed to short sleep durations.

  7. DANN: a deep learning approach for annotating the pathogenicity of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quang, Daniel; Chen, Yifei; Xie, Xiaohui

    2015-03-01

    Annotating genetic variants, especially non-coding variants, for the purpose of identifying pathogenic variants remains a challenge. Combined annotation-dependent depletion (CADD) is an algorithm designed to annotate both coding and non-coding variants, and has been shown to outperform other annotation algorithms. CADD trains a linear kernel support vector machine (SVM) to differentiate evolutionarily derived, likely benign, alleles from simulated, likely deleterious, variants. However, SVMs cannot capture non-linear relationships among the features, which can limit performance. To address this issue, we have developed DANN. DANN uses the same feature set and training data as CADD to train a deep neural network (DNN). DNNs can capture non-linear relationships among features and are better suited than SVMs for problems with a large number of samples and features. We exploit Compute Unified Device Architecture-compatible graphics processing units and deep learning techniques such as dropout and momentum training to accelerate the DNN training. DANN achieves about a 19% relative reduction in the error rate and about a 14% relative increase in the area under the curve (AUC) metric over CADD's SVM methodology. All data and source code are available at https://cbcl.ics.uci.edu/public_data/DANN/. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Mendelian randomization in health research: using appropriate genetic variants and avoiding biased estimates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amy E; Davies, Neil M; Ware, Jennifer J; VanderWeele, Tyler; Smith, George Davey; Munafò, Marcus R

    2014-03-01

    Mendelian randomization methods, which use genetic variants as instrumental variables for exposures of interest to overcome problems of confounding and reverse causality, are becoming widespread for assessing causal relationships in epidemiological studies. The main purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how results can be biased if researchers select genetic variants on the basis of their association with the exposure in their own dataset, as often happens in candidate gene analyses. This can lead to estimates that indicate apparent "causal" relationships, despite there being no true effect of the exposure. In addition, we discuss the potential bias in estimates of magnitudes of effect from Mendelian randomization analyses when the measured exposure is a poor proxy for the true underlying exposure. We illustrate these points with specific reference to tobacco research. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification of correlated genetic variants jointly associated with rheumatoid arthritis using ridge regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan V; Shedden, Kerby A; Zhu, Ji; Choi, Nam-Hee; Kardia, Sharon Lr

    2009-12-15

    Using the North American Rheumatoid Arthritis Consortium genome-wide association dataset, we applied ridged, multiple least-squares regression to identify genetic variants with apparent unique contributions to variation of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), a newly identified clinical risk factor for development of rheumatoid arthritis. Within a 2.7-Mbp region on chromosome 6 around the well studied HLA-DRB1 locus, ridge regression identified a single-nucleotide polymorphism that was associated with anti-CCP variation when including the additive effects of other single-nucleotide polymorphisms in a multivariable analysis, but that showed only a weak direct association with anti-CCP. This suggests that multivariable methods can be used to identify potentially relevant genetic variants in regions of interest that would be difficult to detect based on direct associations.

  10. Prostate cancer screening using risk stratification based on a multi-state model of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Auvinen, Anssi; Schleutker, Johanna; Wu, Yi-Ying; Fann, Jean Ching-Yuan; Tammela, Teuvo; Chen, Sam Li-Sheng; Chiu, Sherry Yueh-Hsia; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2015-06-01

    Risk-stratified screening for prostate cancer (PCa) with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing incorporating genetic variants has received some attention but has been scarcely investigated. We developed a model to stratify the Finnish population by different risk profiles related to genetic variants to optimize the screening policy. Data from the Finnish randomized controlled trial on screening for PCa with PSA testing were used to estimate a six-state Markov model of disease progression. Blood samples from Finnish men were used to assess the risk of PCa related to three genetic variants (rs4242382, rs138213197, and rs200331695). A risk score-based approach combined with a series of computer simulation models was applied to optimize individual screening policies. The 10-year risk of having progressive prostate cancer detected ranged from 43% in the top 5% risk group to approximately 11% in the bottom half of the population. Using the median group, with screening every four years beginning at 55 years-old, as the reference group, the recommended age beginning screening was approximately 47 years-old for the top 5% risk group and 55 years-old for those in the lower 60% risk group. The recommended interscreening interval has been shortened for individuals in the high risk group. The increased availability of genomic information allows the proposed multistate model to be more discriminating with respect to risk stratification and the suggested screening policy, particularly for the lowest risk groups-. -- A multi-state genetic variant-based model was developed for further application to population risk stratification to optimize the interscreening interval and the age at which to begin screening for PSA. A small sub-group of the population is likely to benefit from more intensive screening with early start and short interval, while half of the population is unlikely to benefit from such protocol (compared with four-year interval after age 55 years). © 2015 Wiley

  11. A Natural Genetic Variant of Granzyme B Confers Lethality to a Common Viral Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Andoniou, Christopher E.; Sutton, Vivien R.; Wikstrom, Matthew E.; Fleming, Peter; Thia, Kevin Y. T.; Matthews, Antony Y.; Kaiserman, Dion; Schuster, Iona S.; Coudert, Jerome D.; Eldi, Preethi; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran; Bird, Phillip I.; Trapani, Joseph A.; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A.

    2014-01-01

    Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB) gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we desc...

  12. LongevityMap: a database of human genetic variants associated with longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budovsky, Arie; Craig, Thomas; Wang, Jingwei; Tacutu, Robi; Csordas, Attila; Lourenço, Joana; Fraifeld, Vadim E; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2013-10-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of human longevity remains a challenge but could lead to life-extending interventions and better treatments for age-related diseases. Toward this end we developed the LongevityMap (http://genomics.senescence.info/longevity/), the first database of genes, loci, and variants studied in the context of human longevity and healthy ageing. We describe here its content and interface, and discuss how it can help to unravel the genetics of human longevity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Assessing Genetic Variants of Uncertain Significance: The Example of Lynch Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, is used as an example. This challenge is addressed by illustrating the importance of combining genetic and functional data in future strategies to assess VUS. The proposed strategies combine clinical genetic, analytical, functional and in silico approaches....... variants of uncertain significance (VUS). This leads to anxiety in carriers and noncarrying relatives alike, as well as to an unnecessary burden to preventive healthcare. The establishment of procedures that enable the diagnostic assessment of VUSs in individuals are discussed and hereditary colorectal...

  14. Genetic Variants in Epigenetic Pathways and Risks of Multiple Cancers in the GAME-ON Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Reka; Scherer, Dominique; Kelemen, Linda E; Risch, Angela; Hazra, Aditi; Balavarca, Yesilda; Issa, Jean-Pierre J; Moreno, Victor; Eeles, Rosalind A; Ogino, Shuji; Wu, Xifeng; Ye, Yuanqing; Hung, Rayjean J; Goode, Ellen L; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2017-06-01

    Background: Epigenetic disturbances are crucial in cancer initiation, potentially with pleiotropic effects, and may be influenced by the genetic background. Methods: In a subsets (ASSET) meta-analytic approach, we investigated associations of genetic variants related to epigenetic mechanisms with risks of breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate carcinomas using 51,724 cases and 52,001 controls. False discovery rate-corrected P values (q values epigenetic function, and cancer etiology. Impact: This approach provides novel insight into possible pleiotropic effects of genes involved in epigenetic processes. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(6); 816-25. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Identification and annotation of genetic variants (SNP/Indel) in Danish Jutland cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh; Panitz, Frank; Holm, Lars-Erik

    We sequenced the whole-genome of a Danish Jutland bull to identify genetic variants (SNP/indel). Using UnifiedGenotyper from the Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), we identified 6,812,198 SNPs and 804,453 indels. There were 2,598,000 (38.1%) novel SNPs and 607,923(75.6%) novel indels while the remai......,122 indels in coding sequences, 832 predicted to cause frame shift, 89 predicted to be inframe insertion and 115 to be inframe deletion. We detected a higher level of genetic variation in the Jutland bull compared to similar data from Holstein cattle......We sequenced the whole-genome of a Danish Jutland bull to identify genetic variants (SNP/indel). Using UnifiedGenotyper from the Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK), we identified 6,812,198 SNPs and 804,453 indels. There were 2,598,000 (38.1%) novel SNPs and 607,923(75.6%) novel indels while...... the remaining was annotated in dbSNP build 133. In-depth annotation of the variants revealed that 45,776 SNPs affected the coding sequences of 11,538 genes, 221 SNPs predicted to cause a premature stop codon, 17 to cause a gain in coding sequence and 20,828 predicted to be non-synonymous. We identified 1...

  16. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and non-genetic risk factors in Hispanic women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C.; John, Esther M.; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M.; Wolff, Roger K.; Baumgartner, Kathy B.; Giuliano, Anna R.; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J.; Slattery, Martha L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. Methods We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. Results We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele odds ratio (OR): 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.74–1.20), 1.20 (0.94–1.53) and 1.49 (1.28–1.75) for current, former and never hormone therapy users, respectively, P-interaction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72–1.42), 1.19 (0.98–1.45) and 1.69 (1.26–2.26) for never, 12 months breastfeeding, respectively, P-interaction 0.014]. Conclusions The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. Impact These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and non-genetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. PMID:26364163

  17. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Mathematics Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Gu, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Yuxi; Ge, Zeng; Wang, Bin; Siok, Wai Ting; Wang, Guoqing; Huen, Michael; Jiang, Yuyang; Tan, Li-Hai; Sun, Yimin

    2017-02-03

    Mathematics ability is a complex cognitive trait with polygenic heritability. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been an effective approach to investigate genetic components underlying mathematic ability. Although previous studies reported several candidate genetic variants, none of them exceeded genome-wide significant threshold in general populations. Herein, we performed GWAS in Chinese elementary school students to identify potential genetic variants associated with mathematics ability. The discovery stage included 494 and 504 individuals from two independent cohorts respectively. The replication stage included another cohort of 599 individuals. In total, 28 of 81 candidate SNPs that met validation criteria were further replicated. Combined meta-analysis of three cohorts identified four SNPs (rs1012694, rs11743006, rs17778739 and rs17777541) of SPOCK1 gene showing association with mathematics ability (minimum p value 5.67 × 10 -10 , maximum β -2.43). The SPOCK1 gene is located on chromosome 5q31.2 and encodes a highly conserved glycoprotein testican-1 which was associated with tumor progression and prognosis as well as neurogenesis. This is the first study to report genome-wide significant association of individual SNPs with mathematics ability in general populations. Our preliminary results further supported the role of SPOCK1 during neurodevelopment. The genetic complexities underlying mathematics ability might contribute to explain the basis of human cognition and intelligence at genetic level.

  18. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on common genetic variants in women of East Asian ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Wanqing; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Guo, Xingyi; Cai, Qiuyin; Long, Jirong; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Wang, Qin; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Ying; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Brennan, Paul; Chen, Shou-Tung; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Hartman, Mikael; Ito, Hidemi; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Matsuo, Keitaro; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Teo, Soo H; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Wu, Anna H; Yip, Cheng Har; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Kang, Daehee; Xiang, Yongbing; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-12-08

    Approximately 100 common breast cancer susceptibility alleles have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The utility of these variants in breast cancer risk prediction models has not been evaluated adequately in women of Asian ancestry. We evaluated 88 breast cancer risk variants that were identified previously by GWAS in 11,760 cases and 11,612 controls of Asian ancestry. SNPs confirmed to be associated with breast cancer risk in Asian women were used to construct a polygenic risk score (PRS). The relative and absolute risks of breast cancer by the PRS percentiles were estimated based on the PRS distribution, and were used to stratify women into different levels of breast cancer risk. We confirmed significant associations with breast cancer risk for SNPs in 44 of the 78 previously reported loci at P women in the middle quintile of the PRS, women in the top 1% group had a 2.70-fold elevated risk of breast cancer (95% CI: 2.15-3.40). The risk prediction model with the PRS had an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.606. The lifetime risk of breast cancer for Shanghai Chinese women in the lowest and highest 1% of the PRS was 1.35% and 10.06%, respectively. Approximately one-half of GWAS-identified breast cancer risk variants can be directly replicated in East Asian women. Collectively, common genetic variants are important predictors for breast cancer risk. Using common genetic variants for breast cancer could help identify women at high risk of breast cancer.

  19. Genetic architecture and balancing selection: the life and death of differentiated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaurens, Violaine; Whibley, Annabel; Joron, Mathieu

    2017-05-01

    Balancing selection describes any form of natural selection, which results in the persistence of multiple variants of a trait at intermediate frequencies within populations. By offering up a snapshot of multiple co-occurring functional variants and their interactions, systems under balancing selection can reveal the evolutionary mechanisms favouring the emergence and persistence of adaptive variation in natural populations. We here focus on the mechanisms by which several functional variants for a given trait can arise, a process typically requiring multiple epistatic mutations. We highlight how balancing selection can favour specific features in the genetic architecture and review the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms shaping this architecture. First, balancing selection affects the number of loci underlying differentiated traits and their respective effects. Control by one or few loci favours the persistence of differentiated functional variants by limiting intergenic recombination, or its impact, and may sometimes lead to the evolution of supergenes. Chromosomal rearrangements, particularly inversions, preventing adaptive combinations from being dissociated are increasingly being noted as features of such systems. Similarly, due to the frequency of heterozygotes maintained by balancing selection, dominance may be a key property of adaptive variants. High heterozygosity and limited recombination also influence associated genetic load, as linked recessive deleterious mutations may be sheltered. The capture of deleterious elements in a locus under balancing selection may reinforce polymorphism by further promoting heterozygotes. Finally, according to recent genomewide scans, balanced polymorphism might be more pervasive than generally thought. We stress the need for both functional and ecological studies to characterize the evolutionary mechanisms operating in these systems. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Exploring genetic variants predisposing to diabetes mellitus and their association with indicators of socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Börge; Dragano, Nico; Scherag, André; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Hoffmann, Per; Nöthen, Markus M; Erbel, Raimund; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Moebus, Susanne

    2014-06-16

    The relevance of disease-related genetic variants for the explanation of social inequalities in complex diseases is unclear and empirical analyses are largely missing. The aim of our study was to examine whether genetic variants predisposing to diabetes mellitus are associated with socioeconomic status in a population-based cohort. We genotyped 11 selected diabetes-related single nucleotide polymorphisms in 4655 participants (age 45-75 years) of the Heinz Nixdorf Recall study. Diabetes status was self-reported or defined by blood glucose levels. Education, income and paternal occupation were assessed as indicators of socioeconomic status. Multiple regression analyses were used to examine the association of socioeconomic status and diabetes by estimating sex-specific and age-adjusted prevalence ratios and their corresponding 95%-confidence intervals. To explore the relationship between individual single nucleotide polymorphisms and socioeconomic status sex- and age-adjusted odds ratios were computed. We adjusted the alpha-level for multiple testing of 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms using Bonferroni's method (α(BF) ~ 0.005). In addition, we explored the association of a genetic risk score with socioeconomic status. Social inequalities in diabetes were observed for all indicators of socioeconomic status. However, there were no significant associations between individual diabetes-related risk alleles and socioeconomic status with odds ratios ranging from 0.87 to 1.23. Similarly, the genetic risk score analysis revealed no evidence for an association. Our data provide no evidence for an association between 11 diabetes-related risk alleles and different indicators of socioeconomic status in a population-based cohort, suggesting that the explored genetic variants do not contribute to health inequalities in diabetes.

  1. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Ellen M.; Nato, Alejandro Q.; Matsushita, Mark M.; Chapman, Kathy L.; Stanaway, Ian B.; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B.; Raskind, Wendy H.

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS. PMID:27120335

  2. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beate Peter

    Full Text Available Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1 on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS.

  3. Genetic Candidate Variants in Two Multigenerational Families with Childhood Apraxia of Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Beate; Wijsman, Ellen M; Nato, Alejandro Q; Matsushita, Mark M; Chapman, Kathy L; Stanaway, Ian B; Wolff, John; Oda, Kaori; Gabo, Virginia B; Raskind, Wendy H

    2016-01-01

    Childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) is a severe and socially debilitating form of speech sound disorder with suspected genetic involvement, but the genetic etiology is not yet well understood. Very few known or putative causal genes have been identified to date, e.g., FOXP2 and BCL11A. Building a knowledge base of the genetic etiology of CAS will make it possible to identify infants at genetic risk and motivate the development of effective very early intervention programs. We investigated the genetic etiology of CAS in two large multigenerational families with familial CAS. Complementary genomic methods included Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis, copy-number analysis, identity-by-descent sharing, and exome sequencing with variant filtering. No overlaps in regions with positive evidence of linkage between the two families were found. In one family, linkage analysis detected two chromosomal regions of interest, 5p15.1-p14.1, and 17p13.1-q11.1, inherited separately from the two founders. Single-point linkage analysis of selected variants identified CDH18 as a primary gene of interest and additionally, MYO10, NIPBL, GLP2R, NCOR1, FLCN, SMCR8, NEK8, and ANKRD12, possibly with additive effects. Linkage analysis in the second family detected five regions with LOD scores approaching the highest values possible in the family. A gene of interest was C4orf21 (ZGRF1) on 4q25-q28.2. Evidence for previously described causal copy-number variations and validated or suspected genes was not found. Results are consistent with a heterogeneous CAS etiology, as is expected in many neurogenic disorders. Future studies will investigate genome variants in these and other families with CAS.

  4. Novel Variants in Individuals with RYR1-Related Congenital Myopathies: Genetic, Laboratory, and Clinical Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Todd

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The ryanodine receptor 1-related congenital myopathies (RYR1-RM comprise a spectrum of slow, rare neuromuscular diseases. Affected individuals present with a mild-to-severe symptomatology ranging from proximal muscle weakness, hypotonia and joint contractures to scoliosis, ophthalmoplegia, and respiratory involvement. Although there is currently no FDA-approved treatment for RYR1-RM, our group recently conducted the first clinical trial in this patient population (NCT02362425. This study aimed to characterize novel RYR1 variants with regard to genetic, laboratory, muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and clinical findings. Genetic and histopathology reports were obtained from participant’s medical records. Alamut Visual Software was used to determine if participant’s variants had been previously reported and to assess predicted pathogenicity. Physical exams, pulmonary function tests, T1-weighted muscle MRI scans, and blood measures were completed during the abovementioned clinical trial. Six novel variants (two de novo, three dominant, and one recessive were identified in individuals with RYR1-RM. Consistent with established RYR1-RM histopathology, cores were observed in all biopsies, except Case 6 who exhibited fiber-type disproportion. Muscle atrophy and impaired mobility with Trendelenburg gait were the most common clinical symptoms and were identified in all cases. Muscle MRI revealed substantial inter-individual variation in fatty infiltration corroborating the heterogeneity of the disease. Two individuals with dominant RYR1 variants exhibited respiratory insufficiency: a clinical symptom more commonly associated with recessive RYR1-RM cases. This study demonstrates that a genetics-led approach is suitable for the diagnosis of suspected RYR1-RM which can be corroborated through histopathology, muscle MRI and clinical examination.

  5. Spectrum of genetic variants of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in a German single center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel, Cornelia; Sadowski, Carolin Eva; Kohlstedt, Daniela; Keller, Katja; Stäritz, Franziska; Grübling, Nannette; Becker, Kerstin; Mackenroth, Luisa; Rump, Andreas; Schröck, Evelin; Arnold, Norbert; Wimberger, Pauline; Kast, Karin

    2017-05-01

    Determination of mutation status of BRCA1 and BRCA2 has become part of the clinical routine. However, the spectrum of genetic variants differs between populations. The aim of this study was to deliver a comprehensive description of all detected variants. In families fulfilling one of the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer (GC-HBOC) criteria for genetic testing, one affected was chosen for analysis. DNA of blood lymphocytes was amplified by PCR and prescreened by DHPLC. Aberrant fragments were sequenced. All coding exons and splice sites of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were analyzed. Screening for large rearrangements in both genes was performed by MLPA. Of 523 index patients, 121 (23.1%) were found to carry a pathogenic or likely pathogenic (class 4/5) mutation. A variant of unknown significance (VUS) was detected in 73/523 patients (13.9%). Two mutations p.Gln1756Profs*74 and p.Cys61Gly comprised 42.3% (n = 33/78) of all detected pathogenic mutations in BRCA1. Most of the other mutations were unique mutations. The most frequently detected mutation in BRCA2 was p.Val1283Lys (13.9%; n = 6/43). Altogether, 101 different neutral genetic variants were counted in BRCA1 (n = 35) and in BRCA2 (n = 66). The two most frequently detected mutations are founder mutations in Poland and Czech Republic. More similarities seem to be shared with our direct neighbor countries compared to other European countries. For comparison of the extended genotype, a shared database is needed.

  6. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, B.M.L. (Bart M.L.); Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel; Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Linnér, R.K. (Richard Karlsson); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A); Derringer, J.; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J.; Liu, J.Z. (Jimmy Z); Vlaming, Ronald; SAhluwalia, T. (Tarunveer)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVery few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associ...

  7. Genetic purgatory and the cardiac channelopathies: Exposing the variants of uncertain/unknown significance issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Merriam-Webster's online dictionary defines purgatory as "an intermediate state after death for expiatory purification" or more specifically as "a place or state of punishment wherein according to Roman Catholic doctrine the souls of those who die in God׳s grace may make satisfaction for past sins and so become fit for heaven." Alternatively, it is defined as "a place or state of temporary suffering or misery." Either way, purgatory is a place where you are stuck, and you don't want to be stuck there. It is in this context that the term genetic purgatory is introduced. Genetic purgatory is a place where the genetic test-ordering physician and patients and their families are stuck when a variant of uncertain/unknown significance (VUS) has been elucidated. It is in this dark place where suffering and misery are occurring because of unenlightened handling of a VUS, which includes using the VUS for predictive genetic testing and making radical treatment recommendations based on the presence or absence of a so-called maybe mutation. Before one can escape from this miserable place, one must first recognize that one is stuck there. Hence, the purpose of this review article is to fully expose the VUS issue as it relates to the cardiac channelopathies and make the cardiologists/geneticists/genetic counselors who order such genetic tests believers in genetic purgatory. Only then can one meaningfully attempt to get out of that place and seek to promote a VUS to disease-causative mutation status or demote it to an utterly innocuous and irrelevant variant. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  9. Association study of functional genetic variants of innate immunity related genes in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggest that the innate immune system is implicated in the early events of celiac disease (CD pathogenesis. In this work for the first time we have assessed the relevance of different proinflammatory mediators typically related to innate immunity in CD predisposition. Methods We performed a familial study in which 105 celiac families characterized by the presence of an affected child with CD were genotyped for functional polymorphisms located at regulatory regions of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes. Familial data was analysed with a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT that revealed no statistically significant differences in the transmission pattern of the different genetic markers considered. Results The TDT analysis for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, and MCP-1 genes genetic variants did not reveal biased transmission to the affected offspring. Only a borderline association of RANTES promoter genetic variants with CD predisposition was observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that the analysed polymorphisms of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes do not seem to play a major role in CD genetic predisposition in our population.

  10. Impact of Genetic Variants on the Individual Potential for Body Fat Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soyeon Cha

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The past decade has witnessed the discovery of obesity-related genetic variants and their functions through genome-wide association studies. Combinations of risk alleles can influence obesity phenotypes with different degrees of effectiveness across various individuals by interacting with environmental factors. We examined the interaction between genetic variation and changes in dietary habits or exercise that influences body fat loss from a large Korean cohort (n = 8840. Out of 673 obesity-related SNPs, a total of 100 SNPs (37 for carbohydrate intake; 19 for fat intake; 44 for total calories intake; 25 for exercise onset identified to have gene-environment interaction effect in generalized linear model were used to calculate genetic risk scores (GRS. Based on the GRS distribution, we divided the population into four levels, namely, “very insensitive”, “insensitive”, “sensitive”, and “very sensitive” for each of the four categories, “carbohydrate intake”, “fat intake”, “total calories intake”, and “exercise”. Overall, the mean body fat loss became larger when the sensitivity level was increased. In conclusion, genetic variants influence the effectiveness of dietary regimes for body fat loss. Based on our findings, we suggest a platform for personalized body fat management by providing the most suitable and effective nutrition or activity plan specific to an individual.

  11. Genetic polymorphisms of pharmacogenomic VIP variants in the Yi population from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mengdan; Li, Dianzhen; Zhao, Guige; Li, Jing; Niu, Fanglin; Li, Bin; Chen, Peng; Jin, Tianbo

    2018-03-30

    Drug response and target therapeutic dosage are different among individuals. The variability is largely genetically determined. With the development of pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, widespread research have provided us a wealth of information on drug-related genetic polymorphisms, and the very important pharmacogenetic (VIP) variants have been identified for the major populations around the world whereas less is known regarding minorities in China, including the Yi ethnic group. Our research aims to screen the potential genetic variants in Yi population on pharmacogenomics and provide a theoretical basis for future medication guidance. In the present study, 80 VIP variants (selected from the PharmGKB database) were genotyped in 100 unrelated and healthy Yi adults recruited for our research. Through statistical analysis, we made a comparison between the Yi and other 11 populations listed in the HapMap database for significant SNPs detection. Two specific SNPs were subsequently enrolled in an observation on global allele distribution with the frequencies downloaded from ALlele FREquency Database. Moreover, F-statistics (Fst), genetic structure and phylogenetic tree analyses were conducted for determination of genetic similarity between the 12 ethnic groups. Using the χ2 tests, rs1128503 (ABCB1), rs7294 (VKORC1), rs9934438 (VKORC1), rs1540339 (VDR) and rs689466 (PTGS2) were identified as the significantly different loci for further analysis. The global allele distribution revealed that the allele "A" of rs1540339 and rs9934438 were more frequent in Yi people, which was consistent with the most populations in East Asia. F-statistics (Fst), genetic structure and phylogenetic tree analyses demonstrated that the Yi and CHD shared a closest relationship on their genetic backgrounds. Additionally, Yi was considered similar to the Han people from Shaanxi province among the domestic ethnic populations in China. Our results demonstrated significant differences on

  12. Genetic Variants in the FADS Gene: Implications for Dietary Recommendations for Fatty Acid Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Rasika A; Pani, Vrindarani; Chilton, Floyd H

    2014-06-01

    Unequivocally, genetic variants within the fatty acid desaturase ( FADS ) cluster are determinants of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC-PUFA) levels in circulation, cells and tissues. A recent series of papers have addressed these associations in the context of ancestry; evidence clearly supports that the associations are robust to ethnicity. However ∼80% of African Americans carry two copies of the alleles associated with increased levels of arachidonic acid, compared to only ∼45% of European Americans raising important questions of whether gene-PUFA interactions induced by a modern western diet are differentially driving the risk of diseases of inflammation in diverse populations, and are these interactions leading to health disparities. We highlight an important aspect thus far missing in the debate regarding dietary recommendations; we content that current evidence from genetics strongly suggest that an individual's, or at the very least the population from which an individual is sampled, genetic architecture must be factored into dietary recommendations currently in place.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of Statin-Induced Myopathy: A Focused Review of the Clinical Translation of Pharmacokinetic Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talameh, Jasmine A; Kitzmiller, Joseph P

    2014-04-23

    Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the United States and are extremely effective in reducing major cardiovascular events in the millions of Americans with hyperlipidemia. However, many patients (up to 25%) cannot tolerate or discontinue statin therapy due to statin-induced myopathy (SIM). Patients will continue to experience SIM at unacceptably high rates or experience unnecessary cardiovascular events (as a result of discontinuing or decreasing their statin therapy) until strategies for predicting or mitigating SIM are identified. A promising strategy for predicting or mitigating SIM is pharmacogenetic testing, particularly of pharmacokinetic genetic variants as SIM is related to statin exposure. Data is emerging on the association between pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM. A current, critical evaluation of the literature on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and SIM for potential translation to clinical practice is lacking. This review focuses specifically on pharmacokinetic genetic variants and their association with SIM clinical outcomes. We also discuss future directions, specific to the research on pharmacokinetic genetic variants, which could speed the translation into clinical practice. For simvastatin, we did not find sufficient evidence to support the clinical translation of pharmacokinetic genetic variants other than SLCO1B1 . However, SLCO1B1 may also be clinically relevant for pravastatin- and pitavastatin-induced myopathy, but additional studies assessing SIM clinical outcome are needed. CYP2D6*4 may be clinically relevant for atorvastatin-induced myopathy, but mechanistic studies are needed. Future research efforts need to incorporate statin-specific analyses, multi-variant analyses, and a standard definition of SIM. As the use of statins is extremely common and SIM continues to occur in a significant number of patients, future research investments in pharmacokinetic genetic variants have the potential to make a profound impact on

  14. Interaction between common breast cancer susceptibility variants, genetic ancestry, and nongenetic risk factors in Hispanic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejía, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger K; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna R; Ziv, Elad; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Slattery, Martha L

    2015-11-01

    Most genetic variants associated with breast cancer risk have been discovered in women of European ancestry, and only a few genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted in minority groups. This research disparity persists in post-GWAS gene-environment interaction analyses. We tested the interaction between hormonal and lifestyle risk factors for breast cancer, and ten GWAS-identified SNPs among 2,107 Hispanic women with breast cancer and 2,587 unaffected controls, to gain insight into a previously reported gene by ancestry interaction in this population. We estimated genetic ancestry with a set of 104 ancestry-informative markers selected to discriminate between Indigenous American and European ancestry. We used logistic regression models to evaluate main effects and interactions. We found that the rs13387042-2q35(G/A) SNP was associated with breast cancer risk only among postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy [per A allele OR: 0.94 (95% confidence intervals, 0.74-1.20), 1.20 (0.94-1.53), and 1.49 (1.28-1.75) for current, former, and never hormone therapy users, respectively, Pinteraction 0.002] and premenopausal women who breastfed >12 months [OR: 1.01 (0.72-1.42), 1.19 (0.98-1.45), and 1.69 (1.26-2.26) for never, 12 months breastfeeding, respectively, Pinteraction 0.014]. The correlation between genetic ancestry, hormone replacement therapy use, and breastfeeding behavior partially explained a previously reported interaction between a breast cancer risk variant and genetic ancestry in Hispanic women. These results highlight the importance of understanding the interplay between genetic ancestry, genetics, and nongenetic risk factors and their contribution to breast cancer risk. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. DIXDC1 Phosphorylation and Control of Dendritic Morphology Are Impaired by Rare Genetic Variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickie Kwan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of neural connectivity is essential for brain function, and disruption of this process is associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. DIX domain containing 1 (DIXDC1 has previously been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, but its role in postnatal brain function remains unknown. Using a knockout mouse model, we determined that DIXDC1 is a regulator of excitatory neuron dendrite development and synapse function in the cortex. We discovered that MARK1, previously linked to ASDs, phosphorylates DIXDC1 to regulate dendrite and spine development through modulation of the cytoskeletal network in an isoform-specific manner. Finally, rare missense variants in DIXDC1 were identified in ASD patient cohorts via genetic sequencing. Interestingly, the variants inhibit DIXDC1 isoform 1 phosphorylation, causing impairment to dendrite and spine growth. These data reveal that DIXDC1 is a regulator of cortical dendrite and synaptic development and provide mechanistic insight into morphological defects associated with neurodevelopmental disorders.

  16. Association of breast cancer risk with genetic variants showing differential allelic expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamdi, Yosr; Soucy, Penny; Adoue, Véronique

    2016-01-01

    There are significant inter-individual differences in the levels of gene expression. Through modulation of gene expression, cis-acting variants represent an important source of phenotypic variation. Consequently, cis-regulatory SNPs associated with differential allelic expression are functional....../or mechanisms. Thereafter, using data from a genome-wide map of allelic expression associated SNPs, 313 genetic variants were selected and their association with breast cancer risk was then evaluated in 46,451 breast cancer cases and 42,599 controls of European ancestry ascertained from 41 studies participating...... in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. The associations were evaluated with overall breast cancer risk and with estrogen receptor negative and positive disease. One novel breast cancer susceptibility locus on 4q21 (rs11099601) was identified (OR = 1.05, P = 5.6x10-6). rs11099601 lies in a 135 kb linkage...

  17. Systematic evaluation of genes and genetic variants associated with type 1 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ram, Ramesh; Mehta, Munish; Nguyen, Tri Quang

    2016-01-01

    levels of genes in four different cell types: EBV-transformed B cell lines (resting and 6 h PMA stimulated) and purified CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We mapped cis-acting expression quantitative trait loci and found 24 non-HLA loci that affected the expression of 31 transcripts significantly in at least one......Genome-wide association studies have found >60 loci that confer genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Many of these are defined only by anonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms: the underlying causative genes, as well as the molecular bases by which they mediate susceptibility......, are not known. Identification of how these variants affect the complex mechanisms contributing to the loss of tolerance is a challenge. In this study, we performed systematic analyses to characterize these variants. First, all known genes in strong linkage disequilibrium (r2 > 0.8) with the reported single...

  18. High prevalence of genetic variants previously associated with Brugada syndrome in new exome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard, B; Jabbari, R; Refsgaard, L

    2013-01-01

    to a surprisingly high genotype prevalence of 1:23 (274:6258). Genotyping the four common ESP-derived variants CACNA2D1 S709N, SCN5A F2004L, CACNB2 S143F, and CACNB2 T450I in the Danish controls, we found a genotype prevalence comparable with that found in ESP. We suggest that exome data are used in research......More than 300 variants in 12 genes have been associated with Brugada syndrome (BrS) which has a prevalence ranging between 1:2000 and 1:100,000. Until recently, there has been little knowledge regarding the distribution of genetic variations in the general population. This problem was partly solved...

  19. Genetic variants alter T-bet binding and gene expression in mucosal inflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Soderquest

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The polarization of CD4+ T cells into distinct T helper cell lineages is essential for protective immunity against infection, but aberrant T cell polarization can cause autoimmunity. The transcription factor T-bet (TBX21 specifies the Th1 lineage and represses alternative T cell fates. Genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that may be causative for autoimmune diseases. The majority of these polymorphisms are located within non-coding distal regulatory elements. It is considered that these genetic variants contribute to disease by altering the binding of regulatory proteins and thus gene expression, but whether these variants alter the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors has not been determined. Here, we show that SNPs associated with the mucosal inflammatory diseases Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis (UC and celiac disease, but not rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis, are enriched at T-bet binding sites. Furthermore, we identify disease-associated variants that alter T-bet binding in vitro and in vivo. ChIP-seq for T-bet in individuals heterozygous for the celiac disease-associated SNPs rs1465321 and rs2058622 and the IBD-associated SNPs rs1551398 and rs1551399, reveals decreased binding to the minor disease-associated alleles. Furthermore, we show that rs1465321 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL for the neighboring gene IL18RAP, with decreased T-bet binding associated with decreased expression of this gene. These results suggest that genetic polymorphisms may predispose individuals to mucosal autoimmune disease through alterations in T-bet binding. Other disease-associated variants may similarly act by modulating the binding of lineage-specifying transcription factors in a tissue-selective and disease-specific manner.

  20. Germline genetic variants in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway as predictors of colorectal cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Reyes, Monica E.; Lin, Moubin; He, Yonggang; Nguyen, Son V.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Background The Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway plays a key role in stem cell maintenance in the colorectum. Rare high penetrance genetic mutations in components of this pathway result in familial colorectal cancer, yet the impact of common, germline variants remains unknown. Methods We assessed 172 variants in 26 genes from the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in 809 CRC cases and 814 healthy controls, followed by replication of the top findings in another 691 cases and 775 controls. In silico informatic tools were used to predict functional effects of variants. Results Eighteen SNPs in the pathway were significantly associated with CRC risk (P <0.05) in the discovery phase. We observed a significant dose-response increase in CRC risk by number of risk genotypes carried (P = 4.19 × 10−8). Gene-based analysis implicated CSNK1D (P = 0.014), FZD3 (P = 0.023), and APC (P = 0.027) as significant for CRC risk. In the replication phase, FZD3:rs11775139 remained significantly associated with reduced risk with a pooled OR of 0.85 (95% CI: 0.76–0.94, P = 0.001). Although borderline significant in the replication population, APC:rs2545162 was highly significant in the pooled analysis - OR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.16–1.74, P =0.00085. Functional assessment identified several potential biological mechanisms underlying these associations. Conclusions Our findings suggest that common germline variants in the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway maybe involved in CRC development. Impact These variants may be informative in CRC risk assessment to identify individuals at increased risk who would be candidates for screening. PMID:26809274

  1. Association between LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotta, Luca A.; Sharp, Stephen. J; Burgess, Stephen; Perry, John R. B.; Stewart, Isobel. D; Willems, Sara M.; Luan, Jian’an; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, Jose-Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salamanca, Elena C; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Inês; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David. B; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Importance Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 or HMGCR, encoding the respective molecular targets of ezetimibe and statins, have previously been used as proxies to study the efficacy of these lipid-lowering drugs. Alleles near HMGCR are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, mimicking the increased incidence of new-onset diabetes associated with statin treatment in randomized clinical trials. It is unknown whether alleles near NPC1L1 are also associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To investigate whether LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 and other genes encoding current or prospective molecular targets of lipid-lowering therapy (i.e. HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting and Participants The associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease of LDL-lowering genetic variants were investigated in meta-analyses of genetic association studies. Meta-analyses included 50,775 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 270,269 controls including three studies and 60,801 individuals with coronary artery disease and 123,504 controls from a published meta-analysis. Data collection took place in Europe and the United States between 1991 and 2016. Exposure LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1, HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR. Main Outcomes and Measures Odds ratio of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Results LDL-lowering genetic variants at NPC1L1 were inversely associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio for a genetically-predicted reduction of 1 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.88; p=0.008) and directly associated with type 2 diabetes (2.42, 1.70-3.43; p<0.001). The odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for PCSK9 genetic variants was 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.38, p=0.03). For a given reduction in LDL cholesterol, genetic variants were associated with a similar reduction in coronary artery

  2. Heritability estimates of the Big Five personality traits based on common genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, R A; Pluess, M

    2015-07-14

    According to twin studies, the Big Five personality traits have substantial heritable components explaining 40-60% of the variance, but identification of associated genetic variants has remained elusive. Consequently, knowledge regarding the molecular genetic architecture of personality and to what extent it is shared across the different personality traits is limited. Using genomic-relatedness-matrix residual maximum likelihood analysis (GREML), we here estimated the heritability of the Big Five personality factors (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism and openness for experience) in a sample of 5011 European adults from 527,469 single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the genome. We tested for the heritability of each personality trait, as well as for the genetic overlap between the personality factors. We found significant and substantial heritability estimates for neuroticism (15%, s.e. = 0.08, P = 0.04) and openness (21%, s.e. = 0.08, P Big Five personality traits using the GREML approach. Findings should be considered exploratory and suggest that detectable heritability estimates based on common variants is shared between neuroticism and openness to experiences.

  3. TPMT genetic variants are associated with increased rejection with azathioprine use in heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jackson J; Geske, Jennifer R; Boilson, Barry A; Frantz, Robert P; Edwards, Brooks S; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Kremers, Walter K; Weinshilboum, Richard M; Pereira, Naveen L

    2013-12-01

    Azathioprine (AZA) is an important immunosuppressant drug used in heart transplantation (HTX). Consensus guidelines recommend that patients with thiopurine S-methyltransferase (TPMT) genetic variants be started on lower AZA dose because of higher active metabolite levels and risk of adverse events. However, in-vitro lymphocyte proliferation assays performed in participants with inactive TPMT alleles have suggested that AZA use may result in decreased immunosuppressant efficacy as compared with wild-type (WT) individuals. The objective of this study was therefore to determine the effect of TPMT genetic variation on AZA efficacy or prevention of rejection in HTX recipients treated with AZA. We genotyped 93 HTX recipients treated with AZA and measured erythrocyte TPMT enzyme activity. Acute rejection was monitored by routine endomyocardial biopsies. There were 83 WT and 10 heterozygote (HZ) HTX recipients. TPMT activity level was lower in HZ compared with WT (13.1±2.8 vs. 21±4.5 U/ml red blood cell, Prejection earlier (Prejection score was higher (P=0.02) than WT. AZA was discontinued more frequently in HZ (P=0.01) because of rejection. The incidence of leukopenia was similar between the groups (40 vs. 43%, P=1.0). HTX recipients with TPMT genetic variant alleles who are treated with AZA develop acute rejection earlier, more frequently, and of greater severity. These patients, despite having lower TPMT enzymatic activity, should be monitored carefully for possible increased risk of acute rejection.

  4. FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index: insights from 177,330 individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Downer, Mary K; Tanaka, Toshiko; Smith, Caren E; Sluijs, Ivonne; Sonestedt, Emily; Chu, Audrey Y; Renström, Frida; Lin, Xiaochen; Ängquist, Lars H; Huang, Jinyan; Liu, Zhonghua; Li, Yanping; Asif Ali, Muhammad; Xu, Min; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Boer, Jolanda M A; Chen, Peng; Daimon, Makoto; Eriksson, Johan; Perola, Markus; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Heppe, Denise H M; Holloway, John W; Houston, Denise K; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Yu-Mi; Laaksonen, Maarit A; Jääskeläinen, Tiina; Lee, Nanette R; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Lu, Wei; Luben, Robert N; Manichaikul, Ani; Männistö, Satu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Monda, Keri L; Ngwa, Julius S; Perusse, Louis; van Rooij, Frank J A; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Wen, Wanqing; Wojczynski, Mary K; Zhu, Jingwen; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bouchard, Claude; Cai, Qiuyin; Cooper, Cyrus; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita G; Hansen, Torben; Christiansen, Lene; Hofman, Albert; Johansson, Ingegerd; Jørgensen, Torben; Karasawa, Shigeru; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kristiansson, Kati; Li, Huaixing; Lin, Xu; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt K; Long, Jirong; Mikkilä, Vera; Mozaffarian, Dariush; North, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Raitakari, Olli; Rissanen, Harri; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Uitterlinden, André G; Zillikens, M Carola; Franco, Oscar H; Shyong Tai, E; Ou Shu, Xiao; Siscovick, David S; Toft, Ulla; Verschuren, W M Monique; Vollenweider, Peter; Wareham, Nicholas J; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Zheng, Wei; Ridker, Paul M; Kang, Jae H; Liang, Liming; Jensen, Majken K; Curhan, Gary C; Pasquale, Louis R; Hunter, David J; Mohlke, Karen L; Uusitupa, Matti; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rankinen, Tuomo; Orho-Melander, Marju; Wang, Tao; Chasman, Daniel I; Franks, Paul W; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Hu, Frank B; Loos, Ruth J F; Nettleton, Jennifer A; Qi, Lu

    2014-12-20

    FTO is the strongest known genetic susceptibility locus for obesity. Experimental studies in animals suggest the potential roles of FTO in regulating food intake. The interactive relation among FTO variants, dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) is complex and results from previous often small-scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177,330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m(2), P = 1.9 × 10(-105)), and all participants (0.30 [0.30, 0.35] kg/m(2), P = 3.6 × 10(-107)). The BMI-increasing allele of the FTO variant showed a significant association with higher dietary protein intake (effect per allele = 0.08 [0.06, 0.10] %, P = 2.4 × 10(-16)), and relative weak associations with lower total energy intake (-6.4 [-10.1, -2.6] kcal/day, P = 0.001) and lower dietary carbohydrate intake (-0.07 [-0.11, -0.02] %, P = 0.004). The associations with protein (P = 7.5 × 10(-9)) and total energy (P = 0.002) were attenuated but remained significant after adjustment for BMI. We did not find significant interactions between the FTO variant and dietary intake of total energy, protein, carbohydrate or fat on BMI. Our findings suggest a positive association between the BMI-increasing allele of FTO variant and higher dietary protein intake and offer insight into potential link between FTO, dietary protein intake and adiposity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Detection of Clinically Relevant Genetic Variants in Autism Spectrum Disorder by Whole-Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Yuen, Ryan K.C.; Jin, Xin; Wang, Mingbang; Chen, Nong; Wu, Xueli; Ju, Jia; Mei, Junpu; Shi, Yujian; He, Mingze; Wang, Guangbiao; Liang, Jieqin; Wang, Zhe; Cao, Dandan; Carter, Melissa T.; Chrysler, Christina; Drmic, Irene E.; Howe, Jennifer L.; Lau, Lynette; Marshall, Christian R.; Merico, Daniele; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Thompson, Ann; Uddin, Mohammed; Walker, Susan; Luo, Jun; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Zwaigenbaum, Lonnie; Ring, Robert H.; Wang, Jian; Lajonchere, Clara; Wang, Jun; Shih, Andy; Szatmari, Peter; Yang, Huanming; Dawson, Geraldine; Li, Yingrui; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2013-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) demonstrates high heritability and familial clustering, yet the genetic causes remain only partially understood as a result of extensive clinical and genomic heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) shows promise as a tool for identifying ASD risk genes as well as unreported mutations in known loci, but an assessment of its full utility in an ASD group has not been performed. We used WGS to examine 32 families with ASD to detect de novo or rare inherited genetic variants predicted to be deleterious (loss-of-function and damaging missense mutations). Among ASD probands, we identified deleterious de novo mutations in six of 32 (19%) families and X-linked or autosomal inherited alterations in ten of 32 (31%) families (some had combinations of mutations). The proportion of families identified with such putative mutations was larger than has been previously reported; this yield was in part due to the comprehensive and uniform coverage afforded by WGS. Deleterious variants were found in four unrecognized, nine known, and eight candidate ASD risk genes. Examples include CAPRIN1 and AFF2 (both linked to FMR1, which is involved in fragile X syndrome), VIP (involved in social-cognitive deficits), and other genes such as SCN2A and KCNQ2 (linked to epilepsy), NRXN1, and CHD7, which causes ASD-associated CHARGE syndrome. Taken together, these results suggest that WGS and thorough bioinformatic analyses for de novo and rare inherited mutations will improve the detection of genetic variants likely to be associated with ASD or its accompanying clinical symptoms. PMID:23849776

  6. THE INFLUENCE OF GENETIC VARIANTS OF κ-CASEIN ON MILK COMPONENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Čuboň

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Milk production of 22 cows of Slovak Pied breed with Holstein-Friesian was analyzed according to the genetic variants of the polymorphic proteins determined by starch gel electrophoresis. The effect of genetic variants of the proteins was analyzed by selected properties of milk (milk yield, proteins, fats and lactose. Differences between the productive characters in testing groups were evaluated according to statistic method of t-test. Evaluation was carried out during throughout lactation. Based on the analyses we have obtained results frequency of genotypes: κ-CN AA in 9 cows (41%, AB in 12 cows (54.5% and BB in one cow, which is 4.5%. The average daily milk production of κ-CN AA was 13.5 l/day and in κ-CN AB 14.2 l/day. Contents of protein of genetic variation κ-CN AA was 3.1% in milk genotype κ-CN AB was found not significant lower protein proportion 3.0%. Based on the analyses, we can assume that cow’s nutrition higher influence the increase in the proportion of protein than polymorphism of κ-CN. In our research was found out the average fat content 4.0% in genetic variation of κ-CN AA and not significant lower in genetic variation κ-CN AB 3.8%. The average lactose content in the cow’s milk with κ-CN AA genotype was 4.9% and κ-CN AB was 5.0%. The difference between fat content wasn’t statistically significant.

  7. Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Enjalbert, Brice

    2009-04-01

    Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.

  8. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... are pathogenic, precludes targeted healthcare for both carriers and their relatives. To facilitate the identification of pathogenic VUS, we have developed an in cellulo genetic screen-based procedure for the large-scale mutagenization, identification, and cataloging of residues of MMR genes critical for MMR gene...

  9. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. METHODS: We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D suscept...

  10. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel G; Fontana, Mark Alan; Meddens, S Fleur W; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davies, Gail; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted

  11. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Okbay (Aysu); Baselmans, B.M.L. (Bart M.L.); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); P. Turley (Patrick); M. Nivard (Michel); Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Linnér, R.K. (Richard Karlsson); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A); J. Derringer; J. Gratten (Jacob); J.J. Lee (James J.); Liu, J.Z. (Jimmy Z); R. de Vlaming (Ronald); SAhluwalia, T. (Tarunveer); Buchwald, J. (Jadwiga); A. Cavadino (Alana); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis C.); Furlotte, N.A. (Nicholas A); Garfield, V. (Victoria); Geisel, M.H. (Marie Henrike); J.R. Gonzalez (Juan R.); Haitjema, S. (Saskia); R. Karlsson (Robert); Der Laan, S.W. (Sander Wvan); K.-H. Ladwig (Karl-Heinz); J. Lahti (Jari); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Liu, T. (Tian); Matteson, L. (Lindsay); E. Mihailov (Evelin); M. Miller (Mike); CMinica, C. (Camelia); MNolte, I. (Ilja); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); P.J. van der Most (Peter); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); Y. Qian (Yong); O. Raitakari (Olli); R. Rawal (R.); A. Realo; Rueedi, R. (Rico); Schmidt, B. (Börge); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); E. Stergiakouli (Evangelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); K.D. Taylor (Kent); Wedenoja, J. (Juho); Wellmann, J. (Juergen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); MWillems, S. (Sara); Zhao, W. (Wei); L.C. Study (LifeLines Cohort); N. Amin (Najaf); Bakshi, A. (Andrew); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); Cherney, S. (Samantha); Cox, S.R. (Simon R); G. Davies (Gail); O.S.P. Davis (Oliver S.); J. Ding (Jun); N. Direk (Nese); Eibich, P. (Peter); R. Emeny (Rebecca); Fatemifar, G. (Ghazaleh); J.D. Faul; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.J. Forstner (Andreas); C. Gieger (Christian); Gupta, R. (Richa); T.B. Harris (Tamara); J.M. Harris (Juliette); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P.L. de Jager (Philip); M. Kaakinen (Marika); E. Kajantie (Eero); Karhunen, V. (Ville); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M. Kumari (Meena); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Franke (Lude); Li-Gao, R. (Ruifang); Koini, M. (Marisa); A. Loukola (Anu); P. Marques-Vidal; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); M. Mosing (Miriam); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); Pulkki-R'back, L. (Laura); L. Quaye (Lydia); R'ikkönen, K. (Katri); I. Rudan (Igor); R. Scott (Rodney); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A.R. Sutin; Trzaskowski, M. (Maciej); Vinkhuyze, A.E. (Anna E.); L. Yu (Lei); D. Zabaneh (Delilah); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David A.); Berger, K. (Klaus); L. Bertram (Lars); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Snieder (Harold); Chang, S.-C. (Shun-Chiao); F. Cucca (Francesco); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K. Hagen (Knut); U. Bültmann (Ute); E.J. Geus (Eeco); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T. Hansen (T.); Hartman, C.A. (Catharine A); C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); D.A. Hinds (David A.); E. Hypponen (Elina); W.G. Iacono (William); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. JöCkel (Karl-Heinz); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); Keltikangas-J'rvinen, L. (Liisa); P. Kraft (Peter); Kubzansky, L.D. (Laura D.); Lehtim'ki, T. (Terho); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); A. Metspalu (Andres); M. Mills (Melinda); R. de Mutsert (Reneé); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); R. Plomin (Robert); O. Polasek (Ozren); C. Power (Christopher); S.S. Rich (Stephen); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); Schlessinger, D. (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Svento (Rauli); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); DSpector, T. (Tim); Steptoe, A. (Andrew); A. Terracciano; A.R. Thurik (Roy); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Vollenweider (Peter); Wagner, G.G. (Gert G.); D.R. Weir (David); J. Yang (Joanna); Conley, D.C. (Dalton C.); G.D. Smith; Hofman, A. (Albert); M. Johannesson (Magnus); D. Laibson (David); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M.N. Meyer (Michelle N.); Pickrell, J.K. (Joseph K.); Esko, T. (T'nu); R.F. Krueger; J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); M. Bartels (Meike); D. Cesarini (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVery few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data.

  12. Novel Genetic Variants of Sporadic Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) in a Chinese Population Identified by Whole-Exome Sequencing (WES).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong; Cao, Yu; Li, Yaxiong; Lei, Dongyun; Li, Lin; Hou, Zong Liu; Han, Shen; Meng, Mingyao; Shi, Jianlin; Zhang, Yayong; Wang, Yi; Niu, Zhaoyi; Xie, Yanhua; Xiao, Benshan; Wang, Yuanfei; Li, Xiao; Yang, Lirong; Wang, Wenju; Jiang, Lihong

    2018-03-05

    BACKGROUND Recently, mutations in several genes have been described to be associated with sporadic ASD, but some genetic variants remain to be identified. The aim of this study was to use whole-exome sequencing (WES) combined with bioinformatics analysis to identify novel genetic variants in cases of sporadic congenital ASD, followed by validation by Sanger sequencing. MATERIAL AND METHODS Five Han patients with secundum ASD were recruited, and their tissue samples were analyzed by WES, followed by verification by Sanger sequencing of tissue and blood samples. Further evaluation using blood samples included 452 additional patients with sporadic secundum ASD (212 male and 240 female patients) and 519 healthy subjects (252 male and 267 female subjects) for further verification by a multiplexed MassARRAY system. Bioinformatic analyses were performed to identify novel genetic variants associated with sporadic ASD. RESULTS From five patients with sporadic ASD, a total of 181,762 genomic variants in 33 exon loci, validated by Sanger sequencing, were selected and underwent MassARRAY analysis in 452 patients with ASD and 519 healthy subjects. Three loci with high mutation frequencies, the 138665410 FOXL2 gene variant, the 23862952 MYH6 gene variant, and the 71098693 HYDIN gene variant were found to be significantly associated with sporadic ASD (PASD (PASD, and supported the use of WES and bioinformatics analysis to identify disease-associated mutations.

  13. Effects of breed and casein genetic variants on protein profile in milk from Swedish Red, Danish Holstein, and Danish Jersey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Frida; Buitenhuis, Albert Johannes; Johansson, M

    2014-01-01

    , and technological properties of milk. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between casein (CN) genetic variants and detailed protein composition in Swedish and Danish dairy milk. Milk and DNA samples were collected from approximately 400 individual cows each of 3 Scandinavian dairy breeds......In selecting cows for higher milk yields and milk quality, it is important to understand how these traits are affected by the bovine genome. The major milk proteins exhibit genetic polymorphism and these genetic variants can serve as markers for milk composition, milk production traits......: Swedish Red (SR), Danish Holstein (DH), and Danish Jersey (DJ). The protein profile with relative concentrations of α-lactalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and αS1-, αS2-, κ-, and β-CN was determined for each milk sample using capillary zone electrophoresis. The genetic variants of the αS1- (CSN1S1), β- (CSN2...

  14. Genetic variants associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-associated angioedema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pare, Guillaume; Kubo, Michiaki; Byrd, James B.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Woodard-Grice, Alencia; Teo, Koon K.; Anand, Sonia S.; Zuvich, Rebecca L.; Bradford, Yuki; Ross, Stephanie; Nakamura, Yusuke; Ritchie, Marylyn; Brown, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to identify genetic variants associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor-associated angioedema. Participants and methods We carried out a genome-wide association study in 175 individuals with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema and 489 ACE inhibitor-exposed controls from Nashville (Tennessee) and Marshfield (Wisconsin). We tested for replication in 19 cases and 57 controls who participated in Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination with Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET). Results There were no genome-wide significant associations of any single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with angioedema. Sixteen SNPs in African Americans and 41 SNPs in European Americans were associated moderately with angioedema (Pangioedema in the Nashville/Marshfield sample and ONTARGET. In a candidate gene analysis, rs989692 in the gene encoding neprilysin (MME), an enzyme that degrades bradykinin and substance P, was significantly associated with angioedema in ONTARGET and Nashville/Marshfield African Americans. Conclusion Unlike other serious adverse drug effects, ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema is not associated with a variant with a large effect size. Variants in MME and genes involved in immune regulation may be associated with ACE inhibitor-associated angioedema. PMID:23838604

  15. Immunosensing during colonization by Candida albicans: does it take a village to colonize the intestine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Carol A; Pierce, Jessica V

    2011-06-01

    Candida albicans, an opportunistic fungal pathogen and a component of the normal flora of the gastrointestinal tract, is a frequent colonizer of humans. Is C. albicans capable of sensing the immune status of its host, a process we term immunosensing, and, if so, how? C. albicans causes serious disease only in immunocompromised hosts and therefore the ability to immunosense would be advantageous to an organism. We propose a speculative model whereby, during colonization, C. albicans produces phenotypic variants that vary in relative concentration depending on host status. One variant is optimized for persistence as a commensal, whereas the other variant has higher capacity to initiate pathogenic interactions. When the ratio of the two variants changes, the pathogenic potential of the population changes. The critical element of this model is that the C. albicans colonizing population is not uniform but is composed of subpopulations of phenotypic variants that are advantageous under different host conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetic burden of common variants in progressive and bout-onset multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorosina, Melissa; Brambilla, Paola; Clarelli, Ferdinando; Barizzone, Nadia; Lupoli, Sara; Guaschino, Clara; Osiceanu, Ana Maria; Moiola, Lucia; Ghezzi, Angelo; Coniglio, Gabriella; Patti, Francesco; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Manunta, Paolo; Glorioso, Nicola; Guerini, Franca R; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Perla, Franco; Martinelli, Vittorio; Cusi, Daniele; Leone, Maurizio; Comi, Giancarlo; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo

    2014-06-01

    The contribution of genetic variants underlying the susceptibility to different clinical courses of multiple sclerosis (MS) is still unclear. The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the proportion of liability explained by common SNPs and the genetic burden of MS-associated SNPs in progressive onset (PrMS) and bout-onset (BOMS) cases. We estimated the proportion of variance in disease liability explained by 296,391 autosomal SNPs in cohorts of Italian PrMS and BOMS patients using the genome-wide complex trait analysis (GCTA) tool, and we calculated a weighted genetic risk score (wGRS) based on the known MS-associated loci. Our results identified that common SNPs explain a greater proportion of phenotypic variance in BOMS (36.5%±10.1%) than PrMS (20.8%±6.0%) cases, and a trend of decrease was observed when testing primary progressive (PPMS) without brain MRI inflammatory activity (p = 7.9 × 10(-3)). Similarly, the wGRS and the variance explained by MS-associated SNPs were higher in BOMS than PPMS in males (wGRS: 6.63 vs 6.51, p = 0.04; explained variance: 4.8%±1.5% vs 1.7%±0.6%; p = 0.05). Our results suggest that the liability of disease is better captured by common genetic variants in BOMS than PrMS cases. The absence of inflammatory activity and male gender further raise the difference between clinical courses. © The Author(s) 2013.

  17. Association Analysis of Genetic Variants with Type 2 Diabetes in a Mongolian Population in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haihua Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large scale genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified approximately 80 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs conferring susceptibility to type 2 diabetes (T2D. However, most of these loci have not been replicated in diverse populations and much genetic heterogeneity has been observed across ethnic groups. We tested 28 SNPs previously found to be associated with T2D by GWAS in a Mongolian sample of Northern China (497 diagnosed with T2D and 469 controls for association with T2D and diabetes related quantitative traits. We replicated T2D association of 11 SNPs, namely, rs7578326 (IRS1, rs1531343 (HMGA2, rs8042680 (PRC1, rs7578597 (THADA, rs1333051 (CDKN2, rs6723108 (TMEM163, rs163182 and rs2237897 (KCNQ1, rs1387153 (MTNR1B, rs243021 (BCL11A, and rs10229583 (PAX4 in our sample. Further, we showed that risk allele of the strongest T2D associated SNP in our sample, rs757832 (IRS1, is associated with increased level of TG. We observed substantial difference of T2D risk allele frequency between the Mongolian sample and the 1000G Caucasian sample for a few SNPs, including rs6723108 (TMEM163 whose risk allele reaches near fixation in the Mongolian sample. Further study of genetic architecture of these variants in susceptibility of T2D is needed to understand the role of these variants in heterogeneous populations.

  18. Genetic variants in PPP2CA are associated with gastric cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongtong; He, Kexin; Mao, Yingying; Zhu, Meng; Yan, Caiwang; Yu, Fei; Qi, Qi; Wang, Tianpei; Wang, Yan; Du, Jiangbo; Liu, Li

    2017-09-13

    Protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), a tumor suppressor protein, has been implicated in cell cycle and apoptosis. Additionally, studies have illustrated its crucial roles in transformation of normal human cells to tumorigenic status. PPP2CA, which encodes the alpha isoform of the catalytic subunit of PP2A, has been recently reported to be associated with several types of cancers. Therefore, we hypothesized that genetic variants in PPP2CA might influence susceptibility of gastric cancer. To test this hypothesis, three tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in PPP2CA were genotyped in a case-control study including 1,113 cases and 1,848 controls in a Chinese population. Three tagging SNPs in PPP2CA were genotyped using Illumina Human Exome BeadChip. We observed that the A allele of rs13187105 was associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-1.28, P = 0.017). Further analyses showed that rs13187105 [A] was associated with decreased expression of PPP2CA mRNA (P = 5.1 × 10 -6 ), and PPP2CA mRNA was significantly lower in gastric tumor tissues when comparing that in their adjacent normal tissues (P = 0.037). These findings support our hypothesis that genetic variants in PPP2CA may be implicated in gastric cancer susceptibility in Chinese population.

  19. TPO genetic variants and risk of differentiated thyroid carcinoma in two European populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipollini, Monica; Pastor, Susana; Gemignani, Federica; Castell, Juan; Garritano, Sonia; Bonotti, Alessandra; Biarnés, Josefina; Figlioli, Gisella; Romei, Cristina; Marcos, Ricard; Cristaudo, Alfonso; Elisei, Rossella; Landi, Stefano; Velázquez, Antonia

    2013-12-15

    Thyroid cancer risk involves the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. The thyroperoxidase (TPO) has a key role in the iodine metabolism, being essential for the thyroid function. Mutations in the TPO gene are common in congenital hypothyroidism, and there are also signs of the implication of TPO in thyroid cancer. We performed a case-control association study of genetic variants in TPO and differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) in 1,586 DTC patients and 1,769 controls including two European populations (Italy: 1,190 DTC and 1,290 controls; Spain: 396 DTC and 479 controls). Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed separately for each population and each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). From the three studied polymorphisms, significant associations were detected between DTC and rs2048722 and rs732609 in both populations (p TPO polymorphism in the Italian and the Spanish populations. Our results, for the first time, point to TPO as a gene involved in the risk of DTC, and suggest the importance of interactions between TPO variants and other unidentified population-specific factors in determining thyroid cancer risk. Copyright © 2013 UICC.

  20. A Genetic Variant in the Distal Enhancer Region of the Human Renin Gene Affects Renin Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasukazu Makino

    Full Text Available The high heritability of plasma renin activity was confirmed in recent investigations. A variation located near the strong enhancer of the human renin gene (REN, C-5312T, has been shown to have different transcription activity levels depending on its allele: the 5312T allele shows transcription levels that are 45% greater than those of the 5312C allele. The purpose of this study was to confirm the hypothesis that variations in the enhancer region of the REN gene are involved in regulating renal expression of renin.Sixty-four subjects with biopsy-proven renal diseases were included in this study (male/female: 35/29, age 41.9 ± 20.9 years, SBP/DBP 123.1 ± 23.7/73.4 ± 14.8 mmHg, s-Cr 0.93 ± 0.63 mg/dl. A genetic variant of REN, C-5312T, was assayed by PCR-RFLP and the TaqMan method. Total RNAs from a small part of the renal cortex were reverse-transcribed and amplified for REN and GAPDH with a real-time PCR system.Logarithmically transformed expression values of the relative ratio of REN to GAPDH (10-3 were as follows (mean ± SE: CC (26 cases, 0.016 ± 0.005; CT (33 cases, 0.047 ± 0.021 (p = 0.41 vs. CC; TT (5 cases, 0.198 ± 0.194 (p = 0.011 vs. CC, p < 0.031 vs. CT. Thus, significant differences in REN expression were observed among the genetic variants.The results suggest that variants in the enhancer region of the human renin gene have an effect on the expression levels of renin in renal tissue; this observation is in good accordance with the results of the transcriptional assay.

  1. Common genetic variants in Wnt signaling pathway genes as potential prognostic biomarkers for colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Chien Ting

    Full Text Available Compelling evidence has implicated the Wnt signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. We assessed the use of tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs in adenomatous polyposis coli (APC/β-catenin (CTNNB1 genes to predict outcomes in patients with colorectal cancer. We selected and genotyped 10 tSNP to predict common variants across entire APC and CTNNB1 genes in 282 colorectal cancer patients. The associations of these tSNPs with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival were evaluated by Kaplan-Meier analysis, Cox regression model, and survival tree analysis. The 5-year overall survival rate was 68.3%. Survival tree analysis identified a higher-order genetic interaction profile consisting of the APC rs565453, CTNNB1 2293303, and APC rs1816769 that was significantly associated with overall survival. The 5-year survival overall rates were 89.2%, 66.1%, and 58.8% for the low-, medium-, and high-risk genetic profiles, respectively (log-rank P = 0.001. After adjusting for possible confounders, including age, gender, carcinoembryonic antigen levels, tumor differentiation, stage, lymphovascular invasion, perineural invasion, and lymph node involvement, the genetic interaction profile remained significant. None of the studied SNPs were individually associated with distant metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Our results suggest that the genetic interaction profile among Wnt pathway SNPs might potentially increase the prognostic value in outcome prediction for colorectal cancer.

  2. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klei Lambertus

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism spectrum disorders (ASD are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. Methods By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. Results By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Conclusions Our results, when viewed in the context

  3. Common genetic variants, acting additively, are a major source of risk for autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klei, Lambertus; Sanders, Stephan J; Murtha, Michael T; Hus, Vanessa; Lowe, Jennifer K; Willsey, A Jeremy; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Yu, Timothy W; Fombonne, Eric; Geschwind, Daniel; Grice, Dorothy E; Ledbetter, David H; Lord, Catherine; Mane, Shrikant M; Martin, Christa Lese; Martin, Donna M; Morrow, Eric M; Walsh, Christopher A; Melhem, Nadine M; Chaste, Pauline; Sutcliffe, James S; State, Matthew W; Cook, Edwin H; Roeder, Kathryn; Devlin, Bernie

    2012-10-15

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are early onset neurodevelopmental syndromes typified by impairments in reciprocal social interaction and communication, accompanied by restricted and repetitive behaviors. While rare and especially de novo genetic variation are known to affect liability, whether common genetic polymorphism plays a substantial role is an open question and the relative contribution of genes and environment is contentious. It is probable that the relative contributions of rare and common variation, as well as environment, differs between ASD families having only a single affected individual (simplex) versus multiplex families who have two or more affected individuals. By using quantitative genetics techniques and the contrast of ASD subjects to controls, we estimate what portion of liability can be explained by additive genetic effects, known as narrow-sense heritability. We evaluate relatives of ASD subjects using the same methods to evaluate the assumptions of the additive model and partition families by simplex/multiplex status to determine how heritability changes with status. By analyzing common variation throughout the genome, we show that common genetic polymorphism exerts substantial additive genetic effects on ASD liability and that simplex/multiplex family status has an impact on the identified composition of that risk. As a fraction of the total variation in liability, the estimated narrow-sense heritability exceeds 60% for ASD individuals from multiplex families and is approximately 40% for simplex families. By analyzing parents, unaffected siblings and alleles not transmitted from parents to their affected children, we conclude that the data for simplex ASD families follow the expectation for additive models closely. The data from multiplex families deviate somewhat from an additive model, possibly due to parental assortative mating. Our results, when viewed in the context of results from genome-wide association studies, demonstrate that a

  4. Genetic analysis of allelic variants, single-step mutations, three allelic variants of the 15 STR loci in the population of Northeast Bosnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžiavdić Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of nuclear DNA microsatellite markers were analyzed in a reference sample of the population of northeast Bosnia. 437 samples taken from unrelated individuals were processed and three samples of paternity proof were shown. Detection effectiveness profile of the research, points to a valid choice of method of extraction, amplification and genotyping STR loci with PowerPlextm16. Genetic analysis of allelic variants of the 15 STR loci detected 17 samples determined as microvariants. Samples were divided into 15 different allelic variants at 7 different loci, and are: in locus D7S820, D16S539, D3S1358, D18S51, PENTA D, PENTA E and in locus vWA. Genetic analysis of mutations in cases of paternity determined three examples of single-step mutations in the loci FGA, Penta D and D3S1358. Genetic analysis of observed STR loci detected three allelic variant of genotype combination 7/10/11.3 in locus D7S820 Type II.

  5. Phenome Wide Association Studies demonstrating pleiotropy of genetic variants within FTO with and without adjustment for body mass index

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    Robert Michael Cronin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phenome-wide association studies (PheWAS have demonstrated utility in validating genetic associations derived from traditional genetic studies as well as identifying novel genetic associations. Here we used an electronic health record (EHR-based PheWAS to explore pleiotropy of genetic variants in the fat mass and obesity associated gene (FTO, some of which have been previously associated with obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2D. We used a population of 10,487 individuals of European ancestry with genome-wide genotyping from the Electronic Medical Records and Genomics (eMERGE Network and another population of 13,711 individuals of European ancestry from the BioVU DNA biobank at Vanderbilt genotyped using Illumina HumanExome BeadChip. A meta-analysis of the two study populations replicated the well-described associations between FTO variants and obesity (odds ratio [OR]=1.25, 95% Confidence Interval=1.11-1.24, p=2.10 x 10 9 and FTO variants and T2D (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.08-1.21, p=2.34 x 10 6. The meta-analysis also demonstrated that FTO variant rs8050136 was significantly associated with sleep apnea (OR=1.14, 95% CI=1.07-1.22, p=3.33 x 10 5; however, the association was attenuated after adjustment for body mass index (BMI. Novel phenotype associations with obesity-associated FTO variants included fibrocystic breast disease (rs9941349, OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.74-0.91, p=5.41x10 5 and trends toward associations with nonalcoholic liver disease and gram-positive bacterial infections. FTO variants not associated with obesity demonstrated other potential disease associations including noninflammatory disorders of the cervix and chronic periodontitis. These results suggest that genetic variants in FTO may have pleiotropic associations, some of which are not mediated by obesity.

  6. Mitochondrial DNA variant at HVI region as a candidate of genetic markers of type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumilar, Gun Gun; Purnamasari, Yunita; Setiadi, Rahmat

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is maternally inherited. mtDNA mutations which can contribute to the excess of maternal inheritance of type 2 diabetes. Due to the high mutation rate, one of the areas in the mtDNA that is often associated with the disease is the hypervariable region I (HVI). Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the genetic variants of human mtDNA HVI that related to the type 2 diabetes in four samples that were taken from four generations in one lineage. Steps being taken include the lyses of hair follicles, amplification of mtDNA HVI fragment using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), detection of PCR products through agarose gel electrophoresis technique, the measurement of the concentration of mtDNA using UV-Vis spectrophotometer, determination of the nucleotide sequence via direct sequencing method and analysis of the sequencing results using SeqMan DNASTAR program. Based on the comparison between nucleotide sequence of samples and revised Cambridge Reference Sequence (rCRS) obtained six same mutations that these are C16147T, T16189C, C16193del, T16127C, A16235G, and A16293C. After comparing the data obtained to the secondary data from Mitomap and NCBI, it were found that two mutations, T16189C and T16217C, become candidates as genetic markers of type 2 diabetes even the mutations were found also in the generations of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. The results of this study are expected to give contribution to the collection of human mtDNA database of genetic variants that associated to metabolic diseases, so that in the future it can be utilized in various fields, especially in medicine.

  7. Genetic variant rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Agnese; Warrier, Varun; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction, alongside unusually repetitive behaviours and narrow interests. Asperger Syndrome (AS) is one subgroup of ASC and differs from classic autism in that in AS there is no language or general cognitive delay. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors are implicated in ASC and genes involved in neural connectivity and neurodevelopment are good candidates for studying the susceptibility to ASC. The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 (ARNT2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in neurodevelopmental processes, neuronal connectivity and cellular responses to hypoxia. A mutation in this gene has been identified in individuals with ASC and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been nominally associated with AS and autistic traits in previous studies. In this study, we tested 34 SNPs in ARNT2 for association with AS in 118 cases and 412 controls of Caucasian origin. P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among the SNPs analysed was calculated in our sample. Finally, SNP annotation allowed functional and structural analyses of the genetic variants in ARNT2. We tested the replicability of our result using the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) database of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). We report statistically significant association of rs17225178 with AS. This SNP modifies transcription factor binding sites and regions that regulate the chromatin state in neural cell lines. It is also included in a LD block in our sample, alongside other genetic variants that alter chromatin regulatory regions in neural cells. These findings demonstrate that rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with AS and support previous studies that pointed out an involvement of this gene in the predisposition to ASC.

  8. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abulí, Anna; Morillas, Juan D; Rigau, Joaquim; Latorre, Mercedes; Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; Peña, Elena; Riestra, Sabino; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Xicola, Rosa M; Llor, Xavier; Fernández-Rozadilla, Ceres; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis; Villanueva, Cristina M; Moreno, Victor; Piqué, Josep M; Carracedo, Angel; Castells, Antoni; Andreu, Montserrat; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Alonso-Espinaco, Virginia; Muñoz, Jenifer; Gonzalo, Victoria; Bessa, Xavier; González, Dolors; Clofent, Joan; Cubiella, Joaquin

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1

  9. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

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    Moreno Victor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive, rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive, rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant, and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive. In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1

  10. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pangilinan, Faith

    2012-08-02

    AbstractBackgroundNeural tube defects (NTDs) are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe) that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T) and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q)) have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate\\/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk.MethodsA tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate\\/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents), including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects.ResultsNearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p < 0.01 level. The ten strongest association signals (p-value range: 0.0003–0.0023) were found in nine genes (MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury)) and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225). The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele). Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing.ConclusionsTo our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the

  11. Evaluation of common genetic variants in 82 candidate genes as risk factors for neural tube defects

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    Pangilinan Faith

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neural tube defects (NTDs are common birth defects (~1 in 1000 pregnancies in the US and Europe that have complex origins, including environmental and genetic factors. A low level of maternal folate is one well-established risk factor, with maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation reducing the occurrence of NTD pregnancies by 50-70%. Gene variants in the folate metabolic pathway (e.g., MTHFR rs1801133 (677 C > T and MTHFD1 rs2236225 (R653Q have been found to increase NTD risk. We hypothesized that variants in additional folate/B12 pathway genes contribute to NTD risk. Methods A tagSNP approach was used to screen common variation in 82 candidate genes selected from the folate/B12 pathway and NTD mouse models. We initially genotyped polymorphisms in 320 Irish triads (NTD cases and their parents, including 301 cases and 341 Irish controls to perform case–control and family based association tests. Significantly associated polymorphisms were genotyped in a secondary set of 250 families that included 229 cases and 658 controls. The combined results for 1441 SNPs were used in a joint analysis to test for case and maternal effects. Results Nearly 70 SNPs in 30 genes were found to be associated with NTDs at the p MFTC, CDKN2A, ADA, PEMT, CUBN, GART, DNMT3A, MTHFD1 and T (Brachyury and included the known NTD risk factor MTHFD1 R653Q (rs2236225. The single strongest signal was observed in a new candidate, MFTC rs17803441 (OR = 1.61 [1.23-2.08], p = 0.0003 for the minor allele. Though nominally significant, these associations did not remain significant after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. Conclusions To our knowledge, with respect to sample size and scope of evaluation of candidate polymorphisms, this is the largest NTD genetic association study reported to date. The scale of the study and the stringency of correction are likely to have contributed to real associations failing to survive

  12. Common genetic variants and modification of penetrance of BRCA2-associated breast cancer.

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    Mia M Gaudet

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The considerable uncertainty regarding cancer risks associated with inherited mutations of BRCA2 is due to unknown factors. To investigate whether common genetic variants modify penetrance for BRCA2 mutation carriers, we undertook a two-staged genome-wide association study in BRCA2 mutation carriers. In stage 1 using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform, 592,163 filtered SNPs genotyped were available on 899 young (<40 years affected and 804 unaffected carriers of European ancestry. Associations were evaluated using a survival-based score test adjusted for familial correlations and stratified by country of the study and BRCA2*6174delT mutation status. The genomic inflation factor (λ was 1.011. The stage 1 association analysis revealed multiple variants associated with breast cancer risk: 3 SNPs had p-values<10(-5 and 39 SNPs had p-values<10(-4. These variants included several previously associated with sporadic breast cancer risk and two novel loci on chromosome 20 (rs311499 and chromosome 10 (rs16917302. The chromosome 10 locus was in ZNF365, which contains another variant that has recently been associated with breast cancer in an independent study of unselected cases. In stage 2, the top 85 loci from stage 1 were genotyped in 1,264 cases and 1,222 controls. Hazard ratios (HR and 95% confidence intervals (CI for stage 1 and 2 were combined and estimated using a retrospective likelihood approach, stratified by country of residence and the most common mutation, BRCA2*6174delT. The combined per allele HR of the minor allele for the novel loci rs16917302 was 0.75 (95% CI 0.66-0.86, and for rs311499 was 0.72 (95% CI 0.61-0.85, . FGFR2 rs2981575 had the strongest association with breast cancer risk (per allele HR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.18-1.39, . These results indicate that SNPs that modify BRCA2 penetrance identified by an agnostic approach thus far are limited to variants that also modify risk of sporadic BRCA2 wild-type breast cancer.

  13. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Fran?ois L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasi...

  14. Genetic variants associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wen-Hung; Chang, Wan-Chun; Lee, Yun-Shien; Wu, Ying-Ying; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Ho, Hsin-Chun; Chen, Ming-Jing; Lin, Jing-Yi; Hui, Rosaline Chung-Yee; Ho, Ji-Chen; Wu, Wei-Ming; Chen, Ting-Jui; Wu, Tony; Wu, Yih-Ru; Hsih, Mo-Song; Tu, Po-Hsun; Chang, Chen-Nen; Hsu, Chien-Ning; Wu, Tsu-Lan; Choon, Siew-Eng; Hsu, Chao-Kai; Chen, Der-Yuan; Liu, Chin-San; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Kaniwa, Nahoko; Saito, Yoshiro; Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Azukizawa, Hiroaki; Shi, Yongyong; Wang, Tzu-Hao; Chuang, Shiow-Shuh; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Chang, Chee-Jen; Chang, Yu-Sun; Hung, Shuen-Iu

    2014-08-06

    The antiepileptic drug phenytoin can cause cutaneous adverse reactions, ranging from maculopapular exanthema to severe cutaneous adverse reactions, which include drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The pharmacogenomic basis of phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions remains unknown. To investigate the genetic factors associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. Case-control study conducted in 2002-2014 among 105 cases with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions (n=61 Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and n=44 drug reactions with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms), 78 cases with maculopapular exanthema, 130 phenytoin-tolerant control participants, and 3655 population controls from Taiwan, Japan, and Malaysia. A genome-wide association study (GWAS), direct sequencing of the associated loci, and replication analysis were conducted using the samples from Taiwan. The initial GWAS included samples of 60 cases with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions and 412 population controls from Taiwan. The results were validated in (1) 30 cases with severe cutaneous adverse reactions and 130 phenytoin-tolerant controls from Taiwan, (2) 9 patients with Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis and 2869 population controls from Japan, and (3) 6 cases and 374 population controls from Malaysia. Specific genetic factors associated with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions. The GWAS discovered a cluster of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in CYP2C genes at 10q23.33 that reached genome-wide significance. Direct sequencing of CYP2C identified missense variant rs1057910 (CYP2C9*3) that showed significant association with phenytoin-related severe cutaneous adverse reactions (odds ratio, 12; 95% CI, 6.6-20; P=1.1 × 10(-17)). The statistically significant association between CYP2C9*3 and phenytoin

  15. Coinfection with Human Cytomegalovirus Genetic Variants in Transplant Recipients and Its Impact on Antiviral T Cell Immune Reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey; Brennan, Rebekah M; Tey, Siok-Keen; Smyth, Mark J; Burrows, Scott R; Miles, John J; Hill, Geoffrey R; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-08-15

    Reconstitution of T cell immunity is absolutely critical for the effective control of virus-associated infectious complications in hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients. Coinfection with genetic variants of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) in transplant recipients has been linked to clinical disease manifestation; however, how these genetic variants impact T cell immune reconstitution remains poorly understood. In this study, we have evaluated dynamic changes in the emergence of genetic variants of CMV in HSCT recipients and correlated these changes with reconstitution of antiviral T cell responses. In an analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms within sequences encoding HLA class I-restricted CMV epitopes from the immediate early 1 gene of CMV, coinfection with genetically distinct variants of CMV was detected in 52% of patients. However, in spite of exposure to multiple viral variants, the T cell responses in these patients were preferentially directed to a limited repertoire of HLA class I-restricted CMV epitopes, either conserved, variant, or cross-reactive. More importantly, we also demonstrate that long-term control of CMV infection after HSCT is primarily mediated through the efficient induction of stable antiviral T cell immunity irrespective of the nature of the antigenic target. These observations provide important insights for the future design of antiviral T cell-based immunotherapeutic strategies for transplant recipients, emphasizing the critical impact of robust immune reconstitution on efficient control of viral infection. Infection and disease caused by human cytomegalovirus (CMV) remain a significant burden in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The establishment of efficient immunological control, primarily mediated by cytotoxic T cells, plays a critical role in preventing CMV-associated disease in transplant recipients. Recent studies have also begun to investigate the impact genetic variation in CMV

  16. Genetic variants associated with skin aging in the Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wenshan; Tan, Jingze; Hüls, Anke; Ding, Anan; Liu, Yu; Matsui, Mary S; Vierkötter, Andrea; Krutmann, Jean; Schikowski, Tamara; Jin, Li; Wang, Sijia

    2017-04-01

    The progression and manifestation of human skin aging has a strong genetic basis; however, most of the supporting evidence has been gathered in Caucasian populations. The genetic contribution to the variation in skin aging in non-Caucasian populations is poorly understood. To investigate the genetic risk factors of relevance for skin aging in East Asians, we conducted the first candidate gene study for signs of skin aging in Han Chinese. We collected skin aging and genotype data in 502 female Han Chinese from the Taizhou cohort. We evaluated skin aging by the validated skin aging score SCINEXA™. Confounding factors were assessed through a questionnaire. We obtained the genotype data for 21 candidate SNPs and for a further 509 SNPs from 16 related candidate genes. Associations were tested by linear and logistic regression analyses and adjusted for potential confounders. Our candidate study found a significant association between SNP rs2066853 in exon 10 of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor gene AHR and crow's feet. In addition, we found a significant association between SNP rs10733310 in intron 5 of BNC2 and pigment spots on the arms, and between SNP rs11979919, 3kb downstream of COL1A2, and laxity of eyelids. Our results identified genetic risk factors for signs of skin aging (pigmentation, wrinkles or laxity) in Han Chinese. We also found that the manifestation of skin aging is further modified by anatomical site. Together with previous work, our results also suggest that different genetic variants could be responsible for distinct skin aging signs characteristic of Caucasians compared to East Asians. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Pain modality- and sex-specific effects of COMT genetic functional variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfer, Inna; Segall, Samantha K.; Lariviere, William R.; Smith, Shad B.; Dai, Feng; Slade, Gary G.; Rashid, Naim U.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.; Campbell, Claudia; Edwards, Robert; Liu, Qian; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamine neurotransmitters involved in a number of physiological functions including pain perception. Both human and mouse COMT genes possess functional polymorphisms contributing to inter-individual variability in pain phenotypes such as sensitivity to noxious stimuli, severity of clinical pain and response to pain treatment. In this study, we found that the effects of Comt functional variation in mice are modality-specific. Spontaneous inflammatory nociception and thermal nociception behaviors were correlated the most with the presence of the B2 SINE transposon insertion residing in the 3’UTR mRNA region. Similarly, in humans, COMT functional haplotypes were associated with thermal pain perception and with capsaicin-induced pain. Furthermore, COMT genetic variations contributed to pain behaviors in mice and pain ratings in humans in a sex-specific manner. The ancestral Comt variant, without a B2 SINE insertion, was more strongly associated with sensitivity to capsaicin in female versus male mice. In humans, the haplotype coding for low COMT activity increased capsaicin-induced pain perception in women, but not men. These findings reemphasize the fundamental contribution of COMT to pain processes, and provide a fine-grained resolution of this contribution at the genetic level that can be used to guide future studies in the area of pain genetics. PMID:23701723

  18. Genetic variants associated with earlier age at menopause increase the risk of cardiovascular events in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnowski, Chloé; Kavousi, Maryam; Isaacs, Steve; Demerath, Ellen W; Broer, Linda; Muka, Taulant; Franco, Oscar H; Ikram, Mohammad Arfan; Uitterlinden, André; Franceschini, Nora; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Murabito, Joanne M

    2018-04-01

    To better understand the relationship between cardiovascular disease risk and age-at-natural menopause using genetic data. Early menopause is associated with cardiovascular disease risk. We constructed a genetic risk score comprising 56 age-at-natural menopause decreasing alleles in men and women from the Framingham Heart Study, the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study, and the Rotterdam Study. If the genetic predisposition to earlier age-at-natural menopause is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk, it is reasonable to ask whether the risk is shared by men carrying the alleles, despite not experiencing menopause. We estimated the hazard ratio for the score for time to first cardiovascular event. To investigate the possible genetic pleiotropy between age-at-natural menopause and cardiovascular disease, we performed cross-trait linkage disequilibrium score regressions between age-at-natural menopause and cardiovascular disease and risk factors using genome-wide association studies. Twenty-two thousand five hundred and sixty-eight cardiovascular disease-free participants at baseline were analyzed (9,808 men, 12,760 women). Each additional unit of the genetic propensity to earlier age-at-natural menopause increased the hazard of both cardiovascular disease and cardiac death in women (cardiovascular disease: hazard ratio 1.10 [1.04-1.16], P = 9.7 × 10; cardiac death: 1.12 [1.02-1.24], P = 0.03), whereas no effect was observed for either outcome in men (hazard ratio 0.99 [0.95-1.04], P = 0.71; 1.05 [0.94-1.16], P = 0.34). We found significant negative genetic correlations in women, but not men, between age-at-natural menopause and cardiovascular disease and risk factors. Genetic variants associated with earlier age-at-natural menopause are associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk in women, but not men, suggesting sex-specific genetic effects on cardiovascular disease risk.

  19. Genetic Variants and Hamstring Injury in Soccer: An Association and Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larruskain, Jon; Celorrio, David; Barrio, Irantzu; Odriozola, Adrian; Gil, Susana M; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan R; Nozal, Raul; Ortuzar, Isusko; Lekue, Jose A; Aznar, Jose M

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association of candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with noncontact hamstring muscle injuries in elite soccer players and to create and validate a model to assess the risk of hamstring injury. A total of 107 elite male outfield players were prospectively followed for six seasons. Players were genotyped for 37 SNP previously investigated in relation to musculoskeletal injuries. The association of SNP, previous injury, age, level of play, position, and anthropometric data with 129 hamstring injuries (413 observations) was investigated in the discovery phase (2010-2015), and a multivariable Cox frailty model was created using forward selection. The model's discriminative ability was tested in the validation phase (2015-2016, 31 injuries, 98 observations) using Harrell's C index. Five SNP were found to be significantly associated with hamstring injury in a multivariable model: matrix metalloproteinase 3 rs679620 (A vs G, hazard ratio [HR] = 2.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.51-2.81), tenascin C rs2104772 (A vs T, HR = 1.65, 95% CI = 1.17-2.32), interleukin 6 rs1800795 (GG vs GC + CC, HR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.11-2.53), nitric oxide synthase 3 rs1799983 (G vs T, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 1.01-1.79), and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α rs11549465 (CC vs CT, HR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.00-4.29). Age also entered the model (≥24 vs <24 yr, HR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.29-3.42). The model showed acceptable discrimination in the discovery phase (C index = 0.74), but not in the validation phase (C index = 0.52). Genetic variants appear to be involved in the etiology of hamstring injuries but were not found to have predictive value by themselves. Further research, increasing the number of genetic variants and including environmental factors in complex multifactorial risk models, is necessary.

  20. Genetic Variants in Isolated Ebstein Anomaly Implicated in Myocardial Development Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Sicko

    Full Text Available Ebstein anomaly (EA is a rare heart defect in which the tricuspid valve is malformed and displaced. The tricuspid valve abnormalities can lead to backflow of blood from the right ventricle to the right atrium, preventing proper circulation of blood to the lungs. Although the etiology of EA is largely unresolved, increased prevalence of EA in those with a family history of congenital heart disease suggests EA has a genetic component. Copy number variants (CNVs are a major source of genetic variation and have been implicated in a range of congenital heart defect phenotypes. We performed a systematic, genome-wide search for CNVs in 47 isolated EA cases using genotyping microarrays. In addition, we used a custom HaloPlex panel to sequence three known EA genes and 47 candidate EA genes. We identified 35 candidate CNVs in 24 (51% EA cases. Rare sequence variants in genes associated with cardiomyopathy were identified in 11 (23% EA cases. Two CNVs near the transcriptional repressor HEY1, a member of the NOTCH signaling pathway, were identified in three unrelated cases. All other candidate CNVs were each identified in a single case. At least 11 of 35 candidate CNVs include genes involved in myocardial development or function, including multiple genes in the BMP signaling pathway. We identified enrichment of gene sets involved in histone modification and cardiomyocyte differentiation, supporting the involvement of the developing myocardium in the etiology of EA. Gene set enrichment analysis also identified ribosomal RNA processing, a potentially novel pathway of altered cardiac development in EA. Our results suggest an altered myocardial program may contribute to abnormal tricuspid valve development in EA. Future studies should investigate abnormal differentiation of cardiomyocytes as a potential etiological factor in EA.

  1. Rare genetic variants in the endocannabinoid system genes CNR1 and DAGLA are associated with neurological phenotypes in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Douglas R; Stanley, Christine M; Foss, Theodore; Boles, Richard G; McKernan, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Rare genetic variants in the core endocannabinoid system genes CNR1, CNR2, DAGLA, MGLL and FAAH were identified in molecular testing data from 6,032 patients with a broad spectrum of neurological disorders. The variants were evaluated for association with phenotypes similar to those observed in the orthologous gene knockouts in mice. Heterozygous rare coding variants in CNR1, which encodes the type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1), were found to be significantly associated with pain sensitivity (especially migraine), sleep and memory disorders-alone or in combination with anxiety-compared to a set of controls without such CNR1 variants. Similarly, heterozygous rare variants in DAGLA, which encodes diacylglycerol lipase alpha, were found to be significantly associated with seizures and neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism and abnormalities of brain morphology, compared to controls. Rare variants in MGLL, FAAH and CNR2 were not associated with any neurological phenotypes in the patients tested. Diacylglycerol lipase alpha synthesizes the endocannabinoid 2-AG in the brain, which interacts with CB1 receptors. The phenotypes associated with rare CNR1 variants are reminiscent of those implicated in the theory of clinical endocannabinoid deficiency syndrome. The severe phenotypes associated with rare DAGLA variants underscore the critical role of rapid 2-AG synthesis and the endocannabinoid system in regulating neurological function and development. Mapping of the variants to the 3D structure of the type 1 cannabinoid receptor, or primary structure of diacylglycerol lipase alpha, reveals clustering of variants in certain structural regions and is consistent with impacts to function.

  2. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel G; Fontana, Mark Alan; Meddens, S Fleur W; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Bergmann, Sven; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davies, Gail; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Liewald, David C; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-06-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association.

  3. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  4. Risk variants of the α-synuclein locus and REM sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson's disease: a genetic association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørnarå, Kari Anne; Pihlstrøm, Lasse; Dietrichs, Espen; Toft, Mathias

    2018-02-21

    Parkinson's disease is a heterogeneous disorder where genetic factors may underlie clinical variability. Rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD) is a parasomnia strongly linked to synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that SNCA variants conferring risk of Parkinson's disease would also predispose to an RBD phenotype. We assessed possible RBD (pRBD) status using the RBD screening questionnaire and investigated known susceptibility variants for Parkinson's disease located in the α-synuclein (SNCA) and tau (MAPT) gene loci in 325 Parkinson's disease patients. Associations between genetic risk variants and RBD were investigated by logistic regression, and an independent dataset of 382 patients from the Parkinson's Progression Marker Initiative (PPMI) study was used for replication. pRBD was associated with rs3756063 located in the 5' region of SNCA (two-sided p = 0.018, odds ratio 1.44). We replicated this finding in the PPMI dataset (one-sided p = 0.036, odds ratio 1.35) and meta-analyzed the results (two-sided p = 0.0032, odds ratio 1.40). The Parkinson's disease risk variant in the 3' region of SNCA and the MAPT variant showed no association with pRBD. Our findings provide proof of principle that a largely stable, dichotomous clinical feature of Parkinson's disease can be linked to a specific genetic susceptibility profile. Indirectly, it also supports the hypothesis of RBD as relevant marker for a distinct subtype of the disorder.

  5. DEPTOR promoter genetic variants and insulin resistance in obese children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Jernej; Šutuš Temovski, Tamara; Rozmarič, Tomaž; Horvat, Simon; Beltram, Jasmina; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina; Battelino, Tadej; Kotnik, Primož

    2017-03-01

    Insulin resistance (IR) is one of the major metabolic complications of obesity in children and adolescents. DEP domain-containing mammalian target of rapamycin interacting protein (DEPTOR) is involved in downstream insulin signaling and DEPTOR's effects are regulated by its level of expression. To analyze promoter region of DEPTOR for genetic variants associated with altered IR in obese children and adolescents. IR was determined in 322 normoglycemic obese subjects [173 females, 149 males; mean age 13.3 ± 3.5 yr, mean BMI-SDS 2.85 ± 0.83, HbA1C 5.2 ± 0.2% (33 ± 2.5 mmol/mol)] using homeostatic model assessment - insulin resistance [HOMA-IR (>2 prepubertal and >3 pubertal)] and whole body insulin sensitivity index [WBISI (C (rs7840156) was associated with a significant 2-fold decreased risk to present with IR, determined by HOMA-IR [odds ratio (OR) = 0.614, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.435-0.867, p = 0.0057) and WBISI (OR = 0.582, 95% CI = 0.414-0.817, p = 0.0018). The CC genotype had lower mean HOMA-IR value (2.47 ± 0.44 vs. 3.04 ± 0.14, p = 0.0177) and higher mean WBISI value (7.00 ± 0.71 vs. 5.27 ± 0.33, p = 0.0235) than TT genotype. Variant c.-143T>C was located in evolutionary highly conserved region in DEPTOR promoter region. Presented results on association between insulin sensitivity and genetic variants in DEPTOR gene suggest DEPTOR and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway to be potential target for future research and pharmacological interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Genetic variants associated with breast size also influence breast cancer risk

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    Eriksson Nicholas

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While some factors of breast morphology, such as density, are directly implicated in breast cancer, the relationship between breast size and cancer is less clear. Breast size is moderately heritable, yet the genetic variants leading to differences in breast size have not been identified. Methods To investigate the genetic factors underlying breast size, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS of self-reported bra cup size, controlling for age, genetic ancestry, breast surgeries, pregnancy history and bra band size, in a cohort of 16,175 women of European ancestry. Results We identified seven single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs significantly associated with breast size (p−8: rs7816345 near ZNF703, rs4849887 and (independently rs17625845 flanking INHBB, rs12173570 near ESR1, rs7089814 in ZNF365, rs12371778 near PTHLH, and rs62314947 near AREG. Two of these seven SNPs are in linkage disequilibrium (LD with SNPs associated with breast cancer (those near ESR1 and PTHLH, and a third (ZNF365 is near, but not in LD with, a breast cancer SNP. The other three loci (ZNF703, INHBB, and AREG have strong links to breast cancer, estrogen regulation, and breast development. Conclusions These results provide insight into the genetic factors underlying normal breast development and show that some of these factors are shared with breast cancer. While these results do not directly support any possible epidemiological relationships between breast size and cancer, this study may contribute to a better understanding of the subtle interactions between breast morphology and breast cancer risk.

  7. Genetic variants demonstrating flip-flop phenomenon and breast cancer risk prediction among women of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengfeng; Qian, Frank; Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo; Ojengbede, Oladosu; Zheng, Wei; Blot, William; Nathanson, Katherine L; Hennis, Anselm; Nemesure, Barbara; Ambs, Stefan; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2018-04-01

    Few studies have evaluated the performance of existing breast cancer risk prediction models among women of African ancestry. In replication studies of genetic variants, a change in direction of the risk association is a common phenomenon. Termed flip-flop, it means that a variant is risk factor in one population but protective in another, affecting the performance of risk prediction models. We used data from the genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in the African diaspora (The Root consortium), which included 3686 participants of African ancestry from Nigeria, USA, and Barbados. Polygenic risk scores (PRSs) were constructed from the published odds ratios (ORs) of four sets of susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Discrimination capacity was measured using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Flip-flop phenomenon was observed among 30~40% of variants across studies. Using the 34 variants with consistent directionality among previous studies, we constructed a PRS with AUC of 0.531 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.512-0.550), which is similar to the PRS using 93 variants and ORs from European ancestry populations (AUC = 0.525, 95% CI: 0.506-0.544). Additionally, we found the 34-variant PRS has good discriminative accuracy in women with family history of breast cancer (AUC = 0.586, 95% CI: 0.532-0.640). We found that PRS based on variants identified from prior GWASs conducted in women of European and Asian ancestries did not provide a comparable degree of risk stratification for women of African ancestry. Further large-scale fine-mapping studies in African ancestry populations are desirable to discover population-specific genetic risk variants.

  8. Dietary fatty acids modulate associations between genetic variants and circulating fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte membranes: meta-analysis of nine studies in the CHARGE consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scope: Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. We evaluated i...

  9. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin

    2017-01-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS c...

  10. Genetic variants in FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and skin cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nan, Hongmei; Qureshi, Abrar A; Hunter, David J; Han, Jiali

    2009-01-01

    The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and its receptor (FGFR) play an important role in tumorigenesis. Deregulation of the FGFR2 gene has been identified in a number of cancer sites. Overexpression of the FGFR4 protein has been linked to cutaneous melanoma progression. Previous studies reported associations between genetic variants in the FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and development of various cancers. We evaluated the associations of four genetic variants in the FGFR2 gene highly related to breast cancer risk and the three common tag-SNPs in the FGFR4 gene with skin cancer risk in a nested case-control study of Caucasians within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) among 218 melanoma cases, 285 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cases, 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC) cases, and 870 controls. We found no evidence for associations between these seven genetic variants and the risks of melanoma and nonmelanocytic skin cancer. Given the power of this study, we did not detect any contribution of genetic variants in the FGFR2 or FGFR4 genes to inherited predisposition to skin cancer among Caucasian women

  11. Calling genotypes from public RNA-sequencing data enables identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, Patrick; Zhernakova, Daria V.; de Haan, Mark; van der Sijde, Marijke; Bonder, Marc Jan; Karjalainen, Juha; van der Velde, K. Joeri; Abbott, Kristin M.; Fu, Jingyuan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sinke, Richard J.; Swertz, Morris A.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    Background: RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) is a powerful technique for the identification of genetic variants that affect gene-expression levels, either through expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping or through allele-specific expression (ASE) analysis. Given increasing numbers of RNA-seq

  12. Habitual sleep duration is associated with BMI and macronutrient intake and may be modified by CLOCK genetic variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake. We examined associations betw...

  13. Genetic variants in FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and skin cancer risk in the Nurses' Health Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi Abrar A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human fibroblast growth factor (FGF and its receptor (FGFR play an important role in tumorigenesis. Deregulation of the FGFR2 gene has been identified in a number of cancer sites. Overexpression of the FGFR4 protein has been linked to cutaneous melanoma progression. Previous studies reported associations between genetic variants in the FGFR2 and FGFR4 genes and development of various cancers. Methods We evaluated the associations of four genetic variants in the FGFR2 gene highly related to breast cancer risk and the three common tag-SNPs in the FGFR4 gene with skin cancer risk in a nested case-control study of Caucasians within the Nurses' Health Study (NHS among 218 melanoma cases, 285 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cases, 300 basal cell carcinoma (BCC cases, and 870 controls. Results We found no evidence for associations between these seven genetic variants and the risks of melanoma and nonmelanocytic skin cancer. Conclusion Given the power of this study, we did not detect any contribution of genetic variants in the FGFR2 or FGFR4 genes to inherited predisposition to skin cancer among Caucasian women.

  14. The complement system in age-related macular degeneration: A review of rare genetic variants and implications for personalized treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerlings, M.J.; Jong, E.K.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2017-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal disease and the major cause of irreversible vision loss in the elderly. Numerous studies have found both common and rare genetic variants in the complement pathway to play a role in the pathogenesis of AMD. In this review we provide an

  15. Genome-Wide Interaction Analyses between Genetic Variants and Alcohol Consumption and Smoking for Risk of Colorectal Cancer.

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    Jian Gong

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC. However, variants in these loci explain only a small proportion of familial aggregation, and there are likely additional variants that are associated with CRC susceptibility. Genome-wide studies of gene-environment interactions may identify variants that are not detected in GWAS of marginal gene effects. To study this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis for interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO. Interactions were tested using logistic regression. We identified interaction between CRC risk and alcohol consumption and variants in the 9q22.32/HIATL1 (Pinteraction = 1.76×10-8; permuted p-value 3.51x10-8 region. Compared to non-/occasional drinking light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs9409565 CT genotype (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74-0.91]; P = 2.1×10-4 and TT genotypes (OR,0.62 [95% CI, 0.51-0.75]; P = 1.3×10-6 but not associated among those with the CC genotype (p = 0.059. No genome-wide statistically significant interactions were observed for smoking. If replicated our suggestive finding of a genome-wide significant interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption might contribute to understanding colorectal cancer etiology and identifying subpopulations with differential susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on CRC risk.

  16. Genome-Wide Interaction Analyses between Genetic Variants and Alcohol Consumption and Smoking for Risk of Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomb, Polly A.; Campbell, Peter T.; Baron, John A.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Casey, Graham; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Figueiredo, Jane C.; Gallinger, Steven; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Lin, Yi; Lindor, Noralane M.; Nishihara, Reiko; Ogino, Shuji; Potter, John D.; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Thornquist, Mark; Toth, Reka; Wallace, Robert; White, Emily; Jiao, Shuo; Lemire, Mathieu; Hsu, Li; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many genetic susceptibility loci for colorectal cancer (CRC). However, variants in these loci explain only a small proportion of familial aggregation, and there are likely additional variants that are associated with CRC susceptibility. Genome-wide studies of gene-environment interactions may identify variants that are not detected in GWAS of marginal gene effects. To study this, we conducted a genome-wide analysis for interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking using data from the Colon Cancer Family Registry (CCFR) and the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium (GECCO). Interactions were tested using logistic regression. We identified interaction between CRC risk and alcohol consumption and variants in the 9q22.32/HIATL1 (Pinteraction = 1.76×10−8; permuted p-value 3.51x10-8) region. Compared to non-/occasional drinking light to moderate alcohol consumption was associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer among individuals with rs9409565 CT genotype (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.74–0.91]; P = 2.1×10−4) and TT genotypes (OR,0.62 [95% CI, 0.51–0.75]; P = 1.3×10−6) but not associated among those with the CC genotype (p = 0.059). No genome-wide statistically significant interactions were observed for smoking. If replicated our suggestive finding of a genome-wide significant interaction between genetic variants and alcohol consumption might contribute to understanding colorectal cancer etiology and identifying subpopulations with differential susceptibility to the effect of alcohol on CRC risk. PMID:27723779

  17. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  18. Relations between lipoprotein(a) concentrations, LPA genetic variants, and the risk of mortality in patients with established coronary heart disease : a molecular and genetic association study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zewinger, Stephen; Kleber, Marcus E.; Tragante Do O, V; McCubrey, Raymond O.; Schmidt, Amand F.; Direk, Kenan; Laufs, Ulrich; Werner, Christian; Koenig, Wolfgang; Rothenbacher, Dietrich; Mons, Ute; Breitling, Lutz P; Brenner, Herrmann; Jennings, Richard T.; Petrakis, Ioannis; Triem, Sarah; Klug, Mira; Filips, Alexandra; Blankenberg, Stefan; Waldeyer, Christoph; Sinning, Christoph; Schnabel, Renate B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Vlachopoulou, Efthymia; Nygård, Ottar; Svingen, Gard Frodahl Tveitevåg; Pedersen, Eva Ringdal; Tell, Grethe S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Nieminen, Markku S.; Laaksonen, Reijo; Trompet, Stella; Smit, Roelof A.J.; Sattar, Naveed; Jukema, J. Wouter; Groesdonk, Heinrich V.; Delgado, Graciela; Stojakovic, Tatjana; Pilbrow, Anna P.; Cameron, Vicky A.; Richards, A. Mark; Doughty, Robert N.; Gong, Yan; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Johnson, Julie A; Scholz, Markus; Beutner, Frank; Thiery, Joachim; Smith, J. Gustav; Vilmundarson, Ragnar O.; McPherson, Ruth; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Cresci, Sharon; Lenzini, Petra A.; Spertus, John A.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Girelli, Domenico; Martinelli, Nicola I.; Leiherer, Andreas; Saely, Christoph H.; Drexel, Heinz; Mündlein, Axel; Braund, Peter S; Nelson, Christopher P.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Kofink, Daniel; Hoefer, Imo E.; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Ko, Yi-An; Hartiala, Jaana A.; Allayee, Hooman; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Hazen, Stanley L.; Eriksson, Niclas; Held, Claes; Hagström, Emil; Wallentin, Lars; Åkerblom, Axel; Siegbahn, Agneta; Karp, Igor; Labos, Christopher; Pilote, Louise; Engert, James C.; Brophy, James M.; Thanassoulis, George; Bogaty, Peter; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Kaczor, Marcin; Sanak, Marek; Virani, Salim S.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Lee, Vei Vei; Boerwinkle, Eric; Holmes, Michael V.; Horne, Benjamin D; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Patel, Riyaz S; Krämer, Bernhard K; Scharnagl, Hubert; Fliser, Danilo; März, Winfried; Speer, Thimoteus

    Background Lipoprotein(a) concentrations in plasma are associated with cardiovascular risk in the general population. Whether lipoprotein(a) concentrations or LPA genetic variants predict long-term mortality in patients with established coronary heart disease remains less clear. Methods We obtained

  19. Associations between an obesity related genetic variant (FTO rs9939609 and prostate cancer risk.

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    Sarah J Lewis

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Observational studies suggest that obese men have a lower risk of incident prostate cancer, but an increased risk of advanced and fatal cancers. These observations could be due to confounding, detection bias, or a biological effect of obesity. Genetic studies are less susceptible to confounding than observational epidemiology and can suggest how associations between phenotypes (such as obesity and diseases arise. To determine whether the associations between obesity and prostate cancer are causal, we conducted a genetic association study of the relationship between a single nucleotide polymorphism known to be associated with obesity (FTO rs9939609 and prostate cancer. Data are from a population-based sample of 1550 screen-detected prostate cancers, 1815 age- and general practice matched controls with unrestricted prostate specific antigen (PSA values and 1175 low-PSA controls (PSA <0.5 ng/ml. The rs9939609 A allele, which was associated with higher BMI in the sample, was inversely associated with overall (odds ratio (OR versus all controls  = 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.85-1.02 p = 0.12 per allele and low-grade (OR = 0.90; 0.81-0.99 p = 0.03 per allele prostate cancer risk, but positively associated with high-grade cancer among cases (OR high- versus low-grade cancer  = 1.16; 0.99-1.37 p = 0.07 per allele. Although evidence for these effects was weak, they are consistent with observational data based on BMI phenotypes and suggest that the observed association between obesity and prostate cancer is not due to confounding. Further research should confirm these findings, extend them to other BMI-related genetic variants and determine whether they are due to detection bias or obesity-related hormonal changes.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN20141297.

  20. Association between Genetic Variants and Diabetes Mellitus in Iranian Populations: A Systematic Review of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaeian, Mehrnoosh; Enayati, Samaneh; Tabatabaei-Malazy, Ozra; Amoli, Mahsa M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Diabetes mellitus as the most prevalent metabolic disease is a multifactorial disease which is influenced by environmental and genetic factors. In this systematic review, we assessed the association between genetic variants and diabetes/its complications in studies with Iranian populations. Methods. Google Scholar, PubMed, Scopus, and Persian web databases were systematically searched up to January 2014. The search terms were “gene,” “polymorphism,” “diabetes,” and “diabetic complications”; nephropathy, retinopathy, neuropathy, foot ulcer, and CAD (coronary artery diseases); and Persian equivalents. Animal studies, letters to editor, and in vitro studies were excluded. Results. Out of overall 3029 eligible articles, 88 articles were included. We found significant association between CTLA-4, IL-18, VDR, TAP2, IL-12, and CD4 genes and T1DM, HNFα and MODY, haptoglobin, paraoxonase, leptin, TCF7L2, calreticulin, ERα, PPAR-γ2, CXCL5, calpain-10, IRS-1 and 2, GSTM1, KCNJ11, eNOS, VDR, INSR, ACE, apoA-I, apo E, adiponectin, PTPN1, CETP, AT1R, resistin, MMP-3, BChE K, AT2R, SUMO4, IL-10, VEGF, MTHFR, and GSTM1 with T2DM or its complications. Discussion. We found some controversial results due to heterogeneity in ethnicity and genetic background. We thought genome wide association studies on large number of samples will be helpful in identifying diabetes susceptible genes as an alternative to studying individual candidate genes in Iranian populations. PMID:26587547

  1. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreiner, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie; Brix, Susanne; Pers, Tune H; Couto Alves, Alexessander; Warrington, Nicole M; Tiesler, Carla M T; Fuertes, Elaine; Franke, Lude; Hirschhorn, Joel N; James, Alan; Simpson, Angela; Tung, Joyce Y; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Custovic, Adnan; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Strachan, David P; Henderson, John; Hinds, David; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. We sought to investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. We meta-analyzed 2 genome-wide association studies on self-reported allergy and sensitization comprising a total of 62,330 subjects. These results were used to calculate enrichment for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) previously associated with autoimmune diseases. Furthermore, we probed for enrichment within genetic pathways and of transcription factor binding sites and characterized commonalities in variant burden on tissue-specific regulatory sites by calculating the enrichment of allergy SNPs falling in gene regulatory regions in various cells using Encode Roadmap DNase-hypersensitive site data. Finally, we compared the allergy data with those of all known diseases. Among 290 loci previously associated with 16 autoimmune diseases, we found a significant enrichment of loci also associated with allergy (P = 1.4e-17) encompassing 29 loci at a false discovery rate of less than 0.05. Such enrichment seemed to be a general characteristic for autoimmune diseases. Among the common loci, 48% had the same direction of effect for allergy and autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we observed an enrichment of allergy SNPs falling within immune pathways and regions of chromatin accessible in immune cells that was also represented in patients with autoimmune diseases but not those with other diseases. We identified shared susceptibility loci and commonalities in pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases, suggesting shared disease mechanisms. Further studies of these shared genetic mechanisms might help in understanding the complex relationship between these diseases, including the parallel increase in disease prevalence. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  2. Genetic variants of the alpha-synuclein gene SNCA are associated with multiple system atrophy.

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    Ammar Al-Chalabi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple system atrophy (MSA is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia and autonomic dysfunction. Pathogenic mechanisms remain obscure but the neuropathological hallmark is the presence of alpha-synuclein-immunoreactive glial cytoplasmic inclusions. Genetic variants of the alpha-synuclein gene, SNCA, are thus strong candidates for genetic association with MSA. One follow-up to a genome-wide association of Parkinson's disease has identified association of a SNP in SNCA with MSA. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: We evaluated 32 SNPs in the SNCA gene in a European population of 239 cases and 617 controls recruited as part of the Neuroprotection and Natural History in Parkinson Plus Syndromes (NNIPPS study. We used 161 independently collected samples for replication. Two SNCA SNPs showed association with MSA: rs3822086 (P = 0.0044, and rs3775444 (P = 0.012, although only the first survived correction for multiple testing. In the MSA-C subgroup the association strengthened despite more than halving the number of cases: rs3822086 P = 0.0024, OR 2.153, (95% CI 1.3-3.6; rs3775444 P = 0.0017, OR 4.386 (95% CI 1.6-11.7. A 7-SNP haplotype incorporating three SNPs either side of rs3822086 strengthened the association with MSA-C further (best haplotype, P = 8.7 x 10(-4. The association with rs3822086 was replicated in the independent samples (P = 0.035. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a genetic association between MSA and alpha-synuclein which has replicated in independent samples. The strongest association is with the cerebellar subtype of MSA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00211224.

  3. Genetic variants and early cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence phenotypes in adolescents.

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    Jennifer O'Loughlin

    Full Text Available While the heritability of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence (ND is well-documented, the contribution of specific genetic variants to specific phenotypes has not been closely examined. The objectives of this study were to test the associations between 321 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that capture common genetic variation in 24 genes, and early smoking and ND phenotypes in novice adolescent smokers, and to assess if genetic predictors differ across these phenotypes.In a prospective study of 1294 adolescents aged 12-13 years recruited from ten Montreal-area secondary schools, 544 participants who had smoked at least once during the 7-8 year follow-up provided DNA. 321 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 24 candidate genes were tested for an association with number of cigarettes smoked in the past 3 months, and with five ND phenotypes (a modified version of the Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire, the ICD-10 and three clusters of ND symptoms representing withdrawal symptoms, use of nicotine for self-medication, and a general ND/craving symptom indicator.The pattern of SNP-gene associations differed across phenotypes. Sixteen SNPs in seven genes (ANKK1, CHRNA7, DDC, DRD2, COMT, OPRM1, SLC6A3 (also known as DAT1 were associated with at least one phenotype with a p-value <0.01 using linear mixed models. After permutation and FDR adjustment, none of the associations remained statistically significant, although the p-values for the association between rs557748 in OPRM1 and the ND/craving and self-medication phenotypes were both 0.076.Because the genetic predictors differ, specific cigarette smoking and ND phenotypes should be distinguished in genetic studies in adolescents. Fifteen of the 16 top-ranked SNPs identified in this study were from loci involved in dopaminergic pathways (ANKK1/DRD2, DDC, COMT, OPRM1, and SLC6A3.Dopaminergic pathways may be salient during early smoking and the development of ND.

  4. The impact of FADS genetic variants on ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in African Americans

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    Rudock Megan E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arachidonic acid (AA is a long-chain omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA synthesized from the precursor dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA that plays a vital role in immunity and inflammation. Variants in the Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS family of genes on chromosome 11q have been shown to play a role in PUFA metabolism in populations of European and Asian ancestry; no work has been done in populations of African ancestry to date. Results In this study, we report that African Americans have significantly higher circulating levels of plasma AA (p = 1.35 × 10-48 and lower DGLA levels (p = 9.80 × 10-11 than European Americans. Tests for association in N = 329 individuals across 80 nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS locus revealed significant association with AA, DGLA and the AA/DGLA ratio, a measure of enzymatic efficiency, in both racial groups (peak signal p = 2.85 × 10-16 in African Americans, 2.68 × 10-23 in European Americans. Ancestry-related differences were observed at an upstream marker previously associated with AA levels (rs174537, wherein, 79-82% of African Americans carry two copies of the G allele compared to only 42-45% of European Americans. Importantly, the allelic effect of the G allele, which is associated with enhanced conversion of DGLA to AA, on enzymatic efficiency was similar in both groups. Conclusions We conclude that the impact of FADS genetic variants on PUFA metabolism, specifically AA levels, is likely more pronounced in African Americans due to the larger proportion of individuals carrying the genotype associated with increased FADS1 enzymatic conversion of DGLA to AA.

  5. Association analysis of genetic variants in the myosin IXB gene in acute pancreatitis.

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    Rian M Nijmeijer

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Impairment of the mucosal barrier plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acute pancreatitis. The myosin IXB (MYO9B gene and the two tight-junction adaptor genes, PARD3 and MAGI2, have been linked to gastrointestinal permeability. Common variants of these genes are associated with celiac disease and inflammatory bowel disease, two other conditions in which intestinal permeability plays a role. We investigated genetic variation in MYO9B, PARD3 and MAGI2 for association with acute pancreatitis. METHODS: Five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MYO9B, two SNPs in PARD3, and three SNPs in MAGI2 were studied in a Dutch cohort of 387 patients with acute pancreatitis and over 800 controls, and in a German cohort of 235 patients and 250 controls. RESULTS: Association to MYO9B and PARD3 was observed in the Dutch cohort, but only one SNP in MYO9B and one in MAGI2 showed association in the German cohort (p < 0.05. Joint analysis of the combined cohorts showed that, after correcting for multiple testing, only two SNPs in MYO9B remained associated (rs7259292, p = 0.0031, odds ratio (OR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (95% CI 1.35-2.78; rs1545620, p = 0.0006, OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.16-1.53. SNP rs1545620 is a non-synonymous SNP previously suspected to impact on ulcerative colitis. None of the SNPs showed association to disease severity or etiology. CONCLUSION: Variants in MYO9B may be involved in acute pancreatitis, but we found no evidence for involvement of PARD3 or MAGI2.

  6. Genetic variants in regulatory regions of microRNAs are associated with lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kaipeng; Wang, Cheng; Qin, Na; Yang, Jianshui; Zhu, Meng; Dai, Juncheng; Jin, Guangfu; Shen, Hongbing; Ma, Hongxia; Hu, Zhibin

    2016-07-26

    Genetic variants in regulatory regions of some miRNAs might be associated with lung cancer risk and survival. We performed a case-control study including 1341 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases and 1982 controls to evaluate the associations of 7 potentially functional polymorphisms in several differently expressed miRNAs with NSCLC risk. Each SNP was also tested for the association with overall survival of 1001 NSCLC patients. We identified that rs9660710 in miR-200b/200a/429 cluster and rs763354 in miR-30a were significantly associated with NSCLC risk [odds ratio (OR) = 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.30, P = 0.002; OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.80-0.98, P = 0.017; respectively]. However, no significant association between variants and NSCLC death risk was observed in survival analysis. Functional annotation showed that both rs9660710 and rs763354 were located in regulatory elements in lung cancer cells. Compared to normal tissues, miR-200a-3p, miR-200a-5p, miR-200b-3p, miR-200b-5p and miR-429 were significantly increased in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Lung Adenocarcinoma (LUAD) tumors, whereas miR-30a-3p and miR-30a-5p were significantly decreased in tumors (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, we observed that rs9660710 is an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) or methylation eQTL for miR-429 expression in TCGA normal tissues. Our results indicated that rs9660710 in miR-200b/200a/429 cluster and rs763354 in miR-30a might modify the susceptibility to NSCLC.

  7. A natural genetic variant of granzyme B confers lethality to a common viral infection.

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    Christopher E Andoniou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many immune response genes are highly polymorphic, consistent with the selective pressure imposed by pathogens over evolutionary time, and the need to balance infection control with the risk of auto-immunity. Epidemiological and genomic studies have identified many genetic variants that confer susceptibility or resistance to pathogenic micro-organisms. While extensive polymorphism has been reported for the granzyme B (GzmB gene, its relevance to pathogen immunity is unexplored. Here, we describe the biochemical and cytotoxic functions of a common allele of GzmB (GzmBW common in wild mouse. While retaining 'Asp-ase' activity, GzmBW has substrate preferences that differ considerably from GzmBP, which is common to all inbred strains. In vitro, GzmBW preferentially cleaves recombinant Bid, whereas GzmBP activates pro-caspases directly. Recombinant GzmBW and GzmBP induced equivalent apoptosis of uninfected targets cells when delivered with perforin in vitro. Nonetheless, mice homozygous for GzmBW were unable to control murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection, and succumbed as a result of excessive liver damage. Although similar numbers of anti-viral CD8 T cells were generated in both mouse strains, GzmBW-expressing CD8 T cells isolated from infected mice were unable to kill MCMV-infected targets in vitro. Our results suggest that known virally-encoded inhibitors of the intrinsic (mitochondrial apoptotic pathway account for the increased susceptibility of GzmBW mice to MCMV. We conclude that different natural variants of GzmB have a profound impact on the immune response to a common and authentic viral pathogen.

  8. High prevalence of genetic variants previously associated with LQT syndrome in new exome data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Refsgaard, Lena; Holst, Anders G; Sadjadieh, Golnaz

    2012-01-01

    Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) has provided important knowledge on this topic. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of previously LQTS-associated variants in ESP (5400 individuals), in order to identify possible false-positive LQTS variants. With this aim, we performed a search for previously...... published LQTS-associated variants in ESP. In addition, a PolyPhen-2 prediction was conducted, and the four most prevalent LQTS-associated variants with significant functional effects present in ESP were genotyped in a second control population. We identified 33 missense variants previously associated...... with LQTS in ESP. These 33 variants affected 173 alleles and this corresponded to a LQTS prevalence of 1:31 in the ESP population. PolyPhen-2 predicted 30% of the 33 variants present in ESP to be benign compared with 13% among LQTS-associated variants not present in ESP (P=0.019). Genotyping of the four...

  9. [Study of genetic variants in the BDNF, COMT, DAT1 and SERT genes in Colombian children with attention deficit disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Rojas, Jenny; Arboleda-Bustos, Carlos E; Morales, Luis; Benítez, Bruno A; Beltrán, Diana; Izquierdo, Álvaro; Arboleda, Humberto; Vásquez, Rafael

    Attention deficit and hyperactive disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent among children in Bogota City. Both genetic and environmental factors play a very important role in the etiology of ADHD. However, to date few studies have addressed the association of genetic variants and ADHD in the Colombian population. To test the genetic association between polymorphisms in the DAT1, HTTLPR, COMT and BDNF genes and ADHD in a sample from Bogota City. We genotyped the most common polymorphisms in DAT1, SERT, COMT and BDNF genes associated with ADHD using conventional PCR followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) in 97 trios recruited in a medical center in Bogota. The transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) was used to determine the association between such genetic variants and ADHD. The TDT analysis showed that no individual allele of any variant studied has a preferential transmission. Our results suggest that the etiology of the ADHD may be complex and involves several genetic factors. Further studies in other candidate polymorphisms in a larger sample size will improve our knowledge of the ADHD in Colombian population. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of CCR5 and SDF-1 genetic variants and HIV infection in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Padh, Harish

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 infection and progression exhibits interindividual variation. The polymorphism in the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4, the principal coreceptors for HIV-1 and their ligands like SDF-1 have a profound effect in altering the HIV-1 disease progression rate. A single nucleotide polymorphism designated SDF1-3'UTR-801G-A has been associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection or delayed progression to AIDS. In this study, the SDF1-3'A polymorphism, CCR5∆32 polymorphism and CCR5 promoter polymorphism at positions 58934 G/T, 59029 G/A, 59353 T/C, 59356 C/T, 59402 A/G and 59653 C/T were analysed in Indian population. The polymorphisms in HIV-1 patients and healthy individuals were evaluated by conventional PCR, RFLP-PCR and direct sequencing techniques. The CCR5∆32 mutant allele was found to be almost absent in Indian population. The analysis of the CCR5-59356C/T polymorphism revealed a trend towards an association of the C allele with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection. The frequency of allele CCR5-59356C was higher in HIV-1 patients (100%) as compared to healthy control subjects (89%, P = 0.003). The correlation of SDF1-3'A and CCR5 promoter CCR5-58934G/T, CCR5-59029G/A, CCR5-59353T/C, CCR5-59402 A/G and CCR5-59653C/T polymorphisms and protection to HIV-1 infection and progression to AIDS was found to be nonsignificant. Nine haplotypes with more than 1% frequency were detected but were not significant in their protective role against HIV. Comparative analysis with global populations showed a noteworthy difference in CCR5 and SDF-1 polymorphisms' frequency distribution, indicating the ethnic variability of Indians. Although susceptibility to infections cannot be completely dependent on one or few genetic variants, it is important to remember that SDF-1 and CCR5 variants have been correlated globally with HIV-1 infection and disease progression. In the light of that, higher frequency of SDF-1 variants in the Indian population is noteworthy. © 2015 John

  11. Molecular and genetic characterization of natural HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 variants from North India and their functional implications.

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    Larance Ronsard

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Designing an ideal vaccine against HIV-1 has been difficult due to enormous genetic variability as a result of high replication rate and lack of proofreading activity of reverse transcriptase leading to emergence of genetic variants and recombinants. Tat transactivates HIV-1 LTR, resulting in a remarkable increase in viral gene expression, and plays a vital role in pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic variations of Tat exon-1 from HIV-1 infected patients from North India. METHODS: Genomic DNA was isolated from PBMCs and Tat exon-1 was PCR amplified with specific primers followed by cloning, sequencing and sequence analyses using bioinformatic tools for predicting HIV-1 subtypes, recombination events, conservation of domains and phosphorylation sites, and LTR transactivation by luciferase assay. RESULTS: Phylogenetic analysis of Tat exon-1 variants (n = 120 revealed sequence similarity with South African Tat C sequences and distinct geographical relationships were observed for B/C recombinants. Bootscan analysis of our variants showed 90% homology to Tat C and 10% to B/C recombinants with a precise breakpoint. Natural substitutions were observed with high allelic frequencies which may be beneficial for virus. High amino acid conservation was observed in Tat among Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART recipients. Barring few changes, most of the functional domains, predicted motifs and phosphorylation sites were well conserved in most of Tat variants. dN/dS analysis revealed purifying selection, implying the importance of functional conservation of Tat exon-1. Our Indian Tat C variants and B/C recombinants showed differential LTR transactivation. CONCLUSIONS: The possible role of Tat exon-1 variants in shaping the current HIV-1 epidemic in North India was highlighted. Natural substitutions across conserved functional domains were observed and provided evidence for the emergence of B/C recombinants within the

  12. Molecular and genetic characterization of natural HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 variants from North India and their functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsard, Larance; Lata, Sneh; Singh, Jyotsna; Ramachandran, Vishnampettai G; Das, Shukla; Banerjea, Akhil C

    2014-01-01

    Designing an ideal vaccine against HIV-1 has been difficult due to enormous genetic variability as a result of high replication rate and lack of proofreading activity of reverse transcriptase leading to emergence of genetic variants and recombinants. Tat transactivates HIV-1 LTR, resulting in a remarkable increase in viral gene expression, and plays a vital role in pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to characterize the genetic variations of Tat exon-1 from HIV-1 infected patients from North India. Genomic DNA was isolated from PBMCs and Tat exon-1 was PCR amplified with specific primers followed by cloning, sequencing and sequence analyses using bioinformatic tools for predicting HIV-1 subtypes, recombination events, conservation of domains and phosphorylation sites, and LTR transactivation by luciferase assay. Phylogenetic analysis of Tat exon-1 variants (n = 120) revealed sequence similarity with South African Tat C sequences and distinct geographical relationships were observed for B/C recombinants. Bootscan analysis of our variants showed 90% homology to Tat C and 10% to B/C recombinants with a precise breakpoint. Natural substitutions were observed with high allelic frequencies which may be beneficial for virus. High amino acid conservation was observed in Tat among Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) recipients. Barring few changes, most of the functional domains, predicted motifs and phosphorylation sites were well conserved in most of Tat variants. dN/dS analysis revealed purifying selection, implying the importance of functional conservation of Tat exon-1. Our Indian Tat C variants and B/C recombinants showed differential LTR transactivation. The possible role of Tat exon-1 variants in shaping the current HIV-1 epidemic in North India was highlighted. Natural substitutions across conserved functional domains were observed and provided evidence for the emergence of B/C recombinants within the ORF of Tat exon-1. These events are likely to have

  13. Maternal obesity and tobacco use modify the impact of genetic variants on the occurrence of conotruncal heart defects.

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    Xinyu Tang

    Full Text Available Conotruncal heart defects (CTDs are among the most severe birth defects worldwide. Studies of CTDs indicate both lifestyle behaviors and genetic variation contribute to the risk of CTDs. Based on a hybrid design using data from 616 case-parental and 1645 control-parental triads recruited for the National Birth Defects Prevention Study between 1997 and 2008, we investigated whether the occurrence of CTDs is associated with interactions between 921 maternal and/or fetal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and maternal obesity and tobacco use. The maternal genotypes of the variants in the glutamate-cysteine ligase, catalytic subunit (GCLC gene and the fetal genotypes of the variants in the glutathione S-transferase alpha 3 (GSTA3 gene were associated with an elevated risk of CTDs among obese mothers. The risk of delivering infants with CTDs among obese mothers carrying AC genotype for a variant in the GCLC gene (rs6458939 was 2.00 times the risk among those carrying CC genotype (95% confidence interval: 1.41, 2.38. The maternal genotypes of several variants in the glutathione-S-transferase (GST family of genes and the fetal genotypes of the variants in the GCLC gene interacted with tobacco exposures to increase the risk of CTDs. Our study suggests that the genetic basis underlying susceptibility of the developing heart to the adverse effects of maternal obesity and tobacco use involve both maternal and embryonic genetic variants. These results may provide insights into the underlying pathophysiology of CTDs, and ultimately lead to novel prevention strategies.

  14. Predicting the Pathogenic Potential of BRCA1 and BRCA2 Gene Variants Identified in Clinical Genetic Testing

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    Clare Brookes

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Missense variants are very commonly detected when screening for mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Pathogenic mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes lead to an increased risk of developing breast, ovarian, prostate and/or pancreatic cancer. This study aimed to assess the predictive capability of in silico programmes and mutation databases in assisting diagnostic laboratories to determine the pathogenicity of sequence-detectable mutations. Methods: Between July 2011 and April 2013, an analysis was undertaken of 13 missense BRCA gene variants that had been detected in patients referred to the Genetic Health Services New Zealand (Northern Hub for BRCA gene analysis. The analysis involved the use of 13 in silico protein prediction programmes, two in silico transcript analysis programmes and the examination of three BRCA gene databases. Results: In most of the variants, the analysis showed different in silico interpretations. This illustrates the interpretation challenges faced by diagnostic laboratories. Conclusion: Unfortunately, when using online mutation databases and carrying out in silico analyses, there is significant discordance in the classification of some missense variants in the BRCA genes. This discordance leads to complexities in interpreting and reporting these variants in a clinical context. The authors have developed a simple procedure for analysing variants; however, those of unknown significance largely remain unknown. As a consequence, the clinical value of some reports may be negligible.

  15. Identifying rare disease variants in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulated data: a comparison of several statistical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ruixue; Huang, Chien-Hsun; Lo, Shaw-Hwa; Zheng, Tian; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful at identifying common disease variants associated with complex diseases, but the common variants identified have small effect sizes and account for only a small fraction of the estimated heritability for common diseases. Theoretical and empirical studies suggest that rare variants, which are much less frequent in populations and are poorly captured by single-nucleotide polymorphism chips, could play a significant role in complex diseases. Several new statistical methods have been developed for the analysis of rare variants, for example, the combined multivariate and collapsing method, the weighted-sum method and a replication-based method. Here, we apply and compare these methods to the simulated data sets of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 and thereby explore the contribution of rare variants to disease risk. In addition, we investigate the usefulness of extreme phenotypes in identifying rare risk variants when dealing with quantitative traits. Finally, we perform a pathway analysis and show the importance of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in explaining different phenotypes.

  16. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

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    Timothy Read

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  17. Stepwise emergence of azole, echinocandin and amphotericin B multidrug resistance in vivo in Candida albicans orchestrated by multiple genetic alterations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Hare; Thyssen Astvad, Karen Marie; Vale Silva, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to characterize the underlying molecular mechanisms in consecutive clinical Candida albicans isolates from a single patient displaying stepwise-acquired multidrug resistance.  Methods: Nine clinical isolates (P-1 to P-9) were susceptibility tested by EU...

  18. Association analysis of PON2 genetic variants with serum paraoxonase activity and systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Manzi Susan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low serum paraoxonase (PON activity is associated with the risk of coronary artery disease, diabetes and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Our prior studies have shown that the PON1/rs662 (p.Gln192Arg, PON1/rs854560 (p.Leu55Met, PON3/rs17884563 and PON3/rs740264 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms significantly affect serum PON activity. Since PON1, PON2 and PON3 share high degree of structural and functional properties, in this study, we examined the role of PON2 genetic variation on serum PON activity, risk of SLE and SLE-related clinical manifestations in a Caucasian case-control sample. Methods PON2 SNPs were selected from HapMap and SeattleSNPs databases by including at least one tagSNP from each bin defined in these resources. A total of nineteen PON2 SNPs were successfully genotyped in 411 SLE cases and 511 healthy controls using pyrosequencing, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP or TaqMan allelic discrimination methods. Results Our pair-wise linkage disequilibrium (LD analysis, using an r2 cutoff of 0.7, identified 14 PON2 tagSNPs that captured all 19 PON2 variants in our sample, 12 of which were not in high LD with known PON1 and PON3 SNP modifiers of PON activity. Stepwise regression analysis of PON activity, including the known modifiers, identified five PON2 SNPs [rs6954345 (p.Ser311Cys, rs13306702, rs987539, rs11982486, and rs4729189; P = 0.005 to 2.1 × 10-6] that were significantly associated with PON activity. We found no association of PON2 SNPs with SLE risk but modest associations were observed with lupus nephritis (rs11981433, rs17876205, rs17876183 and immunologic disorder (rs11981433 in SLE patients (P = 0.013 to 0.042. Conclusions Our data indicate that PON2 genetic variants significantly affect variation in serum PON activity and have modest effects on risk of lupus nephritis and SLE-related immunologic disorder.

  19. Autoimmunity and antibody affinity maturation are modulated by genetic variants on mouse chromosome 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin, Roxanne; Dugas, Véronique; Chabot-Roy, Geneviève; Salem, David; Zahn, Astrid; Di Noia, Javier M; Rauch, Joyce; Lesage, Sylvie

    2015-04-01

    Autoimmune diseases result from a break in immune tolerance leading to an attack on self-antigens. Autoantibody levels serve as a predictive tool for the early diagnosis of many autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes. We find that a genetic locus on mouse chromosome 12 influences the affinity maturation of antibodies as well as autoantibody production. Thus, we generated a NOD.H2(k) congenic strain bearing B10 alleles at the locus comprised within the D12Mit184 and D12Mit12 markers, which we named NOD.H2(k)-Chr12. We determined the biological relevance of the Chr12 locus on the autoimmune process using an antigen-specific TCR transgenic autoimmune mouse model. Specifically, the 3A9 TCR transgene, which recognizes a peptide from hen egg lysozyme (HEL) in the context of I-A(k), and the HEL transgene, which is expressed under the rat-insulin promoter (iHEL), were bred into the NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic strain. In the resulting 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 mice, we observed a significant decrease in diabetes incidence as well as a decrease in both the quantity and affinity of HEL-specific IgG autoantibodies relative to 3A9 TCR:iHEL NOD.H2(k) mice. Notably, the decrease in autoantibodies due to the Chr12 locus was not restricted to the TCR transgenic model, as it was also observed in the non-transgenic NOD.H2(k) setting. Of importance, antibody affinity maturation upon immunization and re-challenge was also impeded in NOD.H2(k)-Chr12 congenic mice relative to NOD.H2(k) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that a genetic variant(s) present within the Chr12 locus plays a global role in modulating antibody affinity maturation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease – a genome-wide analysis of common variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R.; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Levi, Christopher; O′Donnell, Christopher J.; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C.; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M. Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P.; Thompson, John R.; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Chambers, John C.; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M.; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background and Purpose Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each have a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Methods Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, CARDIoGRAM, and C4D consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (pstroke (LAS) subtype. Results Common variants associated with CAD at pstroke and particularly the large artery stroke subtype with coronary artery disease. PMID:24262325

  1. The pathogenicity of genetic variants previously associated with left ventricular non-compaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, Yeganeh; Jabbari, Javad; Jabbari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    an updated list of previously reported LVNC-associated variants with biologic description and investigate the prevalence of LVNC variants in healthy general population to find false-positive LVNC-associated variants. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Human Gene Mutation Database and PubMed were systematically...... searched to identify all previously reported LVNC-associated variants. Thereafter, the Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAC), that both represent the background population, was searched for all variants. Four in silico prediction tools were assessed to determine...

  2. Common genetic variants and subclinical atherosclerosis: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Jose D; Manichaikul, Ani; Wang, Xin-Qun; Rich, Stephen S; Rotter, Jerome I; Post, Wendy S; Polak, Joseph F; Budoff, Matthew J; Bluemke, David A

    2016-02-01

    Subclinical atherosclerosis (sCVD), measured by coronary artery calcium (CAC) and carotid intima media thickness (CIMT) is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) of sCVD and CVD have focused primarily on Caucasian populations. We hypothesized that these associations may differ in populations from distinct genetic backgrounds. The associations between sCVD and 66 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from published GWAS of sCVD and CVD were tested in 8224 Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) and MESA Family participants [2329 Caucasians (EUA), 691 Chinese (CHN), 2482 African Americans (AFA), and 2012 Hispanic (HIS)] using an additive model adjusting for CVD risk factors, with SNP significance defined by a Bonferroni-corrected p < 7.6 × 10(-4) (0.05/66). In EUA there were significant associations for CAC with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P = 2 × 10(-9); rs4977574, P = 4 × 10(-9)), COL4A1 (rs9515203, P = 9 × 10(-6)), and PHACTR1 (rs9349379, P = 4 × 10(-4)). In HIS, CAC was associated with SNPs in 9p21 (rs1333049, P = 8 × 10(-5); rs4977574, P = 5 × 10(-5)), APOA5 (rs964184, P = 2 × 10(-4)), and ADAMTS7 (rs7173743, P = 4 × 10(-4)). There were no associations between CAC and 9p21 SNPs for AFA and CHN. Fine mapping of the 9p21 region revealed SNPs with robust associations with CAC in EUA and HIS but no significant associations in AFA and CHN. Our results suggest some shared genetic architecture for sCVD across ethnic groups, while also underscoring the possibility of novel variants and/or pathways in risk of CVD in ethnically diverse populations. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  3. Genetic variants in EPAS1 contribute to adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in Sherpas.

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    Masayuki Hanaoka

    Full Text Available Sherpas comprise a population of Tibetan ancestry in the Himalayan region that is renowned for its mountaineering prowess. The very small amount of available genetic information for Sherpas is insufficient to explain their physiological ability to adapt to high-altitude hypoxia. Recent genetic evidence has indicated that natural selection on the endothelial PAS domain protein 1 (EPAS1 gene was occurred in the Tibetan population during their occupation in the Tibetan Plateau for millennia. Tibetan-specific variations in EPAS1 may regulate the physiological responses to high-altitude hypoxia via a hypoxia-inducible transcription factor pathway. We examined three significant tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs13419896, rs4953354, and rs4953388 in the EPAS1 gene in Sherpas, and compared these variants with Tibetan highlanders on the Tibetan Plateau as well as with non-Sherpa lowlanders. We found that Sherpas and Tibetans on the Tibetan Plateau exhibit similar patterns in three EPAS1 significant tag SNPs, but these patterns are the reverse of those in non-Sherpa lowlanders. The three SNPs were in strong linkage in Sherpas, but in weak linkage in non-Sherpas. Importantly, the haplotype structured by the Sherpa-dominant alleles was present in Sherpas but rarely present in non-Sherpas. Surprisingly, the average level of serum erythropoietin in Sherpas at 3440 m was equal to that in non-Sherpas at 1300 m, indicating a resistant response of erythropoietin to high-altitude hypoxia in Sherpas. These observations strongly suggest that EPAS1 is under selection for adaptation to the high-altitude life of Tibetan populations, including Sherpas. Understanding of the mechanism of hypoxia tolerance in Tibetans is expected to provide lights to the therapeutic solutions of some hypoxia-related human diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  4. Genetic variants in MARCO are associated with the susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population.

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    Mai-Juan Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Susceptibility to tuberculosis is not only determined by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, but also by the genetic component of the host. Macrophage receptor with a collagenous structure (MARCO is essential components required for toll like receptor-signaling in macrophage response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which may contribute to tuberculosis risk. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To specifically investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in MARCO gene are associated with pulmonary tuberculosis in Chinese Han population. By selecting tagging SNPs in MARCO gene, 17 tag SNPs were identified and genotyped in 923 pulmonary tuberculosis patients and 1033 healthy control subjects using a hospital based case-control association study. Single-point and haplotype analysis revealed an association in intron and exon region of MARCO gene. One SNP (rs17009726 was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis, where the carriers of the G allele had a 1.65 fold (95% CI = 1.32-2.05, p(corrected = 9.27E-5 increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. Haplotype analysis revealed that haplotype GC containing G allele of 17009726 and haplotype TGCC (rs17795618T/A, rs1371562G/T, rs6761637T/C, rs2011839C/T were also associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (p(corrected = 0.0001 and 0.029, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested that genetic variants in MARCO gene were associated with pulmonary tuberculosis susceptibility in Chinese Han population, and the findings emphasize the importance of MARCO mediated immune responses in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis.

  5. Detection of new genetic variants of Betacoronaviruses in Endemic Frugivorous Bats of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razanajatovo, Norosoa H; Nomenjanahary, Lalaina A; Wilkinson, David A; Razafimanahaka, Julie H; Goodman, Steven M; Jenkins, Richard K; Jones, Julia P G; Heraud, Jean-Michel

    2015-03-12

    Bats are amongst the natural reservoirs of many coronaviruses (CoVs) of which some can lead to severe infection in human. African bats are known to harbor a range of pathogens (e.g., Ebola and Marburg viruses) that can infect humans and cause disease outbreaks. A recent study in South Africa isolated a genetic variant closely related to MERS-CoV from an insectivorous bat. Though Madagascar is home to 44 bat species (41 insectivorous and 3 frugivorous) of which 34 are endemic, no data exists concerning the circulation of CoVs in the island's chiropteran fauna. Certain Malagasy bats can be frequently found in close contact with humans and frugivorous bats feed in the same trees where people collect and consume fruits and are hunted and consumed as bush meat. The purpose of our study is to detect and identify CoVs from frugivorous bats in Madagascar to evaluate the risk of human infection from infected bats. Frugivorous bats belonging to three species were captured in four different regions of Madagascar. We analyzed fecal and throat swabs to detect the presence of virus through amplification of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, which is highly conserved in all known coronaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses were performed from positive specimens. From 351 frugivorous bats, we detected 14 coronaviruses from two endemic bats species, of which 13 viruses were identified from Pteropus rufus and one from Eidolon dupreanum, giving an overall prevalence of 4.5%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Malagasy strains belong to the genus Betacoronavirus but form three distinct clusters, which seem to represent previously undescribed genetic lineages. Our findings suggest that CoVs circulate in frugivorous bats of Madagascar, demonstrating the needs to evaluate spillover risk to human populations especially for individuals that hunt and consume infected bats. Possible dispersal mechanisms as to how coronaviruses arrived on Madagascar are discussed.

  6. Identification of Common Genetic Variants Influencing Spontaneous Dizygotic Twinning and Female Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbarek, Hamdi; Steinberg, Stacy; Nyholt, Dale R.; Gordon, Scott D.; Miller, Michael B.; McRae, Allan F.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Day, Felix R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J.; Davies, Gareth E.; Martin, Hilary C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Jansen, Rick; McAloney, Kerrie; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Plomin, Robert; Spector, Tim D.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Reversade, Bruno; Harris, R. Alan; Aagaard, Kjersti; Kristjansson, Ragnar P.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur Ingi; Sigurdardottir, Olof; Iacono, William G.; Lambalk, Cornelis B.; Montgomery, Grant W.; McGue, Matt; Ong, Ken K.; Perry, John R.B.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Stefánsson, Kari; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous dizygotic (DZ) twinning occurs in 1%–4% of women, with familial clustering and unknown physiological pathways and genetic origin. DZ twinning might index increased fertility and has distinct health implications for mother and child. We performed a GWAS in 1,980 mothers of spontaneous DZ twins and 12,953 control subjects. Findings were replicated in a large Icelandic cohort and tested for association across a broad range of fertility traits in women. Two SNPs were identified (rs11031006 near FSHB, p = 1.54 × 10−9, and rs17293443 in SMAD3, p = 1.57 × 10−8) and replicated (p = 3 × 10−3 and p = 1.44 × 10−4, respectively). Based on ∼90,000 births in Iceland, the risk of a mother delivering twins increased by 18% for each copy of allele rs11031006-G and 9% for rs17293443-C. A higher polygenic risk score (PRS) for DZ twinning, calculated based on the results of the DZ twinning GWAS, was significantly associated with DZ twinning in Iceland (p = 0.001). A higher PRS was also associated with having children (p = 0.01), greater lifetime parity (p = 0.03), and earlier age at first child (p = 0.02). Allele rs11031006-G was associated with higher serum FSH levels, earlier age at menarche, earlier age at first child, higher lifetime parity, lower PCOS risk, and earlier age at menopause. Conversely, rs17293443-C was associated with later age at last child. We identified robust genetic risk variants for DZ twinning: one near FSHB and a second within SMAD3, the product of which plays an important role in gonadal responsiveness to FSH. These loci contribute to crucial aspects of reproductive capacity and health. PMID:27132594

  7. Genetic Variants on Chromosome 1q41 Influence Ocular Axial Length and High Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiao; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Zhou, Xin; Meguro, Akira; Nakata, Isao; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Goh, Liang-Kee; Li, Yi-Ju; Lim, Wan'e; Ho, Candice E. H.; Hawthorne, Felicia; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chua, Daniel; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Yamashiro, Kenji; Ohno-Matsui, Kyoko; Matsuo, Keitaro; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Vithana, Eranga; Seielstad, Mark; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Beuerman, Roger W.; Tai, E.-Shyong; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Aung, Tin; Young, Terri L.; Wong, Tien-Yin

    2012-01-01

    As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL). Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = −0.16 mm per minor allele, Pmeta = 2.69×10−10). The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.68–0.84, Pmeta = 4.38×10−7) in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia. PMID:22685421

  8. Association of genetic variants with rapid fibrosis: progression after liver transplantation for hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layden, Jennifer E; Tayo, Bamidele O; Cotler, Scott J; Clark, Nina M; Baraoidan, Kristine; Friedman, Scott L; Cooper, Richard S

    2014-05-27

    Recurrence of hepatitis C, the main indication for liver transplantation in the United States, leads to rapid fibrosis progression and worse outcomes compared to other indications. While clinical variables play a role, they are insufficient to explain all inter-patient variability in posttransplant fibrosis progression. Genetic factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) outcomes have been identified, but limited studies have been conducted in the context of HCV-related liver transplantation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine candidate genes related to the immune response and rate of fibrosis in subjects undergoing liver transplantation for HCV. One hundred twelve recipients with detailed posttransplant fibrosis and clinical information were genotyped using 25 single nucleotide variants (SNVs), including five SNVs within the IL28B gene region. Associations between SNVs and rapid fibrosis progression were performed controlling for pertinent clinical variables and haplotype analyses for the IL28B gene were completed. Significant multivariable associations were found for rs8099917 (IL28B), rs1991401 (DDX5), rs4969168 (SOC3), and rs7976497 (MLEC). The minor allele was protective against rapid fibrosis progression for the IL28B SNV (G allele), MLEC SNV (T allele), and DDX5 SNV (G allele). For the SOC3 SNV, the minor allele (A) increased the risk for rapid fibrosis progression. Additionally, two recipient haplotype structures for IL28B were significantly associated with rapid fibrosis progression. These findings indicate that recipient genetic factors play a role in posttransplant HCV-related fibrosis progression. Molecular studies of these pathways may elucidate the pathogenesis of posttransplant fibrosis progression and provide risk prediction markers.

  9. Molecular characterization of norovirus variants and genetic diversity of noroviruses and sapoviruses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaimongkol, Natthawan; Khamrin, Pattara; Malasao, Rungnapa; Thongprachum, Aksara; Kongsricharoern, Tipachan; Ukarapol, Nuthapong; Ushijima, Hiroshi; Maneekarn, Niwat

    2014-07-01

    Norovirus (NoV) and Sapovirus (SaV) have been reported as a common cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide. For a decade, surveillances of NoV and SaV have been conducted continually in Thailand. To monitor the epidemiological situation and to determine the genetic variation of NoV and SaV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, 567 samples collected from pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis were examined during 2007, and 2010-2011 by semi-nested RT-PCR and nucleotide sequencing methods. NoV was detected at 15.9%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed multiple NoV genotypes, GI/14 (1.1%), GII/1 (1.1%), GII/2 (1.1%), GII/3 (4.4%), GII/4 (65.6%), GII/6 (10.0%), GII/7 (2.2%), GII/12 (4.4%), GII/13 (3.3%), GII/16 (5.7%), and unclassified genotype (1.1%), circulating in this area. Among these, NoV GII/4 was the most prevalent genotype with a predominance of GII/4 2009 over other variants, 1996, 2006a, and 2006b. For SaV, the prevalence was 1.2% which was much lower than those of NoV and only SaV GI/1 was detected. This study highlights the epidemiology of NoV and SaV and genetic diversity of viruses circulating in pediatric patients hospitalized with acute gastroenteritis in Chiang Mai, Thailand. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Genetic variants on chromosome 1q41 influence ocular axial length and high myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Fan

    Full Text Available As one of the leading causes of visual impairment and blindness, myopia poses a significant public health burden in Asia. The primary determinant of myopia is an elongated ocular axial length (AL. Here we report a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies on AL conducted in 1,860 Chinese adults, 929 Chinese children, and 2,155 Malay adults. We identified a genetic locus on chromosome 1q41 harboring the zinc-finger 11B pseudogene ZC3H11B showing genome-wide significant association with AL variation (rs4373767, β = -0.16 mm per minor allele, P(meta =2.69 × 10(-10. The minor C allele of rs4373767 was also observed to significantly associate with decreased susceptibility to high myopia (per-allele odds ratio (OR =0.75, 95% CI: 0.68-0.84, P(meta =4.38 × 10(-7 in 1,118 highly myopic cases and 5,433 controls. ZC3H11B and two neighboring genes SLC30A10 and LYPLAL1 were expressed in the human neural retina, retinal pigment epithelium, and sclera. In an experimental myopia mouse model, we observed significant alterations to gene and protein expression in the retina and sclera of the unilateral induced myopic eyes for the murine genes ZC3H11A, SLC30A10, and LYPLAL1. This supports the likely role of genetic variants at chromosome 1q41 in influencing AL variation and high myopia.

  11. Expression of long non-coding RNAs in autoimmunity and linkage to enhancer function and autoimmune disease risk genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aune, T M; Crooke, P S; Patrick, A E; Tossberg, J T; Olsen, N J; Spurlock, C F

    2017-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified numerous genetic variants conferring autoimmune disease risk. Most of these genetic variants lie outside protein-coding genes hampering mechanistic explorations. Numerous mRNAs are also differentially expressed in autoimmune disease but their regulation is also unclear. The majority of the human genome is transcribed yet its biologic significance is incompletely understood. We performed whole genome RNA-sequencing [RNA-seq] to categorize expression of mRNAs, known and novel long non-coding RNAs [lncRNAs] in leukocytes from subjects with autoimmune disease and identified annotated and novel lncRNAs differentially expressed across multiple disorders. We found that loci transcribing novel lncRNAs were not randomly distributed across the genome but co-localized with leukocyte transcriptional enhancers, especially super-enhancers, and near genetic variants associated with autoimmune disease risk. We propose that alterations in enhancer function, including lncRNA expression, produced by genetics and environment, change cellular phenotypes contributing to disease risk and pathogenesis and represent attractive therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic variants in FGFR2 and TNRC9 genes are associated with breast cancer risk in Pakistani women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhar, Ayesha; Jamil, Farrukh; Bashir, Qamar; Ahmad, Munawar Saleem; Masood, Misbah; Tanvir, Imrana; Rashid, Naeem; Waheed, Abdul; Afzal, Muhammad Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad Akram

    2016-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) lead to genetic differences in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility among women from different ethnicities. The present study aimed at investigating the involvement of SNPs of three genes, including fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), trinucleotide-repeat-containing 9 (TNRC9) and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MAP3K1), as risk factors for the development of BC. A case‑control study (90‑100 cases; 90‑100 controls) was performed to evaluate five genetic variants of three genes, including FGFR2 (SNPs: rs1219648, rs2981582), TNRC9 (SNPs: rs8051542, rs3803662) and MAP3K1 (SNP: rs889312) as BC risk factors in Pakistani women. Significant associations were observed between BC risk and two SNPs of FGFR2 [rs2981582 (P=0.005), rs1219648 (P=9.08e‑006)] and one SNP of TNRC9 [rs3803662) (P=0.012)] in Pakistani women. On examining the different interactions of these SNPs with various clinicopathological characteristics, all three associated genetic variants, rs2981582 rs1219648 and rs3803662, exhibited a greater predisposition to sporadic, in comparison to familial, BC. Furthermore, there was an increased effect of BC risk between haplotype combinations of the two SNPs of FGFR2 (rs2981582 and rs1219648) in Pakistani women. The results of the present study suggest that variants of FGFR2 and TNRC9 may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of BC in Pakistani women.

  13. An Evaluation of Factors Associated With Pathogenic PRSS1, SPINK1, CTFR, and/or CTRC Genetic Variants in Patients With Idiopathic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalaly, Niloofar Y; Moran, Robert A; Fargahi, Farshid; Khashab, Mouen A; Kamal, Ayesha; Lennon, Anne Marie; Walsh, Christi; Makary, Martin A; Whitcomb, David C; Yadav, Dhiraj; Cebotaru, Liudmila; Singh, Vikesh K

    2017-08-01

    We evaluated factors associated with pathogenic genetic variants in patients with idiopathic pancreatitis. Genetic testing (PRSS1, CFTR, SPINK1, and CTRC) was performed in all eligible patients with idiopathic pancreatitis between 2010 to 2015. Patients were classified into the following groups based on a review of medical records: (1) acute recurrent idiopathic pancreatitis (ARIP) with or without underlying chronic pancreatitis; (2) idiopathic chronic pancreatitis (ICP) without a history of ARP; (3) an unexplained first episode of acute pancreatitis (AP)pancreatitis. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors associated with pathogenic genetic variants. Among 197 ARIP and/or ICP patients evaluated from 2010 to 2015, 134 underwent genetic testing. A total of 88 pathogenic genetic variants were found in 64 (47.8%) patients. Pathogenic genetic variants were identified in 58, 63, and 27% of patients with ARIP, an unexplained first episode of AP <35 years of age, and ICP without ARP, respectively. ARIP (OR: 18.12; 95% CI: 2.16-151.87; P=0.008) and an unexplained first episode of AP<35 years of age (OR: 2.46; 95% CI: 1.18-5.15; P=0.017), but not ICP, were independently associated with pathogenic genetic variants in the adjusted analysis. Pathogenic genetic variants are most likely to be identified in patients with ARIP and an unexplained first episode of AP<35 years of age. Genetic testing in these patient populations may delineate an etiology and prevent unnecessary diagnostic testing and procedures.

  14. Association of genetic susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes with breast cancer risk in women of European ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Milne, Roger L; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J; Hopper, John L; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Pilar Zamora, M; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-05-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at p < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR 0.94, 95 % CI = 0.92-0.95, p = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06, p = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR 0.97, 95 % CI = 0.95-0.99, p = 8.05E-04). We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk.

  15. Association of Genetic Susceptibility Variants for Type 2 Diabetes with Breast Cancer Risk in Women of European Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhiguo; Wen, Wanqing; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Zhang, Ben; Long, Jirong; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Milne, Roger L.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Lindstrom, Sara; Bojesen, Stig E.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Arndt, Volker; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brenner, Hermann; Burwinkel, Barbara; Cai, Qiuyin; Casey, Graham; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Couch, Fergus J.; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Dörk, Thilo; Dumont, Martine; Fasching, Peter A.; Figueroa, Jonine; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Flyger, Henrik; Fostira, Florentia; Gammon, Marilie; Giles, Graham G.; Guénel, Pascal; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hamann, Ute; Harrington, Patricia; Hartman, Mikael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hopper, John L.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jasmine, Farzana; John, Esther M.; Johnson, Nichola; Kabisch, Maria; Khan, Sofia; Kibriya, Muhammad; Knight, Julia A.; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kriege, Mieke; Kristensen, Vessela; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Eunjung; Li, Jingmei; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luben, Robert; Lubinski, Jan; Malone, Kathleen E.; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; McLean, Catriona; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miao, Hui; Muir, Kenneth; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Neven, Patrick; Olson, Janet E.; Perkins, Barbara; Peterlongo, Paolo; Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Pylkäs, Katri; Rudolph, Anja; Santella, Regina; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Schoemaker, Minouk; Shah, Mitul; Shrubsole, Martha; Southey, Melissa C.; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Toland, Amanda E.; Tomlinson, Ian; Torres, Diana; Truong, Thérèse; Ursin, Giske; Van Der Luijt, Rob B.; Verhoef, Senno; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Whittemore, Alice S.; Winqvist, Robert; Zamora, M. Pilar; Zhao, Hui; Dunning, Alison M.; Simard, Jacques; Hall, Per; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul; Hunter, David; Easton, Douglas F.; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Type 2 diabetes (T2D) has been reported to be associated with an elevated risk of breast cancer. It is unclear, however, whether this association is due to shared genetic factors. Methods We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) using risk variants from 33 known independent T2D susceptibility loci and evaluated its relation to breast cancer risk using the data from two consortia, including 62,328 breast cancer patients and 83,817 controls of European ancestry. Unconditional logistic regression models were used to derive adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to measure the association of breast cancer risk with T2D GRS or T2D-associated genetic risk variants. Meta-analyses were conducted to obtain summary ORs across all studies. Results The T2D GRS was not found to be associated with breast cancer risk, overall, by menopausal status, or for estrogen receptor positive or negative breast cancer. Three T2D associated risk variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple comparisons using the Bonferroni method (at P < 0.001), rs9939609 (FTO) (OR = 0.94, 95% CI = 0.92 – 0.95, P = 4.13E-13), rs7903146 (TCF7L2) (OR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.02 – 1.06, P = 1.26E-05), and rs8042680 (PRC1) (OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.95 – 0.99, P = 8.05E-04). Conclusions We have shown that several genetic risk variants were associated with the risk of both T2D and breast cancer. However, overall genetic susceptibility to T2D may not be related to breast cancer risk. PMID:27053251

  16. Evaluation of Four Genetic Variants in Han Chinese Subjects with High Myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimeng Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High myopia is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. However, the exact etiology of high myopia remains unraveled despite numerous attempts of elucidation. Previous genome-wide association study (GWAS has revealed that four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, including rs2969180, rs1652333, rs9307551, and rs7837791, were associated with high myopia in Caucasians. The present study was conducted to investigate whether these genetic variants were associated with high myopia in Han Chinese. These four SNPs were genotyped by SNaPshot method in a Han Chinese cohort composed of 827 patients with high myopia and 988 healthy controls. Among the SNPs genotyped, only rs9307551 was found to be significantly associated with high myopia in this study. Carriers of rs9307551A allele, AA, and AC genotypes had an increased risk of high myopia (OR = 1.33, 95% CI 1.14–1.54; OR = 1.75, 95% CI 1.28–2.38; OR = 1.59, 95% CI 1.24–2.01, resp.. Interestingly, when split by gender, the association between rs9307551 and high myopia proved to be gender-specific with significance observed only in females but not males. These findings suggested that the SNP of rs9307551 showed a gender-specific association with high myopia in the Han Chinese population. In addition, LOC100506035, a lincRNA gene, might play a crucial role in the susceptibility to high myopia.

  17. A Simplified Strategy for Introducing Genetic Variants into Drosophila Compound Autosome Stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliland, William D; May, Dennis P; Colwell, Eileen M; Kennison, James A

    2016-09-26

    Drosophila stocks bearing compound chromosomes, single molecules of DNA that carry the genomic complement of two chromosomes, are useful tools for studying meiosis and mitosis. However, these stocks cannot easily be crossed to stocks with regular chromosomes, due to the lethality of the resulting whole-chromosome aneuploidy. This prevents the examination of interesting genetic variants in a compound chromosome background. Methods to circumvent this difficulty have included the use of triploid females or nondisjunction (caused by either cold-induced microtubule depolymerization or meiotic mutants.) Here we present a new approach for crossing compound chromosomes that takes advantage of the nonhomologous segregations that result when multiple chromosomes in the same genome are prevented from meiotic crossing over by heterozygosity for balancer chromosomes. This approach gives higher yields of the desired progeny in fewer generations of crossing. Using this technique, we have created and validated stocks carrying both a compound-X and compound-2, as well as compound-2 stocks carrying the meiotic mutant nod. Copyright © 2016 Author et al.

  18. Variants in the SP110 gene are associated with genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis in West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Kerrie; Campbell, Sarah J.; Fielding, Katherine; Sillah, Jackson; Bah, Boubacar; Gustafson, Per; Manneh, Kebba; Lisse, Ida; Sirugo, Giorgio; Bennett, Steve; Aaby, Peter; McAdam, Keith P. W. J.; Bah-Sow, Oumou; Lienhardt, Christian; Kramnik, Igor; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2006-01-01

    The sst1 locus has been identified in a mouse model to control resistance and susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. Subsequent studies have now identified Ipr1 (intracellular pathogen resistance 1) to be the gene responsible. Ipr1 is encoded within the sst1 locus and is expressed in the tuberculosis lung lesions and macrophages of sst1-resistant, but not sst1-susceptible mice. We have therefore examined the closest human homologue of Ipr1, SP110, for its ability to control susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in humans. In a study of families from The Gambia we have identified three polymorphisms that are associated with disease. On examination of additional families from Guinea-Bissau and the Republic of Guinea, two of these associations were independently replicated. These variants are in strong linkage disequilibrium with each other and lie within a 31-kb block of low haplotypic diversity, suggesting that a polymorphism within this region has a role in genetic susceptibility to tuberculosis in humans. PMID:16803959

  19. Genetically variant populations of Paragonimus proliferus Hsia & Chen, 1964 from central Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doanh, P N; Hien, H V; Nonaka, N; Horii, Y; Nawa, Y

    2013-06-01

    Among about 50 nominal Paragonimus species, Paragonimus proliferus is rather a rare species, found only in Yunnan province, China, until our recent discovery of this species in Lai Chau province, northern Vietnam close to Yunnan, China. Here we add Quang Binh province, central Vietnam as a new endemic area of P. proliferus. Large excysted metacercariae found in mountainous crabs, Potamiscus tannanti, were morphologically identified as P. proliferus, which was confirmed further by molecular analyses. Second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) sequences of the P. proliferus population in Quang Binh province were completely (100%) identical with those of P. proliferus populations in Lai Chau province, northern Vietnam and Yunnan province, China. However, cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene sequences of Quang Binh population were significantly different (5.6%) from that of previously reported northern Vietnam and Yunnan, China populations. A phylogenetic tree revealed that all CO1 sequences of P. proliferus Quang Binh population formed a distinct group, which was clustered with northern Vietnam and Yunnan, China populations with the bootstrap value of 75%. This is the first record of the genetically variant population of P. proliferus, distribution of which is geographically remote from the previously reported endemic areas in the border between northern Vietnam and Yunnan, China, suggesting that P. proliferus may be much more widely distributed in the Indochina peninsula (or South-East Asia) than expected.

  20. Associating disease-related genetic variants in intergenic regions to the genes they impact

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    Geoff Macintyre

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a method to assist in interpretation of the functional impact of intergenic disease-associated SNPs that is not limited to search strategies proximal to the SNP. The method builds on two sources of external knowledge: the growing understanding of three-dimensional spatial relationships in the genome, and the substantial repository of information about relationships among genetic variants, genes, and diseases captured in the published biomedical literature. We integrate chromatin conformation capture data (HiC with literature support to rank putative target genes of intergenic disease-associated SNPs. We demonstrate that this hybrid method outperforms a genomic distance baseline on a small test set of expression quantitative trait loci, as well as either method individually. In addition, we show the potential for this method to uncover relationships between intergenic SNPs and target genes across chromosomes. With more extensive chromatin conformation capture data becoming readily available, this method provides a way forward towards functional interpretation of SNPs in the context of the three dimensional structure of the genome in the nucleus.

  1. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Blumberg, B S; Putnam, F W

    1987-01-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO4/PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene. Images PMID:3474609

  2. Thrombotic genetic risk factors and warfarin pharmacogenetic variants in São Miguel's healthy population (Azores

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    Pacheco Paula R

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Summary Background The Azorean population presents the highest standardized mortality rate for cardiovascular diseases (CVD when compared to mainland Portugal and other populations. Since thrombosis is a common cause of CVD, we assessed four polymorphisms in three thrombotic risk genes – F5 (G1691A, F2 (G20210A and MTHFR (C677T, A1298C, in 469 healthy blood donors from São Miguel Island (Azores. We also analysed the CYP2C9 (C430T, A1075C and VKORC1 (G1639A variants in fifty-eight individuals with predisposition to thrombosis (possessing at least one variation in F5 or F2 genes and one in MTHFR to evaluate their warfarin drug response genetic profiles. Results Among the 469 individuals, the data showed that thrombotic risk allele frequencies – 1691A (4.9%, 20210A (1.8%, 677T (41.7% and 1298C (24.8% – were similar to other Caucasians, but significantly different from mainland Portuguese (χ2, p F5, F2, MTHFR C677T and A1298C. Complete homozygosity for all wild-type alleles (GG GG CC AA was present in 11.7%, being GG GG CT AA (22.4% the most frequent profile. The results also demonstrated that 12.4% (58 out of 469 of São Miguel islanders have increased genetic predisposition to thrombosis. Subsequently, we evaluated these individuals for their warfarin response genetic profiles. The data showed that seven out of fifty-eight individuals are poor metabolizers (two with CYP2C9*2/*2 and five with CYP2C9*2/*3 genotypes. VKORC1 polymorphism analysis identified twelve individuals (20.7% with AA genotype, who probably will require lower doses of warfarin. The joint analysis of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 revealed that 79.3% (46 out of 58 of the individuals carry at least one polymorphism in these genes. Within these, twenty-five individuals (43.1% need intermediate and/or low doses of warfarin, if treatment is started. Conclusion The present study demonstrated, for the first time, that São Miguel, and possibly the Azores population, shows significant

  3. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F

    2015-03-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10(-16)). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10(-7)). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10(-37)). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10(-22)), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10(-6)). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such

  4. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W.; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D.; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D’Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A.; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H.; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G.; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index—the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10−16). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10−7). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10−37). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10−22), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10−6). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such

  5. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Chindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Results Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. Conclusions We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  6. FANCM and RECQL genetic variants and breast cancer susceptibility: relevance to South Poland and West Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Myszka, Aleksander; Karpinski, Pawel; Sasiadek, Maria M; Akopyan, Hayane; Hammet, Fleur; Tsimiklis, Helen; Park, Daniel J; Pope, Bernard J; Slezak, Ryszard; Kitsera, Nataliya; Siekierzynska, Aleksandra; Southey, Melissa C

    2018-01-19

    FANCM and RECQL have recently been reported as breast cancer susceptibility genes and it has been suggested that they should be included on gene panel tests for breast cancer predisposition. However, the clinical value of testing for mutations in RECQL and FANCM remains to be determined. In this study, we have characterised the spectrum of FANCM and RECQL mutations in women affected with breast or ovarian cancer from South-West Poland and West Ukraine. We applied Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based enrichment method for targeted massively parallel sequencing, to screen the coding exons and proximal intron-exon junctions of FANCM and RECQL in germline DNA from unrelated women affected with breast cancer (n = 338) and ovarian cancer (n = 89) from Poland (n = 304) and Ukraine (n = 123). These women were at high-risk of carrying a genetic predisposition to breast and/or ovarian cancer due to a family history and/or early-onset disease. Among 427 women screened, we identified one carrier of the FANCM:c.1972C > T nonsense mutation (0.23%), and two carriers of the frameshift insertion FANCM:c.1491dup (0.47%). None of the variants we observed in RECQL were predicted to be loss-of-function mutations by standard variant effect prediction tools. Our study of the Polish and Ukrainian populations has identified a carrier frequency of truncating mutations in FANCM consistent with previous reports. Although initial reports suggesting that mutations in RECQL could be associated with increased breast cancer risk included women from Poland and identified the RECQL:c.1667_1667 + 3delAGTA mutation in 0.23-0.35% of breast cancer cases, we did not observe any carriers in our study cohort. Continued screening, both in research and diagnostic settings, will enable the accumulation of data that is needed to establish the clinical utility of including RECQL and FANCM on gene panel tests.

  7. Deleterious genetic variants in ciliopathy genes increase risk of ritodrine-induced cardiac and pulmonary side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Heewon; Kwon, Eun Jin; You, Young-Ah; Park, Yoomi; Min, Byung Joo; Yoo, Kyunghun; Hwang, Han-Sung; Kim, Ju Han; Kim, Young Ju

    2018-01-24

    Ritodrine is a commonly used tocolytic to prevent preterm labour. However, it can cause unexpected serious adverse reactions, such as pulmonary oedema, pulmonary congestion, and tachycardia. It is unknown whether such adverse reactions are associated with pharmacogenomic variants in patients. Whole-exome sequencing of 13 subjects with serious ritodrine-induced cardiac and pulmonary side-effects was performed to identify causal genes and variants. The deleterious impact of nonsynonymous substitutions for all genes was computed and compared between cases (n = 13) and controls (n = 30). The significant genes were annotated with Gene Ontology (GO), and the associated disease terms were categorised into four functional classes for functional enrichment tests. To assess the impact of distributed rare variants in cases with side effects, we carried out rare variant association tests with a minor allele frequency ≤ 1% using the burden test, the sequence Kernel association test (SKAT), and optimised SKAT. We identified 28 genes that showed significantly lower gene-wise deleteriousness scores in cases than in controls. Three of the identified genes-CYP1A1, CYP8B1, and SERPINA7-are pharmacokinetic genes. The significantly identified genes were categorized into four functional classes: ion binding, ATP binding, Ca 2+ -related, and ciliopathies-related. These four classes were significantly enriched with ciliary genes according to SYSCILIA Gold Standard genes (P side effects may be associated with deleterious genetic variants in ciliary and pharmacokinetic genes.

  8. Molecular characterization of a genetic variant of the steroid hormone-binding globulin gene in heterozygous subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.O.; Catterall, J.F. [Population Council, New York, NY (United States); Carino, C. [Instituto National de la Nutricion, Mexico City, MX (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    Steroid hormone-binding globulin in human serum displays different isoelectric focusing (IEF) patterns among individuals, suggesting genetic variation in the gene for this extracellular steroid carrier protein. Analysis of allele frequencies and family studies suggested the existence of two codominant alleles of the gene. Subsequent determination of the molecular basis of a variant of the gene was carried out using DNA from homozygous individuals from a single Belgian family. It was of interest to characterize other variant individuals to determine whether all variants identified by IEF phenotyping were caused by the same mutation or whether other mutations occurred in the gene in different populations. Previous studies identified Mexican subjects who were heterozygous for the variant IEF phenotype. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to localize the mutation in these subjects and to purify the variant allele for DNA sequence analysis. The results show that the mutation in this population is identical to that identified in the Belgian family, and no other mutations were detected in the gene. These data represent the first analysis of steroid hormone-binding globulin gene variation in heterozygous subjects and further support the conclusion of biallelism of the gene worldwide. 11 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Genome-wide assessment for genetic variants associated with ventricular dysfunction after primary coronary artery bypass graft surgery.

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    Amanda A Fox

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Postoperative ventricular dysfunction (VnD occurs in 9-20% of coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgical patients and is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. Understanding genetic causes of postoperative VnD should enhance patient risk stratification and improve treatment and prevention strategies. We aimed to determine if genetic variants associate with occurrence of in-hospital VnD after CABG surgery. METHODS: A genome-wide association study identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with postoperative VnD in male subjects of European ancestry undergoing isolated primary CABG surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. VnD was defined as the need for ≥2 inotropes or mechanical ventricular support after CABG surgery. Validated SNPs were assessed further in two replication CABG cohorts and meta-analysis was performed. RESULTS: Over 100 SNPs were associated with VnD (P2.1 of developing in-hospital VnD after CABG surgery. However, three genetic loci identified by meta-analysis were more modestly associated with development of postoperative VnD. Studies of larger cohorts to assess these loci as well as to define other genetic mechanisms and related biology that link genetic variants to postoperative ventricular dysfunction are warranted.

  10. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

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    Jennifer A Danielewski

    Full Text Available Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP (n = 17, genital warts (n = 43, anal cancer (n = 6 and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5, was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65% clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04. This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02. Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these

  11. A common genetic variant within SCN10A modulates cardiac SCN5A expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Boogaard, Malou; Smemo, Scott; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Arnolds, David E.; van de Werken, Harmen J. G.; Klous, Petra; McKean, David; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Moosmann, Julia; Toka, Okan; Yang, Xinan H.; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Bezzina, Connie R.; de Laat, Wouter; Seidman, Christine; Seidman, J. G.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Barnett, Phil; Moskowitz, Ivan P.

    2014-01-01

    Variants in SCN10A, which encodes a voltage-gated sodium channel, are associated with alterations of cardiac conduction parameters and the cardiac rhythm disorder Brugada syndrome; however, it is unclear how SCN10A variants promote dysfunctional cardiac conduction. Here we showed by high-resolution

  12. Network Mendelian randomization: using genetic variants as instrumental variables to investigate mediation in causal pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Stephen; Daniel, Rhian M; Butterworth, Adam S; Thompson, Simon G

    2015-04-01

    Mendelian randomization uses genetic variants, assumed to be instrumental variables for a particular exposure, to estimate the causal effect of that exposure on an outcome. If the instrumental variable criteria are satisfied, the resulting estimator is consistent even in the presence of unmeasured confounding and reverse causation. We extend the Mendelian randomization paradigm to investigate more complex networks of relationships between variables, in particular where some of the effect of an exposure on the outcome may operate through an intermediate variable (a mediator). If instrumental variables for the exposure and mediator are available, direct and indirect effects of the exposure on the outcome can be estimated, for example using either a regression-based method or structural equation models. The direction of effect between the exposure and a possible mediator can also be assessed. Methods are illustrated in an applied example considering causal relationships between body mass index, C-reactive protein and uric acid. These estimators are consistent in the presence of unmeasured confounding if, in addition to the instrumental variable assumptions, the effects of both the exposure on the mediator and the mediator on the outcome are homogeneous across individuals and linear without interactions. Nevertheless, a simulation study demonstrates that even considerable heterogeneity in these effects does not lead to bias in the estimates. These methods can be used to estimate direct and indirect causal effects in a mediation setting, and have potential for the investigation of more complex networks between multiple interrelated exposures and disease outcomes. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association.

  13. Characterization of LEDGF/p75 genetic variants and association with HIV-1 disease progression.

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    Peter Messiaen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF/p75 is an important co-factor involved in HIV-1 integration, the LEDGF/p75-IN interaction is a promising target for the new class of allosteric HIV integrase inhibitors (LEDGINs. Few data are available on the genetic variability of LEDGF/p75 and the influence on HIV disease in vivo. This study evaluated the relation between LEDGF/p75 genetic variation, mRNA expression and HIV-1 disease progression in order to guide future clinical use of LEDGINs. METHODS: Samples were derived from a therapy-naïve cohort at Ghent University Hospital and a Spanish long-term-non-progressor cohort. High-resolution melting curve analysis and Sanger sequencing were used to identify all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the coding region, flanking intronic regions and full 3'UTR of LEDGF/p75. In addition, two intronic tagSNPs were screened based on previous indication of influencing HIV disease. LEDGF/p75 mRNA was quantified in patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC using RT-qPCR. RESULTS: 325 samples were investigated from patients of Caucasian (n = 291 and African (n = 34 origin, including Elite (n = 49 and Viremic controllers (n = 62. 21 SNPs were identified, comprising five in the coding region and 16 in the non-coding regions and 3'UTR. The variants in the coding region were infrequent and had no major impact on protein structure according to SIFT and PolyPhen score. One intronic SNP (rs2737828 was significantly under-represented in Caucasian patients (P<0.0001 compared to healthy controls (HapMap. Two SNPs showed a non-significant trend towards association with slower disease progression but not with LEDGF/p75 expression. The observed variation in LEDGF/p75 expression was not correlated with disease progression. CONCLUSIONS: LEDGF/p75 is a highly conserved protein. Two non-coding polymorphisms were identified indicating a correlation with disease outcome, but further

  14. Association of genetic variants of the incretin-related genes with quantitative traits and occurrence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese

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    Mayumi Enya

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Rare variants of GIPR may contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes, possibly through insulin secretory defects. Furthermore, the genetic variant of PCSK1 might influence glucose homeostasis by altered insulin resistance independently of BMI, incretin level or proinsulin conversion, and may be associated with the occurrence of type 2 diabetes in Japanese.

  15. Trans-eQTLs reveal that independent genetic variants associated with a complex phenotype converge on intermediate genes, with a major role for the HLA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Jansen, Ritsert C; Veldink, Jan H; Westra, Harm Jan; Arends, Danny; Bonder, Marc Jan; Fu, Jingyuan; Deelen, Patrick; Groen, Hendricus; Smolonska, Joanna; Weersma, Rinse K; Hofstra, Robert M W; Buurman, Wim A; Rensen, Sander; Wolfs, Marcel G M; Platteel, Mathieu; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Elbers, Clara C; Festen, Noortje; Trynka, Gosia; Hofker, Marten H; Saris, Christiaan G J; Ophoff, Roel A; van den Berg, Leonard H; van Heel, David A; Wijmenga, Cisca; te Meerman, Gerhardus; Franke, Lude

    2011-01-01

    For many complex traits, genetic variants have been found associated. However, it is still mostly unclear through which downstream mechanism these variants cause these phenotypes. Knowledge of these intermediate steps is crucial to understand pathogenesis, while also providing leads for potential

  16. IGF2R Genetic Variants, Circulating IGF2 Concentrations and Colon Cancer Risk in African Americans and Whites

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    Cathrine Hoyo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mannose 6 Phosphate/Insulin-like Growth Factor Receptor-2 (IGF2R encodes a type-1 membrane protein that modulates availability of the potent mitogen, IGF2. We evaluated the associations between IGF2R non-synonymous genetic variants (c.5002G>A, Gly1619Arg(rs629849, and c.901C>G, Leu252Val(rs8191754, circulating IGF2 levels, and colon cancer (CC risk among African American and White participants enrolled in the North Carolina Colon Cancer Study (NCCCS. Generalized linear models were used to compare circulating levels of IGF2 among 298 African American and 518 White controls. Logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association of IGF2R genetic variants and CC risk. Women homozygous for the IGF2R c.5002 G>A allele, had higher mean levels of circulating IGF2, 828 (SD=321 ng/ml compared to non-carriers, 595 (SD=217 ng/ml (p-value=0.01. This pattern was not apparent in individuals homozygous for the IGF2R c.901 C>G variant. Whites homozygous for the IGF2R c.901 C>G variant trended towards a higher risk of CC, OR=2.2 [95% CI(0.9–5.4], whereas carrying the IGF2R c.5002 G>A variant was not associated with CC risk. Our findings support the hypothesis that being homozygous for the IGF2R c.5002 G>A modulates IGF2 circulating levels in a sex-specific manner, and while carrying the IGF2R c.901 C>G may increase cancer risk, the mechanism may not involve modulation of circulating IGF2.

  17. Identification and replication of the interplay of four genetic high-risk variants for urinary bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinski, Silvia; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Ickstadt, Katja; Gerullis, Holger; Otto, Thomas; Roth, Emanuel; Volkert, Frank; Ovsiannikov, Daniel; Moormann, Oliver; Banfi, Gergely; Nyirady, Peter; Vermeulen, Sita H; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine D; Johnson, Alison; Karagas, Margaret R; Kogevinas, Manolis; Malats, Nuria; Schwenn, Molly; Silverman, Debra T; Koutros, Stella; Rothman, Nathaniel; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Hengstler, Jan G; Golka, Klaus

    2017-12-07

    Little is known whether genetic variants identified in genome-wide association studies interact to increase bladder cancer risk. Recently, we identified two- and three-variant combinations associated with a particular increase of bladder cancer risk in a urinary bladder cancer case-control series (Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors at TU Dortmund (IfADo), 1501 cases, 1565 controls). In an independent case-control series (Nijmegen Bladder Cancer Study, NBCS, 1468 cases, 1720 controls) we confirmed these two- and three-variant combinations. Pooled analysis of the two studies as discovery group (IfADo-NBCS) resulted in sufficient statistical power to test up to four-variant combinations by a logistic regression approach. The New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (2080 cases and 2167 controls) were used as a replication series. Twelve previously identified risk variants were considered. The strongest four-variant combination was obtained in never smokers. The combination of rs1014971[AA] near apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3A (APOBEC3A) and chromobox homolog 6 (CBX6), solute carrier family 1s4 (urea transporter), member 1 (Kidd blood group) (SLC14A1) exon single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1058396[AG, GG], UDP glucuronosyltransferase 1 family, polypeptide A complex locus (UGT1A) intron SNP rs11892031[AA] and rs8102137[CC, CT] near cyclin E1 (CCNE1) resulted in an unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.59 (95% CI = 1.93-3.47; P = 1.87 × 10-10), while the individual variant ORs ranged only between 1.11 and 1.30. The combination replicated in the New England and Spanish Bladder Cancer Studies (ORunadjusted = 1.60, 95% CI = 1.10-2.33; P = 0.013). The four-variant combination is relatively frequent, with 25% in never smoking cases and 11% in never smoking controls (total study group: 19% cases, 14% controls). In conclusion, we show that four high-risk variants can statistically interact to confer

  18. Isogenic Cellular Systems Model the Impact of Genetic Risk Variants in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes

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    Mark A. Wallet

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available At least 57 independent loci within the human genome confer varying degrees of risk for the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D. The majority of these variants are thought to contribute to overall genetic risk by modulating host innate and adaptive immune responses, ultimately resulting in a loss of immunological tolerance to β cell antigens. Early efforts to link specific risk variants with functional alterations in host immune responses have employed animal models or genotype-selected individuals from clinical bioresource banks. While some notable genotype:phenotype associations have been described, there remains an urgent need to accelerate the discovery of causal variants and elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which susceptible alleles alter immune functions. One significant limitation has been the inability to study human T1D risk loci on an isogenic background. The advent of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs and genome-editing technologies have made it possible to address a number of these outstanding questions. Specifically, the ability to drive multiple cell fates from iPSC under isogenic conditions now facilitates the analysis of causal variants in multiple cellular lineages. Bioinformatic analyses have revealed that T1D risk genes cluster within a limited number of immune signaling pathways, yet the relevant immune cell subsets and cellular activation states in which candidate risk genes impact cellular activities remain largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the functional impact of several candidate risk variants on host immunity in T1D and present an isogenic disease-in-a-dish model system for interrogating risk variants, with the goal of expediting precision therapeutics in T1D.

  19. Detection of CYP2C19 Genetic Variants in Malaysian Orang Asli from Massively Parallel Sequencing Data.

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    Geik Yong Ang

    Full Text Available The human cytochrome P450 (CYP is a superfamily of enzymes that have been a focus in research for decades due to their prominent role in drug metabolism. CYP2C is one of the major subfamilies which metabolize more than 10% of all clinically used drugs. In the context of CYP2C19, several key genetic variations that alter the enzyme's activity have been identified and catalogued in the CYP allele nomenclature database. In this study, we investigated the presence of well-established variants as well as novel polymorphisms in the CYP2C19 gene of 62 Orang Asli from the Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 449 genetic variants were detected including 70 novel polymorphisms; 417 SNPs were located in introns, 23 in upstream, 7 in exons, and 2 in downstream regions. Five alleles and seven genotypes were inferred based on the polymorphisms that were found. Null alleles that were observed include CYP2C19*3 (6.5%, *2 (5.7% and *35 (2.4% whereas allele with increased function *17 was detected at a frequency of 4.8%. The normal metabolizer genotype was the most predominant (66.1%, followed by intermediate metabolizer (19.4%, rapid metabolizer (9.7% and poor metabolizer (4.8% genotypes. Findings from this study provide further insights into the CYP2C19 genetic profile of the Orang Asli as previously unreported variant alleles were detected through the use of massively parallel sequencing technology platform. The systematic and comprehensive analysis of CYP2C19 will allow uncharacterized variants that are present in the Orang Asli to be included in the genotyping panel in the future.

  20. Detection of CYP2C19 Genetic Variants in Malaysian Orang Asli from Massively Parallel Sequencing Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Geik Yong; Yu, Choo Yee; Subramaniam, Vinothini; Abdul Khalid, Mohd Ikhmal Hanif; Tuan Abdu Aziz, Tuan Azlin; Johari James, Richard; Ahmad, Aminuddin; Abdul Rahman, Thuhairah; Mohd Nor, Fadzilah; Ismail, Adzrool Idzwan; Md Isa, Kamarudzaman; Salleh, Hood; Teh, Lay Kek; Salleh, Mohd Zaki

    2016-01-01

    The human cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a superfamily of enzymes that have been a focus in research for decades due to their prominent role in drug metabolism. CYP2C is one of the major subfamilies which metabolize more than 10% of all clinically used drugs. In the context of CYP2C19, several key genetic variations that alter the enzyme's activity have been identified and catalogued in the CYP allele nomenclature database. In this study, we investigated the presence of well-established variants as well as novel polymorphisms in the CYP2C19 gene of 62 Orang Asli from the Peninsular Malaysia. A total of 449 genetic variants were detected including 70 novel polymorphisms; 417 SNPs were located in introns, 23 in upstream, 7 in exons, and 2 in downstream regions. Five alleles and seven genotypes were inferred based on the polymorphisms that were found. Null alleles that were observed include CYP2C19*3 (6.5%), *2 (5.7%) and *35 (2.4%) whereas allele with increased function *17 was detected at a frequency of 4.8%. The normal metabolizer genotype was the most predominant (66.1%), followed by intermediate metabolizer (19.4%), rapid metabolizer (9.7%) and poor metabolizer (4.8%) genotypes. Findings from this study provide further insights into the CYP2C19 genetic profile of the Orang Asli as previously unreported variant alleles were detected through the use of massively parallel sequencing technology platform. The systematic and comprehensive analysis of CYP2C19 will allow uncharacterized variants that are present in the Orang Asli to be included in the genotyping panel in the future.

  1. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, François L; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-02-15

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen.

  2. Candida albicans pathogenicity mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, François L.; Wilson, Duncan; Hube, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The polymorphic fungus Candida albicans is a member of the normal human microbiome. In most individuals, C. albicans resides as a lifelong, harmless commensal. Under certain circumstances, however, C. albicans can cause infections that range from superficial infections of the skin to life-threatening systemic infections. Several factors and activities have been identified which contribute to the pathogenic potential of this fungus. Among them are molecules which mediate adhesion to and invasion into host cells, the secretion of hydrolases, the yeast-to-hypha transition, contact sensing and thigmotropism, biofilm formation, phenotypic switching and a range of fitness attributes. Our understanding of when and how these mechanisms and factors contribute to infection has significantly increased during the last years. In addition, novel virulence mechanisms have recently been discovered. In this review we present an update on our current understanding of the pathogenicity mechanisms of this important human pathogen. PMID:23302789

  3. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; Da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-28

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10(-6)]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  4. Evaluation of regulatory genetic variants in POU5F1 and risk of congenital heart disease in Han Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Ding, Chenyue; Zhang, Kai; Ni, Bixian; da, Min; Hu, Liang; Hu, Yuanli; Xu, Jing; Wang, Xiaowei; Chen, Yijiang; Mo, Xuming; Cui, Yugui; Shen, Hongbing; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Jiayin; Hu, Zhibin

    2015-10-01

    OCT4 is a transcription factor of the POU family, which plays a key role in embryonic development and stem cell pluripotency. Previous studies have shown that Oct4 is required for cardiomyocyte differentiation in mice and its depletion could result in cardiac morphogenesis in embryo. However, whether the genetic variations in OCT4 coding gene, POU5F1, confer the predisposition to congenital heart disease (CHD) is unclear. This study sought to investigate the associations between low-frequency (defined here as having minor allele frequency (MAF) between 0.1%-5%) and rare (MAF below 0.1%) variants with potential function in POU5F1 and risk of CHD. We conducted association analysis in a two-stage case-control study with a total of 2,720 CHD cases and 3,331 controls in Chinese. The low-frequency variant rs3130933 was observed to be associated with a significantly increased risk of CHD [additive model: adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 2.15, adjusted P = 3.37 × 10-6]. Furthermore, luciferase activity assay showed that the variant A allele led to significantly lower expression levels as compared to the G allele. These findings indicate for the first time that low-frequency functional variant in POU5F1 may contribute to the risk of congenital heart malformations.

  5. Genetic ancestry modifies the association between genetic risk variants and breast cancer risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejerman, Laura; Stern, Mariana C; Ziv, Elad; John, Esther M; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Hines, Lisa M; Wolff, Roger; Wang, Wei; Baumgartner, Kathy B; Giuliano, Anna R; Slattery, Martha L

    2013-08-01

    Hispanic women in the USA have lower breast cancer incidence than non-Hispanic white (NHW) women. Genetic factors may contribute to this difference. Breast cancer genome-wide association studies (GWAS) conducted in women of European or Asian descent have identified multiple risk variants. We tested the association between 10 previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and risk of breast cancer in a sample of 4697 Hispanic and 3077 NHW women recruited as part of three population-based case-control studies of breast cancer. We used stratified logistic regression analyses to compare the associations with different genetic variants in NHWs and Hispanics classified by their proportion of Indigenous American (IA) ancestry. Five of 10 SNPs were statistically significantly associated with breast cancer risk. Three of the five significant variants (rs17157903-RELN, rs7696175-TLR1 and rs13387042-2q35) were associated with risk among Hispanics but not in NHWs. The odds ratio (OR) for the heterozygous at 2q35 was 0.75 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.50-1.15] for low IA ancestry and 1.38 (95% CI = 1.04-1.82) for high IA ancestry (P interaction 0.02). The ORs for association at RELN were 0.87 (95% CI = 0.59-1.29) and 1.69 (95% CI = 1.04-2.73), respectively (P interaction 0.03). At the TLR1 locus, the ORs for women homozygous for the rare allele were 0.74 (95% CI = 0.42-1.31) and 1.73 (95% CI = 1.19-2.52) (P interaction 0.03). Our results suggest that the proportion of IA ancestry modifies the magnitude and direction of the association of 3 of the 10 previously reported variants. Genetic ancestry should be considered when assessing risk in women of mixed descent and in studies designed to discover causal mutations.

  6. Genetic Variants in SNCA and the Risk of Sporadic Parkinson’s Disease and Clinical Outcomes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa Loureiro das Chagas Campêlo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of the contribution of genetic susceptibility to the etiology of Parkinson’s disease (PD. Genetic variations in the SNCA gene are well established by linkage and genome-wide association studies. Positive associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in SNCA and increased risk for PD were found. However, the role of SNCA variants in individual traits or phenotypes of PD is unknown. Here, we reviewed the current literature and identified 57 studies, performed in fourteen different countries, that investigated SNCA variants and susceptibility to PD. We discussed the findings based on environmental factors, history of PD, clinical outcomes, and ethnicity. In conclusion, SNPs within the SNCA gene can modify the susceptibility to PD, leading to increased or decreased risk. The risk associations of some SNPs varied among samples. Of notice, no studies in South American or African populations were found. There is little information about the effects of these variants on particular clinical aspects of PD, such as motor and nonmotor symptoms. Similarly, evidence of possible interactions between SNCA SNPs and environmental factors or disease progression is scarce. There is a need to expand the clinical applicability of these data as well as to investigate the role of SNCA SNPs in populations with different ethnic backgrounds.

  7. Genetic variants of the arachidonic acid pathway in non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-induced acute urticaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornejo-García, J A; Jagemann, L R; Blanca-López, N; Doña, I; Flores, C; Guéant-Rodríguez, R M; Torres, M J; Fernández, J; Laguna, J J; Rosado, A; Agúndez, J A G; García-Martín, E; Canto, G; Guéant, J-L; Blanca, M

    2012-12-01

    To date, genetic studies of hypersensitivity reactions to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been carried out mainly in aspirin-induced asthma and to a lesser extent in chronic urticaria, with no studies in patients with acute urticaria (AU), the most common entity induced by these drugs. In this work, we analysed the association of common variants of 15 relevant genes encoding both enzymes and receptors from the arachidonic acid (AA) pathway with NSAID-induced AU. Patients were recruited in several Allergy Services that are integrated into the Spanish network RIRAAF, and diagnosed of AU induced by cross-intolerance (CRI) to NSAIDs. Genotyping was carried out by TaqMan allelic discrimination assays. A total of 486 patients with AU induced by CRI to NSAIDs and 536 unrelated controls were included in this large Spanish case-control study. Seven variants from 31 tested in six genes were associated in a discovery study population from Malaga (0.0003 ≤ p-value ≤ 0.041). A follow-up analysis in an independent sample from Madrid replicated three of the SNPs from the ALOX15 (rs7220870), PTGDR (rs8004654) and CYSLTR1 (rs320095) genes (1.055x10(-6) ≤meta-analysis p-value ≤ 0.003). Genetic variants of the AA pathway may play an important role in NSAID-induced AU. These data may help understand the mechanism underlying this disease. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Meta-analysis of genetic association studies supports a contribution of common variants to susceptibility to common disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmueller, Kirk E; Pearce, Celeste L; Pike, Malcolm; Lander, Eric S; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2003-02-01

    Association studies offer a potentially powerful approach to identify genetic variants that influence susceptibility to common disease, but are plagued by the impression that they are not consistently reproducible. In principle, the inconsistency may be due to false positive studies, false negative studies or true variability in association among different populations. The critical question is whether false positives overwhelmingly explain the inconsistency. We analyzed 301 published studies covering 25 different reported associations. There was a large excess of studies replicating the first positive reports, inconsistent with the hypothesis of no true positive associations (P bias and was concentrated among 11 of the 25 associations. For 8 of these 11 associations, pooled analysis of follow-up studies yielded statistically significant replication of the first report, with modest estimated genetic effects. Thus, a sizable fraction (but under half) of reported associations have strong evidence of replication; for these, false negative, underpowered studies probably contribute to inconsistent replication. We conclude that there are probably many common variants in the human genome with modest but real effects on common disease risk, and that studies using large samples will convincingly identify such variants.

  9. Modeling disease risk through analysis of physical interactions between genetic variants within chromatin regulatory circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradin, Olivia; Cohen, Andrea J; Luppino, Jennifer M; Bayles, Ian M; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Scacheri, Peter C

    2016-11-01

    SNPs associated with disease susceptibility often reside in enhancer clusters, or super-enhancers. Constituents of these enhancer clusters cooperate to regulate target genes and often extend beyond the linkage disequilibrium (LD) blocks containing risk SNPs identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We identified 'outside variants', defined as SNPs in weak LD with GWAS risk SNPs that physically interact with risk SNPs as part of a target gene's regulatory circuitry. These outside variants further explain variation in target gene expression beyond that explained by GWAS-associated SNPs. Additionally, the clinical risk associated with GWAS SNPs is considerably modified by the genotype of outside variants. Collectively, these findings suggest a potential model in which outside variants and GWAS SNPs that physically interact in 3D chromatin collude to influence target transcript levels as well as clinical risk. This model offers an additional hypothesis for the source of missing heritability for complex traits.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Ohdo syndrome, Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficit syndrome, Say-Barber/Biesecker/Young-Simpson type BMRS SBBYS Ohdo syndrome, Say-Barber-Biesecker variant Ohdo ... D, Brunner H, Bitoun P. Blepharophimosis-mental retardation (BMR) syndromes: A proposed clinical classification of the so- ...

  11. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : a mendelian randomisation study

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M.; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hypponen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2 diabetes, which in no way offsets their substantial benefits. We sought to investigate the associations of LDL cholesterol-lowering PCSK9 variants with type 2 diabetes and related biomarkers to gauge the...

  12. [Antigen differences of genetic variants Abent+ and Abent- poliovirus vaccine strain of III type].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyrobokov, V P; Kostenko, I H; Nikolaienko, I V

    2003-01-01

    Hybridomes--producers of monoclonal antibodies (MAB) were obtained able to differentiate the variants Abent+ and Abent- poliovirus vaccine strain in the virus neutralizing reaction. Using the obtained panel the changes of the epitope structure of capsid proteins of poliovirus variants (dissociants) were found which appeared during reproduction in cell culture. It proves the fact that there exist essential antigenic differences of superficial virion's proteins, which appear during the process of dissociation.

  13. Detection and characterization of small insertion and deletion genetic variants in modern layer chicken genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiero, Clarissa; Gheyas, Almas A; Ralph, Hannah K; Eory, Lel; Paton, Bob; Kuo, Richard; Fulton, Janet; Preisinger, Rudolf; Kaiser, Pete; Burt, David W

    2015-07-31

    Small insertions and deletions (InDels) constitute the second most abundant class of genetic variants and have been found to be associated with many traits and diseases. The present study reports on the detection and characterisation of about 883 K high quality InDels from the whole-genome analysis of several modern layer chicken lines from diverse breeds. To reduce the error rates seen in InDel detection, this study used the consensus set from two InDel-calling packages: SAMtools and Dindel, as well as stringent post-filtering criteria. By analysing sequence data from 163 chickens from 11 commercial and 5 experimental layer lines, this study detected about 883 K high quality consensus InDels with 93% validation rate and an average density of 0.78 InDels/kb over the genome. Certain chromosomes, viz, GGAZ, 16, 22 and 25 showed very low densities of InDels whereas the highest rate was observed on GGA6. In spite of the higher recombination rates on microchromosomes, the InDel density on these chromosomes was generally lower relative to macrochromosomes possibly due to their higher gene density. About 43-87% of the InDels were found to be fixed within each line. The majority of detected InDels (86%) were 1-5 bases and about 63% were non-repetitive in nature while the rest were tandem repeats of various motif types. Functional annotation identified 613 frameshift, 465 non-frameshift and 10 stop-gain/loss InDels. Apart from the frameshift and stopgain/loss InDels that are expected to affect the translation of protein sequences and their biological activity, 33% of the non-frameshift were predicted as evolutionary intolerant with potential impact on protein functions. Moreover, about 2.5% of the InDels coincided with the most-conserved elements previously mapped on the chicken genome and are likely to define functional elements. InDels potentially affecting protein function were found to be enriched for certain gene-classes e.g. those associated with cell proliferation

  14. Genetic variants affecting cross-sectional lung function in adults show little or no effect on longitudinal lung function decline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    John, Catherine; Soler Artigas, María; Hui, Jennie

    2017-01-01

    across eight time points). A mixed model was fitted and weighted risk scores were calculated for the joint effect of 26 known regions on baseline and longitudinal changes in FEV1 and FEV1/FVC. Potential additional regions of interest were identified and followed up in two independent cohorts. RESULTS......: The 26 regions previously associated with cross-sectional lung function jointly showed a strong effect on baseline lung function (p=4.44×10-16 for FEV1/FVC) but no effect on longitudinal decline (p=0.160 for FEV1/FVC). This was replicated in an independent cohort. 39 additional regions of interest (48...... variants) were identified; these associations were not replicated in two further cohorts. CONCLUSIONS: Previously identified genetic variants jointly have a strong effect on cross-sectional lung function in adults but little or no effect on the rate of decline of lung function. It is possible...

  15. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Davies, Gail; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Miller, Michael B; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Bergmann, Sven; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Liewald, David C; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (N = 298,420), depressive symptoms (N = 161,460), and neuroticism (N = 170,910). We identified three variants associated with subjective well-being, two with depressive symptoms, and eleven with neuroticism, including two inversion polymorphisms. The two depressive symptoms loci replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings, and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal/pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association. PMID:27089181

  16. Habitual sleep duration is associated with BMI and macronutrient intake and may be modified by CLOCK genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashti, Hassan S; Follis, Jack L; Smith, Caren E; Tanaka, Toshiko; Cade, Brian E; Gottlieb, Daniel J; Hruby, Adela; Jacques, Paul F; Lamon-Fava, Stefania; Richardson, Kris; Saxena, Richa; Scheer, Frank A J L; Kovanen, Leena; Bartz, Traci M; Perälä, Mia-Maria; Jonsson, Anna; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Kalafati, Ioanna-Panagiota; Mikkilä, Vera; Partonen, Timo; Lemaitre, Rozenn N; Lahti, Jari; Hernandez, Dena G; Toft, Ulla; Johnson, W Craig; Kanoni, Stavroula; Raitakari, Olli T; Perola, Markus; Psaty, Bruce M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Grarup, Niels; Highland, Heather M; Rallidis, Loukianos; Kähönen, Mika; Havulinna, Aki S; Siscovick, David S; Räikkönen, Katri; Jørgensen, Torben; Rotter, Jerome I; Deloukas, Panos; Viikari, Jorma S A; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Linneberg, Allan; Seppälä, Ilkka; Hansen, Torben; Salomaa, Veikko; Gharib, Sina A; Eriksson, Johan G; Bandinelli, Stefania; Pedersen, Oluf; Rich, Stephen S; Dedoussis, George; Lehtimäki, Terho; Ordovás, José M

    2015-01-01

    Short sleep duration has been associated with greater risks of obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Also, common genetic variants in the human Circadian Locomotor Output Cycles Kaput (CLOCK) show associations with ghrelin and total energy intake. We examined associations between habitual sleep duration, body mass index (BMI), and macronutrient intake and assessed whether CLOCK variants modify these associations. We conducted inverse-variance weighted, fixed-effect meta-analyses of results of adjusted associations of sleep duration and BMI and macronutrient intake as percentages of total energy as well as interactions with CLOCK variants from 9 cohort studies including up to 14,906 participants of European descent from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium. We observed a significant association between sleep duration and lower BMI (β ± SE = 0.16 ± 0.04, P y) adults (men: 0.11 ± 0.06%, P = 0.03; women: 0.10 ± 0.05%, P = 0.04) and with lower carbohydrate (-0.31 ± 0.12%, P y) women. In addition, the following 2 nominally significant interactions were observed: between sleep duration and rs12649507 on PUFA intake and between sleep duration and rs6858749 on protein intake. Our results indicate that longer habitual sleep duration is associated with lower BMI and age- and sex-specific favorable dietary behaviors. Differences in the relative intake of specific macronutrients associated with short sleep duration could, at least in part, explain previously reported associations between short sleep duration and chronic metabolic abnormalities. In addition, the influence of obesity-associated CLOCK variants on the association between sleep duration and macronutrient intake suggests that longer habitual sleep duration could ameliorate the genetic predisposition to obesity via a favorable dietary profile. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Identification of genetic variants associated with Huntington's disease progression: a genome-wide association study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensman Moss, Davina J; Pardiñas, Antonio F; Langbehn, Douglas; Lo, Kitty; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund; Durr, Alexandra; Mead, Simon; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2017-09-01

    Huntington's disease is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene, HTT. Age at onset has been used as a quantitative phenotype in genetic analysis looking for Huntington's disease modifiers, but is hard to define and not always available. Therefore, we aimed to generate a novel measure of disease progression and to identify genetic markers associated with this progression measure. We generated a progression score on the basis of principal component analysis of prospectively acquired longitudinal changes in motor, cognitive, and imaging measures in the 218 indivduals in the TRACK-HD cohort of Huntington's disease gene mutation carriers (data collected 2008-11). We generated a parallel progression score using data from 1773 previously genotyped participants from the European Huntington's Disease Network REGISTRY study of Huntington's disease mutation carriers (data collected 2003-13). We did a genome-wide association analyses in terms of progression for 216 TRACK-HD participants and 1773 REGISTRY participants, then a meta-analysis of these results was undertaken. Longitudinal motor, cognitive, and imaging scores were correlated with each other in TRACK-HD participants, justifying use of a single, cross-domain measure of disease progression in both studies. The TRACK-HD and REGISTRY progression measures were correlated with each other (r=0·674), and with age at onset (TRACK-HD, r=0·315; REGISTRY, r=0·234). The meta-analysis of progression in TRACK-HD and REGISTRY gave a genome-wide significant signal (p=1·12 × 10 -10 ) on chromosome 5 spanning three genes: MSH3, DHFR, and MTRNR2L2. The genes in this locus were associated with progression in TRACK-HD (MSH3 p=2·94 × 10 -8 DHFR p=8·37 × 10 -7 MTRNR2L2 p=2·15 × 10 -9 ) and to a lesser extent in REGISTRY (MSH3 p=9·36 × 10 -4 DHFR p=8·45 × 10 -4 MTRNR2L2 p=1·20 × 10 -3 ). The lead single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in TRACK-HD (rs557874766) was genome

  18. The functional influences of common ABCB1 genetic variants on the inhibition of P-glycoprotein by Antrodia cinnamomea extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jyh Sheu

    Full Text Available Antrodia cinnamomea is a traditional healthy food that has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anticacer effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the ethanolic extract of A. cinnamomea (EEAC can affect the efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp and the effect of ABCB1 genetic variants on the interaction between EEAC and P-gp. To investigate the mechanism of this interaction, Flp-In™-293 cells stably transfected with various genotypes of human P-gp were established and the expression of P-gp was confirmed by Western blot. The results of the rhodamine 123 efflux assay demonstrated that EEAC efficiently inhibited wild-type P-gp function at an IC50 concentration of 1.51 ± 0.08 µg/mL through non-competitive inhibition. The IC50 concentrations for variant-type 1236T-2677T-3435T P-gp and variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp were 5.56 ± 0.49 µg/mL and 3.33±0.67 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, the inhibition kinetics of EEAC also changed to uncompetitive inhibition in variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp. The ATPase assay revealed that EEAC was an ATPase stimulator and was capable of reducing verapamil-induced ATPase levels. These results indicate that EEAC may be a potent P-gp inhibitor and higher dosages may be required in subjects carrying variant-types P-gp. Further studies are required to translate this basic knowledge into clinical applications.

  19. Assessing the impact of a combined analysis of four common low-risk genetic variants on autism risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carayol Jerome

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a complex disorder characterized by deficits involving communication, social interaction, and repetitive and restrictive patterns of behavior. Twin studies have shown that autism is strongly heritable, suggesting a strong genetic component. In other disease states with a complex etiology, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and cardiovascular disease, combined analysis of multiple genetic variants in a genetic score has helped to identify individuals at high risk of disease. Genetic scores are designed to test for association of genetic markers with disease. Method The accumulation of multiple risk alleles markedly increases the risk of being affected, and compared with studying polymorphisms individually, it improves the identification of subgroups of individuals at greater risk. In the present study, we show that this approach can be applied to autism by specifically looking at a high-risk population of children who have siblings with autism. A two-sample study design and the generation of a genetic score using multiple independent genes were used to assess the risk of autism in a high-risk population. Results In both samples, odds ratios (ORs increased significantly as a function of the number of risk alleles, with a genetic score of 8 being associated with an OR of 5.54 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.45 to 12.49. The sensitivities and specificities for each genetic score were similar in both analyses, and the resultant area under the receiver operating characteristic curves were identical (0.59. Conclusions These results suggest that the accumulation of multiple risk alleles in a genetic score is a useful strategy for assessing the risk of autism in siblings of affected individuals, and may be better than studying single polymorphisms for identifying subgroups of individuals with significantly greater risk.

  20. Chromosome 9p21 genetic variants are associated with myocardial infarction but not with ischemic stroke in a Taiwanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Fen; Tsai, Pei-Chien; Liao, Yi-Chu; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Tai, Chih-Ta; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Lin, Ruey-Tay

    2011-08-01

    Genetic variants on chromosome 9p21 confer a robust risk for coronary artery disease but inconsistent risk for stroke. This study investigated whether such genetic variants exert differential risks on myocardial infarction (MI) and ischemic stroke in a Taiwanese population. The study recruited 425 MI patients, 687 patients with ischemic stroke, and 1377 healthy controls. Four key single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on chromosome 9p21 were genotyped. Multivariate permutation analyses demonstrated that the risk T allele of rs1333040 and G allele of rs2383207 were associated with MI (P = 0.045 and 0.002, respectively). Subjects with the rs2383207 GG genotype had a 1.85-fold (P = 0.021) risk for MI when compared with the subjects with the AA genotype. Further analysis showed that significant results only exist in the young MI group (stroke (adjusted P ranged from 0.097 to 0.540). Haplotype analysis showed global P values of 0.032 for MI and 0.290 for stroke. Genetic variations in the 9p21 region are associated with MI but not with stroke in a Taiwanese population. Early-onset MI was more likely to carry the risk genotypes of 9p21 SNPs.

  1. Lifestyle genomics and the metabolic syndrome: A review of genetic variants that influence response to diet and exercise interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Peri H; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Dhaliwal, Rupinder; Royall, Dawna; Brauer, Paula; Tremblay, Angelo; Klein, Doug; Mutch, David M

    2018-02-05

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) comprises a cluster of risk factors that includes central obesity, dyslipidemia, impaired glucose homeostasis and hypertension. Individuals with MetS have elevated risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease; thus placing significant burdens on social and healthcare systems. Lifestyle interventions (comprised of diet, exercise or a combination of both) are routinely recommended as the first line of treatment for MetS. Only a proportion of people respond, and it has been assumed that psychological and social aspects primarily account for these differences. However, the etiology of MetS is multifactorial and stems, in part, on a person's genetic make-up. Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with the various components of MetS, and several of these SNPs have been shown to modify a person's response to lifestyle interventions. Consequently, genetic variants can influence the extent to which a person responds to changes in diet and/or exercise. The goal of this review is to highlight SNPs reported to influence the magnitude of change in body weight, dyslipidemia, glucose homeostasis and blood pressure during lifestyle interventions aimed at improving MetS components. Knowledge regarding these genetic variants and their ability to modulate a person's response will provide additional context for improving the effectiveness of personalized lifestyle interventions that aim to reduce the risks associated with MetS.

  2. Genetic analyses of the NF1 gene in Turkish neurofibromatosis type I patients and definition of three novel variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulusal SD

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis Type I (NF1 is a multi systemic autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder predisposing patients to have benign and/or malignant lesions predominantly of the skin, nervous system and bone. Loss of function mutations or deletions of the NF1 gene is responsible for NF1 disease. Involvement of various pathogenic variants, the size of the gene and presence of pseudogenes makes it difficult to analyze. We aimed to report the results of 2 years of multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA and next generation sequencing (NGS for genetic diagnosis of NF1 applied at our genetic diagnosis center. The MLPA, semiconductor sequencing and Sanger sequencing were performed in genomic DNA samples from 24 unrelated patients and their affected family members referred to our center suspected of having NF1. In total, three novel and 12 known pathogenic variants and a whole gene deletion were determined. We suggest that next generation sequencing is a practical tool for genetic analysis of NF1. Deletion/duplication analysis with MLPA may also be helpful for patients clinically diagnosed to carry NF1 but do not have a detectable mutation in NGS.

  3. The role of genetic variants in genes regulating the oxytocin-vasopressin neurohumoral system in childhood-onset aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Ayesha I; Zai, Clement C; Berall, Laura; Abu, Zihad; Din, Farah; Nowrouzi, Behdin; Chen, Sheng; Beitchman, Joseph H

    2014-10-01

    The genetic etiology of aggressive behaviors remains elusive, but growing evidence suggests that they are heritable, and certain genetic variants have been implicated as contributing factors. The oxytocin-vasopressin (OXT-AVP) neurohumoral system has recently been implicated in social behaviors. Oxytocin, especially, has been linked to prosocial behaviors such as trust and social bonds. Hence, the aim of this study was to determine whether genes regulating this system were also associated with childhood-onset aggressive behaviors. Our sample included 182 White children showing extreme, persistent, and pervasive aggressive behavior. These cases were matched with 182 White controls on the basis of sex and age. We used PCR to determine the genotype for 28 single nucleotide polymorphisms within eight genes regulating the OXT-AVP system, including CD38 polymorphisms. Genotypic analyses were carried out using STATA, whereas differences in haplotypic and allelic frequencies were analyzed using Unphased. None of the results reached significance after correction for multiple testing. However, nominally significant allelic effects were observed for OXTR rs6770632T (P=0.028) and AVPR1A rs11174811G (P=0.040) in females, and OXTR rs237898A (P=0.006), rs237902C (P=0.007), and AVP rs3761249A (P=0.008) in males. Genetic variants regulating the OXT-AVP system may be associated with childhood-onset aggression.

  4. FTO genetic variants, dietary intake and body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Qibin; Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas; Downer, Mary K

    2014-01-01

    -scale studies in humans are highly inconsistent. We performed large-scale analyses based on data from 177 330 adults (154 439 Whites, 5776 African Americans and 17 115 Asians) from 40 studies to examine: (i) the association between the FTO-rs9939609 variant (or a proxy single-nucleotide polymorphism) and total...... energy and macronutrient intake and (ii) the interaction between the FTO variant and dietary intake on BMI. The minor allele (A-allele) of the FTO-rs9939609 variant was associated with higher BMI in Whites (effect per allele = 0.34 [0.31, 0.37] kg/m(2), P = 1.9 × 10(-105)), and all participants (0.30 [0...

  5. Discovery of coding genetic variants influencing diabetes-related serum biomarkers and their impact on risk of type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahluwalia, Tarunveer Singh; Allin, Kristine Højgaard; Sandholt, Camilla Helene

    2015-01-01

    CONTEXT: Type 2 diabetes (T2D) prevalence is spiraling globally, and knowledge of its pathophysiological signatures is crucial for a better understanding and treatment of the disease. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to discover underlying coding genetic variants influencing fasting serum levels of nine......, of which the association with the CELSR2 locus has not been shown previously. CONCLUSION: The identified loci influence processes related to insulin signaling, cell communication, immune function, apoptosis, DNA repair, and oxidative stress, all of which could provide a rationale for novel diabetes...

  6. Genetics, sleep and memory: a recall-by-genotype study of ZNF804A variants and sleep neurophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmich, Charlotte; Durant, Claire; Jones, Matthew W; Timpson, Nicholas J; Bartsch, Ullrich; Corbin, Laura J

    2015-10-24

    Schizophrenia is a complex, polygenic disorder for which over 100 genetic variants have been identified that correlate with diagnosis. However, the biological mechanisms underpinning the different symptom clusters remain undefined. The rs1344706 single nucleotide polymorphism within ZNF804A was among the first genetic variants found to be associated with schizophrenia. Previously, neuroimaging and cognitive studies have revealed several associations between rs1344706 and brain structure and function. The aim of this study is to use a recall-by-genotype (RBG) design to investigate the biological basis for the association of ZNF804A variants with schizophrenia. A RBG study, implemented in a population cohort, will be used to evaluate the impact of genetic variation at rs1344706 on sleep neurophysiology and procedural memory consolidation in healthy participants. Participants will be recruited from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) on the basis of genotype at rs1344706 (n = 24). Each participant will be asked to take part in two nights of in-depth sleep monitoring (polysomnography) allowing collection of neurophysiological sleep data in a manner not amenable to large-scale study. Sleep questionnaires will be used to assess general sleep quality and subjective sleep experience after each in-house recording. A motor sequencing task (MST) will be performed before and after the second night of polysomnography. In order to gather additional data about habitual sleep behaviour participants will be asked to wear a wrist worn activity monitor (actiwatch) and complete a sleep diary for two weeks. This study will explore the biological function of ZNF804A genotype (rs1344706) in healthy volunteers by examining detailed features of sleep architecture and physiology in relation to motor learning. Using a RBG approach will enable us to collect precise and detailed phenotypic data whilst achieving an informative biological gradient. It would not be

  7. From risk genes to psychiatric phenotypes - Studies of fibroblast growth factor-related and genome-wide genetic variants in humans and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental disorder with a high heritability. This thesis describes studies on the association between genetic variants and phenotypes related to schizophrenia, such as brain volume and IQ, in order to learn about which processes are affected by schizophrenia-associated genetic

  8. Telomerase RNA Component (TERC) genetic variants interact with the mediterranean diet modifying the inflammatory status and its relationship with aging: CORDIOPREV study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Leukocyte telomere length (LTL) attrition has been associated with age-related diseases. Telomerase RNA Component (TERC) genetic variants have been associated with LTL; whereas fatty acids (FAs) can interact with genetic factors and influence in aging. We explore whether variability at t...

  9. Genetic association study of exfoliation syndrome identifies a protective rare variant at LOXL1 and five new susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Tin; Ozaki, Mineo; Lee, Mei Chin; Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mizoguchi, Takanori; Igo, Robert P; Haripriya, Aravind; Williams, Susan E; Astakhov, Yury S; Orr, Andrew C; Burdon, Kathryn P; Nakano, Satoko; Mori, Kazuhiko; Abu-Amero, Khaled; Hauser, Michael; Li, Zheng; Prakadeeswari, Gopalakrishnan; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Cherecheanu, Alina Popa; Kang, Jae H; Nelson, Sarah; Hayashi, Ken; Manabe, Shin-Ichi; Kazama, Shigeyasu; Zarnowski, Tomasz; Inoue, Kenji; Irkec, Murat; Coca-Prados, Miguel; Sugiyama, Kazuhisa; Järvelä, Irma; Schlottmann, Patricio; Lerner, S Fabian; Lamari, Hasnaa; Nilgün, Yildirim; Bikbov, Mukharram; Park, Ki Ho; Cha, Soon Cheol; Yamashiro, Kenji; Zenteno, Juan C; Jonas, Jost B; Kumar, Rajesh S; Perera, Shamira A; Chan, Anita S Y; Kobakhidze, Nino; George, Ronnie; Vijaya, Lingam; Do, Tan; Edward, Deepak P; de Juan Marcos, Lourdes; Pakravan, Mohammad; Moghimi, Sasan; Ideta, Ryuichi; Bach-Holm, Daniella; Kappelgaard, Per; Wirostko, Barbara; Thomas, Samuel; Gaston, Daniel; Bedard, Karen; Greer, Wenda L; Yang, Zhenglin; Chen, Xueyi; Huang, Lulin; Sang, Jinghong; Jia, Hongyan; Jia, Liyun; Qiao, Chunyan; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Xuyang; Zhao, Bowen; Wang, Ya-Xing; Xu, Liang; Leruez, Stéphanie; Reynier, Pascal; Chichua, George; Tabagari, Sergo; Uebe, Steffen; Zenkel, Matthias; Berner, Daniel; Mossböck, Georg; Weisschuh, Nicole; Hoja, Ursula; Welge-Luessen, Ulrich-Christoph; Mardin, Christian; Founti, Panayiota; Chatzikyriakidou, Anthi; Pappas, Theofanis; Anastasopoulos, Eleftherios; Lambropoulos, Alexandros; Ghosh, Arkasubhra; Shetty, Rohit; Porporato, Natalia; Saravanan, Vijayan; Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Shivkumar, Chandrashekaran; Kalpana, Narendran; Sarangapani, Sripriya; Kanavi, Mozhgan R; Beni, Afsaneh Naderi; Yazdani, Shahin; Lashay, Alireza; Naderifar, Homa; Khatibi, Nassim; Fea, Antonio; Lavia, Carlo; Dallorto, Laura; Rolle, Teresa; Frezzotti, Paolo; Paoli, Daniela; Salvi, Erika; Manunta, Paolo; Mori, Yosai; Miyata, Kazunori; Higashide, Tomomi; Chihara, Etsuo; Ishiko, Satoshi; Yoshida, Akitoshi; Yanagi, Masahide; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Ohashi, Tsutomu; Sakurai, Toshiya; Sugimoto, Takako; Chuman, Hideki; Aihara, Makoto; Inatani, Masaru; Miyake, Masahiro; Gotoh, Norimoto; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Ikeda, Yoko; Ueno, Morio; Sotozono, Chie; Jeoung, Jin Wook; Sagong, Min; Park, Kyu Hyung; Ahn, Jeeyun; Cruz-Aguilar, Marisa; Ezzouhairi, Sidi M; Rafei, Abderrahman; Chong, Yaan Fun; Ng, Xiao Yu; Goh, Shuang Ru; Chen, Yueming; Yong, Victor H K; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Olawoye, Olusola O; Ashaye, Adeyinka O; Ugbede, Idakwo; Onakoya, Adeola; Kizor-Akaraiwe, Nkiru; Teekhasaenee, Chaiwat; Suwan, Yanin; Supakontanasan, Wasu; Okeke, Suhanya; Uche, Nkechi J; Asimadu, Ifeoma; Ayub, Humaira; Akhtar, Farah; Kosior-Jarecka, Ewa; Lukasik, Urszula; Lischinsky, Ignacio; Castro, Vania; Grossmann, Rodolfo Perez; Megevand, Gordana Sunaric; Roy, Sylvain; Dervan, Edward; Silke, Eoin; Rao, Aparna; Sahay, Priti; Fornero, Pablo; Cuello, Osvaldo; Sivori, Delia; Zompa, Tamara; Mills, Richard A; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Hewitt, Alex W; Coote, Michael; Crowston, Jonathan G; Astakhov, Sergei Y; Akopov, Eugeny L; Emelyanov, Anton; Vysochinskaya, Vera; Kazakbaeva, Gyulli; Fayzrakhmanov, Rinat; Al-Obeidan, Saleh A; Owaidhah, Ohoud; Aljasim, Leyla Ali; Chowbay, Balram; Foo, Jia Nee; Soh, Raphael Q; Sim, Kar Seng; Xie, Zhicheng; Cheong, Augustine W O; Mok, Shi Qi; Soo, Hui Meng; Chen, Xiao Yin; Peh, Su Qin; Heng, Khai Koon; Husain, Rahat; Ho, Su-Ling; Hillmer, Axel M; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Escudero-Domínguez, Francisco A; González-Sarmiento, Rogelio; Martinon-Torres, Frederico; Salas, Antonio; Pathanapitoon, Kessara; Hansapinyo, Linda; Wanichwecharugruang, Boonsong; Kitnarong, Naris; Sakuntabhai, Anavaj; Nguyn, Hip X; Nguyn, Giang T T; Nguyn, Trình V; Zenz, Werner; Binder, Alexander; Klobassa, Daniela S; Hibberd, Martin L; Davila, Sonia; Herms, Stefan; Nöthen, Markus M; Moebus, Susanne; Rautenbach, Robyn M; Ziskind, Ari; Carmichael, Trevor R; Ramsay, Michele; Álvarez, Lydia; García, Montserrat; González-Iglesias, Héctor; Rodríguez-Calvo, Pedro P; Fernández-Vega Cueto, Luis; Oguz, Çilingir; Tamcelik, Nevbahar; Atalay, Eray; Batu, Bilge; Aktas, Dilek; Kasım, Burcu; Wilson, M Roy; Coleman, Anne L; Liu, Yutao; Challa, Pratap; Herndon, Leon; Kuchtey, Rachel W; Kuchtey, John; Curtin, Karen; Chaya, Craig J; Crandall, Alan; Zangwill, Linda M; Wong, Tien Yin; Nakano, Masakazu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; den Hollander, Anneke I; Vesti, Eija; Fingert, John H; Lee, Richard K; Sit, Arthur J

    2017-07-01

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is the most common known risk factor for secondary glaucoma and a major cause of blindness worldwide. Variants in two genes, LOXL1 and CACNA1A, have previously been associated with XFS. To further elucidate the genetic basis of XFS, we collected a global sample of XFS cases to refine the association at LOXL1, which previously showed inconsistent results across populations, and to identify new variants associated with XFS. We identified a rare protective allele at LOXL1 (p.Phe407, odds ratio (OR) = 25, P = 2.9 × 10 -14 ) through deep resequencing of XFS cases and controls from nine countries. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of XFS cases and controls from 24 countries followed by replication in 18 countries identified seven genome-wide significant loci (P < 5 × 10 -8 ). We identified association signals at 13q12 (POMP), 11q23.3 (TMEM136), 6p21 (AGPAT1), 3p24 (RBMS3) and 5q23 (near SEMA6A). These findings provide biological insights into the pathology of XFS and highlight a potential role for naturally occurring rare LOXL1 variants in disease biology.

  10. Identification of Nitrogen Consumption Genetic Variants in Yeast Through QTL Mapping and Bulk Segregant RNA-Seq Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, Francisco A; Brice, Claire; Molinet, Jennifer; Tisné, Sebastién; Abarca, Valentina; Tapia, Sebastián M; Oporto, Christian; García, Verónica; Liti, Gianni; Martínez, Claudio

    2017-06-07

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is responsible for wine must fermentation. In this process, nitrogen represents a limiting nutrient and its scarcity results in important economic losses for the wine industry. Yeast isolates use different strategies to grow in poor nitrogen environments and their genomic plasticity enables adaptation to multiple habitats through improvements in nitrogen consumption. Here, we used a highly recombinant S. cerevisiae multi-parent population (SGRP-4X) derived from the intercross of four parental strains of different origins to identify new genetic variants responsible for nitrogen consumption differences during wine fermentation. Analysis of 165 fully sequenced F12 segregants allowed us to map 26 QTL in narrow intervals for 14 amino acid sources and ammonium, the majority of which represent genomic regions previously unmapped for these traits. To complement this strategy, we performed Bulk segregant RNA-seq (BSR-seq) analysis in segregants exhibiting extremely high and low ammonium consumption levels. This identified several QTL overlapping differentially expressed genes and refined the gene candidate search. Based on these approaches, we were able to validate ARO1 , PDC1 , CPS1 , ASI2 , LYP1 , and ALP1 allelic variants underlying nitrogen consumption differences between strains, providing evidence of many genes with small phenotypic effects. Altogether, these variants significantly shape yeast nitrogen consumption with important implications for evolution, ecological, and quantitative genomics. Copyright © 2017 Cubillos et al.

  11. Identification of Nitrogen Consumption Genetic Variants in Yeast Through QTL Mapping and Bulk Segregant RNA-Seq Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Cubillos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is responsible for wine must fermentation. In this process, nitrogen represents a limiting nutrient and its scarcity results in important economic losses for the wine industry. Yeast isolates use different strategies to grow in poor nitrogen environments and their genomic plasticity enables adaptation to multiple habitats through improvements in nitrogen consumption. Here, we used a highly recombinant S. cerevisiae multi-parent population (SGRP-4X derived from the intercross of four parental strains of different origins to identify new genetic variants responsible for nitrogen consumption differences during wine fermentation. Analysis of 165 fully sequenced F12 segregants allowed us to map 26 QTL in narrow intervals for 14 amino acid sources and ammonium, the majority of which represent genomic regions previously unmapped for these traits. To complement this strategy, we performed Bulk segregant RNA-seq (BSR-seq analysis in segregants exhibiting extremely high and low ammonium consumption levels. This identified several QTL overlapping differentially expressed genes and refined the gene candidate search. Based on these approaches, we were able to validate ARO1, PDC1, CPS1, ASI2, LYP1, and ALP1 allelic variants underlying nitrogen consumption differences between strains, providing evidence of many genes with small phenotypic effects. Altogether, these variants significantly shape yeast nitrogen consumption with important implications for evolution, ecological, and quantitative genomics.

  12. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : a mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hypponen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, Charlotte N.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert A.; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofi A.; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H Lester; Larson, Eric B; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen J; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Donnell, Martin O'; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Doerr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J; Meade, Tom W.; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothee; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amelie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    Background Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2

  13. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes: A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, A.F. (Amand F.); D.I. Swerdlow (Daniel); M.V. Holmes (Michael); R.S. Patel (Riyaz); Fairhurst-Hunter, Z. (Zammy); Lyall, D.M. (Donald M.); Hartwig, F.P. (Fernando Pires); Horta, B.L. (Bernardo Lessa); E. Hypponen (Elina); C. Power (Christopher); Moldovan, M. (Max); E.P.A. van Iperen (Erik); G. Kees Hovingh; I. Demuth (Ilja); Norman, K. (Kristina); E. Steinhagen-Thiessen (Elisabeth); Demuth, J. (Juri); L. Bertram (Lars); Liu, T. (Tian); S. Coassin (Stefan); J. Willeit (Johann); S. Kiechl (Stefan); Willeit, K. (Karin); Mason, D. (Dan); J. Wright (Juliet); R. Morris (Richard); Wanamethee, G. (Goya); P.H. Whincup (Peter); Y. Ben-Shlomo; S. McLachlan (Stela); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); M. Kivimaki (Mika); Welch, C. (Catherine); Sanchez-Galvez, A. (Adelaida); P. Marques-Vidal (Pedro); A.N. Nicolaides (Andrew); A.G. Panayiotou (Andrie); Onland-Moret, N.C. (N Charlotte); Y.T. van der Schouw (Yvonne); G. Matullo; Fiorito, G. (Giovanni); S. Guarrera (Simonetta); C. Sacerdote (Carlotta); N.J. Wareham (Nick); C. Langenberg (Claudia); Scott, R. (Robert); Luan, J. (Jian'an); M. Bobak (Martin); S. Malyutina; Pajak, A. (Andrzej); R. Kubinova; A. Tamosiunas (Abdonas); H. Pikhart (Hynek); L.L.N. Husemoen (Lise Lotte); N. Grarup (Niels); O. Pedersen (Oluf); T. Hansen (T.); A. Linneberg (Allan); Simonsen, K.S. (Kenneth Starup); J. Cooper (Jim); S.E. Humphries (Steve); M.H. Brilliant (Murray H.); T.E. Kitchner (Terrie E.); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); D.S. Carrell (David); McCarty, C.A. (Catherine A.); Kirchner, H.L. (H Lester); E.B. Larson (Eric B.); D.R. Crosslin (David); de Andrade, M. (Mariza); Roden, D.M. (Dan M.); J.C. Denny (Joshua C.); C. Carty (Cara); Hancock, S. (Stephen); J. Attia (John); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); Donnell, M.O.'. (Martin O'); Yusuf, S. (Salim); Chong, M. (Michael); G. Pare (Guillame); P. van der Harst (Pim); Said, M.A. (M Abdullah); Eppinga, R.N. (Ruben N.); N. Verweij (Niek); H. Snieder (Harold); Christen, T. (Tim); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); E. Ingelsson (Erik); Pazoki, R. (Raha); O.H. Franco (Oscar); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Dehghan (Abbas); A. Teumer (Alexander); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); M. Dörr (Marcus); Lerch, M.M. (Markus M.); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); Ward, J. (Joey); J.P. Pell (Jill P.); Smith, D.J. (Daniel J.); Meade, T. (Tom); A-H. Maitland-van der Zee (Anke-Hilse); Baranova, E.V. (Ekaterina V.); Young, R. (Robin); I. Ford (Ian); A. Campbell (Archie); S. Padmanabhan (Sandosh); M.L. Bots (Michiel); Grobbee, D.E. (Diederick E.); P. Froguel (Philippe); D. Thuillier (Dorothee); B. Balkau (Beverley); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); Cariou, B. (Bertrand); Smart, M. (Melissa); Bao, Y. (Yanchun); M. Kumari (Meena); A. Mahajan (Anubha); P.M. Ridker (Paul); D.I. Chasman (Daniel I.); A. Reiner (Alexander); L.A. Lange (Leslie); M.D. Ritchie (Marylyn D.); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); J.P. Casas (Juan); J. Keating (John); Preiss, D. (David); A. Hingorani (Aroon); N. Sattar (Naveed)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of

  14. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : A mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Holmes, Michael V.; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M.; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pajak, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie; Humphries, Steve E.; Brilliant, Murray; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Kirchner, H. Lester; Larson, Eric B.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M.; Denny, Joshua C.; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth; Donnell, Martin O.; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M. Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N.; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P.; Smith, Daniel J.; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H.; Baranova, Ekaterina V.; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Reiner, Alex P.; Lange, Leslie A.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J.; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Sattar, Naveed

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2

  15. PCSK9 genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes : a mendelian randomisation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Amand F.; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Holmes, Michael V; Patel, Riyaz S.; Fairhurst-Hunter, Zammy; Lyall, Donald M; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hyppönen, Elina; Power, Christine; Moldovan, Max; van Iperen, Erik Pa; Hovingh, G. Kees; Demuth, Ilja; Norman, Kristina; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Demuth, Juri; Bertram, Lars; Liu, Tian; Coassin, Stefan; Willeit, Johann; Kiechl, Stefan; Willeit, Karin; Mason, Dan; Wright, John; Morris, Richard W; Wanamethee, Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; McLachlan, Stela; Price, Jackie F; Kivimaki, Mika; Welch, Catherine; Sanchez-Galvez, Adelaida; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Nicolaides, Andrew N.; Panayiotou, Andrie G.; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Matullo, Giuseppe; Fiorito, Giovanni; Guarrera, Simonetta; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Langenberg, Claudia; Scott, Robert A; Luan, Jian'an; Bobak, Martin; Malyutina, Sofia; Pająk, Andrzej; Kubinova, Ruzena; Tamosiunas, Abdonas; Pikhart, Hynek; Husemoen, Lise Lotte Nystrup; Grarup, Niels; Pedersen, Oluf; Hansen, Torben; Linneberg, Allan; Simonsen, Kenneth Starup; Cooper, Jackie A; Humphries, Steve E; Brilliant, Murray H; Kitchner, Terrie; Hakonarson, Hakon; Carrell, David S; McCarty, Catherine A; Kirchner, H Lester; Larson, Eric B; Crosslin, David R; de Andrade, Mariza; Roden, Dan M; Denny, Joshua C; Carty, Cara; Hancock, Stephen; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; O'Donnell, Martin; Yusuf, Salim; Chong, Michael; Pare, Guillaume; van der Harst, Pim; Said, M Abdullah; Eppinga, Ruben N; Verweij, Niek; Snieder, Harold; Christen, Tim; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Gustafsson, Stefan; Lind, Lars; Ingelsson, Erik; Pazoki, Raha; Franco, Oscar H.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Dehghan, Abbas; Teumer, Alexander; Baumeister, Sebastian; Dörr, Marcus; Lerch, Markus M; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Ward, Joey; Pell, Jill P; Smith, Daniel J; Meade, Tom; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke H; Baranova, Ekaterina V; Young, Robin; Ford, Ian; Campbell, Archie; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Bots, Michiel L.; Grobbee, Diederick E; Froguel, Philippe; Thuillier, Dorothée; Balkau, Beverley; Bonnefond, Amélie; Cariou, Bertrand; Smart, Melissa; Bao, Yanchun; Kumari, Meena; Mahajan, Anubha; Ridker, Paul M; Chasman, Daniel I; Reiner, Alex P; Lange, Leslie A; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Casas, Juan Pablo; Keating, Brendan J; Preiss, David; Hingorani, Aroon D; Sattar, Naveed

    BACKGROUND: Statin treatment and variants in the gene encoding HMG-CoA reductase are associated with reductions in both the concentration of LDL cholesterol and the risk of coronary heart disease, but also with modest hyperglycaemia, increased bodyweight, and modestly increased risk of type 2

  16. Data sharing as a national quality improvement program: reporting on BRCA1 and BRCA2 variant-interpretation comparisons through the Canadian Open Genetics Repository (COGR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, Matthew S; Zakoor, Kathleen-Rose; Chun, Kathy; Speevak, Marsha D; Waye, John S; McCready, Elizabeth; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Lamont, Ryan E; Feilotter, Harriet; Bosdet, Ian; Tucker, Tracy; Young, Sean; Karsan, Aly; Charames, George S; Agatep, Ronald; Spriggs, Elizabeth L; Chisholm, Caitlin; Vasli, Nasim; Daoud, Hussein; Jarinova, Olga; Tomaszewski, Robert; Hume, Stacey; Taylor, Sherryl; Akbari, Mohammad R; Lerner-Ellis, Jordan

    2017-07-20

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to develop a national program for Canadian diagnostic laboratories to compare DNA-variant interpretations and resolve discordant-variant classifications using the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes as a case study.MethodsBRCA1 and BRCA2 variant data were uploaded and shared through the Canadian Open Genetics Repository (COGR; http://www.opengenetics.ca). A total of 5,554 variant observations were submitted; classification differences were identified and comparison reports were sent to participating laboratories. Each site had the opportunity to reclassify variants. The data were analyzed before and after the comparison report process to track concordant- or discordant-variant classifications by three different models.ResultsVariant-discordance rates varied by classification model: 38.9% of variants were discordant when using a five-tier model, 26.7% with a three-tier model, and 5.0% with a two-tier model. After the comparison report process, the proportion of discordant variants dropped to 30.7% with the five-tier model, to 14.2% with the three-tier model, and to 0.9% using the two-tier model.ConclusionWe present a Canadian interinstitutional quality improvement program for DNA-variant interpretations. Sharing of variant knowledge by clinical diagnostic laboratories will allow clinicians and patients to make more informed decisions and lead to better patient outcomes.Genetics in Medicine advance online publication, 20 July 2017; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.80.

  17. Genetic Association of HLA Gene Variants with MRI Brain Structure in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Xuan; Wan, Yu; Tan, Lin; Liu, Jinyuan; Wang, Hui-Fu; Sun, Fu-Rong; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Jiang, Teng; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2017-07-01

    There is accumulating evidence that the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, how they affect AD occurrence is still unknown. In this study, we firstly investigated the association of gene variants in HLA gene variants and brain structures on MRI in a large sample from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) to explore the effects of HLA on AD pathogenesis. We selected hippocampus, hippocampus CA1 subregion, parahippocampus, posterior cingulate, precuneus, middle temporal, entorhinal cortex, and amygdala as regions of interest (ROIs). According to the previous association studies of HLA variants and AD, 12 SNPs in HLA were identified in the dataset following quality control measures. In total group analysis, our results showed that TNF-α SNPs at rs2534672 and rs2395488 were significantly positively associated with the volume of the left middle temporal lobe (rs2534672: P = 0.00035, Pc = 0.004; rs2395488: P = 0.0038, Pc = 0.023) at baseline. In the longitudinal study, HFE rs1800562 was remarkably correlated with the lower atrophy rate of right middle temporal lobe (P = 0.0003, Pc = 0.003) and RAGE rs2070600 was associated with the atrophy rate of right hippocampus substructure-CA1 over 2 years (P = 0.003, Pc = 0.035). Furthermore, we detected the above four associations in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subgroup analysis, as well as the association of rs2534672 with the baseline volume of the left middle temporal lobe in normal cognition (NC) subgroup analysis. Our study provided preliminary evidences that HLA gene variants might participate in the structural alteration of AD associated brain regions, hence modulating the susceptibility of AD.

  18. Genetic variant of AMD1 is associated with obesity in urban Indian children.

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    Rubina Tabassum

    Full Text Available Hyperhomocysteinemia is regarded as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and obesity. Manifestation of these chronic metabolic disorders starts in early life marked by increase in body mass index (BMI. We hypothesized that perturbations in homocysteine metabolism in early life could be a link between childhood obesity and adult metabolic disorders. Thus here we investigated association of common variants from homocysteine metabolism pathway genes with obesity in 3,168 urban Indian children.We genotyped 90 common variants from 18 genes in 1,325 children comprising of 862 normal-weight (NW and 463 over-weight/obese (OW/OB children in stage 1. The top signal obtained was replicated in an independent sample set of 1843 children (1,399 NW and 444 OW/OB in stage 2. Stage 1 association analysis revealed association between seven variants and childhood obesity at P<0.05, but association of only rs2796749 in AMD1 [OR = 1.41, P = 1.5×10(-4] remained significant after multiple testing correction. Association of rs2796749 with childhood obesity was validated in stage 2 [OR = 1.28, P = 4.2×10(-3] and meta-analysis [OR = 1.35, P = 1.9×10(-6]. AMD1 variant rs2796749 was also associated with quantitative measures of adiposity and plasma leptin levels that was also replicated and corroborated in combined analysis.Our study provides first evidence for the association of AMD1 variant with obesity and plasma leptin levels in children. Further studies to confirm this association, its functional significance and mechanism of action need to be undertaken.

  19. A genome-wide screen for genetic variants that modify the recruitment of REST to its target genes.

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    Rory Johnson

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of human diseases are being linked to genetic variants, but our understanding of the mechanistic links leading from DNA sequence to disease phenotype is limited. The majority of disease-causing nucleotide variants fall within the non-protein-coding portion of the genome, making it likely that they act by altering gene regulatory sequences. We hypothesised that SNPs within the binding sites of the transcriptional repressor REST alter the degree of repression of target genes. Given that changes in the effective concentration of REST contribute to several pathologies-various cancers, Huntington's disease, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular smooth muscle proliferation-these SNPs should alter disease-susceptibility in carriers. We devised a strategy to identify SNPs that affect the recruitment of REST to target genes through the alteration of its DNA recognition element, the RE1. A multi-step screen combining genetic, genomic, and experimental filters yielded 56 polymorphic RE1 sequences with robust and statistically significant differences of affinity between alleles. These SNPs have a considerable effect on the the functional recruitment of REST to DNA in a range of in vitro, reporter gene, and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, we observe allele-specific biases in deeply sequenced chromatin immunoprecipitation data, consistent with predicted differenes in RE1 affinity. Amongst the targets of polymorphic RE1 elements are important disease genes including NPPA, PTPRT, and CDH4. Thus, considerable genetic variation exists in the DNA motifs that connect gene regulatory networks. Recently available ChIP-seq data allow the annotation of human genetic polymorphisms with regulatory information to generate prior hypotheses about their disease-causing mechanism.

  20. A Genome-Wide Screen for Genetic Variants That Modify the Recruitment of REST to Its Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rory; Richter, Nadine; Bogu, Gireesh K.; Bhinge, Akshay; Teng, Siaw Wei; Choo, Siew Hua; Andrieux, Lise O.; de Benedictis, Cinzia; Jauch, Ralf; Stanton, Lawrence W.

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of human diseases are being linked to genetic variants, but our understanding of the mechanistic links leading from DNA sequence to disease phenotype is limited. The majority of disease-causing nucleotide variants fall within the non-protein-coding portion of the genome, making it likely that they act by altering gene regulatory sequences. We hypothesised that SNPs within the binding sites of the transcriptional repressor REST alter the degree of repression of target genes. Given that changes in the effective concentration of REST contribute to several pathologies—various cancers, Huntington's disease, cardiac hypertrophy, vascular smooth muscle proliferation—these SNPs should alter disease-susceptibility in carriers. We devised a strategy to identify SNPs that affect the recruitment of REST to target genes through the alteration of its DNA recognition element, the RE1. A multi-step screen combining genetic, genomic, and experimental filters yielded 56 polymorphic RE1 sequences with robust and statistically significant differences of affinity between alleles. These SNPs have a considerable effect on the the functional recruitment of REST to DNA in a range of in vitro, reporter gene, and in vivo analyses. Furthermore, we observe allele-specific biases in deeply sequenced chromatin immunoprecipitation data, consistent with predicted differenes in RE1 affinity. Amongst the targets of polymorphic RE1 elements are important disease genes including NPPA, PTPRT, and CDH4. Thus, considerable genetic variation exists in the DNA motifs that connect gene regulatory networks. Recently available ChIP–seq data allow the annotation of human genetic polymorphisms with regulatory information to generate prior hypotheses about their disease-causing mechanism. PMID:22496669

  1. Genetic variants at 1p11.2 and breast cancer risk: a two-stage study in Chinese women.

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    Yue Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified several breast cancer susceptibility loci, and one genetic variant, rs11249433, at 1p11.2 was reported to be associated with breast cancer in European populations. To explore the genetic variants in this region associated with breast cancer in Chinese women, we conducted a two-stage fine-mapping study with a total of 1792 breast cancer cases and 1867 controls. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs including rs11249433 in a 277 kb region at 1p11.2 were selected and genotyping was performed by using TaqMan® OpenArray™ Genotyping System for stage 1 samples (878 cases and 900 controls. In stage 2 (914 cases and 967 controls, three SNPs (rs2580520, rs4844616 and rs11249433 were further selected and genotyped for validation. The results showed that one SNP (rs2580520 located at a predicted enhancer region of SRGAP2 was consistently associated with a significantly increased risk of breast cancer in a recessive genetic model [Odds Ratio (OR  =  1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI  =  1.16-2.36 for stage 2 samples; OR  =  1.51, 95% CI  =  1.16-1.97 for combined samples, respectively]. However, no significant association was observed between rs11249433 and breast cancer risk in this Chinese population (dominant genetic model in combined samples: OR  =  1.20, 95% CI  =  0.92-1.57. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Genotypes of rs2580520 at 1p11.2 suggest that Chinese women may have different breast cancer susceptibility loci, which may contribute to the development of breast cancer in this population.

  2. Genome-wide characterization of genetic variants and putative regions under selection in meat and egg-type chicken lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschiero, Clarissa; Moreira, Gabriel Costa Monteiro; Gheyas, Almas Ara; Godoy, Thaís Fernanda; Gasparin, Gustavo; Mariani, Pilar Drummond Sampaio Corrêa; Paduan, Marcela; Cesar, Aline Silva Mello; Ledur, Mônica Corrêa; Coutinho, Luiz Lehmann

    2018-01-25

    Meat and egg-type chickens have been selected for several generations for different traits. Artificial and natural selection for different phenotypes can change frequency of genetic variants, leaving particular genomic footprints throghtout the genome. Thus, the aims of this study were to sequence 28 chickens from two Brazilian lines (meat and white egg-type) and use this information to characterize genome-wide genetic variations, identify putative regions under selection using Fst method, and find putative pathways under selection. A total of 13.93 million SNPs and 1.36 million INDELs were identified, with more variants detected from the broiler (meat-type) line. Although most were located in non-coding regions, we identified 7255 intolerant non-synonymous SNPs, 512 stopgain/loss SNPs, 1381 frameshift and 1094 non-frameshift INDELs that may alter protein functions. Genes harboring intolerant non-synonymous SNPs affected metabolic pathways related mainly to reproduction and endocrine systems in the white-egg layer line, and lipid metabolism and metabolic diseases in the broiler line. Fst analysis in sliding windows, using SNPs and INDELs separately, identified over 300 putative regions of selection overlapping with more than 250 genes. For the first time in chicken, INDEL variants were considered for selection signature analysis, showing high level of correlation in results between SNP and INDEL data. The putative regions of selection signatures revealed interesting candidate genes and pathways related to important phenotypic traits in chicken, such as lipid metabolism, growth, reproduction, and cardiac development. In this study, Fst method was applied to identify high confidence putative regions under selection, providing novel insights into selection footprints that can help elucidate the functional mechanisms underlying different phenotypic traits relevant to meat and egg-type chicken lines. In addition, we generated a large catalog of line-specific and common

  3. SIRT1 genetic variants associate with the metabolic response of Caucasians to a controlled lifestyle intervention – the TULIP Study

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    Stefan Norbert

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sirtuin1 (SIRT1 regulates gene expression in distinct metabolic pathways and mediates beneficial effects of caloric restriction in animal models. In humans, SIRT1 genetic variants associate with fasting energy expenditure. To investigate the relevance of SIRT1 for human metabolism and caloric restriction, we analyzed SIRT1 genetic variants in respect to the outcome of a controlled lifestyle intervention in Caucasians at risk for type 2 diabetes. Methods A total of 1013 non-diabetic Caucasians from the Tuebingen Family Study (TUEF were genotyped for four tagging SIRT1 SNPs (rs730821, rs12413112, rs7069102, rs2273773 for cross-sectional association analyses with prediabetic traits. SNPs that associated with basal energy expenditure in the TUEF cohort were additionally analyzed in 196 individuals who underwent a controlled lifestyle intervention (Tuebingen Lifestyle Intervention Program; TULIP. Multivariate regressions analyses with adjustment for relevant covariates were performed to detect associations of SIRT1 variants with the changes in anthropometrics, weight, body fat or metabolic characteristics (blood glucose, insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and liver fat, measured by magnetic resonance techniques after the 9-month follow-up test in the TULIP study. Results Minor allele (X/A carriers of rs12413112 (G/A had a significantly lower basal energy expenditure (p = 0.04 and an increased respiratory quotient (p = 0.02. This group (rs12413112: X/A was resistant against lifestyle-induced improvement of fasting plasma glucose (GG: -2.01%, X/A: 0.53%; p = 0.04, had less increase in insulin sensitivity (GG: 17.3%, X/A: 9.6%; p = 0.05 and an attenuated decline in liver fat (GG: -38.4%, X/A: -7.5%; p = 0.01. Conclusion SIRT1 plays a role for the individual lifestyle intervention response, possibly owing to decreased basal energy expenditure and a lower lipid-oxidation rate in rs12413112 X/A allele carriers. SIRT1 genetic

  4. Genetic analysis of melanocortin 1 receptor red hair color variants in a Russian population of Eastern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motorina, Anna V; Palkina, Nadezhda V; Komina, Anna V; Ruksha, Tatiana G; Artyukhov, Ivan P; Kozlov, Vasily V

    2018-03-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor is a Gs protein-coupled receptor implicated in melanogenesis regulation. The receptor gene is highly polymorphic, which accounts for the association of several of its single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with an increased risk of melanoma. The present study aimed to evaluate the distribution of melanocortin 1 receptor gene variants R151C, R160W, and D294H within the Russian population of Eastern Siberia and its association with melanoma development. Melanoma patients (n=95) admitted to Krasnoyarsk Territorial Oncological Center and healthy controls (n=334) were enrolled in the study. A clinical examination of patients was performed to evaluate the phenotypic features of melanoma patients. SNPs were analyzed by real-time PCR. Clinical examination indicated a more frequent occurrence of fair skin type, blue eyes, blonde and red hair, and more frequent localization of freckles on the neck, trunk, and extremities in the melanoma group of patients. The R151C melanocortin 1 receptor gene variant was found in 18% of melanoma patients and associated with an increased likelihood of melanoma development (odds ratio=6.4; 95% confidence interval: 2.8-14.3; P=0.0001). The two remaining variant alleles of the melanocortin 1 receptor gene occurred with low frequency both in controls and in the melanoma group. The R160W SNP was identified neither in controls nor in melanoma patients. The D294H heterozygous variant was observed in 0.3% of individuals in the control group and in 1.1% of the patients in the melanoma group. Such an asymmetric distribution of the melanocortin 1 receptor within red hair color genotypes in the population under study compared with other populations may be because of Russian genetic homogeneity. Carriers of the mutant R151C allele should exercise caution in terms of exposure to the sun to avoid the risk of melanoma development.

  5. Tertiary and quaternary structural differences between two genetic variants of bovine casein by small-angle X-ray scattering

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    Pessen, H.; Kumosinski, T.F.; Farrell, H.M. Jr.; Brumberger, H. (Dept. of Agriculture, Eastern Regional Research Center, Philadelphia, PA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The casein complexes of bovine milk consist of four major protein fractions, alpha s1, alpha s2, beta, and kappa. Colloidal particles of casein (termed micelles) contain inorganic calcium and phosphate; they are very roughly spherical with an average radius of 650 A. Removal of Ca2+ leads to the formation of smaller protein aggregates with an average radius of 94 A. Two genetic variants, A and B, of the predominant fraction, alpha s1-casein, result in milks with markedly different physical properties, such as solubility and heat stability. To investigate the molecular basis for these differences, small-angle X-ray scattering was performed on the respective colloidal micelles and submicelles. Scattering curves for submicelles of both variants showed multiple Gaussian character; data for the B variant were previously interpreted in terms of two concentric regions of different electron density, i.e., a compact core and a relatively loose shell. For the submicelle of A, there was a third Gaussian, reflecting a negative contribution due to interparticle interference. Molecular parameters for submicelles of both A and B are in agreement with hydrodynamic data in the literature. Data for the micelles, for which scattering yields cross-sectional information, were fitted by a sum of three Gaussians for both variants; for these, the corresponding two lower radii of gyration represent the two concentric regions of the submicelles, while the third reflects the average packing of submicelles within the micellar cross section. Most of the molecular parameters obtained showed small but consistent differences between A and B, but for submicelles within the micelle several differences were particularly notable: A has a greater molecular weight for the compact region of the constituent submicelle (82,000 vs 60,000) and a much greater submicellar packing number.

  6. Novel autism subtype-dependent genetic variants are revealed by quantitative trait and subphenotype association analyses of published GWAS data.

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    Valerie W Hu

    Full Text Available The heterogeneity of symptoms associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs has presented a significant challenge to genetic analyses. Even when associations with genetic variants have been identified, it has been difficult to associate them with a specific trait or characteristic of autism. Here, we report that quantitative trait analyses of ASD symptoms combined with case-control association analyses using distinct ASD subphenotypes identified on the basis of symptomatic profiles result in the identification of highly significant associations with 18 novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. The symptom categories included deficits in language usage, non-verbal communication, social development, and play skills, as well as insistence on sameness or ritualistic behaviors. Ten of the trait-associated SNPs, or quantitative trait loci (QTL, were associated with more than one subtype, providing partial replication of the identified QTL. Notably, none of the novel SNPs is located within an exonic region, suggesting that these hereditary components of ASDs are more likely related to gene regulatory processes (or gene expression than to structural or functional changes in gene products. Seven of the QTL reside within intergenic chromosomal regions associated with rare copy number variants that have been previously reported in autistic samples. Pathway analyses of the genes associated with the QTL identified in this study implicate neurological functions and disorders associated with autism pathophysiology. This study underscores the advantage of incorporating both quantitative traits as well as subphenotypes into large-scale genome-wide analyses of complex disorders.

  7. A Period 2 genetic variant interacts with plasma SFA to modify plasma lipid concentrations in adults with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rios, Antonio; Perez-Martinez, Pablo; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Phillips, Catherine M; Gjelstad, Ingrid M F; Wright, John W; Karlström, Brita; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; van Hees, A M J; Helal, Olfa; Polus, Anna; Defoort, Catherine; Riserus, Ulf; Blaak, Ellen E; Lovegrove, Julie A; Drevon, Christian A; Roche, Helen M; Lopez-Miranda, Jose

    2012-07-01

    Genetic variants of Period 2 (PER2), a circadian clock gene, have been linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, it is still unknown whether these genetic variants interact with the various types of plasma fatty acids. This study investigated whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the PER2 locus (rs934945 and rs2304672) interact with various classes of plasma fatty acids to modulate plasma lipid metabolism in 381 participants with MetS in the European LIPGENE study. Interestingly, the rs2304672 SNP interacted with plasma total SFA concentrations to affect fasting plasma TG, TG-rich lipoprotein (TRL-TG), total cholesterol, apoC-II, apoB, and apoB-48 concentrations (P-interaction SFA concentration (>median) had a higher plasma TG concentration (P = 0.001) and higher TRL-TG (P SFA concentration (>median) had higher plasma concentrations of apo C-II (P SFA concentration in participants with MetS. The understanding of these gene-nutrient interactions could help to provide a better knowledge of the pathogenesis in MetS.

  8. A genome wide association study (GWAS) providing evidence of an association between common genetic variants and late radiotherapy toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gillian C; Thompson, Deborah; Fachal, Laura; Kerns, Sarah; Talbot, Chris; Elliott, Rebecca M; Dorling, Leila; Coles, Charlotte E; Dearnaley, David P; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Symonds, Paul; Yarnold, John; Baynes, Caroline; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Dennis, Joe; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wilkinson, Jennifer S; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Tanteles, George A; Platte, Radka; Mayes, Rebecca; Conroy, Don; Maranian, Mel; Luccarini, Craig; Gulliford, Sarah L; Sydes, Matthew R; Hall, Emma; Haviland, Joanne; Misra, Vivek; Titley, Jennifer; Bentzen, Søren M; Pharoah, Paul D P; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; West, Catharine M L

    2014-05-01

    This study was designed to identify common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with toxicity 2years after radiotherapy. A genome wide association study was performed in 1850 patients from the RAPPER study: 1217 received adjuvant breast radiotherapy and 633 had radical prostate radiotherapy. Genotype associations with both overall and individual endpoints of toxicity were tested via univariable and multivariable regression. Replication of potentially associated SNPs was carried out in three independent patient cohorts who had radiotherapy for prostate (516 RADIOGEN and 862 Gene-PARE) or breast (355 LeND) cancer. Quantile-quantile plots show more associations at the P<5×10(-7) level than expected by chance (164 vs. 9 for the prostate cases and 29 vs. 4 for breast cases), providing evidence that common genetic variants are associated with risk of toxicity. Strongest associations were for individual endpoints rather than an overall measure of toxicity in all patients. However, in general, significant associations were not validated at a nominal 0.05 level in the replication cohorts. This largest GWAS to date provides evidence of true association between common genetic variants and toxicity. Associations with toxicity appeared to be tumour site-specific. Future GWAS require higher statistical power, in particular in the validation stage, to test clinically relevant effect sizes of SNP associations with individual endpoints, but the required sample sizes are achievable. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Reduced Penetrance and Variable Expression of SCN5A Mutations and the Importance of Co-inherited Genetic Variants: Case Report and Review of the Literature

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    T. Robyns, MD.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the SCN5A gene are responsible for multiple phenotypical presentations including Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, progressive familial heart block, sick sinus syndrome, dilated cardiomyopathy, lone atrial fibrillation and multiple overlap syndromes. These different phenotypic expressions of a mutation in a single gene can be explained by variable expression and reduced penetrance. One of the possible explanations of these phenomena is the co-inheritance of genetic variants. We describe a family where the individuals exhibit a compound heterozygosity in the SCN5A gene including a mutation (R1632H and a new variant (M858L. Individuals with both the mutation and new variant present with a more severe phenotype including spontaneous atrial tachyarrhythmia at young age. We give an overview of the different phenotypes of "SCN5A disease" and discuss the importance of co-inherited genetic variants in the expression of SCN5A disease.

  10. Numerous Brugada syndrome-associated genetic variants have no effect on J-point elevation, syncope susceptibility, malignant cardiac arrhythmia, and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghouse, Jonas; Have, Christian T; Skov, Morten W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether Brugada syndrome (BrS)-associated variants identified in the general population have an effect on J-point elevation as well as whether carriers of BrS variants were more prone to experience syncope and malignant ventricular arrhythmia and had increased mortality......S-associated variants. Electrocardiograms (ECG) were analyzed electronically, and data on syncope, ventricular arrhythmias, and mortality were obtained from administrative health-care registries. RESULTS: In HGMD, 382 BrS-associated genetic variants were identified. Of these, 28 variants were identified in the study...... cohort. None of the carriers presented with type 1 BrS ECG pattern. Mean J-point elevation in V1 and V2 were within normal guideline limits for carriers and noncarriers. There was no difference in syncope susceptibility (carriers 8/624; noncarriers 98/5,562; P = 0.51), ventricular arrhythmia (carriers 4...

  11. Association of CISH -292A/T genetic variant with hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Hoang V; Toan, Nguyen L; Song, Le H; Kremsner, Peter G; Kun, Jürgen F J; Tp, Velavan

    2012-04-01

    Cytokine-inducible SRC homology 2 domain protein (CISH) is a suppressor of cytokine signaling that controls interleukin-2 signaling pathway. We investigated the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -292A>T in 473 Vietnamese hepatitis B virus (HBV) carriers and 416 healthy controls. CISH variants at -292A>T were associated to HBV infection (Allelic: OR, 1.22 95% CI, 1-1.49; P = 0.04; Recessive: OR, 1.69 95% CI 1.23-2.54; P = 0.007). A gene dose effect for the risk allele -292T was observed (P = 0.04). The level of interleukin 2 and liver enzymes such as alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, total bilirubin, and direct bilirubin were not associated to CISH polymorphism at position -292A>T This study associated the vital role of CISH SNP -292A>T variant to hepatitis B virus infection in a Vietnamese population.

  12. Pleiotropic Meta-Analyses of Longitudinal Studies Discover Novel Genetic Variants Associated with Age-Related Diseases

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    Liang He

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Age-related diseases may result from shared biological mechanisms in intrinsic processes of aging. Genetic effects on age-related diseases are often modulated by environmental factors due to their little contribution to fitness or are mediated through certain endophenotypes. Identification of genetic variants with pleiotropic effects on both common complex diseases and endophenotypes may reveal potential conflicting evolutionary pressures and deliver new insights into shared genetic contribution to healthspan and lifespan. Here, we performed pleiotropic meta-analyses of genetic variants using five NIH-funded datasets by integrating univariate summary statistics for age-related diseases and endophenotypes. We investigated three groups of traits: (1 endophenotypes such as blood glucose, blood pressure, lipids, hematocrit, and body mass index, (2 time-to-event outcomes such as the age-at-onset of diabetes mellitus (DM, cancer, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs and neurodegenerative diseases (NDs, and (3 both combined. In addition to replicating previous findings, we identify seven novel genome-wide significant loci (< 5e-08, out of which five are low-frequency variants. Specifically, from Group 2, we find rs7632505 on 3q21.1 in SEMA5B, rs460976 on 21q22.3 (1 kb from TMPRSS2 and rs12420422 on 11q24.1 predominantly associated with a variety of CVDs, rs4905014 in ITPK1 associated with stroke and heart failure, rs7081476 on 10p12.1 in ANKRD26 associated with multiple diseases including DM, CVDs, and NDs. From Group 3, we find rs8082812 on 18p11.22 and rs1869717 on 4q31.3 associated with both endophenotypes and CVDs. Our follow-up analyses show that rs7632505, rs4905014, and rs8082812 have age-dependent effects on coronary heart disease or stroke. Functional annotation suggests that most of these SNPs are within regulatory regions or DNase clusters and in linkage disequilibrium with expression quantitative trait loci, implying their potential regulatory

  13. Functional complementation studies identify candidate genes and common genetic variants associated with ovarian cancer survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaye, Lydia; Dafou, Dimitra; Ramus, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Common germline genetic variation and/or somatic alterations in tumours may be associated with survival in women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. The successful identification of genetic associations relies on a suitable strategy for identifying and testing candidate genes. We used microcell-mediat...

  14. Genetic variants associated with drugs-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions: a PRISMA-compliant systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oussalah, A.; Mayorga, C.; Blanca, M.; Barbaud, A.; Nakonechna, A.; Cernadas, J.; Gotua, M.; Brockow, K.; Caubet, J.-C.; Bircher, A.; Atanaskovic, M.; Demoly, P.; K Tanno, L.; Terreehorst, I.; Laguna, J. J.; Romano, A.; Guéant, J.-L.

    2016-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity includes allergic (AR) and nonallergic reactions (NARs) influenced by genetic predisposition. We performed a systematic review of genetic predictors of IgE-mediated AR and NAR with MEDLINE and PubMed search engine between January 1966 and December 2014. Among 3110 citations,

  15. Genetic Testing for Long-QT Syndrome Distinguishing Pathogenic Mutations From Benign Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kapa, Suraj; Tester, David J.; Salisbury, Benjamin A.; Harris-Kerr, Carole; Pungliya, Manish S.; Alders, Marielle; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Background-Genetic testing for long-QT syndrome (LQTS) has diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic implications. Hundreds of causative mutations in 12 known LQTS-susceptibility genes have been identified. Genetic testing that includes the 3 most commonly mutated genes is available clinically.

  16. Genetic Variants Influencing Circulating Lipid Levels and Risk of Coronary Artery Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waterworth, Dawn M.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Song, Kijoung; Chen, Li; Zhao, Jing Hua; Ripatti, Samuli; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Zhang, Weihua; Yuan, Xin; Lim, Noha; Luan, Jian'an; Ashford, Sofie; Wheeler, Eleanor; Young, Elizabeth H.; Hadley, David; Thompson, John R.; Braund, Peter S.; Johnson, Toby; Struchalin, Maksim; Surakka, Ida; Luben, Robert; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Rodwell, Sheila A.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Inouye, Michael; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Elliott, Paul; Schlessinger, David; Sanna, Serena; Scuteri, Angelo; Jackson, Anne; Mohlke, Karen L.; Tuomilehto, Jaako; Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Mahley, Robert W.; Grundy, Scott M.; McArdle, Wendy; Cardon, Lon; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Chambers, John C.; Boehnke, Michael; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Salomaa, Veikko; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ruokonen, Aimo; Barroso, Inês; Epstein, Stephen E.; Hakonarson, Hakon H.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Hall, Alistair S.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Strachan, David P.; Barter, Philip; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Peltonen, Leena; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McPherson, Ruth; Mooser, Vincent; Sandhu, Manjinder S.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic studies might provide new insights into the biological mechanisms underlying lipid metabolism and risk of CAD. We therefore conducted a genome-wide association study to identify novel genetic determinants of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol

  17. Context-specific effects of genetic variants associated with autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Iris H; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2017-10-01

    Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease are typical examples of complex genetic diseases caused by a combination of genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Insight into the genetic risk factors (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) has increased since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became possible in 2007 and, for individual diseases, SNPs can now explain some 15-50% of genetic risk. GWAS have also shown that some 50% of the genetic risk factors for individual autoimmune diseases overlap between different diseases. Thus, shared risk factors may converge to pathways that, when perturbed by genetic variation, predispose to autoimmunity in general. This raises the question of what determines disease specificity, and suggests that identical risk factors may have different effects in various autoimmune diseases. Addressing this question requires translation of genetic risk factors to causal genes and then to molecular and cellular pathways. Since >90% of the genetic risk factors are found in the non-coding part of the genome (i.e. outside the exons of protein-coding genes) and can have an impact on gene regulation, there is an urgent need to better understand the non-coding part of the genome. Here, we will outline the methods being used to unravel the gene regulatory networks perturbed in autoimmune diseases and the importance of doing this in the relevant cell types. We will highlight findings in coeliac disease, which manifests in the small intestine, to demonstrate how cell type and disease context can impact on the consequences of genetic risk factors. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  18. Context-specific effects of genetic variants associated with autoimmune disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonkers, Iris H.; Wijmenga, Cisca

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease are typical examples of complex genetic diseases caused by a combination of genetic and non-genetic risk factors. Insight into the genetic risk factors (single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)) has increased since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became possible in 2007 and, for individual diseases, SNPs can now explain some 15–50% of genetic risk. GWAS have also shown that some 50% of the genetic risk factors for individual autoimmune diseases overlap between different diseases. Thus, shared risk factors may converge to pathways that, when perturbed by genetic variation, predispose to autoimmunity in general. This raises the question of what determines disease specificity, and suggests that identical risk factors may have different effects in various autoimmune diseases. Addressing this question requires translation of genetic risk factors to causal genes and then to molecular and cellular pathways. Since >90% of the genetic risk factors are found in the non-coding part of the genome (i.e. outside the exons of protein-coding genes) and can have an impact on gene regulation, there is an urgent need to better understand the non-coding part of the genome. Here, we will outline the methods being used to unravel the gene regulatory networks perturbed in autoimmune diseases and the importance of doing this in the relevant cell types. We will highlight findings in coeliac disease, which manifests in the small intestine, to demonstrate how cell type and disease context can impact on the consequences of genetic risk factors. PMID:28977443

  19. Psd1 Effects on Candida albicans Planktonic Cells and Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Sónia; Silva, Patrícia M; Felício, Mário R; de Medeiros, Luciano N; Kurtenbach, Eleonora; Santos, Nuno C

    2017-01-01

    Candida albicans is an important human pathogen, causing opportunistic infections. The adhesion of planktonic cells to a substrate is the first step for biofilm development. The antimicrobial peptide (AMP) Ps d1 is a defensin isolated from Pisum sativum seeds. We tested the effects of this AMP on C. albicans biofilms and planktonic cells, comparing its activity with amphotericin B and fluconazole. Three C. albicans variants were studied, one of them a mutant deficient in glucosylceramide synthase, conferring resistance to Ps d1 antifungal action. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to assess morphological and biomechanical changes on fungal cells. Surface alterations, with membrane disruption and leakage of cellular contents, were observed. Cytometry assays and confocal microscopy imaging showed that Ps d1 causes cell death, in a time and concentration-dependent manner. These results demonstrate Ps d1 pleiotropic action against a relevant fungal human pathogen, suggesting its use as natural antimycotic agent.

  20. Separate and combined effects of genetic variants and pre-treatment whole blood gene expression on response to exposure-based cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Roberts, Susanna; Keers, Robert; Lee, Sang Hyuck; De Jong, Simone; Gaspar, Héléna; Teismann, Tobias; Wannemüller, André; Schneider, Silvia; Jöhren, Peter; Margraf, Jürgen; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2017-04-01

    Exposure-based cognitive behavioural therapy (eCBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety disorders. Response varies between individuals. Gene expression integrates genetic and environmental influences. We analysed the effect of gene expression and genetic markers separately and together on treatment response. Adult participants (n ≤ 181) diagnosed with panic disorder or a specific phobia underwent eCBT as part of standard care. Percentage decrease in the Clinical Global Impression severity rating was assessed across treatment, and between baseline and a 6-month follow-up. Associations with treatment response were assessed using expression data from 3,233 probes, and expression profiles clustered in a data- and literature-driven manner. A total of 3,343,497 genetic variants were used to predict treatment response alone and combined in polygenic risk scores. Genotype and expression data were combined in expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses. Expression levels were not associated with either treatment phenotype in any analysis. A total of 1,492 eQTLs were identified with q genetic variants and treatment response did not affect expression levels significantly. Genetic variants did not significantly predict treatment response alone or in polygenic risk scores. We assessed gene expression alone and alongside genetic variants. No associations with treatment outcome were identified. Future studies require larger sample sizes to discover associations.

  1. Shared genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke and coronary artery disease: a genome-wide analysis of common variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; König, Inke R; Rosand, Jonathan; Clarke, Robert; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Mitchell, Braxton D; Assimes, Themistocles L; Levi, Christopher; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Fornage, Myriam; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Psaty, Bruce M; Hengstenberg, Christian; Seshadri, Sudha; Erdmann, Jeanette; Bis, Joshua C; Peters, Annette; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; März, Winfried; Meschia, James F; Kathiresan, Sekar; Ikram, M Arfan; McPherson, Ruth; Stefansson, Kari; Sudlow, Cathie; Reilly, Muredach P; Thompson, John R; Sharma, Pankaj; Hopewell, Jemma C; Chambers, John C; Watkins, Hugh; Rothwell, Peter M; Roberts, Robert; Markus, Hugh S; Samani, Nilesh J; Farrall, Martin; Schunkert, Heribert

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic stroke (IS) and coronary artery disease (CAD) share several risk factors and each has a substantial heritability. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to evaluate the extent of shared genetic determination of the two diseases. Genome-wide association data were obtained from the METASTROKE, Coronary Artery Disease Genome-wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM), and Coronary Artery Disease (C4D) Genetics consortia. We first analyzed common variants reaching a nominal threshold of significance (Pstroke (LAS) subtype. Common variants associated with CAD at P<0.01 were associated with a significant excess risk for IS and for LAS and vice versa. Among the 42 known genome-wide significant loci for CAD, 3 and 5 loci were significantly associated with IS and LAS, respectively. In the joint meta-analyses, 15 loci passed genome-wide significance (P<5×10(-8)) for the combined phenotype of IS or CAD and 17 loci passed genome-wide significance for LAS or CAD. Because these loci had prior evidence for genome-wide significance for CAD, we specifically analyzed the respective signals for IS and LAS and found evidence for association at chr12q24/SH2B3 (PIS=1.62×10(-7)) and ABO (PIS=2.6×10(-4)), as well as at HDAC9 (PLAS=2.32×10(-12)), 9p21 (PLAS=3.70×10(-6)), RAI1-PEMT-RASD1 (PLAS=2.69×10(-5)), EDNRA (PLAS=7.29×10(-4)), and CYP17A1-CNNM2-NT5C2 (PLAS=4.9×10(-4)). Our results demonstrate substantial overlap in the genetic risk of IS and particularly the LAS subtype with CAD.

  2. Association of genetic variants with isolated fasting hyperglycaemia and isolated postprandial hyperglycaemia in a Han Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomu Kong

    Full Text Available Though multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with type 2 diabetes have been identified, the genetic bases of isolated fasting hyperglycaemia (IFH and isolated postprandial hyperglycaemia (IPH were still unclear. In present study, we aimed to investigate the association of genome-wide association study-validated genetic variants and IFH or IPH in Han Chinese.We genotyped 27 validated SNPs in 6,663 unrelated individuals comprising 341 IFH, 865 IPH, 1,203 combined fasting hyperglycaemia and postprandial hyperglycaemia, and 4,254 normal glycaemic subjects of Han ancestry. The distributions of genotype frequencies of FTO, CDKAL1 and GCKR were significant different between individuals with IFH and those with IPH (SNP(ptrend : rs8050136(0.0024, rs9939609(0.0049, rs7756992(0.0122, rs780094(0.0037. Risk allele of FTO specifically increased the risk of IFH (rs8050136: OR 1.403 [95% CI 1.125-1.750], p = 0.0027; rs9939609: 1.398 [1.120-1.744], p = 0.0030. G allele of CDKAL1 specifically increased the risk of IPH (1.217 [1.092-1.355], p = 0.0004. G allele of GCKR increased the risk of IFH (1.167 [0.999-1.362], p = 0.0513, but decreased the risk of IPH (0.891 [0.801-0.991], p = 0.0331. In addition, TCF7L2 and KCNQ1 increased the risk of both IFH and IPH. When combined, each additional risk allele associated with IFH increased the risk for IFH by 1.246-fold (p<0.0001, while each additional risk allele associated with IPH increased the risk for IPH by 1.190-fold (p<0.0001.Our results indicate that genotype distributions of variants from FTO, GCKR, CDKAL1 were different between IPH and IFH in Han Chinese. Variants of genes modulating insulin sensitivity (FTO, GCKR contributed to the risk of IFH, while variants of genes related to beta cell function (CDKAL1 increase the risk of IPH.

  3. The relationship between genetic risk variants with brain structure and function in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Licia P; Köhler, Cristiano A; de Sousa, Rafael T

    2017-01-01

    Genetic-neuroimaging paradigms could provide insights regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Nevertheless, findings have been inconsistent across studies. A systematic review of gene-imaging studies involving individuals with BD was conducted across electronic major databases from...

  4. Genetic schizophrenia risk variants jointly modulate total brain and white matter volume

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, Afke F.; Bakker, Steven C.; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Derks, Eske M.; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Boos, Heleen B. M.; Cahn, Wiepke; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Ripke, Stephan; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kahn, René S.; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Andreassen, Ole A.; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; St Clair, David; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Purcell, Shaun; Dudbridge, Frank; Neale, Benjamin M.; Rossin, Lizzy; Visscher, Peter M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Golimbet, Vera; de Hert, Marc; Jonsson, Erik G.; Bitter, István; Pietiläinen, Olli P. H.; Collier, David A.; Tosato, Sarah; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bergen, Sarah E.; Black, Donald W.; Børglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nicholas; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; de Haan, Lieuwe; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegline, Ina; Gill, Michael; Glenthøj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Hamshere, Marian; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Ingason, Andrés; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Jürgens, Gesche; Keller, Matthew C.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lawrence, Jacob; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGrath, John J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Duncan E.; McQuillin, Andrew; Melle, Ingrid; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nikolov, Ivan; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; Nöthen, Markus M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Ørntoft, Torben F.; Owen, Michael J.; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Ben; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Quinn, Emma M.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Réthelyi, János M.; Ribble, Robert; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thygesen, Johan H.; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; van den Oord, Edwin; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud; Veldink, Jan; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Daly, Mark J.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2013-01-01

    Thousands of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are weakly associated with schizophrenia. It is likely that subsets of disease-associated SNPs are associated with distinct heritable disease-associated phenotypes. Therefore, we examined the shared genetic susceptibility modulating

  5. Association Between a Genetic Variant Related to Glutamic Acid Metabolism and Coronary Heart Disease in Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qibin; Prudente, Sabrina; Mendonca, Christine; Andreozzi, Francesco; di Pietro, Natalia; Sturma, Mariella; Novelli, Valeria; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Formoso, Gloria; Gervino, Ernest V.; Hauser, Thomas H.; Muehlschlegel, Jochen D.; Niewczas, Monika A.; Krolewski, Andrzej S.; Biolo, Gianni; Pandolfi, Assunta; Rimm, Eric; Sesti, Giorgio; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Hu, Frank

    2013-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Diabetes is associated with an elevated risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). Previous studies have suggested that the genetic factors predisposing to excess cardiovascular risk may be different in diabetic and non-diabetic participants. OBJECTIVE To identify genetic determinants of CHD that are specific to diabetic patients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We studied five independent sets of CHD cases and CHD-negative controls from the Nurses Health Study (NHS; enrolled in 1976 and followed through 2008), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; enrolled in 1986 and followed through 2008), Joslin Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), Gargano Heart Study (enrolled in 2001-2008), and Catanzaro Study (enrolled in 2004-2010). Included were a total of 1,517 CHD cases and 2,671 CHD-negative controls, all with type 2 diabetes. Results in diabetic patients were compared with those in 737 non-diabetic CHD cases and 1,637 non-diabetic CHD-negative controls from the NHS and HPFS cohorts. EXPOSURE 2,543,016 common genetic variants occurring throughout the genome. MAIN OUTCOME CHD defined as fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, or angiographic evidence of significant stenosis of the coronary arteries. RESULTS We identified a variant on chromosome 1q25 (rs10911021) consistently associated with CHD risk among diabetic participants with an odds ratio of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22-1.51, P=2×10−8). No association between this variant and CHD was detected among non-diabetic participants (OR=0.99, P=0.89), consistent with a significant gene-by-diabetes interaction on CHD risk (P=2×10−4). As compared to protective allele homozygotes, rs10911021 risk allele homozygotes were characterized by a 32% decrease in the expression of the neighboring glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) gene in human endothelial cells (P=0.0048). They also showed a decreased ratio between plasma

  6. Identification of genetic variants associated with Huntington's disease progression: a genome-wide association study

    OpenAIRE

    Hensman Moss, Davina J; Pardinas, Antonio; Langbehn, Douglas; Lo, Kitty; Leavitt, Blair R; Roos, Raymund; Durr, Alexandra; Mead, Simon; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Coleman, A; Santos, R Dar; Decolongon, J; Sturrock, A

    2017-01-01

    Background\\ud \\ud Huntington's disease is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene, HTT. Age at onset has been used as a quantitative phenotype in genetic analysis looking for Huntington's disease modifiers, but is hard to define and not always available. Therefore, we aimed to generate a novel measure of disease progression and to identify genetic markers associated with this progression measure.\\ud \\ud Methods\\ud \\ud We generated a progression score on the basis of principal ...

  7. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication.......Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  8. Genetic Variants in KLOTHO Associate With Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sørensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Decline in cognitive abilities is a major concern in aging individuals. A potential important factor for functioning of the central nervous system in late-life stages is the KLOTHO (KL) gene. KL is expressed in various organs including the brain and is involved in multiple biological processes......, for example, growth factor signaling. In the present study, 19 tagging gene variants in KL were studied in relation to 2 measures of cognitive function, a 5-item cognitive composite score and the Mini Mental State Examination, in 1,480 Danes 92-100 years of age. We found that heterozygotes for the previously...

  9. Detecting and characterizing mixed infections with genetic variants of Anaplasma phagocytophilum in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) by developing an ankA cluster-specific nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouglin, Maggy; Chagneau, Sophie; Faille, Frédéric; Verheyden, Hélène; Bastian, Suzanne; Malandrin, Laurence

    2017-08-07

    Anaplasma phagocytophilum is a tick-transmitted Gram-negative obligate intracellular bacterium able to infect a wide variety of wild and domestic animals worldwide. Based on the genetic diversity observed with different molecular markers, several host-specific lineages have been identified. Roe deer is one of the most important reservoirs of this bacterium and hosts different genetic groups sometimes found on domestic animals. We therefore developed an ankA cluster-specific nested PCR (nPCR) to evaluate the prevalence of the three different ankA genetic groups described in roe deer (clusters II, III and IV) at three locations in France and the level of co-infections. The specificity of the three nPCRs was assessed by partially sequencing 35 amplicons of ankA genes obtained from the different nested PCRs. All three genetic lineages were detected in roe deer from all three geographical locations. Of the infected deer population, 60.7% were co-infected by two or three different genetic variants. Co-infections varied from 42.9 to 70.6% of the infected population depending on the local infection prevalences (from 33.3 to 73.9%). All types of mixed infections occurred, suggesting the absence of a strict variant exclusion by another variant. Mixed infections by two or three genetic variants of A. phagocytopilum are a common feature in roe deer. Genetic variants (cluster IV) also found in domestic ruminants (cattle and sheep) were present in all the roe deer populations analyzed, suggesting a shared epidemiological cycle.

  10. Genetic Panel Screening of Nearly 100 Mutations Reveals New Insights into the Breed Distribution of Risk Variants for Canine Hereditary Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Donner

    Full Text Available The growing number of identified genetic disease risk variants across dog breeds challenges the current state-of-the-art of population screening, veterinary molecular diagnostics, and genetic counseling. Multiplex screening of such variants is now technologically feasible, but its practical potential as a supportive tool for canine breeding, disease diagnostics, pet care, and genetics research is still unexplored.To demonstrate the utility of comprehensive genetic panel screening, we tested nearly 7000 dogs representing around 230 breeds for 93 disease-associated variants using a custom-designed genotyping microarray (the MyDogDNA® panel test. In addition to known breed disease-associated mutations, we discovered 15 risk variants in a total of 34 breeds in which their presence was previously undocumented. We followed up on seven of these genetic findings to demonstrate their clinical relevance. We report additional breeds harboring variants causing factor VII deficiency, hyperuricosuria, lens luxation, von Willebrand's disease, multifocal retinopathy, multidrug resistance, and rod-cone dysplasia. Moreover, we provide plausible molecular explanations for chondrodysplasia in the Chinook, cerebellar ataxia in the Norrbottenspitz, and familiar nephropathy in the Welsh Springer Spaniel.These practical examples illustrate how genetic panel screening represents a comprehensive, efficient and powerful diagnostic and research discovery tool with a range of applications in veterinary care, disease research, and breeding. We conclude that several known disease alleles are more widespread across different breeds than previously recognized. However, careful follow up studies of any unexpected discoveries are essential to establish genotype-phenotype correlations, as is readiness to provide genetic counseling on their implications for the dog and its breed.

  11. Dietary fatty acids modulate associations between genetic variants and circulating fatty acids in plasma and erythrocyte membranes: meta-analysis of 9 studies in the CHARGE consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caren E.; Follis, Jack L.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Foy, Millennia; Wu, Jason H.Y.; Ma, Yiyi; Tanaka, Toshiko; Manichakul, Ani W.; Wu, Hongyu; Chu, Audrey Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Ferruci, Luigi; da Chen, Yii-Der I; Rich, Stephen S.; Djoussé, Luc; Ridker, Paul M.; Tang, Weihong; McKnight, Barbara; Tsai, Michael Y.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hu, Frank B.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Arnett, Donna K.; King, Irena B.; Sun, Qi; Wang, Lu; Lumley, Thomas; Chiuve, Stephanie E.; Siscovick, David S; Ordovás, José M.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.

    2015-01-01

    Scope Tissue concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce cardiovascular disease risk, and genetic variants are associated with circulating fatty acids concentrations. Whether dietary fatty acids interact with genetic variants to modify circulating omega-3 fatty acids is unclear. Objective We evaluated interactions between genetic variants and fatty acid intakes for circulating alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). Methods and Results We conducted meta-analyses (N to 11,668) evaluating interactions between dietary fatty acids and genetic variants (rs174538 and rs174548 in FADS1 (fatty acid desaturase 1), rs7435 in AGPAT3 (1-acyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate), rs4985167 in PDXDC1 (pyridoxal-dependent decarboxylase domain-containing 1), rs780094 in GCKR (glucokinase regulatory protein) and rs3734398 in ELOVL2 (fatty acid elongase 2)). Stratification by measurement compartment (plasma vs. erthyrocyte) revealed compartment-specific interactions between FADS1 rs174538 and rs174548 and dietary ALA and linoleic acid for DHA and DPA. Conclusion Our findings reinforce earlier reports that genetically-based differences in circulating fatty acids may be partially due to differences in the conversion of fatty acid precursors. Further, fatty acids measurement compartment may modify gene-diet relationships, and considering compartment may improve the detection of gene-fatty acids interactions for circulating fatty acid outcomes. PMID:25626431

  12. Detection of an ABCA1 variant associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus susceptibility for biochemistry and genetic laboratory courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legorreta-Herrera, M; Mosqueda-Romo, N A; Hernández-Clemente, F; Soto-Cruz, I

    2013-01-01

    We selected diabetes mellitus for this laboratory exercise to provide students with an explicit model for scientific research concerning the association between the R230C polymorphism and susceptibility to type 2 diabetes mellitus, which is highly prevalent in the Mexican population. We used a collaborative project-based learning to engage students to direct their own learning process. Students worked in small groups with the same learning goal to research, organize data, and present seminars to experimentally genotype the C230 variant and correctly interpret their results. At the conclusion of this laboratory exercise, the students were able to demonstrate a clear understanding of the relevant biological molecular principles to genotype the C230 variant, showed technical competency to carry out the experimental protocols with proficiency, and interpret their results using statistical analyses. The students discussed their understanding of the genetic technologies and the broader social and ethical implications of the research. A randomly selected team was trained to work as a "sentinel" to monitor their classmates and ensure the proper application of techniques. Moreover, the evaluation of this exercise is shared between the students and the instructors; the students evaluate their own work and the performance of their classmates. At the end of the course, the students complete a questionnaire to anonymously provide feedback and information regarding their perception of the learning outcomes. Overall, the student feedback was positive, indicating that the exercise was useful and that it would help to prepare the students for professional practice. Copyright © 2013 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Pathogenicity of novel ABCD1 variants: The need for biochemical testing in the era of advanced genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schackmann, Martin J A; Ofman, Rob; van Geel, Björn M; Dijkstra, Inge M E; van Engelen, Klaartje; Wanders, Ronald J A; Engelen, Marc; Kemp, Stephan

    2016-06-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by mutations in ABCD1 and characterized by very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) accumulation. In male patients, an increased plasma VLCFA levels in combination with a pathogenic mutation in ABCD1 confirms the diagnosis. Recent studies have shown that many women with ALD also develop myelopathy. Correct diagnosis is important for management including genetic counseling. Diagnosis in women can only be confirmed when VLCFA levels are elevated or when a known pathogenic ABCD1 mutation is identified. However, in 15-20% of women with ALD VLCFA plasma levels are not elevated. Demonstration that a novel sequence variant is pathogenic can be a challenge when VLCFA levels are in the normal range. Here we report two women with a clinical presentation compatible with ALD, an ABCD1 variation (p.Arg17His and p.Ser358Pro) of unknown significance, but with normal VLCFA levels. We developed a diagnostic test that is based on generating clonal cell lines that express only one of the two alleles. Subsequent biochemical studies enabled us to show that the two sequence variants were not pathogenic, thereby excluding the diagnosis ALD in these women. We conclude that the clonal approach is an important addition to the existing diagnostic array. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. AIRE genetic variants and predisposition to polygenic autoimmune disease: The case of Graves' disease and a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colobran, Roger; Giménez-Barcons, Mireia; Marín-Sánchez, Ana; Porta-Pardo, Eduard; Pujol-Borrell, Ricardo

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) is a transcriptional regulator that is crucial for establishing central tolerance as illustrated by the Mendelian Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy-Candidiasis-Ectodermal Dystrophy (APECED) syndrome associated with AIRE-inactivating recessive or dominant mutations. Polymorphisms in AIRE have been proposed to be implicated in genetic susceptibility to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmune diseases. Because there is evidence that in predisposition to Graves' disease (GD) central tolerance is crucial, we investigated whether AIRE polymorphisms could modulate risk of GD. A case-control association study using 29 variants and conducted in 150 GD patients and 200 controls did not detect any significant association. This result is not exceptional: a systematic review of the literature, including GWAS, on the association of AIRE variants with organ specific autoimmune diseases did not show clear associations; similarly heterozygous recessive mutations are not associated to non-Mendelian autoimmunity. Dominant negative mutations of AIRE are associated to autoimmunity but as mild forms of APECED rather than to non-Mendelian organ specific autoimmunity. The lack of association of common AIRE polymorphisms with polygenic autoimmune diseases is counterintuitive as many other genes less relevant for immunological tolerance have been found to be associated. These findings give rise to the intriguing possibility that evolution has excluded functionally modifying polymorphisms in AIRE. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Virulence factors of Candida albicans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Piłat, Joanna; Siennicka, Katarzyna; Magda, Urszula; Kurzatkowski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common etiological factor of opportunistic human fungal infections. In this review, we focus on the major virulence factors that mediate the pathogenesis of C. albicans. Among these virulence factors, secreted aspartyl proteases, adherence, pleomorphism are the most important features of C. albicans infections. Ability to exist as different pleomorphic forms is defined as pleomorphism. A number of quorum sensing (QS) molecules have been described which affect morphogenesis process in C. albicans. Furthermore, the morphological transition of C. albicans in response to changing environmental conditions represent a means by which the strain adapts to different biological niches. Furthermore, every morphotype has own virulence profile and each pleomorphic form provide critical functions required for pathogenesis. Candida albicans is a producer of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Among them lipases, phospholipases and secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap) are most significant in virulence. Sap proteins contribute to pathogenesis by digestion of host cell membranes and molecules of the host immune system to avoid antimicrobial attack by the host. One of the key features in the development of candidiasis is adhesion ofC. albicans to buccal and vaginal epithelial cells. The adhesion to host cells represents the first step in the internalization process which involves adhesins. Knowledge of the role of the various C. albicans' virulence factors during in vivo infections is still incomplete, therefore further studies including quantification of genes expression and histopathological examination of tissues damage are required to fully understand pathogenesis of this opportunistic pathogen.

  16. Maintenance of genetic variation in human personality: testing evolutionary models by estimating heritability due to common causal variants and investigating the effect of distant inbreeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verweij, Karin J H; Yang, Jian; Lahti, Jari; Veijola, Juha; Hintsanen, Mirka; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Heinonen, Kati; Pouta, Anneli; Pesonen, Anu-Katriina; Widen, Elisabeth; Taanila, Anja; Isohanni, Matti; Miettunen, Jouko; Palotie, Aarno; Penke, Lars; Service, Susan K; Heath, Andrew C; Montgomery, Grant W; Raitakari, Olli; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Räikkönen, Katri; Eriksson, Johan G; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Lehtimäki, Terho; Martin, Nicholas G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Visscher, Peter M; Keller, Matthew C; Zietsch, Brendan P

    2012-10-01

    Personality traits are basic dimensions of behavioral variation, and twin, family, and adoption studies show that around 30% of the between-individual variation is due to genetic variation. There is rapidly growing interest in understanding the evolutionary basis of this genetic variation. Several evolutionary mechanisms could explain how genetic variation is maintained in traits, and each of these makes predictions in terms of the relative contribution of rare and common genetic variants to personality variation, the magnitude of nonadditive genetic influences, and whether personality is affected by inbreeding. Using genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from > 8000 individuals, we estimated that little variation in the Cloninger personality dimensions (7.2% on average) is due to the combined effect of common, additive genetic variants across the genome, suggesting that most heritable variation in personality is due to rare variant effects and/or a combination of dominance and epistasis. Furthermore, higher levels of inbreeding were associated with less socially desirable personality trait levels in three of the four personality dimensions. These findings are consistent with genetic variation in personality traits having been maintained by mutation-selection balance. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Genome-wide functional analysis in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, Thabiso E.; Ells, Ruan; Pohl, Carolina H.; Albertyn, Jacobus; Tsilo, Toi J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Candida albicans is an important etiological agent of superficial and life-threatening infections in individuals with compromised immune systems. To date, we know of several overlapping genetic networks that govern virulence attributes in this fungal pathogen. Classical use of deletion mutants has led to the discovery of numerous virulence factors over the years, and genome-wide functional analysis has propelled gene discovery at an even faster pace. Indeed, a number of recent studies using large-scale genetic screens followed by genome-wide functional analysis has allowed for the unbiased discovery of many new genes involved in C. albicans biology. Here we share our perspectives on the role of these studies in analyzing fundamental aspects of C. albicans virulence properties. PMID:28277904

  18. A functional genetic variant in fragile-site gene FATS modulates the risk of breast cancer in triparous women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Fangfang; Zhang, Jun; Qiu, Li; Zhao, Yawen; Xing, Pan; Lu, Jiachun; Chen, Kexin; Li, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    The fragile-site associated tumor suppressor (FATS, formerly known as C10orf90), a regulator of p53-p21 pathway has been involved in the onset of breast cancer. Recent data support the idea that the crosstalk between FATS and p53 may be of physiological importance for reproduction during evolution. The aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that FATS genetic polymorphism can influence the risk of breast cancer. We conducted population-based studies in two independent cohorts comprising 1 532 cases and 1 573 controls in Tianjin of North China, and 804 cases and 835 controls in Guangzhou of South China, coupled with functional validation methods, to investigate the role of FATS genetic variant in breast cancer risk. We identified a functional variant rs11245007 (905C > T, 262D/N) in fragile-site gene FATS that modulates p53 activation. FATS-262 N exhibited stronger E3 activity to polyubiquitinate p53 than did FATS-262D, leading to the stronger transcriptional activity of p53 and more pronounced stabilization of p53 protein and its activation in response to DNA damage. Case–control studies found that CT or TT genotype was significantly associated with a protective effect on breast cancer risk in women with parity ≥ 3, which was not affected by family history. Our findings suggest the role of FATS-p53 signaling cascade in suppressing pregnancy-related carcinogenesis and potential application of FATS genotyping in breast cancer prevention. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1570-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  19. Genetic variants at 12p11 and 12q24 are associated with breast cancer risk in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzhen Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS has identified three new breast cancer susceptibility loci at 12p11, 12q24 and 21q21 in populations of European descent. However, because of the genetic heterogeneity, it is largely unknown for the role of these loci in the breast cancer susceptibility in the populations of non-European descent. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we genotyped three variants (rs10771399 at 12p11, rs1292011 at 12q24 and rs2823093 at 21q21 in an independent case-control study with a total of 1792 breast cancer cases and 1867 cancer-free controls in a Chinese population. We found that rs10771399 and rs1292011 were significantly associated with risk of breast cancer with per-allele odds ratios (ORs of 0.85 (95% confidence interval (CI: 0.76-0.96; P = 0.010 and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.76-0.95; P = 4.50×10(-3, respectively, which was consistent with those reported in populations of European descent. Similar effects were observed between ER/PR positive and negative breast cancer for both loci. However, we did not found significant association between rs2823093 and breast cancer risk (OR = 0.97, 95%CI = 0.76-1.24; P  = 0.795. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that genetic variants at 12p11 and 12q24 may also play an important role in breast cancer development in Chinese women.

  20. Common genetic variants on 6q24 associated with exceptional episodic memory performance in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barral, Sandra; Cosentino, Stephanie; Christensen, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: There are genetic influences on memory ability as we age, but no specific genes have been identified. OBJECTIVE: To use a cognitive endophenotype, exceptional episodic memory (EEM) performance, derived from nondemented offspring from the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) to identify genetic...... individuals. Results of the individual replication cohorts were combined by meta-analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Episodic memory scores computed as the mean of the 2 standardized measures of Logical Memory IA and IIA. RESULTS: Heritability estimates indicated a significant genetic component for EEM (h2 = 0...... peak. Replication in one cohort identified a set of 26 SNPs associated with episodic memory (P ≤ .05). Meta-analysis of the 26 SNPs using the 4 independent replication cohorts found SNPs rs9321334 and rs6902875 to be nominally significantly associated with episodic memory (P = .009 and P = .013...

  1. Innate immunity to Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Kiyoura

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is not a pathogen in healthy individuals, but can cause severe systemic candidiasis in immunocompromised patients. C. albicans has various virulence factors and activates the innate immune system. Specifically, C. albicans induces proinflammatory cytokine production in various cell types via many receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs and C-type lectin receptors (CLRs. This microorganism also promotes phagocytosis via CLRs on macrophages. In a previous study, we found that C. albicans induces the production of galectin-3, which is a known CLR that kills C. albicans. This review indicates that the use of mouthwash containing an antimicrobial peptide or protein might be a useful new oral care method for the prevention of oral candidiasis.

  2. Genotyping for NOD2 genetic variants and crohn disease: a metaanalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdanyar, Shiva; Weischer, Maren; Nordestgaard, Børge

    2009-01-01

    important risk factors for Crohn disease. In addition, we used studies for which combined information from all genotypes was available to compare risks in simple heterozygotes, compound heterozygotes, and homozygotes. PubMed, EMBASE, and Web of Science were searched. Seventy-five articles (18 727 cases......BACKGROUND: Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC variants of the NOD2 gene (nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain containing 2; alias, CARD15) influence the risk of Crohn disease. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review to examine whether Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, and Leu1007fsinsC are equally......-test results: simple heterozygotes vs compound heterozygotes, P risk of Crohn disease was markedly higher for Leu1007fsinsC than for Arg702Trp and Gly908Arg. Combining all...

  3. Cellular Components Mediating Coadherence of Candida albicans and Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, T; Cen, L; Kaplan, C; Zhou, X; Lux, R; Shi, W; He, X

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen found as part of the normal oral flora. It can be coisolated with Fusobacterium nucleatum, an opportunistic bacterial pathogen, from oral disease sites, such as those involved in refractory periodontitis and pulp necrosis. The physical coadherence between these 2 clinically important microbes has been well documented and suggested to play a role in facilitating their oral colonization and colocalization and contributing to polymicrobial pathogenesis. Previous studies indicated that the physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum was mediated by the carbohydrate components on the surface of C. albicans and the protein components on the Fusobaterium cell surface. However, the identities of the components involved still remain elusive. This study was aimed at identifying the genetic determinants involved in coaggregation between the 2 species. By screening a C. albicans SN152 mutant library and a panel of F. nucleatum 23726 outer membrane protein mutants, we identified FLO9, which encodes a putative adhesin-like cell wall mannoprotein of C. albicans and radD, an arginine-inhibitable adhesin-encoding gene in F. nucleatum that is involved in interspecies coadherence. Consistent with these findings, we demonstrated that the strong coaggregation between wild-type F. nucleatum 23726 and C. albicans SN152 in an in vitro assay could be greatly inhibited by arginine and mannose. Our study also suggested a complex multifaceted mechanism underlying physical interaction between C. albicans and F. nucleatum and for the first time revealed the identity of major genetic components involved in mediating the coaggregation. These observations provide useful knowledge for developing new targeted treatments for disrupting interactions between these 2 clinically relevant pathogens. © International & American Associations for Dental Research 2015.

  4. Effect of phage on the infectivity of Vibrio cholerae and emergence of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Udden, S M Nashir; Faruque, A S G; Calderwood, Stephen B; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2008-11-01

    Seasonal epidemics of cholera in Bangladesh are self-limited in nature, presumably due to phage predation of the causative Vibrio cholerae during the late stage of an epidemic, when cholera patients excrete large quantities of phage in their stools. To further understand the mechanisms involved, we studied the effect of phage on the infectivity and survival of V. cholerae shed in stools. The 50% infectious dose of stool vibrios in infant mice was approximately 10-fold higher when the stools contained a phage (1.8 x 10(3) to 5.7 x 10(6) PFU/ml) than when stools did not contain a detectable phage. In competition assays in mice using a reference strain and phage-negative cholera stools, the infectivity of biofilm-like clumped cells was 3.9- to 115.9-fold higher than that of the corresponding planktonic cells. However, the difference in infectivity of these two cell populations in phage-positive stools was significantly less than that in phage-negative stools (P = 0.0006). Coculture of a phage and V. cholerae or dilutions of phage-positive cholera stools in nutrient medium, but not in environmental water, caused rapid emergence of phage-resistant derivatives of the bacteria, and these derivatives lost their O1 antigen. In cholera stools and in intestinal contents of mice prechallenged with a mixture of V. cholerae and phage, the bacteria remained completely phage susceptible, suggesting that the intestinal environment did not favor the emergence of phage-resistant derivatives that lost the O1 antigen. Our results indicate that phages lead to the collapse of epidemics by modulating the required infectious dose of the bacteria. Furthermore, the dominance of phage-resistant variants due to the bactericidal selective mechanism occurs rarely in natural settings, and the emerging variants are thus unable to sustain the ongoing epidemic.

  5. Association of ABCB1 genetic variants with renal function in Africans and in Caucasians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elston Robert C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, is expressed in human endothelial and mesangial cells, which contribute to control renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. We investigated the association of ABCB1 variants with renal function in African and Caucasian subjects. Methods In Africans (290 subjects from 62 pedigrees, we genotyped the 2677G>T and 3435 C>T ABCB1 polymorphisms. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR was measured using inulin clearance and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF using para-aminohippurate clearance. In Caucasians (5382 unrelated subjects, we analyzed 30 SNPs located within and around ABCB1, using data from the Affymetrix 500 K chip. GFR was estimated using the simplified Modification of the Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault equations. Results In Africans, compared to the reference genotype (GG or CC, each copy of the 2677T and 3435T allele was associated, respectively, with: GFR higher by 10.6 ± 2.9 (P P = 0.06 mL/min; ERPF higher by 47.5 ± 11.6 (P P = 0.007 mL/min; and renal resistances lower by 0.016 ± 0.004 (P P = 0.004 mm Hg/mL/min. In Caucasians, we identified 3 polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene that were strongly associated with all estimates of GFR (smallest P value = 0.0006, overall P = 0.014 after multiple testing correction. Conclusion Variants of the ABCB1 gene were associated with renal function in both Africans and Caucasians and may therefore confer susceptibility to nephropathy in humans. If confirmed in other studies, these results point toward a new candidate gene for nephropathy in humans.

  6. APOL1 genetic variants are not associated with longitudinal blood pressure in young black adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Teresa K; Estrella, Michelle M; Vittinghoff, Eric; Lin, Feng; Gutierrez, Orlando M; Kramer, Holly; Lewis, Cora E; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Allen, Norrina B; Winkler, Cheryl A; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten B; Peralta, Carmen A

    2017-10-01

    Whether APOL1 polymorphisms contribute to the excess risk of hypertension among blacks is unknown. To assess this we evaluated whether self-reported race and, in blacks, APOL1 risk variants (high-risk [2 risk alleles] versus low-risk [0-1 risk allele]) were associated with longitudinal blood pressure. Blood pressure trajectories were determined using linear mixed-effects (slope) and latent class models (5 distinct groups) during 25 years of follow-up in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults Study. Associations of race and APOL1 genotypes with blood pressure change, separately, using linear mixed-effects and multinomial logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, and traditional hypertension risk factors, anti-hypertensive medication use, and kidney function were evaluated. Among 1700 whites and 1330 blacks (13% APOL1 high-risk, mean age 25 years; 46% male) mean mid-, ([systolic + diastolic blood pressure]/2), systolic, and diastolic blood pressures were 89, 110, and 69 mm Hg, respectively. One percent of participants used anti-hypertensive medications at baseline. Compared to whites, blacks, regardless of APOL1 genotype, had significantly greater increases in mid-blood pressure and were more likely to experience significantly increasing mid-blood pressure trajectories with adjusted relative risk ratios of 5.21 and 7.27 for moderate-increasing and elevated-increasing versus low-stable blood pressure, respectively. Among blacks, longitudinal mid-blood pressure changes and mid-blood pressure trajectory classification were similar by APOL1 risk status. Modeling systolic and diastolic blood pressure as outcomes yielded similar findings. From young adulthood to mid-life, blacks have greater blood pressure increases versus whites that are not fully explained by traditional risk factors. Thus APOL1 variants are not associated with longitudinal blood pressure in blacks. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. All

  7. TGFβ1 genetic variants are associated with an increased risk of acute brucellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepanjnia, Adel; Eskandari-Nasab, Ebrahim; Moghadampour, Mehdi; Tahmasebi, Arezoo; Dahmardeh, Fatemeh

    2015-07-01

    Cytokines play a critical role in the regulation of the immune response against brucellosis infection, and mediate production of many pro- and anti-inflammatory signals. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGFβ1), a powerful suppressive cytokine, inhibits macrophage activation and modulates T-cell function, and plays crucial roles in regulation of microbial replication and host responses to brucella. The association of three polymorphisms in the TGFβ1 gene (-509 C/T [rs1800469], + 868 C/T [rs1800470], and + 913 G/C [rs1800471]) in promoter, codons 10 and 25, respectively, with brucellosis infection was evaluated. This case-control study was performed on a total of 281 Iranian subjects including 153 patients with active brucellosis and 128 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals as controls. Genotyping for the TGFβ1 -509 C/T and + 868 C/T variants was performed using tetra amplification refractory mutation system-polymerase chain reaction (T-ARMS-PCR). Also, the + 913 G/C polymorphism was genotyped using an allele-specific PCR. The results demonstrated that the TGFβ1 + 868 C/T mutant homozygote genotype (TT vs CC), was a risk factor for developing brucellosis in the co-dominant and recessive models (odds ratio (OR) = 2.60, p = 0.023; OR = 2.602, p = 0.014, respectively). Additionally, the diplotype analyses revealed that TGFβ1 codon 10 and 25 diplotype, TT/GG, was associated with an increased risk of brucellosis (OR = 2.49, p = 0.038). Other TGFβ1 variants did not increase the risk of brucellosis infection. Our findings propose that TGFβ1 + 868 TT genotype and TT/GG diplotype may confer increased risk of brucellosis in the examined population.

  8. Genetic characterization of natural variants of Vpu from HIV-1 infected individuals from Northern India and their impact on virus release and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Verma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genetic studies reveal that vpu is one of the most variable regions in HIV-1 genome. Functional studies have been carried out mostly with Vpu derived from laboratory adapted subtype B pNL 4-3 virus. The rationale of this study was to characterize genetic variations that are present in the vpu gene from HIV-1 infected individuals from North-India (Punjab/Haryana and determine their functional relevance. METHODS: Functionally intact vpu gene variants were PCR amplified from genomic DNA of HIV-1 infected individuals. These variants were then subjected to genetic analysis and unique representative variants were cloned under CMV promoter containing expression vector as well as into pNL 4-3 HIV-1 virus for intracellular expression studies. These variants were characterized with respect to their ability to promote virus release as well as cell death. RESULTS: Based on phylogenetic analysis and extensive polymorphisms with respect to consensus Vpu B and C, we were able to arbitrarily assign variants into two major groups (B and C. The group B variants always showed significantly higher virus release activity and exhibited moderate levels of cell death. On the other hand, group C variants displayed lower virus release activity but greater cell death potential. Interestingly, Vpu variants with a natural S61A mutation showed greater intracellular stability. These variants also exhibited significant reduction in their intracellular ubiquitination and caused greater virus release. Another group C variant that possessed a non-functional β-TrcP binding motif due to two critical serine residues (S52 and S56 being substituted with isoleucine residues, showed reduced virus release activity but modest cytotoxic activity. CONCLUSIONS: The natural variations exhibited by our Vpu variants involve extensive polymorphism characterized by substitution and deletions that contribute toward positive selection. We identified two major groups and an extremely

  9. Shared genetic risk between migraine and coronary artery disease: A genome-wide analysis of common variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoelar, Aree; Anttila, Verneri; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Terwindt, Gisela M.; Freilinger, Tobias M.; Frei, Oleksander; Shadrin, Alexey; Wang, Yunpeng; Dale, Anders M.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Palotie, Aarno; Andreassen, Ole A.; Zwart, John-Anker

    2017-01-01

    Migraine is a recurrent pain condition traditionally viewed as a neurovascular disorder, but little is known of its vascular basis. In epidemiological studies migraine is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, including coronary artery disease (CAD), suggesting shared pathogenic mechanisms. This study aimed to determine the genetic overlap between migraine and CAD, and to identify shared genetic risk loci, utilizing a conditional false discovery rate approach and data from two large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of CAD (C4D, 15,420 cases, 15,062 controls; CARDIoGRAM, 22,233 cases, 64,762 controls) and one of migraine (22,120 cases, 91,284 controls). We found significant enrichment of genetic variants associated with CAD as a function of their association with migraine, which was replicated across two independent CAD GWAS studies. One shared risk locus in the PHACTR1 gene (conjunctional false discovery rate for index SNP rs9349379 < 3.90 x 10−5), which was also identified in previous studies, explained much of the enrichment. Two further loci (in KCNK5 and AS3MT) showed evidence for shared risk (conjunctional false discovery rate < 0.05). The index SNPs at two of the three loci had opposite effect directions in migraine and CAD. Our results confirm previous reports that migraine and CAD share genetic risk loci in excess of what would be expected by chance, and highlight one shared risk locus in PHACTR1. Understanding the biological mechanisms underpinning this shared risk is likely to improve our understanding of both disorders. PMID:28957430

  10. Education influences the association between genetic variants and refractive error: a meta-analysis of five Singapore studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiao; Wojciechowski, Robert; Kamran Ikram, M; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Chen-Wei; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2014-01-15

    Refractive error is a complex ocular trait governed by both genetic and environmental factors and possibly their interplay. Thus far, data on the interaction between genetic variants and environmental risk factors for refractive errors are largely lacking. By using findings from recent genome-wide association studies, we investigated whether the main environmental factor, education, modifies the effect of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms on refractive error among 8461 adults from five studies including ethnic Chinese, Malay and Indian residents of Singapore. Three genetic loci SHISA6-DNAH9, GJD2 and ZMAT4-SFRP1 exhibited a strong association with myopic refractive error in individuals with higher secondary or university education (SHISA6-DNAH9: rs2969180 A allele, β = -0.33 D, P = 3.6 × 10(-6); GJD2: rs524952 A allele, β = -0.31 D, P = 1.68 × 10(-5); ZMAT4-SFRP1: rs2137277 A allele, β = -0.47 D, P = 1.68 × 10(-4)), whereas the association at these loci was non-significant or of borderline significance in those with lower secondary education or below (P for interaction: 3.82 × 10(-3)-4.78 × 10(-4)). The evidence for interaction was strengthened when combining the genetic effects of these three loci (P for interaction = 4.40 × 10(-8)), and significant interactions with education were also observed for axial length and myopia. Our study shows that low level of education may attenuate the effect of risk alleles on myopia. These findings further underline the role of gene-environment interactions in the pathophysiology of myopia.

  11. Education influences the association between genetic variants and refractive error: a meta-analysis of five Singapore studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Qiao; Wojciechowski, Robert; Kamran Ikram, M.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chen, Peng; Zhou, Xin; Pan, Chen-Wei; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Saw, Seang-Mei

    2014-01-01

    Refractive error is a complex ocular trait governed by both genetic and environmental factors and possibly their interplay. Thus far, data on the interaction between genetic variants and environmental risk factors for refractive errors are largely lacking. By using findings from recent genome-wide association studies, we investigated whether the main environmental factor, education, modifies the effect of 40 single nucleotide polymorphisms on refractive error among 8461 adults from five studies including ethnic Chinese, Malay and Indian residents of Singapore. Three genetic loci SHISA6-DNAH9, GJD2 and ZMAT4-SFRP1 exhibited a strong association with myopic refractive error in individuals with higher secondary or university education (SHISA6-DNAH9: rs2969180 A allele, β = −0.33 D, P = 3.6 × 10–6; GJD2: rs524952 A allele, β = −0.31 D, P = 1.68 × 10−5; ZMAT4-SFRP1: rs2137277 A allele, β = −0.47 D, P = 1.68 × 10−4), whereas the association at these loci was non-significant or of borderline significance in those with lower secondary education or below (P for interaction: 3.82 × 10−3–4.78 × 10−4). The evidence for interaction was strengthened when combining the genetic effects of these three loci (P for interaction = 4.40 × 10−8), and significant interactions with education were also observed for axial length and myopia. Our study shows that low level of education may attenuate the effect of risk alleles on myopia. These findings further underline the role of gene–environment interactions in the pathophysiology of myopia. PMID:24014484

  12. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mavaddat, Nasim; Pharoah, Paul D P; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is lacking. M...

  13. Shared genetic variants suggest common pathways in allergy and autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Waage, Johannes; Standl, Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background: The relationship between allergy and autoimmune disorders is complex and poorly understood. Objective: To investigate commonalities in genetic loci and pathways between allergy and autoimmune diseases to elucidate shared disease mechanisms. Methods: We meta-analyzed two GWAS on self-r...

  14. A genetic variant in osteoprotegerin is associated with progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knevel, Rachel; de Rooy, Diederik P. C.; Saxne, Tore; Lindqvist, Elisabet; Leijsma, Martha K.; Daha, Nina A.; Koeleman, Bobby P. C.; Tsonaka, Roula; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Schonkeren, Joris J. M.; Toes, Rene E. M.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Wilson, Anthony G.; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Progression of joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is partly heritably; 45 to 58% of the variance in joint destruction is estimated to be explained by genetic factors. The binding of RANKL (Receptor Activator for Nuclear Factor kappa B Ligand) to RANK results in the

  15. Effects of genetic variants of the bovine WNT8A gene on nine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However, similar research on the effects of genetic variations of Wnt8A gene on growth traits is lacking. Therefore, in this study, polymorphisms of Wnt8A were detectedin 396 animals from Chinese Qinchuan cattle using DNA pool sequencing and PCR-RFLP methods. Four novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of ...

  16. Genetic variants in the region harbouring IL2/IL21 associated with ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E. A. M.; Goyette, P.; Scott, R.; Annese, V.; Zhernakova, A.; Lian, J.; Lefebvre, C.; Brant, S. R.; Cho, J. H.; Silverberg, M. S.; Taylor, K. D.; de Jong, D. J.; Stokkers, P. C.; Mcgovern, D.; Palmieri, O.; Achkar, J-P; Xavier, R. J.; Daly, M. J.; Duerr, R. H.; Wijmenga, C.; Weersma, R. K.; Rioux, J. D.

    Objectives: Genetic susceptibility is known to play a large part in the predisposition to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) known as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The IL2/IL21 locus on 4q27 is known to be a common risk locus for inflammatory disease (shown in coeliac

  17. Genetic variants in the region harbouring IL2/IL21 associated with ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E.A.M.; Goyette, P.; Scott, R.; Annese, V.; Zhernakova, A.; Lian, J.; Lefèbvre, C.; Brant, S.R.; Cho, J.H.; Silverberg, M.S.; Taylor, K.D.; de Jong, D.J.; Stokkers, P.C.; Mcgovern, D.; Palmieri, O.; Achkar, J.P.; Xavier, R.J.; Daly, M.J.; Duerr, R.H.; Wijmenga, C.; Weersma, R.K.; Rioux, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Genetic susceptibility is known to play a large part in the predisposition to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) known as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The IL2/IL21 locus on 4q27 is known to be a common risk locus for inflammatory disease (shown in coeliac

  18. Genetic variants in the region harbouring IL2/IL21 associated with ulcerative colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E. A. M.; Goyette, P.; Scott, R.; Annese, V.; Zhernakova, A.; Lian, J.; Lefèbvre, C.; Brant, S. R.; Cho, J. H.; Silverberg, M. S.; Taylor, K. D.; de Jong, D. J.; Stokkers, P. C.; Mcgovern, D.; Palmieri, O.; Achkar, J.-P.; Xavier, R. J.; Daly, M. J.; Duerr, R. H.; Wijmenga, C.; Weersma, R. K.; Rioux, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is known to play a large part in the predisposition to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) known as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The IL2/IL21 locus on 4q27 is known to be a common risk locus for inflammatory disease (shown in coeliac disease, type 1

  19. Genetic variants in the region harbouring IL2/IL21 associated with ulcerative colitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Festen, E.A.; Goyette, P.; Scott, R.; Annese, V.; Zhernakova, A.; Lian, J.; Lefebvre, C.; Brant, S.R.; Cho, J.H.; Silverberg, M.S.; Taylor, K.D.; Jong, D.J. de; Stokkers, P.C.; Mcgovern, D.; Palmieri, O.; Achkar, J.P.; Xavier, R.J.; Daly, M.J.; Duerr, R.H.; Wijmenga, C.; Weersma, R.K.; Rioux, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Genetic susceptibility is known to play a large part in the predisposition to the inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) known as Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). The IL2/IL21 locus on 4q27 is known to be a common risk locus for inflammatory disease (shown in coeliac

  20. Open-array analysis of genetic variants in Egyptian patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Diabetes mellitus is considered a major public health problem worldwide. Susceptibility to diabetes is influenced by both genetic and environmental determinants. Aims/hypothesis: The aim of the present study was to test for 16 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in established Type 2 ...

  1. Genetic variant in CACNA1C is associated with PTSD in traumatized police officers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzyzewska, Izabela M.; Ensink, Judith B. M.; Nawijn, Laura; Mul, Adri N.; Koch, Saskia B.; Venema, Andrea; Shankar, Vinod; Frijling, Jessie L.; Veltman, Dirk J.; Lindauer, Ramon J. L.; Olff, Miranda; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Henneman, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a debilitating psychiatric disorder that may develop after a traumatic event. Here we aimed to identify epigenetic and genetic loci associated with PTSD. We included 73 traumatized police officers with extreme phenotypes regarding symptom severity despite

  2. Sequence variant classification and reporting: recommendations for improving the interpretation of cancer susceptibility genetic test results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plon, S.E.; Eccles, D.M.; Easton, D.F.; Foulkes, W.D.; Genuardi, M.; Greenblatt, M.S.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Spurdle, A.B.; Tavtigian, S.V.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic testing of cancer susceptibility genes is now widely applied in clinical practice to predict risk of developing cancer. In general, sequence-based testing of germline DNA is used to determine whether an individual carries a change that is clearly likely to disrupt normal gene function.

  3. Prediction of breast cancer risk based on profiling with common genetic variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Mavaddat (Nasim); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); K. Michailidou (Kyriaki); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M.N. Brook (Mark N.); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Dennis (Joe); A.M. Dunning (Alison); M. Shah (Mitul); R.N. Luben (Robert); J. Brown (Judith); S.E. Bojesen (Stig); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); S.F. Nielsen (Sune F.); H. Flyger (Henrik); K. Czene (Kamila); H. Darabi (Hatef); M. Eriksson (Mikael); J. Peto (Julian); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); F. Dudbridge (Frank); N. Johnson (Nichola); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); A. Broeks (Annegien); S. Verhoef; E.J. Rutgers (Emiel J.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Ashworth (Alan); N. Orr (Nick); M. Schoemaker (Minouk); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Brinton (Louise); J. Lissowska (Jolanta); F.J. Couch (Fergus); J.E. Olson (Janet); C. Vachon (Celine); V.S. Pankratz (Shane); D. Lambrechts (Diether); H. Wildiers (Hans); C. van Ongeval (Chantal); E. van Limbergen (Erik); V. Kristensen (Vessela); G. Grenaker Alnæs (Grethe); S. Nord (Silje); A.-L. Borresen-Dale (Anne-Lise); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); T.A. Muranen (Taru); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); C. Blomqvist (Carl); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); A. Rudolph (Anja); P. Seibold (Petra); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); P.A. Fasching (Peter); L. Haeberle (Lothar); A.B. Ekici (Arif); M.W. Beckmann (Matthias); B. Burwinkel (Barbara); F. Marme (Federick); A. Schneeweiss (Andreas); C. Sohn (Christof); A. Trentham-Dietz (Amy); P. Newcomb (Polly); L. Titus (Linda); K.M. Egan (Kathleen M.); D. Hunter (David); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); R. Tamimi (Rulla); P. Kraft (Peter); N. Rahman (Nazneen); C. Turnbull (Clare); A. Renwick (Anthony); S. Seal (Sheila); J. Li (Jingmei); J. Liu (Jianjun); M.K. Humphreys (Manjeet); J. Benítez (Javier); M.P. Zamora (Pilar); J.I. Arias Pérez (José Ignacio); P. Menéndez (Primitiva); A. Jakubowska (Anna); J. Lubinski (Jan); K. Jaworska-Bieniek (Katarzyna); K. Durda (Katarzyna); N.V. Bogdanova (Natalia); N.N. Antonenkova (Natalia); T. Dörk (Thilo); H. Anton-Culver (Hoda); S.L. Neuhausen (Susan); A. Ziogas (Argyrios); L. Bernstein (Leslie); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); C.J. van Asperen (Christi); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); M.W.R. Reed (Malcolm); E.K. Khusnutdinova (Elza); M. Bermisheva (Marina); D. Prokofyeva (Darya); Z. Takhirova (Zalina); A. Meindl (Alfons); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); C. Sutter (Christian); R. Yang (Rongxi); P. Schürmann (Peter); M. Bremer (Michael); H. Christiansen (Hans); T.-W. Park-Simon; P. Hillemanns (Peter); P. Guénel (Pascal); T. Truong (Thérèse); F. Menegaux (Florence); M. Sanchez (Marie); P. Radice (Paolo); P. Peterlongo (Paolo); S. Manoukian (Siranoush); V. Pensotti (Valeria); J. Hopper (John); H. Tsimiklis (Helen); C. Apicella (Carmel); M.C. Southey (Melissa); H. Brauch (Hiltrud); T. Brüning (Thomas); Y.-D. Ko (Yon-Dschun); A.J. Sigurdson (Alice); M.M. Doody (Michele M.); U. Hamann (Ute); D. Torres (Diana); H.U. Ulmer (Hans); A. Försti (Asta); E.J. Sawyer (Elinor); I.P. Tomlinson (Ian); M. Kerin (Michael); N. Miller (Nicola); I.L. Andrulis (Irene); J.A. Knight (Julia); G. Glendon (Gord); A. Marie Mulligan (Anna); G. Chenevix-Trench (Georgia); R. Balleine (Rosemary); G.G. Giles (Graham); R.L. Milne (Roger); C.A. McLean (Catriona Ann); A. Lindblom (Annika); S. Margolin (Sara); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); B.E. Henderson (Brian); F. Schumacher (Fredrick); L. Le Marchand (Loic); U. Eilber (Ursula); S. Wang-Gohrke (Shan); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); A. Hollestelle (Antoinette); A.M.W. van den Ouweland (Ans); L.B. Koppert (Lisa); J. Carpenter (Jane); C. Clarke (Christine); R.J. Scott (Rodney J.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); V. Kataja (Vesa); V-M. Kosma (Veli-Matti); J.M. Hartikainen (J.); H. Brenner (Hermann); V. Arndt (Volker); C. Stegmaier (Christa); A. Karina Dieffenbach (Aida); R. Winqvist (Robert); K. Pykäs (Katri); A. Jukkola-Vuorinen (Arja); M. Grip (Mervi); K. Offit (Kenneth); J. Vijai (Joseph); M. Robson (Mark); R. Rau-Murthy (Rohini); M. Dwek (Miriam); R. Swann (Ruth); K. Annie Perkins (Katherine); M.S. Goldberg (Mark); F. Labrèche (France); M. Dumont (Martine); D. Eccles (Diana); W. Tapper (William); M. Rafiq (Meena); E.M. John (Esther M.); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); S. Slager (Susan); D. Yannoukakos (Drakoulis); A.E. Toland (Amanda); S. Yao (Song); W. Zheng (Wei); S.L. Halverson (Sandra L.); A. González-Neira (Anna); G. Pita (G.); M. Rosario Alonso; N. Álvarez (Nuria); D. Herrero (Daniel); D.C. Tessier (Daniel C.); D. Vincent (Daniel); F. Bacot (Francois); C. Luccarini (Craig); C. Baynes (Caroline); S. Ahmed (Shahana); M. Maranian (Melanie); S. Healey (Sue); J. Simard (Jacques); P. Hall (Per); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M. García-Closas (Montserrat)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Data for multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer may be combined to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. Such stratification could guide preventive and screening strategies. However, empirical evidence for genetic risk stratification is

  4. The MLH1 c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in colorectal cancer: genetic association study in 18,723 individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Abulí

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent neoplasms and an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Mendelian syndromes account for about 5% of the total burden of CRC, being Lynch syndrome and familial adenomatous polyposis the most common forms. Lynch syndrome tumors develop mainly as a consequence of defective DNA mismatch repair associated with germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. A significant proportion of variants identified by screening these genes correspond to missense or noncoding changes without a clear pathogenic consequence, and they are designated as "variants of uncertain significance", being the c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A variant in the MLH1 gene a clear example. The implication of this variant as a low-penetrance risk variant for CRC was assessed in the present study by performing a case-control study within a large cohort from the COGENT consortium-COST Action BM1206 including 18,723 individuals (8,055 colorectal cancer cases and 10,668 controls and a case-only genotype-phenotype correlation with several clinical and pathological characteristics restricted to the Epicolon cohort. Our results showed no involvement of this variant as a low-penetrance variant for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility and no association with any clinical and pathological characteristics including family history for this neoplasm or Lynch syndrome.

  5. Genome-wide Association Study of Cannabis Dependence Severity, Novel Risk Variants, and Shared Genetic Risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherva, Richard; Wang, Qian; Kranzler, Henry; Zhao, Hongyu; Koesterer, Ryan; Herman, Aryeh; Farrer, Lindsay A; Gelernter, Joel

    2016-05-01

    Cannabis dependence (CAD) is a serious problem worldwide and is of growing importance in the United States because cannabis is increasingly available legally. Although genetic factors contribute substantially to CAD risk, at present no well-established specific genetic risk factors for CAD have been elucidated. To report findings for DSM-IV CAD criteria from association analyses performed in large cohorts of African American and European American participants from 3 studies of substance use disorder genetics. This genome-wide association study for DSM-IV CAD criterion count was performed in 3 independent substance dependence cohorts (the Yale-Penn Study, Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment [SAGE], and International Consortium on the Genetics of Heroin Dependence [ICGHD]). A referral sample and volunteers recruited in the community and from substance abuse treatment centers included 6000 African American and 8754 European American participants, including some from small families. Participants from the Yale-Penn Study were recruited from 2000 to 2013. Data were collected for the SAGE trial from 1990 to 2007 and for the ICGHD from 2004 to 2009. Data were analyzed from January 2, 2013, to November 9, 2015. Criterion count for DSM-IV CAD. Among the 14 754 participants, 7879 were male, 6875 were female, and the mean (SD) age was 39.2 (10.2) years. Three independent regions with genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism associations were identified, considering the largest possible sample. These included rs143244591 (β = 0.54, P = 4.32 × 10-10 for the meta-analysis) in novel antisense transcript RP11-206M11.7;rs146091982 (β = 0.54, P = 1.33 × 10-9 for the meta-analysis) in the solute carrier family 35 member G1 gene (SLC35G1); and rs77378271 (β = 0.29, P = 2.13 × 10-8 for the meta-analysis) in the CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 gene (CSMD1). Also noted was evidence of genome-level pleiotropy between CAD and

  6. Validation of variants in SLC28A3 and UGT1A6 as genetic markers predictive of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, H.; Ross, C. J. D.; Rassekh, S. R.; Sandor, G. S. S.; Caron, H. N.; van Dalen, E. C.; Kremer, L. C.; van der Pal, H. J.; Rogers, P. C.; Rieder, M. J.; Carleton, B. C.; Hayden, M. R.; Hayden, Michael; Carleton, Bruce; Ross, Colin; MacLeod, Stuart; Wasserman, Wyeth; Mitton, Craig; Smith, Anne; Hildebrand, Claudette; Pastrana, Lucila Castro; Ghannadan, Reza; Rassekh, Rod; Lim, Jonathan; Carter, Catherine; Miao, Fudan; Visscher, Henk; Pussegoda, Kusala; Higginson, Michelle; Butland, Stefanie; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Nijssen-Jordan, Cheri; Johnson, David; Verbeek, Linda; Kaczowka, Rick; Stevenson, Patti; Grundy, Paul; Stobart, Kent; Wilson, Bev; Desai, Sunil; Spavor, Maria; Churcher, Linda; Chow, Terence; Hall, Kevin; Honcharik, Nick; Israels, Sara; Chan, Shanna; Garnham, Byron; Staub, Michelle; Rieder, Michael; Malkin, Becky; Portwine, Carol; Cranston, Amy; Koren, Gideon; Ito, Shinya; Nathan, Paul; Greenberg, Mark; Bournissen, Facundo Garcia; Inoue, Miho; Sakaguchi, Sachi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Fujii, Hisaki; Ogawa, Mina; Ingram, Ryoko; Kamiya, Taro; Karande, Smita; Silva, Mariana; Willing, Stephanie; Vaillancourt, Régis; Elliott-Miller, Pat; Johnston, Donna; Mankoo, Herpreet; Wong, Elaine; Wilson, Brenda; O'Connor, Lauren; Maher, Maurica; Bussières, Jean-Francois; Lebel, Denis; Barret, Pierre; Closon, Aurélie; Dubé, Marie-Pierre; Phillips, Michael; Jabado, Nada; Santo, Anelise Espirito; Nagy, Martine; Avard, Denise; Murray, Margaret; Boliver, Darlene; Tiller, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    The use of anthracyclines as effective antineoplastic drugs is limited by the occurrence of cardiotoxicity. Multiple genetic variants predictive of anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity (ACT) in children were recently identified. The current study was aimed to assess replication of these findings in

  7. Genetic variants in toll-like receptors are not associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility or anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment outcome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coenen, Marieke J H; Enevold, Christian; Barrera, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    Several studies point to a role of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) in the development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We investigated if genetic variants in TLR genes are associated with RA and response to tumour necrosis factor blocking (anti-TNF) medication....

  8. PNPLA 3 I148M genetic variant associates with insulin resistance and baseline viral load in HCV genotype 2 but not in genotype 3 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rembeck, Karolina; Maglio, Cristina; Lagging, Martin

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Hepatic steatosis in HCV patients has been postulated as a risk factor associated with a higher frequency of fibrosis and cirrhosis. A single genetic variant, PNPLA3 I148M, has been widely associated with increased hepatic steatosis. Previous studies of the PNPLA3 I148M...

  9. GSTP1 and TNF Gene Variants and Associations between Air Pollution and Incident Childhood Asthma : The Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacIntyre, Elaina A.; Brauer, Michael; Melen, Erik; Bauer, Carl Peter; Bauer, Mario; Berdel, Dietrich; Bergstroem, Anna; Brunekreef, Bert; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Kluemper, Claudia; Fuertes, Elaine; Gehring, Ulrike; Gref, Anna; Heinrich, Joachim; Herbarth, Olf; Kerkhof, Marjan; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Kozyrskyj, Anita L.; Pershagen, Goran; Postma, Dirkje S.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Carlsten, Christopher

    Background: Genetics may partially explain observed heterogeneity in associations between traffic-related air pollution and incident asthma. Objective: Our aim was to investigate the impact of gene variants associated with oxidative stress and inflammation on associations between air pollution and

  10. New population-based exome data are questioning the pathogenicity of previously cardiomyopathy-associated genetic variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Charlotte Hartig; Nielsen, Jonas B; Refsgaard, Lena

    2013-01-01

    variants in the NHLBI-Go Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) containing exome data from 6500 individuals. In ESP, we identified 94 variants out of 687 (14%) variants previously associated with HCM, 58 out of 337 (17%) variants associated with DCM, and 38 variants out of 209 (18%) associated with ARVC...... with these cardiomyopathies, but the disease-causing effect of reported variants is often dubious. In order to identify possible false-positive variants, we investigated the prevalence of previously reported cardiomyopathy-associated variants in recently published exome data. We searched for reported missense and nonsense...... times higher than expected from the phenotype prevalences in the general population (HCM 1:500, DCM 1:2500, and ARVC 1:5000) and our data suggest that a high number of these variants are not monogenic causes of cardiomyopathy....

  11. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W

    2015-01-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying...... differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed...... of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels...

  12. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Gilbert

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542. Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels.Men with PSA between 3-10 ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7-10 or stage T2C. We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men.The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%; High risk: 184 (21.2%. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AUC = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2 vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5 (p-value = 0.40.We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10 ng/mL. Replication and gaining more accurate

  13. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score≤6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng

  14. Genetic variants within the serotonin transporter associated with familial risk for major depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talati, Ardesheer; Guffanti, Guia; Odgerel, Zagaa; Ionita-Laza, Iuliana; Malm, Heli; Sourander, Andre; Brown, Alan S.; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Gingrich, Jay A.; Weissman, Myrna M.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the serotonin transporter promoter linked polymorphism (5HTTLPR) in depression, despite much research, remains unclear. Most studies compare persons with and without depression to each other. We show offspring at high (N=192) as compared to low (N=101) familial risk for major depressive disorder were almost four times as likely to have two copies of the short allele at 5HTTLPR, suggesting that incorporation of family history could be helpful in identifying genetic differences. PMID:25920807

  15. Comparison of Genetic Variants in Cancer-Related Genes between Chinese Hui and Han Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chaoyong; Chen, Zhiqiang; Ma, Xixian; Yang, Ming; Wang, Zhizhong; Dong, Ying; Yang, Ting; Yang, Wenjun

    2015-01-01

    The Chinese Hui population, as the second largest minority ethnic group in China, may have a different genetic background from Han people because of its unique demographic history. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic differences between Han and Hui Chinese from the Ningxia region of China by comparing eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms in cancer-related genes. DNA samples were collected from 99 Hui and 145 Han people from the Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region in China, and SNPs were detected using an improved multiplex ligase detection reaction method. Genotyping data from six 1000 Genomes Project population samples (99 Utah residents with northern and western European ancestry (CEU), 107 Toscani in Italy (TSI), 108 Yoruba in Ibadan (YRI), 61 of African ancestry in the southwestern US (ASW), 103 Han Chinese in Beijing (CHB), and 104 Japanese in Tokyo (JPT)) were also included in this study. Differences in the distribution of alleles among the populations were assessed using χ2 tests, and FST was used to measure the degree of population differentiation. We found that the